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Sample records for vhf radar echoes

  1. Letter to the Editor: Complete maps of the aspect sensitivity of VHF atmospheric radar echoes

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    R. M. Worthington

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the MU radar at Shigaraki, Japan (34.85°N, 136.10°E, we measure the power distribution pattern of VHF radar echoes from the mid-troposphere. The large number of radar beam-pointing directions (320 allows the mapping of echo power from 0° to 40° from zenith, and also the dependence on azimuth, which has not been achieved before at VHF wavelengths. The results show how vertical shear of the horizontal wind is associated with a definite skewing of the VHF echo power distribution, for beam angles as far as 30° or more from zenith, so that aspect sensitivity cannot be assumed negligible at any beam-pointing angle that most existing VHF radars are able to use. Consequently, the use of VHF echo power to calculate intensity of atmospheric turbulence, which assumes only isotropic backscatter at large beam zenith angles, will sometimes not be valid.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; instruments and techniques

  2. Long-period unstable gravity-waves and associated VHF radar echoes

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    R. M. Worthington

    Full Text Available VHF atmospheric radar is used to measure the wind velocity and radar echo power related to long-period wind perturbations, including gravity waves, which are observed commonly in the lower stratosphere and tropopause region, and sometimes in the troposphere. These wind structures have been identified previously as either inertia-gravity waves, often associated with jet streams, or mountain waves. At heights of peak wind shear, imbalances are found between the echo powers of a symmetric pair of radar beams, which are expected to be equal. The largest of these power differences are found for conditions of simultaneous high wind shear and high aspect sensitivity. It is suggested that the effect might arise from tilted specular reflectors or anisotropic turbulent scatterers, a result of, for example, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities generated by the strong wind shears. This radar power-difference effect could offer information about the onset of saturation in long-period waves, and the formation of thin layers of turbulence.

  3. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

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    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  4. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

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    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  5. Meteoroid Fragmentation as Revealed in Head- and Trail-Echoes Observed with the Arecibo UHF and VHF Radars

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    Mathews, J. D.; Malhorta, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent 46.8/430 MHz (VHF/UHF) radar meteor observations at Arecibo Observatory (AO) that reveal many previously unreported features in the radar meteor return - including flare-trails at both UHF and VHF - that are consistent with meteoroid fragmentation. Signature features of fragmentation include strong intra-pulse and pulse-to-pulse fading as the result of interference between or among multiple meteor head-echo returns and between head-echo and impulsive flare or "point" trail-echoes. That strong interference fading occurs implies that these scatterers exhibit well defined phase centers and are thus small compared with the wavelength. These results are consistent with and offer advances beyond a long history of optical and radar meteoroid fragmentation studies. Further, at AO, fragmenting and flare events are found to be a large fraction of the total events even though these meteoroids are likely the smallest observed by the major radars. Fragmentation is found to be a major though not dominate component of the meteors observed at other HPLA radars that are sensitive to larger meteoroids.

  6. Observations of mesosphere summer echoes with calibrated VHF radars at latitudes between 54°N and 69°N in summer 2004

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    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Kirkwood, S.; Jönsson, L. O.; Eriksson, Håkan

    2005-08-01

    Mesosphere Summer Echoes (MSE) have been observed with 50-MHz VHF radars at middle (MSE) and polar latitudes (PMSE) for more than 20 years. The occurrence and seasonal variation of these radar echoes as well as their dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity are mostly studied basing on relative signal strength measurements (signal-to-noise ratios). The latitudinal dependence of the appearance and intensity of mesospheric summer echoes is still an open question as the widely used relative signal strength observations are determined by the atmospheric properties as well as by the individual radar characteristics. The use of absolutely calibrated echo powers allows a system in-depended comparison of mesospheric summer echoes observed at different sites by different systems. We present two different radar calibration methods. One applies a noise source to calibrate the receive path of the radar only, a second uses the radar signal itself to calibrate the complete transmitting and receiving path of the radar system. Both techniques and the same calibration hardware have been applied to the ALWIN VHF radar at Andenes/Norway (69°N), the ESRAD radar at Kiruna/Sweden (68deg;N) and OSWIN radar at Kühlungsborn/Germany (54°N). The sensitivity of the different radar systems and the seasonal and diurnal variation of the occurrence of mesospheric summer echoes at different locations are discussed on the basis of radar backscatter cross-sections.

  7. Meteor head echo altitude distributions and the height cutoff effect studied with the EISCAT HPLA UHF and VHF radars

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    A. Westman

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Meteor head echo altitude distributions have been derived from data collected with the EISCAT VHF (224MHz and UHF (930MHz high-power, large-aperture (HPLA radars. At the high-altitude end, the distributions cut off abruptly in a manner reminiscent of the trail echo height ceiling effect observed with classical meteor radars. The target dimensions are shown to be much smaller than both the VHF and the UHF probing wavelengths, but the cutoff heights for the two systems are still clearly different, the VHF cutoff being located several km above the UHF one. A single-collision meteor-atmosphere interaction model is used to demonstrate that meteors in the (1.3–7.2µg mass range will ionise such that critical electron density at 224MHz is first reached at or around the VHF cutoff altitude and critical density at 930MHz will be reached at the UHF cutoff altitude. The observed seasonal variation in the cutoff altitudes is shown to be a function of the seasonal variation of atmospheric density with altitude. Assuming that the electron density required for detection is in the order of the critical density, the abrupt altitude cutoffs can be explained as a consequence of the micrometeoroid joint size-speed distribution dropping off so fast at the large-mass, high-velocity end that above a certain altitude the number of detectable events becomes vanishingly small. Conversely, meteors at the low-mass end of the distribution will be gradually retarded such that the ionisation they generate never reaches critical density. These particles will remain unobservable.Key words. Radio science (instruments and techniques – Interplatery physics (interplanetary dust – General or miscellaneous (new fields

