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Sample records for viability enzymes mediating

  1. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

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    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  2. Calmodulin-mediated reversible immobilization of enzymes.

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    Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Gregory, Kalvin J; Schrift, G; Deo, Sapna

    2007-07-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the protein calmodulin, CaM, as an affinity tag for the reversible immobilization of enzymes on surfaces. Our strategy takes advantage of the of the reversible, calcium-mediated binding of CaM to its ligand phenothiazine and of the ability to produce fusion proteins between CaM and a variety of enzymes to reversibly immobilize enzymes in an oriented fashion to different surfaces. Specifically, we employed two different enzymes, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and beta-lactamase and two different solid supports, a silica surface and cellulose membrane modified by covalently attaching a phenothiazine ligand, to demonstrate the versatility of our immobilization method. Fusion proteins between CaM-OPH and CaM-beta-lactamase were prepared by using genetic engineering strategies to introduce the calmodulin tail at the N-terminus of each of the two enzymes. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM adopts a conformation that favors interaction between hydrophobic pockets in CaM and phenothiazine, while in the presence of a Ca(2+)-chelating agent such as EGTA, the interaction between CaM and phenothiazine is disrupted, thus allowing for removal of the CaM-fusion protein from the surface under mild conditions. CaM also acts as a spacer molecule, orienting the enzyme away from the surface and toward the solution, which minimizes enzyme interactions with the immobilization surface. Since the method is based on the highly selective binding of CaM to its phenothiazine ligand, and this is covalently immobilized on the surface, the method does not suffer from ligand leaching nor from interference from other proteins present in the cell extract. An additional advantage lies in that the support can be regenerated by passing through EGTA, and then reused for the immobilization of the same or, if desired, a different enzyme. Using a fusion protein approach for immobilization purposes avoids the use of harsh conditions in the immobilization and/or regeneration

  3. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on mycelial development, spore viability and enzyme activity of Penicillium Roqueforti.

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    Martínez-Rodríguez, Yamile; Acosta-Muñiz, Carlos; Olivas, Guadalupe I; Guerrero-Beltrán, José; Rodrigo-Aliaga, Dolores; Mujica-Paz, Hugo; Welti-Chanes, Jorge; Sepulveda, David R

    2014-01-03

    This study investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure treatments on mycelial development, spore viability, and total proteolytic and lipolytic activity of Penicillium roqueforti PV-LYO 10 D. Fungus growing in liquid medium was pressure-treated at 300, 400, and 500 MPa for 10 min at 20°C following seven days of incubation at 25°C and analyzed periodically up to day 9 after treatments to evaluate the effect on fungal growth. Mycelial mass of P. roqueforti was significantly affected at all pressure treatments evaluated, being 15.48%, 22.28%, 30.03%, and 12.53% lower than controls on day 1, 3, 6, and 9 after 300 MPa treatment, respectively. In a similar way, at 400 and 500 MPa, mycelial mass was 31.08% and 60.34% lower than controls one day after treatments and 49.74% and 80.85% lower on day 9, respectively. The viability of P. roqueforti spores decreased by 36.53% at 300 MPa, and complete inactivation took place at ≥400 MPa from an initial count of 7 log cfu/mL. Total proteolytic activity was not significantly affected at 300 MPa but was reduced by 18.22% at 400 MPa and by 43.18% at 500 MPa. Total lipolytic activity also decreased as the intensity of the pressure treatments increased. 21.69%, 39.12%, and 56.26% activity reductions were observed when treatments of 300, 400 and 500 MPa were applied, respectively. The results from this study show that pressure treatments are able to control growth, inactivate spores, and alter enzyme activity of P. roqueforti, which could be of interest in extending the shelf-life of blue-veined cheeses and other food products. © 2013.

  4. Two-stage enzyme mediated drug release from LMWG hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, KJC; Stuart, MCA; Feringa, BL; van Esch, J; Bommel, Kjeld J.C. van; Feringa, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    An enzymatically cleavable low molecular weight gelator-(model) drug conjugate system can be employed to effect a two-step enzyme mediated drug release, demonstrating the potential of LMWG systems for the development of drug delivery devices.

  5. Water-mediated correlations in DNA-enzyme interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Capolupo, A; Kurian, P; Vitiello, G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider dipole-mediated correlations between DNA and enzymes in the context of their water environment. Such correlations emerge from electric dipole-dipole interactions between aromatic ring structures in DNA and in enzymes, and they are mediated by radiative fields that stimulate transitions between the $l=0$ and $l=1$ rotational levels of the molecular water electric dipoles. We show that there are matching collective modes between DNA and enzyme dipole fields, and that a dynamic time-averaged polarization vanishes in the water dipole field only if either DNA, enzyme, or both are absent from the sample. This persistent field may serve as the electromagnetic image that, in popular colloquialisms about DNA biochemistry, allows enzymes to "scan" or "read" the double helix. Topologically nontrivial configurations in the coherent ground state requiring clamplike enzyme behavior on the DNA may stem, ultimately, from spontaneously broken gauge symmetries.

  6. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

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    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Ovarian fluid mediates the temporal decline in sperm viability in a fish with sperm storage.

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    Clelia Gasparini

    Full Text Available A loss of sperm viability and functionality during sperm transfer and storage within the female reproductive tract can have important fitness implications by disrupting fertilization and impairing offspring development and survival. Consequently, mechanisms that mitigate the temporal decline in sperm function are likely to be important targets of selection. In many species, ovarian fluid is known to regulate and maintain sperm quality. In this paper, we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata, a highly polyandrous freshwater fish exhibiting internal fertilization and sperm storage, to determine whether ovarian fluid (OF influences the decline in sperm viability (the proportion of live sperm in the ejaculate over time and whether any observed effects depend on male sexual ornamentation. To address these questions we used a paired experimental design in which ejaculates from individual males were tested in vitro both in presence and absence of OF. Our results revealed that the temporal decline in sperm viability was significantly reduced in the presence of OF compared to a saline control. This finding raises the intriguing possibility that OF may play a role in mediating the decline in sperm quality due to the deleterious effects of sperm ageing, although other possible explanations for this observation are discussed. Interestingly, we also show that the age-related decline in sperm viability was contingent on male sexual ornamentation; males with relatively high levels of iridescence (indicating higher sexual attractiveness exhibited a more pronounced decline in sperm viability over time than their less ornamented counterparts. This latter finding offers possible insights into the functional basis for the previously observed trade-off between these key components of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection.

  8. Water-mediated correlations in DNA-enzyme interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P.; Capolupo, A.; Craddock, T. J. A.; Vitiello, G.

    2018-01-01

    In this letter we consider dipole-mediated correlations between DNA and enzymes in the context of their water environment. Such correlations emerge from electric dipole-dipole interactions between aromatic ring structures in DNA and in enzymes. We show that there are matching collective modes between DNA and enzyme dipole fields, and that a dynamic time-averaged polarization vanishes in the water dipole field only if either DNA, enzyme, or both are absent from the sample. This persistent field may serve as the electromagnetic image that, in popular colloquialisms about DNA biochemistry, allows enzymes to ;scan; or ;read; the double helix. Topologically nontrivial configurations in the coherent ground state requiring clamplike enzyme behavior on the DNA may stem, ultimately, from spontaneously broken gauge symmetries.

  9. Hibiscus sabdariffa extractivities on cadmium-mediated alterations of human U937 cell viability and activation.

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    Okoko, Tebekeme; Ere, Diepreye

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the anthocyanin-rich extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) calyx on the viability of cadmium-treated U937 cells and cadmium-mediated activation of U937-derived macrophages. The macrophage cell line U937 was treated with cadmium (0.1 μ mol/L) and later incubated with the anthocyanin-rich extract and cell viability was assessed via trypan blue staining. In the other experiment, the U937 cells were transformed to the macrophage form by treatment with phorbol 12, myristate 13, and acetate and incubated with cadmium (10 μ mol/L). The anthocyanin-rich extract was added to the cells later and subsequently, the supernatant of each cell culture was analysed for the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), nitric oxide, and catalase activity as indices for the activation of macrophages. It revealed that the anthocynanin-rich extract significantly (P sabdariffa possesses significant immunoprotective effect. These corroborate the immense reported antioxidant and medicinal potential of the calyces of the plant which could be exploited for pharmacological and neutraceutical advantages. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing an Enzyme Mediated Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition Model

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    Mayes, M. A.; Post, W. M.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    We developed the Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model in order to mechanistically model the decomposition of soil organic carbon (C). This presentation is an overview of the concept and development of the model and of the design of complementary lab-scale experiments. The model divides soil C into five pools of particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved, microbial, and enzyme organic C (Wang et al. 2012). There are three input types - cellulose, lignin, and dissolved C. Decomposition is mediated via microbial extracellular enzymes using the Michaelis-Menten equation, resulting in the production of a common pool of dissolved organic C. Parameters for the Michaelis-Menten equation are obtained through a literature review (Wang and Post, 2012a). The dissolved C is taken up by microbial biomass and proportioned according to microbial maintenance and growth, which were recalculated according to Wang and Post (2012b). The model allows dissolved C to undergo adsorption and desorption reactions with the mineral-associated C, which was also parameterized based upon a literature review and complementary laboratory experiments. In the lab, four 14C-labeled substrates (cellulose, fatty acid, glucose, and lignin-like) were incubated with either the particulate C pool, the mineral-associated C pool, or to bulk soils. The rate of decomposition was measured via the production of 14CO2 over time, along with incorporation into microbial biomass, production of dissolved C, and estimation of sorbed C. We performed steady-state and dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses under temperature increases of 1-5°C for a period of 100 y. Simulations indicated an initial decrease in soil organic C consisting of both cellulose and lignin pools. Over longer time intervals (> 6 y), however, a shrinking microbial population, a concomitant decrease in enzyme production, and a decrease in microbial carbon use efficiency together decreased CO2 production and resulted in greater

  11. Spatial and Temporal Measurements of Temperature and Cell Viability in Response to Nanoparticle Mediated Photothermal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Jon R [ORNL; Rodgers, Amanda [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harvie, Erica [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Carswell, William [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Torti, Suzy [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy is a promising alternative to tumor resection. However, quantitative measurements of cellular response to these treatments are limited. This paper introduces a Bimodal Enhanced Analysis of Spatiotemporal Temperature (BEAST) algorithm to rapidly determine the viability of cancer cells in vitro following photothermal therapy alone or in combination with nanoparticles. Materials & Methods: To illustrate the capability of the BEAST viability algorithm, single wall carbon nanohorns were added to renal cancer (RENCA) cells in vitro and time-dependent spatial temperature maps measured with an infrared camera during laser therapy were correlated with post-treatment cell viability distribution maps obtained by cell-staining fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: The BEAST viability algorithm accurately and rapidly determined the cell viability as function of time, space, and temperature.

  12. Ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability in an altricial bird.

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    Keith W Sockman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously dependent siblings often compete for parentally provided resources. This competition may lead to mortality, the probability of which may be a function, in part, of the individual offspring's production order. In birds, serial ovulation followed by hatching asynchrony of simultaneous dependents leads to differences in post-hatching survival that largely depend on ovulation (laying order. This has led to the widespread assumption that early-laid eggs are of greater value and therefore should possess different maternally manipulated characteristics than later-laid eggs. However, this perspective ignores the potential effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability, an effect which some studies suggest should offset the effect of laying order on post-hatching viability. I examined the relationship between laying order and hatching and fledging probability in wild, free-living Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii. In broods with complete hatching success, first-laid and therefore first-hatched offspring had the highest probability of fledging, and fledging probability declined with increasing laying order. However, first-laid eggs were less likely than later-laid eggs to hatch. This effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability seemed to offset that on post-hatching viability, and, consistently, maternal investment in egg size varied little if at all with respect to laying order. These results suggest that ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability and should encourage a re-evaluation of the solitary role post-embryonic survival often plays when researchers make assumptions about the value of propagules based on the order in which they are produced.

  13. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  14. Maltose-binding protein isolated from Escherichia coli induces Toll-like receptor 2-mediated viability in U937 cells.

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    Xiaoxia, Zhao; Weihua, Ni; Qingyong, Zhang; Fengli, Wang; Yingying, Li; Xiaxia, Sun; Zhonghui, Liu; Guixiang, Tai

    2011-07-01

    Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial products has been utilised to potentiate immune responses against haematologic malignancies. The maltose-binding protein (MBP) of Escherichia coli could induce the activation of immune cells via TLR4. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TLRs mediated the biological effects of MBP on U937 and Jurkat cells in vitro. METHODS We observed the effect of MBP on U937 and Jurkat cells by using the WST, cell cycle analysis and morphological observation. Further, cells were stimulated with MBP for indicated times and doses, and detected by RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining to investigate the mechanisms involved in cell viability. MBP enhanced the viability of U937 and Jurkat cells, and the effects were blocked by anti-TLR2, but not anti-TLR4 in U937 cells. Further studies confirmed that MBP was able to directly bind to U937 and Jurkat cells and modulate TLR expression. The effects of MBP depended on the activation of NF-κB and MAP kinase in U937 and Jurkat cells. Our results demonstrated that MBP could directly promote U937 cell viability via TLR2. It suggested that MBP may be used as an adjuvant for participating in the immunotherapy of haematologic malignancies.

  15. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers. Part 4: Kinetics of Redox Enzymes Coupled With Electron Mediators

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    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed kinetic analysis of the pertinent physical processes underlying the operation of enzyme electrodes immobilized within alkane thiol self assembled monolayers is developed. These electrodes utilize a soluble mediator, which partitions into the monolayer, regenerates the active catalytic form of the enzyme and is re-oxidized at the underlying support electrode surface giving rise to a current which reflects kinetic events at the enzyme surface. Both the enzyme/substrate and enzyme mediator kinetics have been quantified fully in terms of a ping-pong mechanism for the former and Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the latter. The effect of substrate and mediator diffusion in solution have also been specifically considered and the latter processes have been shown to result in a complex expression for the reaction flux. Four limiting kinetic cases have been enumerated and simple expressions for the reaction flux in each of these rate limiting situations have been developed. Kinetic case diagrams have been presented as an aid to mechanistic diagnosis. The complicating effects of diffusive loss of reduced mediator from the enzyme layer have also been examined and the relation between the observed flux corresponding to reduced mediator oxidation at the support electrode and the substrate reaction flux in the enzyme layer have been quantified in terms of an efficiency factor. Results extracted from recently published practical realizations of immobilized monolayer enzyme systems have been discussed in the context of the proposed model analysis.

  16. An enzyme immunoassay for polymorphonuclear leucocyte-mediated fibrinogenolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R.; Leuven, C.J.M. van; Stolk, J.; Hiemstra, P.S.; Ronday, H.K.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.

    1997-01-01

    Upon stimulation, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) release potent serine proteases, i.e. elastase, cathepsin C and proteinase 3, which contribute to the degradation of tissue and plasma components. Here, we describe the development of a plasma test to assess PMN-mediated fibrinogenolysis as a

  17. Effect of anaesthetics and dichlorodifluoromethane on the viability of the cells of Escherichia coli and the activities of some of its enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverty, D.M.; Fennema, O.

    1985-01-01

    Three anaesthetics (halothane, CF/sub 3/CHClBr; Ethrane, F/sub 2/ HCOF/sub 2/CCHClF; cyclopropane) and one other halogenated, short-chain hydrocarbon (F-12, Cl/sub 2/F/sub 2/C) were tested under various conditions to determine their effects on the viability of cells of Escherichia coli and the activities of some of its enzymes. When any of the test chemicals were applied for 60 min at concentrations slightly in excess of saturation, the number of surviving cells decreased substantially, with halothane being the most biocidal of the four chemicals and F-12 the least. Three enzymes (malate dehydrogenase, MD; NADH dehydrogenase; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GPD) were tested for activity after treatment of E. coli with the test chemicals. In all instances, GPD was least resistant to inactivation and MD was most resistant. Halothane was most inhibitory followed in order by Ethrane, cyclopropane and F-12. Treatment of E. coli with halothane for 60 min at 23 degrees C and a concentration slightly in excess of saturation, resulted in nearly complete inhibition of all three enzymes.

  18. Phospholipase Dα1-mediated phosphatidic acid change is a key determinant of desiccation-induced viability loss in seeds.

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    Chen, Hongying; Yu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Xudong; Yang, Lan; Huang, Xing; Zhang, Jie; Pritchard, Hugh W; Li, Weiqi

    2018-01-01

    High sensitivity of seeds to water loss is a widespread phenomenon in the world's plant species. The molecular basis of this trait is poorly understood but thought to be associated with critical changes in membrane function. We profiled membrane lipids of seeds in eight species with varying levels of desiccation tolerance and found a close association between reducing seed viability and increasing phosphatidic acid (PA). We applied hydration-dehydration cycles to Arabidopsis seeds, which are normally desiccation tolerant, to mimic the onset of desiccation sensitivity with progression towards germination and examined the role of phospholipase D (PLD) in desiccation stress-induced production of PA. We found that PLDα1 became more abundant and migrated from the cytosol to the membrane during desiccation, whereas PLDδ did not change, and that all desiccation-induced PA was derived from PLDα1 hydrolysis. When PLDα1 was suppressed, the germination level after each hydration-dehydration cycle improved significantly. We further demonstrated that PLDα1-mediated PA formation modulates desiccation sensitivity as applying its inhibitor improved seed desiccation tolerance and its suppression in protoplasts enhanced survival under dehydration. The insights provided by comparative lipidomics enable us to propose a new membrane-based model for seed desiccation stress and survival. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Enzyme

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    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  20. ATM is required for the prolactin-induced HSP90-mediated increase in cellular viability and clonogenic growth after DNA damage.

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    Karayazi Atici, Ödül; Urbanska, Anna; Gopal Gopinathan, Sesha; Boutillon, Florence; Goffin, Vincent; Shemanko, Carrie S

    2017-11-24

    Prolactin acts as a survival factor for breast cancer cells, but the prolactin signaling pathway and the mechanism is unknown. Previously, we identified the master chaperone, heat shock protein 90α (HSP90α), as a prolactin-Janus-Kinase-(JAK2)-signal-transducer-and-activator-of-transcription-5-(STAT5) target gene involved in survival, and here we investigated the role of HSP90 in the mechanism of prolactin-induced viability in response to DNA damage. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase protein (ATM) plays a critical role in the cellular response to double strand DNA damage. Prolactin increased viability of breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin or etoposide. The increase in cellular resistance is specific to the prolactin receptor, as the prolactin receptor antagonist, Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, prevented the increase in viability. Two different HSP90 inhibitors, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin and BIIB021, reduced the prolactin-mediated increase in cell viability of doxorubicin treated cells, and led to a decrease in JAK2, ATM and phospho-ATM protein levels. Inhibitors of JAK2 (G6) and ATM (KU55933) abolished the prolactin-mediated increase in cell viability of DNA damaged cells, supporting the involvement of each, as well as the cross-talk of ATM with the prolactin pathway in the context of DNA damage. Drug synergism was detected between the ATM inhibitor, KU55933, and doxorubicin, and also between the HSP90 inhibitor, BIIB021, and doxorubicin. Short interfering RNA, directed against ATM, prevented the PRL-mediated increase in cell survival in both 2D and 3D collagen gel cultures, and in clonogenic cell survival, after doxorubicin treatment. Our results indicate that ATM contributes to the prolactin-JAK2-STAT5-HSP90 pathway in mediating cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  1. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

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    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  2. Genetic inactivation of mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA preserves neuronal viability and mitochondrial integrity in response to oxidative challenges

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    Michael eForte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential to neuronal viability and function due to their roles in ATP production, intracellular calcium regulation, and activation of apoptotic pathways. Accordingly, mitochondrial dysfunction has been indicated in a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent evidence points to the permeability transition pore (PTP as a key player in mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases, in which pathologic opening leads to mitochondrial swelling, rupture, release of cytochrome c, and neuronal death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are inducers of PTP opening, have been prominently implicated in the progression of many of these neurodegenerative diseases. In this context, inactivation of a mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA (p66 has been recently shown to prevent the neuronal cell death leading to axonal severing in the murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. To further characterize the response of neurons lacking p66, we assessed their reaction to treatment with oxidative stressors implicated in neurodegenerative pathways. Specifically, p66-knockout (p66-KO and wild-type (WT neurons were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO, and assessed for cell viability and changes in mitochondrial properties, including morphology and ROS production. The results showed that p66-KO neurons had greater survival following treatment with oxidative stressors and generated less ROS when compared to WT neurons. Correspondingly, mitochondria in p66-KO neurons showed diminished morphological changes in response to these challenges. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of developing mitochondria-targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders, and emphasize p66, mitochondrial ROS, and the PTP as key targets for maintaining mitochondrial and neuronal

  3. Enzyme-triggered, cell penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of anti-tumor agents.

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    He, Huining; Sun, Lu; Ye, Junxiao; Liu, Ergang; Chen, Sunhui; Liang, Qiuling; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C

    2016-10-28

    Conventional chemotherapy has little or no specificity for cancer cells, normally resulting in low drug accumulation at the tumor region (inefficacy) and drug-induced severe side effects (toxicity). Nowadays, new strategies have been developed to improve both the targeting ability and cellular drug uptake using active targeting ligands and drug internalization agents, which could recognize and interact with specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells and then trigger a drug internalization process by transporting the cargos into cells. Among those strategies, enzyme-triggered cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated systems seem to be a feasible approach. The expression level of specific enzymes like proteases, esterases or glycosidases is often higher in tumor cells than in normal tissues, and such concentration gradients can be exploited as a tool for targeted cancer therapy. CPPs are known to be effective in promoting membrane transportation of the drug cargos, rendering a deeper tumor permeation that could further enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the delivered drug. An enzyme-triggered, CPP-mediated system would combine these advantages to yield a system with the enhanced tumor targeting ability and internalization efficiency and so far many systems have been successfully exploited and applied to cancer therapy. In this review, typical enzymes applied in cancer theranostic systems were firstly reviewed, followed by analyzing pros and cons of cell penetrating peptides. Most importantly, different types of applications of enzyme-triggered CPP-mediated systems in tumor imaging were illustrated. Finally, the drug loaded applications, i.e. enzyme-triggered CPP-mediated systems in drug delivery were reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzyme electrode studies of glucose oxidase modified with a redox mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, P N; Bradford, V Q; Whitaker, R G

    1991-01-01

    Glucose oxidase modified by the covalent attachment of ferrocenecarboxylic acid or ferrocene-acetic acid groups undergoes direct oxidation at metal electrodes. Studies of the comparative stability of the two modified enzymes on storage and on electrochemical cycling show that the material modified with ferroceneacetic acid is the more stable. Amperometric studies of enzyme electrodes based on these modified forms of glucose oxidase show that their application in practical biosensors is severely limited by the poor stability of the oxidized form of the covalently attached ferrocene mediator. A comparison of the results obtained with the native enzyme and with that modified with ferroceneacetic acid, for the oxidation of glucose, d-mannose, 2-deoxy-d-glucose, d-xylose and d-galactose, suggests that the modification procedure has little effect on the selectivity of the enzyme.

  5. Halloween genes encode P450 enzymes that mediate steroid hormone biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2004-02-27

    Mutation of members of the Halloween gene family results in embryonic lethality. We have shown that two of these genes code for enzymes responsible for specific steps in the synthesis of ecdysone, a polyhydroxylated sterol that is the precursor of the major molting hormone of all arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. These two mitochondrial P450 enzymes, coded for by disembodied (dib) (CYP302A1) and shadow (sad) (CYP315A1), are the C22 and C2 hydroxylases, respectively, as shown by transfection of the gene into S2 cells and subsequent biochemical analysis. These are the last two enzymes in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. A third enzyme, necessary for the critical conversion of ecdysone to 20-hydroxyecdysone, the 20-monooxygenase, is encoded by shade (shd) (CYP314A1). All three enzymes are mitochondrial although shade has motifs suggesting both mitochondrial and microsomal locations. By tagging these enzymes, their subcellular location has been confirmed by confocal microscopy. Shade is present in several tissues as expected while disembodied and shadow are restricted to the ring gland. The paradigm used should allow us to define the enzymes mediating the entire ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway.

  6. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-Juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-Jiao; Huang, Jun-Mei; Liu, Han-Wei; Shen, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated IFNAR1 degradation. This may provide a novel

  7. The Halloween genes code for cytochrome P450 enzymes mediating synthesis of the insect molting hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim; Rybczynski, Robert; Warren, James T.

    2006-01-01

    ), are mediated by four cytochrome P450 enzymes, encoded by genes in the Halloween family. Orthologs of the Drosophila Halloween genes phantom (phm: CYP306A1), disembodied (dib: CYP302A1), shadow (sad: CYP315A1) and shade (shd: CYP314A1) were obtained from the endocrinological model insect, the tobacco hornworm...... during the fifth instar. Transcript levels of shd in the fat body and midgut closely parallel the enzyme activity measured in vitro. The data indicate that these Halloween genes are transcriptionally regulated to support the high biosynthetic activity that produces the cyclic ecdysteroid pulses...

  8. Enzyme mediated synthesis of polypyrrole in the presence of chondroitin sulfate and redox mediators of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grijalva-Bustamante, G.A. [Departamento de Investigación en Polímeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Evans-Villegas, A.G. [Departamento de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad de Sonora, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castillo-Castro, T. del, E-mail: terecat@polimeros.uson.mx [Departamento de Investigación en Polímeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castillo-Ortega, M.M. [Departamento de Investigación en Polímeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz-Silva, R. [Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, 380-8553, Nagano (Japan); Huerta, F. [Departamento Ingeniería Textil y Papelera, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1, E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Morallón, E. [Departamento Química Física e Instituto Universitario de Materiales, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2016-06-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) was synthesized by enzyme mediated oxidation of pyrrole using naturally occurring compounds as redox mediators. The catalytic mechanism is an enzymatic cascade reaction in which hydrogen peroxide is the oxidizer and soybean peroxidase, in the presence of acetosyringone, syringaldehyde or vanillin, acts as a natural catalysts. The effect of the initial reaction composition on the polymerization yield and electrical conductivity of PPy was analyzed. Morphology of the PPy particles was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy whereas the chemical structure was studied by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic techniques. The redox mediators increased the polymerization yield without a significant modification of the electronic structure of PPy. The highest conductivity of PPy was reached when chondroitin sulfate was used simultaneously as dopant and template during pyrrole polymerization. Electroactive properties of PPy obtained from natural precursors were successfully used in the amperometric quantification of uric acid concentrations. PPy increases the amperometric sensitivity of carbon nanotube screen-printed electrodes toward uric acid detection. - Highlights: • A new method of pyrrole polymerization using naturally occurring redox mediators and doping agents was studied. • The catalytic efficiency of different redox mediators toward pyrrole oxidation was evaluated. • Two different naturally occurring polymers were studied as bifunctional steric stabilizer/doping agents. • Polypyrrole improves the amperometric response of carbon nanotube screen printed electrodes toward uric acid sensing.

  9. Mediating electrostatic binding of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride to enzyme surfaces improves conformational stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordwald, Erik M; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-08-01

    We have recently developed a general approach to improve the utility of enzymes in ionic liquids (ILs) via tuning of the ratio of enzyme-containing positive to negative surface charges. In this work, the impact of enzyme surface charge ratio on the biophysical interaction of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]) with chymotrypsin and lipase was investigated to understand this approach at the molecular level. Results of fluorescence quenching assays indicated that the extent of binding of the [BMIM] cation decreased (7- and 3.5-fold for chymotrypsin and lipase, respectively) as a function of increasing ratio of positive to negative surface charges. Conformational stability assays further showed a close correlation between thermodynamic stabilization and enzyme surface charge ratio as well as [BMIM] binding. As evidence of this correlation, succinylation and acetylation resulted in the stabilization of chymotrypsin in 10% (v/v) [BMIM][Cl] by 17.0 and 6.6 kJ/mol, respectively, while cationization destabilized chymotrypsin by 3.6 kJ/mol. Combined, these results indicate that altering the surface charge ratio mediates the organization of IL molecules, namely, [BMIM] and [Cl], around the enzymes. Preferential exclusion of [Cl], in particular, via lowering of the ratio of positive to negative surface charges, correlated with increased enzyme stability. Accordingly, these results more broadly provide insight into the mechanism of stabilization in ILs via charge modification.

  10. Viability Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Saint-Pierre, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Viability theory designs and develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty that are found in many domains involving living beings, from biological evolution to economics, from environmental sciences to financial markets, from control theory and robotics to cognitive sciences. It involves interdisciplinary investigations spanning fields that have traditionally developed in isolation. The purpose of this book is to present an initiation to applications of viability theory, explai

  11. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP) FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Heriansyah ePutra; Heriansyah ePutra; Hideaki eYasuhara; Naoki eKinoshita; Debendra eNeupane

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP) was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and ...

  12. Robust hybrid enzyme nanoreactor mediated plasmonic sensing strategy for ultrasensitive screening of anti-diabetic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiheng; Wu, Di; Hu, Na; Li, Ning; Dai, Chunji; Chen, Xuefeng; Suo, Yourui; Li, Guoliang; Wu, Yongning

    2018-01-15

    Enzyme inhibition based drug screening strategy has been widely employed for new drug discovery. But this strategy faces some challenges in practical application especially for the trace active compound screening from natural products such as the stability of enzyme and the sensitivity of screening approach. Inspired by the above, we for the first time demonstrate the self-assembly of α-glucosidase (GAA) and glucose oxidase (GOx) into one multi-enzymes-inorganic nanoreactor with hierarchical structure (flower shape). The hybrid enzyme nanoreactor enjoys the merits including the character of assembly line, the enhanced enzymatic activity and robust stability. The flower shape of enzyme nanoreactor possessed a bigger specific surface area, facilitating the trace GAA inhibitor detection. Based on the above, we proposed an enzyme nanoreactor mediated plasmonic sensing strategy for anti-diabetic drug screening. First, maltose was chosen as the substrate for GAA and the generated glucose were immediately utilized by GOx to generate H2O2, and finally, H2O2 etched the Ag nanoprism to round nanodiscs, resulting in the blue shift of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption band. With the aid of hybrid enzyme nanoreactor guided SPR, the ultrasensitive screening of GAA inhibitor (i.e. anti-diabetic drug) can be realized with the detection limit of 5nM for acarbose. The proposed approach was successfully utilized for GAA inhibitor screening from natural products. We anticipate that the proposed sensing method may provide new insights and inspirations in the enzyme inhibition based drug discovery and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coactivation of SF-1-mediated transcription of steroidogenic enzymes by Ubc9 and PIAS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Noriko; Shibata, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Isao; Ikeda, Yayoi; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Yokota, Kenichi; Murai-Takeda, Ayano; Nakagawa, Ken; Oya, Mototsugu; Murai, Masaru; Rainey, William E; Saruta, Takao; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) is a nuclear orphan receptor, which is essential for adrenal development and regulation of steroidogenic enzyme expression. SF-1 is posttranslationally modified by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1), thus mostly resulting in attenuation of transcription. We investigated the role of sumoylation enzymes, Ubc9 and protein inhibitors of activated STAT1 (PIAS1), in SF-1-mediated transcription of steroidogenic enzyme genes in the adrenal cortex. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that both Ubc9 and PIAS1 interacted with SF-1. Transient transfection assays in adrenocortical H295R cells showed Ubc9 and PIAS1 potentiated SF-1-mediated transactivation of reporter constructs containing human CYP17, CYP11A1, and CYP11B1 but not CYP11B2 promoters. Reduction of endogenous Ubc9 and PIAS1 by introducing corresponding small interfering RNA significantly reduced endogenous CYP17, CYP11A1, and CYP11B1 mRNA levels, indicating that they normally function as coactivators of SF-1. Wild type and sumoylation-inactive mutants of Ubc9 and PIAS1 can similarly enhance the SF-1-mediated transactivation of the CYP17 gene, indicating that the coactivation potency of Ubc9 and PIAS1 is independent of sumoylation activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that SF-1, Ubc9, and PIAS1 were recruited to an endogenous CYP17 gene promoter in the context of chromatin in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed that SF-1, Ubc9, and PIAS1 were expressed in the nuclei of the human adrenal cortex. In cortisol-producing adenomas, the expression pattern of SF-1 and Ubc9 were markedly increased, whereas that of PIAS1 was decreased compared with adjacent normal adrenals. These results showed the physiological roles of Ubc9 and PIAS1 as SF-1 coactivators beyond sumoylation enzymes in adrenocortical steroidogenesis and suggested their possible pathophysiological roles in human cortisol-producing adenomas.

  14. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferons (IFN-α/β have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective: This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design: Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results: Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit, caspase site (β1 subunit, and trypsin site (β2 subunit of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2 and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1. Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S

  15. Enzyme mediated synthesis of polypyrrole in the presence of chondroitin sulfate and redox mediators of natural origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Bustamante, G A; Evans-Villegas, A G; del Castillo-Castro, T; Castillo-Ortega, M M; Cruz-Silva, R; Huerta, F; Morallón, E

    2016-06-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) was synthesized by enzyme mediated oxidation of pyrrole using naturally occurring compounds as redox mediators. The catalytic mechanism is an enzymatic cascade reaction in which hydrogen peroxide is the oxidizer and soybean peroxidase, in the presence of acetosyringone, syringaldehyde or vanillin, acts as a natural catalysts. The effect of the initial reaction composition on the polymerization yield and electrical conductivity of PPy was analyzed. Morphology of the PPy particles was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy whereas the chemical structure was studied by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic techniques. The redox mediators increased the polymerization yield without a significant modification of the electronic structure of PPy. The highest conductivity of PPy was reached when chondroitin sulfate was used simultaneously as dopant and template during pyrrole polymerization. Electroactive properties of PPy obtained from natural precursors were successfully used in the amperometric quantification of uric acid concentrations. PPy increases the amperometric sensitivity of carbon nanotube screen-printed electrodes toward uric acid detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. RNAi-mediated silencing of paramyosin expression in Trichinella spiralis results in impaired viability of the parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-PMY not only as a structural protein but also as an immunomodulatory protein to protect the worm from being attacked by host complement components. In this study, the functions of PMY in the viability and the growth development of T. spiralis were confirmed at the first time by silencing the gene function with RNA interference technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To understand its functions in the viability of the worm, we used RNA interference to silence the expression of Ts-pmy mRNA and protein in the parasite. Significant silencing of Ts-pmy mRNA expression in larval and adult T. spiralis was achieved by siRNA and dsRNA through soaking and electroporation. Electroporation of T. spiralis larvae with 8 µM siRNA1743 or 100 ng/µl dsRNA-PF3 resulted in 66.3% and 60.4% decrease in Ts-pmy transcript and 52.0% and 64.7% decrease in Ts-PMY protein expression, respectively, compared with larvae treated with irrelevant control siRNA or dsRNA. Larvae treated with siRNA1743 displayed significant reduction in molting (40.8% and serious surface damage as detected with SYTOX fluorescent staining. Infection of mice with larvae electroporated with Ts-pmy siRNA1743 resulted in 37.6% decrease in adult worm burden and 23.2% decrease in muscle larvae burden compared with mice infected with control siRNA-treated larvae. In addition, adult worms recovered from mice infected with siRNA-treated larvae released 24.8% less newborn larvae. CONCLUSION: It is the first time RNAi was used on T. spiralis to demonstrate that silencing PMY expression in T. spiralis significantly reduces the parasite's viability and infectivity, further confirming that Ts-PMY plays an important role in the survival of T. spiralis and therefore is a promising target for vaccine development.

  17. Development of microbial-enzyme-mediated decomposition model parameters through steady-state and dynamic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model, based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, that describes the dynamics of physically defined pools of soil organic matter (SOC). These include particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved organic matter (POC, MOC, and DOC, respectively), microbial biomass, and associated exoenzymes. The ranges and/or distributions of parameters were determined by both analytical steady-state and dynamic analyses with SOC data from the literature. We used an improved multi-objective parameter sensitivity analysis (MOPSA) to identify the most important parameters for the full model: maintenance of microbial biomass, turnover and synthesis of enzymes, and carbon use efficiency (CUE). The model predicted an increase of 2 C (baseline temperature =12 C) caused the pools of POC-Cellulose, MOC, and total SOC to increase with dynamic CUE and decrease with constant CUE, as indicated by the 50% confidence intervals. Regardless of dynamic or constant CUE, the pool sizes of POC, MOC, and total SOC varied from 8% to 8% under +2 C. The scenario analysis using a single parameter set indicates that higher temperature with dynamic CUE might result in greater net increases in both POC-Cellulose and MOC pools. Different dynamics of various SOC pools reflected the catalytic functions of specific enzymes targeting specific substrates and the interactions between microbes, enzymes, and SOC. With the feasible parameter values estimated in this study, models incorporating fundamental principles of microbial-enzyme dynamics can lead to simulation results qualitatively different from traditional models with fast/slow/passive pools.

  18. Functional and structural studies on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae GmhA, the first enzyme in the glycero-manno-heptose biosynthesis pathways, demonstrate a critical role in lipooligosaccharide synthesis and gonococcal viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Igor H; Zielke, Ryszard A; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2017-04-01

    Sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase, GmhA, is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of nucleotide-activated-glycero-manno-heptoses and an attractive, yet underexploited, target for development of broad-spectrum antibiotics. We demonstrated that GmhA homologs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis (hereafter called GmhAGC and GmhANM , respectively) were interchangeable proteins essential for lipooligosaccharide (LOS) synthesis, and their depletion had adverse effects on neisserial viability. In contrast, the Escherichia coli ortholog failed to complement GmhAGC depletion. Furthermore, we showed that GmhAGC is a cytoplasmic enzyme with induced expression at mid-logarithmic phase, upon iron deprivation and anaerobiosis, and conserved in contemporary gonococcal clinical isolates including the 2016 WHO reference strains. The untagged GmhAGC crystallized as a tetramer in the closed conformation with four zinc ions in the active site, supporting that this is most likely the catalytically active conformation of the enzyme. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the active site residues E65 and H183 were important for LOS synthesis but not for GmhAGC function in bacterial viability. Our studies bring insights into the importance and mechanism of action of GmhA and may ultimately facilitate targeting the enzyme with small molecule inhibitors. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Halloween genes code for cytochrome P450 enzymes mediating synthesis of the insect moulting hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewitz, K F; Rybczynski, R; Warren, J T; Gilbert, L I

    2006-12-01

    The developmental events occurring during moulting and metamorphosis of insects are controlled by precisely timed changes in levels of ecdysteroids, the moulting hormones. The final four sequential hydroxylations of steroid precursors into the active ecdysteroid of insects, 20E (20-hydroxyecdysone), are mediated by four cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, encoded by genes in the Halloween family. Orthologues of the Drosophila Halloween genes phantom (phm; CYP306A1), disembodied (dib; CYP302A1), shadow (sad; CYP315A1) and shade (shd; CYP314A1) were obtained from the endocrinological model insect, the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. Expression of these genes was studied and compared with changes in the ecdysteroid titre that controls transition from the larval to pupal stage. phm, dib and sad, which encode P450s that mediate the final hydroxylations in the biosynthesis of ecdysone, were selectively expressed in the prothoracic gland, the primary source of ecdysone during larval and pupal development. Changes in their expression correlate with the haemolymph ecdysteroid titre during the fifth (final) larval instar. Shd, the 20-hydroxylase, which converts ecdysone into the more active 20E, is expressed in tissues peripheral to the prothoracic glands during the fifth instar. Transcript levels of shd in the fat body and midgut closely parallel the enzyme activity measured in vitro. The results indicate that these Halloween genes are transcriptionally regulated to support the high biosynthetic activity that produces the cyclic ecdysteroid pulses triggering moulting.

  20. Evaluation of a UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme for gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Adam J.; Brown, Melissa N. [School of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 647520, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7520 (United States); Black, Margaret E., E-mail: blackm@vetmed.wsu.edu [School of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 647520, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7520 (United States)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Goal was to enhance dFdC cytotoxicity by the creation of a UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme possesses both native activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion renders cells equally sensitive to dFdC relative to dCK expression alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual activities of fusion not sufficient to augment cell dFdC sensitivity in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data may warrant the implementation of UCMK mutagenesis studies. -- Abstract: While gemcitabine (2 Prime -2 Prime -difluoro-2 Prime -deoxycytidine, dFdC) displays wide-ranging antineoplastic activity as a single agent, variable response rates and poor intracellular metabolism often limit its clinical efficacy. In an effort to enhance dFdC cytotoxicity and help normalize response rates, we created a bifunctional fusion enzyme that combines the enzymatic activities of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase (UCMK) in a single polypeptide. Our goal was to evaluate whether the created fusion could induce beneficial, functional changes toward dFdC, expedite dFdC conversion to its active antimetabolites and consequently amplify cell dFdC sensitivity. While kinetic analyses revealed the UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme to possess both native activities, the fusion rendered cells sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of dFdC at the same level as dCK expression alone. These results suggest that increased wild-type UCMK expression does not provide a significant enhancement in dFdC-mediated cytotoxicity and may warrant the implementation of studies aimed at engineering UCMK variants with improved activity toward gemcitabine monophosphate.

  1. d-Alanine 2, Leucine 5 Enkephaline (DADLE-mediated DOR activation augments human hUCB-BFs viability subjected to oxidative stress via attenuation of the UPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhubanti Mullick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs although being potent in repairing injured or ischemic tissues, their success regarding tissue-regenerative approaches are hindered by the paucity in their viability. The elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in damaged sites provoke the pernicious effects of donor MSC survival. In the present study, the effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR activation on human umbilical cord-blood borne fibroblasts (hUCB-BFs survival under oxidative stress (H2O2 was evaluated. Oxidative stress which is known to trigger pathological conditions of the unfolded protein response (UPR leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Upon its activation by D-Alanine 2, Leucine 5 Enkephaline (DADLE, selective DOR agonist in hUCB-BFs under oxidative stress, a significant down regulation (~2 folds of key UPR genes was observed as determined by qPCR, Thioflavin-T protein aggregation assay and western blot analysis. Concomitantly, the oxidative stress-mediated cell-death was ameliorated and the viable-cells' percentage was enhanced following DOR activation. The intracellular ROS production upon H2O2 treatment as determined by CM-H2DCFDA staining was repressed, the anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 was upregulated along with a significant suppression in the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad upon DOR activation. Upon subsequent treatment with naltrindole, the effects of DADLE-induced cytoprotection were reverted significantly. These results propound the role of DADLE-mediated DOR-activation on improvement of the viability, which might succour successful hUCB-BFs transplants and greatly absolve the inefficacy of tissue-specific engineered transplants.

  2. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple IgE-mediated sensitizations to enzymes after occupational exposure: evaluation by skin prick test, RAST, and immunoblot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, A; Jeep, S; Wahl, R; Kunkel, G; Kleine-Tebbe, J

    1997-09-01

    We investigated 10 sensitized and 10 nonsensitized workers from a pharmaceutic factory who had been exposed to powdered trypsin, chymotrypsin, bromelain, papain, amylase, and lipase. Ten nonallergic subjects served as a control group. Titrated skin prick tests (SPT), RAST, and immunoblot studies were performed with all six enzymes. SPT reactivity revealed multiple sensitizations to proteolytic enzymes, i.e., papain (specifically sensitized/total number of sensitizations: 9/10), trypsin (8/10), chymotrypsin (8/10), and bromelain (7/10) and appeared to be more frequent and more pronounced than sensitizations to amylase (3/10) or lipase (3/10). The low molecular weight of proteolytic enzymes (20-30 kDa) and their biologic activity might facilitate mucosal penetration more easily and thus-compared to amylase and lipase-permit an immune response and induction of allergic hypersensitivity. Immunoblot studies demonstrated IgG-binding bands in both SPT-positive and -negative workers, indicating exposure to the enzymes, but not in 10 unexposed control subjects. IgE-binding bands of the enzymes were detected only in workers with a positive SPT reaction and/or a positive RAST result. IgG bands were more frequent and the IgG/IgE ratio was increased in workers without allergic complaints compared to symptomatic workers. This might indicate that high levels of specific IgG antibodies to enzymes are associated with an immune response lacking allergic manifestations in spite of IgE-mediated sensitizations to the enzymes. Atopic subjects were at greater risk of developing IgE-mediated sensitization (7/10) and allergic symptoms to enzymes (5/7). However, even without risk of atopy, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity occurred in a few subjects (3/13) exposed to enzymes by inhalation for prolonged periods of time.

  4. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  5. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Predator mediated selection and the impact of developmental stage on viability in wood frog tadpoles (Rana sylvatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calsbeek Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex life histories require adaptation of a single organism for multiple ecological niches. Transitions between life stages, however, may expose individuals to an increased risk of mortality, as the process of metamorphosis typically includes developmental stages that function relatively poorly in both the pre- and post-metamorphic habitat. We studied predator-mediated selection on tadpoles of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, to identify this hypothesized period of differential predation risk and estimate its ontogenetic onset. We reared tadpoles in replicated mesocosms in the presence of the larval odonate Anax junius, a known tadpole predator. Results The probability of tadpole survival increased with increasing age and size, but declined steeply at the point in development where hind limbs began to erupt from the body wall. Selection gradient analyses indicate that natural selection favored tadpoles with short, deep tail fins. Tadpoles resorb their tails as they progress toward metamorphosis, which may have led to the observed decrease in survivorship. Path models revealed that selection acted directly on tail morphology, rather than through its indirect influence on swimming performance. Conclusions This is consistent with the hypothesis that tail morphology influences predation rates by reducing the probability a predator strikes the head or body.

  7. Fusaric Acid Production in Fusarium oxysporum Transformants Generated by Restriction Enzyme-Mediated Integration Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusaric acid (FA is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species. Its toxicity is relatively low but often associated with other mycotoxins, thus enhancing total toxicity. To date, biosynthetic genes or enzymes for FA have not been identified in F. oxysporum. In order to explore the genetic element(s for FA biosynthesis, restriction enzyme mediated integration (REMI procedure as an insertional mutagenesis was employed using FA producing-F. oxysporum strains. Genetic transformation of two F. oxysporum strains by REMI yielded more than 7,100 transformants with efficiency of average 3.2 transformants/μg DNA. To develop a screening system using phytotoxicity of FA, eleven various grains and vegetable seeds were tested for germination in cultures containing FA: Kimchi cabbage seed was selected as the most sensitive host. Screening for FA non-producer of F. oxysporum was done by growing each fungal REMI transformant in Czapek-Dox broth for 3 weeks at 25oC then observing if the Kimchi cabbage seeds germinated in the culture filtrate. Of more than 5,000 REMI transformants screened, fifty-three made the seeds germinated, indicating that they produced little or fewer FA. Among them, twenty-six were analyzed for FA production by HPLC and two turned out to produce less than 1% of FA produced by a wild type strain. Sequencing of genomic DNA regions (252 bp flanking the vector insertion site revealed an uncharacterized genomic region homologous (93% to the F. fujikuroi genome. Further study is necessary to determine if the vector insertion sites in FA-deficient mutants are associated with FA production.

  8. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

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    Heriansyah ePutra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples.

  9. Effects of depleting the essential central metabolic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase on the growth and viability of Candida albicans: implications for antifungal drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodaki, Alexandra; Young, Tim; Brown, Alistair J P

    2006-08-01

    The central metabolic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (Fba1p) catalyzes a reversible reaction required for both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Fba1p is a potential antifungal target because it is essential in yeast and because fungal and human aldolases differ significantly. To test the validity of Fba1p as an antifungal target, we have examined the effects of depleting this enzyme in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Using a methionine/cysteine-conditional mutant (MET3-FBA1/fba1), we have shown that Fba1p is required for the growth of C. albicans. However, Fba1p must be depleted to below 5% of wild-type levels before growth is blocked. Furthermore, Fba1p depletion exerts static rather than cidal effects upon C. albicans. Fba1p is a relatively abundant and stable protein in C. albicans, and hence, Fba1p levels decay relatively slowly following MET3-FBA1 shutoff. Taken together, our observations can account for our observation that the virulence of MET3-FBA1/fba1 cells is only partially attenuated in the mouse model of systemic candidiasis. We conclude that an antifungal drug directed against Fba1p would have to be potent to be effective.

  10. Growth factor sequestration and enzyme-mediated release from genipin-crosslinked gelatin microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul A; Thiele, Jeffrey S; Stegemann, Jan P

    2017-11-01

    Controlled release of growth factors allows the efficient, localized, and temporally-optimized delivery of bioactive molecules to potentiate natural physiological processes. This concept has been applied to treatments for pathological states, including chronic degeneration, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. Peptide microspheres are particularly suited for this application because of their low cost, ease of manufacture, and interaction with natural remodeling processes active during healing. The present study characterizes gelatin microspheres for the entrapment and delivery of growth factors, with a focus on tailored protein affinity, loading capacity, and degradation-mediated release. Genipin crosslinking in PBS and CHES buffers produced average microsphere sizes ranging from 15 to 30 microns with population distributions ranging from about 15 to 60 microns. Microsphere formulations were chosen based on properties important for controlled transient and spatial delivery, including size, consistency, and stability. The microsphere charge affinity was found to be dependent on gelatin type, with type A (GelA) carriers consistently having a lower negative charge than equivalent type B (GelB) carriers. A higher degree of crosslinking, representative of primary amine consumption, resulted in a greater negative net charge. Gelatin type was found to be the strongest determinant of degradation, with GelA carriers degrading at higher rates versus similarly crosslinked GelB carriers. Growth factor release was shown to depend upon microsphere degradation by proteolytic enzymes, while microspheres in inert buffers showed long-term retention of growth factors. These studies illuminate fabrication and processing parameters that can be used to control spatial and temporal release of growth factors from gelatin-based microspheres.