  8. Calculating the azimuth of mountain waves, using the effect of tilted fine-scale stable layers on VHF radar echoes

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    R. M. Worthington

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple method is described, based on standard VHF wind-profiler data, where imbalances of echo power between four off-vertical radar beams, caused by mountain waves, can be used to calculate the orientation of the wave pattern. It is shown that the mountain wave azimuth (direction of the horizontal component of the wavevector, is given by the vector [ W (PE - P W ,W (PN - P S ]; PN, PS, PE, PW are radar echo powers, measured in dB, in beams pointed away from vertical by the same angle towards north, south, east and west respectively, and W is the vertical wind velocity. The method is applied to Aberystwyth MST radar data, and the calculated wave vector usually, but not always, points into the low-level wind direction. The mean vertical wind at Aberystwyth, which may also be affected by tilted aspect-sensitive layers, is investigated briefly using the entire radar output 1990-1997. The mean vertical-wind profile is inconsistent with existing theories, but a new mountain-wave interpretation is proposed.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques.

  9. Spatial variability of the aspect sensitivity of VHF radar echoes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere during jet stream passages

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    J. G. Yoe

    Full Text Available The aspect sensitivity of SOUSY-VHF-radar oblique-beam echoes from the troposphere and lower stratosphere has been examined for a number of jet stream passages during the years 1990 - 1992. When the core of the jet is overhead or nearly so, vertical profiles of the aspect sensitivity display two notable features. First, the distinction between mainly isotropic and strongly aspect-sensitive echoes in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, respectively, often reported for measurements made during calm conditions, does not necessarily prevail in the vicinity of the jet stream. Second, echoes obtained at altitudes near the height of the horizontal wind maximum are found to be more aspect sensitive for beams directed parallel to the horizontal flow or nearly so, than for other beam directions. It is demonstrated that time-averaged horizontal wind speeds estimated from the radar data, taking into account the reduced effective oblique-beam zenith angle resulting from aspect sensitivity, may exceed uncorrected wind speeds by as much as 10 m s-1 in these circumstances. Implications for wind profiling and for describing the backscattering process are discussed. Doppler spectral widths examined for one jet stream passage are found to be narrower in a beam aligned with the horizontal wind at heights near the wind speed maximum than corresponding widths measured in a beam projected at right angles to the jet. The narrowest spectra thus coincide with the most aspect-sensitive echoes, consistent with the hypothesis that such returns result from specular backscattering processes.

  10. Calculating the azimuth of mountain waves, using the effect of tilted fine-scale stable layers on VHF radar echoes

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    R. M. Worthington

    Full Text Available A simple method is described, based on standard VHF wind-profiler data, where imbalances of echo power between four off-vertical radar beams, caused by mountain waves, can be used to calculate the orientation of the wave pattern. It is shown that the mountain wave azimuth (direction of the horizontal component of the wavevector, is given by the vector [ W (PE - P W ,W (PN - P S ]; PN, PS, PE, PW are radar echo powers, measured in dB, in beams pointed away from vertical by the same angle towards north, south, east and west respectively, and W is the vertical wind velocity. The method is applied to Aberystwyth MST radar data, and the calculated wave vector usually, but not always, points into the low-level wind direction. The mean vertical wind at Aberystwyth, which may also be affected by tilted aspect-sensitive layers, is investigated briefly using the entire radar output 1990-1997. The mean vertical-wind profile is inconsistent with existing theories, but a new mountain-wave interpretation is proposed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques.

  11. Observation of polar mesosphere summer echoes with calibrated VHF radars at 69° in the Northern and Southern hemispheres

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    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Morris, R. J.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Murphy, D. J.

    2007-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) observed in the northern and southern hemisphere were studied using continuous measurements obtained by calibrated VHF radars located at Andenes (69.3°N) and Davis (68.6°S) during the boreal summer 2004 and the austral summer 2004/2005. The PMSE observed at Davis have a lower peak volume reflectivity of approximately 4 . 10-11 m-1 compared with their counterparts (7 . 10-10 m-1) observed at Andenes. The duration of the PMSE season is correlated with the dynamical and thermal state of the mesopause region supported by recent studies using meridional winds and temperatures. PMSE occurred less frequently but with greater variability above Davis. The diurnal variation of PMSE occurrence has a maximum around 11-16 LT in both hemispheres, and a minimum occurs during late evening with a longer duration in the southern hemisphere. The mean PMSE season at both sites started around 34 days before solstice, but the duration of the Davis PMSE season is about 9 days shorter than at Andenes. The maximum occurrence height of PMSE at Davis is 86 km which is about 1 km higher than at Andenes.

  12. Observation of strong VHF-radar echoes from the E-region at 69°N and 54°N: Echo properties, relation to sporadic layers, and physical mechanisms

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    Rapp, Markus; Leitert, Lasse; Latteck, Ralph; Zecha, Marius; Hoffmann, Peter; Höffner, Josef; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; La Hoz, Cesar

    For more than ten years the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics at Rostock University in Kühlungsborn has been operating two VHF-radars (53.5 MHz) at the Arctic location Andenes (69N, 16E) as well as the mid-latitude site Kühlungsborn (54.1N 11.8E). Both radars have primarily been used for the study of strong radar echoes from the summer mesopause region known as (polar) mesosphere summer echoes or (P)MSE. PMSE occur from mid May until mid August in an altitude range from 80 -90 km, i.e., at the time of year and in the altitude range where the atmosphere is supersaturated with respect to ice such that ice particles may form, modify the D-region plasma, and lead to spectacular radar echoes. The existence of echoes from above this altitude range has generally been deemed impossible since refractive index fluctuations arising from neutral dynamics such as turbulence are effectively destroyed at these altitudes owing to the exponential increase of viscosity with height. Also, plasma instabilities which occur between 90 -110 km height produce field aligned irregularities and should not lead to detectable echoes for vertically sounding radars at polar latitudes where the magnetic field lines are essentially perpendicular to the surface. It hence comes as a surprise that our recent observations in the altitude range from 90 -115 km reveals the presence of strong radar echoes both at 69N as well as 54N. These echoes have a typical duration of less than 1 hour and extend over less than 1 km in height. They occur in the entire altitude range from 90 to 115 km with a pronounced maximum at 100 km. The seasonal variation is marked by a pronounced maximum during the summer months. This paper describes the morphology and statistics of these echoes, discusses its relation to sporadic E-layers and sporadic metal layers, and closes with an initial attempt to identify a physical mechanism responsible for these structures.