  11. Altering the selection capabilities of common cloning vectors via restriction enzyme mediated gene disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The cloning of gene sequences forms the basis for many molecular biological studies. One important step in the cloning process is the isolation of bacterial transformants carrying vector DNA. This involves a vector-encoded selectable marker gene, which in most cases, confers resistance to an antibiotic. However, there are a number of circumstances in which a different selectable marker is required or may be preferable. Such situations can include restrictions to host strain choice, two phase cloning experiments and mutagenesis experiments, issues that result in additional unnecessary cloning steps, in which the DNA needs to be subcloned into a vector with a suitable selectable marker. Results We have used restriction enzyme mediated gene disruption to modify the selectable marker gene of a given vector by cloning a different selectable marker gene into the original marker present in that vector. Cloning a new selectable marker into a pre-existing marker was found to change the selection phenotype conferred by that vector, which we were able to demonstrate using multiple commonly used vectors and multiple resistance markers. This methodology was also successfully applied not only to cloning vectors, but also to expression vectors while keeping the expression characteristics of the vector unaltered. Conclusions Changing the selectable marker of a given vector has a number of advantages and applications. This rapid and efficient method could be used for co-expression of recombinant proteins, optimisation of two phase cloning procedures, as well as multiple genetic manipulations within the same host strain without the need to remove a pre-existing selectable marker in a previously genetically modified strain. PMID:23497512

  12. Effect of Magnesium as Substitute Material in Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation for Soil-Improvement Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Heriansyah; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Neupane, Debendra; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated as a soil-improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with C O 3 2 ? as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and tre...

  13. Phytochrome-mediated repression of enzyme synthesis (lipoxygenase): a threshold phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze-Karow, H; Schopfer, P; Mohr, H

    1970-01-01

    Synthesis of the enzyme lipoxygenase in the cotyledons of the mustard seedling (Sinapis alba L.) is controlled by phytochrome (P(fr)) through a threshold mechanism. The repression of enzyme synthesis by P(fr) is a very rapid process after the threshold level is surpassed. Similarly, enzyme synthesis starts instantaneously and with full speed as soon as the P(fr) level decreases below the threshold level. Thus P(fr) rapidly inhibits synthesis of an enzyme and functions through an all-or-none control mechanism of high precision.

  14. Phytochrome-Mediated Repression of Enzyme Synthesis (Lipoxygenase): A Threshold Phenomenon*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karow, H. Oelze-; Schopfer, P.; Mohr, H.

    1970-01-01

    Synthesis of the enzyme lipoxygenase in the cotyledons of the mustard seedling (Sinapis alba L.) is controlled by phytochrome (Pfr) through a threshold mechanism. The repression of enzyme synthesis by Pfr is a very rapid process after the threshold level is surpassed. Similarly, enzyme synthesis starts instantaneously and with full speed as soon as the Pfr level decreases below the threshold level. Thus Pfr rapidly inhibits synthesis of an enzyme and functions through an all-or-none control mechanism of high precision. PMID:5263762

  15. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  16. Stimulation of enzyme synthesis by sublethal concentrations of chloramphenicol is not mediated by ribonucleotide pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S R; Switzer, R L

    1975-05-01

    Growth of Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 strain pyrA81 in minimal medium containing 0.8 mug of chloramphenicol (CAP) per ml resulted in a 50 to 100% increase in the steady-state nucleotide pools in the cells. When such a culture was starved for uracil, the pyrimidine nucleotide pools decayed much more slowly in CAP-treated cells than in controls. An attempt was made to determine whether this effect of CAP on nucleotide pools could account for enhanced enzyme derepression observed under the same conditions (8). Treatment with low levels of puromycin also resulted in elevation of nucleotide pools but did not lead to enhanced enzyme synthesis. CAP treatment during arginine starvation has been shown to enhance enzyme synthesis, but nucleotide pools were not significantly affected by CAP nor was the stringent response relieved under these conditions. Thus, the effects of CAP on enzyme synthesis cannot be the result of effects of the antibiotic on nucleotide pools in all cases. The elevation of nucleotide pools was shown not to be due to enhanced conversion of exogeneous uracil into nucleotides, but to result from the enhanced turnover of ribonucleic acid in CAP-treated cells.

  17. Regulation of SESAME-mediated H3T11 phosphorylation by glycolytic enzymes and metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yu

    Full Text Available Cancer cells prefer aerobic glycolysis, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. Recent studies showed that the rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2 directly phosphorylates H3 at threonine 11 (H3T11 to regulate gene expression and cell proliferation, revealing its non-metabolic functions in connecting glycolysis and histone modifications. We have reported that the yeast homolog of PKM2, Pyk1 phosphorylates H3T11 to regulate gene expression and oxidative stress resistance. But how glycolysis regulates H3T11 phosphorylation remains unclear. Here, using a series of glycolytic enzyme mutants and commercial available metabolites, we investigated the role of glycolytic enzymes and metabolites on H3T11 phosphorylation. Mutation of glycolytic genes including phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI1, enolase (ENO2, triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1, or folate biosynthesis enzyme (FOL3 significantly reduced H3T11 phosphorylation. Further study demonstrated that glycolysis regulates H3T11 phosphorylation by fueling the substrate, phosphoenonylpyruvate and the coactivator, FBP to Pyk1. Thus, our results provide a comprehensive view of how glycolysis modulates H3T11 phosphorylation.

  18. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA.

  19. Nuclear receptor-mediated induction of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters by anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Role of nuclear receptors in adverse anticancer drug reactions? Unwanted drug-drug interactions and the development of multidrug resistance are ongoing concerns in the treatment of cancer patients. A common factor that is shared by both phenomena is enzyme induction. Especially, the induction of

  20. An in-vitro cocktail assay for assessing compound-mediated inhibition of six major cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Jian-Jun; Zhan, Jenny; Bu, Hai-Zhi; Lin, Jiunn H

    2014-08-01

    An efficient screening assay was developed and validated for simultaneous assessment of compound-mediated inhibition of six major human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. This method employed a cocktail of six probe substrates (i.e., phenacetin, amodiaquine, diclofenac, S-mephenytoin, dextromethorphan and midazolam for CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4, respectively) as well as individual prototypical inhibitors of the six CYP enzymes in human liver microsomes under optimized incubation conditions. The corresponding marker metabolites (i.e., acetaminophen, N-desethylamodiaquine, 4-OH-diclofenac, 4-OH-S-mephenytoin, dextrorphan and 1-OH-midazolam) in the incubates were quantified using LC-MS/MS methods either by an internal standard (IS) calibration curve or a simplified analyte-to-IS peak area ratio approach. The results showed that the IC 50 values determined by the cocktail approach were in good agreement with those obtained by the individual substrate approach as well as those reported in the literature. Besides, no remarkable difference was observed between the two quantification approaches. In conclusion, this new cocktail assay can be used for reliable screening of compound-mediated CYP inhibition.

  1. Liposome-mediated targeting of enzymes to cancer cells for site-specific activation of prodrugs : Comparison with the corresponding antibody-enzyme conjugate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, Maria José; Jagtenberg, Joycelyn C.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Storm, Gert

    Purpose. Immunoenzymosomes are tumor-targeted immunoliposomes bearing enzymes on their surface. These enzymes are capable of converting relatively nontoxic prodrugs into active cytostatic agents. The aims of this study were to compare the enzyme delivery capability of immunoenzymosomes with that of

  2. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transient expression of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in detached sunflower leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Lindenmuth, Benjamin E; McDonald, Karen A; Hwang, Hwang; Bui, Mai Q Nguyen; Falk, Bryce W; Uratsu, Sandra L; Phu, My L; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2014-01-01

    For biofuel applications, synthetic endoglucanase E1 and xylanase (Xyn10A) derived from Acidothermus cellulolyticus were transiently expressed in detached whole sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves using vacuum infiltration. Three different expression systems were tested, including the constitutive CaMV 35S-driven, CMVar (Cucumber mosaic virus advanced replicating), and TRBO (Tobacco mosaic virus RNA-Based Overexpression Vector) systems. For 6-day leaf incubations, codon-optimized E1 and xylanase driven by the CaMV 35S promoter were successfully expressed in sunflower leaves. The two viral expression vectors, CMVar and TRBO, were not successful although we found high expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves previously for other recombinant proteins. To further enhance transient expression, we demonstrated two novel methods: using the plant hormone methyl jasmonic acid in the agroinfiltration buffer and two-phase optimization of the leaf incubation temperature. When methyl jasmonic acid was added to Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell suspensions and infiltrated into plant leaves, the functional enzyme production increased 4.6-fold. Production also increased up to 4.2-fold when the leaf incubation temperature was elevated above the typical temperature, 20C, to 30C in the late incubation phase, presumably due to enhanced rate of protein synthesis in plant cells. Finally, we demonstrated co-expression of E1 and xylanase in detached sunflower leaves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of (co)expression of heterologous plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in sunflower.

  3. An enzyme similar to animal type II photolyases mediates photoreactivation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M; Jarillo, J A; Klimczak, L J; Landry, L G; Peng, T; Last, R L; Cashmore, A R

    1997-02-01

    The important issue of photoreactivation DNA repair in plants has become even more interesting in recent years because a family of genes that are highly homologous to photoreactivating DNA repair enzymes but that function as blue light photoreceptors has been isolated. Here, we report the isolation of a novel photolyase-like sequence from Arabidopsis designated PHR1 (for photoreactivating enzyme). It shares little sequence similarity with either type I photolyases or the cryptochrome family of blue light photoreceptors. Instead, the PHR1 gene encodes an amino acid sequence with significant homology to the recently characterized type II photolyases identified in a number of prokaryotic and animal systems. PHR1 is a single-copy gene and is not expressed in dark-grown etiolated seedlings: the message is light inducible, which is similar to the expression profile for photoreactivation activity in plants. The PHR1 protein complements a photolyase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli and thus confers photoreactivation activity. In addition, an Arabidopsis mutant that is entirely lacking in photolyase activity has been found to contain a lesion within this Arabidopsis type II photolyase sequence. We conclude that PHR1 represents a genuine plant photolyase gene and that the plant genes with homology to type I photolyases (the cryptochrome family of blue light photoreceptors) do not contribute to photoreactivation repair, at least in the case of Arabidopsis.

  4. The Enzyme-Mediated Direct Reversal of a Dithymine Photoproduct in Germinating Endospores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL repairs a special thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct, or SP, in germinating endospores. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damaging product found in endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. Early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair SP in the absence of light. Recently, it has been established that SPL belongs to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily utilize a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM to reductively cleave its C5'-S bond, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. The H atom donor is suggested to be a conserved cysteine141 in B. subtilis SPL; the resulting thiyl radical likely interacts with a neighboring tyrosine99 before oxidizing the 5'-dA to 5'-dA radical and, subsequently, regenerating SAM. These findings suggest SPL to be the first enzyme in the large radical SAM superfamily (>44,000 members to utilize a radical transfer pathway for catalysis; its study should shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the SAM regeneration process in other members of the superfamily.

  5. The hemostatic effect study of Cirsium setosum on regulating α1-ARs via mediating norepinephrine synthesis by enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nianwei; Li, Yanmei; Zhou, Mengge; Gao, Jie; Hou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang

    2017-03-01

    Cirsium setosum (CS) is the aboveground part of Cephalanoplos segetum Kitam. Although it has been used as a hemostatic treatment for thousands of years and is still in use today, the mechanism of CS on regulating ARs is still not clear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism of CS on regulating ARs. We developed a simple method based on UPLC/Q-TOF MS combined adrenergic receptor dual-luciferase reporter assay systems for the rapid determination of active constituents in CS. The mechanism of tyramine, the main active component for regulating ARs, was further investigated by an in vitro norepinephrine biotransformation test and in vivo vaso activity tests. Two phenethylamine ARs regulators (tyramine and N-methyltyramine) in CS were characterized, and it was found that tyramine could induce vasoconstriction via regulation of α1-ARs by mediating norepinephrine synthesis. The hemostatic effect of CS is associated with tyramine and N-methyltyramine, via regulation of α1-ARs, and the mechanism of tyramine is related to mediating norepinephrine synthesis by enzyme catalysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel Lakshmipriya

    Full Text Available Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP, and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors.

  7. Enzyme-free cell detachment mediated by resonance vibration with temperature modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashina, Yuta; Hirano, Makoto; Imashiro, Chikahiro; Totani, Kiichiro; Komotori, Jun; Takemura, Kenjiro

    2017-10-01

    Cell detachment is an essential process in adherent cell culture. However, trypsinization, which is the most popular detachment technique used in culture, damages cellular membranes. Reducing cellular membrane damage during detachment should improve the quality of cell culture. In this article, we propose an enzyme-free cell detachment method based on resonance vibration with temperature modulation. We developed a culture device that can excite a resonance vibration and control temperature. We then evaluated the cell detachment ratio and the growth response, observed the morphology, and analyzed the cellular protein of the collected cells-mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12). With the temperature of 10°C and the maximum vibration amplitude of 2 μm, 77.9% of cells in number were successfully detached compared with traditional trypsinization. The 72-h proliferation ratio of the reseeded cells was similar to that with trypsinization, whereas the proliferation ratio of proposed method was 12.6% greater than that of trypsinization after freezing and thawing. Moreover, the cells can be collected relatively intact and both intracellular and cell surface proteins in the proposed method were less damaged than in trypsinization. These results show that this method has definite advantages over trypsinization, which indicates that it could be applied to subcultures of cells that are more susceptible to trypsin damage for mass culture of sustainable clinical use. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2279-2288. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP) often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP), and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors.

  9. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  10. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  11. MAS receptors mediate vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of candesartan upon the recovery of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; do Prado, Alejandro F; Gomes, Mayara S; Pernomian, Laena; da Silva, Carlos H T P; Gerlach, Raquel F; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2015-10-05

    AT1 antagonists effectively prevent atherosclerosis since AT1 upregulation and angiotensin II-induced proinflammatory actions are critical to atherogenesis. Despite the classic mechanisms underlying the vasoprotective and atheroprotective actions of AT1 antagonists, the cross-talk between angiotensin-converting enzyme-angiotensin II-AT1 and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axes suggests other mechanisms beyond AT1 blockage in such effects. For instance, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity is inhibited by reactive oxygen species derived from AT1-mediated proinflammatory signaling. Since angiotensin-(1-7) promotes antiatherogenic effects, we hypothesized that the vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of AT1 antagonists could result from their inhibitory effects on the AT1-mediated negative modulation of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality. Interestingly, our results showed that early atherosclerosis triggered in thoracic aorta from high cholesterol fed-Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice impairs angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality by a proinflammatory-redox AT1-mediated pathway. In such mechanism, AT1 activation leads to the aortic release of tumor necrosis factor-α, which stimulates NAD(P)H oxidase/Nox1-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. While hydrogen peroxide inhibits angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity, superoxide impairs MAS functionality. Candesartan treatment restored the functionality of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis by inhibiting the proinflammatory-redox AT1-mediated mechanism. Candesartan also promoted vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects that were mediated by MAS since A779 (MAS antagonist) co-treatment inhibited them. The role of MAS receptors as the final mediators of the vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of candesartan was supported by the vascular actions of angiotensin

  12. Mycorrhizal-induced calmodulin mediated changes in antioxidant enzymes and growth response of drought-stressed trifoliate orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ming eHuang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L Raf.] is considered highly arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM dependent for growth responses through a series of signal transductions in form of various physiological responses. The proposed study was carried out to evaluate the effect of an AM fungus (Funneliformis mosseae on growth, antioxidant enzyme (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutase, SOD activities, leaf relative water content (RWC, calmodulin (CaM, superoxide anion (O2•− and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations in leaves of the plants exposed to both well-watered (WW and drought stress (DS conditions. A 58-day of DS significantly decreased mycorrhizal colonization by 60% than WW. Compared to non-AM seedlings, AM seedlings displayed significantly higher shoot morphological properties (plant height, stem diameter and leaf number, biomass production (shoot and root fresh weight and leaf RWC, regardless of soil water status. AM inoculation significantly increased CaM and soluble protein concentrations and CAT activity, and significantly decreased O2•− and H2O2 concentration under both WW and DS conditions. The AM seedlings also exhibited significantly higher Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities than the non-AM seedlings under DS but not under WW, which are triggered by higher CaM levels in AM plants on the basis of correlation studies. Further, the negative correlation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities with O2•− and H2O2 concentration showed the DS-induced ROS scavenging ability of CaM mediated SODs under mycorrhization. Our results demonstrated that AM-inoculation elevated the synthesis of CaM in leaves and up-regulated activities of the antioxidant enzymes, thereby, repairing the possible oxidative damage to plants by lowering the ROS accumulation under DS condition.

  13. Autotaxin, a synthetic enzyme of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, mediates the induction of nerve-injured neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Jerold

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, we reported that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA induces long-lasting mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as demyelination and upregulation of pain-related proteins through one of its cognate receptors, LPA1. In addition, mice lacking the LPA1 receptor gene (lpa1-/- mice lost these nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain behaviors and phenomena. However, since lpa1-/- mice did not exhibit any effects on the basal nociceptive threshold, it is possible that nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and its machineries are initiated by LPA via defined biosynthetic pathways that involve multiple enzymes. Here, we attempted to clarify the involvement of a single synthetic enzyme of LPA known as autotaxin (ATX in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Wild-type mice with partial sciatic nerve injury showed robust mechanical allodynia starting from day 3 after the nerve injury and persisting for at least 14 days, along with thermal hyperalgesia. On the other hand, heterozygous mutant mice for the autotaxin gene (atx+/-, which have 50% ATX protein and 50% lysophospholipase D activity compared with wild-type mice, showed approximately 50% recovery of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, hypersensitization of myelinated Aβ˜ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafqOSdiMbaGaaaaa@2D83@- or Aδ-fiber function following nerve injury was observed in electrical stimuli-induced paw withdrawal tests using a Neurometer®. The hyperalgesia was completely abolished in lpa1-/- mice, and reduced by 50% in atx+/- mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that LPA biosynthesis through ATX is the source of LPA for LPA1 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. Therefore, targeted inhibition of ATX-mediated LPA biosynthesis as well as

  14. Site-Specific Bioconjugation of an Organometallic Electron Mediator to an Enzyme with Retained Photocatalytic Cofactor Regenerating Capacity and Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung In Lim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(PH being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(PH concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH. A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  15. Elevated glutathione level does not protect against chronic alcohol mediated apoptosis in recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A over-expressing alcohol metabolizing enzymes--alcohol dehydrogenase and Cytochrome P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2011-06-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol leads to liver injury. Ethanol-inducible Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) plays a critical role in alcohol mediated oxidative stress due to its ability to metabolize ethanol. In the present study, using the recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A that over-expresses the alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and CYP2E1; and control HepG2 cells, the mechanism and mode of cell death due to chronic ethanol exposure were studied. Untreated VL-17A cells exhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress when compared with untreated HepG2 cells. Chronic alcohol exposure, i.e., 100 mM ethanol treatment for 72 h caused a significant decrease in viability (47%) in VL-17A cells but not in HepG2 cells. Chronic ethanol mediated cell death in VL-17A cells was predominantly apoptotic, with increased oxidative stress as the underlying mechanism. Chronic ethanol exposure of VL-17A cells resulted in 1.1- to 2.5-fold increased levels of ADH and CYP2E1. Interestingly, the level of the antioxidant GSH was found to be 3-fold upregulated in VL-17A cells treated with ethanol, which may be a metabolic adaptation to the persistent and overwhelming oxidative stress. In conclusion, the increased GSH level may not be sufficient enough to protect VL-17A cells from chronic alcohol mediated oxidative stress and resultant apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Buddleja polystachya are Mediated Through Dual Inhibition of Ca(++) Influx and Phosphodiesterase Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Najeeb-ur; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan; Khan, Aslam; Nazneen, Maryam; El Gamal, Ali A; Fawzy, Ghada A; Al-Ati, Hanan Y; Abdel-kader, Maged S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities of the hydro-alcoholic extract of Buddleja polystachya (Bp.Cr) with possible mode of action explored along with activity-directed fractionation. Bp.Cr and its aqueous (Bp.Aq) and organic fractions, petroleum ether (Bp.Pet), dichloromethane (Bp.DCM), ethylacetate (Bp.EtAc) and butanol (Bp.But), were tested using the in-vivo and in-vitro assays. The crude extract (100-300 mg/kg) showed 20 and 60% protection of castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. In isolated rabbit jejunum, Bp.Cr like papaverine inhibited spontaneous and high K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions equi-potently. In guinea-pig ileum, Bp.Cr showed a moderate spasmogenic effect. The activity-directed fractionation revealed that the spasmolytic activity was concentrated in the organic fractions and spasmogenic component in the aqueous fraction. Amongst the organic fractions, BP.DCM and Bp.Pet inhibited spontaneous and high K(+) -induced contractions equi-potently, while Bp.But, like verapamil was more potent against high K(+) . The crude extract and its organic fractions caused rightward shift in the Ca(++) -concentration response curves (CRCs), similar to verapamil, and all except Bp.But potentiated the isoprenaline-inhibitory CRCs to the left, similar to papaverine. The results of this study indicate that the crude extract of B. polystachya possesses antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities, mediated possibly through dual inhibition of Ca(++) influx and phospodiesterase enzyme. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Amperometric enzyme electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo,E.J.; Danilowicz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances on amperometric enzyme electrodes are reviewed with particular emphasis on biosensors based on Glucose Oxidase and Horseradish Peroxidase. Redox mediation by artificial soluble and polymer attached redox mediators is discussed in terms of recent theoretical developments and experimental verification. The dependence of the amperometric response on substrate and mediator concentration, enzyme concentration, electrode potential and film thickness are analyzed. Possible applicatio...

  18. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  19. Cyclic AMP-mediated control of lipogenic enzyme synthesis during adipose differentiation of 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, B M; Green, H

    1981-05-01

    During the adipose differentiation of 3T3-F442A cells, there is an increase in the synthesis of numerous proteins, including the lipogenic enzymes glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, fatty acid synthetase and malic enzyme. Agents that increase cAMP content (Dibutyryl cAMP, theophylline, and isoproterenol) are known to induce lipolysis in fat cells; but the same agents are shown here to reduce the synthesis of the lipogenic enzymes during adipose differentiation. The extent of reduction depends on the agent used and differs for the three enzymes; fatty acid synthetase is most sensitive and its synthesis can be suppressed completely. In contrast to their effects on lipogenic enzyme synthesis, these agents do not affect morphological changes or the synthesis of several other proteins, of which some increase and others (such as actin) decrease during the differentiation. The effects of the agents on the synthesis of lipogenic enzymes are not dependent on lipolysis, since they take place to the same degree in cells not permitted to accumulate triglyceride. Translation in vitro of mRNA isolated from cells treated with the agents promoting cAMP accumulation indicates that the levels of functional mRNA for lipogenic enzymes are reduced. We conclude that, in addition to its activation of lipolysis, cAMP reduces specifically mRNA accumulation for lipogenic enzymes. These results also demonstrate the independent control of morphological change and enzyme synthesis during adipose differentiation.

  20. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JL

    2014-12-01

    increase in the intracellular level of glutathione and total glutathione S-transferase content. SCE significantly elevated the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 4, whereas the expression of organic anion transporting peptide 1A2 and 1B1 was significantly downregulated by SCE. Knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering ribonucleic acid attenuated the regulatory effect of SCE on these DMEs and drug transporters. SCE significantly upregulated Nrf2 and promoted the translocation of Nrf2 from cytoplasm to the nuclei. Additionally, SCE significantly suppressed the expression of cytosolic Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (the repressor of Nrf2 and remarkably increased Nrf2 stability in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the hepatoprotective effects of SCE may be partially ascribed to the modulation of DMEs and drug transporters via Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway. SCE may alter the pharmacokinetics of other coadministered drugs that are substrates of these DMEs and transporters and thus cause unfavorable herb–drug interactions. Keywords: Nrf2, Keap1, HepG2 cell, drug metabolizing enzyme, drug transporter, P-gp, MRP, OATP, Schisandra chinensis

  1. Viability, invariance and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carja, Ovidiu; Vrabie, Ioan I

    2007-01-01

    The book is an almost self-contained presentation of the most important concepts and results in viability and invariance. The viability of a set K with respect to a given function (or multi-function) F, defined on it, describes the property that, for each initial data in K, the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by that function or multi-function) to have at least one solution. The invariance of a set K with respect to a function (or multi-function) F, defined on a larger set D, is that property which says that each solution of the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by F and issuing in K remains in K, at least for a short time.The book includes the most important necessary and sufficient conditions for viability starting with Nagumo's Viability Theorem for ordinary differential equations with continuous right-hand sides and continuing with the corresponding extensions either to differential inclusions or to semilinear or even fully nonlinear evolution equations, systems and inclusions. In th...

  2. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulous and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharoyces pombe, cellulase, .beta.-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastick, Stanley M.; Mohagheghi, Ali; Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel

    1994-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35.degree. C. to about 40.degree. C. until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

  3. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-12-13

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

  4. A novel helper phage for HaloTag-mediated co-display of enzyme and substrate on phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delespaul, Wouter; Peeters, Yves; Herdewijn, Piet; Robben, Johan

    2015-05-01

    Phage display is an established technique for the molecular evolution of peptides and proteins. For the selection of enzymes based on catalytic activity however, simultaneous coupling of an enzyme and its substrate to the phage surface is required. To facilitate this process of co-display, we developed a new helper phage displaying HaloTag, a modified haloalkane dehalogenase that binds specifically and covalently to functionalized haloalkane ligands. The display of functional HaloTag was demonstrated by capture on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, after coupling a biotinylated haloalkane ligand, or after on-phage extension of a DNA oligonucleotide primer with a biotinylated nucleotide by phi29 DNA polymerase. We also achieved co-display of HaloTag and phi29 DNA polymerase, thereby opening perspectives for the molecular evolution of this enzyme (and others) towards new substrate specificities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug Delivery by an Enzyme-Mediated Cyclization of a Lipid Prodrug with Unique Bilayer-Formation Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Lars; Peters, Günther H.j.; Madsen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Special delivery: Liposomal drug-delivery systems in which prodrugs are activated specifically by disease-associated enzymes have great potential for the treatment of severe diseases, such as cancer. A new type of phospholipid-based prodrug has the ability to form stable small unilamellar vesicles...

  6. The peptidases of Trypanosoma cruzi: digestive enzymes, virulence factors, and mediators of autophagy and programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Vanina E; Niemirowicz, Gabriela T; Cazzulo, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of the American Trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, contains cysteine, serine, threonine, aspartyl and metallo peptidases. The most abundant among these enzymes is cruzipain, a cysteine proteinase expressed as a mixture of isoforms, some of them membrane-bound. The enzyme is an immunodominant antigen in human chronic Chagas disease and seems to be important in the host/parasite relationship. Inhibitors of cruzipain kill the parasite and cure infected mice, thus validating the enzyme as a very promising target for the development of new drugs against the disease. In addition, a 30kDa cathepsin B-like enzyme, two metacaspases and two autophagins have been described. Serine peptidases described in the parasite include oligopeptidase B, a member of the prolyl oligopeptidase family involved in Ca(2+)-signaling during mammalian cell invasion; a prolyl endopeptidase (Tc80), against which inhibitors are being developed, and a lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase. Metallopeptidases homologous to the gp63 of Leishmania spp. are present, as well as two metallocarboxypeptidases belonging to the M32 family, previously found only in prokaryotes. The proteasome has properties similar to those of other eukaryotes, and its inhibition by lactacystin blocks some differentiation steps in the life cycle of the parasite. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Enzyme-Mediated Biomineralization of Oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) Fumarate Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongio, M; Nejadnik, M.R.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Kinard, L.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; van den Beucken, J.J.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is added at different concentrations (i.e., 0, 2.5, and 10 mg · ml−1) to oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) (OPF) hydrogels. The scaffolds are either incubated in 10 mM calcium glycerophosphate (Ca–GP) solution for 2 weeks or implanted in a rat subcutaneous

  8. Curcumin Successfully Inhibited the Computationally Identified CYP2A6 Enzyme-Mediated Bioactivation of Aflatoxin B1 in Arbor Acres broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Ishfaq; Sun, Xiaoqi; Wang, He; Li, Wei; Wang, Xinghe; Cheng, Ping; Li, Sihong; Zhang, Xiuying; Hamid, Sattar

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are often responsible for the toxic and carcinogenic effects of toxicants, such as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The human hepatic CYP2A6 enzyme mediates the oxidative metabolism of several procarcinogens. In this study, we characterized a partial sequence of CYP2A6 gene from Arbor Acres (AA) broiler and studied its role in AFB1 bioactivation. Moreover, the effect of curcumin on CYP2A6 is illustrated. Six groups of AA broiler were treated for 28 days including the control group (fed only basal diet), curcumin alone-treated group (450 mg/kg feed), the group fed AFB1-contaminated feed (5 mg/kg feed) plus the low (150 mg), medium (300 mg) or high (450 mg) of curcumin, and the group fed AFB1-contaminated diet alone (5 mg/kg feed). After the end of treatment period, liver samples were collected for different analyses. The results revealed that the histopathological examination showed clear signs of liver toxicity in AA broliers in AFB1-fed group, but curcumin-supplementation in feed prevented partially AFB1-induced liver toxicity. Liver and body weights were recorded to study the AFB1 harmful effects. We noted an obvious increase in liver weight and decrease in body weight in AFB1-fed group. But, the administration of curcumin partially ameliorated the increase in liver weight and decrease in body weight in a dose-dependent manner. The results (RT-PCR and Elisa) revealed that mRNA and protein expression level enhanced in AFB1-fed group. Consistently, CYP2A6 enzyme activity also increased in AFB1-fed group, suggesting that AA broiler CYP2A6 actively involved in bioactivation of AFB1. However, curcumin treatment inhibited CYP2A6 at mRNA and protein levels in AFB1 treated AA broiler in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum inhibition of liver CYP2A6 enzyme activity in AA broiler has been achieved at a dose of 450 mg/kg curcumin. This is the first study identifying and confirming the role of CYP2A6 enzyme in AFB1 bioactivation in AA broiler liver (in vivo), and

  9. Curcumin Successfully Inhibited the Computationally Identified CYP2A6 Enzyme-Mediated Bioactivation of Aflatoxin B1 in Arbor Acres broiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Ishfaq; Sun, Xiaoqi; Wang, He; Li, Wei; Wang, Xinghe; Cheng, Ping; Li, Sihong; Zhang, Xiuying; Hamid, Sattar

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are often responsible for the toxic and carcinogenic effects of toxicants, such as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The human hepatic CYP2A6 enzyme mediates the oxidative metabolism of several procarcinogens. In this study, we characterized a partial sequence of CYP2A6 gene from Arbor Acres (AA) broiler and studied its role in AFB1 bioactivation. Moreover, the effect of curcumin on CYP2A6 is illustrated. Six groups of AA broiler were treated for 28 days including the control group (fed only basal diet), curcumin alone-treated group (450 mg/kg feed), the group fed AFB1-contaminated feed (5 mg/kg feed) plus the low (150 mg), medium (300 mg) or high (450 mg) of curcumin, and the group fed AFB1-contaminated diet alone (5 mg/kg feed). After the end of treatment period, liver samples were collected for different analyses. The results revealed that the histopathological examination showed clear signs of liver toxicity in AA broliers in AFB1-fed group, but curcumin-supplementation in feed prevented partially AFB1-induced liver toxicity. Liver and body weights were recorded to study the AFB1 harmful effects. We noted an obvious increase in liver weight and decrease in body weight in AFB1-fed group. But, the administration of curcumin partially ameliorated the increase in liver weight and decrease in body weight in a dose-dependent manner. The results (RT-PCR and Elisa) revealed that mRNA and protein expression level enhanced in AFB1-fed group. Consistently, CYP2A6 enzyme activity also increased in AFB1-fed group, suggesting that AA broiler CYP2A6 actively involved in bioactivation of AFB1. However, curcumin treatment inhibited CYP2A6 at mRNA and protein levels in AFB1 treated AA broiler in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum inhibition of liver CYP2A6 enzyme activity in AA broiler has been achieved at a dose of 450 mg/kg curcumin. This is the first study identifying and confirming the role of CYP2A6 enzyme in AFB1 bioactivation in AA broiler liver (in vivo), and

  10. A Bacterial Homolog of a Eukaryotic Inositol Phosphate Signaling Enzyme Mediates Cross-kingdom Dialog in the Mammalian Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Stentz, Régis; Osborne, Samantha; Horn, Nikki; Li, Arthur W.H.; Hautefort, Isabelle; Bongaerts, Roy; Rouyer, Marine; Bailey, Paul; Shears, Stephen B.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Brearley, Charles A.; Carding, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dietary InsP6 can modulate eukaryotic cell proliferation and has complex nutritive consequences, but its metabolism in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract is poorly understood. Therefore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in order to search for candidate InsP6 phosphatases. We determined that prominent gut bacteria express homologs of the mammalian InsP6 phosphatase (MINPP) and characterized the enzyme from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtMinpp). W...

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM-17) mediates the ectodomain cleavage of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakadze, Nina L; Sithu, Srinivas D; Sen, Utpal; English, William R; Murphy, Gillian; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2006-02-10

    Ectodomain shedding has emerged as an important regulatory step in the function of transmembrane proteins. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an adhesion receptor that mediates inflammatory and immune responses, undergoes shedding in the presence of inflammatory mediators and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The shedding of ICAM-1 in ICAM-1-transfected 293 cells upon PMA stimulation and in endothelial cells upon tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation was blocked by metalloproteinase inhibitors, whereas serine protease inhibitors were ineffective. p-Aminophenylmercuric acetate, a mercuric compound that is known to activate matrix metalloproteinases, up-regulated ICAM-1 shedding. TIMP-3 (but not TIMP-1 or -2) effectively blocked cleavage. This profile suggests the involvement of the ADAM family of proteases in the cleavage of ICAM-1. The introduction of enzymatically active tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE) into ICAM-1-expressing cells up-regulated cleavage. Small interfering RNA directed against TACE blocked ICAM-1 cleavage. ICAM-1 transfected into TACE-/- fibroblasts did not show increased shedding over constitutive levels in the presence of PMA, whereas cleavage did occur in ICAM-1-transfected TACE+/+ cells. These results indicate that ICAM-1 shedding is mediated by TACE. Blocking the shedding of ICAM-1 altered the cell adhesive function, as ICAM-1-mediated cell adhesion was up-regulated in the presence of TACE small interfering RNA and TIMP-3, but not TIMP-1. However, cleavage was found to occur at multiple sites within the stalk domain of ICAM-1, and numerous point mutations within the region did not affect cleavage, indicating that TACE-mediated cleavage of ICAM-1 may not be sequence-specific.

  12. Electrochemical monitoring of intracellular enzyme activity of single living mammalian cells by using a double-mediator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumae, Yoshiharu [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takahashi, Yasufumi [Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ino, Kosuke [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-09-09

    Graphical abstract: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells were evaluated by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). - Highlights: • NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase activity of single cells were evaluated with SECM. • Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−}/menadione concentrations were optimized for long-term SECM monitoring. • Menadione affect the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and GSH. • At 100 μM menadione, the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−} generation rate decreased rapidly within 30 min. - Abstract: We evaluated the intracellular NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double-mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The double-mediator system was used to amplify the current response from the intracellular NQO activity and to reduce menadione-induced cell damage. The electron shuttle between the electrode and menadione was mediated by the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple. Generation of ferrocyanide was observed immediately after the addition of a lower concentration (10 μM) of menadione. The ferrocyanide generation rate was constant for 120 min. At a higher menadione concentration (100 μM), the ferrocyanide generation rate decreased within 30 min because of the cytotoxic effect of menadione. We also investigated the relationship between intracellular reactive oxygen species or glutathione levels and exposure to different menadione concentrations to determine the optimal condition for SECM with minimal invasiveness. The present study clearly demonstrates that SECM is useful for the analysis of intracellular enzymatic activities in single cells with a double-mediator system.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhiza mediates glomalin-related soil protein production and soil enzyme activities in the rhizosphere of trifoliate orange grown under different P levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) is beneficial to soil and plants and is affected by various factors. To address whether mycorrhizal-induced GRSP and relevant soil enzymes depend on external P levels, a pot study evaluated effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae on GRSP production and soil enzyme activities. Three GRSP categories, as easily-extractable GRSP (EE-GRSP), difficultly-extractable GRSP (DE-GRSP), and total (EE-GRSP + DE-GRSP) GRSP (T-GRSP), were analyzed, together with five enzyme activities (β-glucosidase, catalase, peroxidase, phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase) in the rhizosphere of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) grown under 0, 3, and 30 mM KH2PO4 in a sand substrate. After 4 months, root AM colonization and substrate hyphal length decreased with increasing P levels. Shoot, root, and total biomass production was significantly increased by AM colonization, regardless of P levels, but more profound under 0 mM P than under 30 mM KH2PO4. In general, production of these three GRSP categories under 0 or 30 mM KH2PO4 was similar in non-mycorrhizosphere but decreased in mycorrhizosphere. Mycorrhization significantly increased the production of EE-GRSP, DE-GRSP and T-GRSP, soil organic carbon (SOC), and activity of substrate β-glucosidase, catalase, peroxidase, and phosphatase, but decreased polyphenol oxidase activity, irrespective of P levels. Production of EE-GRSP, DE-GRSP, and T-GRSP significantly positively correlated with SOC and β-glucosidase, catalase, and peroxidase activity, negatively with polyphenol oxidase activity, but not with hyphal length or phosphatase activity. These results indicate that AM-mediated production of GRSP and relevant soil enzyme activities may not depend on external P concentrations.

  14. Nitrate reductase (NR)-dependent NO production mediates ABA- and H2O2-induced antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyun; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Xianghui; Guo, Zhenfei

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) are important signals in gene expression and physiological responses during plant adaptation to environmental stresses. The essential role of NR-derived NO production in ABA and H2O2 induced antioxidant enzymes were studied using transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing Stylosanthes guianensis 9-cis-epoxycartenoid dioxygenase gene (SgNCED1) for elevated ABA level, or over-expressing wheat oxalate oxidase gene (OxO) for elevated H2O2 level in comparison to the wild type. Compared to the wild type, higher levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and nitrate reductase (NR) activities and NO production were observed in all transgenic plants. For investigating the relationship of ABA, H2O2, and NR-produced NO in the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, scavengers of H2O2 and NO, and an inhibitor of NR were used in the experiments. The results indicate that H2O2-induced activities of SOD, CAT, and APX depends on NR-derived NO in OxO transgenic plants, while ABA-induced activities depends on H2O2 and NR-derived NO in SgNCED1 transgenic plants. Compared to unaltered nitrate reductase 2 (NIA2), NIA1 transcript was induced in both types of transgenic plants. It is suggested NR-derived NO is essential for ABA- or H2O2-induced antioxidant enzyme activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A Bacterial Homolog of a Eukaryotic Inositol Phosphate Signaling Enzyme Mediates Cross-kingdom Dialog in the Mammalian Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis Stentz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dietary InsP6 can modulate eukaryotic cell proliferation and has complex nutritive consequences, but its metabolism in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract is poorly understood. Therefore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in order to search for candidate InsP6 phosphatases. We determined that prominent gut bacteria express homologs of the mammalian InsP6 phosphatase (MINPP and characterized the enzyme from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtMinpp. We show that BtMinpp has exceptionally high catalytic activity, which we rationalize on the basis of mutagenesis studies and by determining its crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. We demonstrate that BtMinpp is packaged inside outer membrane vesicles (OMVs protecting the enzyme from degradation by gastrointestinal proteases. Moreover, we uncover an example of cross-kingdom cell-to-cell signaling, showing that the BtMinpp-OMVs interact with intestinal epithelial cells to promote intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Our characterization of BtMinpp offers several directions for understanding how the microbiome serves human gastrointestinal physiology.

  16. Liver enzyme-mediated oxidation of Echinacea purpurea alkylamides: production of novel metabolites and changes in immunomodulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Nadja B; Tutor, Katrina; Doty, Bethany A; Spelman, Kevin; Sasagawa, Masa; Raner, Gregory M; Wenner, Cynthia A

    2006-12-01

    The medicinal plant Echinacea is widely used to treat upper respiratory infections and is reported to stimulate the human immune system. A major constituent class of Echinacea, the alkylamides, has immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies show that alkylamides are oxidized by cytochrome P450 enzymes, but the immunomodulatory activity of these products is unknown. The objectives of this study were to characterize the products formed by incubation of an Echinacea extract and an isolated alkylamide with human liver microsomes, and to evaluate the influence of Echinacea alkylamides and metabolites on cytokine production by Jurkat human T cells. A novel class of carboxylic acid alkylamide metabolites was identified and shown to be the major constituents present after 2-h incubation of alkylamides with human liver microsomes. Echinacea alkylamides suppressed IL-2 secretion by stimulated T cells, and this effect was significantly lessened upon oxidation of the alkylamides to carboxylic acids and hydroxylated metabolites. These findings highlight the importance of considering the influence of liver enzyme metabolism when evaluating the immunomodulatory effects of alkylamides.

  17. A bacterial homolog of a eukaryotic inositol phosphate signaling enzyme mediates cross-kingdom dialog in the mammalian gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentz, Régis; Osborne, Samantha; Horn, Nikki; Li, Arthur W H; Hautefort, Isabelle; Bongaerts, Roy; Rouyer, Marine; Bailey, Paul; Shears, Stephen B; Hemmings, Andrew M; Brearley, Charles A; Carding, Simon R

    2014-02-27

    Dietary InsP6 can modulate eukaryotic cell proliferation and has complex nutritive consequences, but its metabolism in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract is poorly understood. Therefore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in order to search for candidate InsP6 phosphatases. We determined that prominent gut bacteria express homologs of the mammalian InsP6 phosphatase (MINPP) and characterized the enzyme from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtMinpp). We show that BtMinpp has exceptionally high catalytic activity, which we rationalize on the basis of mutagenesis studies and by determining its crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. We demonstrate that BtMinpp is packaged inside outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) protecting the enzyme from degradation by gastrointestinal proteases. Moreover, we uncover an example of cross-kingdom cell-to-cell signaling, showing that the BtMinpp-OMVs interact with intestinal epithelial cells to promote intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Our characterization of BtMinpp offers several directions for understanding how the microbiome serves human gastrointestinal physiology. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A dietary colorant crocin mitigates arthritis and associated secondary complications by modulating cartilage deteriorating enzymes, inflammatory mediators and antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemshekhar, M; Sebastin Santhosh, M; Sunitha, K; Thushara, R M; Kemparaju, K; Rangappa, K S; Girish, K S

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration and inflammation are the hallmark of progressive arthritis and is the leading cause of disability in 10-15% of middle aged individuals across the world. Cartilage and synovium are mainly degraded by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic ways. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAases) and aggrecanases are the enzymatic mediators and inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species being non-enzymatic mediators. In addition, MMPs and HAases generated end-products act as inflammation inducers via CD44 and TLR-4 receptors involved NF-κB pathway. Although several drugs have been used to treat arthritis, numerous reports describe the side effects of these drugs that may turn fatal. On this account several medicinal plants and their isolated molecules have been involved in modern medicine strategies to fight against arthritis. In view of this, the present study investigated the antiarthritic potentiality of Crocin, a dietary colorant carotenoid isolated from stigma of Crocus sativus. Crocin effectively neutralized the augmented serum levels of enzymatic (MMP-13, MMP-3 and MMP-9 and HAases) and non-enzymatic (TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB, IL-6, COX-2, PGE(2) and ROS) inflammatory mediators. Further, Crocin re-established the arthritis altered antioxidant status of the system (GSH, SOD, CAT and GST). It also protected the bone resorption by inhibiting the elevated levels of bone joint exoglycosidases, cathepsin-D and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases. Taken together, Crocin revitalized the arthritis induced cartilage and bone deterioration along with inflammation and oxidative damage that could be accredited to its antioxidant nature. Thus, Crocin could be an effective antiarthritic agent which can equally nullify the arthritis associated secondary complication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Palaeoproterozoic ice houses and the evolution of oxygen-mediating enzymes: the case for a late origin of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L; Kopp, Robert E

    2008-08-27

    Two major geological problems regarding the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis are (i) identifying a source of oxygen pre-dating the biological oxygen production and capable of driving the evolution of oxygen tolerance, and (ii) determining when oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. One solution to the first problem is the accumulation of photochemically produced H(2)O(2) at the surface of the glaciers and its subsequent incorporation into ice. Melting at the glacier base would release H(2)O(2), which interacts with seawater to produce O(2) in an environment shielded from the lethal levels of ultraviolet radiation needed to produce H(2)O(2). Answers to the second problem are controversial and range from 3.8 to 2.2 Gyr ago. A sceptical view, based on the metals that have the redox potentials close to oxygen, argues for the late end of the range. The preponderance of geological evidence suggests little or no oxygen in the Late Archaean atmosphere (less than 1 ppm). The main piece of evidence for an earlier evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis comes from lipid biomarkers. Recent work, however, has shown that 2-methylhopanes, once thought to be unique biomarkers for cyanobacteria, are also produced anaerobically in significant quantities by at least two strains of anoxygenic phototrophs. Sterane biomarkers provide the strongest evidence for a date 2.7 Gyr ago or above, and could also be explained by the common evolutionary pattern of replacing anaerobic enzymes with oxygen-dependent ones. Although no anaerobic sterol synthesis pathway has been identified in the modern biosphere, enzymes that perform the necessary chemistry do exist. This analysis suggests that oxygenic photosynthesis could have evolved close in geological time to the Makganyene Snowball Earth Event and argues for a causal link between the two.

  20. The stimulatory effect of the octadecaneuropeptide ODN on astroglial antioxidant enzyme systems is mediated through a GPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra eHamdi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense systems, including superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damage caused by oxidative stress on the central nervous system. Astrocytes specifically synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN. ODN is the ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine receptors (CBR, and an adenylyl cyclase- and phospholipase C-coupled receptor. We have recently shown that ODN is a potent protective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase activities and stimulation of cell apoptosis in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the type of receptor involved in ODN-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase in cultured rat astrocytes. We found that ODN induced a rapid stimulation of SOD and catalase gene transcription in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 0.1 nM ODN blocked H2O2-evoked reduction of both mRNA levels and activities of SOD and catalase. Furthermore, the inhibitory actions of ODN on the deleterious effects of H2O2 on SOD and catalase were abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1–8[Dleu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. Finally, the protective action of ODN against H2O2-evoked inhibition of endogenous antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A (PKA-dependent, but protein kinase C-independent. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that ODN, acting through its metabotropic receptor coupled to the PKA pathway, prevents oxidative stress-induced alteration of antioxidant enzyme expression and activities. The peptide ODN is thus a potential candidate for the development of specific agonists that would selectively mimic its protective activity.

  1. A conserved degron containing an amphipathic helix regulates the cholesterol-mediated turnover of human squalene monooxygenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Ngee Kiat; Howe, Vicky; Jatana, Nidhi; Thukral, Lipi; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-12-08

    Cholesterol biosynthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is tightly controlled by multiple mechanisms to regulate cellular cholesterol levels. Squalene monooxygenase (SM) is the second rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and is regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally. SM undergoes cholesterol-dependent proteasomal degradation when cholesterol is in excess. The first 100 amino acids of SM (designated SM N100) are necessary for this degradative process and represent the shortest cholesterol-regulated degron identified to date. However, the fundamental intrinsic characteristics of this degron remain unknown. In this study, we performed a series of deletions, point mutations, and domain swaps to identify a 12-residue region (residues Gln-62-Leu-73), required for SM cholesterol-mediated turnover. Molecular dynamics and circular dichroism revealed an amphipathic helix within this 12-residue region. Moreover, 70% of the variation in cholesterol regulation was dependent on the hydrophobicity of this region. Of note, the earliest known Doa10 yeast degron, Deg1, also contains an amphipathic helix and exhibits 42% amino acid similarity with SM N100. Mutating SM residues Phe-35/Ser-37/Leu-65/Ile-69 into alanine, based on the key residues in Deg1, blunted SM cholesterol-mediated turnover. Taken together, our results support a model whereby the amphipathic helix in SM N100 attaches reversibly to the ER membrane depending on cholesterol levels; with excess, the helix is ejected and unravels, exposing a hydrophobic patch, which then serves as a degradation signal. Our findings shed new light on the regulation of a key cholesterol synthesis enzyme, highlighting the conservation of critical degron features from yeast to humans. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. L-carnitine Mediated Reduction in Oxidative Stress and Alteration in Transcript Level of Antioxidant Enzymes in Sheep Embryos Produced In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A; Reddy, I J; Gupta, P S P; Mondal, S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the effect of L-carnitine on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development, with L-carnitine-mediated alteration if any in transcript level of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) in oocytes and developing sheep embryos produced in vitro. Different concentrations of L-carnitine (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm, 7.5 mm and 10 mm) were used in maturation medium. Oocytes matured with 10 mm L-carnitine showed significantly (p L-carnitine were not significantly different. Maturation rate was not influenced by supplementation of any experimental concentration of L-carnitine. There was a significant (p L-carnitine-treated oocytes and embryos than control group. Antioxidant effect of L-carnitine was proved by culturing oocytes and embryos with H2O2 in the presence of L-carnitine which could be able to protect oocytes and embryos from H2O2-induced oxidative damage. L-carnitine supplementation significantly (p L-carnitine supplementation during in vitro maturation reduces oxidative stress-induced embryo toxicity by decreasing intracellular ROS and increasing intracellular GSH that in turn improved developmental potential of oocytes and embryos and alters transcript level of antioxidant enzymes. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Tissue-Specific and Light-Mediated Expression of the C4 Photosynthetic NAD-Dependent Malic Enzyme of Amaranth Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. J.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    In the C4 dicotyledonous grain plant amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus), a mitochondrial NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NAD-ME; EC 1.1.1.39) serves a specialized and essential role in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In this study we have examined specialized photosynthetic gene expression patterns for the NAD-ME [alpha] subunit. We show here that the [alpha] subunit gene is preferentially expressed in leaves and cotyledons (the most photosynthetically active tissues), and this expression is specific to the bundle-sheath cells of these tissues from the earliest stages of development. Synthesis of the [alpha] subunit polypeptide and accumulation of its corresponding mRNA are strongly light-dependent, but this regulation is also influenced by seedling development. In addition, light-dependent accumulation of the [alpha] subunit mRNA is regulated at transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional levels. Our findings demonstrate that the NAD-ME of amaranth has acquired numerous complex tissue-specific and light-mediated regulation patterns that define its specialized function as a key enzyme in the C4 photosynthetic pathway. PMID:12226404

  4. AAV1 mediated co-expression of formylglycine-generating enzyme and arylsulfatase a efficiently corrects sulfatide storage in a mouse model of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurai, Toshiyuki; Hisayasu, Sanae; Kitagawa, Ryo; Migita, Makoto; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA) and is characterized by deposition of sulfatide in all organs, particularly the nervous system. Recently, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) was found to be essential for activation of sulfatases. This study examined the utility of FGE co-expression in AAV type 1 vector (AAV1)-mediated gene therapy of ASA knockout (MLD) mice. AAV1-ASA alone or AAV1-ASA and AAV1-FGE were co-injected into a single site of the hippocampus. Enzyme assay and immunohistochemical analysis showed that ASA was detected not only in the injected hemisphere but also in the non-injected hemisphere by 7 months after injection. Level of ASA activity and extent of ASA distribution were significantly enhanced by co-introduction of AAV1-FGE. Marked reductions in sulfatide levels were observed throughout the entire brain. The unexpectedly widespread distribution of ASA may be due to a combination of diffusion in extracellular spaces, transport through axons, and circulation in cerebrospinal fluid. The rotarod test revealed improvement of neurological functions. These results demonstrate that direct injection of AAV1 vectors expressing ASA and FGE represents a highly promising approach with significant implications for the development of clinical protocols for MLD gene therapy.