  13. An ambiguity-function-based method for analysis of Doppler decompressed radar signals applied to EISCAT measurements of oblique UHF-VHF meteor echoes

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    Wannberg, G.; Pellinen-Wannberg, A.; Westman, A.

    1996-05-01

    Binary phase modulation using Barker codes as the modulating sequences is often used as a pulse compression technique in incoherent scatter radar measurements of the ionospheric E region. Demodulation of the compressed signal is usually accomplished by matched filtering techniques. If the target has appreciable velocity, the resulting Doppler shift detunes the scattered signal relative to the filter, and the target response spreads over a large range interval. The paper describes the development of a new data analysis method, based on an ambiguity function description of radar total-power measurements, which uses the characteristic Doppler decompression signatures to identify, extract, and analyze high-velocity events from conventional Barker-coded power profile type incoherent scatter (IS) measurements. Data sets recorded with the European Incoherent Scatter UHF (931 MHz) and VHF (224 MHz) radars during the 1990-1991 Geminid and 1993 Perseid showers are shown to contain many events which are associated with individual meteors crossing the radar beams over a wide range of aspect angles, including a few near-radial cases. Line-of-sight velocities and effective cross sections are derived for some of the best dual radar events. The cross sections are very small and increase with decreasing wavelength, something not observed before. It is suggested that this is indicative of a scattering mechanism different from the one operating at near-normal incidence at VHF, and Rayleigh scatter from compact "balls" of plasma contained within the meteor coma is proposed as a possible candidate, in qualitative agreement with the observations. Finally, some signal-processing related aspects of the method are discussed. It is shown that most IS radars should be able to apply it to their existing programs with very little effort and without having to compromise the performance in normal E region applications. The method could therefore become a powerful tool for studies of meteor

  14. Relationship between propagation direction of gravity waves in OH and OI airglow images and VHF radar echo occurrence during the SEEK-2 campaign

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    F. Onoma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW in OI (557.7nm and OH airglow images and VHF radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities (FAI in the E-region during the SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 campaign period from 29 July to 9 August 2002. An all-sky imager was operated at Nishino-Omote (30.5 N, 130.1 E, Japan. On 14 nights, 17 AGW events were detected in OI and OH airglow images. AGW propagated mostly toward the northeast or southeast. From comparison with the E-region FAI occurrence, which is detected by a nearby VHF radar (31.57MHz, we found that AGW tended to propagate southeastward during FAI events. This result suggests that the interaction between AGW and E-region plasma plays an important role in generating FAI. Furthermore, polarization electric fields generated directly by AGW may contribute to the FAI generation.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora, Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  15. PMSE Observations With the Tri-Static EISCAT VHF Radars

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    Mann, I.; Tjulin, A.; Häggström, I.

    2013-12-01

    The polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are generated in the ionosphere at roughly 80 to 90 altitude by electron irregularities in the presence of charged solid particles and PMSE are most likely observed when ice particles form onto nanodust. PMSE formation is an important part in understanding mesospheric processes, but is also an interesting example for dusty plasma phenomena occurring in space. To investigate the phenomena that lead to formation of PMSE it is helpful to study the radar reflectivity of the mesosphere at different angles. PMSE were previously studied at different aspect angles in order to better understand the scattering process. Another way is observing PMSE from multiple sites simultaneously. During this summer the EISCAT radars that are located in Northern Scandinavia could for the first time be used for tri-static observations in the VHF band and we carried out observations during three subsequent days in June 2013. The radar signal was transmitted in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø (69.59 deg N, 19.23 deg E) and the scattered signal was measured from Tromsø, Kiruna (67.86 deg N, 20.44 deg E) and Sodankylä (67.36 deg N, 26.63 deg E). Zenith observations were simultaneously carried out with the Tromsø UHF radar (933 MHz). Other groups have previously reported the observations of PMSE simultaneously with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars, but with a much lower occurrence rate for the UHF. UHF observations made during this campaign are dominated by incoherent scatter. The VHF system in Tromsø detected PMSE for a large fraction of the observation time. The VHF receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. Preliminary results from the campaign will be presented and discussed.

  16. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

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    A. N. Karashtin

    Full Text Available HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8–9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  17. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

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    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  18. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

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    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  19. First wind shear observation in PMSE with the tristatic EISCAT VHF radar

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ingrid; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A; Rostami, S; Anyairo, CC; Dalin, P

    2016-01-01

    (c) American Geophysical Union, reprinted with permission. Article also available at source: https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JA023080 The Polar Summer Mesosphere has the lowest temperatures that occur in the entire Earth system. Water ice particles below the optically observable size range participate there in the formation of strong radar echoes (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes, PMSE). To study PMSE we carried out observations with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) VHF and EIS...

  20. Layered Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes Observed with the Tri-Static Eiscat VHF

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    Mann, I.; Anyairo, C.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are strong radar echoes that are typically observed at 50 to 500 MHz. They are often discussed in the context of dusty plasma studies and linked to e.g. the existence of charged ice particles, neutral atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stratification. The PMSE are observed at mesospheric temperature minimum when ice particles form, though the exact path of formation is still a topic for research. Mesospheric smoke particles that are assumed to form after or during the meteor ablation process possibly contribute to the formation of the ice particles. For understanding the formation of the radar echoes their variation with scattering angle is an important parameter. We analyze PMSE observations with the tri-static EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz) during one day in June when PMSE were observed almost continuously from 7:00 to 13:00 UT. The radar signal was transmitted and received in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø. The receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. The altitude of the PMSE changed with time and the extension of the echoes in altitude was smaller toward the end of the observation. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. The observations suggest that the scattering process underlying the PMSE occurs over a broad range of scattering angles. Based on the observations we will show that the spectral width of the received echoes is most likely determined by the variations within the observed volume rather than by the scattering process. The observed frequency shifts suggest a layer structure and horizontal motions that vary with altitude. UHF (933 MHz) radar observations were carried out in parallel, they display predominantly incoherent scatter and an electron density typical for the altitude. Some other studies, have in

  1. Properties of echo spectra observed by MST radars

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    Wakasugi, K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent scatter and Fresnel reflection are the fundamental echoing mechanisms to interpret the signals observed by Mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars. Turbulent scattered echoes provide information about the turbulence structure and mean flow of the atmosphere. Observational results with VHF MST radars, however, show the importance of Fresnel reflection due to the infinite gradient of reflectivity at the edges of a scattering layer. This condition is excluded for the weak fluctuation models but it is still possible to include the observed aspect sensitivity by assuming an anisotropic structure of fluctuations. Another explanation of the aspect sensitivity observed by MST radars is advanced. Spectral estimates by the widely used periodogram were related to a four-dimensional spectrum of atmospheric fluctuations with anisotropic structure. Effects of the radar system such as antenna beam width, beam direction and Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) data length were discussed for the anisotropic turbulent atmosphere. Echo parameters were also estimated.

  2. Radar efficiency and the calculation of decade-long PMSE backscatter cross-section for the Resolute Bay VHF radar

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    N. Swarnalingam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75.0° N, 95.0° W and operating at 51.5 MHz, has been used to investigate Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE since 1997. PMSE are a unique form of strong coherent radar echoes, and their understanding has been a challenge to the scientific community since their discovery more than three decades ago. While other high latitude radars have recorded strong levels of PMSE activities, the Resolute Bay radar has observed relatively lower levels of PMSE strengths. In order to derive absolute measurements of PMSE strength at this site, a technique is developed to determine the radar efficiency using cosmic (sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. VHF radars are only rarely calibrated, but determination of efficiency is even less common. Here we emphasize the importance of efficiency for determination of cross-section measurements. The significant advantage of this method is that it can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world as long as the sky noise variations are known. The radar efficiencies for two on-site radars at Resolute Bay are determined. PMSE backscatter cross-section is estimated, and decade-long PMSE strength variations at this location are investigated. It was noticed that the median of the backscatter cross-section distribution remains relatively unchanged, but over the years a great level of variability occurs in the high power tail of the distribution.

  3. First wind shear observation in PMSE with the tristatic EISCAT VHF radar

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    Mann, I.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.; Rostami, S.; Anyairo, C. C.; Dalin, P.

    2016-11-01

    The Polar Summer Mesosphere has the lowest temperatures that occur in the entire Earth system. Water ice particles below the optically observable size range participate there in the formation of strong radar echoes (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes, PMSE). To study PMSE we carried out observations with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) VHF and EISCAT UHF radar simultaneously from a site near Tromsø (69.58°N, 19.2272°E) and observed VHF backscattering also with the EISCAT receivers in Kiruna (67.86°N, 20.44°E) and Sodankylä (67.36°N, 26.63°E). This is one of the first tristatic measurements with EISCAT VHF, and we therefore describe the observations and geometry in detail. We present observations made on 26 June 2013 from 7:00 to 13:00 h UT where we found similar PMSE patterns with all three VHF receivers and found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE formation. We find no signs of PMSE in the UHF data. The electron densities that we derive from observed incoherent scatter at UHF are at PMSE altitudes close to the noise level but possibly indicate reduced electron densities directly above the PMSE.

  4. Simultaneous observation of sporadic E with a rapid-run ionosonde and VHF coherent backscatter radar

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    T. Maruyama

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK 2 rocket campaign, ionograms were recorded every minute at the Yamagawa Radio Observatory at about 90km west of the region monitored by a VHF (very high frequency coherent backscatter radar. Sporadic E-layer parameters, which include the critical (foEs and blanketing (fbEs frequencies, the layer height (h'Es, and the width of the range spread of sporadic E-traces, were compared with RTI (range-time-intensity plots of VHF quasi-periodic (QP and continuous coherent backscatter echoes. A close relationship was found between the appearance of QP echoes in the RTI plots and the level of spatial inhomogeneity in sporadic E plasma, signified here by the difference between foEs and fbEs. During QP echo events, foEs increased while fbEs decreased, so that the difference foEs-fbEs was enhanced, indicating the development of strong spatial structuring in electron density within a sporadic E-layer. On the other hand, increases in sporadic E range spreading also correlated with the occurrence of QP echoes but the degree of correlation varied from event to event. Continuous radar echoes were observed in association with low altitude sporadic E-layers, located well below 100 km and at times as low as 90 km. During the continuous echo events, both foEs and fbEs were less variable, and the difference foEs-fbEs was small and not as dynamic as in the QP echoes. On the other hand, the Es-layer spread intensified during continuous echoes, which means that some patchiness or corrugation in those low altitude layers is also necessary for the continuous backscatter echoes to take place.