  5. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme as a potential mediator of the influence of smoking on the response to treatment with narrowband ultraviolet B in psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwin, Agnieszka Beata; Sokolowska, Marianna; Chodynicka, Bozena

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between smoking and the treatment with narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) in psoriasis patients and to examine the role of the soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor type one (sTNF-R1) in plasma and that of TNF-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE) released from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in this relationship. The study has been conducted among 45 inpatients with plaque-type psoriasis vulgaris and 36 inpatients with other chronic inflammatory skin disorders from similar social background (controls). Taking into account the number of cigarettes smoked daily and the duration of smoking, subjects were classified as mild, moderate and heavy smokers. The severity of psoriasis was assessed using psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score, concentrations of sTNF-R1 and TACE (expressed in ng/ml)--with quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassays before (T(0)) and after 20 NB-UVB irradiations (T(20)). The pretreatment concentration of sTNF-R1 was 2.55+/-0.17 in patients and 1.79+/-0.13 in controls (Psmoking and with TACE concentration (R=0.50 and R=0.47, Ppredicting the response to the treatment with NB-UVB in smoking psoriasis patients. Smoking may adversely influence this treatment and TACE may be one of mediators in this influence.

  7. In situ hybridization chain reaction mediated ultrasensitive enzyme-free and conjugation-free electrochemcial genosensor for BRCA-1 gene in complex matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Wang, Siqi; Qin, You; Xu, Lu; Jin, Dan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we report an enzyme-free and conjugation-free electrochemical genosensor enabling an ultrasensitive readout of BRCA-1, a breast cancer susceptibility gene. The sensor employs a target-responsive hybridization chain reaction (HCR) to significantly amplify the detectable current signals. By means of a functional auxiliary probe pair and a versatile initiator sequence, a linear DNA concatemer structure can be formed via spontaneous and continuous polymerization of DNA oligomers in the presence of target sequence. Such a DNA nanoassembly endows the genosensor an ultrahigh sensitivity up to 1 aM, which is higher than that of the nanomaterials-based or enzyme mediated amplification approaches by several orders of magnitude. More importantly, the sensor's responsive peak current exhibits a favorable linear correlation to the logarithm of the concentrations of target sequence ranging from 1 aM to 10 pM. In addition, the sensor is highly selective, and can discriminate a single mismatched sequence. This HCR-based genosensor is also capable of probing low-abundance BRCA-1 gene sequence directly in complex matrices, such as 50% human serum, with minimal interference. These advantages will make our tailor-engineered HCR-based electrochemical genosensor appealing to genetic analysis and clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quercetin inhibits LPS-induced adhesion molecule expression and oxidant production in human aortic endothelial cells by p38-mediated Nrf2 activation and antioxidant enzyme induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2016-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of ischemic heart disease and stroke, is an inflammatory disease of arteries in a hyperlipidemic milieu. Endothelial expression of cellular adhesion molecules, such as endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (E-selectin) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The dietary flavonoid, quercetin, has been reported to inhibit expression of cellular adhesion molecules, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that quercetin dose-dependently (5-20µM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mRNA and protein expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Incubation of HAEC with quercetin also significantly reduced LPS-induced oxidant production, but did not inhibit activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Furthermore, quercetin induced activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and subsequent mRNA and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1, and glutamate-cysteine ligase. The induction of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes was partly inhibited by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) inhibitor, SB203580. Our results suggest that quercetin suppresses LPS-induced oxidant production and adhesion molecule expression by inducing Nrf2 activation and antioxidant enzyme expression, which is partially mediated by p38; and the inhibitory effect of quercetin on adhesion molecule expression is not due to inhibition of NF-κB activation, but instead due to antioxidant-independent effects of HO-1. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. C1q/TNF-Related Protein-9 Ameliorates Ox-LDL-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via PGC-1α/AMPK-Mediated Antioxidant Enzyme Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijian Sun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL accumulation is one of the critical determinants in endothelial dysfunction in many cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9 is identified to be an adipocytokine with cardioprotective properties. However, the potential roles of CTRP9 in endothelial function remain largely elusive. In the present study, the effects of CTRP9 on the proliferation, apoptosis, migration, angiogenesis, nitric oxide (NO production and oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs exposed to ox-LDL were investigated. We observed that treatment with ox-LDL inhibited the proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and the generation of NO, while stimulated the apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS production in HUVECs. Incubation of HUVECs with CTRP9 rescued ox-LDL-induced endothelial injury. CTRP9 treatment reversed ox-LDL-evoked decreases in antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(PH dehydrogenase quinone 1, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. Furthermore, CTRP9 induced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC1-α and phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Of interest, AMPK inhibition or PGC1-α silencing abolished CTRP9-mediated antioxidant enzymes levels, eNOS expressions, and endothelial protective effects. Collectively, we provided the first evidence that CTRP9 attenuated ox-LDL-induced endothelial injury by antioxidant enzyme inductions dependent on PGC-1α/AMPK activation.

  10. PTM-Switchboard--a database of posttranslational modifications of transcription factors, the mediating enzymes and target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Logan; Vo, Antony; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2009-01-01

    Gene transcription is largely regulated by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). The TF activity is significantly regulated by its posttranslational modifications (PTMs). TF-PTMs serve as 'molecular switchboards' that map multiple upstream signaling events, in response to various environmental perturbations, to the downstream transcriptional events. While many instances of TF-PTMs and their effect on gene regulation have been experimentally determined, a systematic meta-analysis or a quantitative model-based investigation of this process has not been undertaken. A prerequisite to such analyses is a database of known instances of TF-PTMs affecting transcriptional regulation. The PTM-Switchboard database meets this need by cataloging such instances in the model system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The database stores triplets of genes such that the ability of one gene (TF) to regulate a target gene is dependent on one or more PTMs catalyzed by a third gene (modifying enzyme). The database currently includes a large sample of experimentally characterized instances curated from the literature. In addition to providing a framework for searching and analyzing the data, the database will serve to benchmark computational methods. In the future, the database will be expanded to mammalian organisms, and will also include triplets predicted from computational approaches. The database can be accessed at http://cagr.pcbi.upenn.edu/PTMswitchboard.

  11. Temperature Stress at Grain Filling Stage Mediates Expression of Three Isoform Genes Encoding Starch Branching Enzymes in Rice Endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-su WEI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An early-maturity indica rice variety Zhefu 49, whose grain quality and starch structure are sensitive to environmental temperature, was subjected to different temperatures (32°C for high temperature and 22°C for optimum temperature at the grain filling stage in plant growth chambers, and the different expressions of three isoform genes (SBEI, SBEIII and SBEIV encoding starch branching enzyme (SBE in the endosperms were studied by the real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR method. Effects of high temperature on the SBE expression in developing rice endosperms were isoform-dependent. High temperature significantly down-regulated the expressions of SBEI and SBEIII, while up-regulated the expression of SBEIV. Compared with SBEIV and SBEIII, the expression of SBEI gene in Zhefu 49 rice endosperms was more sensitive to temperature variation at the grain filling stage. This study indicates that changes in weather/climate conditions especially temperature stress influence rice grain formation and its quality as evidenced by isoform expression.

  12. Oxidation of R- and S-omeprazole stereoselectively mediated by liver microsomal cytochrome P450 2C19 enzymes from cynomolgus monkeys and common marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shotaro; Kawano, Mirai; Murayama, Norie; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-15

    Racemic omeprazole has been used for clinically treating gastric acid-related diseases and also as a typical human cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C19 probe substrate in preclinical studies. S-Omeprazole has been developed as a single enantiomer medicine, which has been reported not to be associated with polymorphic human P450 2C19 phenotypes. In this study, 5-hydroxylation and sulfoxidation activities, with respect to stereoselective R- and S-omeprazole oxidations by liver microsomes from experimental animals including non-human primates and humans, were investigated in vitro. Liver microsomes from humans, cynomolgus monkeys, and mice preferentially mediated R-omeprazole 5-hydroxylations, however those from marmosets, minipigs, dogs, and rats preferentially mediated S-omeprazole 5-hydroxylations. High catalytic activities were observed for recombinant human P450 2C19 in R-omeprazole 5-hydroxlations, cynomolgus monkey P450 2C19 in both R- and S-omeprazole 5-hydroxlations, and marmoset P450 2C19 in S-omeprazole 5-hydroxlations. On the other hand, human, cynomolgus monkey, and marmoset P450 3A enzymes preferentially mediated S-omeprazole sulfoxidations. Correlation and kinetic analyses revealed a high affinity of polymorphic cynomolgus monkey and marmoset liver microsomal P450 2C19 enzymes with respect to R- and S-omeprazole 5-hydroxylations, respectively, and a high capacity of cynomolgus monkey and marmoset liver microsomal P450 3A4 for omeprazole 5-hydroxylations and sulfoxidations. R-and S-omeprazole 5-hydroxylation activities in cynomolgus monkey and marmoset liver microsomes were significantly different among wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous animals genotyped for cynomolgus monkey P450 2C19 p.[(Phe100Asn; Ala103Val; Ile112Leu)] and for marmoset P450 2C19 p.[(Phe7Leu; Ser254Leu; Ile469Thr)], respectively. The results of this study demonstrate polymorphic cynomolgus monkey and marmoset P450 2C19-dependent omeprazole oxidation activities with individual variations

  13. Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Shira C Shafir; Sorvillo, Frank J.; Sorvillo, Teresa; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms is rare but often fatal and typically affects children. We attempted to determine parameters of viability and methods of inactivating the eggs of these roundworms. Loss of viability resulted when eggs were heated to 62°C or desiccated for 7 months but not when frozen at –15°C for 6 months.

  14. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Compared to Real-Time PCR and Enzyme Immunoassay for Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sural, Preethi; Loomis, Caroline R.; Pesta, Christine; Gonzalez-Krellwitz, Laura; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Riska, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the primary cause of health care-associated diarrhea. While most laboratories have been using rapid antigen tests for detecting C. difficile toxins, they have poor sensitivity; newer molecular methods offer rapid results with high test sensitivity and specificity. This study was designed to compare the performances of two molecular assays (Meridian illumigene and BD GeneOhm) and two antigen assays (Wampole Quik Chek Complete and TechLab Tox A/B II) to detect toxigenic C. difficile. Fecal specimens from hospitalized patients (n = 139) suspected of having C. difficile infection were tested by the four assays. Nine specimens were positive and 109 were negative by all four methods. After discrepant analysis by toxigenic culture (n = 21), the total numbers of stool specimens classified as positive and negative for toxigenic C. difficile were 21 (15%) and 118 (85%), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were as follows: GeneOhm (95.2%, 100%, 100%, and 99.2%), illumigene (95.2%, 96.6%, 83.3%, and 99.2%), Tox A/B II (52.4%, 97.5%, 78.6%, and 92.4%), and Quik Chek Complete (47.6%, 100%, 100%, and 91.9%). The illumigene assay performed comparably to the GeneOhm assay with a slight decrease in test specificity; the sensitivities of both far exceeded those of the antigen assays. The clinical characteristics of the concordant and discrepant study patients were similar, including stool consistency and frequency. In the era of rapid molecular-based tests for toxigenic C. difficile, toxin enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) should no longer be considered the standard of care. PMID:22189114

  15. Desiccation-induced changes in viability, lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intermediate seeds of Mimusopsis elengi showed obvious membrane lipid peroxidation during desiccation. When the moisture content (MC) decreased from initial 41.8 to 6.1%, seed viability significantly decreased from 100 to 23%, consorted with activity changes of a few anti-oxidative enzymes. The activities of superoxide ...

  16. Monitoring cell growth, viability, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael; Spearman, Maureen; Braasch, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    as an estimate of cellular activity. The state of cellular viability may be measured by the release of an enzyme such as lactate dehydrogenase or more directly from the intracellular adenylate energy charge from cell lysates. Alternatively, radioactive techniques may be used for an accurate determination of cellular protein synthesis.

  17. Molecular Identification of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates Recovered from Egyptian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Badawy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of antibiotics in clinical settings is thought to have led to the global emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding aminoglycoside resistance and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. All K. pneumoniae isolates were phenotypically identified using API 20E and then confirmed genotypically through amplification of the specific K. pneumoniae phoE gene. All isolates were genotyped by the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction technique (ERIC-PCR. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by a modified Kirby-Bauer method and broth microdilution. All resistant or intermediate-resistant isolates to either gentamicin or amikacin were screened for 7 different genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs. In addition, all resistant or intermediate-resistant isolates to either ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin were screened for 5 genes encoding the quinolone resistance protein (Qnr, 1 gene encoding quinolone-modifying enzyme, and 3 genes encoding quinolone efflux pumps. Biotyping using API 20E revealed 13 different biotypes. Genotyping demonstrated that all isolates were related to 2 main phylogenetic groups. Susceptibility testing revealed that carbapenems and tigecycline were the most effective agents. Investigation of genes encoding AMEs revealed that acc(6′-Ib was the most prevalent, followed by acc(3′-II, aph(3′-IV, and ant(3′′-I. Examination of genes encoding Qnr proteins demonstrated that qnrB was the most prevalent, followed by qnrS, qnrD, and qnrC. It was found that 61%, 26%, and 12% of quinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates harbored acc(6′-Ib-cr, oqxAB, and qebA, respectively. The current study demonstrated a high prevalence of aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance genes among clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae.

  18. mTOR mediates human trophoblast invasion through regulation of matrix-remodeling enzymes and is associated with serine phosphorylation of STAT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Susann [Placenta-Lab, Department of Obstetrics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740 Jena (Germany); Renaud, Stephen J. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L3N6 (Canada); Schleussner, Ekkehard [Placenta-Lab, Department of Obstetrics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740 Jena (Germany); Graham, Charles H. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L3N6 (Canada); Markert, Udo R., E-mail: markert@med.uni-jena.de [Placenta-Lab, Department of Obstetrics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2009-06-10

    The intracellular signaling molecule mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for cell growth and proliferation. It is involved in mouse embryogenesis, murine trophoblast outgrowth and linked to tumor cell invasiveness. In order to assess the role of mTOR in human trophoblast invasion we analyzed the in vitro invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo immortalized first-trimester trophoblast cells in conjunction with enzyme secretion upon mTOR inhibition and knockdown of mTOR protein expression. Additionally, we also tested the capability of mTOR to trigger signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 by its phosphorylation status. Rapamycin inhibited mTOR kinase activity as demonstrated with a lower phosphorylation level of the mTOR substrate p70 S6 kinase (S6K). With the use of rapamycin and siRNA-mediated mTOR knockdown we could show that cell proliferation, invasion and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9, urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) and its major physiological uPA inhibitor (PAI)-1 were inhibited. While tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 was unaffected by mTOR inhibition and knockdown, serine phosphorylation was diminished. We conclude that mTOR signaling is one major mechanism in a tightly regulated network of intracellular signal pathways including the JAK/STAT system to regulate invasion in human trophoblast cells by secretion of enzymes that remodel the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) such as MMP-2, -9, uPA and PAI-1. Dysregulation of mTOR may contribute to pregnancy-related pathologies caused through impaired trophoblast invasion.

  19. Mediated effect of ultrasound treated Diclofenac on mussel hemocytes: First evidence for the involvement of respiratory burst enzymes in the induction of DCF-mediated unspecific mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufexi, Eirini; Dailianis, Stefanos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Manariotis, Ioannis D

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the toxic behavior of diclofenac (DCF) before and after its ultrasound (US) treatment, as well as the involvement of intracellular target molecules, such as NADPH oxidase and NO synthase, in the DCF-induced adverse effects on hemocytes of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this context, appropriate volumes (350 and 500mL) of DCF solutions (at concentrations of 2, 2.5, 5 and 10mgL(-1)) were treated under different ultrasound operating conditions (frequency at 582 and 862kHz, electric power density at 133 and 167W) for assessing US method efficiency. In parallel, DCF and US DCF-mediated cytotoxic (in terms of cell viability measured with the use of neutral red uptake/NRU method), oxidative (in terms of superoxide anions/(.)O2(-), nitric oxides such as NO2(-) and lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde/MDA content) and genotoxic (DNA damage measured by the use of Comet assay method) effects were investigated in hemocytes exposed for 1h to 5, 10 and 100ngL(-1) and 1, 10 and 20μgL(-1) of DCF. The involvement of NADPH oxidase and NO synthase to the DCF-induced toxicity was further investigated by the use of 10μΜ L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor and 10μΜ DPI, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. According to the results, 350mL of 2mgL(-1) DCF showed higher degradation (>50%) under 167W electric power density and frequency at 862kHz for 120min, compared to degradation in all other cases, followed by a significant elimination of its toxicity. Specifically, US DCF-treated hemocytes showed a significant attenuation of DCF-mediated cytotoxic, oxidative and genotoxic effects, which appeared to be caused by NADPH oxidase and NO synthase activation, since their inhibition was followed by a significant elimination of (.)O2(-) and NO2(-) generation and the concomitant oxidative damage within cells. The results of the present study showed for the first time that unspecific mode of action of DCF, associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase

  20. Identification, characterization and developmental expression of Halloween genes encoding P450 enzymes mediating ecdysone biosynthesis in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Rybczynski, Robert; Warren, James T; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2006-03-01

    The insect molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) plays a central role in regulating gene expression during development and metamorphosis. In many Lepidoptera, the pro-hormone 3-dehydroecdysone (3DE), synthesized from cholesterol in the prothoracic gland, is rapidly converted to ecdysone (E) by a hemolymph reductase, and E is subsequently converted to 20E in various peripheral target tissues. Recently, four Drosophila melanogaster P450 enzymes, encoded by specific Halloween genes, were cloned and functionally characterized as mediating the last hydroxylation steps leading to 20E. We extended this work to the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta, an established model for endocrinological and developmental studies. cDNA clones were obtained for three Manduca orthologs of CYP306A1 (phantom; phm, the 25-hydroxylase), CYP302A1 (disembodied; dib, the 22-hydroxylase) and CYP315A1 (shadow; sad, the 2-hydroxylase), expressed predominantly in the prothoracic gland during the fifth (final) larval instar and during pupal-adult development, with fifth instar mRNA levels closely paralleling the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer. The data indicate that transcriptional regulation of phm, dib and sad plays a role in the developmentally varying steroidogenic capacities of the prothoracic glands during the fifth instar. The consistent expression of the Halloween genes confirms the importance of the prothoracic glands in pupal-adult development. These studies establish Manduca as an excellent model for examining the regulation of the Halloween genes.

  1. Visual Detection of Canine Parvovirus Based on Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and with Lateral Flow Dipstick

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, Yu-Ling; YEN, Chon-Ho; TU, Ching-Fu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAMP–ELISA) and with lateral flow dipstick (LAMP–LFD) are rapid, sensitive and specific methods for the visual detection of clinical pathogens. In this study, LAMP–ELISA and LAMP–LFD were developed for the visual detection of canine parvovirus (CPV). For LAMP, a set of four primers (biotin-labeled forward inner primers) was designed to specifically amplify a region of the VP2 gene of CPV. The optimum time and temperature for LAMP were 60 min and 65°C, respectively. The specific capture oligonucleotide probes, biotin-labeled CPV probe for LAMP–ELISA and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled CPV probe for LAMP–LFD were also designed for hybridization with LAMP amplicons on streptavidin-coated wells and LFD strips, respectively. For the comparison of detection sensitivity, conventional PCR and LAMP for CPV detection were also performed. The CPV detection limits by PCR, PCR–ELISA, LAMP, LAMP–ELISA and LAMP–LFD were 102, 102, 10−1, 10−1 and 10−1 TCID50/ml, respectively. In tests using artificially contaminated dog fecal samples, the samples with CPV inoculation levels of ≥1 TCID50/ml gave positive results by both LAMP–ELISA and LAMP–LFD. Our data indicated that both LAMP–ELISA and LAMP–LFD are promising as rapid, sensitive and specific methods for an efficient diagnosis of CPV infection. PMID:24334855

  2. Simple Identification of Human Taenia Species by Multiplex Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification in Combination with Dot Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Munehiro; Ito, Akira

    2016-06-01

    For differential detection of Taenia solium, Taenia saginata, and Taenia asiatica, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene has been recently developed and shown to be sensitive, specific, and effective. However, to achieve differential identification, one specimen requires three reaction mixtures containing a primer set of each Taenia species separately, which is complex and time consuming and increases the risk of cross-contamination. In this study, we developed a simple differential identification of human Taenia species using multiplex LAMP (mLAMP) in combination with dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA). Forward inner primers of T. solium, T. saginata, and T. asiatica labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), digoxigenin (DIG), and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA), respectively, and biotin-labeled backward inner primers were used in mLAMP. The mLAMP assay succeeded in specific amplification of each respective target gene in a single tube. Furthermore, the mLAMP product from each species was easily distinguished by dot-ELISA with an antibody specific for FITC, DIG, or TAMRA. The mLAMP assay in combination with dot-ELISA will make identification of human Taenia species simpler, easier, and more practical. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Protective effect of marine mangrove Rhizophora apiculata on acetic acid induced experimental colitis by regulating anti-oxidant enzymes, inflammatory mediators and nuclear factor-kappa B subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Vinod Prabhu; C, Guruvayoorappan

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and ulcer in the lining of the large intestine. In this study we investigate the effect of Rhizophora apiculata (R. apiculata) on acetic acid induced colitis in mouse model. Experimental animals were randomized into four groups: normal untreated, colitis control, R. apiculata treated group and sulfasalazine treated group. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.01) decreased macroscopic score and wet weight of damaged colon compared to colitis control. This effect was confirmed biochemically by significant (p<0.01) reduction of colitis associated increase in myeloperoxidase activity. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.05) increased anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels compared to colitis control. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.01) reduced lipid peroxides (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) and inflammatory mediators such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expressions compared to colitis control. R. apiculata treatment significantly (p<0.01) inhibits the translocation of NF-kB p65 and p50 subunits. Taken together these findings suggest that R. apiculata prevents acetic acid induced colitis in experimental mouse model and may serve as an excellent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that could potentially be useful as a (natural) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Loop 7 of E2 enzymes: an ancestral conserved functional motif involved in the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Papaleo

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin (Ub system controls almost every aspect of eukaryotic cell biology. Protein ubiquitination depends on the sequential action of three classes of enzymes (E1, E2 and E3. E2 Ub-conjugating enzymes have a central role in the ubiquitination pathway, interacting with both E1 and E3, and influencing the ultimate fate of the substrates. Several E2s are characterized by an extended acidic insertion in loop 7 (L7, which if mutated is known to impair the proper E2-related functions. In the present contribution, we show that acidic loop is a conserved ancestral motif in E2s, relying on the presence of alternate hydrophobic and acidic residues. Moreover, the dynamic properties of a subset of family 3 E2s, as well as their binary and ternary complexes with Ub and the cognate E3, have been investigated. Here we provide a model of L7 role in the different steps of the ubiquitination cascade of family 3 E2s. The L7 hydrophobic residues turned out to be the main determinant for the stabilization of the E2 inactive conformations by a tight network of interactions in the catalytic cleft. Moreover, phosphorylation is known from previous studies to promote E2 competent conformations for Ub charging, inducing electrostatic repulsion and acting on the L7 acidic residues. Here we show that these active conformations are stabilized by a network of hydrophobic interactions between L7 and L4, the latter being a conserved interface for E3-recruitment in several E2s. In the successive steps, L7 conserved acidic residues also provide an interaction interface for both Ub and the Rbx1 RING subdomain of the cognate E3. Our data therefore suggest a crucial role for L7 of family 3 E2s in all the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade. Its different functions are exploited thank to its conserved hydrophobic and acidic residues in a finely orchestrate mechanism.

  5. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  6. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NOW HONOR/MEMORIAL GENERAL DONATION MONTHLY PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  7. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  8. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex Uev1A-Ubc13 promotes breast cancer metastasis through nuclear factor-кB mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaojia; Shen, Siqi; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Weiwei; Xiao, Wei

    2014-07-14

    UEV1A encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Ubc13), which is required for Ubc13-catalyzed Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of target proteins and nuclear factor κB (NF-кB) activation. Previous reports have correlated the level of UEV1A expression with tumorigenesis; however, the detailed molecular events leading to tumors particularly breast cancer and metastasis are unclear. This study is to investigate roles of different UEV1 splicing variants, and its close homolog MMS2, in promoting tumorigenesis and metastasis in breast cancer cells. We experimentally manipulated the UEV1 and MMS2 levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and monitored their effects on cell invasion and migration, as well as tumor formation and metastasis in xenograft mice. The underlying molecular mechanisms leading to metastasis were also examined. It was found that overexpression of UEV1A alone, but not UEV1C or MMS2, is sufficient to induce cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. This process is mediated by NF-κB activation and requires functional Ubc13. Our experimental data establish that among NF-κB target genes, UEV1A-regulated matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) expression plays a critical role in cell invasion and metastasis. Interestingly, experimental depletion of UEV1 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces MMP1 expression and prevents tumor formation and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model, while overexpression of MMP1 overrides the metastasis effects in UEV1-depleted cells. These results identify UEV1A as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of metastasic breast cancers.

  9. Effects of a blend of essential oils and an enzyme combination on nutrient digestibility, ileum histology and expression of inflammatory mediators in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X R; Awati, A; Agazzi, A; Vitari, F; Ferrari, A; Bento, H; Crestani, M; Domeneghini, C; Bontempo, V

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of an improved gut environment of post-weaning piglets when administered a blend of essential oils (EO; thymol and cinnamaldehyde) and an enzyme combination (xylanase and β-glucanase (XB)) either alone or in combination. To assess the effect of dietary treatments, faecal nutrient digestibility and microbial counts, as well as ileum histology and gene expression of inflammatory mediators were evaluated. One hundred and ninety-two weaned piglets were allocated into four experimental treatments, and fed the basal diet (CTRL) either without or with EO, XB or their combination (EO+XB) for a 42-day period. The experiment concerning digestibility was designed with two periods (period I: days 15 to 21; period II: days 29 to 35) and the faeces were collected on days 20, 21, 34 and 35. On day 42, six piglets from each treatment were slaughtered. It was found that EO, XB and EO+XB supplementation did not affect (P>0.05) the growth performance of the piglets from days 0 to 42. Moreover, no dietary effect on faecal score was observed. Faecal digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, ash, dietary fibre, lipid, CP and NDF were increased from period I to period II (P0.05) of EO, XB or their combination on the faecal digestibility was observed at both periods. Compared with the CTRL diet, dietary XB reduced the faecal Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli counts but increased the Lactobacillus to Coliforms ratio on day 42 (P=0.02, 0.03 and 0.03, respectively), and all the additives supplementations decreased the counts of faecal Coliforms on day 42 (Ppiglets treated with EO+XB compared with the EO group (P=0.02). In conclusion, the administration of EO, XB or their combination was effective in improving ileum histology, and EO+XB supplementation might benefit the modulation of the expression of ileum inflammatory cytokines in piglets.

  10. The viability of perilabyrinthine osteocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2012-01-01

    Bone remodeling is highly inhibited around the inner ear space, most likely by the anti-resorptive action of the inner ear cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) entering perilabyrinthine bone through the lacuno-canalicular porosity (LCP). This extracellular signaling pathway depends on the viability...

  11. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  12. Kunstige Enzymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Bjerre, Jeannette; Marinescu, Lavinia

    2007-01-01

    Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin.......Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin....

  13. Redefining the effect of salt on thermophilic starter cell viability, culturability and metabolic activity in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, C D; Fallico, V; Wilkinson, M G; Sheehan, J J

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the differential effect of salt concentration in the outside and inside layers of brine salted cheeses on viability, culturability and enzyme activity of starter bacteria. The high-salt environment of the outside layer caused a sharp decrease in L. helveticus viability as measured by traditional plate counts. Remarkably, this was associated with lower release of intracellular enzymes (LDH), reduced levels of proteolysis and larger membrane integrity as measured by flow cytometry (FC) following classical Live/Dead staining. FC analysis of light scattering properties highlighted a significant reduction in size and granularity of the microbiota located in the cheese surface, suggestive of cell shrinkage and condensation of internal macromolecules probably due to hyperosmotic stress. The microbiota of the cheese surface were found to experience greater oxidative stress, as measured by FC analysis of the total levels of reactive oxygen species, compared to that of the interior layer. These results lead us to postulate that the physiology and health status of the microbiota were significantly different in the outer and inner layers of the cheese. The hyperosmotic environment of the outer layer resulted in reduced cell lysis, as measurable by assays based upon membrane integrity, but rather triggered cell death via mechanisms involving cell shrinkage and ROS-mediated damage of vital intracellular components. This study challenges the current thinking on how salt controls microbial activity in ripening cheese, especially in cheeses which are brine salted as local variations in biochemical ripening indices can differ significantly from the outside to the inside of a ripening cheese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting melanoma growth and viability reveals dualistic functionality of the phosphonothionate analogue of carba cyclic phosphatidic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prestwich Glenn D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the incidence of melanoma in the U.S. is rising faster than any other cancer, the FDA-approved chemotherapies lack efficacy for advanced disease, which results in poor overall survival. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, autotaxin (ATX, the enzyme that produces LPA, and the LPA receptors represent an emerging group of therapeutic targets in cancer, although it is not known which of these is most effective. Results Herein we demonstrate that thio-ccPA 18:1, a stabilized phosphonothionate analogue of carba cyclic phosphatidic acid, ATX inhibitor and LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, induced a marked reduction in the viability of B16F10 metastatic melanoma cells compared with PBS-treated control by 80-100%. Exogenous LPA 18:1 or D-sn-1-O-oleoyl-2-O-methylglyceryl-3-phosphothioate did not reverse the effect of thio-ccPA 18:1. The reduction in viability mediated by thio-ccPA 18:1 was also observed in A375 and MeWo melanoma cell lines, suggesting that the effects are generalizable. Interestingly, siRNA to LPA3 (siLPA3 but not other LPA receptors recapitulated the effects of thio-ccPA 18:1 on viability, suggesting that inhibition of the LPA3 receptor is an important dualistic function of the compound. In addition, siLPA3 reduced proliferation, plasma membrane integrity and altered morphology of A375 cells. Another experimental compound designed to antagonize the LPA1/3 receptors significantly reduced viability in MeWo cells, which predominantly express the LPA3 receptor. Conclusions Thus the ability of thio-ccPA 18:1 to inhibit the LPA3 receptor and ATX are key to its molecular mechanism, particularly in melanoma cells that predominantly express the LPA3 receptor. These observations necessitate further exploration and exploitation of these targets in melanoma.

  15. Enzyme-mediated coupling of a bi-functional phenolic compound onto wool to enhance its physical, mechanical and functional properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffar Hossain, Kh. M.; Díaz González, María; Riva Juan, Ascensión; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2009-01-01

    Electronic version of an article published as "Enzyme and microbial technology", 08 Desembre 2009, p. 1-5 Wool fibres have been modified with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) to improve their performance at use. This water insoluble bi-functional phenolic compound has been grafted on wool through a laccase enzyme catalyzed reaction in an aqueous-ethanol mixture. The capacity of laccase to oxidise NDGA in this aqueous-organic medium has been studied electrochemicaly. The increase of CH2, CH...

  16. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  17. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  18. The use of fluorescent probes to assess viability of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Breeuwer, P.; Abee, T.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Determination of the viability of bacteria by the conventional plating technique is a time-consuming process. Methods based on enzyme activity or membrane integrity are much faster and may be good alternatives. Assessment of the viability of suspensions of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter

  19. Tychastic measure of viability risk

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Dordan, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a forecasting mechanism of the price intervals for deriving the SCR (solvency capital requirement) eradicating the risk during the exercise period on one hand, and measuring the risk by computing the hedging exit time function associating with smaller investments the date until which the value of the portfolio hedges the liabilities on the other. This information, summarized under the term “tychastic viability measure of risk” is an evolutionary alternative to statistical measures, when dealing with evolutions under uncertainty. The book is written by experts in the field and the target audience primarily comprises research experts and practitioners.

  20. Fluorescence techniques to detect and to assess viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Chitarra, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause major economic losses in commercial crop production worldwide every year. The current methods used to detect and to assess the viability of bacterial pathogens and to test seed lots or plants for contamination are usually based on plate assays or on serological techniques. Plating methods provide information about cell viability, but are generally laborious and time-consuming. Serological techniques, such as immunofluorescence microscopy (IF) and enzym...

  1. Candida albicans glutathione reductase downregulates Efg1-mediated cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway and leads to defective hyphal growth and virulence upon decreased cellular methylglyoxal content accompanied by activating alcohol dehydrogenase and glycolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, MyungHee; Baek, Yong-Un; Kwak, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2017-04-01

    Glutathione reductase maintains the glutathione level in a reduced state. As previously demonstrated, glutathione is required for cell growth/division and its biosynthesizing-enzyme deficiency causes methylglyoxal accumulation. However, experimental evidences for reciprocal relationships between Cph1-/Efg1-mediated signaling pathway regulation and methylglyoxal production exerted by glutathione reductase on yeast morphology remain unclear. Glutathione reductase (GLR1) disruption/overexpression were performed to investigate aspects of pathological/morphological alterations in Candida albicans. These assumptions were proved by observations of cellular susceptibility to oxidants and thiols, and measurements of methylglyoxal and glutathione content in hyphal-inducing conditions mainly through the activity of GLR1-overexpressing cells. Additionally, the transcriptional/translational levels of bioenergetic enzymes and dimorphism-regulating protein kinases were examined in the strain. The GLR1-deficient strain was non-viable when GLR1 expression under the control of a CaMAL2 promoter was conditionally repressed, despite partial rescue of growth by exogenous thiols. During filamentation, non-growing hyphal GLR1-overexpressing cells exhibited resistance against oxidants and cellular methylglyoxal was significantly decreased, which concomitantly increased expressions of genes encoding energy-generating enzymes, including fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1), with remarkable repression of Efg1-signaling cascades. This is the first report that GLR1-triggered Efg1-mediated signal transduction repression strictly reduces dimorphic switching and virulence by maintaining the basal level of methylglyoxal following the enhanced gene expressions of glycolytic enzymes and ADH1. The Efg1 downregulatory mechanism by GLR1 expression has possibilities to involve in other complex network of signal pathways

  2. Improvement In Rabbit Corneal Cell Suspension Viability After Freezing With Gingko Biloba Extrakt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Aktan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the addition of Gingko Biloba extract (EGb 761 to rabbit corneal epithelial medium before cell freezing improved cell viability after freezing then thawing. After removal of corneas, they were treated with enzymes and the corneal epithelium was prepared as a single cell suspension in freezing media with or without EGb 761. After freezing for two weeks then thawing, a higher cell viability was found in the cornea cell suspensions which had been frozen pretreated with EGb 761 in the media. The improvement with corneal cell viability with EGb 761 pretreatment is postulated to be based on the antioxidant capacity of the plant extract.

  3. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  4. The role of histamine in the regulation of the viability, proliferation and transforming growth factor β1 secretion of rat wound fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Monika; Bojanowska, Ewa; Staszewska, Teresa; Ciosek, Joanna; Juszczak, Marlena; Drobnik, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation mediators play a regulatory role in repair processes. The study will examine the influence of histamine on wound fibroblast metabolic activity, viability, proliferation, and TGFβ1 secretion. The study also will identify the histamine receptor involved in regulation of the tested repair processes. Fibroblasts were obtained from the granulation tissue of wounds or intact dermis of rats. The MTT and BrdU assays were used to examine the effect of histamine (10-8M-10-4M) on the viability and metabolic activity of fibroblasts, and on their proliferative capacity. The influence of histamine receptor antagonists (i.e., ketotifen, ranitidine, ciproxifan and JNJ7777120) and agonists (2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride, amthamine dihydrobromide) was also investigated. The TGFβ1 and histamine receptors H1 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histamine significantly increased granulation tissue fibroblast viability and metabolic activity at 10-8 and 10-6M but did not change their proliferative activity. Only the blockade of the H1 receptor removed this effect of histamine. H1 receptor agonist (2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride) increased cell viability, thereby mimicking histamine action. Both Histamine (10-4M) and 2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride increased TGFβ1 concentration in cell culture medium. However, ketotifen blocked histamine-induced augmentation of TGFβ1. H1 receptor expression on wound fibroblasts was confirmed. The regulatory influence of histamine on wound fibroblast function (viability/metabolic activity or secretion of TGFβ1) is dependent on H1 receptor stimulation. Contrary to wound fibroblasts, these cells express a very low level of H1 receptors when isolated from intact dermis and histamine is unable to modify their metabolic activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  5. A novel nuclear xenobiotic receptors (AhR/PXR/CAR)-mediated mechanism of DEHP-induced cerebellar toxicity in quails (Coturnix japonica) via disrupting CYP enzyme system homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zheng-Hai; Xia, Jun; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Li, Xue-Nan; Zhang, Cong; Zhao, Hua-Shan; Zhu, Shi-Yong; Li, Jin-Long

    2017-07-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is causing serious health hazard in wildlife animal and human through environment and food chain, including the effect of brain development and impacted neurobehavioral outcomes. However, DEHP exposure caused cerebellar toxicity in bird remains unclear. To evaluate DEHP-exerted potential neurotoxicity in cerebellum, male quails were exposed with 0, 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg BW/day DEHP by gavage treatment for 45 days. Neurobehavioral abnormality and cerebellar histopathological alternation were observed in DEHP-induced quails. DEHP exposure increased the contents of total Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and Cytochrome b5 (Cyt b5) and the activities of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (NCR) and aniline-4-hydeoxylase (AH) in quail cerebellum. The expression of nuclear xenobiotic receptors (NXRs) and the transcriptions of CYP enzyme isoforms were also influenced in cerebellum by DEHP exposure. These results suggested that DEHP exposure caused the toxic effects of quail cerebellum. DEHP exposure disrupted the cerebellar CYP enzyme system homeostasis via affecting the transcription of CYP enzyme isoforms. The cerebellar P450arom and CYP3A4 might be biomarkers in evaluating the neurotoxicity of DEHP in bird. Finally, this study provided new evidence that DEHP-induced toxic effect of quail cerebellum was associated with activating the NXRs responses and disrupting the CYP enzyme system homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differences between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin II-AT(1) antagonism on angiotensin-mediated responses in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Oosterga, M; Buikema, H; Mariani, M; Grandjean, JG; van Glist, WH

    The cur-rent study aimed to demonstrate differences between angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and Ang II-AT(1) receptor antagonism on full concentration-contraction responses to Ang I. Contraction responses to increasing concentrations of Ang I (1 nM-1 muM) were evaluated in organ

  7. Complement Split Product C5a Mediates the Lipopolysaccharide‐Induced Mobilization of Cfu‐S and Haemopoietic Progenitor Cells, But Not the Mobilization Induced By Proteolytic Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, W.J.; van Oudenaren, A.; H.A. van Dijk (Henk); M.R. Daha (Mohamed); R. Benner (Robbert)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. Intravenous (i.v.) injection of mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the proteolytic enzymes trypsin and proteinase, mobilizes pluripotent haemopoietic stem cells (CFU‐s) as well as granulocyte‐macrophage progenitor cells (GM‐CFU) and the early progenitors of the erythroid

  8. Enzyme Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; De Ferrari, Luna; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B O; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCa...

  9. Habitat management affects soil chemistry and allochthonous organic inputs mediating microbial structure and exo-enzyme activity in Wadden Sea salt-marsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Thi Do, Hai; Weingartner, Magdalena; Nolte, Stefanie; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The Wadden Sea (WS) region is Europe's largest wetland and home to approximately 20% of its salt marsh area. Mainland salt marshes of the WS are anthropogenically influenced systems and have traditionally been used for livestock grazing in wide parts. After foundation of WS National Parks in the late 1980s and early 1990s, artificial drainage has been abandoned; however, livestock grazing is still common in many areas of the National Parks and is under ongoing discussion as a habitat-management practice. While studies so far focused on effects of livestock grazing on biodiversity, little is known about how biogeochemical processes, element cycling, and particularly carbon sequestration are affected. Here, we present data from a recent field study focusing on grazing effects on soil properties, microbial exo-enzyme activity, microbial abundance and structure. Exo-enzyme activity was studied conducting digestive enzyme assays for various enzymes involved in C- and N cycling. Microbial abundance and structure was assessed measuring specific gene abundance of fungi and bacteria using quantitative PCR. Soil compaction induced by grazing led to higher bulk density and decreases in soil redox (Δ >100 mV). Soil pH was significantly lower in grazed parts. Further, the proportion of allochthonous organic matter (marine input) was significantly smaller in grazed vs. ungrazed sites, likely caused by a higher sediment trapping capacity of the taller vegetation in the ungrazed sites. Grazing induced changes in bulk density, pH and redox resulted in reduced activity of enzymes involved in microbial C acquisition; however, there was no grazing effect on enzymes involved in N acquisition. While changes in pH, bulk density or redox did not affect microbial abundance and structure, the relative amount of marine organic matter significantly reduced the relative abundance of fungi (F:B ratio). We conclude that livestock grazing directly affects microbial exo-enzyme activity, thus

  10. Wildlife Tunnel Enhances Population Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney van der Ree

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Roads and traffic are pervasive components of landscapes throughout the world: they cause wildlife mortality, disrupt animal movements, and increase the risk of extinction. Expensive engineering solutions, such as overpasses and tunnels, are increasingly being adopted to mitigate these effects. Although some species readily use such structures, their success in preventing population extinction remains unknown. Here, we use population viability modeling to assess the effectiveness of tunnels for the endangered Mountain Pygmy-possum (Burramys parvus in Australia. The underpasses reduced, but did not completely remove, the negative effects of a road. The expected minimum population size of a "reconnected" population remained 15% lower than that of a comparable "undivided" population. We propose that the extent to which the risk of extinction decreases should be adopted as a measure of effectiveness of mitigation measures and that the use of population modeling become routine in these evaluations.

  11. Malthus, Boserup and population viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneuil, N

    1994-01-01

    The Malthus-Boserup explanatory framework is revisited from the point of view of viability theory. Instead of imposing a univocal relationship between population pressure and level of knowledge, the way technology will change is not determined, it is only constrained. This leads to regard any situation as associated to a set of reachable futures. When no possibility is left for systems to avoid extinction, systems are no longer viable. Hence, the control-phase space can be divided into regions corresponding to gradual danger or security. This point of view allows the introduction of ideas such as incentives to create or to use new knowledge, gives a role to the threatening power of Malthusian checks, and leaves space for a specific variety of behaviors. The Boserupian theme then appears indirectly, emerging from the constraints imposed by the inertia of technological change.

  12. Viability of telework at PROCEMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, Maria Amelia de Mesquita

    2003-02-01

    At the end of the 20th century, telework appears as one of the modalities of flexible work, which is related to new organizational structures as well as to increasing use of technology. It revolutionizes the traditional ways of performing work. Its implementation creates a number of questions to be answered by the organizations and the individuals involved. This article presents a case study on the viability of implementing telework at Procempa (The Data Processing Company of the City of Porto Alegre). The case study analyzes the technical, organizational, psychological, legal, and labor union dimensions. As a result of this study, we can identify the organization's stage of readiness for telework, the conditions under which it would be implemented, and the specific issues of an implementation.

  13. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes skeletal muscle progenitor cell (MPC) viability via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Kelly; Lewis, Davina; Shew, Mathew; Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Halum, Stacey

    2014-12-01

    Muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) are currently being investigated as cellular vectors to deliver neurotrophic factor (NF) for the promotion of re-innervation after axonal injury. Ideally NF delivery in such a model would enhance axonal regeneration while simultaneously promoting MPC viability. To date, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is one of the few NFs known to promote both re-innervation and MPC viability. We herein identify ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) as a factor that promotes MPC viability in culture, and demonstrate CNTF to impart greater viability effects on MPCs than IGF-1. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition via LY294002 results in abrogation of CNTF-mediated viability, suggesting that the CNTF-mediated MPC viability benefit occurs via the PI3-Akt pathway. Finally, we employ a genetic model, establishing MPC cultures from mice deficient in class IA PI-3 K (p85α(-/-) ) mice, and demonstrate that the viability benefit imparted by CNTF is completely abrogated in PI-3 K-deficient MPCs compared to wild-type controls. In summary, our investigations define CNTF as a promoter of MPC viability beyond IGF-1, and reveal that the CNTF-mediated MPC viability effects occur via the PI3-Akt pathway. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Leucine zipper-mediated targeting of multi-enzyme cascade reactions to inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli for enhanced production of 1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gui Hwan; Seong, Wonjae; Fu, Yaoyao; Yoon, Paul K; Kim, Seong Keun; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2017-03-01

    Metabolons in nature have evolved to facilitate more efficient catalysis of multistep reactions through the co-localization of functionally related enzymes to cellular organelles or membrane structures. To mimic the natural metabolon architecture, we present a novel artificial metabolon that was created by targeting multi-enzyme cascade reactions onto inclusion body (IB) in Escherichia coli. The utility of this system was examined by co-localizing four heterologous enzymes of the 1-butanol pathway onto an IB that was formed in E. coli through overexpression of the cellulose binding domain (CBD) of Cellulomonas fimi exoglucanase. To target the 1-butanol pathway enzymes to the CBD IB, we utilized a peptide-peptide interaction between leucine zipper (LZ) peptides. We genetically fused the LZ peptide to the N-termini of four heterologous genes involved in the synthetic 1-butanol pathway, whereas an antiparallel LZ peptide was fused to the CBD gene. The in vivo activity of the CBD IB-based metabolon was examined through the determination of 1-butanol synthesis using E. coli transformed with two plasmids containing the LZ-fused CBD and LZ-fused 1-butanol pathway genes, respectively. In vivo synthesis of 1-butanol using the engineered E. coli yielded 1.98g/L of 1-butanol from glucose, representing a 1.5-fold increase over that obtained from E. coli expressing the LZ-fused 1-butanol pathway genes alone. In an attempt to examine the in vitro 1-butanol productivity, we reconstituted CBD IB-based metabolon using CBD IB and individual enzymes of 1-butanol pathway. The 1-butanol productivity of in vitro reconstituted CBD IB-based metabolon using acetoacetyl-CoA as the starting material was 2.29mg/L/h, 7.9-fold higher than that obtained from metabolon-free enzymes of 1-butanol pathway. Therefore, this novel CBD-based artificial metabolon may prove useful in metabolic engineering both in vivo and in vitro for the efficient production of desired products. Copyright © 2017

  15. Active peptides from skate (Okamejei kenojei) skin gelatin diminish angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity and intracellular free radical-mediated oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Ryu, BoMi; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-15

    Skin gelatin of skate (Okamejei kenojei) was hydrolyzed using Alcalase, flavourzyme, Neutrase and protamex. It was found that the Alcalase hydrolysate exhibited the highest angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Then, Alcalase hydrolysate was further hydrolyzed with protease and separated by an ultrafiltration membrane system. Finally, two peptides responsible for ACE inhibitory activity were identified to be MVGSAPGVL (829Da) and LGPLGHQ (720Da), with IC50 values of 3.09 and 4.22μM, respectively. Moreover, the free radical-scavenging activity of the purified peptides was determined in human endothelial cells. In addition, the antioxidative mechanism of the purified peptides was evaluated by protein and gene expression levels of antioxidant enzymes. The current study demonstrated that the peptides derived from skate skin gelatin could be used in the food industry as functional ingredients with potent antihypertensive and antioxidant benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing risk of liver enzyme elevation in patients with immune-mediated diseases and different hepatitis B virus serostatus receiving anti-TNF agents: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ying-Ming; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chan, K Arnold

    2017-11-01

    Liver enzyme elevation is an important and common adverse effect among patients with immune-mediated diseases who receive tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF), and has various causes. Hence, we evaluated the relative risks of developing liver enzyme elevation in anti-TNF users with differing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection status. At a hospital in central Taiwan, 407 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis received anti-TNF therapy between 1 January 2004 and 30 June 2012. We performed a nested case-control study (n = 368) of cases with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) > 40 international units/L ≤ 12 months after starting anti-TNF therapy, and corresponding controls without liver enzyme elevation. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between liver enzyme elevation and HBV serostatus, as well as other risk factors. Thirty cases were compared to 338 controls. After adjustment for potential confounders, HBV surface antigen-positive (HBsAg(+)) serostatus was associated with substantially higher likelihood of developing elevated ALT (adjusted odds ratio 7.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.16-31.31) relative to those with an uninfected HBV status; no such association was observed among HBsAg-negative/HBV core antibody-positive (HBsAg(-)/HBcAb(+)) patients (adjusted odds ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.33-3.25). Increased risk of ALT elevation was associated with methotrexate used alone, without folic acid (adjusted odds ratio 11.60, 95% CI 2.52-56.46), and history of ALT elevation (adjusted odds ratio 13.71, 95% CI 4.32-45.75). HBsAg(+) patients with immune-mediated diseases who received anti-TNF therapy had an approximately eight-fold higher likelihood of liver enzyme elevation than those without HBV infection, whereas patients with HBsAg(-)/HBcAb(+) serostatus had a risk similar to that of uninfected patients.

  17. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex Uev1A-Ubc13 promotes breast cancer metastasis through nuclear factor-кB mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhaojia; Shen, Siqi; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Weiwei; XIAO, WEI

    2014-01-01

    Introduction UEV1A encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Ubc13), which is required for Ubc13-catalyzed Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of target proteins and nuclear factor κB (NF-кB) activation. Previous reports have correlated the level of UEV1A expression with tumorigenesis; however, the detailed molecular events leading to tumors particularly breast cancer and metastasis are unclear. This study is to investigate roles of different UEV1 splicing variants, and its close homolog MM...

  18. The Modified Human DNA Repair Enzyme O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Is a Negative Regulator of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription upon Alkylation DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, Alvin K. C.; Oh, Hue Kian; Ali, Rahmen B.; Li, Benjamin F. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cell proliferation requires precise control to prevent mutations from replication of (unrepaired) damaged DNA in cells exposed spontaneously to mutagens. Here we show that the modified human DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (R-MGMT), formed from the suicidal repair of the mutagenic O6-alkylguanine (6RG) lesions by MGMT in the cells exposed to alkylating carcinogens, functions in such control by preventing the estrogen receptor (ER) from transcription activation that me...

  19. Procyanidins from Wild Grape (Vitis amurensis Seeds Regulate ARE-Mediated Enzyme Expression via Nrf2 Coupled with p38 and PI3K/Akt Pathway in HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Sik Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procyanidins, polymers of flavan-3-ol units, have been reported to exhibit many beneficial health effects such as antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive properties of procyanidins from wild grape (Vitis amurensis seeds in particular their roles in inducing phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes as well as in modulating the upstream kinases. Ethanolic extract of V. amurensis seeds was fractionated with a series of organic solvents and finally separated into six fractions, F1–F6. Chemical properties of the procyanidins were analyzed by vanillin assay, BuOH-HCl test, and depolymerization with phloroglucinol followed by LC/MS analysis. The F5 had the highest procyanidin content among all the fractions and strongly induced the reporter activity of antioxidant response element as well as the protein expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor (Nrf2 in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells. The procyanidin-rich F5 also strongly induced the expression of the phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes such as NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase1 and hemeoxygenase1. Phosphorylations of the upstream kinases such as MAPKs and PI3K/Akt were significantly increased by treatment with procyanidin fraction. In addition, the procyanidin-mediated Nrf2 expression was partly attenuated by PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and almost completely by p38 inhibitor SB202190, but neither by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, the procyanidins from wild grape seeds could be used as a potential natural chemopreventive agent through Nrf2/ARE-mediated phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes induction via p38 and PI3K/Akt pathway.

  20. Procyanidins from wild grape (Vitis amurensis) seeds regulate ARE-mediated enzyme expression via Nrf2 coupled with p38 and PI3K/Akt pathway in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Min-Ji; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Procyanidins, polymers of flavan-3-ol units, have been reported to exhibit many beneficial health effects such as antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive properties of procyanidins from wild grape (Vitis amurensis) seeds in particular their roles in inducing phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes as well as in modulating the upstream kinases. Ethanolic extract of V. amurensis seeds was fractionated with a series of organic solvents and finally separated into six fractions, F1-F6. Chemical properties of the procyanidins were analyzed by vanillin assay, BuOH-HCl test, and depolymerization with phloroglucinol followed by LC/MS analysis. The F5 had the highest procyanidin content among all the fractions and strongly induced the reporter activity of antioxidant response element as well as the protein expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor (Nrf2) in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells. The procyanidin-rich F5 also strongly induced the expression of the phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 and hemeoxygenase1. Phosphorylations of the upstream kinases such as MAPKs and PI3K/Akt were significantly increased by treatment with procyanidin fraction. In addition, the procyanidin-mediated Nrf2 expression was partly attenuated by PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and almost completely by p38 inhibitor SB202190, but neither by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, the procyanidins from wild grape seeds could be used as a potential natural chemopreventive agent through Nrf2/ARE-mediated phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes induction via p38 and PI3K/Akt pathway.

  1. Iron mediates catalysis of nucleic acid processing enzymes: support for Fe(II) as a cofactor before the great oxidation event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C Denise; Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Athavale, Shreyas S; Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-04-20

    Life originated in an anoxic, Fe2+-rich environment. We hypothesize that on early Earth, Fe2+ was a ubiquitous cofactor for nucleic acids, with roles in RNA folding and catalysis as well as in processing of nucleic acids by protein enzymes. In this model, Mg2+ replaced Fe2+ as the primary cofactor for nucleic acids in parallel with known metal substitutions of metalloproteins, driven by the Great Oxidation Event. To test predictions of this model, we assay the ability of nucleic acid processing enzymes, including a DNA polymerase, an RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase, to use Fe2+ in place of Mg2+ as a cofactor during catalysis. Results show that Fe2+ can indeed substitute for Mg2+ in catalytic function of these enzymes. Additionally, we use calculations to unravel differences in energetics, structures and reactivities of relevant Mg2+ and Fe2+ complexes. Computation explains why Fe2+ can be a more potent cofactor than Mg2+ in a variety of folding and catalytic functions. We propose that the rise of O2 on Earth drove a Fe2+ to Mg2+ substitution in proteins and nucleic acids, a hypothesis consistent with a general model in which some modern biochemical systems retain latent abilities to revert to primordial Fe2+-based states when exposed to pre-GOE conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Anticancer potency of the milk extract of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nuts against aflatoxin B1 mediated hepatocellular carcinoma bearing Wistar rats with reference to tumour marker enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, B; Muthulakshmi, V; Sachdanandam, P

    1999-05-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is an important consideration in the aetiology of human and animal hepatocellular carcinoma. The influence of the drug, Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut extract, on hepatocarcinogenicity of aflatoxin B1 was evaluated in adult albino male Wistar rats. Aflatoxin B1 was administered intraperitoneally to induce hepatocellular carcinoma. These cancer bearing animals were treated with Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut extract (200 mg/kg body weight/day) in sunflower oil orally for 14 days. The plasma and the liver tumour tissue were investigated biochemically for lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. The elevation of plasma concentration of these enzymes were indicative of the persistent deteriorating effect of aflatoxin B1 in cancer bearing animals. Lactate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases levels were decreased in liver, whereas alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were increased in cancer conditions. These enzyme levels were reversed to near normal control values in drug treated animals. The analysis of marker enzyme activities clearly indicates the antitumour efficacy of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut extract on aflatoxin B1 induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  4. Bioresponsive Release System for Visual Fluorescence Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen from Mesoporous Silica Nanocontainers Mediated Optical Color on Quantum Dot-Enzyme-Impregnated Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-05-02

    An all-in-one paper-based analytical device (PAD) was successfully developed for visual fluorescence detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on CdTe/CdSe quantum dot (QD)-enzyme-impregnated paper by coupling with a bioresponsive controlled-release system from DNA-gated mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs). The assay was carried out in a centrifuge tube by using glucose-loaded MSNs with a CEA aptamer and a QD-enzyme-paper attached on the lid. Initially, single-strand complementary DNA to a CEA aptamer was covalently conjugated to the aminated MSN, and then glucose (enzyme substrate) molecules were gated into the pore with the help of the aptamer. Glucose oxidase (GOD) and CdTe/CdSe QDs were coimmobilized on paper for the visual fluorescence signal output. Upon target CEA introduction in the detection cell, the analyte specifically reacted with the immobilized aptamer on the MSN to open the pore, thereby resulting in the glucose release. The released glucose was oxidized by the immobilized GOD on paper to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter quenched the fluorescence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which could be determined by the naked eye on a portable smartphone and a commercial fluorospectrometer. Under optimal conditions, the PAD-based sensing system enabled sensitive discrimination of target CEA against other biomarkers or proteins in a linear range of 0.05-20 ng mL-1 with a limit of detection of 6.7 pg mL-1 (ppt). In addition, our strategy displayed high specificity, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy for analyzing human serum specimens with a commercial human CEA ELISA kit. Importantly, this methodology offers promise for simple analysis of biological samples and is suitable for use in the mass production of miniaturized devices, thus opening new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  5. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP44 counteracts the DNA double-strand break response mediated by the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Lukas, Claudia; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Protein recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) relies on ubiquitylation of the surrounding chromatin by the RING finger ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168. Flux through this pathway is opposed by several deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), including OTUB1 and USP3. By analyzing the effect...... considerable functional redundancy among cellular DUBs that restrict ubiquitin-dependent protein assembly at DSBs. Our findings implicate USP44 in negative regulation of the RNF8/RNF168 pathway and illustrate the usefulness of DUB overexpression screens for identification of antagonizers of ubiquitin...

  6. Exogenous proline mediates alleviation of cadmium stress by promoting photosynthetic activity, water status and antioxidative enzymes activities of young date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari, M; Ben Ahmed, Ch; Zorrig, W; Elloumi, N; Rabhi, M; Delmail, D; Ben Rouina, B; Labrousse, P; Ben Abdallah, F

    2016-06-01

    The ability of exogenous compatible solutes, such as proline, to counteract cadmium (Cd) inhibitory effects in young date palm plants (Phoenix dactylifera L. cv Deglet Nour) was investigated. Two-year-old date palm plants were subjected for five months at different Cd stress levels (0, 10 and 30 mg CdCl2 kg(-1) soil) whether supplied or not with exogenous proline (20mM) added through the irrigation water. Different levels of Cd stress altered plant growth, gas exchanges and chlorophyll content as well as water status, but at different extent among them. In contrast, an increase of antioxidant enzymes activities of Cd-treated plants in association with high amounts of proline content, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage (EL) were observed. Interestingly, exogenous proline mitigated the adverse effects of Cd on young date palm. Indeed, it alleviated the oxidative damage induced by Cd accumulation and established better levels of plant growth, water status and photosynthetic activity. Moreover, proline-treated plants showed high antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxydase) in roots and leaves as compared to Cd-treated plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does the balanced scorecard support organizational viability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Beeres, R.J.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we assess whether the balanced scorecard (BSC) supports the necessary functions for organizational viability. To this purpose, we use the viable system model (VSM) as a means to describe the functions required for organizational viability. Then we use the VSM as a template to assess

  8. Pollen viability and membrane lipid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, van D.G.J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis membrane lipid composition is studied in relation to pollen viability during storage. Chapter 1 reviews pollen viability, membranes in the dry state and membrane changes associated with cellular aging. This chapter is followed by a study of age-related changes in phospholipid

  9. A partial exploration of the potential energy surfaces of SCN and HSCN: implications for the enzyme-mediated detoxification of cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zottola, Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Cyanide (CN) is considered to be a terrorist chemical weapon due to its ready availability in multi-kilogram quantities and multi-modal means of intoxication. The body uses the sulfur transferase enzyme rhodanese to detoxify cyanide via conversion of cyanide to thiocyanate. This paper explores the potential energy surfaces for the conversion of cyanide anion and hydrogen cyanide to thiocyanate anion and thiocyanic acid, respectively. The potential energy surface for the conversion of cyanide anion to thiocyanate shows that the formation of thiocyanate (SCN) is vastly preferred to formation of its isomer SNC. However, the potential energy surface for the conversion of hydrogen cyanide to thiocyanic acid reveals that the formation of HSCN and HNCS would be relatively equal. The failure for analytical methods to detect HNCS is rationalized by the observation that deprotonation of either HNCS or HSCN leads to the same thiocyanate anion.

  10. MAS-mediated antioxidant effects restore the functionality of angiotensin converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis in diabetic rat carotid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araujo; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species during type I-diabetes impairs carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis functionality, which accounts for the impaired carotid flow in diabetic rats. We also hypothesized that angiotensin-(1-7) chronic treatment of diabetic rats restores carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis functionality and carotid flow. Relaxant curves for angiotensin II or angiotensin-(1-7) were obtained in carotid from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Superoxide or hydrogen peroxide levels were measured by flow cytometry in carotid endothelial cells. Carotid flow was also determined. We found that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in diabetic rat carotid impairs ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis functionality, which reduces carotid flow. In this mechanism, hydrogen peroxide derived from superoxide dismutation inhibits ACE2 activity in generating angiotensin-(1-7) seemingly by activating I(Cl,SWELL0, while superoxide inhibits the nitrergic Mas-mediated vasorelaxation evoked by angiotensin-(1-7). Angiotensin-(1-7) treatment of diabetic rats restored carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis functionality by triggering a positive feedback played by endothelial Mas receptors, that blunts endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species. Mas-mediated antioxidant effects also restored diabetic rat carotid flow, pointing to the contribution of ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis in maintaining carotid flow.

  11. Effects of natural phytochemicals in Angelica sinensis (Danggui) on Nrf2-mediated gene expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes and anti-inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Wu, Qing; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Hu; Yang, Yinhua; Xu, Xiaoting; Huang, Ying; Khor, Tin Oo; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-09-01

    The root of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (abbreviated as AS) (Danggui) has a long history in Asian herbal medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that AS possesses anti-cancer and anti-oxidant activities. Because the transcription factor Nrf2 mediates the expression of many cellular anti-oxidative stress genes, including genes that are involved in phase II drug metabolism and anti-oxidative stress, this study sought to investigate whether pure compounds from AS or an AS extract could activate antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated gene expression and induce anti-inflammatory activities. Z-Ligustilide (Ligu), 3-butylidenephthalide (Buty) and CO2 supercritical fluid-extracted lipophilic AS extract (SFE) were tested in HepG2-C8 cells stabilized with ARE luciferase reporter gene. Ligu and Buty caused significant toxicity only at 100 μm. All three samples induced ARE-luciferase activity; however, SFE at 8.5 µg/ml induced ARE-luciferase activity 2-3 fold more potently than did either of the pure compounds. SFE also significantly increased the endogenous mRNA of Nrf2 and the Nrf2 target anti-oxidative gene NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1). The protein expression of NQO1 was also significantly induced by SFE. In RAW 264.7 cells, SFE suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-1β and TNF-α expression about 2 fold stronger than sulforaphane, whereas both pure compounds and SFE suppressed inflammatory nitric oxide (NO) production. In summary, this study demonstrates that AS has anti-inflammatory effects and activates the Nrf2 pathway, which protects against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, A M; Bernardi, L A; Christiansen, O B

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy loss prior to viability is common and research in the field is extensive. Unfortunately, terminology in the literature is inconsistent. The lack of consensus regarding nomenclature and classification of pregnancy loss prior to viability makes it difficult to compare study results from...... different centres. In our opinion, terminology and definitions should be based on clinical findings, and when possible, transvaginal ultrasound. With this Early Pregnancy Consensus Statement, it is our goal to provide clear and consistent terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability....

  13. The NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor pevonedistat activates the eIF2α and mTOR pathways inducing UPR-mediated cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Gilles M; Zheng, Shuhua; Leclerc, Guy J; DeSalvo, Joanna; Swords, Ronan T; Barredo, Julio C

    2016-11-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of cancer-related death in children, and cure rates for adults remain dismal. Further, effective treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory ALL remain elusive. We previously uncovered that ALL cells are prone to apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR)-mediated mechanisms. We investigated the antineoplastic activity of pevonedistat(®), a novel NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor that targets E3 cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) dependent proteasomal protein degradation, in ALL. Herein, we report that pevonedistat induces apoptosis in ALL cells by dysregulating the translational machinery leading to induction of proteotoxic/ER stress and UPR-mediated cell death. Mechanistically, pevonedistat led to P-eIF2a dephosphorylation causing atypical proteotoxic/ER stress from failure to halt protein translation via the UPR and upregulation of mTOR/p70S6K. Additional studies revealed that pevonedistat re-balanced the homeostasis of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins to favor cell death through altered expression and/or activity of Mcl-1, NOXA, and BIM, suggesting that pevonedistat has a "priming" effect on ALL by altering the apoptotic threshold through modulation of Mcl-1 activity. Further, we demonstrated that pevonedistat synergizes with selected anti-leukemic agents in vitro, and prolongs survival of NSG mice engrafted with ALL cells, lending support for the use of pevonedistat as part of a multi-agent approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-08

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Calcium-mediated conversion of sucrose to starch in relation to the activities of amylases and sucrose-metabolizing enzymes in sorghum grains raised through liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S; Singh, R

    2000-04-01

    Detached ears of sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were cultured in complete liquid medium containing Ca2+(0, 3, 10 and 30 mM) and effect of this ion on the conversion of sucrose to starch with respect to the activities of amylases, sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase and soluble invertases were studied in developing grains. Presence of 3 mM Ca2+ in culture medium enhanced both accumulation of starch and activity of alpha-amylase in grain but without having any influence on the activity of beta-amylase. However, with 10 and 30 mM Ca2+, the accumulation of starch and activities of both amylases decreased and with advancement in culturing period, starch accumulation was further decreased. Irrespective of its concentration, Ca2+ enhanced the activities of sucrose synthase (synthesis), sucrose-phosphate synthase, soluble acid invertase and soluble-neutral invertase. Increase in the concentration of Ca2+ in culture medium was concomitant with an elevation in relative proportion of sucrose in the grain reflecting a net balance in per cent increase with Ca2+ in the activities of sucrose-synthesizing enzymes over sucrose-hydrolysing ones. Based on the results, it is suggested that assimilation of Ca2+ by grain is essential for maintaining high activity of alpha-amylase to generate starch primers required for the conversion of sucrose to starch during grain filling in sorghum.

  16. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for urinary albumin using commercially available reagents is described. The assay range is 2.5-120 micrograms/l. When samples are analysed in two standard dilutions, the assayable albumin concentration range is 2.5-240 mg/l, covering the clinical range from...

  17. Food Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  18. Nitric oxide, afferent sensory nerves, and antioxidative enzymes in the mechanism of protection mediated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer and sodium hydrosulfide against aspirin-induced gastric damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Wojcik, Dagmara; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin exerts side effects within the gastrointestinal tract. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been implicated in gastroprotection but the mechanism of beneficial action of these gaseous mediators against aspirin-induced damage has not been fully studied. We determined the involvement of afferent sensory neurons, calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis in gastroprotection of H2S-releasing NaHS and CO-releasing tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer (CORM-2) against aspirin-induced injury. Wistar rats with or without capsaicin-induced denervation of sensory neurons were pretreated with vehicle, CORM-2 (5 mg/kg intragastrically), or NaHS (5 mg/kg intragastrically) with or without capsazepine (5 mg/kg intragastrically) or N G-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally). The areas of aspirin-induced lesions and gastric blood flow (GBF) were assessed by planimetry and laser flowmetry respectively. Gastric mucosal messenger RNA and/or protein expression of CGRP, heme oxygenase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, interleukin-1β, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1), and superoxide dismutase was determined by real-time PCR or Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) content was determined by colorimetric assay. Aspirin caused gastric lesions, decreased GBF, and raised MDA content, but pretreatment with NaHS and CORM-2 reduced these effects. Capsaicin-induced denervation or co-treatment with capsazepine reversed the gastroprotective and vasodilatory effects of NaHS but not those of CORM-2. L-NNA reversed NaHS-induced gastroprotection and partly reduced CORM-2-induced gastroprotection. NaHS and CORM-2 decreased MDA and 4-HNE content, restoring GPx-1 protein expression. We conclude that H2S- but not CO-mediated gastroprotection against aspirin-induced injury involves afferent sensory nerves and partly NO activity. NaHS and CORM-2 prevented

  19. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Le Roux

    Full Text Available Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively, the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number, and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species, though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification

  20. Enzyme-mediated formulation of stable elliptical silver nanoparticles tested against clinical pathogens and MDR bacteria and development of antimicrobial surgical thread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Rupak; Bhagat, Chintan; Shrestha, Pragya; Awal, Suvash; Dudhagara, Pravin

    2017-05-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are believed to be emerging tool against various infectious diseases including multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In the present study, in vitro synthesis of AgNPs was optimized using 1:50 ratio of macerozyme (25 μg/μl) and 1 mM AgNO3 incubated at 80 °C for 8 h. AgNPs were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Characterization studies suggest the synthesis of elliptical, stable and crystalline AgNPs with an average size of 38.26 ± 0.4 nm calculated using TEM. The XRD pattern revealed the face-centered-cubic (fcc) form of metallic silver. Good shape integrity and dispersion of AgNPs after 1 year of incubation confirmed their stability. AgNPs were exibited the antimicrobial property against ten pathogenic bacteria, three molds and one yeast. The AgNPs also revealed remarkable antimicrobial activity against three MDR strains i.e. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase positive Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Teicoplanin resistant Streptococcus Pneumoniae. The AgNPs coated surgical threads (suture) were revealed the remarkble antibacterial activity against three MDR strains. This is the first report to synthesize antimicrobial elliptical AgNPs using enzymes. The results suggest the possibilities to develop the nanoparticles coated antimicrobial medical fabric to combat against MDR infection.

  1. SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 mediates viral immediate-early protein SUMOylation in crayfish to facilitate reproduction of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host "arms race" and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses.

  2. Near viability for fully nonlinear differential inclusions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irina Căpraru; Alina Lazu

    2014-01-01

    .... We establish a viability result under Lipschitz hypothesis on F, that consists in proving the existence of solutions of the differential inclusion above, starting from a given set, which remain...

  3. Poxvirus viability and signatures in historical relics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCollum, Andrea M; Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly; Karem, Kevin L; Davidson, Whitni B; Paddock, Christopher D; Reynolds, Mary G; Damon, Inger K

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been >30 years since the eradication of smallpox, the unearthing of well-preserved tissue material in which the virus may reside has called into question the viability of variola virus decades or centuries...

  4. Intraspecific variation in pollen viability, germination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleaceae) cultivars 'Koroneiki', 'Mastoidis' and 'Kalamata' was studied with scanning electron microscopy to identify genotype- distinguishing characters that could be employed for morphological cultivar discrimination. Pollen viability and germination ...

  5. Probiotic viability – does it matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Sampo J. Lahtinen

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are viable by definition, and viability of probiotics is often considered to be a prerequisite for the health benefits. Indeed, the overwhelming majority of clinical studies in the field have been performed with viable probiotics. However, it has also been speculated that some of the mechanisms behind the probiotic health effects may not be dependent on the viability of the cells, and therefore is also possible that also nonviable probiotics could have some health benefits. The eff...

  6. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha L.) bark extract regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated enzyme expression via Nrf2 pathway activation in normal hepatocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Oszmiański, Jan; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2014-04-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha L.), a plant used in traditional medicine, is a rich source of procyanidins which have been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activity. In this study, we assessed the effect of hawthorn bark extract (HBE) on Nrf2 pathway activation in THLE-2 and HepG2 cells. Treatment with 1.1 µg/mL, 5.5 µg/mL and 11 µg/mL of HBE resulted in the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytosol to the nucleus in both cell lines; however, the accumulation of phosphorylated Nrf2 was observed only in THLE-2. Accordingly, treatment of cells with HBE was associated with an increase in the mRNA and protein level of such Nrf2-dependent genes as glutathione S-transferases (GSTA, GSTP, GSTM, GSTT), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) (0.2-1.1-fold change, p < 0.05), however, only in normal THLE-2 hepatocytes. The induction of NQO1 correlated with an increased level of p53 (0.21-0.42-fold change, p < 0.05). These effects may be related to induction of phosphorylation of upstream ERK and JNK kinases. Collectively, the results suggest that the Nrf2/ARE pathway may play an important role in the regulation of procyanidin-mediated antioxidant/detoxifying effects in hepatocytes, and this may explain the hepatoprotective and chemopreventive properties of these phytochemicals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1 mediates high fat diet-induced adiposity, endocrine profile, and gastrointestinal tract proliferation-associated biomarkers in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Dwairi

    Full Text Available Obesity and associated hormonal disturbances are risk factors for colon cancer. Cytosolic Malic Enzyme (ME1 generates NADPH used for lipogenesis in gastrointestinal (GI, liver and adipose tissues. We have reported that inclusion of soy protein isolate (SPI in the diet lowered body fat content and colon tumor incidence of rats fed AIN-93G diet, while others have demonstrated SPI inhibition of rat hepatic ME1 expression. The present study examined the individual and combined effects of dietary SPI and absence of ME1 on: 1 serum concentrations of hormones implicated in colon cancer development, 2 expression of lipogenic and proliferation-associated genes in the mouse colon and small intestine, and 3 liver and adipose expression of lipogenic and adipocytokine genes that may contribute to colon cancer predisposition.Weanling wild type (WT and ME1 null (MOD-1 male mice were fed high-fat (HF, iso-caloric diets containing either casein (CAS or SPI as sole protein source for 5 wks. Somatic growth, serum hormone and glucose levels, liver and adipose tissue weights, GI tissue parameters, and gene expression were evaluated.The MOD-1 genotype and SPI-HF diet resulted in decreases in: body and retroperitoneal fat weights, serum insulin, serum leptin, leptin/adiponectin ratio, adipocyte size, colon mTOR and cyclin D1 mRNA abundance, and jejunum FASN mRNA abundance, when compared to WT mice fed CAS-HF. Regardless of diet, MOD-1 mice had reductions in liver weight, liver steatosis, and colon crypt depth, and increases in adipose tissue expression of IRS1 and IRS2, compared to WT mice. SPI-HF diet reduced ME1 gene expression only in retroperitoneal fat.Data suggest that the pharmacological targeting of ME1 or the inclusion of soy protein in the diet may provide avenues to reduce obesity and its associated pro-tumorigenic endocrine environment and improve insulin sensitivity, potentially disrupting the obesity-colon cancer connection.

  9. Enzyme Nanorings

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; So, Christopher; White, Brian R.; Carlson, Jonathan C.T.; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Wagner, Carston

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated that nanostructures, and in particular nanorings incorporating a homodimeric enzyme, can be prepared by chemically induced self-assembly of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)-histidine triad nucleotide binding 1(Hint1) fusion proteins. The dimensions of the nanorings were found by static light scattering and atomic force microscopy studies to be dependent on the length and composition of the peptide linking the fusion proteins, ranging in size from 10 to 70 nm in diameter and...

  10. Electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized enzymes and redox polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skotheim, T.A.; Okamoto, Y.; Hale, P.D.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes an enzyme electrode for sensing the presence of at least one component of a mixture of components. It comprises: an enzyme, the catalytic activity of the enzyme being indicative of the component, a non-physiological electron transfer mediator between the enzyme and electron collector, and an electron collector.

  11. Inhibitors of membrane transport reduce lysosomal enzyme secretion from dogfish phagocytes and their killing of sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, P; Arvan, P; Falkow, S; Hoffstein, S; Weissmann, G

    1979-04-01

    Blood phagocytes of the dogfish Mustelus canis attack oocytes of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata, first provoking a surrogate fertilization response and then killing the eggs. To test the hypothesis that secretion of lysosomal contents is critical in this model of phagocyte-mediated cell injury, we studied effects of agents that modify lysosomal enzyme secretion. Inhibitors of membrane transport (>0.1 mM) inhibited postphagocytic secretion of lysosomal beta-glucuronidase from dogfish phagocytes: phloretin > ethacrynate > furosemide > 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid > pyridoxal phosphate > ouabain. The same order of activity was found for inhibition by these agents of killing of Arbacia eggs by phagocytes. Cell activation (fertilization response) and cytotoxicity were quantitated both morphologically and by measurements of enzyme (beta-glucuronidase, catalase) release. The agents neither inhibited fertilization responses of eggs to calcium ionophore A23187 nor impaired their viability. Vital staining demonstrated that ethacrynate prevented phagocytes from degranulating upon contact with zymosan particles. The data not only suggest that agents primarily known for their capacity to inhibit membrane transport systems can inhibit lysosomal enzyme secretion from phagocytes but also support the hypothesis that secretion of lysosomal contents mediates activation and killing of target cells in phagocyte-mediated tissue injury.

  12. The postmitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae after spaceflight showed higher viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed as an ideal model organism for clarifying the biological effects caused by spaceflight conditions. The postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells onboard Practice eight recoverable satellite were subjected to spaceflight for 15 days. After recovery, the viability, the glycogen content, the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, the DNA content and the lipid peroxidation level in yeast cells were analyzed. The viability of the postmitotic yeast cells after spaceflight showed a three-fold increase as compared with that of the ground control cells. Compared to the ground control cells, the lipid peroxidation level in the spaceflight yeast cells markedly decreased. The spaceflight yeast cells also showed an increase in G2/M cell population and a decrease in Sub-G1 cell population. The glycogen content and the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase significantly decreased in the yeast cells after spaceflight. In contrast, the activity of malate dehydrogenase showed an obvious increase after spaceflight. These results suggested that microgravity or spaceflight could promote the survival of postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells through regulating carbohydrate metabolism, ROS level and cell cycle progression.

  13. Viability analysis in biological evaluations: Concepts of population viability analysis, biological population, and ecological scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory D. Hayward; John R. Squires

    1994-01-01

    Environmental protection strategies often rely on environmental impact assessments. As part of the assessment process biologists are routinely asked to evaluate the effects of management actions on plants and animals. This evaluation often requires that biologists make judgments about the viability of affected populations. However, population viability...

  14. Effect of air drying on bacterial viability: A multiparameter viability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nocker, A.; Fernández, P.S.; Montijn, R.; Schuren, F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of desiccation on the viability of microorganisms is a question of great interest for a variety of public health questions and industrial applications. Although viability is traditionally assessed by plate counts, cultivation-independent methods are increasingly applied with the aim to

  15. Viability and Resilience of Languages in Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Laetitia; Castelló, Xavier; Bernard, Claire; Deffuant, Guillaume; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Martin, Sophie; Miguel, Maxi San

    2010-01-01

    We study the viability and resilience of languages, using a simple dynamical model of two languages in competition. Assuming that public action can modify the prestige of a language in order to avoid language extinction, we analyze two cases: (i) the prestige can only take two values, (ii) it can take any value but its change at each time step is bounded. In both cases, we determine the viability kernel, that is, the set of states for which there exists an action policy maintaining the coexistence of the two languages, and we define such policies. We also study the resilience of the languages and identify configurations from where the system can return to the viability kernel (finite resilience), or where one of the languages is lead to disappear (zero resilience). Within our current framework, the maintenance of a bilingual society is shown to be possible by introducing the prestige of a language as a control variable. PMID:20126655

  16. Probiotic viability – does it matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampo J. Lahtinen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are viable by definition, and viability of probiotics is often considered to be a prerequisite for the health benefits. Indeed, the overwhelming majority of clinical studies in the field have been performed with viable probiotics. However, it has also been speculated that some of the mechanisms behind the probiotic health effects may not be dependent on the viability of the cells and, therefore, is also possible that also non-viable probiotics could have some health benefits. The efficacy of non-viable probiotics has been assessed in a limited number of studies, with varying success. While it is clear that viable probiotics are more effective than non-viable probiotics and that, in many cases, viability is indeed a prerequisite for the health benefit, there are also some cases where it appears that non-viable probiotics could also have beneficial effects on human health.

  17. Industrial fungal enzymes: an occupational allergen perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brett J; Beezhold, Donald H

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes.

  18. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J. Green

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes.

  19. Activin Receptor Signaling Regulates Prostatic Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Simon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutational changes coupled with endocrine, paracrine, and/or autocrine signals regulate cell division during carcinogenesis. The hormone signals remain undefined, although the absolute requirement in vitro for fetal serum indicates the necessity for a fetal serum factor(s in cell proliferation. Using prostatic cancer cell (PCC lines as a model of cancer cell proliferation, we have identified the fetal serum component activin A and its signaling through the activin receptor type II (ActRII, as necessary, although not sufficient, for PCC proliferation. Activin A induced Smad2 phosphorylation and PCC proliferation, but only in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS. Conversely, activin A antibodies and inhibin A suppressed FBS-induced PCC proliferation confirming activin A as one of multiple serum components required for PCC proliferation. Basic fibroblast growth factor was subsequently shown to synergize activin A-induced PCC proliferation. Inhibition of ActRII signaling using a blocking antibody or antisense-P decreased mature ActRII expression, Smad2 phosphorylation, and the apparent viability of PCCs and neuroblastoma cells grown in FBS. Suppression of ActRII signaling in PCC and neuroblastoma cells did not induce apoptosis as indicated by the ratio of active/inactive caspase 3 but did correlate with increased cell detachment and ADAM-15 expression, a disintegrin whose expression is strongly correlated with prostatic metastasis. These findings indicate that ActRII signaling is required for PCC and neuroblastoma cell viability, with ActRII mediating cell fate via the regulation of cell adhesion. That ActRII signaling governs both cell viability and cell adhesion has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to regulate cancer growth and metastasis.

  20. Economic Viability and Marketing Strategies of Periwinkle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The economic viability and marketing strategies of periwinkle species in twelve major markets across Rivers State Nigeria were investigated using structured questionnaires. The results indicated that marketing strategies are enroute, through harvesters (collectors), to wholesalers (those who purchase in small quantities ...

  1. Extending the viability of sea urchin gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegler, M A; Oppenheimer, S B

    1995-04-01

    The sea urchin is the material of choice for studying many early developmental events. Methods to extend the viability of sea urchin gametes have not received much attention, but it is well known that the eggs are easily damaged by freezing. This study was designed to extend the viability of Lytechinus pictus eggs and sperm without freezing. Gamete viability measurements were based on relative numbers of fertilized vs unfertilized eggs, percentage fertilization, and on observations of embryonic development. Results indicate that gametes can be stored longer and at lower temperatures than previously described. Sperm were consistently kept viable for at least 12 days with little decrease in viability when stored in glass test tubes or plastic petri dishes and submerged in ice inside a refrigerator at 0 +/- 1 degree C. In one experiment, sperm stored in glass test tubes on ice remained viable up to 20 days after extraction. Eggs were maintained from 1 to 7 days, rather than the 1 day or so previously reported, when stored in glass test tubes submerged in ice in a refrigerator at 0 +/- 1 degree C. Results of egg and sperm experiments varied at different times in the season. Such variations may be caused by seasonal cytoplasmic changes, population differences, or the time mature individuals were maintained unfed in aquaria prior to use. Results from this study should be useful for a variety of research, mariculture, and teaching applications in which sea urchin supplies are limited or when the same gamete population is required for subsequent experiments.

  2. Incorporating evolutionary processes into population viability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierson, J.C.; Beissinger, S.R.; Bragg, J.G.; Coates, D.J.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Sunnucks, P.; Schumaker, N.H.; Trotter, M.V.; Young, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined how ecological and evolutionary (eco-evo) processes in population dynamics could be better integrated into population viability analysis (PVA). Complementary advances in computation and population genomics can be combined into an eco-evo PVA to offer powerful new approaches to understand

  3. Assessment of myocardial viability using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seok Nam [College of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    The potential for recovery of left ventricular dysfunction after myocardial revascularization represents a practical clinical definition for myocardial viability. The evaluation of viable myocardium in patients with severe global left ventricular dysfunction due to coronary artery disease and with regional dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction is an important issue whether left ventricular dysfunction may be reversible or irreversible after therapy. If the dysfunction is due to stunning or hibernation, functional improvement is observed. But stunned myocardium may recover of dysfunction with no revascularization. Hibernation is chronic process due to chronic reduction in the resting myocardial blood flow. There are two types of myocardial hibernation; 'functional hibernation' with preserved contractile reserve and 'structural hibernation' without contractile reserve in segments with preserved glucose metabolism. This review focus on the application of F-18 FDG and other radionuclides to evaluate myocardial viability. In addition the factors influencing predictive value of FDG imaging for evaluating viability and the different criteria for viability are also reviewed.

  4. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  5. Viability of smallholder dairying in Wedza, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvinorova, Plaxedis Ivy; Halimani, Tinyiko Edward; Mano, Renneth T; Ngongoni, Nobbert Takarwirwa

    2013-04-01

    Viability differences in smallholder dairy farming are a result of differences in access to markets and services. It is hypothesized that innovations that improve productivity and market linkages also improve returns and viability. The viability of smallholder dairying in Wedza was characterised by interviewing 52 households using semi-structured questionnaires. Information on demographics, production, marketing, livestock numbers, assets and constraints was obtained. Farmers were resource-constrained with differences in access to resources. The highly resourced farmers had higher milk output and numbers of livestock. Almost 40 % of the households were female-headed, and these dominated the poor category. Household sizes ranged from 4 to 13 persons. Milk off-take was low (3.7 ± 0.53 l/cow/day), due to various constraints. Only rich farmers had viable enterprises in purely financial terms. Per litre cost of milk was more than selling price (US$0.96) for most farmers except the relatively rich. Operating ratios were 1.7, 0.6, 1.4 and 1.1 for the poor, rich, sub-centre and milk collection centre farmers, respectively. This means incomes from the dairy activities did not cover costs. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increases in total variable costs and labour reduced returns. Milk production and viability were influenced by access to resources and markets.

  6. Pollen viability in Quercus robur L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batos Branislava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The variability of viability (germination rate and the length of pollen tubes of fresh pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L. pollen grains was studied in vitro on a medium containing 15% sucrose. Spatial variability was studied by sampling fresh pollen grains from a total of thirteen trees at four different sites in the area of Belgrade (Košutnjak, Banovo Brdo, Ada Ciganlija and Bojčin Forest in a single year (2011. In order to assess temporal variability and determine the effects of climate change on a small time scale, we studied the viability of the pollen grains collected from one tree at the Banovo Brdo site in six different years (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2011 and 2012. Interindividual variability was tested on the pollen grains sampled from eight trees at Ada Ciganlija in 2004. The percentage values of the pollen grain germination rate and the pollen tube length showed no statistically significant differences between the sites. However, the studied characteristics of the pollen grain viability (germination rate and pollen tube length showed statistically significant differences in both temporal (between the pollen collection years and interindividual variability. This type of research makes a valuable contribution to pedunculate oak breeding programs through the identification of trees with stable production and a good quality of pollen. Furthermore, it can be important in defining the patterns of spatial, temporal and individual variability of pollen grain viability under the influence of climate factors, which are showing compelling changing trends from year to year.

  7. Cosmological viability of theories with massive spin-2 fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koennig, Frank

    2017-03-30

    Theories of spin-2 fields take on a particular role in modern physics. They do not only describe the mediation of gravity, the only theory of fundamental interactions of which no quantum field theoretical description exists, it furthermore was thought that they necessarily predict massless gauge bosons. Just recently, a consistent theory of a massive graviton was constructed and, subsequently, generalized to a bimetric theory of two interacting spin-2 fields. This thesis studies both the viability and consequences at cosmological scales in massive gravity as well as bimetric theories. We show that all consistent models that are free of gradient and ghost instabilities behave like the cosmological standard model, LCDM. In addition, we construct a new theory of massive gravity which is stable at both classical background and quantum level, even though it suffers from the Boulware-Deser ghost.

  8. Ponatinib reduces viability, migration, and functionality of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover-Proaktor, Ayala; Granot, Galit; Shapira, Saar; Raz, Oshrat; Pasvolsky, Oren; Nagler, Arnon; Lev, Dorit L; Inbal, Aida; Lubin, Ido; Raanani, Pia; Leader, Avi

    2017-06-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have revolutionized the prognosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. With the advent of highly efficacious therapy, the focus has shifted toward managing TKI adverse effects, such as vascular adverse events (VAEs). We used an in vitro angiogenesis model to investigate the TKI-associated VAEs. Our data show that imatinib, nilotinib, and ponatinib reduce human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) viability. Pharmacological concentrations of ponatinib induced apoptosis, reduced migration, inhibited tube formation of HUVECs, and had a negative effect on endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) function. Furthermore, in HUVECs transfected with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), the effect of ponatinib on tube formation and on all parameters representing normal endothelial cell function was less prominent than in control cells. This is the first report regarding the pathogenesis of ponatinib-associated VAEs. The antiangiogenic effect of ponatinib, possibly mediated by VEGFR2 inhibition, as shown in our study, is another piece in the intricate puzzle of TKI-associated VAEs.

  9. Enzyme-mediated hydrolytic activation of prodrugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yan-hui Yang; Herve Aloysius; Daigo Inoyama; Yu Chen; Long-qin Hu

    2011-01-01

    Prodrug design is an important part of drug discovery. Prodrugs can offer many advantages over parent drugs such as increased solubility, enhanced stability, improved bioavailability, reduced side effects, and better selectivity...

  10. No. 347-Obstetric Management at Borderline Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Noor Niyar N; Chari, Radha S; Dunn, Michael S; Jones, Griffith; Shah, Prakesh; Barrett, Jon F R

    2017-09-01

    The primary objective of this guideline was to develop consensus statements to guide clinical practice and recommendations for obstetric management of a pregnancy at borderline viability, currently defined as prior to 25+6 weeks. Clinicians involved in the obstetric management of women whose fetus is at the borderline of viability. Women presenting for possible birth at borderline viability. This document presents a summary of the literature and a general consensus on the management of pregnancies at borderline viability, including maternal transfer and consultation, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate, fetal heart rate monitoring, and considerations in mode of delivery. Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched using the following keywords: extreme prematurity, borderline viability, preterm, pregnancy, antenatal corticosteroids, mode of delivery. The results were then studied, and relevant articles were reviewed. The references of the reviewed studies were also searched, as were documents citing pertinent studies. The evidence was then presented at a consensus meeting, and statements were developed. The content and recommendations were developed by the consensus group from the fields of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Neonatology, Perinatal Nursing, Patient Advocacy, and Ethics. The quality of evidence was rated using criteria described in the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology framework (reference 1). The Board of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada approved the final draft for publication. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology framework. The interpretation of strong and weak recommendations is described later. The Summary of Findings is available upon request. A multidisciplinary approach should be used in counselling women and families at borderline

  11. Viability of encapsulated Lactobacillus sp. Mar 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVI TRIANA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus sp. Mar 8 had advantages as probiotic digestive system cholesterol lowering Lactobacillus. Applying in industry, particular processing technique is necessary for gaining product that ready for marketing and consuming. Spray drying is common technique using in various food processing. High processing temperature, 100-200oC, for 3-10 second become the barrier because cells were under extreme temperature stress. Therefore, encapsulate was needed to protect the cells from those extreme conditions. Viability and survival rate of encapsulated Lactobacillus sp. Mar 8 have been investigated. The result showed that Lactobacillus sp. Mar 8 that was encapsulated by 10% skim milk has higher viability than those by 5% skim milk, namely 72.37% and 51.69% respectively. Survival rate of encapsulated Lactobacillus cells will come to zero in 41.28 years. Therefore, encapsulated Lactobacillus sp. Mar 8 may use as probiotic agent.

  12. Mechanism of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress regulating viability and biocontrol ability of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-01-16

    The use of antagonistic yeasts to control postharvest pathogens is a promising alternative to fungicides. The effectiveness of the antagonists against fungal pathogens is greatly dependent on their viability, which is usually mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effects of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress on the viability and biocontrol efficacy of Rhodotorula glutinis and, using flow cytometric analysis, observed the changes of ROS accumulation and apoptosis in the yeast cells with or without H₂O₂ treatment. We found that the viability of R. glutinis decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner under H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress. Compared to the control, yeast cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited more accumulation of ROS and higher levels of protein oxidative damage, but showed lower efficacy for biocontrol of Penicillium expansum causing blue mold rot on peach fruit. The results indicate that apoptosis is a main cause of the cell viability loss in R. glutinis, which is attributed to ROS accumulation under oxidative stress. These findings offer a plausible explanation that oxidative stress affects biocontrol efficacy of R. glutinis via regulating its viability and cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability: systemic training adaptations versus acute exercise responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie; Andersen, Christina; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-10-01

    Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p cancer cell viability in vitro. During 2 h of acute exercise, increases in serum lactate (6-fold, p exercise reduced viability by -9.2 % in MCF-7 (p = 0.04) and -9.4 % in MDA-MB-231 (p exercise session reduced breast cancer viability, while adaptations to 6 months of training had no impact. Our data question the prevailing dogma that training-dependent baseline reductions in risk factors mediate the protective effect of exercise on breast cancer. Instead, we propose that the cancer protection is driven by accumulative effects of repeated acute exercise responses.

  14. Production of cell wall enzymes in pepper seedlings, inoculated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pepper seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal AM fungus, Glomus etunicatum, produced cellulase, polygal-acturonase and pectin methylestrase enzymes. The activities of the enzymes increased as the pepper seedlings matured in age, showing that the activity of the enzymes in the seedlings was age mediated.

  15. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted by that enzyme......Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  16. Methanol dehydrogenase biofuel cells and enzyme-based electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes the linking of enzymes to electrodes and their application in biofuel cells and as analytical devices. Methanol dehydrogenase, an NAD independent enzyme was purified by two phase aqueous partition. The enzyme incorporated into a biofuel cell was capable of producing a current in the presence of either a soluble or insoluble mediator. Optimisation of the current was carried out and a variety of alternative membranes, mediators and electrodes were investigated for possi...

  17. Fluorescent antibody-viability staining and beta-glucuronidase assay as rapid methods for monitoring Escherichia coli viability in coastal marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, G; De Pasquale, F; Mancuso, M; Zampino, D; Crisafi, E

    2006-01-01

    A faecal pollution monitoring of coastal Messina waters was performed by comparing three (microscopic, enzyme, and culture) methods. Evidence of Escherichia coli cells (29.99 to 96.79% of the total enteropathogenic serotypes) retaining their viability into the marine environment was shown. beta-Glucuronidase activity rates suggested that living cells were also metabolically active. Heavily polluted sites were detected, where improperly treated urban wastes were discharged. Significant relationships between microscopic and enzymatic data proved both methods to be suitable alternatives to the culture method for E. coli detection, improving environmental quality assessment.

  18. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  19. Rapid onsite assessment of spore viability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Gaucher, Sara P.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2005-12-01

    This one year LDRD addresses problems of threat assessment and restoration of facilities following a bioterror incident like the incident that closed down mail facilities in late 2001. Facilities that are contaminated with pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis spores must be shut down while they are treated with a sporicidal agent and the effectiveness of the treatment is ascertained. This process involves measuring the viability of spore test strips, laid out in a grid throughout the facility; the CDC accepted methodologies require transporting the samples to a laboratory and carrying out a 48 hr outgrowth experiment. We proposed developing a technique that will ultimately lead to a fieldable microfluidic device that can rapidly assess (ideally less than 30 min) spore viability and effectiveness of sporicidal treatment, returning facilities to use in hours not days. The proposed method will determine viability of spores by detecting early protein synthesis after chemical germination. During this year, we established the feasibility of this approach and gathered preliminary results that should fuel a future more comprehensive effort. Such a proposal is currently under review with the NIH. Proteomic signatures of Bacillus spores and vegetative cells were assessed by both slab gel electrophoresis as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection. The conditions for germination using a number of chemical germinants were evaluated and optimized and the time course of protein synthesis was ascertained. Microseparations were carried out using both viable spores and spores inactivated by two different methods. A select number of the early synthesis proteins were digested into peptides for analysis by mass spectrometry.

  20. Viability of pollen grains of tetraploid banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliane Leila Soares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Obtaining banana tetraploid cultivars from triploid strains results in total or partial reestablishment of fertility, allowing the occurrence of some fruits with seeds, a feature that is undesirable from a marketing perspective. The objective of this study was to assess the viability of pollen of 12 banana tetraploid hybrids (AAAB by means of in vitro germination and two histochemical tests (acetocarmine and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The pollen tube growth was evaluated by germinating grains in three culture media — M1: 0.03% Ca(NO3∙4H2O, 0.02% Mg(SO4∙7H2O, 0.01% KNO3, 0.01% H3BO3 and 15% sucrose; M2: 0.03% Ca(NO3∙4H2O, 0.01% KNO3, 0.01% H3BO3 and 10% sucrose; and M3: 0.015% H3BO3, 0.045% Ca3(PO42 and 25% sucrose. The acetocarmine staining indicated high viability (above 80%, except for the genotypes YB42-17 and Caprichosa, which were 76 and 70%, respectively. However, the in vitro germination rate was lower than 50% for all the genotypes, except for the hybrids YB42-17 (M1 and YB42-47 (M1. The medium M1 provided the greatest germination percentage and pollen tube growth. Among the genotypes assessed, YB42-47 presented the highest germination rate (61.5% and tube length (5.0 mm. On the other hand, the Vitória cultivar had the lowest germination percentage (8.2% in medium M1. Studies of meiosis can shed more light on the differences observed in the evaluated tetraploids, since meiotic irregularities can affect pollen viability.

  1. Viability, Apoptosis, Proliferation, Activation, and Cytokine Secretion of Human Keratoconus Keratocytes after Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of cross-linking (CXL on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, activation, and cytokine secretion of human keratoconus (KC keratocytes, in vitro. Methods. Primary KC keratocytes were cultured in DMEM/Ham’s F12 medium supplemented with 10% FCS and underwent UVA illumination (370 nm, 2 J/cm2 during exposure to 0.1% riboflavin and 20% Dextran in PBS. Twenty-four hours after CXL, viability was assessed using Alamar blue assay; apoptosis using APO-DIRECT Kit; proliferation using ELISA-BrdU kit; and CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression using flow cytometry. Five and 24 hours after CXL, FGFb, HGF, TGFβ1, VEGF, KGF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was measured using enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA. Results. Following CXL, cell viability and proliferation decreased (P0.06. Five hours after CXL, FGFb secretion increased significantly (P=0.037; however no other cytokine secretion differed significantly from controls after 5 or 24 hours (P>0.12. Conclusions. Cross-linking decreases viability, triggers apoptosis, and inhibits proliferation, without an impact on multipotent hematopoietic stem cell transformation and myofibroblastic transformation of KC keratocytes. CXL triggers FGFb secretion of KC keratocytes transiently (5 hours, normalizing after 24 hours.