  5. Simultaneous observation of sporadic E with a rapid-run ionosonde and VHF coherent backscatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK 2 rocket campaign, ionograms were recorded every minute at the Yamagawa Radio Observatory at about 90km west of the region monitored by a VHF (very high frequency coherent backscatter radar. Sporadic E-layer parameters, which include the critical (foEs and blanketing (fbEs frequencies, the layer height (h'Es, and the width of the range spread of sporadic E-traces, were compared with RTI (range-time-intensity plots of VHF quasi-periodic (QP and continuous coherent backscatter echoes. A close relationship was found between the appearance of QP echoes in the RTI plots and the level of spatial inhomogeneity in sporadic E plasma, signified here by the difference between foEs and fbEs. During QP echo events, foEs increased while fbEs decreased, so that the difference foEs-fbEs was enhanced, indicating the development of strong spatial structuring in electron density within a sporadic E-layer. On the other hand, increases in sporadic E range spreading also correlated with the occurrence of QP echoes but the degree of correlation varied from event to event. Continuous radar echoes were observed in association with low altitude sporadic E-layers, located well below 100 km and at times as low as 90 km. During the continuous echo events, both foEs and fbEs were less variable, and the difference foEs-fbEs was small and not as dynamic as in the QP echoes. On the other hand, the Es-layer spread intensified during continuous echoes, which means that some patchiness or corrugation in those low altitude layers is also necessary for the continuous backscatter echoes to take place.

  6. VHF volume-imaging radar observation of aspect-sensitive scatterers tilted in mountain waves above a convective boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin stable atmospheric layers cause VHF radars to receive increased echo power from near zenith. Layers can be tilted from horizontal, for instance by gravity waves, and the direction of VHF "glinting" is measurable by spatial domain interferometry or many-beam Doppler beam swinging (DBS. This paper uses the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, Shigaraki, Japan as a volume-imaging radar with 64-beam DBS, to show tilting of layers and air flow in mountain waves. Tilt of aspect-sensitive echo power from horizontal is nearly parallel to air flow, as assumed in earlier measurements of mountain-wave alignment. Vertical-wind measurements are self-consistent from different beam zenith angles, despite the combined effects of aspect sensitivity and horizontal-wind gradients.

  7. Statistics of 150-km echoes over Jicamarca based on low-power VHF observations

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    J. L. Chau

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we summarize the statistics of the so-called 150-km echoes obtained with a low-power VHF radar operation at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (11.97 S, 76.87 W, and 1.3 dip angle at 150-km altitude in Peru. Our results are based on almost four years of observations between August 2001 and July 2005 (approximately 150 days per year. The majority of the observations have been conducted between 08:00 and 17:00 LT. We present the statistics of occurrence of the echoes for each of the four seasons as a function of time of day and altitude. The occurrence frequency of the echoes is ~75% around noon and start decreasing after 15:00 LT and disappear after 17:00 LT in all seasons. As shown in previous campaign observations, the 150-echoes appear at a higher altitude (>150 km in narrow layers in the morning, reaching lower altitudes (~135 km around noon, and disappear at higher altitudes (>150 km after 17:00 LT. We show that although 150-km echoes are observed all year long, they exhibit a clear seasonal variability on altitudinal coverage and the percentage of occurrence around noon and early in the morning. We also show that there is a strong day-to-day variability, and no correlation with magnetic activity. Although our results do not solve the 150-km riddle, they should be taken into account when a reasonable theory is proposed.

  8. The first operation and results of the Chung-Li VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. K.; Kuo, F. S.; Chu, Y. S.; Fu, I. J.; Rottger, J.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Chung-Li Very High Frequency (VHF) radar is used in the dual-mode operations, applying Doppler beam-swinging as well as the spaced-antenna-drift method. The design of the VHF radar is examined. Results of performance tests are discussed.

  9. Bias-Voltage Stabilizer for HVHF Amplifiers in VHF Pulse-Echo Measurement Systems

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    Hojong Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of high-voltage–high-frequency (HVHF amplifiers on echo-signal quality is greater with very-high-frequency (VHF, ≥100 MHz ultrasound transducers than with low-frequency (LF, ≤15 MHz ultrasound transducers. Hence, the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier must be stabilized to ensure stable echo-signal amplitudes. We propose a bias-voltage stabilizer circuit to maintain stable DC voltages over a wide input range, thus reducing the harmonic-distortion components of the echo signals in VHF pulse-echo measurement systems. To confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we measured and compared the deviations in the gain of the HVHF amplifier with and without a bias-voltage stabilizer. Between −13 and 26 dBm, the measured gain deviations of a HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer are less than that of an amplifier without a bias-voltage stabilizer. In order to confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we compared the pulse-echo responses of the amplifiers, which are typically used for the evaluation of transducers or electronic components used in pulse-echo measurement systems. From the responses, we observed that the amplitudes of the echo signals of a VHF transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer were higher than those of the transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier alone. The second, third, and fourth harmonic-distortion components of the HVHF amplifier with the bias-voltage stabilizer were also lower than those of the HVHF amplifier alone. Hence, the proposed scheme is a promising method for stabilizing the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier, and improving the echo-signal quality of VHF transducers.

  10. Bias-Voltage Stabilizer for HVHF Amplifiers in VHF Pulse-Echo Measurement Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojong; Park, Chulwoo; Kim, Jungsuk; Jung, Hayong

    2017-10-23

    The impact of high-voltage-high-frequency (HVHF) amplifiers on echo-signal quality is greater with very-high-frequency (VHF, ≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers than with low-frequency (LF, ≤15 MHz) ultrasound transducers. Hence, the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier must be stabilized to ensure stable echo-signal amplitudes. We propose a bias-voltage stabilizer circuit to maintain stable DC voltages over a wide input range, thus reducing the harmonic-distortion components of the echo signals in VHF pulse-echo measurement systems. To confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we measured and compared the deviations in the gain of the HVHF amplifier with and without a bias-voltage stabilizer. Between -13 and 26 dBm, the measured gain deviations of a HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer are less than that of an amplifier without a bias-voltage stabilizer. In order to confirm the feasibility of the bias-voltage stabilizer, we compared the pulse-echo responses of the amplifiers, which are typically used for the evaluation of transducers or electronic components used in pulse-echo measurement systems. From the responses, we observed that the amplitudes of the echo signals of a VHF transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier with a bias-voltage stabilizer were higher than those of the transducer triggered by the HVHF amplifier alone. The second, third, and fourth harmonic-distortion components of the HVHF amplifier with the bias-voltage stabilizer were also lower than those of the HVHF amplifier alone. Hence, the proposed scheme is a promising method for stabilizing the bias voltage of an HVHF amplifier, and improving the echo-signal quality of VHF transducers.