  2. Viability, apoptosis, proliferation, activation, and cytokine secretion of human keratoconus keratocytes after cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuefei; Stachon, Tanja; Wang, Jiong; Langenbucher, Achim; Seitz, Berthold; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of cross-linking (CXL) on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, activation, and cytokine secretion of human keratoconus (KC) keratocytes, in vitro. Primary KC keratocytes were cultured in DMEM/Ham's F12 medium supplemented with 10% FCS and underwent UVA illumination (370 nm, 2 J/cm(2)) during exposure to 0.1% riboflavin and 20% Dextran in PBS. Twenty-four hours after CXL, viability was assessed using Alamar blue assay; apoptosis using APO-DIRECT Kit; proliferation using ELISA-BrdU kit; and CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression using flow cytometry. Five and 24 hours after CXL, FGFb, HGF, TGFβ1, VEGF, KGF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was measured using enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Following CXL, cell viability and proliferation decreased (P 0.06). Five hours after CXL, FGFb secretion increased significantly (P = 0.037); however no other cytokine secretion differed significantly from controls after 5 or 24 hours (P > 0.12). Cross-linking decreases viability, triggers apoptosis, and inhibits proliferation, without an impact on multipotent hematopoietic stem cell transformation and myofibroblastic transformation of KC keratocytes. CXL triggers FGFb secretion of KC keratocytes transiently (5 hours), normalizing after 24 hours.

  3. Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

    1999-04-12

    Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

  4. VIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS AND PHYSIOLOGICAL BEHAVIORS IN CABBAGE SEEDS IN DEPENDS ON STAGE OF MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Panayotov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purposes of the present study were to establish the changes during different stage of maturity and development of cabbage seed as well as earliest behaviors of viability and harvesting data. The experiments were carried out with two typical Bulgarian cultivars Balkan and Ditmarsko ranno. Samples of seeds in different days after fl owering – 30, 40, 50 and 60 days were analyzed. The physiological parameters and viability and vigor were investigated. The weight of one seeds was highest between 40 and 50 days. The primary germination was observed in seed harvested in 30 days, but the stability one was registered on 60 day. The intensity of respiration and activity of enzyme peroxides changed during seed development and maturity.

  5. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  6. Industrial enzyme applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ole; Borchert, Torben Vedel; Fuglsang, Claus Crone

    2002-08-01

    The effective catalytic properties of enzymes have already promoted their introduction into several industrial products and processes. Recent developments in biotechnology, particularly in areas such as protein engineering and directed evolution, have provided important tools for the efficient development of new enzymes. This has resulted in the development of enzymes with improved properties for established technical applications and in the production of new enzymes tailor-made for entirely new areas of application where enzymes have not previously been used.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yanxi [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); College of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Cao, Qiuhui [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Wu, Lingyun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Yang, Guangdong, E-mail: gyang@lakeheadu.ca [The School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  8. Artificial evolution by viability rather than competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    Full Text Available Evolutionary algorithms are widespread heuristic methods inspired by natural evolution to solve difficult problems for which analytical approaches are not suitable. In many domains experimenters are not only interested in discovering optimal solutions, but also in finding the largest number of different solutions satisfying minimal requirements. However, the formulation of an effective performance measure describing these requirements, also known as fitness function, represents a major challenge. The difficulty of combining and weighting multiple problem objectives and constraints of possibly varying nature and scale into a single fitness function often leads to unsatisfactory solutions. Furthermore, selective reproduction of the fittest solutions, which is inspired by competition-based selection in nature, leads to loss of diversity within the evolving population and premature convergence of the algorithm, hindering the discovery of many different solutions. Here we present an alternative abstraction of artificial evolution, which does not require the formulation of a composite fitness function. Inspired from viability theory in dynamical systems, natural evolution and ethology, the proposed method puts emphasis on the elimination of individuals that do not meet a set of changing criteria, which are defined on the problem objectives and constraints. Experimental results show that the proposed method maintains higher diversity in the evolving population and generates more unique solutions when compared to classical competition-based evolutionary algorithms. Our findings suggest that incorporating viability principles into evolutionary algorithms can significantly improve the applicability and effectiveness of evolutionary methods to numerous complex problems of science and engineering, ranging from protein structure prediction to aircraft wing design.

  9. The relationship between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samplaski, Mary K; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Mullen, Brendan; Garbens, Alaina; Jarvi, Keith A

    2015-05-14

    In humans, sperm DNA fragmentation rates have been correlated with sperm viability rates. Reduced sperm viability is associated with high sperm DNA fragmentation, while conversely high sperm viability is associated with low rates of sperm DNA fragmentation. Both elevated DNA fragmentation rates and poor viability are correlated with impaired male fertility, with a DNA fragmentation rate of >30% indicating subfertility. We postulated that in some men, the sperm viability assay could predict the sperm DNA fragmentation rates. This in turn could reduce the need for sperm DNA fragmentation assay testing, simplifying the infertility investigation and saving money for infertile couples. All men having semen analyses with both viability and DNA fragmentation testing were identified via a prospectively collected database. Viability was measured by eosin-nigrosin assay. DNA fragmentation was measured using the sperm chromosome structure assay. The relationship between DNA fragmentation and viability was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. From 2008-2013, 3049 semen analyses had both viability and DNA fragmentation testing. A strong inverse relationship was seen between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates, with r=-0.83. If viability was ≤50% (n=301) then DNA fragmentation was ≥ 30% for 95% of the samples. If viability was ≥75% (n=1736), then the DNA fragmentation was ≤30% for 95% of the patients. Sperm viability correlates strongly with DNA fragmentation rates. In men with high levels of sperm viability≥75%, or low levels of sperm viability≤ 30%, DFI testing may be not be routinely necessary. Given that DNA fragmentation testing is substantially more expensive than vitality testing, this may represent a valuable cost-saving measure for couples undergoing a fertility evaluation.

  10. Determination of the efficient enzyme concentration for lytic digestion of vegetative cells but not spores in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miroslava; Alica; Anna

    2017-01-01

    The fact that lytic enzymes such as b-glucuronidase are capable of cell wall lysis, while the integrity of the spore is not affected, is used in the spore viability tests to investigate meiotic processes...

  11. Acetaldehyde-Mediated Neurotoxicity: Relevance to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Tong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol-induced neuro-developmental abnormalities are associated with impaired insulin and IGF signaling, and increased oxidative stress in CNS neurons. We examined the roles of ethanol and its principal toxic metabolite, acetaldehyde, as mediators of impaired insulin/IGF signaling and oxidative injury in immature cerebellar neurons. Cultures were exposed to 3.5 mM acetaldehyde or 50 mM ethanol ± 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP, an inhibitor of ethanol metabolism, and viability, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and insulin responsiveness were measured 48 hours later. Acetaldehyde or ethanol increased neuronal death and levels of 8-OHdG and 4-HNE, and reduced mitochondrial function. Ethanol inhibited insulin responsiveness, whereas acetaldehyde did not. 4-MP abated ethanol-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, but failed to restore insulin responsiveness. Furthermore, alcohol and aldehyde metabolizing enzyme genes were inhibited by prenatal ethanol exposure; this effect was mediated by acetaldehyde and not ethanol + 4MP. These findings suggest that brain insulin resistance in prenatal alcohol exposure is caused by direct effects of ethanol, whereas oxidative stress induced neuronal injury is likely mediated by ethanol and its toxic metabolites. Moreover, the adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on brain development may be exacerbated by down-regulation of genes needed for metabolism and detoxification of alcohol in the brain.

  12. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Mao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and field-effect transistor (FET measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  13. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  14. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of a specific MMP-9 mediated degradation fragment of type III collagen--A novel biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Larsen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of collagen in the arterial wall by matrix metalloproteinases is the hallmark of atherosclerosis. We have developed an ELISA for the quantification of type III collagen degradation mediated by MMP-9 in urine....

  15. Glycosylation is an Androgen-Regulated Process Essential for Prostate Cancer Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Munkley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid androgen hormones play a key role in the progression and treatment of prostate cancer, with androgen deprivation therapy being the first-line treatment used to control cancer growth. Here we apply a novel search strategy to identify androgen-regulated cellular pathways that may be clinically important in prostate cancer. Using RNASeq data, we searched for genes that showed reciprocal changes in expression in response to acute androgen stimulation in culture, and androgen deprivation in patients with prostate cancer. Amongst 700 genes displaying reciprocal expression patterns we observed a significant enrichment in the cellular process glycosylation. Of 31 reciprocally-regulated glycosylation enzymes, a set of 8 (GALNT7, ST6GalNAc1, GCNT1, UAP1, PGM3, CSGALNACT1, ST6GAL1 and EDEM3 were significantly up-regulated in clinical prostate carcinoma. Androgen exposure stimulated synthesis of glycan structures downstream of this core set of regulated enzymes including sialyl-Tn (sTn, sialyl LewisX (SLeX, O-GlcNAc and chondroitin sulphate, suggesting androgen regulation of the core set of enzymes controls key steps in glycan synthesis. Expression of each of these enzymes also contributed to prostate cancer cell viability. This study identifies glycosylation as a global target for androgen control, and suggests loss of specific glycosylation enzymes might contribute to tumour regression following androgen depletion therapy.

  16. Selected soil enzyme activities in an oak-hickory forest following long-term prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. R. Bayan; F. Eivazi

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical reactions within the soil are mediated by soil flora and fauna, and are catalyzed by enzymes. Therefore, enzymes play a significant role in nutrient cycling. Enzymes are specific for the type of chemical reactions in which they participate. Arylsulfatase is the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of an arylsulfate anion by fission of the oxygen-sulfur...

  17. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    a number of interesting results, it has some potential pitfalls that have rarely been discussed. In the present paper, I review the major findings of ecology and evolution studies employing sperm viability staining and outline the method's principle limitations. The key problem is that the viability assay......The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced...

  18. Assessing the Viability of Tiger Subpopulations in a Fragmented Landscape

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew Linkie; Guillaume Chapron; Deborah J. Martyr; Jeremy Holden; Nigel Leader-Williams

    2006-01-01

    .... This study aimed to provide such information for tigers in the Kerinci Seblat (KS) region, Sumatra, by identifying and assessing subpopulation viability under different management strategies. 2...

  19. Fault Detection and Isolation using Viability Theory and Interval Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaniee Zarch, Majid; Puig, Vicenç; Poshtan, Javad

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of interval observers and viability theory in fault detection and isolation (FDI). Viability theory develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty. These methods can be used for checking the consistency between observed and predicted behavior by using simple sets that approximate the exact set of possible behavior (in the parameter or state space). In this paper, fault detection is based on checking for an inconsistency between the measured and predicted behaviors using viability theory concepts and sets. Finally, an example is provided in order to show the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  20. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of storage conditions on the viability of enteropathogenics bacteria in biobanking of human stools: Cases of Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae O: 1.

  1. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Christ; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal; Limpaitoon, Tanachai; Phan, Trucy; Megel, Olivier; Chang, Jessica; DeForest, Nicholas

    2010-10-11

    Non-residential sectors offer many promising applications for electrical storage (batteries) and photovoltaics (PVs). However, choosing and operating storage under complex tariff structures poses a daunting technical and economic problem that may discourage potential customers and result in lost carbon and economic savings. Equipment vendors are unlikely to provide adequate environmental analysis or unbiased economic results to potential clients, and are even less likely to completely describe the robustness of choices in the face of changing fuel prices and tariffs. Given these considerations, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have designed the Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service (SVOW): a tool that helps building owners, operators and managers to decide if storage technologies and PVs merit deeper analysis. SVOW is an open access, web-based energy storage and PV analysis calculator, accessible by secure remote login. Upon first login, the user sees an overview of the parameters: load profile, tariff, technologies, and solar radiation location. Each parameter has a pull-down list of possible predefined inputs and users may upload their own as necessary. Since the non-residential sectors encompass a broad range of facilities with fundamentally different characteristics, the tool starts by asking the users to select a load profile from a limited cohort group of example facilities. The example facilities are categorized according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. After the load profile selection, users select a predefined tariff or use the widget to create their own. The technologies and solar radiation menus operate in a similar fashion. After these four parameters have been inputted, the users have to select an optimization setting as well as an optimization objective. The analytic engine of SVOW is LBNL?s Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed

  2. Comparative studies of cellular viability levels on 2D and 3D in vitro culture matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargotti, M; Lopez-Gonzalez, U; Byrne, H J; Casey, A

    2017-09-18

    In this study, the cellular viability and function of immortalized human cervical and dermal cells are monitored and compared in conventional 2D and two commercial 3D membranes, Collagen and Geltrex, of varying working concentration and volume. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay, cellular morphology was monitored with confocal microscopy, and cell cycle studies and cell death mechanism studies were performed with flow cytometry. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to 3D environment causing alterations to effective resazurin concentration, uptake and conversion rates, which was dependent on exposure time, but also due to the effect of the membrane itself on cellular function. These effects were verified by flow cytometry, in which no significant differences in viable cell numbers between 2D and 3D systems were observed after 24 h culture. The results showed the observed effect was different after shorter exposure periods, was also dependent on working concentration of the 3D system and could be mediated by altering the culture vessel size. Cell cycle analysis revealed cellular function could be altered by growth on the 3D substrates and the alterations were noted to be dependent on 3D membrane concentration. The use of 3D culture matrices has been widely interpreted to result in "improved viability levels" or "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" compared to cells cultured on traditional 2D systems. The results of this study show that cellular health and viability levels are not altered by culture in 3D environments, but their normal cycle can be altered as indicated in the cell cycle studies performed and such variations must be accounted for in studies employing 3D membranes for in vitro cellular screening.

  3. Microbial enzyme activities of peatland soils in south central Alaska lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial enzyme activities related to carbon and nutrient acquisition were measured on Alaskan peatland soils as indicators of nutrient limitation and biochemical sustainability. Peat decomposition is mediated by microorganisms and enzymes that in turn are limited by various ph...

  4. Incorporating evolutionary processes into population viability models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Jennifer C; Beissinger, Steven R; Bragg, Jason G; Coates, David J; Oostermeijer, J Gerard B; Sunnucks, Paul; Schumaker, Nathan H; Trotter, Meredith V; Young, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    We examined how ecological and evolutionary (eco-evo) processes in population dynamics could be better integrated into population viability analysis (PVA). Complementary advances in computation and population genomics can be combined into an eco-evo PVA to offer powerful new approaches to understand the influence of evolutionary processes on population persistence. We developed the mechanistic basis of an eco-evo PVA using individual-based models with individual-level genotype tracking and dynamic genotype-phenotype mapping to model emergent population-level effects, such as local adaptation and genetic rescue. We then outline how genomics can allow or improve parameter estimation for PVA models by providing genotypic information at large numbers of loci for neutral and functional genome regions. As climate change and other threatening processes increase in rate and scale, eco-evo PVAs will become essential research tools to evaluate the effects of adaptive potential, evolutionary rescue, and locally adapted traits on persistence. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Mycolic Acid Cyclopropanation is Essential for Viability, Drug Resistance, and Cell Wall Integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Daniel; Liu, Zhen; Sacchettini, James C.; Glickman, Michael S.; (MSKCC); (TAM)

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains a major global health problem complicated by escalating rates of antibiotic resistance. Despite the established role of mycolic acid cyclopropane modification in pathogenesis, the feasibility of targeting this enzyme family for antibiotic development is unknown. We show through genetics and chemical biology that mycolic acid methyltransferases are essential for M. tuberculosis viability, cell wall structure, and intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. The tool compound dioctylamine, which we show acts as a substrate mimic, directly inhibits the function of multiple mycolic acid methyltransferases, resulting in loss of cyclopropanation, cell death, loss of acid fastness, and synergistic killing with isoniazid and ciprofloxacin. These results demonstrate that mycolic acid methyltransferases are a promising antibiotic target and that a family of virulence factors can be chemically inhibited with effects not anticipated from studies of each individual enzyme.

  6. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  7. 3D multicellular models reflect the efficiency of MSC-directed enzyme/prodrug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohovic, R; Demkova, L; Cihova, M; Skolekova, S; Durinikova, E; Toro, L; Tyciakova, S; Kozovska, Z; Matuskova, M; Kucerova, L

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) exhibit beneficial properties to serve as cellular vehicles for enzyme/prodrug cancer gene therapy approaches. We have previously shown that engineered human adipose tissue-derived MSC in combination with non-toxic prodrug mediated substantial cytotoxic and antitumor effect. The aim of this study was to develop advanced 3D cultivation method to serve for modelling of the therapeutic outcome in vitro. We have used engineered MSC expressing fusion transgene cytosine deaminase::uracilphosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) in combination with prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC). This therapeutic regimen designated CD-MSC/5FC was combined with the human melanoma cells A375 or EGFP-A375 in both standard monolayer culture and 3-dimensional (3D) multicellular nodules. The extent of cytotoxicity was evaluated by standard viability assay MTS, ATP-based luminescence assay, fluorimetric test, measurement of Caspase-3/7 activation and DNA laddering. The data have shown that the extent of cytotoxic bystander effect mediated by CD-MSC/5FC is significantly lower in 3D culture conditions. However, these data better recapitulate the therapeutic efficiency as observed previously in vivo. We suggest here to use the 3D multicellular culture conditions for better prediction of the therapeutic outcome in mouse xenograft models.

  8. The TCA cycle transferase DLST is important for MYC-mediated leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N M; Li, D; Peng, H L; Laroche, F J F; Mansour, M R; Gjini, E; Aioub, M; Helman, D J; Roderick, J E; Cheng, T; Harrold, I; Samaha, Y; Meng, L; Amsterdam, A; Neuberg, D S; Denton, T T; Sanda, T; Kelliher, M A; Singh, A; Look, A T; Feng, H

    2016-06-01

    Despite the pivotal role of MYC in the pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and many other cancers, the mechanisms underlying MYC-mediated tumorigenesis remain inadequately understood. Here we utilized a well-characterized zebrafish model of Myc-induced T-ALL for genetic studies to identify novel genes contributing to disease onset. We found that heterozygous inactivation of a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (Dlst), significantly delayed tumor onset in zebrafish without detectable effects on fish development. DLST is the E2 transferase of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), which converts α-KG to succinyl-CoA in the TCA cycle. RNAi knockdown of DLST led to decreased cell viability and induction of apoptosis in human T-ALL cell lines. Polar metabolomics profiling revealed that the TCA cycle was disrupted by DLST knockdown in human T-ALL cells, as demonstrated by an accumulation of α-KG and a decrease of succinyl-CoA. Addition of succinate, the downstream TCA cycle intermediate, to human T-ALL cells was sufficient to rescue defects in cell viability caused by DLST inactivation. Together, our studies uncovered an important role for DLST in MYC-mediated leukemogenesis and demonstrated the metabolic dependence of T-lymphoblasts on the TCA cycle, thus providing implications for targeted therapy.

  9. [EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE VIABILITY OF PLANKTON CELLS AND MODEL LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA BIOFILMS IN WATER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, I S; Karpoval, T I; Gruzdeva, O A; Marinenko, O V; Dronina, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    Study the effect of water temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C on viability of plankton forms and model Legionella pneumophila under experimental conditions. Monospecies legionella biofilms, obtained in plates for enzyme immunoassay during 96 hours at 28 degrees C, and water suspension of BCYE agar cultivated cells of L. pneumophila at a concentration of 10(3) - 10(5) CFU per liter were used in the study for evaluation of bactericidal effect of temperature on various legionella forms. Analysis of effects of various temperature regimens on plankton forms and model legionella biofilms has shown that at a temperature range from 50 to 60 degrees C a significant reduction of quantity of viable legionella cells occurs. Model legionella biofilms have partially conserved viability at a temperature of 60 degrees C and only exposition to a temperature of 70 degrees C resulted in death of legionella biofilms and plankton forms of bacteria. A dependence of viability conservation of legionella from the initial concentration of the causative agent in water and duration of exposition at varying temperature was shown. Short-term heating at a temperature of at least 70 degrees C has the most pronounced bactericidal effect on plankton forms and model L. pneumophila biofilms under experimental conditions. Such temperature regimen could be used as one of the prophylaxis approaches during maintenance of especially dangerous water system and, fist of all, systems of hot water supply.

  10. Establishing guidelines to retain viability of probiotics during spray drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model-based approach to map processing conditions suitable to spray dry probiotics with minimal viability loss. The approach combines the drying history and bacterial inactivation kinetics to predict the retention of viability after drying. The approach was used to systematically assess

  11. Evaluation of pollen viability, stigma receptivity and fertilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To provide theoretical basis for artificial pollination in Lagerstroemia indica L., pollen viability and stigma receptivity were tested and the morphological change of stigma was observed. Pollen viability tested by in vitro culture, stigma receptivity examined by benzidine-H2O2 testing and fruit set estimated by field artificial ...

  12. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neuronal cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Vulto, P; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  13. 37 CFR 1.807 - Viability of deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Viability of deposit. 1.807... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.807 Viability of deposit. (a) A deposit of biological material that is capable of...

  14. Evaluation of pollen viability, stigma receptivity and fertilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... To provide theoretical basis for artificial pollination in Lagerstroemia indica L., pollen viability and stigma receptivity were tested and the morphological change of stigma was observed. Pollen viability tested by in vitro culture, stigma receptivity examined by benzidine-H2O2 testing and fruit set estimated.

  15. Studies On Fermentation, Alcohol Production And Viability In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reverse was true in the sugarcane bagasse medium. Yeasts with high viability tended to have high alcohol production ability in the sucrose medium and vice-versa. KEY WORDS: Alcohol production; fermentation; induced mutants; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; viability. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ...

  16. The Economy and Democracy: Viability and Challenges for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Economy and Democracy: Viability and Challenges for Sustainable Democratisation in Nigeria. ... Economic and Policy Review ... the viability for developing sustainable democracy in Nigeria against the background of the country's enormous economic potentials and the economic reforms introduced following the ...

  17. Pollen viability and germination in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to assess pollen viability using the staining technique and in vitro germination with different concentrations of sucrose in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha mollissima, contributing to the knowledge of the reproductive biology and subsidizing their conservation, management and utilization. Pollen viability ...

  18. Viability, Advantages and Design Methodologies of M-Learning Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Todd W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the viability and principle design methodologies of Mobile Learning models in developing regions. Demographic and market studies were utilized to determine the viability of M-Learning delivery as well as best uses for such technologies and methods given socioeconomic and political conditions within the…

  19. [Hemodialysis improves the subendocardial viability ratio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Antonella; Sirico, Maria; Di Micco, Lucia; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2013-01-01

    The subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), a parameter introduced by Buckberg, represents a non-invasive measure of myocardial perfusion related to left ventricular work. AIM. The aim of this study was to verify if dialysis may determine modifications of SEVR and how these modifications are modulated in the 2-day interdialytic period. METHODS.We studied 54 subjects of mean age 6314 years and receiving dialysis for 3215 months. Exclusion criteria were diabetes, resistant hypertension and peripheral vascular diseases and intradialytic hypotension evidenced during the study dialysis session. Pulse wave velocity and SEVR assessments were performed during the third dialysis session of the week, before (pre-HD) and after (post-HD) dialysis, in 2-day interdialytic period after and at the beginning of the following dialysis session. RESULTS.Dialysis reduces PWV, in particular the tertile with the lowest PWV presents the highest percentage reduction (-26%) compared with the second and the third tertiles. In the same way, dialysis leads to an increase of SEVR and patients in the tertile with the highest SEVR values maintain high SEVR values during dialysis and in the interdialytic period. Patients with severe vascular calcifications present higher PWV value and lower SEVR value. CONCLUSIONS.The results of present study demonstrate that ultrafiltration improves PWV (with a mean reduction of 16%) and SEVR (increase of 13%) and that the severity of vascular calcifications influences the effect of ultrafiltration on these two parameters. More studies are certainly necessary to verify our findings. Considered the higher mortality of patients with higher SEVR, it would be important to understand if new dialytic strategies are needed in patients with higher PVW and lower SEVR values.

  20. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  1. Ozone affects pollen viability and NAD(P)H oxidase release from Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, Stefania, E-mail: spas@unipg.it [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Tedeschini, Emma; Frenguelli, Giuseppe [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Wopfner, Nicole; Ferreira, Fatima [Department of Molecular Biology, CD Laboratory for Allergy Diagnosis and Therapy, University of Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); D' Amato, Gennaro [Division of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, ' A. Cardarelli' High Speciality Hospital, Naples (Italy); Ederli, Luisa [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Air pollution is frequently proposed as a cause of the increased incidence of allergy in industrialised countries. We investigated the impact of ozone (O{sub 3}) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and allergen content of ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). Pollen was exposed to acute O{sub 3} fumigation, with analysis of pollen viability, ROS and nitric oxide (NO) content, activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase, and expression of major allergens. There was decreased pollen viability after O{sub 3} fumigation, which indicates damage to the pollen membrane system, although the ROS and NO contents were not changed or were only slightly induced, respectively. Ozone exposure induced a significant enhancement of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. The expression of the allergen Amb a 1 was not affected by O{sub 3}, determined from the mRNA levels of the major allergens. We conclude that O{sub 3} can increase ragweed pollen allergenicity through stimulation of ROS-generating NAD(P)H oxidase. - Highlights: > O{sub 3} reduces the viability of ragweed pollen. > ROS and allergens of ragweed pollen were not affected by O{sub 3} exposure. > O{sub 3} enhances the activity of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. > O{sub 3} increases ragweed pollen allergenicity through NAD(P)H-oxidase stimulation. - This study focuses on the effects of the atmospheric pollutant ozone on ROS content and NAD(P)H oxidase activity of ragweed pollen grains.

  2. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  3. Host-Based Th2 Cell Therapy for Prolongation of Cardiac Allograft Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jason E.; Costanzo, Carliann M.; Sennesh, Joel D.; Solomon, Michael A.; Fowler, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA) therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1) reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2) shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3) prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use “direct” host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to “indirect” therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion. PMID:21559526

  4. Host-based Th2 cell therapy for prolongation of cardiac allograft viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    Full Text Available Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1 reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2 shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3 prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use "direct" host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to "indirect" therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion.

  5. Enzymes and muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plebani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle disorders may result in release of muscle enzymes into the circulation and give increased serum enzyme activity. A variety of enzymes routinely determined in the clinical laboratory may be elevated, but creatine kinase is the enzyme present in the highest concentration in muscle, and in every variety of muscle disease is the serum enzyme which shows the greatest incidence and degree of elevation. Aspartate aminotransferase is the enzyme associated most significantly with inflammation. A diagnostic algorithm based on the combined measurement of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and aldolase has been found to discriminate muscular distrophies from polymyositis and other myopathies. This combination of laboratory tests has diagnostic application and thus allows the clinician to better select patients who need to have a skeletal muscle biopsy as a diagnostic procedure.

  6. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  7. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  8. Enzymes in animal nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Scientific Committee on Animal Nutrition

    2011-01-01

    This report brings overview of endogenous as well as exogenous enzymes and their role and importance in animal nutrition. Enzymes for animal nutrition have been systematically developed since 1980´s. Phytase, xylanase and β-glucanase are used in poultry-rising, pig breeding, aquaculture and begin to push to the ruminant nutrition. Phytase increase availability of P, Ca, Zn, digestibility of proteins and fats. Its positive effect on the environment is well described – enzymes decrease the cont...

  9. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a r...

  10. Repeated AAV-mediated gene transfer by serotype switching enables long-lasting therapeutic levels of hUgt1a1 enzyme in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bočkor, L; Bortolussi, G; Iaconcig, A; Chiaruttini, G; Tiribelli, C; Giacca, M; Benvenuti, F; Zentilin, L; Muro, A F

    2017-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -mediated gene therapy is a promising strategy to treat liver-based monogenic diseases. However, two major obstacles limit its success: first, vector dilution in actively dividing cells, such as hepatocytes in neonates/children, due to the non-integrating nature of the vector; second, development of an immune response against the transgene and/or viral vector. Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type I is a rare monogenic disease with neonatal onset, caused by mutations in the liver-specific UGT1 gene, with toxic accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin in plasma, tissues and brain. To establish an effective and long lasting cure, we applied AAV-mediated liver gene therapy to a relevant mouse model of the disease. Repeated gene transfer to adults by AAV-serotype switching, upon neonatal administration, resulted in lifelong correction of total bilirubin (TB) levels in both genders. In contrast, vector loss over time was observed after a single neonatal administration. Adult administration resulted in lifelong TB levels correction in male, but not female Ugt1-/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that neonatal AAV-mediated gene transfer to the liver supports a second transfer of the therapeutic vector, by preventing the induction of an immune response and supporting the possibility to improve AAV-therapeutic efficacy by repeated administration.

  11. Food and feed enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Rühl, Martin; Zorn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Humans have benefited from the unique catalytic properties of enzymes, in particular for food production, for thousands of years. Prominent examples include the production of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine, as well as bakery and dairy products. The chapter reviews the historic background of the development of modern enzyme technology and provides an overview of the industrial food and feed enzymes currently available on the world market. The chapter highlights enzyme applications for the improvement of resource efficiency, the biopreservation of food, and the treatment of food intolerances. Further topics address the improvement of food safety and food quality.

  12. The market viability of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botterud, A.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M. C.; Yildiz, B.

    2007-04-06

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is supporting system studies to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options. One of the objectives of the current analysis phase is to determine how nuclear hydrogen technologies could evolve under a number of different futures. The outputs of our work will eventually be used in a larger hydrogen infrastructure and market analysis conducted for DOE-EE using a system-level market simulation tool now underway. This report expands on our previous work by moving beyond simple levelized cost calculations and looking at profitability, risk, and uncertainty from an investor's perspective. We analyze a number of technologies and quantify the value of certain technology and operating characteristics. Our model to assess the profitability of the above technologies is based on Real Options Theory and calculates the discounted profits from investing in each of the production facilities. We use Monte-Carlo simulations to represent the uncertainty in hydrogen and electricity prices. The model computes both the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from a production plant. We also quantify the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production in order to maximize investor profits. Uncertainty in electricity and hydrogen prices can be represented with two different stochastic processes: Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM) and Mean Reversion (MR). Our analysis finds that the flexibility to switch between hydrogen and electricity leads

  13. Viability of Booby Offspring is Maximized by Having One Young Parent and One Old Parent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Drummond

    Full Text Available It is widely expected that the quality of offspring will vary with the age of their parents and that this variation should influence animals' choice of mates. However, theoretical predictions for age effects are contradictory and, to our knowledge, we do not know for any wild animal how the quality of offspring is affected by both parents' ages across their lifespans, or whether mothers' and fathers' ages interact. We tackled this question using long-term data on a highly philopatric, insular population of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii. In this species extra-pair paternity is most common in pairs of two young parents or two old parents, implying that these age combinations might prejudice offspring quality. Analysis of the viability of 3,361 offspring of parents up to 21 years old revealed that fledglings with two young parents or two old parents were least likely to become breeders, whereas fledglings with one young parent and one old parent were most likely to do so. For young parents of either sex, offspring viability increased with age of the other parent; for very old parents, it decreased. These effects could be mediated by parents flexibly modifying their investment in offspring in response to their own and their partners´ ages, but evidence for this was lacking. In 5,343 breeding attempts, although mothers' and fathers' ages independently affected four heavily care-dependent breeding traits at the clutch and nestling stages, their interaction did not affect any trait. The effects of parental age combinations on viability could also be mediated by genes: fledglings with one young parent and one old parent could benefit from greater heterozygosity or better genes.

  14. Puget Sound steelhead life cycle model analyses - Population Viability Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This research was initiated by the Puget Sound Steelhead Technical Recovery Team to develop viability criteria for threatened Puget Sound steelhead and to support...

  15. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920). P Velasquez-Vottelerd, Y Anton, R Salazar-Lugo ...

  16. STUDY ON POLLEN VIABILITY AS BIOINDICATOR OF AIR QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina ŞTEFLEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to estimate the relationship between pollen viability and atmospheric pollution (in polluted and non-polluted conditions. The study was carried out in the city of Timisoara. Two areas, with different intensity of road traffic (very high and absent but all characterized by the presence of the same plant species, were selected. The pollen of herbaceous spontaneous species, arboreal species and a shrub species was used (Robinia pseudacacia, Aesculus x carnea, Catalpa bignonioides, Albizzia julibrissin, Rosa canina, Sambucus nigra, Malva neglecta, Ranunculus acer, Trifolium repens, Cichorium intybus. The pollen of these species was treated with TTC (2, 3, 5 Tryphenil-Tetrazolium-Chloride staining solution and viability was then estimated by light microscopy. The results of the mean pollen viability percentage of the examined species are reported. Pollen viability of herbaceous plants is significantly different between the two environments.

  17. Maintaining yeast viability in continuous primary beer fermentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pires, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Brányik, Tomás; Côrte‐Real, Manuela; Vicente, António A

    2014-01-01

    .... This work was aimed at solving one of the most relevant obstacles to implementing ICT on a large scale in beer fermentations, namely the control of biomass and the maintenance of cell viability in a gas‐lift bioreactor...

  18. Desiccation-induced changes in viability, lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-31

    Hendry et al., 1992) and A. saccharinum (Pukacka and Ratajczak, 2006) and intermediate seeds like Azadirachta indica (Varghese and. Naithani, 2002), Coffea Arabica (Dussert et al., 2006), indicating that loss of seed viability ...

  19. Femtosecond optical transfection of cells:viability and efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. Stevenson; B. Agate; X. Tsampoula; P. Fischer; C. T. A. Brown; W. Sibbett; A. Riches; F. Gunn-Moore; K. Dholakia

    2006-01-01

    .... However, there remains no study into the true efficiency of this procedure. Here, we present a detailed analysis of transfection efficiency and cell viability for femtosecond optical transfection using a titanium sapphire laser at 800 nm...

  20. Equine ovarian tissue viability after cryopreservation and in vitro culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficiency of several cryoprotective agents were compared using both slow-freezing and vitrification methods. Results indicate that the viability of ovarian tissue cells increases when DMSO (slow-freezing) and ethylene glycol (vitrification) are used....

  1. Approximate viability for nonlinear evolution inclusions with application to controllability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Benniche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate approximate viability for a graph with respect to fully nonlinear quasi-autonomous evolution inclusions. As application, an approximate null controllability result is given.

  2. Abeta-degrading enzymes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, James Scott; Baig, Shabnam; Palmer, Jennifer; Palmer, Laura E; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2008-04-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) Abeta accumulates because of imbalance between the production of Abeta and its removal from the brain. There is increasing evidence that in most sporadic forms of AD, the accumulation of Abeta is partly, if not in some cases solely, because of defects in its removal--mediated through a combination of diffusion along perivascular extracellular matrix, transport across vessel walls into the blood stream and enzymatic degradation. Multiple enzymes within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of degrading Abeta. Most are produced by neurons or glia, but some are expressed in the cerebral vasculature, where reduced Abeta-degrading activity may contribute to the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which have been most extensively studied, are expressed both neuronally and within the vasculature. The levels of both of these enzymes are reduced in AD although the correlation with enzyme activity is still not entirely clear. Other enzymes shown capable of degrading Abetain vitro or in animal studies include plasmin; endothelin-converting enzymes ECE-1 and -2; matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, -3 and -9; and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). The levels of plasmin and plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA) and ECE-2 are reported to be reduced in AD. Reductions in neprilysin, IDE and plasmin in AD have been associated with possession of APOEepsilon4. We found no change in the level or activity of MMP-2, -3 or -9 in AD. The level and activity of ACE are increased, the level being directly related to Abeta plaque load. Up-regulation of some Abeta-degrading enzymes may initially compensate for declining activity of others, but as age, genetic factors and diseases such as hypertension and diabetes diminish the effectiveness of other Abeta-clearance pathways, reductions in the activity of particular Abeta-degrading enzymes may become critical, leading to the development of AD and CAA.

  3. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    industries, while Taq polymerase T 4 lysozyme, ribonuclease and malate dehydrogenase are enzymes used in research laboratories. A major limitation of most enzymes used in the industries/ research .... pol 1 , (8) Small domain of Klentaq 1 and (C) Superimposed cluster of aromatic residues in K1entaq1. (thick lines) ...

  5. Tomato histone H2B monoubiquitination enzymes SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 contribute to disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea through modulating the balance between SA- and JA/ET-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafen; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Li, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Zhigang; Song, Fengming

    2015-10-21

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination pathway has been shown to play critical roles in regulating growth/development and stress response in Arabidopsis. In the present study, we explored the involvement of the tomato histone H2B monoubiquitination pathway in defense response against Botrytis cinerea by functional analysis of SlHUB1 and SlHUB2, orthologues of the Arabidopsis AtHUB1/AtHUB2. We used the TRV-based gene silencing system to knockdown the expression levels of SlHUB1 or SlHUB2 in tomato plants and compared the phenotype between the silenced and the control plants after infection with B. cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Biochemical and interaction properties of proteins were examined using in vitro histone monoubiquitination and yeast two-hybrid assays, respectively. The transcript levels of genes were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The tomato SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 had H2B monoubiquitination E3 ligases activity in vitro and expression of SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 was induced by infection of B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 and by treatment with salicylic acid (SA) and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). Silencing of either SlHUB1 or SlHUB2 in tomato plants showed increased susceptibility to B. cinerea, whereas silencing of SlHUB1 resulted in increased resistance against Pst DC3000. SlMED21, a Mediator complex subunit, interacted with SlHUB1 but silencing of SlMED21 did not affect the disease resistance to B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. The SlHUB1- and SlHUB2-silenced plants had thinner cell wall but increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased callose deposition and exhibited altered expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid pathway and in ROS generation and scavenging system. Expression of genes in the SA-mediated signaling pathway was significantly upregulated, whereas expression of genes in the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-mediated signaling pathway were markedly decreased in SlHUB1- and SlHUB2

  6. Evidence that a lipolytic enzyme--hematopoietic-specific phospholipase C-β2--promotes mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells by decreasing their lipid raft-mediated bone marrow retention and increasing the promobilizing effects of granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, M; Poniewierska-Baran, A; Borkowska, S; Schneider, G; Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Suszynska, M; Abdel-Latif, A; Kucia, M; Ratajczak, J; Ratajczak, M Z

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and are retained there by the interaction of membrane lipid raft-associated receptors, such as the α-chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the α4β1-integrin (VLA-4, very late antigen 4 receptor) receptor, with their respective specific ligands, stromal-derived factor 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, expressed in BM stem cell niches. The integrity of the lipid rafts containing these receptors is maintained by the glycolipid glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI-A). It has been reported that a cleavage fragment of the fifth component of the activated complement cascade, C5a, has an important role in mobilizing HSPCs into the peripheral blood (PB) by (i) inducing degranulation of BM-residing granulocytes and (ii) promoting their egress from the BM into the PB so that they permeabilize the endothelial barrier for subsequent egress of HSPCs. We report here that hematopoietic cell-specific phospholipase C-β2 (PLC-β2) has a crucial role in pharmacological mobilization of HSPCs. On the one hand, when released during degranulation of granulocytes, it digests GPI-A, thereby disrupting membrane lipid rafts and impairing retention of HSPCs in BM niches. On the other hand, it is an intracellular enzyme required for degranulation of granulocytes and their egress from BM. In support of this dual role, we demonstrate that PLC-β2-knockout mice are poor mobilizers and provide, for the first time, evidence for the involvement of this lipolytic enzyme in the mobilization of HSPCs.

  7. Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis Extract and Its Active Compound, Wogonin, Inhibit Ovalbumin-Induced Th2-Mediated Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soon Shin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis has been widely used as a dietary ingredient and traditional herbal medicine owing to its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the anti-allergic effects of skullcap and its active compounds, focusing on T cell-mediated responses ex vivo and in vivo. Splenocytes from mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA were isolated for analyses of cytokine production and cell viability. Mice sensitized with OVA were orally administered skullcap or wogonin for 16 days, and then immunoglobulin (Ig and cytokine levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Treatment with skullcap significantly inhibited interleukin (IL-4 production without reduction of cell viability. Moreover, wogonin, but not baicalin and baicalein, suppressed IL-4 and interferon-gamma production. In vivo, skullcap and wogonin downregulated OVA-induced Th2 immune responses, especially IgE and IL-5 prediction. Wogonin as an active component of skullcap may be applied as a therapeutic agent for IgE- and IL-5-mediated allergic disorders.

  8. Protective role of morin, a flavonoid, against high glucose induced oxidative stress mediated apoptosis in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Kapoor

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an early event of liver damage in diabetes and oxidative stress has been linked to accelerate the apoptosis in hepatocytes. Therefore, the compounds that can scavenge ROS may confer regulatory effects on high-glucose induced apoptosis. In the present study, primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to high concentration (40 mM of glucose. At this concentration decreased cell viability and enhanced ROS generation was observed. Depleted antioxidant status of hepatocytes under high glucose stress was also observed as evident from transcriptional level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Further, mitochondrial depolarisation was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial integrity and altered expression of Bax and Bcl-2. Increased translocation of apoptotic proteins like AIF (Apoptosis inducing factor & Endo-G (endonuclease-G from its resident place mitochondria to nucleus was also observed. Cyt-c residing in the inter-membrane space of mitochondria also translocated to cytoplasm. These apoptotic proteins initiated caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, increased apoptotic DNA content in glucose treated hepatocytes, suggesting mitochondria mediated apoptotic mode of cell death. Morin, a dietary flavonoid from Psidium guajava was effective in increasing the cell viability and decreasing the ROS level. It maintained mitochondrial integrity, inhibited release of apoptotic proteins from mitochondria, prevented DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation and hypodiploid DNA upon exposure to high glucose. This study confirms the capacity of dietary flavonoid Morin in regulating apoptosis induced by high glucose via mitochondrial mediated pathway through intervention of oxidative stress.

  9. Acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid decrease tumor cell viability and glucose metabolism modulating 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Guilherme A; Furtado, Cristiane M; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Zancan, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The common observation that cancer cells present higher glycolytic rates when compared to control cells leads to the proposal of glycolysis as a potential target for the development of anti-tumoral agents. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA), present anti-tumoral properties, inducing apoptosis and altering tumor glucose utilization. The present work aims at evaluating whether ASA could directly decrease cell glycolysis through inhibition of the major regulatory enzyme within this pathway, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). We show that ASA and SA inhibit purified PFK in a dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition occurs due to the modulation of the enzyme quaternary structure. ASA and SA promote the dissociation of the enzyme active tetramers into quite inactive dimers, a common regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. The inhibitory effects of ASA and SA on PFK are fully reversible and can be prevented or reverted by the binding of the enzyme to the actin filaments. Both drugs are also able to decrease glucose consumption by human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, as well as its viability, which decrease parallelly to the inhibition of PFK on these cells. In the end, we demonstrate the ability of ASA and SA to directly modulate an important regulatory intracellular enzyme, and propose that this is one of their mechanisms promoting anti-tumoral effects.

  10. Comparison of reintroduction and enhancement effects on metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation viability depends upon a balance of extinction and colonization of local habitats by a species. Mechanisms that can affect this balance include physical characteristics related to natural processes (e.g. succession) as well as anthropogenic actions. Plant restorations can help to produce favorable metapopulation dynamics and consequently increase viability; however, to date no studies confirm this is true. Population viability analysis (PVA) allows for the use of empirical data to generate theoretical future projections in the form of median time to extinction and probability of extinction. In turn, PVAs can inform and aid the development of conservation, recovery, and management plans. Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri) is a dune endemic that exhibited metapopulation dynamics. We projected viability of three natural and two restored populations with demographic data spanning 15–23 years to determine the degree the addition of reintroduced population affects metapopulation viability. The models were validated by comparing observed and projected abundances and adjusting parameters associated with demographic and environmental stochasticity to improve model performance. Our chosen model correctly predicted yearly population abundance for 60% of the population-years. Using that model, 50-year projections showed that the addition of reintroductions increases metapopulation viability. The reintroduction that simulated population performance in early-successional habitats had the maximum benefit. In situ enhancements of existing populations proved to be equally effective. This study shows that restorations can facilitate and improve metapopulation viability of species dependent on metapopulation dynamics for survival with long-term persistence of C. pitcheri in Indiana likely to depend on continued active management.

  11. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6 is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, and methionine synthase (MS, in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV. To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state. SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer.

  12. Nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation effects of anti-angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) peptide from Styela clava flesh tissue and its anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Kim, Dong Geon; Han, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Byun, Hee-Guk; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Park, Sun-Joo; Lee, Dae-Ho; Jeon, You-Jin

    2012-09-15

    In our previous study, an anti-angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) peptide (Ala-His-Ile-Ile-Ile, MW: 565.3Da) was isolated from Styela clava flesh tissue. In this study the fractions obtained during the isolation process and the finally purified peptide were examined to see if they had vasorelaxation effects in isolated rat aortas, and then the peptide was investigated for anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The induction of vasorelaxation in the rat aortas was observed with the isolated fractions and the peptide from the enzymatic hydrolysate of S. clava flesh tissue and could be markedly blocked by pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). In human endothelial cells, NO synthesis was found to be increased and eNOS phosphorylation was upregulated when the cells were cultured with the purified peptide. Furthermore, systolic blood pressure was reduced by administration of the potent vasorelaxation peptide in SHRs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Thymoquinone on BEAS-2B Cell Viability and TGF-β1 Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasret Ecevit

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thymoquinone, one of the essential oil in the structure of cumin, is used for alternative therapy for many diseases from past to present. It was shown to have anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects, as well as positive effects on fibrosis. However, there is no study on the effect of thymoquinone on cancer and fibrosis mechanism in bronchial epithelium cell line BEAS-2B. In our study, the effect of thymoquinone on cell viability and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1 level, which has an important role in the regulation of many biological processes including cancer and fibrosis-associated signal transduction, was evaluated. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to thymoquinone at 0–80 μmol/L concentrations for 24-, 48- and 72-hour durations. Cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT test. TGF-β1 level was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method from the collected supernatant. Cell viability was found to be increased at all concentrations and durations (10–80 μmol/L; 24, 48 and 72 h according to the control group (0 μmol/L; thymoquinone in ethanol (p < 0.0001. Moreover, thymoquinone was found to increase the level of TGF-β1 only at 80 μmol/L concentration and 24-hour exposure period (0 μmol/L, 53.41 ± 18.44 pgr/ml TGF-β1; 80 μmol/L, 174.5 ± 80.03 pgr/ml TGF-β1. As a result, thymoquinone was found to increase cell proliferation and encourage TGF-β1 release.

  14. Importance of Donor Chondrocyte Viability for Osteochondral Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Stannard, James P; Stoker, Aaron M; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation provides a biological treatment option for functional restoration of large articular cartilage defects in multiple joints. While successful outcomes after OCA transplantation have been linked to viable donor chondrocytes, the importance of donor cell viability has not been comprehensively validated. To use a canine model to determine the importance of donor chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation with respect to functional success of femoral condylar OCAs based on radiographic, gross, cell viability, histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical outcome measures. Controlled laboratory study. After approval was obtained from the institutional animal care and use committee, adult female dogs (N = 16) were implanted with 8-mm cylindrical OCAs from male dogs in the lateral and medial femoral condyles of 1 knee. OCAs were preserved for 28 or 60 days after procurement, and chondrocyte viability was quantified before implantation. Two different storage media, temperatures, and time points were used to obtain a spectrum of percentage chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation. A successful outcome was defined as an OCA that was associated with graft integration, maintenance of hyaline cartilage, lack of associated cartilage disorder, and lack of fibrillation, fissuring, or fibrous tissue infiltration of the allograft based on subjective radiographic, gross, and histologic assessments at 6 months after implantation. Chondrocyte viability ranged from 23% to 99% at the time of implantation. All successful grafts had >70% chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation, and no graft with chondrocyte viability <70% was associated with a successful outcome. Live-dead stained sections and histologic findings with respect to cell morphological features suggested that successful grafts were consistently composed of viable chondrocytes in lacunae, while grafts that were not successful were composed of nonviable

  15. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  16. Enzyme catalysed tandem reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz-Guinea, Isabel; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    To transfer to the laboratory, the excellent efficiency shown by enzymes in Nature, biocatalysis, had to mimic several synthetic strategies used by the living organisms. Biosynthetic pathways are examples of tandem catalysis and may be assimilated in the biocatalysis field for the use of isolated multi-enzyme systems in the homogeneous phase. The concurrent action of several enzymes that work sequentially presents extraordinary advantages from the synthetic point of view, since it permits a reversible process to become irreversible, to shift the equilibrium reaction in such a way that enantiopure compounds can be obtained from prochiral or racemic substrates, reduce or eliminate problems due to product inhibition or prevent the shortage of substrates by dilution or degradation in the bulk media, etc. In this review we want to illustrate the developments of recent studies involving in vitro multi-enzyme reactions for the synthesis of different classes of organic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Starch Biorefinery Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läufer, Albrecht

    2017-03-07

    Nature uses enzymes to build and convert biomass; mankind uses the same enzymes and produces them on a large scale to make optimum use of biomass in biorefineries. Bacterial α-amylases and fungal glucoamylases have been the workhorses of starch biorefineries for many decades. Pullulanases were introduced in the 1980s. Proteases, cellulases, hemicellulases, and phytases have been on the market for a few years as process aids, improving yields, performance, and costs. Detailed studies of the complex chemical structures of biomass and of the physicochemical limitations of industrial biorefineries have led enzyme developers to produce novel tailor-made solutions for improving yield and profitability in the industry. This chapter reviews the development of enzyme applications in the major starch biorefining processes.

  18. Downregulation of the non-integrin laminin receptor reduces cellular viability by inducing apoptosis in lung and cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiashanee Moodley

    Full Text Available The non-integrin laminin receptor, here designated the 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR, is involved in many physiologically relevant processes, as well as numerous pathological conditions. The overexpression of LRP/LR on various cancerous cell lines plays critical roles in tumour metastasis and angiogenesis. This study investigated whether LRP/LR is implicated in the maintenance of cellular viability in lung and cervical cancer cell lines. Here we show a significant reduction in cellular viability in the aforementioned cell lines as a result of the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LRP. This reduction in cellular viability is due to increased apoptotic processes, reflected by the loss of nuclear integrity and the significant increase in the activity of caspase-3. These results indicate that LRP/LR is involved in the maintenance of cellular viability in tumorigenic lung and cervix uteri cells through the blockage of apoptosis. Knockdown of LRP/LR by siRNA might represent an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung and cervical cancer.