  11. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

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    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  12. Signal processing techniques for phase-coded HF-VHF radars

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    J. A. Baskaradas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available HF-VHF radar techniques are easy to employ and commonly used in geophysical applications. They include deep radio soundings, used for probing the ionosphere, stratosphere-mesosphere measurement, weather forecast and radio-glaciology. Fast algorithms and powerful processors facilitate the development of several kinds of low power radars, but the reduction of the transmitted power has to be compensated by on-line processing of an encoded signal to maintain a favorable signal-to-noise ratio suitable for detection. Moreover, radars have to reconstruct return echoes with different travel times due to various origins (multi-path, adjacent objects, etc.. Such needs can be accomplished by means of signal phase coding and one of the most attractive is the reversal phase code. The composite echo signal must be processed to extract the physical information useful for the measurement considered. In this paper some algorithms used for on-line processing of phase-coded signals will be described, both in time and frequency domain.

  13. Frequency domain interferometry mode observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar

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    P. B. Chilson

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available During the summer of 1997 investigations into the nature of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE were conducted using the European incoherent scatter (EISCAT VHF radar in Norway. The radar was operated in a frequency domain interferometry (FDI mode over a period of two weeks to study the frequency coherence of the returned radar signals. The operating frequencies of the radar were 224.0 and 224.6 MHz. We present the first results from the experiment by discussing two 4-h intervals of data collected over two consecutive nights. During the first of the two days an enhancement of the FDI coherence, which indicates the presence of distinct scattering layers, was found to follow the lower boundary of the PMSE. Indeed, it is not unusual to observe that the coherence values are peaked around the heights corresponding to both the lower- and upper-most boundaries of the PMSE layer and sublayers. A Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism is offered as one possible explanation for the layering structure. Additionally, our analysis using range-time-pseudocolor plots of signal-to-noise ratios, spectrograms of Doppler velocity, and estimates of the positions of individual scattering layers is shown to be consistent with the proposition that upwardly propagating gravity waves can become steepened near the mesopause.Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere · Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics · Radio Science (Interferometry

  14. Frequency domain interferometry mode observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available During the summer of 1997 investigations into the nature of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE were conducted using the European incoherent scatter (EISCAT VHF radar in Norway. The radar was operated in a frequency domain interferometry (FDI mode over a period of two weeks to study the frequency coherence of the returned radar signals. The operating frequencies of the radar were 224.0 and 224.6 MHz. We present the first results from the experiment by discussing two 4-h intervals of data collected over two consecutive nights. During the first of the two days an enhancement of the FDI coherence, which indicates the presence of distinct scattering layers, was found to follow the lower boundary of the PMSE. Indeed, it is not unusual to observe that the coherence values are peaked around the heights corresponding to both the lower- and upper-most boundaries of the PMSE layer and sublayers. A Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism is offered as one possible explanation for the layering structure. Additionally, our analysis using range-time-pseudocolor plots of signal-to-noise ratios, spectrograms of Doppler velocity, and estimates of the positions of individual scattering layers is shown to be consistent with the proposition that upwardly propagating gravity waves can become steepened near the mesopause.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere · Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics · Radio Science (Interferometry

  15. First results from an iron lidar and a VHF radar at Davis, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebken, F.; Morris, R. J.; Hoeffner, J.; Kaifler, B.; Viehl, T.

    2012-12-01

    We present temperature measurements at Davis, Antarctica (69°S, 78°E), and compare with simultaneous and co-located radar measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The mobile scanning iron lidar of the IAP in Kuehlungsborn was installed at Davis in December 2010. It measures iron densities, vertical winds, and temperatures in the iron layer, i. e. from approximately 80 to 100 km. It is based on probing the Doppler broadened resonance line of iron atoms at 386 nm and can operate under daylight conditions. Typical values for temperature uncertainty, altitude and time resolution are 3-5 K, 1 km, and 1 hour, respectively. The lidar also measures neutral air densities and temperatures in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. At Davis the lidar has up to now achieved approximately 2700 hours of data which is presumably the largest nearly continuous data set in Antarctica. The mesopause altitude changes throughout the summer season by several kilometers, significantly different from the northern hemisphere summer. Depending on altitude, temperatures can be warmer or colder compared to the NH summer. Temperatures at Davis near 86 km are rather similar to the NH, but they are much colder at higher altitudes. The thermal structure around the mesopause at Davis is closely related to the general circulation in the stratosphere, namely to the transition from winter to summer conditions. Different from expectations we sometimes find the mesopause significantly higher and colder(!) compared to the NH. Furthermore, we find large thermal tides in the summer months with amplitudes of up to 6-7~K, which is much larger than expected from models. The Australien Antarctic Division operates a 55 MHz VHF radar at Davis since February 2003. We report first simultaneous measurements of PMSE and temperatures by the Fe lidar. PMSE are strong radar echoes related to ice particles and therefore require atmospheric temperatures being lower than the frost point temperature

  16. Interferometric Meteor Head Echo Observations using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hocking, W.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2013-01-01