  19. A Classification Method for Seed Viability Assessment with Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Men

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a viability assessment method for Pisum sativum L. seeds based on the infrared thermography technique. In this work, different artificial treatments were conducted to prepare seeds samples with different viability. Thermal images and visible images were recorded every five minutes during the standard five day germination test. After the test, the root length of each sample was measured, which can be used as the viability index of that seed. Each individual seed area in the visible images was segmented with an edge detection method, and the average temperature of the corresponding area in the infrared images was calculated as the representative temperature for this seed at that time. The temperature curve of each seed during germination was plotted. Thirteen characteristic parameters extracted from the temperature curve were analyzed to show the difference of the temperature fluctuations between the seeds samples with different viability. With above parameters, support vector machine (SVM was used to classify the seed samples into three categories: viable, aged and dead according to the root length, the classification accuracy rate was 95%. On this basis, with the temperature data of only the first three hours during the germination, another SVM model was proposed to classify the seed samples, and the accuracy rate was about 91.67%. From these experimental results, it can be seen that infrared thermography can be applied for the prediction of seed viability, based on the SVM algorithm.

  20. Advances in enzyme immobilisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brady, D

    2009-07-10

    Full Text Available substrate to fix the structure of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferases during rigidification by immobilisation, thereby enhancing the synthetic capability of the enzyme relative to its hydrolytic activity. In particular, modulation of enzyme... aggregates for enantioselective nitrile hydrolysis. Adv Synth Catal 349:2167- 2176 Kaulpiboon J, Pongsawasdi P, Zimmermann W (2007) Molecular imprinting of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferases from Paenibacillus sp. A11 and Bacillus macerans with γ-cyclodextrin...

  1. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  2. The peroxisome proliferator response element of the gene encoding the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase is a target for constitutive androstane receptor beta/9-cis-retinoic acid receptor-mediated transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, A; Winrow, C J; Fernandez-Rachubinski, F; Capone, J P; Rachubinski, R A

    2000-02-11

    The genes encoding the first two enzymes of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOx) and enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HD), contain upstream cis-acting regulatory regions termed peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPRE). Transcription of these genes is mediated through the binding of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), which binds to a PPRE as a heterodimer with the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (RXRalpha). Here we demonstrate that the HD-PPRE is also a target for the constitutive androstane receptor beta (CARbeta). In vitro binding analysis showed that CARbeta bound the HD-PPRE, but not the AOx-PPRE, as a heterodimer with RXRalpha. Binding of CARbeta/RXRalpha to the HD-PPRE occurred via determinants that overlap partially with those required for PPARalpha/RXRalpha binding. In vivo, CARbeta/RXRalpha activated transcription from an HD-PPRE luciferase reporter construct. Interestingly, CARbeta was shown to also modulate PPARalpha/RXRalpha-mediated transactivation in a response element-specific manner. In the presence of the peroxisome proliferator, Wy-14,643, CARbeta had no effect on PPARalpha/RXRalpha-mediated transactivation from the HD-PPRE but antagonized transactivation from the AOx-PPRE in both the presence and the absence of proliferator. Our results illustrate that transcription of the AOx and HD genes is differentially regulated by CARbeta and that the HD gene is a specific target for regulation by CARbeta. Overall, this study proposes a novel role for CARbeta in the regulation of peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

  3. Ozone affects pollen viability and NAD(P)H oxidase release from Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Tedeschini, Emma; Frenguelli, Giuseppe; Wopfner, Nicole; Ferreira, Fatima; D'Amato, Gennaro; Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    Air pollution is frequently proposed as a cause of the increased incidence of allergy in industrialised countries. We investigated the impact of ozone (O(3)) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and allergen content of ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). Pollen was exposed to acute O(3) fumigation, with analysis of pollen viability, ROS and nitric oxide (NO) content, activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase, and expression of major allergens. There was decreased pollen viability after O(3) fumigation, which indicates damage to the pollen membrane system, although the ROS and NO contents were not changed or were only slightly induced, respectively. Ozone exposure induced a significant enhancement of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. The expression of the allergen Amb a 1 was not affected by O(3), determined from the mRNA levels of the major allergens. We conclude that O(3) can increase ragweed pollen allergenicity through stimulation of ROS-generating NAD(P)H oxidase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability in Three Different Storage Media: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the viability of periodontal ligament (PDL cells of avulsed teeth in three different storage media.Materials and Methods: Forty-five premolars extracted for orthodontic therapeutic purposes were randomly and equally divided into three groups based on storage media used [Group I: milk (control; Group II: aloe vera (experimental; Group III: egg white (experimental]. Following extractions, the teeth were placed in one of the three different storage media for 30 minutes, following which the scrapings of the PDL from these teeth were collected in Falcon tubes containing collagenase enzyme in 2.5 mL of phosphate buffered saline. The tubes were subsequently incubated for 30 minutes and centrifuged for five minutes at 800 rpm. The obtained PDL cells were stained with Trypan Blue and were observed under optical microscope. The percentage of viable cells was calculated.Results: Aloe vera showed the highest percentage of viable cells (114.3±8.0, followed by egg white (100.9±6.3 and milk (101.1±7.3.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it appears that aloe vera maintains PDL cell viability better than egg white or milk.

  5. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L. (Scripps)

    2011-11-02

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K{sub i} = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same 'in action' state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of {alpha}-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  6. Low Concentration of Sodium Nitroprusside Promotes Mesenchymal Stem Cell Viability and Proliferation Through Elevation of Metabolic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Mohammadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sodium nitroprusside (SNP releases nitric oxide which has signaling role. Objectives: This study was conducted to understand the role of low concentration of SNP on viability, proliferation and biochemical properties of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Materials and Methods: MSCs were used to evaluate the viability and morphology in presence of SNP (1 to 100 µM at 12, 24 and 36 hours. Then 10, 50 and 100 µM of SNP as well as 24 hours were selected for further study. Cell proliferation was investigated by colony forming assay and population doubling number (PDN. Calcium (Ca2+ potassium (K+ and sodium (Na+ level as well as activity of alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were measured. Results: The MSCs viability increased when treatment with 1 and 10 µM at all the treatment periods while 90 and 100 µM caused significant reduction after 24 and 36 hours. Also 10 µM caused elevation whereas 50 and 100 µM showed reduction of proliferation ability. We observed morphological changes and significant reduction of all the investigated enzymes with 100 µM. Activity of ALT and AST were elevated with 10 µM after 24 hours, whereas LDH and ALP activities were not changed. Na+, K+ and Ca2+ was not changed due to 10 and 50 µM treatments, whereas 100 µM only elevated the level of calcium and sodium ions. Conclusions: Low concentration of SNP caused increase of viability and proliferation due to metabolic activity elevation. But the high concentration of SNP induced cell viability and proliferation reduction caused by metabolic and ionic imbalance as well as infrastructure alteration.

  7. Effect of human autologous serum and fetal bovine serum on human corneal epithelial cell viability, migration and proliferation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Feng Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the concentration-dependent effects of autologous serum (AS and fetal bovine serum (FBS on human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC viability, migration and proliferation. METHODS: AS was prepared from 13 patients with non-healing epithelial defects Dulbecco's modified eagle medium/Ham’s F12 (DMEM/F12 with 5% FBS, 0.5% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, 10 ng/mL human epidermal growth factor, 1% insulin-transferrin-selenium, then were incubated in serum media: DMEM/F12 supplemented by 5%, 10%, 15% or 30% AS or FBS. HCEC viability was analyzed using cell proliferation kit XTT, migration using a wound healing assay, proliferation by the cell proliferation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA BrdU kit. Statistical analysis was performed using the generalized linear model, the values at 30% AS or 30% FBS were used as the baselines. RESULTS: HCEC viability was the highest at 30% AS or 15% FBS and the lowest at 10% AS or 30% FBS application. HCEC migration was the quickest through 30% AS or 30% FBS and the slowest through 5% AS or 5% FBS concentrations. Proliferation was the most increased through 15% AS or 5% FBS and the least increased through 30% AS or 30% FBS concentrations. HCEC viability at 10% and 15% AS was significantly worse (P=0.001, P=0.023 compared to baseline and significantly better at 15% FBS (P=0.003 concentrations. HCEC migration was significantly worse (P≤0.007 and HCEC proliferation significantly better (P<0.001 in all concentration groups compared to baseline. CONCLUSION: For the best viability of HCEC 30% AS or 15% FBS, for HCEC migration 30% AS or 30% FBS, for proliferation 15% AS or 5% FBS should be used. Therefore, we suggest the use of 30% AS in clinical practice.

  8. Tissue viability 2010 -2015:from good to great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Jeanette; Ousey, Karen

    2010-09-01

    This paper explores the challenges of the changing face of the NHS with specific relation to the challenges for community-based tissue viability services following the publication of government documents that identify the need to provide a quality service for all patients in health-care settings. Patients receiving care in the community is paramount to the success of the NHS going forward; service redesign, improvements in quality, outcome tracking, seamless discharge and patient satisfaction/responsibilities has been heralded as the core prerequisites of successful services. Tissue viability is a relatively young specialism, with most services being nurse led and established less than 15 years. It is argued that in order to continue to be successful as a specialism, tissue viability has to challenge traditional patient and nursing beliefs and values.

  9. Multimodality imaging in the assessment of myocardial viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Sara L.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure due to coronary artery disease continues to increase, and it portends a worse prognosis than non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Revascularization improves prognosis in these high-risk patients who have evidence of viability; therefore, optimal assessment of myocardial viability remains essential. Multiple imaging modalities exist for differentiating viable myocardium from scar in territories with contractile dysfunction. Given the multiple modalities available, choosing the best modality for a specific patient can be a daunting task. In this review, the physiology of myocardial hibernation and stunning will be reviewed. All the current methods available for assessing viability including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging with single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography imaging and cardiac computed tomography will be reviewed. The effectiveness of the various techniques will be compared, and the limitations of the current literature will be discussed. PMID:21069458

  10. Viability of Lucilia sericata maggots after exposure to wound antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschlein, Georg; Napp, Matthias; Assadian, Ojan; von Podewils, Sebastian; Reese, Kevin; Hinz, Peter; Matiasek, Johannes; Spitzmueller, Romy; Humphreys, Paul; Jünger, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2017-06-01

    After debridement and before dressing a wound with maggots of calliphorid flies, one frequently performed step is the application of antiseptics to the prepared wound bed. However, the concomitant application of antiseptic agents during maggot therapy is regarded controversial as antiseptics may interfere with maggots' viability. In this experimental in vitro study, the viability of fly maggots was investigated after exposure to various antiseptics frequently used in wound care. Here, we show that Lucilia sericata fly maggots can survive up to an hour's exposure to wound antiseptics such as octenidine, povidone-iodine or polihexanide. Concomitant short-term application of wound antiseptics together with maggots on wound beds is tolerated by larvae and does not impair their viability. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Economic Viability of Brewery Spent Grain as a Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes an investigation into the technical feasibility and economic viability of use grain wastes from the beer brewing process as fuel to generate the heat needed in subsequent brewing process. The study finds that while use of spent grain as a biofuel is technically feasible, the economics are not attractive. Economic viability is limited by the underuse of capital equipment. The investment in heating equipment requires a higher utilization that the client brewer currently anticipates. It may be possible in the future that changing factors may swing the decision to a more positive one.

  12. Economic viability of new launched school lunch programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Smed, Sinne; Mørkbak, Morten Raun

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate determinants for the viability of school lunch programmes with a zero-price start-up period. The study is based on a Danish pilot experiment, in which 38 schools were subsidized to provide free school lunch for all pupils during a two-month start...... activities related to the schools’ support and the users’ feeling of ownership, as well as internal professionalism and leadership in the implementation of the school lunch programme are important for the viability of the programme. Strong performance on the latter factors might to some extent compensate...... for the gap between cost and users’ willingness to pay for school lunches....

  13. Challenge testing of gametes to enhance their viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of survival mechanism that enables them to come through the process. The details of the mechanism remain unknown but, if identified, it could have immense potential as a new way to improve the viability of embryos produced by ART. However, few publications describe systematic ways to challenge test gametes...... and then to use the results as a basis for improving gamete viability. Furthermore, new methods to monitor the reactions of gametes to such challenge tests are needed. In the present review, these two issues are discussed, as are some of the conditions necessary before a challenge test protocol can be part...

  14. Population-specific life histories contribute to metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J.; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, A. Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration efforts can be improved by understanding how variations in life-history traits occur within populations of the same species living in different environments. This can be done by first understanding the demographic responses of natural occurring populations. Population viability analysis continues to be useful to species management and conservation with sensitivity analysis aiding in the understanding of population dynamics. In this study, using life-table response experiments and elasticity analyses, we investigated how population-specific life-history demographic responses contributed to the metapopulation viability of the Federally threatened Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri). Specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) Subpopulations occupying different environments within a metapopulation have independent demographic responses and (2) advancing succession results in a shift from a demographic response focused on growth and fecundity to one dominated by stasis. Our results showed that reintroductions had a positive contribution to the metapopulation growth rate as compared to native populations which had a negative contribution. We found no difference in succession on the contribution to metapopulation viability. In addition, we identified distinct population-specific contributions to metapopulation viability and were able to associate specific life-history demographic responses. For example, the positive impact of Miller High Dunes population on the metapopulation growth rate resulted from high growth contributions, whereas increased time of plant in stasis for the State Park Big Blowout population resulted in negative contributions. A greater understanding of how separate populations respond in their corresponding environment may ultimately lead to more effective management strategies aimed at reducing extinction risk. We propose the continued use of sensitivity analyses to evaluate population-specific demographic influences on

  15. Effect of lycopene on cell viability and cell cycle progression in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomato, has a potential anticancer activity in many types of cancer. Epidemiological and clinical trials rarely provide evidence for mechanisms of the compound’s action, and studies on its effect on cancer of different cell origins are now being done. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of lycopene on cell cycle and cell viability in eight human cancer cell lines. Methods Human cell lines were treated with lycopene (1–5 μM for 48 and 96 h. Cell viability was monitored using the method of MTT. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptotic cells were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick labeling (TUNEL and by DAPI. Results Our data showed a significant decrease in the number of viable cells in three cancer cells lines (HT-29, T84 and MCF-7 after 48 h treatment with lycopene, and changes in the fraction of cells retained in different cell cycle phases. Lycopene promoted also cell cycle arrest followed by decreased cell viability in majority of cell lines after 96 h, as compared to controls. Furthermore, an increase in apoptosis was observed in four cell lines (T-84, HT-29, MCF-7 and DU145 when cells were treated with lycopene. Conclusions Our findings show the capacity of lycopene to inhibit cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle in different phases and increase apoptosis, mainly in breast, colon and prostate lines after 96 h. These observations suggest that lycopene may alter cell cycle regulatory proteins depending on the type of cancer and the dose of lycopene administration. Taken together, these data indicated that the antiproliferative effect of lycopene was cellular type, time and dose-dependent.

  16. Effects of cannabinoids and related fatty acids upon the viability of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Sofia B; Wallenius, Anders; Zackrisson, Hanna; Popova, Dina; Plym Forshell, Linus; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2013-11-01

    Compounds acting on the cannabinoid (CB) receptors are involved in the control of cell fate, and there is an emerging consensus that CBs have anticancer effects. However, the CB-mediated effects are contradictory since some studies suggest stimulatory effects on cancer cell proliferation, and CBs have been shown to stimulate both proliferation and differentiation of other mitotic cells such as stem and progenitor cells. In this study, the concentration-dependent effects of synthetic and endogenous CBs on the viability of mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells have been examined by using fluorescence assays of cell membrane integrity, cell proliferation, oxidative stress, and detection of apoptosis and necrosis. All compounds examined produced a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability in the micromolar range, with the potent CB receptor agonist HU 210 and the enantiomer HU 211 (with no CB receptor activity) being the most potent compounds examined with apparent IC50 values of 1 and 0.6 μM, respectively. The endogenous CB anandamide showed similar potency and efficacy as structurally related polyunsaturated fatty acids with no reported activity at the CB receptors. The rapid (within hours) decrease in cell viability induced by the examined CBs suggests cytocidal rather than antiproliferative effects and is dependent on the plating cell population density with the highest toxicity around 100 cells/mm(2). The CB-induced cytotoxicity, which appears to involve CB receptors and the sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway, is a mixture of both apoptosis and necrosis that can be blocked by the antioxidants α-tocopherol and N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, both synthetic and endogenous CBs produce seemingly unspecific cytotoxic effects in the P19 EC cells.

  17. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  18. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...... for efficient hydrolysis, enzyme stability, and the detrimental interaction between enzyme and lignin. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the various methods for enzyme recovery and recycling, for example recycling of free enzymes, readsorption to fresh material, recycling of solids, membrane...

  19. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  20. Extracellular superoxide production, viability and redox poise in response to desiccation in recalcitrant Castanea sativa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V; Colville, Louise; Whitaker, Claire; Chen, Hongying; Bailly, Christophe; Kranner, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in seed death following dehydration in desiccation-intolerant 'recalcitrant' seeds. However, it is unknown if and how ROS are produced in the apoplast and if they play a role in stress signalling during desiccation. We studied intracellular damage and extracellular superoxide (O(2)(.-)) production upon desiccation in Castanea sativa seeds, mechanisms of O(2)(.-) production and the effect of exogenously supplied ROS. A transient increase in extracellular O(2)(.-) production by the embryonic axes preceded significant desiccation-induced viability loss. Thereafter, progressively more oxidizing intracellular conditions, as indicated by a significant shift in glutathione half-cell reduction potential, accompanied cell and axis death, coinciding with the disruption of nuclear membranes. Most hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-dependent O(2)(.-) production was found in a cell wall fraction that contained extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) with molecular masses of approximately 50 kDa. Cinnamic acid was identified as a potential reductant required for ECPOX-mediated O(2)(.-) production. H(2)O(2), applied exogenously to mimic the transient ROS burst at the onset of desiccation, counteracted viability loss of sub-lethally desiccation-stressed seeds and of excised embryonic axes grown in tissue culture. Hence, extracellular ROS produced by embryonic axes appear to be important signalling components involved in wound response, regeneration and growth.

  1. Application of cyclic biamperometry to viability and cytotoxicity assessment in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Youn, Hyun-Yi; McCanna, David J; Sivak, Jacob G; Mikkelsen, Susan R

    2013-05-01

    The application of cyclic biamperometry to viability and cytotoxicity assessments of human corneal epithelial cells has been investigated. Electrochemical measurements have been compared in PBS containing 5.0 mM glucose and minimal essential growth medium. Three different lipophilic mediators including dichlorophenol indophenol, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (also called menadione or vitamin K3) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine have been evaluated for shuttling electrons across the cell membrane to the external medium. Transfer of these electrons to ferricyanide in the extra cellular medium results in the accumulation of ferrocyanide. The amount of ferrocyanide is then determined using cyclic biamperometry and is related to the extent of cell metabolic activity and therefore cell viability. To illustrate cytotoxicity assessment of chemicals, hydrogen peroxide, benzalkonium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate have been chosen as sample toxins, the cytotoxicities of which have been evaluated and compared to values reported in the literature. Similar values have been reported using colorimetric assays; however, the simplicity of this electrochemical assay can, in principle, open the way to miniaturization onto lab-on-chip devices and its incorporation into tiered-testing approaches for cytotoxicity assessment.

  2. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  3. The practice of investment viability appraisal in Akure, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the role played by valuers in choosing the right viability appraisal technique for an investment appraisal. Structured questionnaire was administered on Twenty one (21) registered and practicing Estate Surveying and Valuation firms in Akure out of which fourteen (14) were retrieved and found good for ...

  4. Proof of Economic Viability of Blended Learning Business Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhmann, Carsten; Hohenberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The discussion on economically sustainable business models with respect to information technology is lacking in many aspects of proven approaches. In the following contribution the economic viability is valued based on a procedural model for design and evaluation of e-learning business models in the form of a case study. As a case study object a…

  5. Evaluating the Viability of Mobile Learning to Enhance Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Iain; Chiu, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative research project was conducted to test the viability of augmenting an e-learning program for workplace learners using mobile content delivered through smart phones. Ten learners taking a six week web-based e-learning course were given smart phones which enabled them to access approximately 70% of the course content, in addition to…

  6. Assessment of viability of microorganisms employing fluorescence techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, P.

    1996-01-01


    Viability assessment of microorganisms is relevant for a wide variety of applications in industry, including evaluation of inactivation treatments and quality assessment of starter cultures for beer, wine, and yoghurt production.

    Usually, the ability of microbial cells to

  7. Banana nectar as a medium for testing pollen viability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-16

    May 16, 2007 ... A quick and reliable method for evaluating pollen quality is essential in a breeding program, especially in a crop such as banana that is characterized by high male and female sterility. In this study the germination and viability of banana pollen was evaluated in a sucrose solution and diluted banana nectar.

  8. Banana nectar as a medium for testing pollen viability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A quick and reliable method for evaluating pollen quality is essential in a breeding program, especially in a crop such as banana that is characterized by high male and female sterility. In this study the germination and viability of banana pollen was evaluated in a sucrose solution and diluted banana nectar. Twenty banana ...

  9. Morphology and viability of castor bean genotypes pollen grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Selma Alves Silva Diamantino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the morphology and viability of the pollen of 15 genotypes of castor bean (Ricinus communis L. and to generate information that can assist in the selection of highly promising male parents for future use in genetic improvement programs aimed at producing seeds for oil extraction. Acetolysis and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the morphology of the pollen. The viability of the pollen grains was estimated by in vitro germination and colorimetric analysis (acetocarmine 2% and 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride 1%. For the in vitro germination, pollen grains were grown in 10 types of solidified culture medium consisting of different concentrations of sucrose, boric acid, calcium nitrate, magnesium sulfate and potassium nitrate. The pollen grains had the following characteristics: medium size, isopolar and subspheroidal shape, radial symmetry, circular ambit, 3-colporate, elongated endoapertures, tectate exine and granulated sexine. The acetocarmine dye overestimated pollen viability. The media M5 and M8 were the most efficient at promoting the germination of pollen grains. The studied genotypes had high levels of viability and can therefore be used as male parents in genetic improvement programs.

  10. Low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography: Detection of myocardial viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljkovic Milan

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography in detection of myocardial viability. Background Vasodilation through low dose dipyridamole infusion may recruit contractile reserve by increasing coronary flow or by increasing levels of endogenous adenosine. Methods Forty-three patients with resting dyssynergy, due to previous myocardial infarction, underwent low-dose adenosine (80, 100, 110 mcg/kg/min in 3 minutes intervals echocardiography test. Gold standard for myocardial viability was improvement in systolic thickening of dyssinergic segments of ≥ 1 grade at follow-up. Coronary angiography was done in 41 pts. Twenty-seven patients were revascularized and 16 were medically treated. Echocardiographic follow up data (12 ± 2 months were available in 24 revascularized patients. Results Wall motion score index improved from rest 1.55 ± 0.30 to 1.33 ± 0.26 at low-dose adenosine (p Conclusion Low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography test has high diagnostic potential for detection of myocardial viability in the group of patients with left ventricle dysfunction due to previous myocardial infarction. Low dose adenosine stress echocardiography may be adequate alternative to low-dose dobutamine test for evaluation of myocardial viability.

  11. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long-terms recoverability of enteropathogens is necessary for future epidemiological studies to screen stool samples when conditions do not permit immediate processing. The aim of this study was to determine the viability and the recoverability of three enteropathogens bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio cholerae O: 1 ...

  12. The viability of business data mining in the sports environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data mining can be viewed as the process of extracting previously unknown information from large databases and utilising this information to make crucial business decisions (Simoudis, 1996: 26). This paper considers the viability of using data mining tools and techniques in sports, particularly with regard to mining the ...

  13. Influence of gamma irradiation on pollen viability, germination ability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Effects of gamma radiation on vitality and competitive ability of Cucumis pollen. Euphytica, 32: 677-684. Yanmaz R, Ellialtıoglu S, Taner KY (1999). The effects of gamma irradiation on pollen viability and haploid plant formation in snake cucumber (Cucumis melo L. var. flexuosus Naud.). Acta Hort. 492:.

  14. Low-level waste vitrification contact maintenance viability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This study investigates the economic viability of contact maintenance in the Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility, which is part of the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. This document was prepared by Flour Daniel, Inc., and transmitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in September 1995.

  15. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was designed to study the floral structure, pollen morphology and the potential pollen viability of five Musa genotypes obtained from the Musa field ... Three different types of pollen were encountered viz, big, moderate and small pollens with corresponding big, moderate and small apertures and pores.

  16. Viability of bull semen extended with commercial semen extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrea Raseona

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of bull spermatozoa diluted with commercial semen extender and two culture media stored at controlled room temperature (24 °C) for 72 hours. Two Nguni bulls were used for semen collection with the aid of an electro-ejaculator. After macroscopic evaluation ...

  17. The economic and social viability of Tanzanian Wildlife Management Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homewood, Katherine; Bluwstein, Jevgeniy; Lund, Jens Friis

    This policy brief contributes to assessing the economic and social viability of Tanzania’s Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) through preliminary findings by the ‘Poverty and ecosystem Impacts of Tanzania’s Wildlife Management Areas’ (PIMA) project, focusing on benefits, costs, and their distribution...

  18. Effect of pretreatments on seed viability during fruit development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies to identify the stage at which developing fruits of Irvingia gabonensis (var. excelsa and var. gabonensis), picked from standing trees and/or forest floors, attain maximum viability and germinability were conducted in two harvesting seasons in 2000 and 2001. Some pretreatment methods were used as a means of ...

  19. Viability of bull semen extended with commercial semen extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After macroscopic evaluation, semen was pooled and aliquoted randomly into Triladyl, modified Ham's F10, and TCM-199 culture media, and then stored at 24 °C. Sperm motility parameters, morphology, and viability were analysed with computer aided sperm analysis (CASA) after 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours. The study was ...

  20. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could provide additional protection in chlorinated drinking water distribution systems. Copper-Silver (Cu-Ag) ionization treatment systems are commercially available for use in large building water systems to help control the risks from Legionella bacteria. The objectives of this study were to develop and optimize Legionella viability assays and use them to investigate the viability of Legionella bacteria after exposure to water treated with coppper and silver ions. Methods: Log phase L. pneumophila cells were used in all experiments and were generated by incubation at 35C for 48 hours in buffered yeast extract broth. Viability assays used included plating on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar to determine the number of culturable cells and treating cells with propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) followed by quantitative PCR targeting mip gene of L. pneumophila. The qPCR viability assays were optimized using L. pneumophila inactivated by heat treatment at 65C for 60 min. The effectiveness of Cu-Ag ionization treatment was studied by inoculating L. pneumonia at 105 CFU/mL in water collected directly from a building water system that employed this technology and incubat

  1. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  2. Potential carbon credit and community expectations towards viability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents results of the potential carbon credit and community expectations towards viability of REDD+ projects in Ugalla- Masito ecosystem using a case of Ilagala and Karago villages whereby REDD+ is being piloted. Various data collection methods were employed and these included focused group discussion, ...

  3. Research Note on viability of herbicide and Hormone - treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The responses and viability of acid scarified seeds of four tropical weeds to gibberellic acid and seven herbicides including Galex, Gramoxone, 2 - 4 D, Atrazine, Simazine, Roundup and Primextra in the Laboratory were investigated. The weeds used are Cassia occidentalis, Cassia obtusifolia Cassia hirtusa and ...

  4. Economic Viability of Deficit Irrigation in the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many arid regions of the world, population growth, groundwater depletion, and uncertain supplies have caused agricultural water to become increasingly scarce. Deficit irrigation (DI) provides a potential response to water scarcity, but no consensus exists on its economic viability. In this pape...

  5. Port viability for choice making among shipping companies in West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the study of port viability for choice making among shipping companies in West Africa sub-region trade route was conducted. Discriminant analysis was used to ascertain the consistency of the attributes of ports that establish their overall attractiveness to the carriers. The critical valued port attributes deduced ...

  6. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAKA DANIEL

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... Long-terms recoverability of enteropathogens is necessary for future epidemiological studies to screen stool samples when conditions do not permit immediate processing. The aim of this study was to determine the viability and the recoverability of three enteropathogens bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica,.

  7. Relationships between cock semen viability and the fertility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CUT User

    Semen was collected from each cock following 5ASM, evaluated for semen viability and 0.05 mL diluted semen used to inseminate five hens per breed, in each experimental group. Significant differences in ejaculation rates and semen quality and quantity were recorded in the four breeds of cocks - with the HP cocks of the ...

  8. Optimizing cell viability in droplet-based cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jan; Willem Visser, Claas; Henke, Sieger; Leijten, Jeroen; Saris, Daniël B F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241604443; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Biofabrication commonly involves the use of liquid droplets to transport cells to the printed structure. However, the viability of the cells after impact is poorly controlled and understood, hampering applications including cell spraying, inkjet bioprinting, and laser-assisted cell transfer. Here,

  9. Interactions between Plant Extracts and Cell Viability Indicators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interactions between Plant Extracts and Cell Viability. Indicators during Cytotoxicity Testing: Implications for. Ethnopharmacological Studies. Sze Mun Chan1, Kong Soo Khoo2 and Nam Weng Sit1*. 1Department of Biomedical Science, 2Department of Chemical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman,.

  10. Dormancy, activation and viability of Rhizopus oligosporus sporangiospores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, N.V.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Interruption of dormancy to improve viability of Rhizopus oligosporus sporangiospores is crucial for the application of stored starter cultures for fungal (tempe) production. We aimed to assess the extent of dormancy and factors that could result in activation. Whereas heat treatments were

  11. Influence of gamma irradiation on pollen viability, germination ability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    July 9th, 11th, 15th, 21st and 28th) and pollen age (0th and 1st days) on the pollen viability, germination ability and fruit and seed-set were investigated in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poir.) and winter squash (Cucurbita maxima ...

  12. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  13. Endothelin receptor B antagonists decrease glioma cell viability independently of their cognate receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Paul H

    2008-11-01

    in vitro, it appears unlikely that this effect is mediated by ETRB inhibition or cross-reaction with ETRA. Instead, we present evidence that A-192621 affects glioma and melanoma viability by activating stress/DNA damage response pathways, which leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This is the first evidence linking ETRB antagonist treatment to enhanced expression of DNA damage-inducible genes.

  14. enzyme-linked

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA MEDIESE TYDSKRIF DEEL 63 29 JANUARIE 1983. B surface antigen in donated screening and confirmation by immunosorbent assay. Hepatitis blood - enzyme-linked. M. O. BUBB, T. ... weeks at weekly intervals. After 6 weeks test blood samples were ... This assay normally takes 3 hours. Results. Fig. 1. Frequency ...

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P G; Rømer, F K; Cortes, D

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or radiolog...

  16. Enzymes and fungal virulence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be common across a variety of fungal pathogens. Most fungal pathogens and ... Fungi utilize the food substances in their immediate vicinity to .... digestion of the fungal secreted enzymes thereby denying access to the host cell. For a pathogen to be successful, it mttst be able to circumvent or overcome these antifungal ...

  17. [Elevated liver enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Axel

    2016-10-01

    Elevated liver enzymes are a frequent finding in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients necessitating further evaluation to clarify the underlying disease. Three different patterns of increased liver enzymes can be defined to allow for a more precise and rational further diagnostic approach. A predominant increase in transaminase activities reflects a disturbance of hepatocellular integrity which can be found in patients with viral hepatitis, genetic liver diseases like Wilson`s disease or hemochromatosis, and drug-induced liver diseases. A second pattern is characterized by high serum alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activities indicating cholestatic liver diseases. The next important diagnostic measure in this group is an ultrasound study discerning intra- from extrahepatic cholestasis. Intrahepatic cholestatic diseases include primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis, genetic disturbances of canalicular membrane transporters or drug-induced liver dieseases. Extrahepatic cholestasis involves obstruction of the large bile ducts by gall stones or tumors. The third enzym pattern is defined by a predominant rise in γ-glutamyl transpeptidase which is observed in alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and infiltrating liver diseases. A rise in liver enzymes is not necessarily indicative of a primary hepatic origin. Extrahepatic diseases often cause similarly increased serum activities. In addition even higher values can be observed under normal conditions during pregnancy or in adolescens. Lower values in asymptomatic patients should only be controlled since more than 30% of elevated transaminases spontaneously normalize during follow-up. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  19. Enzymes and fungal virulence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant pathogenic fungi secrete extracellular enlymes that are capable of degrading the cell walls of their host plants. These CWDES may be necessary for penetration ofthc cell wall harricr. as well as for generation of simple molecules that can he assimilated for growth. Most of these enzymes are substrawinducible and both ...

  20. Differential effects of high MUFA with high or low P/S ratio (polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids) on improving hepatic lipolytic enzymes and mediating PPARγ related with lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase of white adipose tissue in diet-induced obese hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, F-H; Liou, T-H; Chiu, W-C; Shieh, M-J; Chien, Y-W

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between high monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) with different levels of polyunsaturated-to-saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratios and body fat loss in diet-induced obesity (DIO) models. Male Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly assigned to the control group (n=12) and obesity group (n=24) for 4 weeks of the high-fat DIO period; afterward, six hamsters from each group were killed. The remaining control hamsters were still fed a low-fat diet. For an additional 8 weeks, the remaining obesity hamsters were switched to a low-fat diet and subdivided into three subgroups (n=6/group): the obesity-control (ObC) group, high MUFA with high P/S ratio oil (HMHR) group and olive oil (OO) group. Serum insulin and leptin concentrations were measured, and hepatic fatty acid metabolic enzymes and adipose differentiation markers were determined using enzyme activities analysis, western blot and semiquantification reverse-transcription PCR. No difference was observed in the mean energy intake through all study periods. After the DIO period, the obesity group increased in weight gain and epididymal fat weight compared with the control group. DIO hamsters in the HMLR group had significant reductions in white adipose tissue deposition and plasma leptin levels, suppression in adipose peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA expressions and increases in hepatic acyl-CoA oxidase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I activities and mRNA levels compared with those in the ObC group. The HMHR group had upregulated phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) relative to total HSL protein levels compared with the OO group. However, the OO group had significantly elevated hepatic de novo lipogenesis compared with the HMHR group. HMHR seemed to be beneficial in depleting white adipose tissue accumulation by decreasing adipose PPARγ and LPL mRNA expressions and mediating phosphorylation of HSL

  1. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  2. Monitoring enzyme kinetic behavior of enzyme-quantum dot bioconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) hold tremendous promise for in vivo biosensing, cellular imaging, theranostics, and smart molecular sensing probes due to their small size and favorable photonic properties such as resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts. Herein, we demonstrate how QD-based bioconjugates can be used to enhance enzyme kinetics. Enzyme-substrate kinetics are analyzed for solutions containing both alkaline phosphatase enzymes and QDs with enzyme-to- QD molar ratios of 2, 12, and 24 as well as for a solution containing the same concentration of enzymes but without QDs. The enzyme kinetic paramters Vmax, KM, and Kcat/KM are extracted from the enzyme progress curves via the Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results demonstrate an approximate increase in enzyme efficiency of 5 - 8% for enzymes immobilized on the QD versus free in solution without QD immobilization.

  3. Fetal viability as a threshold to personhood. A legal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterfy, A

    1995-12-01

    This essay opens with an examination of US laws concerning fetal viability as they apply to induced abortion, to a mother's right to refuse medical treatment necessary to save the life of a fetus, and to the rights to file suit for the wrongful death of unborn children. The history of abortion policies in the US is traced from the common law period of the early 19th century to the restrictive post-Civil War laws and the decisions of the Supreme Court in Roe vs. Wade, which upheld the constitutionality of previability abortions; Webster vs. Reproductive Health Services, in which the Court assigned viability to the 20th week of pregnancy and acknowledged that States could have a compelling previability interest in the fetus; and the Casey decision, which provided tolerance for limits on the availability of abortion before viability as long as the limits did not create an "undue burden" on the woman seeking the abortion. Courts dealing with the issue of compelling a mother to undergo medical treatment to save her fetus have been inconsistent as they balanced the state's interest in the fetus against the mother's rights to privacy. Judges have tended to err on the side of forcing the medical interventions, but the most recent trend is against this sort of judgement. In these cases, fetal viability has also served as a dividing line. The inconsistency of the legal system is illustrated by the fact that, whereas the fetus now has a legal existence, wrongful death actions entered on behalf of a nonviable fetus have often been denied although courts have been more willing to extend protection to fetuses in wrongful death tort cases than in abortion or medical intervention cases. Criminal law has a unique set of rules for dealing with fetuses as some states have broadened their definitions of "homicide" to include fetuses, even nonviable fetuses. Courts, however, are reluctant to enlarge criminal statutes on their own. While the central position given to the role of

  4. Fungal Spores Viability on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomoiu, I.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Vadrucci, S.; Walther, I.; Cojoc, R.

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigated the security of a spaceflight experiment from two points of view: spreading of dried fungal spores placed on the different wafers and their viability during short and long term missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Microscopic characteristics of spores from dried spores samples were investigated, as well as the morphology of the colonies obtained from spores that survived during mission. The selected fungal species were: Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum, Ulocladium chartarum, and Basipetospora halophila. They have been chosen mainly based on their involvement in the biodeterioration of different substrate in the ISS as well as their presence as possible contaminants of the ISS. From biological point of view, three of the selected species are black fungi, with high melanin content and therefore highly resistant to space radiation. The visual inspection and analysis of the images taken before and after the short and the long term experiments have shown that all biocontainers were returned to Earth without damages. Microscope images of the lids of the culture plates revealed that the spores of all species were actually not detached from the surface of the wafers and did not contaminate the lids. From the adhesion point of view all types of wafers can be used in space experiments, with a special comment on the viability in the particular case of iron wafers when used for spores that belong to B. halophila (halophilic strain). This is encouraging in performing experiments with fungi without risking contamination. The spore viability was lower in the experiment for long time to ISS conditions than that of the short experiment. From the observations, it is suggested that the environment of the enclosed biocontainer, as well as the species'specific behaviour have an important effect, reducing the viability in time. Even the spores were not detached from the surface of the wafers, it was observed that spores used in the

  5. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2015-11-24

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  6. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  7. Oxidative stress and DNA lesions: the role of 8-oxoguanine lesions in Trypanosoma cruzi cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro H N Aguiar

    Full Text Available The main consequence of oxidative stress is the formation of DNA lesions, which can result in genomic instability and lead to cell death. Guanine is the base that is most susceptible to oxidation, due to its low redox potential, and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is the most common lesion. These characteristics make 8-oxoG a good cellular biomarker to indicate the extent of oxidative stress. If not repaired, 8-oxoG can pair with adenine and cause a G:C to T:A transversion. When 8-oxoG is inserted during DNA replication, it could generate double-strand breaks, which makes this lesion particularly deleterious. Trypanosoma cruzi needs to address various oxidative stress situations, such as the mammalian intracellular environment and the triatomine insect gut where it replicates. We focused on the MutT enzyme, which is responsible for removing 8-oxoG from the nucleotide pool. To investigate the importance of 8-oxoG during parasite infection of mammalian cells, we characterized the MutT gene in T. cruzi (TcMTH and generated T. cruzi parasites heterologously expressing Escherichia coli MutT or overexpressing the TcMTH enzyme. In the epimastigote form, the recombinant and wild-type parasites displayed similar growth in normal conditions, but the MutT-expressing cells were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide treatment. The recombinant parasite also displayed significantly increased growth after 48 hours of infection in fibroblasts and macrophages when compared to wild-type cells, as well as increased parasitemia in Swiss mice. In addition, we demonstrated, using western blotting experiments, that MutT heterologous expression can influence the parasite antioxidant enzyme protein levels. These results indicate the importance of the 8-oxoG repair system for cell viability.

  8. Special Issue: Retroviral Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Menéndez-Arias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The retroviral RNA genome encodes for three enzymes essential for virus replication: (i the viral protease (PR, that converts the immature virion into a mature virus through the cleavage of precursor polypeptides; (ii the reverse transcriptase (RT, responsible for the conversion of the single-stranded genomic RNA into double-stranded proviral DNA; and (iii the integrase (IN that inserts the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. All of them are important targets for therapeutic intervention. This Special Issue provides authoritative reviews on the most recent research towards a better understanding of structure-function relationships in retroviral enzymes. The Issue includes three reviews on retroviral PRs, seven on RT and reverse transcription, and four dedicated to viral integration. [...

  9. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  10. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    Purification of proteins is an increasingly important process for the biotechnology industry. Separation of the desired high value protein from other proteins produced by the cell is usually attempted using a combination of different chromatographic techniques. These techniques separate mixtures...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited....... In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...

  11. VIABILITY OF THE PROBIOTIC BACTERIA L. ACIDOPHILUS IN DAIRY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Koreňová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. However, many studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. This study cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria L. acidophilus in some dairy drinks. L. acidophilus was found in the range from 106 to 107 CFU.g-1 in five types of fermented milk products containing probiotic cultures. Two investigated products were up to standard according to Regulation of Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Health of Slovak Republic.doi: 10.5219/147

  12. Nuclear Power Options Viability Study. Volume 4. Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauger, D B; White, J D; Sims, J W [eds.

    1986-09-01

    Documents in the Nuclear Power Options Viability Study (NPOVS) bibliography are classified under one of four headings or categories as follows: nuclear options; light water reactors; liquid metal reactors; and high temperature reactors. The collection and selection of these documents, beginning early in 1984 and continuing through March of 1986, was carried out in support of the study's objective: to explore the viabilities of several nuclear electric power generation options for commercial deployment in the United States between 2000 and 2010. There are approximately 550 articles, papers, reports, and books in the bibliography that have been selected from some 2000 surveyed. The citations have been made computer accessible to facilitate rapid on-line retrieval by keyword, author, corporate author, title, journal name, or document number.

  13. Myocardial Viability: From Proof of Concept to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Bhat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischaemic left ventricular (LV dysfunction can arise from myocardial stunning, hibernation, or necrosis. Imaging modalities have become front-line methods in the assessment of viable myocardial tissue, with the aim to stratify patients into optimal treatment pathways. Initial studies, although favorable, lacked sufficient power and sample size to provide conclusive outcomes of viability assessment. Recent trials, including the STICH and HEART studies, have failed to confer prognostic benefits of revascularisation therapy over standard medical management in ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In lieu of these recent findings, assessment of myocardial viability therefore should not be the sole factor for therapy choice. Optimization of medical therapy is paramount, and physicians should feel comfortable in deferring coronary revascularisation in patients with coronary artery disease with reduced LV systolic function. Newer trials are currently underway and will hopefully provide a more complete understanding of the pathos and management of ischaemic cardiomyopathy.

  14. Traffic networks as information systems a viability approach

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph covers a viability to approach to traffic management by advising to vehicles circulated on the network the velocity they should follow for satisfying global traffic conditions;. It presents an investigation of three structural innovations: The objective is to broadcast at each instant and at each position the advised celerity to vehicles, which could be read by auxiliary speedometers or used by cruise control devices. Namely, 1. Construct regulation feedback providing at each time and position advised velocities (celerities) for minimizing congestion or other requirements. 2. Taking into account traffic constraints of different type, the first one being to remain on the roads, to stop at junctions, etc. 3. Use information provided by the probe vehicles equipped with GPS to the traffic regulator; 4. Use other global traffic measures of vehicles provided by different types of sensors; These results are based on convex analysis, intertemporal optimization and viability theory as mathemati...

  15. Care at the edge of viability: medical and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, Marlyse F; Kirshenbaum, Nancy W; Campbell, Deborah E

    2011-09-01

    Decision-making for extremely immature preterm infants at the margins of viability is ethically, professionally, and emotionally complicated. A standard for prenatal consultation should be developed incorporating assessment of parental decision-making preferences and styles, a communication process involving a reciprocal exchange of information, and effective strategies for decisional deliberation, guided by and consistent with parental moral framework. Professional caregivers providing perinatal consultations or end-of-life counseling for extremely preterm infants should be sensitive to these issues and be taught flexibility in counseling techniques adhering to consistent guidelines. Emphasis must shift away from physician beliefs and behaviors about the boundaries of viability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of human autologous serum and fetal bovine serum on human corneal epithelial cell viability, migration and proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Feng; Stachon, Tanja; Seitz, Berthold; Langenbucher, Achim; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the concentration-dependent effects of autologous serum (AS) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) on human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) viability, migration and proliferation. AS was prepared from 13 patients with non-healing epithelial defects Dulbecco's modified eagle medium/Ham's F12 (DMEM/F12) with 5% FBS, 0.5% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), 10 ng/mL human epidermal growth factor, 1% insulin-transferrin-selenium, then were incubated in serum media: DMEM/F12 supplemented by 5%, 10%, 15% or 30% AS or FBS. HCEC viability was analyzed using cell proliferation kit XTT, migration using a wound healing assay, proliferation by the cell proliferation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) BrdU kit. Statistical analysis was performed using the generalized linear model, the values at 30% AS or 30% FBS were used as the baselines. HCEC viability was the highest at 30% AS or 15% FBS and the lowest at 10% AS or 30% FBS application. HCEC migration was the quickest through 30% AS or 30% FBS and the slowest through 5% AS or 5% FBS concentrations. Proliferation was the most increased through 15% AS or 5% FBS and the least increased through 30% AS or 30% FBS concentrations. HCEC viability at 10% and 15% AS was significantly worse (P=0.001, P=0.023) compared to baseline and significantly better at 15% FBS (P=0.003) concentrations. HCEC migration was significantly worse (P≤0.007) and HCEC proliferation significantly better (Pmigration 30% AS or 30% FBS, for proliferation 15% AS or 5% FBS should be used. Therefore, we suggest the use of 30% AS in clinical practice.

  17. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics associated with regional health information organization viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Landefeld, John; Jha, Ashish K

    2010-01-01

    Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs) will likely play a key role in our nation's effort to catalyze health information exchange. Yet we know little about why some efforts succeed while others fail. We sought to identify factors associated with RHIO viability. Using data from a national survey of RHIOs that we conducted in mid-2008, we examined factors associated with becoming operational and factors associated with financial viability. We used multivariate logistic regression models to identify unique predictors. We classified RHIOs actively facilitating data exchange as operational and measured financial viability as the percent of operating costs covered by revenue from participants in data exchange (0-24%, 25-74%, 75-100%). Predictors included breadth of participants, breadth of data exchanged, whether the RHIO focused on a specific population, whether RHIO participants had a history of collaborating, and sources of revenue during the planning phase. Exchanging a narrow set of data and involving a broad group of stakeholders were independently associated with a higher likelihood of being operational. Involving hospitals and ambulatory physicians, and securing early funding from participants were associated with a higher likelihood of financial viability, while early grant funding seemed to diminish the likelihood. Finding ways to help RHIOs become operational and self-sustaining will bolster the current approach to nationwide health information exchange. Our work suggests that convening a broad coalition of stakeholders to focus on a narrow set of data is an important step in helping RHIOs become operational. Convincing stakeholders to financially commit early in the process may help RHIOs become self-sustaining.

  19. Effect of Allium sativum (garlic) methanol extract on viability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Allium sativum (garlic) methanol extract on viability and apoptosis of human leukemic cell lines. ... bromide (MTT) assay at concentrations of 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 ug/mL of Allium sativum extract following 48-h treatment on U-937, Jurkat Clone E6-1 and K-562 cell lines. The mode of cell ...

  20. Viability and Indication of Pathogenic Microbes in the Environment,

    Science.gov (United States)

    viability of parasitic microbes can be clarified corrently only with consideration of the interaction of the organism with the environment and...adaptation to it. According to this school of thought, the stability of a causative agent in the environment is determined by the specific mechanism through...mechanism of transfer of the contaminating principle, the shorter the period during which the parasitic microbe is in the environment - i.e., the

  1. Effect of Isolation Techniques on Viability of Bovine Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sláma

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of selected isolation methods on the viability of neutrophil granulocytes (neutrophils from the blood of healthy Holstein x Bohemian Red Pied crossbred heifers was evaluated. Two methods of neutrophil isolation were used: a neutrophil isolation on the basis of hypotonic erythrocyte lysis (in two variants: after the erythrocyte lysis proper, the cells were centrifuged at either 200 g or 1000 g, and b neutrophil isolation with FACS Lysing Solution as the lysing agent. The viability of the isolated neutrophils was evaluated on the basis of apoptosis and necrosis. The results obtained with flow cytometry (FCM suggest that, from the isolation techniques used, the method based on FACS Lysing Solution impaired the neutrophil viability least. After the application of this method, 5.36 ± 2.15% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 0.51 ± 0.12% were necrotic. In contrast, when the hypotonic erythrocyte lysis was used, the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils amounted to 42.14 ± 7.12% and 49.00 ± 14.70%, respectively, and 41.12 ± 5.55% and 36.91 ± 24.38% respectively of necrotic neutrophils (P < 0.01. This was also confirmed by the light microscopy. After the isolation with FASC Lysing Solution, 1.92 ± 1.74% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 1.05 ± 0.76% were necrotic, as distinct from after the hypotonic erythrocyte lysis where 9.43 ± 3.69% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 12.67 ± 4.74% of necrotic after centrifugation at 200 g, while 12.60 ± 4.35 were apoptotic and 14.96 ± 12.64% were necrotic after centrifugation at 1000 g. It follows from the above-mentioned data that hypotonic lysis is not a suitable method for the isolation of neutrophils, as the method itself markedly affects cell viability.

  2. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  3. MODERN TECHNIQUES OF CERVICAL INSTRUMENTATION IN IMMATURE SKELETON: VIABILITY ASSESSMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Aires, Ayrana Soares; Silva, Luís Eduardo Carelli Teixeira da; Barros, Alderico Girão Campos de; Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo de; Naves, Cleiton Dias

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study describes the use of materials for modern cervical instrumentation, evaluating its viability in children and adolescents, and the techniques used in different cases. The efficacy of the techniques was analyzed through improvement of pain, maintenance of cervical range of motion, recovery of craniocervical stability, bone consolidation, and spinal stenosis in the postoperative follow-up. Method: Retrospective study of the clinical and radiological parameters of 2...

  4. Comparison of tissue viability imaging and colorimetry: skin blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongbo; Chan, Heidi P; Farahmand, Sara; Nilsson, Gert E; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-02-01

    Operator-independent assessment of skin blanching is important in the development and evaluation of topically applied steroids. Spectroscopic instruments based on hand-held probes, however, include elements of operator dependence such as difference in applied pressure and probe misalignment, while laser Doppler-based methods are better suited for demonstration of skin vasodilatation than for vasoconstriction. To demonstrate the potential of the emerging technology of Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) in the objective and operator-independent assessment of skin blanching. The WheelsBridge TiVi600 Tissue Viability Imager was used for quantification of human skin blanching with the Minolta chromameter CR 200 as an independent colorimeter reference method. Desoximetasone gel 0.05% was applied topically on the volar side of the forearm under occlusion for 6 h in four healthy adults. In a separate study, the induction of blanching in the occlusion phase was mapped using a transparent occlusion cover. The relative uncertainty in the blanching estimate produced by the Tissue Viability Imager was about 5% and similar to that of the chromameter operated by a single user and taking the a(*) parameter as a measure of blanching. Estimation of skin blanching could also be performed in the presence of a transient paradoxical erythema, using the integrated TiVi software. The successive induction of skin blanching during the occlusion phase could readily be mapped by the Tissue Viability Imager. TiVi seems to be suitable for operator-independent and remote mapping of human skin blanching, eliminating the main disadvantages of methods based on hand-held probes.

  5. Uronic polysaccharide degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garron, Marie-Line; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2014-10-01

    In the past several years progress has been made in the field of structure and function of polysaccharide lyases (PLs). The number of classified polysaccharide lyase families has increased to 23 and more detailed analysis has allowed the identification of more closely related subfamilies, leading to stronger correlation between each subfamily and a unique substrate. The number of as yet unclassified polysaccharide lyases has also increased and we expect that sequencing projects will allow many of these unclassified sequences to emerge as new families. The progress in structural analysis of PLs has led to having at least one representative structure for each of the families and for two unclassified enzymes. The newly determined structures have folds observed previously in other PL families and their catalytic mechanisms follow either metal-assisted or Tyr/His mechanisms characteristic for other PL enzymes. Comparison of PLs with glycoside hydrolases (GHs) shows several folds common to both classes but only for the β-helix fold is there strong indication of divergent evolution from a common ancestor. Analysis of bacterial genomes identified gene clusters containing multiple polysaccharide cleaving enzymes, the Polysaccharides Utilization Loci (PULs), and their gene complement suggests that they are organized to process completely a specific polysaccharide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legiti......The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts...... legitimation by accountancy, legitimation by institutionalization, and legitimation by compensation. The analysis relates these changes to a problem of trust associated with mediatization through processes of mediation....

  7. Ca-Lignosulphonate and sclerotial viability of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATTEO MONTANARI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignosulphonates, low cost by-products of the pulping process, have shown suppressive effects against some diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the effect of 1.5% v/v calcium lignosulphonate (Ca-Ls amendment to two commercial potting mixes (peat + coconut fibres; PC; and municipal compost + peat + pumice; MCPP on the viability of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia was investigated. Sclerotia were buried in the Ca-Ls amended substrates for 30 days. Non-amended PC and MCPP, sterile sand and sterile PC with and without Ca-Ls were used as controls. The viability of sclerotia recovered from PC and MCPP amended with Ca-Ls was reduced by 50 and 42% respectively compared to control treatments. Ca-Ls amendment decreased sclerotial viability by enhancing the activity of the indigenous mycoparasitic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, Mucor spp. and Trichoderma spp. The biocontrol ability of Ca-Ls against sclerotia was due to the stimulation of microbial activity and is, therefore, strictly dependent on the microbial composition of the substrate.

  8. Viability studies of optically trapped T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain; Wright, Amanda J.

    2011-10-01

    We present a viability study of optically trapped live T cell hybridomas. T cells form an important part of the adaptive immune response system which is responsible for fighting particular pathogens or diseases. The cells of interest were directly trapped by a laser operating at a wavelength of 1064 nm and their viability measured as a function of time. Cell death was monitored using an inverted fluorescent microscope to observe the uptake by the cell of the fluorescent dye propidium iodide. Studies were undertaken at various laser powers and beam profiles. There is a growing interest in optically trapping immune cells and this is the first study that investigates the viability of a T cell when trapped using a conventional optical trapping system. In such experiments it is crucial that the T cell remains viable and trapping the cell directly means that any artefacts due to a cell-bead interface are removed. Our motivation behind this experiment is to use optical tweezers to gain a greater understanding of the interaction forces between T cells and antigen presenting cells. Measuring these interactions has become important due to recent theories which indicate that the strength of this interaction may underlie the activation of the T-cell and subsequent immune response.

  9. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slart, R H J A; Bax, J J; van der Wall, E E; van Veldhuisen, D J; Jager, P L; Dierckx, R A

    2005-11-01

    An important aspect of the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy is the assessment of myocardial viability. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischaemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularisation. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy (SPECT), whether using 201thallium, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc- tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic and perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularisation. New techniques in the nuclear cardiology field, such as attenuation corrected SPECT, dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT and gated FDG PET are promising and will further improve the detection of myocardial viability. Also the combination of multislice computed tomography scanners with PET opens possibilities of adding coronary calcium scoring and noninvasive coronary angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging and quantification.

  10. Different effects of sonoporation on cell morphology and viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Zhen Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to investigate changes in cell morphology and viability after sonoporation. Sonoportion was achieved by ultrasound (21 kHz exposure on adherent human prostate cancer DU145 cells in the cell culture dishes with the presence of microbubble contrast agents and calcein (a cell impermeant dye. We investigated changes in cell morphology immediately after sonoporation under scanning electron microscope (SEM and changes in cell viability immediately and 6 h after sonoporation under fluorescence microscope. It was shown that various levels of intracellular calcein uptake and changes in cell morphology can be caused immediately after sonoporation: smooth cell surface, pores in the membrane and irregular cell surface. Immediately after sonoporation, both groups of cells with high levels of calcein uptake and low levels of calcein uptake were viable; 6 h after sonoporation, group of cells with low levels of calcein uptake still remained viable, while group of cells with high levels of calcein uptake died. Sonoporation induces different effects on cell morphology, intracellular calcein uptake and cell viability.

  11. Viability of various weed seeds in anaerobic conditions (biogas plant)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S.; Hansen, J.

    1983-04-01

    Seeds from different weeds, Urtica urens L. (nettle), Solanum nigrum L. (nightshade), Avena fatua L. (wild oat-grass), Brassica napus L. (rape), Chenopodium album L. (goose-foot), were put into small polyester net bags, which were placed in biogas reactors containing cattle manure. These ''biogas reactors'' were placed at different temperatures . Net bags were taken out after 4.5, 10.5, 21.5, 38 and 53 days, and the seeds were tested for their viability by germination tests and the tetrazolium method. Concerning all seeds it was manifested that the viability decreased very steeply at 35degC. Most of the seeds had a T/sub 50/ at 2-5 days; Chenopodium album L seeds had a T/sub 50/ at 16 days. After 4.5 days it was not possible to find living Avena fatua L seeds. The decrease in viability was less steep at 20degC and even less steep at 2degC.

  12. Viability of lactobacillus acidophilus in various vaginal tablet formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazeli M.R.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The lactobacilli which are present in vaginal fluids play an important role in prevention of vaginosis and there are considerable interests in formulation of these friendly bacteria into suitable pharmaceutical dosage forms. Formulating these microorganisms for vaginal application is a critical issue as the products should retain viability of lactobacilli during formulation and also storage. The aim of this study was to examine the viability and release of Lactobacillus acidophilus from slow-release vaginal tablets prepared by using six different retarding polymers and from two effervescent tablets prepared by using citric or adipic acid. The Carbomer–based formulations showed high initial viablility compared to those based on HPMC-LV, HPMC-HV, Polycarbophil and SCMC polymers which showed one log decrease in viable cells. All retarding polymers in slow release formulations presented a strong bacterial release at about 2 h except Carbomer polymers which showed to be poor bacterial releasers. Although effervescent formulations produced a quick bacterial release in comparison with polymer based slow-release tablets, they were less stable in cold storage. Due to the strong chelating characteristic of citric acid, the viability was quickly lost for aqueous medium of citric acid in comparison with adipic acid based effervescent tablets.

  13. PET/SPECT imaging: From carotid vulnerability to brain viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert [Department of Surgery, Isala Clinics, Zwolle (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dam, Gooitzen M. van [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijckx, Gert-Jan [Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: czeebregts@hotmail.com

    2010-04-15

    Background: Current key issues in ischemic stroke are related to carotid plaque vulnerability, brain viability, and timing of intervention. The treatment of ischemic stroke has evolved into urgent active interventions, as 'time is brain'. Functional imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could improve selection of patients with a vulnerable plaque and evaluation of brain viability in ischemic stroke. Objective: To describe the current applications of PET and SPECT as a diagnostic tool in relation to ischemic stroke. Methods: A literature search using PubMed identified articles. Manual cross-referencing was also performed. Results: Several papers, all observational studies, identified PET/SPECT to be used as a tool to monitor systemic atheroma modifying treatment and to select high-risk patients for surgery regardless of the degree of luminal stenosis in carotid lesions. Furthermore, PET/SPECT is able to quantify the penumbra region during ischemic stroke and in this way may identify those patients who may benefit from timely intervention. Discussion: Functional imaging modalities such as PET/SPECT may become important tools for risk-assessment and evaluation of treatment strategies in carotid plaque vulnerability and brain viability. Prospective clinical studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PET/SPECT.

  14. Dormancy, activation and viability of Rhizopus oligosporus sporangiospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, N V; Nout, M J R

    2004-04-15

    Interruption of dormancy to improve viability of Rhizopus oligosporus sporangiospores is crucial for the application of stored starter cultures for fungal (tempe) production. We aimed to assess the extent of dormancy and factors that could result in activation. Whereas heat treatments were unsuccessful, Malt Extract Broth (MEB) showed to be a good activation medium, with 80% of dormant spores being activated as measured by fluorescence microscopy using a fluorescent marker, compared with 11% with the control. Peptone and yeast extract but not glucose played an important role in activating dormant spores. Metabolically active (fluorescent) and swollen spores, followed by germ tubes were obtained after activation in MEB for 25 min., 2 and 4 h, respectively, at 37 degrees C. Simultaneously, some interesting transitions took place. Dormant spores represent 85-90% of the total spores at harvest and after drying. Their number decreased to 21-32% after activation with MEB with a concomitant increase of metabolically active spores. As a result of storage, some dormancy was lost, yielding an increase of active spores from 11.2% at harvest to 28.8% after 3 months storage. Levels of active spores were well correlated with their viability. By activation of dormant spores, their viability increased; levels of viable and active spores were maximum in 1 month old starter (61.7% and 75.9% of total spores, respectively) but gradually decreased with concomitant increase of the number of dead spores.

  15. Viability And Conidial Production Of Entomopathogenic Fungi Penicillium SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurariaty Agus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Penicillium sp. order Eurotiales class Eurotiomycetes family Trichocomaceae is one of the entomopathogenic fungi that have the potential to be developed as biological control agent of pests.The study aims to determine the viability and spora production of Entomopathogenic fungi Penicillium sp. Experiments was conducted in Pests Identification and Biological Control laboratory Department of Plant Pest and Disease Faculty of Agriculture Hasanuddin University. The fungus Penicillium sp. cultured in a liquid medium and then added chitin as treatment and others without chitin. The spora viability of fungi was observed on 12th and 24th hours while spora production on 3nd 6th 9th and 12th days after application.The results showed that conidial viability of the fungus Penicillium sp. at 24 hours after application was higher if the medium given chitin than without chitin. The conidial production was higher if given chitin than without chitin. It was highest on 12th day reached 143.4 x 106 conidiaml if media given chitin and on 6th day if without chitin 0.50 x 106 conidiaml.

  16. Cell Viability in Arthroscopic Versus Open Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biant, Leela C; Simons, Michiel; Gillespie, Trudi; McNicholas, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an effective method of repair of articular cartilage defects. It is a 2-stage operation, with the second stage most commonly performed via mini-arthrotomy. Arthroscopic ACI is gaining popularity, as it is less invasive and may accelerate early rehabilitation. However, handling and manipulation of the implant have been shown to cause chondrocyte cell death. To assess the number and viability of cells delivered via an open versus arthroscopic approach in ACI surgery. Controlled laboratory study. Sixteen ACI surgeries were performed on young cadaveric knees by 2 experienced surgeons: 8 via mini-arthrotomy and 8 arthroscopically. Live and dead cells were stained and counted on implants after surgery. The cell number and viability were assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Surgery was timed from knife to skin until the end of cycling the knee 10 times after implantation of the cell-membrane construct. On receipt of cell membranes after transportation from the laboratory, ≥92% of the cells were viable. There were significantly more remaining cells (8.47E+07 arthroscopic vs 1.41E+08 open; P arthroscopic vs 37.34% open; P arthroscopic technique. Open surgery was of a significantly shorter duration (6 vs 32 minutes; P arthroscopic technique. The viability of cells delivered for ACI via an arthroscopic approach was 16 times less than via an open approach. The mini-arthrotomy approach is recommended until long-term clinical comparative data are available.

  17. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Dudchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on the biosensor performance are given. The fructose biosensor is characterized by high signal reproducibility and selectivity to fructose. The developed conductometric biosensor can be successfully used for fructose monitoring in the procedures of food and clinical diagnostic.

  18. Molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated activation of β-galactosidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; McMullan, Greg; Henderson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a single-chain Fv antibody to Escherichia coli β-galactosidase (β-gal) is known to stabilize the enzyme and activate several inactive point mutants, historically called antibody-mediated enzyme formation mutants...

  19. Enzyme synthesis in the regulation of hepatic `malic' enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gillian; Walker, Deryck G.

    1974-01-01

    A homogeneous preparation of `malic' enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) from livers of thyroxine-treated rats was used to prepare in rabbits an antiserum to the enzyme that reacts monospecifically with the `malic' enzyme in livers of rats in several physiological states. Changes in enzyme activity resulting from modification of the state of the animal are hence due to an altered amount of enzyme protein. The antiserum has been used to precipitate out `malic' enzyme from heat-treated supernatant preparations of livers from both adult and neonatal rats, in a number of physiological conditions, that had been injected 30min earlier with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. The low incorporations of radioactivity into the immunoprecipitable enzyme have permitted the qualitative conclusion that changed enzyme activity in adult rats arises mainly from alterations in the rate of enzyme synthesis. The marked increase in `malic' enzyme activity that occurs naturally or as a result of thyroxine treatment of the weanling rat is likewise due to a marked increase in the rate of enzyme synthesis possibly associated with a concurrent diminished rate of enzyme degradation. PMID:4462568

  20. Enzyme synthesis in the regulation of hepatic "malic" enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G; Walker, D G

    1974-10-01

    A homogeneous preparation of ;malic' enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) from livers of thyroxine-treated rats was used to prepare in rabbits an antiserum to the enzyme that reacts monospecifically with the ;malic' enzyme in livers of rats in several physiological states. Changes in enzyme activity resulting from modification of the state of the animal are hence due to an altered amount of enzyme protein. The antiserum has been used to precipitate out ;malic' enzyme from heat-treated supernatant preparations of livers from both adult and neonatal rats, in a number of physiological conditions, that had been injected 30min earlier with l-[4,5-(3)H]leucine. The low incorporations of radioactivity into the immunoprecipitable enzyme have permitted the qualitative conclusion that changed enzyme activity in adult rats arises mainly from alterations in the rate of enzyme synthesis. The marked increase in ;malic' enzyme activity that occurs naturally or as a result of thyroxine treatment of the weanling rat is likewise due to a marked increase in the rate of enzyme synthesis possibly associated with a concurrent diminished rate of enzyme degradation.

  1. Zinc Hyperaccumulation in Squirrelfish (Holocentrus adscenscionis) and Its Role in Embryo Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Chris N.; Capo, Tom; Walsh, Patrick J.; Hogstrand, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Female squirrelfish (Fam. Holocentridae) can accumulate and temporarily sequester copious amounts of zinc (Zn) in their livers. There, it is initially compartmentalized before a subsequent, estrogen-triggered redistribution to the ovaries. Here we show that cellular uptake of Zn is also influenced by estrogen signaling, and that estrogen increases concentrations of the plasma Zn-binding protein vitellogenin (VTG). However, estrogen-mediated increases in VTG are not sufficient to accommodate the magnitude of hepato-ovarian Zn transfer in female squirrelfish (Holocentrus adscensionis). These findings suggest that holocentrids have acquired the ability to use hormonal cues to drive hepatic uptake and storage of Zn, signal for its physiological redistribution, and influence the capacity for systemic transport of Zn beyond the mediation of increased plasma VTG concentrations. Such specific adaptations suggest an advantage for the oocyte, which is corroborated in further studies where we determined that oocyte Zn concentrations are positively correlated with egg viability in captive-spawned squirrelfish. The novel nature of these findings underlies the importance of Zn in squirrelfish reproductive biology. PMID:23056248

  2. Sirt3-Mediated Autophagy Contributes to Resveratrol-Induced Protection against ER Stress in HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jun Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress occurring in stringent conditions is critically involved in neuronal survival and death. Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol that has neuroprotective effects against many neurological disorders. Here, we investigated the potential protective effects of resveratrol in an in vitro ER stress model mimicked by tunicamycin (TM treatment in neuronal HT22 cells. We found that TM dose-dependently decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were both significantly attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol markedly reduced the expression or activation of ER stress-associated factors, including GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12. The results of immunocytochemistry and western blot showed that resveratrol promoted autophagy in TM-treated cells, as evidenced by increased LC3II puncta number, bcelin1 expression and LC3II/LC3I ratio. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine could reduce the protective effects of resveratrol. In addition, the expression of Sirt3 protein and its downstream enzyme activities were significantly increased in resveratrol-treated HT22 cells. To confirm the involvement of Sirt3-mediated mechanisms, siRNA transfection was used to knockdown Sirt3 expression in vitro. The results showed that downregulation of Sirt3 could partially prevented the autophagy and protection induced by resveratrol after TM treatment. Our study demonstrates a pivotal role of Sirt3-mediated autophagy in mediating resveratrol-induced protection against ER stress in vitro, and suggests the therapeutic values of resveratrol in ER stress-associated neuronal injury conditions.

  3. Effects of copper stress on antioxidative enzymes, chlorophyll and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... Effects of copper stress on antioxidative enzymes, chlorophyll and protein content in Atriplex ... One of the major consequences of Cu toxicity is oxidative stress mediated by increased levels of ..... Mitochondrial alterations, cellular response to oxidative stress and defective degradation of proteins in aging.

  4. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  5. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  6. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-07-22

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. PMID:27302062

  8. Population viability impacts of habitat additions and subtractions: A simulation experiment with endangered kangaroo rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species viability is influenced by the quality, quantity and configuration of habitat. For species at risk, a principal challenge is to identify landscape configurations that, if realized, would improve a population’s viability or restoration potential. Critical habitat patche...

  9. Viability of Event Management Business in Batangas City, Philippine: Basis for Business Operation Initiatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeninah Christia D. Borbon

    2016-01-01

    The research study on Viability of Event Management Business in Batangas City: Basis for Business Operation Initiatives aimed to assess the viability of this type of business using Thompson’s (2005...

  10. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  11. Inhibitory effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor on viability and neurite growth of murine hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia CHEN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the mediation effect of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR in the effect of brainderived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF on viability and neurite growth of murine hippocampal neurons. Methods  Hippocampal neurons were obtained from p75NTR+/+ and p75NTR-/- 18-day mice and primarily cultured. For p75NTR+/+ neurons, three experimental groups were set, i.e. control, proBDNF (30ng/ml, and proBDNF (30ng/ml+p75/Fc (30µg/ml groups. For p75NTR-/- neurons, two experimental groups were set, i.e. control and proBDNF (30ng/ml groups. MTT assays were performed after 24h to examine the viability of neonatal primary neurons. Immunofluorescent staining was conducted after 72h to investigate the neurite length. Results With MAP2 and DAPI double fluorescent staining it was identified that the neonatal hippocampal neurons were successfully cultured in vitro with high purity. For viability assay of p75NTR+/+ neurons, it was found that the absorbance value at 570nm (A570 in proBDNF group was significantly lower than that in control group (P0.05. With neurite growth assay of p75NTR+/+ neurons, it was found that the neurite length in proBDNF group was significantly shorter than that in control group (P0.05. With neurite growth assay of p75NTR-/- neurons, no difference in neurite length was observed between proBDNF group and control group. Conclusion proBDNF may inhibit the neuronal viability and neurite growth via p75NTR. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.09.03

  12. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors; Application to Cholinesterase-Inhibition Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luckarift, Heather R; Johnson, Glenn R; Spain, Jim C

    2006-01-01

    ...) using silica-encapsulated equine butyrycholinestearse (BuChE) as a model system. Peptide-mediated silica formation was used to encapsulate BuChE, directly immobilizing the enzyme within a commercial pre-packed column...

  13. Monitoring viability of seeds in gene banks: developing software tools to increase efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring the decline of seed viability is essential for effective long term seed storage in ex situ collections. Recent FAO Genebank Standards recommend monitoring intervals at one-third the time predicted for viability to fall to 85% of initial viability. This poster outlines the development of ...

  14. Non-disruptive measurement system of cell viability in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Nelsen, B. L.; Baselt, T.; Berger, T.; Wiele, M.; Prade, I.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient and oxygen transport, as well as the removal of metabolic waste are essential processes to support and maintain viable tissue. Current bioreactor technology used to grow tissue cultures in vitro has a fundamental limit to the thickness of tissues. Based on the low diffusion limit of oxygen a maximum tissue thickness of 200 μm is possible. The efficiency of those systems is currently under investigation. During the cultivation process of the artificial tissue in bioreactors, which lasts 28 days or longer, there are no possibilities to investigate the viability of cells. This work is designed to determine the influence of a non-disruptive cell viability measuring system on cellular activity. The measuring system uses a natural cellular marker produced during normal metabolic activity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a coenzyme naturally consumed and produced during cellular metabolic processes and has thoroughly been studied to determine the metabolic state of a cell. Measuring the fluorescence of NADH within the cell represents a non-disruptive marker for cell viability. Since the measurement process is optical in nature, NADH fluorescence also provides a pathway for sampling at different measurement depths within a given tissue sample. The measurement system we are using utilizes a special UV light source, to excite the NADH fluorescence state. However, the high energy potentially alters or harms the cells. To investigate the influence of the excitation signal, the cells were irradiated with a laser operating at a wavelength of 355 nm and examined for cytotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to develop a non-cytotoxic system that is applicable for large-scale operations during drug-tissue interaction testing.

  15. Cost Assessment Methodology and Economic Viability of Tidal Energy Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Segura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of technologies with which to harness the energy from ocean currents will have considerable possibilities in the future thanks to their enormous potential for electricity production and their high predictability. In this respect, the development of methodologies for the economic viability of these technologies is fundamental to the attainment of a consistent quantification of their costs and the discovery of their economic viability, while simultaneously attracting investment in these technologies. This paper presents a methodology with which to determine the economic viability of tidal energy projects, which includes a technical study of the life-cycle costs into which the development of a tidal farm can be decomposed: concept and definition, design and development, manufacturing, installation, operation and maintenance and dismantling. These cost structures are additionally subdivided by considering their sub-costs and bearing in mind the main components of the tidal farm: the nacelle, the supporting tidal energy converter structure and the export power system. Furthermore, a technical study is developed in order to obtain an estimation of the annual energy produced (and, consequently, the incomes generated if the electric tariff is known by considering its principal attributes: the characteristics of the current, the ability of the device to capture energy and its ability to convert and export the energy. The methodology has been applied (together with a sensibility analysis to the particular case of a farm composed of first generation tidal energy converters in one of the Channel Island Races, the Alderney Race, in the U.K., and the results have been attained by means of the computation of engineering indexes, such as the net present value, the internal rate of return, the discounted payback period and the levelized cost of energy, which indicate that the proposed project is economically viable for all the case studies.

  16. Cell structure and percent viability by a slide centrifuge technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M G; Hosking, C S

    1982-01-01

    It was found that a slide centrifuge (Cytospin) preparation of a cell suspension allowed a reliable assessment of not only cell structure but also the percentage of non-viable cells. The non-viable cells appeared as "smear" cells and paralleled in number the cells taking up trypan blue. Direct experiment showed the unstained viable cells in a trypan blue cell suspension remained intact in a Cytospin preparation while the cells taking up trypan blue were the "smear" cells. The non-viability of the "smear" cells was confirmed by their inability to survive in culture. Images PMID:7040483

  17. Law and ethics at the border of viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, E F

    2006-06-01

    The Supreme Court of Texas in the case of Miller v. HCA announced a rule in 2003 (118 s.w. 3d 758) that a physician attending the delivery of a severely premature infant may provide life-sustaining treatment for that infant under 'emergent circumstances' as a matter of law without first obtaining parental consent. This paper examines issues of law and ethics relevant to decisions about infant resuscitation at the border of viability. It is argued that there is typically no emergency when infants are delivered at 23 weeks gestation, and parents should be asked for informed consent before resuscitation in the delivery room.

  18. The Viability of Small Banks in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    R. Alton Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Small banks have an important role in financing economic activity through their financial services for small businesses. There has been a sharp decline in the number of small banking organizations in the U.S. since the early 1980s. A continuation of this trend would raise important issues about access to financial services for small businesses. Data on the number of banks, their profits, and the distribution of consistent high and low earning banks tend to tell the same story about the viabil...

  19. Methods for isolation and viability assessment of biological organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letant, Sonia Edith; Baker, Sarah Elyse; Bond, Tiziana; Chang, Allan Shih-Ping

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of biological or chemical organisms can be accomplished using a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) system. The SERS system can be a single or a stacked plurality of photonic crystal membranes with noble-metal lined through pores for flowing analyte potentially containing the biological or chemical organisms. The through pores can be adapted to trap individual biological or chemical organisms and emit SERS spectra, which can then be detected by a detector and further analyzed for viability of the biological or chemical organism.

  20. Viability of human corneal keratocytes during organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Pedersen, T; Møller, H J

    1996-01-01

    The viability of human corneal keratocytes was assessed during four weeks of 'closed system' organ culture at 31 degrees C. After 28 days of culturing, the entire keratocyte population was still alive and viable because all cells incorporated uridine; a parameter for RNA-synthesis. During the fir...... of keratan sulphate proteoglycan suggested that approximately 1% of the total content was lost during the period. In conclusion, our current organ culture technique can maintain a viable keratocyte population for four weeks; a viable stroma can be grafted within this period....

  1. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  2. Resuscitation at the limits of viability--an Irish perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, R A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in neonatal care continue to lower the limit of viability. Decision making in this grey zone remains a challenging process. OBJECTIVE: To explore the opinions of healthcare providers on resuscitation and outcome in the less than 28-week preterm newborn. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to health care providers working in maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. Questions related to neonatal management of the extreme preterm infant, and estimated survival and long-term outcome. RESULTS: The response rate was 55% (74% obstetricians and 70% neonatologists). Less than 1% would advocate resuscitation at 22 weeks, 10% of health care providers advocate resuscitation at 23 weeks gestation, 80% of all health care providers would resuscitate at 24 weeks gestation. 20% of all health care providers would advocate cessation of resuscitation efforts on 22-25 weeks gestation at 5 min of age. 65% of Neonatologists and 54% trainees in Paediatrics would cease resuscitation at 10 min of age. Obstetricians were more pessimistic about survival and long term outcome in newborns delivered between 23 and 27 weeks when compared with neonatologists. This difference was also observed in trainees in paediatrics and obstetrics. CONCLUSION: Neonatologists, trainees in paediatrics and neonatal nurses are generally more optimistic about outcome than their counterparts in obstetrical care and this is reflected in a greater willingness to provide resuscitation efforts at the limits of viability.

  3. Viability of Hanseniaspora uvarum yeast preserved by lyophilization and cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda Moura Pietrowski, Giovana; Grochoski, Mayara; Sartori, Gabriela Felkl; Gomes, Tatiane Aparecida; Wosiacki, Gilvan; Nogueira, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Hanseniaspora yeasts are known to produce volatile compounds that give fruity aromas in wine and fermented fruit. This study aimed to verify the feasibility of the Hanseniaspora uvarum strain that had been isolated and identified during a previous study and preserved by lyophilization and freezing at -80 °C (cryopreservation). This strain was assessed in relation to its macroscopic and microscopic morphology and for its ability to ferment apple must. After having been subjected to lyophilization and cryopreservation, viability was assessed in relation to these characteristics during 12 months of storage. The strain showed stable colonial features and its microscopic appearance was unchanged during all recoveries. The plate count results showed consistency in both processes. Regarding the fermentative capacity, the kinetic results showed 100% viability for the strain subjected to lyophilization, as well as for those preserved at -80 °C. These results demonstrate that the preservation methods used are compatible with the maintenance of the relevant characteristics of the strain for the period of evaluation of this study (12 months). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Improvement on The Ellis and Roberts Viability Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With data sets of germination percent and storage time of seed lot of wheat and sorghum stored at three different storage temperature(t, °C with three different water content (m, % of seeds, together with data set of buckwheat and lettuce reported in literatures, the possibility that seed survival curve were transformed into line by survival proportion and the relationship that logarithm of average viability period (logp50 and standard deviation of seed death distribution in time (δwith t, m and interaction between t and m were analysed. Result indicated that survival proportion transformed seed survival curve to line were much easier than the probability adopted by Ellis and Roberts, and the most important factor affecting logp50 and δ of seed lot was interaction between t and m. Thus, Ellis and Roberts viability model were suggested to be improved as Ki=Vi-p/10K-CWT (t×m to predict longevity of seed lot with initial germination percent unknown, a new model of Gi/G0=A-P/10K-CWT(t×m was constructed to predict longevity of seed lot with initial germination percent already known.

  5. A New Methodology for Evaluation of Nematode Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Rodrigo Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes infections are responsible for debilitating conditions and economic losses in domestic animals as well as livestock and are considered an important public health problem due to the high prevalence in humans. The nematode resistance for drugs has been reported for livestock, highlighting the importance for development of new anthelmintic compounds. The aim of the current study was to apply and compare fluorimetric techniques using Sytox and propidium iodide for evaluating the viability of C. elegans larvae after treatment with anthelmintic drugs. These fluorescent markers were efficient to stain larvae treated with ivermectin and albendazole sulfoxide. We observed that densitometric values were proportional to the concentration of dead larvae stained with both markers. Furthermore, data on motility test presented an inverse correlation with fluorimetric data when ivermectin was used. Our results showed that lower concentrations of drugs were effective to interfere in the processes of cellular transport while higher drugs concentrations were necessary in order to result in any damage to cell integrity. The methodology described in this work might be useful for studies that aim to evaluate the viability of nematodes, particularly for testing of new anthelminthic compounds using an easy, economic, reproducible, and no time-consuming technique.

  6. Economic viability of cerrado vegetation management under conditions of risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simão Corrêa da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerrado vegetation is Brazil’s second largest biome, comprising about 388 municipalities in Minas Gerais state alone and serving as an important source of natural resources. A large share of the wood charcoal produced in Minas Gerais is sourced from Cerrado vegetation. The objective of this work is to assess the economic viability of Cerrado vegetation management for wood charcoal production, under conditions of risk. The study site is a fragment of Cerrado subjected to five levels of intervention as to basal area removal. For risk analysis, the Monte Carlo method was applied, using charcoal price, interest rate and land value as input variables, and using Net Present Value as output variable over an infinite planning horizon. It was concluded that introducing risk in the economic analysis of the various Cerrado management regimes helped provide additional information to that obtained by deterministic analysis, improving understanding and ensuring safety in decision-making about the economic viability of such regimes. For all treatments, the probability of VPL being negative increases with increasing cutting cycle lengths. For all treatments, the optimal cutting cycle is ten years. Treatments where a larger volume of wood was removed proved less prone to risks of economic inviability since they secure more revenue than treatments where less wood was removed.

  7. Cell viability and angiogenic potential of a bioartificial adipose substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvan, Anitha; Nguyen, Luong T H; Su, Yan; Teo, Wee Eong; Liao, Susan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Chan, Ching Wan

    2015-06-01

    An implantable scaffold pre-seeded with cells needs to remain viable and encourage rapid angiogenesis in order to replace injured tissues, especially for tissue defect repairs. We created a bioartificial adipose graft composed of an electrospun 3D nanofibrous scaffold and fat tissue excised from New Zealand white rabbits. Cell viability and angiogenesis potential of the bioartificial substitute were examined during four weeks of culture in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium by immunohistochemical staining with LIVE/DEAD® cell kit and PECAM-1 antibody, respectively. In addition, a Matrigel® assay was performed to examine the possibility of blood vessels sprouting from the bioartificial graft. Our results showed that cells within the graft were viable and vascular tubes were present at week 4, while cells in a fat tissue block were dead in vitro. In addition, capillaries were observed sprouting from the graft into the Matrigel, demonstrating its angiogenic potential. We expect that improved cell viability and angiogenesis in the bioartificial substitute, compared to intact autologous graft, could potentially contribute to its survival following implantation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers.

  9. Production and economic viability of feedlot beef cattle categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrônio Batista dos Santos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was realized to evaluate the production and economic viability of finished beef cattle in feedlot in the Cerrado biome of Piauí State, Brazil. One hundred and fifty cattle -50 bulls (B with an body weight of 283.0 ± 20.82 kg, at 30 months of age; and 100 cull cows (CC with an body weight of 296.1 ± 17.80 kg, at 100 months of age- were used in a completely randomized design. The animal performance indicators for the evaluation of economic viability were initial age (months, slaughter age (months, was initial body weight (kg, final body weight (kg, daily feed intake (kg animal-1; kg kg-1 BW, diet cost (R$ kg-1 of diet, cost of kg produced (R$ kg-1 produced, and average price of the kg of meat for finishing (R$. The CC consumed more sorghum silage and concentrate than B (p < 0.05.There was a difference between the categories (p < 0.05 for gross revenue, balance, opportunity cost, and net revenue per animal, with higher values found for the steer category. The animal category did not affect the profitability of the system, although the bulls provided lower revenues than cull cows.

  10. Noninvasive diagnosis of seed viability using infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranner, Ilse; Kastberger, Gerald; Hartbauer, Manfred; Pritchard, Hugh W

    2010-02-23

    Recent advances in the noninvasive analyses of plant metabolism include stress imaging techniques, mainly developed for vegetative tissues. We explored if infrared thermography can be used to predict whether a quiescent seed will germinate or die upon water uptake. Thermal profiles of viable, aged, and dead Pisum sativum seeds were recorded, and image analysis of 22,000 images per individual seed showed that infrared thermography can detect imbibition- and germination-associated biophysical and biochemical changes. These "thermal fingerprints" vary with viability in this species and in Triticum aestivum and Brassica napus seeds. Thermogenesis of the small individual B. napus seeds was at the limit of the technology. We developed a computer model of "virtual pea seeds," that uses Monte Carlo simulation, based on the heat production of major seed storage compounds to unravel physico-chemical processes of thermogenesis. The simulation suggests that the cooling that dominates the early thermal profiles results from the dissolution of low molecular-weight carbohydrates. Moreover, the kinetics of the production of such "cooling" compounds over the following 100 h is dependent on seed viability. We also developed a deterministic tool that predicts in the first 3 hours of water uptake, when seeds can be redried and stored again, whether or not a pea seed will germinate. We believe that the early separation of individual, ungerminated seeds (live, aged, or dead) before destructive germination assessment creates unique opportunities for integrative studies on cell death, differentiation, and development.

  11. Effects of drinking desalinated seawater on cell viability and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macarrão, Camila Longhi; Bachi, André Luis Lacerda; Mariano, Mario; Abel, Lucia Jamli

    2017-06-01

    Desalination of seawater is becoming an important means to address the increasing scarcity of freshwater resources in the world. Seawater has been used as drinking water in the health, food, and medical fields and various beneficial effects have been suggested, although not confirmed. Given the presence of 63 minerals and trace elements in drinking desalinated seawater (63 DSW), we evaluated their effects on the behavior of tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells through the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. Our results showed that cell viability and proliferation in the presence of 63 DSW were significantly greater than in mineral water and in the presence of fetal bovine serum in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 63 DSW showed no toxic effect on murine embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3) and murine melanoma (B16-F10) cells. In another assay, we also showed that pre-treatment of non-adherent THP-1 cells with 63 DSW reduces apoptosis incidence, suggesting a protective effect against cell death. We conclude that cell viability and proliferation were improved by the mineral components of 63 DSW and this effect can guide further studies on health effects associated with DSW consumption.

  12. Noninvasive diagnosis of seed viability using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranner, Ilse; Kastberger, Gerald; Hartbauer, Manfred; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive analyses of plant metabolism include stress imaging techniques, mainly developed for vegetative tissues. We explored if infrared thermography can be used to predict whether a quiescent seed will germinate or die upon water uptake. Thermal profiles of viable, aged, and dead Pisum sativum seeds were recorded, and image analysis of 22,000 images per individual seed showed that infrared thermography can detect imbibition- and germination-associated biophysical and biochemical changes. These “thermal fingerprints” vary with viability in this species and in Triticum aestivum and Brassica napus seeds. Thermogenesis of the small individual B. napus seeds was at the limit of the technology. We developed a computer model of “virtual pea seeds,” that uses Monte Carlo simulation, based on the heat production of major seed storage compounds to unravel physico-chemical processes of thermogenesis. The simulation suggests that the cooling that dominates the early thermal profiles results from the dissolution of low molecular-weight carbohydrates. Moreover, the kinetics of the production of such “cooling” compounds over the following 100 h is dependent on seed viability. We also developed a deterministic tool that predicts in the first 3 hours of water uptake, when seeds can be redried and stored again, whether or not a pea seed will germinate. We believe that the early separation of individual, ungerminated seeds (live, aged, or dead) before destructive germination assessment creates unique opportunities for integrative studies on cell death, differentiation, and development. PMID:20133712

  13. Effect of Antarctic solar radiation on sewage bacteria viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A

    2005-06-01

    The majority of coastal Antarctic research stations discard untreated sewage waste into the near-shore marine environment. However, Antarctic solar conditions are unique, with ozone depletion increasing the proportion of potentially damaging ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the marine environment. This study assessed the influence of Antarctic solar radiation on the viability of Escherichia coli and sewage microorganisms at Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Cell viability decreased with increased exposure time and with exposure to shorter wavelengths of solar radiation. Cell survival also declined with decreasing cloud cover, solar zenith angle and ozone column depth. However, particulates in sewage increased the persistence of viable bacteria. Ultraviolet radiation doses over Rothera Point were highest during the austral summer. During this time, solar radiation may act to partially reduce the number of viable sewage-derived microorganisms in the surface seawater around Antarctic outfalls. Nevertheless, this effect is not reliable and every effort should be made to fully treat sewage before release into the Antarctic marine environment.

  14. A Review: The Probiotic Bacteria Viability under Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Florina CALINOIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review summarized the current knowledge on probiotics and on the effects that different conditions have under this type of bacteria. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the survival rate/resistance or viability of different probiotic bacteria under several conditions, such as: processing, food composition, storage, freezing, thawing, refrigeration, temperature, oxygen, pH, gastrointestinal environment and package. Nowadays, the demand on probiotic functional foods is increasing rapidly, as the consumers became more aware about the potential health benefits, due to the fact that probiotics help in maintaining the balance and composition of intestinal flora and protect it from pathogens. A daily ingestion of 108–109 CFU ml−1 probiotic microorganisms is crucial in order to be able to demonstrate an effect in our organism, considering the dose and the effect of storage/gastrointestinal environments on the probiotic viability. Microencapsulation of probiotics in different polysaccharides was proven to be an ideal way to preserve and protect the cells from detrimental factors during processing, storage or resistance in the gastrointestinal transit, as many studies demonstrate it. There is a general interest in the improvement of the physical and mechanical stability of the polymers used in probiotics encapsulation, to ensure high population of probiotics not only in food during storage, but also after gastrointestinal digestion. Also, the carrier plays a very important role and should be carefully examined.

  15. Effect of magnetic nanoparticle heating on cortical neuron viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christopher J; Yuan, Yuan; Gilbert, Ryan J; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra

    2014-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are currently approved for use as an adjunctive treatment to glioblastoma multiforme radiotherapy. Radio frequency stimulation of the nanoparticles generates localised hyperthermia, which sensitises the tumour to the effects of radiotherapy. Clinical trials reported thus far are promising, with an increase in patient survival rate; however, what are left unaddressed are the implications of this technology on the surrounding healthy tissue. Aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles suspended in culture medium were applied to chick embryonic cortical neuron cultures. Cultures were heated to 37 °C or 45 °C by an induction coil system for 2 h. The latter regime emulates the therapeutic conditions of the adjunctive therapy. Cellular viability and neurite retraction was quantified 24 h after exposure to the hyperthermic events. The hyperthermic load inflicted little damage to the neuron cultures, as determined by calcein-AM, propidium iodide, and alamarBlue® assays. Fluorescence imaging was used to assess the extent of neurite retraction which was found to be negligible. Retention of chick, embryonic cortical neuron viability was confirmed under the thermal conditions produced by radiofrequency stimulation of iron oxide nanoparticles. While these results are not directly applicable to clinical applications of hyperthermia, the thermotolerance of chick embryonic cortical neurons is promising and calls for further studies employing human cultures of neurons and glial cells.

  16. Paradoxical Roles of Antioxidant Enzymes: Basic Mechanisms and Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xin Gen; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Bao, Yongping; Ho, Ye-Shih; Reddi, Amit R.; Holmgren, Arne; Arnér, Elias S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated from aerobic metabolism, as a result of accidental electron leakage as well as regulated enzymatic processes. Because ROS/RNS can induce oxidative injury and act in redox signaling, enzymes metabolizing them will inherently promote either health or disease, depending on the physiological context. It is thus misleading to consider conventionally called antioxidant enzymes to be largely, if not exclusively, health protective. Because such a notion is nonetheless common, we herein attempt to rationalize why this simplistic view should be avoided. First we give an updated summary of physiological phenotypes triggered in mouse models of overexpression or knockout of major antioxidant enzymes. Subsequently, we focus on a series of striking cases that demonstrate “paradoxical” outcomes, i.e., increased fitness upon deletion of antioxidant enzymes or disease triggered by their overexpression. We elaborate mechanisms by which these phenotypes are mediated via chemical, biological, and metabolic interactions of the antioxidant enzymes with their substrates, downstream events, and cellular context. Furthermore, we propose that novel treatments of antioxidant enzyme-related human diseases may be enabled by deliberate targeting of dual roles of the pertaining enzymes. We also discuss the potential of “antioxidant” nutrients and phytochemicals, via regulating the expression or function of antioxidant enzymes, in preventing, treating, or aggravating chronic diseases. We conclude that “paradoxical” roles of antioxidant enzymes in physiology, health, and disease derive from sophisticated molecular mechanisms of redox biology and metabolic homeostasis. Simply viewing antioxidant enzymes as always being beneficial is not only conceptually misleading but also clinically hazardous if such notions underpin medical treatment protocols based on modulation of redox pathways. PMID:26681794

  17. Enzyme changes associated with mitochondrial malic enzyme deficiency in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Erickson, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    A genetically determined absence of mitochondrial malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in c/sup 3H//c/sup 6H/ mice is accompanied by a four-fold increase in liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and a two-fold increase for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Smaller increases in the activity of serine dehydratase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase are observed while the level of glutamic pyruvate transaminase activity is reduced in the liver of deficient mice. Unexpectedly, the level of activity of total malic enzyme in the livers of mitochrondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice is increased approximately 50% compared to littermate controls. No similar increase in solublle malic enzyme activity is observed in heart of kidney tissue of mutant mice and the levels of total malic enzyme in these tissues are in accord with expected levels of activity in mitochondrial malic enzyme-deficient mice. The divergence in levels of enzyme activity between mutant and wild-type mice begins at 19 to 21 days of age. Immunoinactivation experiments with monospecific antisera to the soluble malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase demonstrate that the activity increases represent increases in the amount of enzyme protein. The alterations are not consistent with a single hormonal response.

  18. Direct In Situ Viability Assessment of Bacteria in Probiotic Dairy Products Using Viability Staining in Conjunction with Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, M. A. E.; Gardiner, G. E.; McBrearty, S. J.; O'Sullivan, E. O.; Mulvihill, D. M.; Collins, J. K.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.; Ross, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    The viability of the human probiotic strains Lactobacillus paracasei NFBC 338 and Bifidobacterium sp. strain UCC 35612 in reconstituted skim milk was assessed by confocal scanning laser microscopy using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight viability stain. The technique was rapid (diluent. PMID:11133474

  19. Hydrolytic enzymes of "Streptococcus milleri".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J

    1987-01-01

    Seventy-two isolates classified as "Streptococcus milleri" were examined for the presence of various hydrolytic enzymes. While no protein or lipid-degrading activities were demonstrated, some isolates showed DNase and mucopolysaccharide-degrading activities. Beta-hemolytic isolates were more likely to produce these enzymes than were nonhemolytic strains. Isolates of one "S. milleri" biotype (mannitol fermentation positive) were uniformly devoid of all enzyme activities tested. PMID:2958496

  20. Dual-Enzyme Characteristics of Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Iridium Nanoparticles and Their Cellular Protective Effect against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hua; Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhao, Meng; Hu, Wei-Liang; Xue, Shan-Shan; Cao, Qian; Le, Xue-Yi; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-04-22

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized iridium nanoparticles (PVP-IrNPs), synthesized by the facile alcoholic reduction method using abundantly available PVP as protecting agents, were first reported as enzyme mimics showing intrinsic catalase- and peroxidase-like activities. The preparation procedure was much easier and more importantly, kinetic studies found that the catalytic activity of PVP-IrNPs was comparable to previously reported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that PVP-IrNPs had the average size of approximately 1.5 nm and mainly consisted of Ir(0) chemical state. The mechanism of PVP-IrNPs' dual-enzyme activities was investigated using XPS, Electron spin resonance (ESR) and cytochrome C-based electron transfer methods. The catalase-like activity was related to the formation of oxidized species Ir(0)@IrO2 upon reaction with H2O2. The peroxidase-like activity originated from their ability acting as electron transfer mediators during the catalysis cycle, without the production of hydroxyl radicals. Interestingly, the protective effect of PVP-IrNPs against H2O2-induced cellular oxidative damage was investigated in an A549 lung cancer cell model and PVP-IrNPs displayed excellent biocompatibility and antioxidant activity. Upon pretreatment of cells with PVP-IrNPs, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in response to H2O2 was decreased and the cell viability increased. This work will facilitate studies on the mechanism and biomedical application of nanomaterials-based enzyme mimic.