    A radar meteor echo is the radar scattering signature from the free-electrons in a plasma trail generated by entry of extraterrestrial particles into the atmosphere. Three categories of scattering mechanisms exist: specular, nonspecular trails, and head-echoes. Generally, there are two types of radars utilized to detect meteors. Traditional VHF meteor radars (often called all-sky1radars) primarily detect the specular reflection of meteor trails traveling perpendicular to the line of sight of the scattering trail, while High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA) radars efficiently detect meteor head-echoes and, in some cases, non-specular trails. The fact that head-echo measurements can be performed only with HPLA radars limits these studies in several ways. HPLA radars are very sensitive instruments constraining the studies to the lower masses, and these observations cannot be performed continuously because they take place at national observatories with limited allocated observing time. These drawbacks can be addressed by developing head echo observing techniques with modified all-sky meteor radars. In addition, the fact that the simultaneous detection of all different scattering mechanisms can be made with the same instrument, rather than requiring assorted different classes of radars, can help clarify observed differences between the different methodologies. In this study, we demonstrate that such concurrent observations are now possible, enabled by the enhanced design of the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) deployed at the Estacion Astronomica Rio Grande (EARG) in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. The results presented here are derived from observations performed over a period of 12 days in August 2011, and include meteoroid dynamical parameter distributions, radiants and estimated masses. Overall, the SAAMER's head echo detections appear to be produced by larger particles than those which have been studied thus far using this technique.

  17. Asymmetric radar echo patterns from insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radar echoes from insects, birds, and bats in the atmosphere exhibit both symmetry and asymmetry in polarimetric patterns. Symmetry refers to similar magnitudes of polarimetric variables at opposite azimuths, and asymmetry relegates to differences in these magnitudes. Asymmetry can be due to diffe...

  18. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  19. Cut-off low monitoring by the French VHF-ST-radar network during the ESTIME campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, J.-L.; Bertin, F.; Campistron, B.; Klaus, V.; Pointin, Y.; van Baelen, J.; Wilson, R.

    2000-05-01

    In order to investigate mesoscale strato-tropospheric exchanges, the field campaign `Echanges Stratosphère-Troposphère: Investigations à Moyenne Echelle' was conducted in France from late 1993 to mid 1995 and focused on cut-off low events. It involved the French research network of five VHF (Very High Frequency) ST (Strato-Tropospheric) radars deployed in southern France. Observations corresponding to three Intensive Observing Periods are reported here. The radar data analyzed and discussed are time-height diagrams of the aspect ratio (AR), that is, the vertical to oblique beam-returned power ratio, used for monitoring three cut-off low events. In order to discuss the validity of the method, 506 h of radar AR data were compared with time-height diagrams of the static stability and the humidity obtained from synoptic European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts model analyses. A dataset corresponding to 297 h of observations is analyzed and discussed here. It is concluded that the AR is a good tracer to document cut-off low events, including tropopause folding identification and the detection of tropospheric air masses of enhanced stability, in dry or weakly humid cases. On the other hand, although the effects of the specific humidity and its gradients on VHF radar echo power could not be extensively investigated, our results suggest that the same parameter cannot be used at mid- and lower-tropospheric levels when the effects of specific humidity significantly reinforce the moist static stability. It is important to take into account these insights in the context of future observing campaigns in which a network of VHF-ST-radars will be involved, and where their role will be to observe and to document the evolution of upper-level features or potential vorticity streamers, or more generally stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges.

  20. Dictionary for Sparse Representation of Chirp Echo in Broadband Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lei

    2010-01-01

    A new dictionary for sparse representation of chirp echo in broadband radar is put forward in this paper. Different with chirplet decomposition which decomposes echo in time-frequency plane, the dictionary transforms the sparsity of target observed by radar in distance range to the sparsity in frequency domain by stretch processing and the sparse representation of echo is realized. Using strict deduction with mathematics, the sparsity of echo in dictionary is proved and the dictionary is orth...

  1. Isolated lower mesospheric echoes seen by medium frequency radar at 70° N, 19° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have noted sporadic instances of strong isolated reflections of medium frequency (MF radar waves from the mesosphere from as low as 50 km altitude and have devised a set of criteria for isolating these apparently anomalous echoes from those normally occurring from progressive partial reflections in the D-region. The object of this study is to map the occurrences of such echoes facilitating comparisons with other observations. For example, the similarity and simultaneity of the echo structure for the 20 January 2005 with VHF radar results presented by Lübken et al. (2006 are particularly striking. In presenting a number of such echo events since 2001 selected from the MF radar dataset (which spans 1997 to present, we find that virtually all echo occurrences coincide with enhanced solar proton fluxes suggesting that substantial ionisation of the mesosphere is a necessary condition. Strong partial reflections of the radio wave in the lower mesosphere combined with seasonally varying total absorption higher up, thus giving false impressions of lower mesospheric layers preferentially in winter, constitute a scenario consistent with our observations.

  2. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

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    P. Czechowsky

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  3. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czechowsky

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  4. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  5. A comparison of overshoot modelling with observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes at radar frequencies of 56 and 224 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnes, O.; Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Senior, A.; Hartquist, T. W.; Rietveld, M. T.; Kosch, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    We have compared radar observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) modulated by artificial electron heating, at frequencies of 224 MHz (EISCAT VHF) and 56 MHz (MORRO). We have concentrated on 1 day of observation, lasting ~ 3.8 h. The MORRO radar, with its much wider beam, observes one or more PMSE layers all the time while the VHF radar observes PMSEs in 69% of the time. Statistically there is a clear difference between how the MORRO and the VHF radar backscatter reacts to the heater cycling (48 s heater on and 168 s heater off). While MORRO often reacts by having its backscatter level increased when the heater is switched on, as predicted by Scales and Chen (2008), the VHF radar nearly always sees the "normal" VHF overshoot behaviour with an initial rapid reduction of backscatter. However, in some heater cycles we do see a substantial recovery of the VHF backscatter after its initial reduction to levels several times above that just before the heater was switched on. For the MORRO radar a recovery during the heater-on phase is much more common. The reaction when the heater was switched off was a clear overshoot for nearly all VHF cases but less so for MORRO. A comparison of individual curves for the backscatter values as a function of time shows, at least for this particular day, that in high layers above ~ 85 km height, both radars see a reduction of the backscatter as the heater is switched on, with little recovery during the heater-on time. These variations are well described by present models. On the other hand, the backscatter in low layers at 81-82 km can be quite different, with modest or no reduction in backscatter as the heater is switched on, followed by a strong recovery for both radars to levels several times above that of the undisturbed PMSEs. This simultaneous, nearly identical behaviour at the two very different radar frequencies is not well described by present modelling.