  1. Enzymes From Rare Actinobacterial Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriya, J; Bharathiraja, S; Manivasagan, P; Kim, S-K

    Actinobacteria constitute rich sources of novel biocatalysts and novel natural products for medical and industrial utilization. Although actinobacteria are potential source of economically important enzymes, the isolation and culturing are somewhat tough because of its extreme habitats. But now-a-days, the rate of discovery of novel compounds producing actinomycetes from soil, freshwater, and marine ecosystem has increased much through the developed culturing and genetic engineering techniques. Actinobacteria are well-known source of their bioactive compounds and they are the promising source of broad range of industrially important enzymes. The bacteria have the capability to degrade a range of pesticides, hydrocarbons, aromatic, and aliphatic compounds (Sambasiva Rao, Tripathy, Mahalaxmi, & Prakasham, 2012). Most of the enzymes are mainly derived from microorganisms because of their easy of growth, minimal nutritional requirements, and low-cost for downstream processing. The focus of this review is about the new, commercially useful enzymes from rare actinobacterial strains. Industrial requirements are now fulfilled by the novel actinobacterial enzymes which assist the effective production. Oxidative enzymes, lignocellulolytic enzymes, extremozymes, and clinically useful enzymes are often utilized in many industrial processes because of their ability to catalyze numerous reactions. Novel, extremophilic, oxidative, lignocellulolytic, and industrially important enzymes from rare Actinobacterial population are discussed in this chapter. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Cytotoxicity and Effects on Cell Viability of Nickel Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Jose E.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, magnetic nanoparticles are finding an increased use in biomedical applications and research. Nanobeads are widely used for cell separation, biosensing and cancer therapy, among others. Due to their properties, nanowires (NWs) are gaining ground for similar applications and, as with all biomaterials, their cytotoxicity is an important factor to be considered before conducting biological studies with them. In this work, the cytotoxic effects of nickel NWs (Ni NWs) were investigated in terms of cell viability and damage to the cellular membrane. Ni NWs with an average diameter of 30-34 nm were prepared by electrodeposition in nanoporous alumina templates. The templates were obtained by a two-step anodization process with oxalic acid on an aluminum substrate. Characterization of NWs was done using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis (EDAX), whereas their morphology was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cell viability studies were carried out on human colorectal carcinoma cells HCT 116 by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation colorimetric assay, whereas the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) homogenous membrane fluorimetric assay was used to measure the degree of cell membrane rupture. The density of cell seeding was calculated to obtain a specific cell number and confluency before treatment with NWs. Optical readings of the cell-reduced MTT products were measured at 570 nm, whereas fluorescent LDH membrane leakage was recorded with an excitation wavelength of 525 nm and an emission wavelength of 580 - 640 nm. The effects of NW length, cell exposure time, as well as NW:cell ratio, were evaluated through both cytotoxic assays. The results show that cell viability due to Ni NWs is affected depending on both exposure time and NW number. On the other hand, membrane rupture and leakage was only significant at later exposure times. Both

  4. Advances and Challenges in Viability Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexin Zeng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne outbreaks are a serious public health and food safety concern worldwide. There is a great demand for rapid, sensitive, specific, and accurate methods to detect microbial pathogens in foods. Conventional methods based on cultivation of pathogens have been the gold standard protocols; however, they take up to a week to complete. Molecular assays such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequencing, microarray technologies have been widely used in detection of foodborne pathogens. Among molecular assays, PCR technology conventional and real-time PCR (qPCR is most commonly used in the foodborne pathogen detection because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, a major drawback of PCR is its inability to differentiate the DNA from dead and viable cells, and this is a critical factor for the food industry, regulatory agencies and the consumer. To remedy this shortcoming, researchers have used biological dyes such as ethidium monoazide (EMA and propidium monoazide (PMA to pretreat samples before DNA extraction to intercalate the DNA of dead cells in food samples, and then proceed with regular DNA preparation and qPCR. By combining PMA treatment with qPCR (PMA-qPCR, scientists have applied this technology to detect viable cells of various bacterial pathogens in foods. The incorporation of PMA into PCR-based assays for viability detection of pathogens in foods has increased significantly in the last decade. On the other hand, some downsides with this approach have been noted, particularly to achieve complete suppression of signal of DNA from the dead cells present in some particular food matrix. Nowadays, there is a tendency of more and more researchers adapting this approach for viability detection; and a few commercial kits based on PMA are available in the market. As time goes on, more scientists apply this approach to a broader range of pathogen detections, this viability approach (PMA or other chemicals such as platinum compound

  5. Farnesol-Induced Apoptosis in Candida albicans Is Mediated by Cdr1-p Extrusion and Depletion of Intracellular Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingsong; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Sanglard, Dominique; Intapa, Chaidan; Dawson, Clinton C.; Peters, Brian M.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol is a key derivative in the sterol biosynthesis pathway in eukaryotic cells previously identified as a quorum sensing molecule in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Recently, we demonstrated that above threshold concentrations, farnesol is capable of triggering apoptosis in C. albicans. However, the exact mechanism of farnesol cytotoxicity is not fully elucidated. Lipophilic compounds such as farnesol are known to conjugate with glutathione, an antioxidant crucial for cellular detoxification against damaging compounds. Glutathione conjugates act as substrates for ATP-dependent ABC transporters and are extruded from the cell. To that end, this current study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that farnesol conjugation with intracellular glutathione coupled with Cdr1p-mediated extrusion of glutathione conjugates, results in total glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and ultimately fungal cell death. The combined findings demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels concomitant with up-regulation of CDR1 and decreased cell viability. However, addition of exogenous reduced glutathione maintained intracellular glutathione levels and enhanced viability. In contrast, farnesol toxicity was decreased in a mutant lacking CDR1, whereas it was increased in a CDR1-overexpressing strain. Further, gene expression studies demonstrated significant up-regulation of the SOD genes, primary enzymes responsible for defense against oxidative stress, with no changes in expression in CDR1. This is the first study describing the involvement of Cdr1p-mediated glutathione efflux as a mechanism preceding the farnesol-induced apoptotic process in C. albicans. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying farnesol-cytotoxicity in C. albicans may lead to the development of this redox-cycling agent as an alternative antifungal agent. PMID:22205973

  6. Enzyme-directed assembly of a nanoparticle probe in tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Miao-Ping; Thompson, Matthew P; Barback, Christopher V; Ku, Ti-Hsuan; Hall, David J; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2013-07-12

    Enzyme-directed assembly in vivo: A targeting strategy is demonstrated, which leads to an active accumulation of nanoparticles by virtue of an assembly event specific to endogenous, enzymatic biochemical signals associated with tumor tissue. The viability of this approach is examined through a proof-of-concept study showing enzyme-directed particle targeting and accumulation in human xenograft tumors in mice following intravenous injection, and the retention of particles is demonstrated within tumors for extended periods of time. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  8. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  9. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Fibrinolytic preflush upon liver retrieval from non-heart beating donors to enhance postpreservation viability and energetic recovery upon reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, T; Hachenberg, A; Tolba, R; Pauleit, D; Akbar, S

    2001-06-27

    Our objective was to evaluate graft equilibration with high viscosity (University of Wisconsin solution [UW]) or low viscosity (Bretschneider's histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate [HTK]) during liver procurement from non-heart beating donors (NHBD) and the potential impact of a preceding fibrinolysis with streptokinase on postpreservation viability. After 60 min of cardiac arrest, rat livers were perfused by gravity (60 cm H2O) via the portal vein with either 60 ml of HTK, 20 ml of UW, or 20 ml of Ringer's solution (22 degrees C including 7500U of streptokinase) and, subsequently, 20 ml of UW. After 24 h of storage at 4 degrees C, viability of the livers was assessed upon isolated reperfusion in vitro. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe perfusion deficits, which were mildly attenuated with HTK, upon flush-out with UW. After preflush with streptokinase, a mostly homogenous distribution of the preservation solution was observed throughout the liver tissue. The choice of the flush-out solution (UW or HTK) had no influence on parenchymal enzyme leakage, hepatic bile production, or tissue levels of ATP after reperfusion of the livers. Fibrinolytic preflush, however, resulted in a relevant and significant improvement of structural integrity as well as functional and metabolic recovery. Compromised vascular tissue perfusion upon organ harvest in NHBD triggers graft dysfunction after cold storage and can easily be circumvented by temporary fibrinolysis before graft retrieval.

  11. Technical viability and development needs for waste forms and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, I.; Gould, T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this breakout session was to provide a forum to discuss technical issues relating to plutonium-bearing waste forms and their disposal facilities. Specific topics for discussion included the technical viability and development needs associated with the waste forms and/or disposal facilities. The expected end result of the session was an in-depth (so far as the limited time would allow) discussion of key issues by the session participants. The session chairs expressed allowance for, and encouragement of, alternative points of view, as well as encouragement for discussion of any relevant topics not addressed in the paper presentations. It was not the intent of this session to recommend or advocate any one technology over another.

  12. Viability report for the ByWater Lakes project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klise, Geoffrey Taylor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Passell, Howard David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peplinski, William J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results from the hydrological, ecological, and renewable energy assessments conducted by Sandia National Laboratories at the ByWater Lakes site in Espanola, New Mexico for ByWater Recreation LLC and Avanyu Energy Services through the New Mexico small business assistance (NMSBA) program. Sandia's role was to assess the viability and provide perspective for enhancing the site to take advantage of renewable energy resources, improve and sustain the natural systems, develop a profitable operation, and provide an asset for the local community. Integral to this work was the identification the pertinent data and data gaps as well as making general observations about the potential issues and concerns that may arise from further developing the site. This report is informational only with no consideration with regards to the business feasibility of the various options that ByWater and Avanyu may be pursuing.

  13. Reconstruction of boundary conditions from internal conditions using viability theory

    KAUST Repository

    Hofleitner, Aude

    2012-06-01

    This article presents a method for reconstructing downstream boundary conditions to a HamiltonJacobi partial differential equation for which initial and upstream boundary conditions are prescribed as piecewise affine functions and an internal condition is prescribed as an affine function. Based on viability theory, we reconstruct the downstream boundary condition such that the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the prescribed initial and upstream conditions and reconstructed downstream boundary condition satisfies the internal value condition. This work has important applications for estimation in flow networks with unknown capacity reductions. It is applied to urban traffic, to reconstruct signal timings and temporary capacity reductions at intersections, using Lagrangian sensing such as GPS devices onboard vehicles.

  14. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts........ In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  15. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines......"Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  16. Relationship between humidity and influenza A viability in droplets and implications for influenza's seasonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yang

    Full Text Available Humidity has been associated with influenza's seasonality, but the mechanisms underlying the relationship remain unclear. There is no consistent explanation for influenza's transmission patterns that applies to both temperate and tropical regions. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ambient humidity and viability of the influenza A virus (IAV during transmission between hosts and to explain the mechanisms underlying it. We measured the viability of IAV in droplets consisting of various model media, chosen to isolate effects of salts and proteins found in respiratory fluid, and in human mucus, at relative humidities (RH ranging from 17% to 100%. In all media and mucus, viability was highest when RH was either close to 100% or below ∼50%. When RH decreased from 84% to 50%, the relationship between viability and RH depended on droplet composition: viability decreased in saline solutions, did not change significantly in solutions supplemented with proteins, and increased dramatically in mucus. Additionally, viral decay increased linearly with salt concentration in saline solutions but not when they were supplemented with proteins. There appear to be three regimes of IAV viability in droplets, defined by humidity: physiological conditions (∼100% RH with high viability, concentrated conditions (50% to near 100% RH with lower viability depending on the composition of media, and dry conditions (<50% RH with high viability. This paradigm could help resolve conflicting findings in the literature on the relationship between IAV viability in aerosols and humidity, and results in human mucus could help explain influenza's seasonality in different regions.

  17. Thermoforming of tracheal cartilage: viability, shape change, and mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yongseok; Protsenko, Dmitriy; Holden, Paul K; Chlebicki, Cara; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-10-01

    Trauma, emergent tracheostomy, and prolonged intubation are common causes of severe deformation and narrowing of the trachea. Laser technology may be used to reshape tracheal cartilage using minimally invasive methods. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the dependence of tracheal cartilage shape change on temperature and laser dosimetry using heated saline bath immersion and laser irradiation, respectively, (2) the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of cartilage, and (3) tissue viability as a function of laser dosimetry. Ex vivo rabbit trachea cartilage specimens were bent and secured around a cylinder (6 mm), and then immersed in a saline bath (45 and 72 degrees C) for 5-100 seconds. In separate experiments, tracheal specimens were irradiated with a diode laser (lambda = 1.45 microm, 220-400 J/cm(2)). Mechanical analysis was then used to determine the elastic modulus in tension after irradiation. Fluorescent viability assays combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were employed to image and identify thermal injury regions. Shape change transition zones, between 62 and 66 degrees C in the saline heating bath and above power densities of 350 J/cm(2) (peak temperatures 65+/-10 degrees C) for laser irradiation were identified. Above these zones, the elastic moduli were higher (8.2+/-4 MPa) than at lower temperatures (4.5+/-3 MPa). LSCM identified significant loss of viable chondrocytes within the laser-irradiation zones. Our results indicate a change in mechanical properties occurs with laser irradiation and further demonstrates that significant thermal damage is concurrent with clinically relevant shape change in the elastic cartilage tissues of the rabbit trachea using the present laser and dosimetry parameters. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The Effect of Saturated Fatty Acids on Methanogenesis and Cell Viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Saturated fatty acids (SFAs are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux, and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093 cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL, myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL, or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18, tested at 10–80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control, corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens.

  19. Enzyme Kinetics? Elementary, my dear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suppose that, in the absence of an enzyme, the. Desirazu N Rao is at the. Department of. Biochemistry, Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His main research interests are in the ateas of protein-DNA interactions using restriction enzymes as model systems and in. DNA methylation. 1 When a carbon atom has four.

  20. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... Key words: Cellulose, cellulase enzyme, fuel ethanol, biomass. ... nearly all fuel ethanol is produced by fermentation of corn ... efficiency. This review will introduce some background knowledge of cellulase enzyme and its hydrolyzation mechanism, focus on its current status in research and application,.

  1. Assessment of C-phycocyanin effect on astrocytes-mediated neuroprotection against oxidative brain injury using 2D and 3D astrocyte tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seul Ki; Park, Jun Sang; Luo, Lidan; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Lee, Hoo Cheol; Shim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-09-24

    Drugs are currently being developed to attenuate oxidative stress as a treatment for brain injuries. C-phycocyanin (C-Pc) is an antioxidant protein of green microalgae known to exert neuroprotective effects against oxidative brain injury. Astrocytes, which compose many portions of the brain, exert various functions to overcome oxidative stress; however, little is known about how C-Pc mediates the antioxidative effects of astrocytes. In this study, we revealed that C-Pc intranasal administration to the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats ensures neuroprotection of ischemic brain by reducing infarct size and improving behavioral deficits. C-Pc also enhanced viability and proliferation but attenuated apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of oxidized astrocytes, without cytotoxicity to normal astrocytes and neurons. To elucidate how C-Pc leads astrocytes to enhance neuroprotection and repair of ischemia brain, we firstly developed 3D oxidized astrocyte model. C-Pc had astrocytes upregulate antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and neurotrophic factors BDNF and NGF, while alleviating inflammatory factors IL-6 and IL-1β and glial scar. Additionally, C-Pc improved viability of 3D oxidized neurons. In summary, C-Pc was concluded to activate oxidized astrocytes to protect and repair the ischemic brain with the combinatorial effects of improved antioxidative, neurotrophic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  2. Pulsed or continuous electromagnetic field induce p53/p21-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in mouse spermatogenic cells in vitro and thus may affect male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solek, Przemyslaw; Majchrowicz, Lena; Bloniarz, Dominika; Krotoszynska, Ewelina; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-05-01

    The impact of electromagnetic field (EMF) on the human health and surrounding environment is a common topic investigated over the years. A significant increase in the electromagnetic field concentration arouses public concern about the long-term effects of EMF on living organisms associated with many aspects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pulsed and continuous electromagnetic field (PEMF/CEMF) on mouse spermatogenic cell lines (GC-1 spg and GC-2 spd) in terms of cellular and biochemical features in vitro. We evaluated the effect of EMF on mitochondrial metabolism, morphology, proliferation rate, viability, cell cycle progression, oxidative stress balance and regulatory proteins. Our results strongly suggest that EMF induces oxidative and nitrosative stress-mediated DNA damage, resulting in p53/p21-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, spermatogenic cells due to the lack of antioxidant enzymes undergo oxidative and nitrosative stress-mediated cytotoxic and genotoxic events, which contribute to infertility by reduction in healthy sperm cells pool. In conclusion, electromagnetic field present in surrounding environment impairs male fertility by inducing p53/p21-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth and viability of juvenile humpback grouper (Cromileptes altivelis supplemented with inorganic and organic selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaimin Hamzah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of inorganic selenium (sodium selenite and organic selenium (selenomethionine supplementation on growth and viability of juvenile humpback grouper (Cromileptes altivelis. The experiment was designed as a completely randomized design with eight treatments and three replications. The treatment being tested was source and dosages of selenium ie., inorganic selenium (sodium selenite supplementation with dosages of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 mg Se/kg diet and organic selenium (selenomethionine with dosages of 1, 2, and 4 mg Se/kg diet. Another treatment was unsupplemented selenium. Juveniles humpback grouper at an initial average length of 6,39±0,41 cm and body weight of 4,49±0,65 g were reared in 90×40×35 cm3 aquaria and fed artificial diet (pellet two times daily (08.00 and 16.00 at satiation. Fishes were reared for 40 days at a stocking density of 12 fish per aquarium on sea water with salinity of 30–31 ppt and temperature of 28–29 °C. The results of this study showed that the source of selenium supplementation (inorganic or organic affected growth performance, glutathione peroxidase (GPx enzyme activity, and blood profiles of the experimental fish. Generally, it was found that selenomethionine supplementation resulted in better fish performance than sodium selenite. In sodium selenite supplementation, survival declined with the increased dosages of Se in the diet, and the supplementation at dosage of 0,5 mg Se/kg diet showed a toxic effects. Histopatological test showed that there were damage in livers, kidneys, and intestines of fish supplemented with sodium selenite from 0.5 to 4 mg Se/kg diet. On the contrary, supplementation of selenomethionine up to 4 mg Se/kg did not show any signs of toxicity and the survival was on 86.11 to 97.22%. Feed efficiency, protein retention, lipid retention, and Se retention indicated that a dosage of 4 mg Se/kg selenomethionine supplementation was the best dosage

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  5. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  6. Cultures of human colonic epithelial cells isolated from endoscopical biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Effect of IFNgamma, TNFalpha and IL-1beta on viability, butyrate oxidation and IL-8 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Bendtzen, K

    2000-01-01

    Cytokine-mediated impairment of viability and metabolic function of epithelial cells has been suggested as a possible early pathogenic event in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is currently unknown whether pro-inflammatory cytokines have a direct effect on human...... nontransformed colonic epithelial cells. We investigated the effects of TNFalpha, IFNgamma and IL-1beta on viability, short chain fatty acid (butyrate) oxidation and IL-8 secretion in human colonic epithelial cell cultures in vitro obtained from macroscopically normal mucosa from IBD patients and controls...... decreased to median 68% of unexposed cultures (P Cells from IBD patients were significantly less sensitive...

  7. Consequences of team charter quality: Teamwork mental model similarity and team viability in engineering design student teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning---including team charters. Team charters were diffused into engineering education as one of many instructional activities to meet the ABET accreditation mandates. However, the implementation and execution of team charters into engineering team based classes has been inconsistent and accepted without empirical evidence of the consequences. The purpose of the current study was to investigate team effectiveness, operationalized as team viability, as an outcome of team charter implementation in an undergraduate engineering team based design course. Two research questions were the focus of the study: a) What is the relationship between team charter quality and viability in engineering student teams, and b) What is the relationship among team charter quality, teamwork mental model similarity, and viability in engineering student teams? Thirty-eight intact teams, 23 treatment and 15 comparison, participated in the investigation. Treatment teams attended a team charter lecture, and completed a team charter homework assignment. Each team charter was assessed and assigned a quality score. Comparison teams did not join the lecture, and were not asked to create a team charter. All teams completed each data collection phase: a) similarity rating pretest; b) similarity posttest; and c) team viability survey. Findings indicate that team viability was higher in teams that attended the lecture and completed the charter assignment. Teams with higher quality team charter scores reported higher levels of team viability than teams with lower quality charter scores. Lastly, no evidence was found to support teamwork mental model similarity as a partial mediator of the team charter quality on team viability

  8. Catalytic Promiscuity of the Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine Enzyme NosL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic promiscuity plays a key role in enzyme evolution and the acquisition of novel biological functions. Because of the high reactivity of radical species, in our view enzymes involving radical-mediated mechanisms could intrinsically be more prone to catalytic promiscuity. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in the study of NosL, a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent L-tryptophan (L-Trp) lyase. We demonstrate here the interesting chemistry and remarkable catalytic promiscuity of NosL, and attempt to highlight the high evolvability of radical SAM enzymes and the potential to engineer these enzymes for novel and improved activities.

  9. Variation of Pollen Viability and Storability in Asparagus (Asparagus offcinalis L.) Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Ozaki, Yukio; Tashiro, Tomoko; Kurahashi, Tomoko; Okubo, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    The optimal culture condition for evaluating pollen viability of asparagus was studied. Sucrose was an effective constituent of the media for raising pollen germination rate. The medium containing 30% sucrose, 0.01% borate and 3% agar was found to be optimum for assessing pollen viability. Effects of temperature and light conditions during in vitro culture on pollen germination rate were not recognized in the range of 20-30℃ in this investigation. Varietal difference of pollen viability and s...

  10. Hesperidin inhibits ovarian cancer cell viability through endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yali; Gao, Jinfang; De, Yinshan

    2017-01-01

    Hesperidin is a vitamin P flavonoid compound primarily present in citrus fruits. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hesperidin inhibits ovarian cancer cell viability via endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathways. A2780 cells were treated with various doses of hesperidin for 6, 12 or 24 h, and the viability of A2780 cells was assessed using the MTT assay. Hesperidin decreased the viability of A2780 cells and increased cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner...

  11. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  12. The Effect of Histone Hyperacetylation on Viability of Basal-Like Breast Cancer Cells MDA-MB-231

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    Aliasghar Rahimian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The Basal-Like breast cancer, is always known for lack of expression of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and as well, absence of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 gene amplification. Improper expression pattern of ER, PR, and Her2, makes Basal-Like breast tumors resistant to the current hormonal and anti HER2 treatments. In recent decades, several studies have been conducted to investigate the regulatory role of chemical modifications of core histones in gene expression. Their results have shown that histone acetylation is involved in regulation of cell survival. Acetylation of core histones is regulated by the epigenetic-modifying enzymes named Histone Deacetylases (HDACs. As a new approach to control the viability of breast tumor cells resistant to the hormonal and anti-HER2 treatments, we have targeted the HDACs. Using Trichostatin A (TSA as a known HDACs inhibitor, we have tried to hyperacetylate the core histones of MDA-MB-231 cells as an in vitro model of Basal-Like breast tumors. Then we have investigated the effect of histone hyperacetylation on viability of MDA-MB-231 cells. Methods MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS and were incubated at 37°C, in a humidified incubator with 5% CO2 atmosphere. Then cells were treated with different concentrations of TSA including: 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1000 nM or control (1% DMSO. After 24 and 48 hours, viability of cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Results After 24 and 48h exposure to different concentrations of TSA, MDA-MB-231 cells showed a maximum tolerable dose. At higher concentrations, TSA decreased the percentage of cell viability through a time-dose dependent manner. IC50 value for 48h treatment was 600 nM. Conclusions Our results indicate that HDACs inhibition and subsequently hyperacetylation of histones, leads to cytotoxic effects on breast tumor cells resistant to the current treatments. Following

  13. BAKERY ENZYMES IN CEREAL TECHNOLOGIES

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    Václav Koman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Bread is the most common and traditional food in the world. For years, enzymes such as malt and fungal alpha-amylase have been used in bread making. Due to the changes in the baking industry and the ever-increasing demand for more natural products, enzymes have gained real importance in bread-making. If an enzyme is added, it is often destroyed by the heat during the baking process. For generations, enzymes have been used for the improvement of texture and appearance, enhancement of nutritional values and generation of appealing flavours and aromas. Enzymes used in bakery industry constitute nearly one third of the market. The bakery products have undergone radical improvements in quality over the past years in terms of flavour, texture and shelf-life. The the biggest contributor for these improvementsis the usage of enzymes. Present work seeks to systematically describe bakery enzymes, their classification, benefits, usage and chemical reactions in the bread making process.doi:10.5219/193

  14. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and plasmid-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcal infections constitute problems to health care institutions. Its resistance to antibiotic has been associated with resistant plasmids (R-plasmid) that have the ability to mediate the production of drug inactivated enzymes such as â-lactamase. Method: Forty five Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and ...

  16. The viability of native microbial communities in martian environment (model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyova, Elena; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Pavlov, Anatolyi; Vdovina, Mariya; Lomasov, Vladimir

    For today the important direction in astrobiology is the experimental simulation of extraterrestrial habitats with the assessment of survivability of microorganisms in such conditions. A new task is to investigate the resistance of native microbial ecosystems which are well adapted to the environment and develop unique protection mechanisms that enable to ensure biosphere formation. The purpose of this research was to study the viability of microorganisms as well as viability of native microbial communities of arid soils and permafrost under stress conditions simulating space environment and martian regolith environment, estimation of duration of Earth like life in the Martian soil. The experimental data obtained give the proof of the preservation of high population density, biodiversity, and reproduction activity under favorable conditions in the Earth analogues of Martian soil - arid soils (Deserts of Israel and Morocco) and permafrost (East Siberia, Antarctica), after the treatment of samples by ionizing radiation dose up to 100 kGy at the pressure of 1 torr, temperature (- 50oC) and in the presence of perchlorate (5%). It was shown that in simulated conditions close to the parameters of the Martian regolith, the diversity of natural bacterial communities was not decreased, and in some cases the activation of some bacterial populations occurred in situ. Our results allow suggesting that microbial communities like those that inhabit arid and permafrost ecosystems on the Earth, can survive at least 500 thousand years under conditions of near surface layer of the Martian regolith. Extrapolation of the data according to the intensity of ionizing radiation to the open space conditions allows evaluating the potential lifespan of cells inside meteorites as 20-50 thousand years at least. In this work new experimental data have been obtained confirming the occurrence of liquid water and the formation of wet soil layer due to sublimation of ice when the temperature of the

  17. Monitoring the viability of citrus rootstocks seeds stored under refrigeration

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    Sérgio Alves de Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The citrus nursery tree is produced through the bud grafting process, in which rootstock is usually grown from seed germination. The objective of this research was to evaluate, in two dissimilar environmental conditions, the viability and polyembryony expression of five citrus rootstocks seeds stored in different periods under refrigeration. The rootstock varieties evaluated were: Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia Osb. cv. Limeira, Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata Raf. cv. Limeira, Citrumelo (P. trifoliata x C. paradisi Macf. cv. Swingle, Sunki mandarin (C. sunki Hort. ex Tanaka and Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. cv. Catania 2. The experimental design was the randomized blocks in a 11 x 5 x 2 factorial scheme, evaluating from time zero to the tenth month of storage, the five varieties of rootstock in two environments: germination and growth B.O.D type chamber (Biological Oxygen Demand - Eletrolab Brand Model FC 122 at 25 °C; and greenhouse seedbed with partial temperature control (22 °C to 36 °C and humidity control (75-85%. The plot had 24 seeds in four replicates, using trays with substrate in greenhouse and Petri dishes with filter paper in B.O.D. chamber. The seed germination rate and polyembryony expression were evaluated monthly. It was concluded that Trifoliate and Citrumelo Swingle seeds can be stored for up to seven months, while Volkamer lemon, Rangpur lime and Sunki seeds can be stored for up to ten months. The polyembryony expression rate was slightly higher when measured in greenhouse than in B.O.D. chamber and remained stable in both environments until the seventh month, from which dropped sharply. Citrumelo Swingle seeds expressed the highest polyembryony rate (18.8%, followed by Rangpur lime and Volkamer lemon (average value of 13.7%, Sunki (9.4% and Trifoliate (3.2%. Despite some differences among varieties, the viability of rootstock stored seeds can be monitored either in the greenhouse or in B

  18. Identifying genetic variants that affect viability in large cohorts.

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    Hakhamanesh Mostafavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of open questions in human evolutionary genetics would become tractable if we were able to directly measure evolutionary fitness. As a step towards this goal, we developed a method to examine whether individual genetic variants, or sets of genetic variants, currently influence viability. The approach consists in testing whether the frequency of an allele varies across ages, accounting for variation in ancestry. We applied it to the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort and to the parents of participants in the UK Biobank. Across the genome, we found only a few common variants with large effects on age-specific mortality: tagging the APOE ε4 allele and near CHRNA3. These results suggest that when large, even late-onset effects are kept at low frequency by purifying selection. Testing viability effects of sets of genetic variants that jointly influence 1 of 42 traits, we detected a number of strong signals. In participants of the UK Biobank of British ancestry, we found that variants that delay puberty timing are associated with a longer parental life span (P~6.2 × 10-6 for fathers and P~2.0 × 10-3 for mothers, consistent with epidemiological studies. Similarly, variants associated with later age at first birth are associated with a longer maternal life span (P~1.4 × 10-3. Signals are also observed for variants influencing cholesterol levels, risk of coronary artery disease (CAD, body mass index, as well as risk of asthma. These signals exhibit consistent effects in the GERA cohort and among participants of the UK Biobank of non-British ancestry. We also found marked differences between males and females, most notably at the CHRNA3 locus, and variants associated with risk of CAD and cholesterol levels. Beyond our findings, the analysis serves as a proof of principle for how upcoming biomedical data sets can be used to learn about selection effects in contemporary humans.

  19. Pitfalls of the MTT assay: Direct and off-target effects of inhibitors can result in over/underestimation of cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, A A; Dmitrenko, V V

    2015-12-15

    The MTT assay (to a less degree MTS, XTT or WST) is a widely exploited approach for measuring cell viability/drug cytotoxicity. MTT reduction occurs throughout a cell and can be significantly affected by a number of factors, including metabolic and energy perturbations, changes in the activity of oxidoreductases, endo-/exocytosis and intracellular trafficking. Over/underestimation of cell viability by the MTT assay may be due to both adaptive metabolic and mitochondrial reprogramming of cells subjected to drug treatment-mediated stress and inhibitor off-target effects. Previously, imatinib, rottlerin, ursolic acid, verapamil, resveratrol, genistein nanoparticles and some polypeptides were shown to interfere with MTT reduction rate resulting in inconsistent results between the MTT assay and alternative assays. Here, to test the under/overestimation of viability by the MTT assay, we compared results derived from the MTT assay with the trypan blue exclusion assay after treatment of glioblastoma U251, T98G and C6 cells with three widely used inhibitors with the known direct and side effects on energy and metabolic homeostasis - temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA-methylating agent, temsirolimus (TEM), an inhibitor of mTOR kinase, and U0126, an inhibitor of MEK1/2 kinases. Inhibitors were applied shortly as in IC50 evaluating studies or long as in studies focusing on drug resistance acquisition. We showed that over/underestimation of cell viability by the MTT assay and its significance depends on a cell line, a time point of viability measurement and other experimental parameters. Furthermore, we provided a comprehensive survey of factors that should be accounted in the MTT assay. To avoid result misinterpretation, supplementation of the tetrazolium salt-based assays with other non-metabolic assays is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ROS-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis-like event directly affect the cell viability of cryopreserved embryogenic callus in Agapanthus praecox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Ren, Li; Chen, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Jie; Reed, Barbara M; Shen, Xiao-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis-like programmed cell death, induced in part by H 2 O 2 , are two key factors that damage cells during plant cryopreservation. Their inhibition can improve cell viability. We hypothesized that oxidative stress and apoptosis-like event induced by ROS seriously impact plant cell viability during cryopreservation. This study documented changes in cell morphology and ultrastructure, and detected dynamic changes in ROS components (O 2 (·-) , H2O2 and OH·), antioxidant systems, and programmed cell death (PCD) events during embryonic callus cryopreservation of Agapanthus praecox. Plasmolysis, organelle ultrastructure changes, and increases in malondialdehyde (a membrane lipid peroxidation product) suggested that oxidative damage and PCD events occurred at several early cryopreservation steps. PCD events including autophagy, apoptosis-like, and necrosis also occurred at later stages of cryopreservation, and most were apoptosis. H2O2 is the most important ROS molecule mediating oxidative damage and affecting cell viability, and catalase and AsA-GSH cycle are involved in scavenging the intracellular H2O2 and protecting the cells against stress damage in the whole process. Gene expression studies verified changes of antioxidant system and PCD-related genes at the main steps of the cryopreservation process that correlated with improved cell viability. Reducing oxidative stress or inhibition of apoptosis-like event by deactivating proteases improved cryopreserved cell viability from 49.14 to 86.85 % and 89.91 %, respectively. These results verify our model of ROS-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis-like event in plant cryopreservation. This study provided a novel insight into cell stress response mechanisms in cryopreservation.

  1. Improvement of cellulolytic enzyme production and performance by rational designing expression regulatory network and enzyme system composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Liu, Guodong; Qu, Yinbo

    2017-12-01

    Filamentous fungi are considered as the most efficient producers expressing lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. Penicillium oxalicum strains possess extraordinary fungal lignocellulolytic enzyme systems and can efficiently utilize plant biomass. In recent years, the regulatory aspects of production of hydrolytic enzymes by P. oxalicum have been well established. This review aims to discuss the recent developments for the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by P. oxalicum. The main cellulolytic transcription factors mediating the complex transcriptional-regulatory network are highlighted. The genome-wide identification of cellulolytic transcription factors, the cascade regulation network for cellulolytic gene expression, and the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation by cellulolytic regulators are discussed. A cellulase regulatory network sensitive to inducers in intracellular environments, the cross-talk of regulation of lignocellulose-degrading enzyme and amylase, and accessory enzymes are also demonstrated. Finally, strategies for the metabolic engineering of P. oxalicum, which show promising applications in the enzymatic hydrolysis for biochemical production, are established. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kelly A; Chapey, Kristen S; Nanescu, Sonia E; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-08

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase (Gamt) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt-deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  3. Delayed angioedema during therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are leading cause of drug-induced angioedema, with incidence of 0.1 to 0.2%. The angioedema is not of immune nature; in predisposed individuals it is caused by accumulation of vasoactive mediators due to reduced activity of angiotensinconverting enzyme. Case report. We presented a 63-year old male patient suffering from hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who had developed two episodes of angioedema during a 5-year long therapy with enalapril. The first episode happened after three, and the second after five years of the therapy. On both occasions, the patient was admitted to the hospital and tracheotomy was avoided in the last moment. Conclusion. Long-term therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors could be associated with delayed angioedema, especially in patients with inflammation of airways caused by infection or chronic irritation.

  4. High Nutrient Levels and TORC1 Activity Reduce Cell Viability following Prolonged Telomere Dysfunction and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Klermund

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells challenged with DNA damage activate checkpoints to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for repair. Successful repair coupled to subsequent checkpoint inactivation is referred to as recovery. When DNA damage cannot be repaired, a choice between permanent arrest and cycling in the presence of damage (checkpoint adaptation must be made. While permanent arrest jeopardizes future lineages, continued proliferation is associated with the risk of genome instability. We demonstrate that nutritional signaling through target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 influences the outcome of this decision. Rapamycin-mediated TORC1 inhibition prevents checkpoint adaptation via both Cdc5 inactivation and autophagy induction. Preventing adaptation results in increased cell viability and hence proliferative potential. In accordance, the ability of rapamycin to increase longevity is dependent upon the DNA damage checkpoint. The crosstalk between TORC1 and the DNA damage checkpoint may have important implications in terms of therapeutic alternatives for diseases associated with genome instability.

  5. The apoptosis linked gene ALG-2 is dysregulated in tumors of various origin and contributes to cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas; Høj, Berit Rahbek; Mollerup, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The apoptosis linked gene-2 (ALG-2), discovered as a proapoptotic calcium binding protein, has recently been found upregulated in lung cancer tissue indicating that this protein may play a role in the pathology of cancer cells and/or may be a tumor marker. Using immunohistochemistry on tissue...... microarrays we analysed the expression of ALG-2 in 7371 tumor tissue samples of various origin as well as in 749 normal tissue samples. Most notably, ALG-2 was upregulated in mesenchymal tumors. No correlation was found between ALG-2 staining intensity and survival of patients with lung, breast or colon...... cancer. siRNA mediated ALG-2 downregulation led to a significant reduction in viability of HeLa cells indicating that ALG-2 may contribute to tumor development and expansion....

  6. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability--an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Højgaard, L; Zachariae, C

    2005-01-01

    of the recipient's conscious awareness of the healer's intention. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that spiritual healing will reduce proliferation and viability of two cancer cell lines in vitro. Three controlled experiments were conducted with three different healers and randomised allocation...... three experimental days, doses, assays, and cells, 34 (51.6%) of 66 independent comparisons showed differences in the hypothesised direction (P = 0.90). The average effect size across cell lines, days, assays, and doses approached zero (Cohen's d = -0.01). The results do not support previous reports...... of beneficial effects of spiritual healing on malignant cell growth in vitro. Reported beneficial effects of spiritual healing on the well-being of cancer patients seem more likely to be mediated by psychosocial and psychophysiological effects of the healer-patient relationship....

  7. Single administration of recombinant IL-6 restores the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes in liver of fasting IL-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavito, A L; Cabello, R; Suarez, J

    2016-01-01

    lipogenic enzymes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Gene and protein expression of lipogenic enzymes were examined in livers of wild-type (WT) and IL-6-deficient (IL-6(-/-) ) mice during fasting and re-feeding conditions. Effects of exogenous IL-6 administration on gene expression of these enzymes were evaluated...... of hepatic lipogenic enzymes. IL-6 administration in vivo and in vitro showed that IL-6-mediated signalling was associated with the up-regulation of hepatic lipogenic enzyme genes. Moreover, silencing STAT3 in HepG2 cells attenuated IL-6 mediated up-regulation of lipogenic gene transcription levels...

  8. Combination of selected enzymes with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in biofilm inactivation, removal and regrowth

    KAUST Repository

    Araujo, Paula Alexandra Da Silva

    2017-03-01

    Enzymes are considered an innovative and environmentally friendly approach for biofilm control due to their lytic and dispersal activities. In this study, four enzymes (β-glucanase, α-amylase, lipase and protease) were tested separately and in combination with the quaternary ammonium compound cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to control flow-generated biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The four enzymes caused modest reduction of biofilm colony forming units (CFU). Protease, β-glucanase and α-amylase also caused modest biofilm removal. CTAB combined with either β-glucanase or α-amylase increased biofilm removal. Its combination with either β-glucanase or protease increased CFU reduction. However, CTAB−protease combination was antagonist in biofilm removal. Long-term effects in biofilm mass reduction were observed after protease exposure. In contrast, biofilms treated with β-glucanase were able to regrowth significantly after exposure. Moreover, short-term respirometry tests with planktonic cells were performed to understand the effects of enzymes and their combination with CTAB on P. fluorescens viability. Protease and lipase demonstrated antimicrobial action, while α-amylase increased bacterial metabolic activity. The combination of CTAB with either protease or α-amylase was antagonistic, decreasing the antimicrobial action of CTAB. The overall results demonstrate a modest effect of the selected enzymes in biofilm control, either when applied alone or each one in combination with CTAB. Total biofilm removal or CFU reduction was not achieved and, in some cases, the use of enzymes antagonized the effects of CTAB. The results also propose that complementary tests, to characterize biofilm integrity and microbial viability, are required when someone is trying to assess the role of novel biocide - enzyme mixtures for effective biofilm control.

  9. A Method for Quantitative Determination of Biofilm Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Strømme

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present a scheme for quantitative determination of biofilm viability offering significant improvement over existing methods with metabolic assays. Existing metabolic assays for quantifying viable bacteria in biofilms usually utilize calibration curves derived from planktonic bacteria, which can introduce large errors due to significant differences in the metabolic and/or growth rates of biofilm bacteria in the assay media compared to their planktonic counterparts. In the presented method we derive the specific growth rate of Streptococcus mutans bacteria biofilm from a series of metabolic assays using the pH indicator phenol red, and show that this information could be used to more accurately quantify the relative number of viable bacteria in a biofilm. We found that the specific growth rate of S. mutans in biofilm mode of growth was 0.70 h−1, compared to 1.09 h−1 in planktonic growth. This method should be applicable to other bacteria types, as well as other metabolic assays, and, for example, to quantify the effect of antibacterial treatments or the performance of bactericidal implant surfaces.

  10. Using Bayesian Population Viability Analysis to Define Relevant Conservation Objectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W Green

    Full Text Available Adaptive management provides a useful framework for managing natural resources in the face of uncertainty. An important component of adaptive management is identifying clear, measurable conservation objectives that reflect the desired outcomes of stakeholders. A common objective is to have a sustainable population, or metapopulation, but it can be difficult to quantify a threshold above which such a population is likely to persist. We performed a Bayesian metapopulation viability analysis (BMPVA using a dynamic occupancy model to quantify the characteristics of two wood frog (Lithobates sylvatica metapopulations resulting in sustainable populations, and we demonstrate how the results could be used to define meaningful objectives that serve as the basis of adaptive management. We explored scenarios involving metapopulations with different numbers of patches (pools using estimates of breeding occurrence and successful metamorphosis from two study areas to estimate the probability of quasi-extinction and calculate the proportion of vernal pools producing metamorphs. Our results suggest that ≥50 pools are required to ensure long-term persistence with approximately 16% of pools producing metamorphs in stable metapopulations. We demonstrate one way to incorporate the BMPVA results into a utility function that balances the trade-offs between ecological and financial objectives, which can be used in an adaptive management framework to make optimal, transparent decisions. Our approach provides a framework for using a standard method (i.e., PVA and available information to inform a formal decision process to determine optimal and timely management policies.

  11. MODERN TECHNIQUES OF CERVICAL INSTRUMENTATION IN IMMATURE SKELETON: VIABILITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrana Soares Aires

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This study describes the use of materials for modern cervical instrumentation, evaluating its viability in children and adolescents, and the techniques used in different cases. The efficacy of the techniques was analyzed through improvement of pain, maintenance of cervical range of motion, recovery of craniocervical stability, bone consolidation, and spinal stenosis in the postoperative follow-up. Method: Retrospective study of the clinical and radiological parameters of 27 patients aged two to 16 years with cervical spine diseases. Results: Two patients had chronic dislocation in C1-C2, one had congenital axis spondylolisthesis, two had congenital dislocation in C1-C2, three had tumors, one had kyphosis after laminectomy, one had post-infection kyphosis, one had fracture, 11 were syndromic with instabilities, and five had congenital cervical scoliosis. As to surgical approaches, two patients were transorally operated, three by anterior approach, 15 by posterior approach, two by anterior and posterior approaches, and five were treated in three stages (anterior, posterior and anterior approaches. Regarding the technique of cervical stabilization, seven patients were treated by Goel-Harms technique, two received Goel’s facet distraction, and three, Wright translaminar screws. There were complications in four cases. Two patients in the instrumentation of C1 lateral mass due to poor positioning, one with cerebrospinal fluid fistula and one with surgical wound infection. Conclusion: Modern cervical instrumentation in pediatric patients is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of cervical instability.

  12. Viability and heat resistance of murine norovirus on bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-01-04

    Contaminated bread was the cause of a large-scale outbreak of norovirus disease in Japan in 2014. Contamination of seafood and uncooked food products by norovirus has been reported several times in the past; however the outbreak resulting from the contamination of bread products was unusual. A few reports on the presence of norovirus on bread products are available; however there have been no studies on the viability and heat resistance of norovirus on breads, which were investigated in this study. ce:italic>/ce:italic> strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, was inoculated directly on 3 types of bread, but the infectivity of MNV-1 on bread samples was almost unchanged after 5days at 20°C. MNV-1 was inoculated on white bread that was subsequently heated in a toaster for a maximum of 2min. The results showed that MNV-1 remained viable if the heating period was insufficient to inactivate. In addition, bread dough contaminated with MNV-1 was baked in the oven. Our results indicated that MNV-1 may remain viable on breads if the heating duration or temperature is insufficient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Methods and applications of population viability analysis (PVA): a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Wu, Jian-Guo; Kou, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Tian-Ming; Smith, Andrew T; Ge, Jian-Ping

    2011-01-01

    With the accelerating human consumption of natural resources, the problems associated with endangered species caused by habitat loss and fragmentation have become greater and more urgent than ever. Conceptually associated with the theories of island biogeography, population viability analysis (PVA) has been one of the most important approaches in studying and protecting endangered species, and this methodology has occupied a central place in conservation biology and ecology in the past several decades. PVA has been widely used and proven effective in many cases, but its predictive ability and accuracy are still in question. Also, its application needs expand. To overcome some of the problems, we believe that PVA needs to incorporate some principles and methods from other fields, particularly landscape ecology and sustainability science. Integrating landscape pattern and socioeconomic factors into PVA will make the approach theoretically more comprehensive and practically more useful. Here, we reviewed the history, basic conception, research methods, and modeling applications and their accuracies of PVA, and proposed the perspective in this field.

  14. Adverse respiratory outcome after premature rupture of membranes before viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspyck, Eric; Bisson, Violene; Roman, Horace; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) before 24 weeks is an independent risk factor for poor outcome in preterm neonates. A retrospective comparative cohort study was conducted, including viable premature infants born between 25 and 34-weeks gestation. Each preterm case with early PPROM was matched with two preterm controls of the same gestational age at birth, sex and birth date and who were born spontaneously with intact membranes. Logistic regression was performed to identify independent risk factors associated with composite respiratory and perinatal adverse outcomes for the overall population of preterm infants. Thirty-five PPROM cases were matched with 70 controls. Extreme prematurity (26-28 weeks) was an independent risk factor for composite perinatal adverse outcomes [odds ratio (OR) 43.9; p = 0.001]. Extreme prematurity (OR 42.9; p = 0.001), PPROM (OR 7.1; p = 0.01), male infant (OR 5.2; p = 0.02) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, OR 4.8; p = 0.04) were factors for composite respiratory adverse outcomes. Preterm premature rupture of membranes before viability represents an independent risk factor for composite respiratory adverse outcomes in preterm neonates. Extreme prematurity may represent the main risk factor for both composite respiratory and perinatal adverse outcomes. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Viability of microencapsulated Lactobacillus casei in synbiotic mayonnaise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieu, M.D.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, whey protein, maltodextrin and GOS (Galacto-oligosaccharides used as microencapsulating agents to protect Lactobacillus casei during spray-drying and mayonnaise storage. The morphology of microcapsules, pH charges, the survival rate during mayonnaise storage as well as survival in simulated gastric fluid (SGF and intestinal fluid (SIF was tested in this study. The results indicated that whey protein showed a protective effect better than maltodextrin during spray-drying. The particles showed spherical shape and typical concavity of all samples and encapsulating agents were not affected by the size and surface structure of particles. The pH charges were not significantly different in all mayonnaise samples in this test. The viability of free cell L. casei after 6 weeks storage was significant decrease about 4 log CFU/g compared to 1.55 to 3.27 log CFU/g in the mayonnaise samples containing microcapsules in which maltodextrin showed the lowest of L. casei survival rate. In SGF and SIF conditions, maltodextrin act as prebiotic sufficiently which do not need adding GOS. The combination of whey protein and maltodextrin in which maltodextrin plays a role as supporting agents for the spray-drying process as well as prebiotic potential, while whey protein with high buffer property which enhancing the survival rate of L. casie in low pH.

  16. Incorporating parametric uncertainty into population viability analysis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Runge, Michael C.; Larson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainty in parameter estimates from sampling variation or expert judgment can introduce substantial uncertainty into ecological predictions based on those estimates. However, in standard population viability analyses, one of the most widely used tools for managing plant, fish and wildlife populations, parametric uncertainty is often ignored in or discarded from model projections. We present a method for explicitly incorporating this source of uncertainty into population models to fully account for risk in management and decision contexts. Our method involves a two-step simulation process where parametric uncertainty is incorporated into the replication loop of the model and temporal variance is incorporated into the loop for time steps in the model. Using the piping plover, a federally threatened shorebird in the USA and Canada, as an example, we compare abundance projections and extinction probabilities from simulations that exclude and include parametric uncertainty. Although final abundance was very low for all sets of simulations, estimated extinction risk was much greater for the simulation that incorporated parametric uncertainty in the replication loop. Decisions about species conservation (e.g., listing, delisting, and jeopardy) might differ greatly depending on the treatment of parametric uncertainty in population models.

  17. Wastewater treatment to enhance the economic viability of microalgae culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, J C M; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Simões, M

    2013-08-01

    Microalgae culture is still not economically viable and it presents some negative environmental impacts, concerning water, nutrient and energy requirements. In this context, this study aims to review the recent advances on microalgal cultures in wastewaters to enhance their economic viability. We focused on three different culture concepts: (1) suspended cell systems, (2) cell immobilization, and (3) microalgae consortia. Cultures with suspended cells are the most studied. The nutrient removal efficiencies are usually high for wastewaters of different sources. However, biomass harvesting is difficult and a costly process due to the small cell size and lower culture density. On the other hand, the cell immobilization systems showed to be the solution for this problem, having as main limitation the nutrient diffusion from bulk to cells, which results in a reduced nutrient removal efficiency. The consortium between microalgae and bacteria enhances the growth of both microorganisms. This culture concept showed to be a promising technology to improve wastewater treatment, regarding not only nutrient removal but also biomass harvesting by bioflocculation. The aggregation mechanism must be studied in depth to find the process parameters that would lead to an effective and cheap harvesting process.

  18. Microscale Electro-Hydrodynamic Cell Printing with High Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankang; Zhao, Xiang; Chang, Jinke; Li, Dichen

    2017-12-01

    Cell printing has gained extensive attentions for the controlled fabrication of living cellular constructs in vitro. Various cell printing techniques are now being explored and developed for improved cell viability and printing resolution. Here an electro-hydrodynamic cell printing strategy is developed with microscale resolution (95%). Unlike the existing electro-hydrodynamic cell jetting or printing explorations, insulating substrate is used to replace conventional semiconductive substrate as the collecting surface which significantly reduces the electrical current in the electro-hydrodynamic printing process from milliamperes (>0.5 mA) to microamperes (printed cells. The smallest width of the electro-hydrodynamically printed hydrogel filament is 82.4 ± 14.3 µm by optimizing process parameters. Multiple hydrogels or multilayer cell-laden constructs can be flexibly printed under cell-friendly conditions. The printed cells in multilayer hydrogels kept alive and gradually spread during 7-days culture in vitro. This exploration offers a novel and promising cell printing strategy which might benefit future biomedical innovations such as microscale tissue engineering, organ-on-a-chip systems, and nanomedicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tissue viability monitoring: a multi-sensor wearable platform approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Davidson, Alan; Buis, Arjan; Glesk, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    Health services worldwide are seeking ways to improve patient care for amputees suffering from diabetes, and at the same time reduce costs. The monitoring of residual limb temperature, interface pressure and gait can be a useful indicator of tissue viability in lower limb amputees especially to predict the occurrence of pressure ulcers. This is further exacerbated by elevated temperatures and humid micro environment within the prosthesis which encourages the growth of bacteria and skin breakdown. Wearable systems for prosthetic users have to be designed such that the sensors are minimally obtrusive and reliable enough to faithfully record movement and physiological signals. A mobile sensor platform has been developed for use with the lower limb prosthetic users. This system uses an Arduino board that includes sensors for temperature, gait, orientation and pressure measurements. The platform transmits sensor data to a central health authority database server infrastructure through the Bluetooth protocol at a suitable sampling rate. The data-sets recorded using these systems are then processed using machine learning algorithms to extract clinically relevant information from the data. Where a sensor threshold is reached a warning signal can be sent wirelessly together with the relevant data to the patient and appropriate medical personnel. This knowledge is also useful in establishing biomarkers related to a possible deterioration in a patient's health or for assessing the impact of clinical interventions.

  20. Viability of osteocytes in bone autografts harvested for dental implantology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, Bernard [CFI-College Francais d' Implantologie, 6 rue de Rome, 75008 Paris (France); Gaudin, Christine; Georgeault, Sonia; Mallet, Romain; Basle, Michel F; Chappard, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.chappard@univ-angers.f [INSERM, U 922-LHEA, Faculte de Medecine, 49045 Angers Cedex (France)

    2009-02-15

    Bone autograft remains a very useful and popular way for filling bone defects. In maxillofacial surgery or implantology, it is used to increase the volume of the maxilla or mandible before placing dental implants. Because there is a noticeable delay between harvesting the graft and its insertion in the receiver site, we evaluated the morphologic changes at the light and transmission electron microscopy levels. Five patients having an autograft (bone harvested from the chin) were enrolled in the study. A small fragment of the graft was immediately fixed after harvesting and a second one was similarly processed at the end of the grafting period when bone has been stored at room temperature for a 20 min +- 33 s period in saline. A net increase in the number of osteocyte lacunae filled with cellular debris was observed (+41.5%). However no cytologic alteration could be observed in the remaining osteocytes. The viability of these cells is known to contribute to the success of autograft in association with other less well-identified factors.