  6. A comparison of overshoot modelling with observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes at radar frequencies of 56 and 224 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Havnes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have compared radar observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs modulated by artificial electron heating, at frequencies of 224 MHz (EISCAT VHF and 56 MHz (MORRO. We have concentrated on 1 day of observation, lasting ~ 3.8 h. The MORRO radar, with its much wider beam, observes one or more PMSE layers all the time while the VHF radar observes PMSEs in 69% of the time. Statistically there is a clear difference between how the MORRO and the VHF radar backscatter reacts to the heater cycling (48 s heater on and 168 s heater off. While MORRO often reacts by having its backscatter level increased when the heater is switched on, as predicted by Scales and Chen (2008, the VHF radar nearly always sees the "normal" VHF overshoot behaviour with an initial rapid reduction of backscatter. However, in some heater cycles we do see a substantial recovery of the VHF backscatter after its initial reduction to levels several times above that just before the heater was switched on. For the MORRO radar a recovery during the heater-on phase is much more common. The reaction when the heater was switched off was a clear overshoot for nearly all VHF cases but less so for MORRO. A comparison of individual curves for the backscatter values as a function of time shows, at least for this particular day, that in high layers above ~ 85 km height, both radars see a reduction of the backscatter as the heater is switched on, with little recovery during the heater-on time. These variations are well described by present models. On the other hand, the backscatter in low layers at 81–82 km can be quite different, with modest or no reduction in backscatter as the heater is switched on, followed by a strong recovery for both radars to levels several times above that of the undisturbed PMSEs. This simultaneous, nearly identical behaviour at the two very different radar frequencies is not well described by present modelling.

  7. VHF radar observation of atmospheric winds, associated shears and C2n at a tropical location: interdependence and seasonal pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jain

    Full Text Available The turbulence refractivity structure constant (C2n is an important parameter of the atmosphere. VHF radars have been used extensively for the measurements of C2n. Presently, most of such observations are from mid and high latitudes and only very limited observations are available for equatorial and tropical latitudes. Indian MST radar is an excellent tool for making high-resolution measurements of atmospheric winds, associated shears and turbulence refractivity structure constant (C2n. This radar is located at Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, a tropical station in India. The objective of this paper is to bring out the height structure of C2n for different seasons using the long series of data (September 1995 – August 1999 from Indian MST radar. An attempt is also made to understand such changes in the height structure of C2n in relation to background atmospheric parameters such as horizontal winds and associated shears. The height structure of C2n, during the summer monsoon and post-monsoon season, shows specific height features that are found to be related to Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ winds. It is important to examine the nature of the radar back-scatterers and also to understand the causative mechanism of such scatterers. Aspect sensitivity of the received radar echo is examined for this purpose. It is observed that radar back-scatterers at the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric heights are more anisotropic, with horizontal correlation length of 10–20 m, as compared to those observed at lower and middle tropospheric heights.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology; tropical meteorology; turbulence

  8. Complementary code and digital filtering for detection of weak VHF radar signals from the mesoscale. [SOUSY-VHF radar, Harz Mountains, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G.; Ruster, R.; Czechowsky, P.

    1983-01-01

    The SOUSY-VHF-Radar operates at a frequency of 53.5 MHz in a valley in the Harz mountains, Germany, 90 km from Hanover. The radar controller, which is programmed by a 16-bit computer holds 1024 program steps in core and controls, via 8 channels, the whole radar system: in particular the master oscillator, the transmitter, the transmit-receive-switch, the receiver, the analog to digital converter, and the hardware adder. The high-sensitivity receiver has a dynamic range of 70 dB and a video bandwidth of 1 MHz. Phase coding schemes are applied, in particular for investigations at mesospheric heights, in order to carry out measurements with the maximum duty cycle and the maximum height resolution. The computer takes the data from the adder to store it in magnetic tape or disc. The radar controller is programmed by the computer using simple FORTRAN IV statements. After the program has been loaded and the computer has started the radar controller, it runs automatically, stopping at the program end. In case of errors or failures occurring during the radar operation, the radar controller is shut off caused either by a safety circuit or by a power failure circuit or by a parity check system.

  9. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric field-aligned irregularities obtained with the Piura VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a summary of the statistical characteristics of echoes from ionospheric (E- and F-region field-aligned irregularities obtained with the Piura VHF radar. This radar is located at ~ 7.0° dip latitude, just outside the equatorial electrojet (EEJ region. Our results are based on (1 intermittent observations made between 1991 and 1999 just few days a year, and (2 continuous observations made between January 2000 and June 2001. During most of the intermittent observations, simultaneous measurements of EEJ and equatorial spread F (ESF irregularities were performed with the Jicamarca VHF radar. From the continuous measurements, we have obtained the diurnal and seasonal characteristics of a variety of parameters (percentage of occurrence, signal-to-noise ratio and/or Doppler velocities from the lower and upper E-region irregularities and also from F-region irregularities over Piura. For example, we have found that (1 the E-region echoes are stronger and occur more frequently during local summer (i.e. between December and March; (2 between May and June, the E-region echoes are weaker and occur less frequently; moreover, during these months, a semidiurnal wave with large amplitudes is observed in the meridional wind (> 100 ms- 1; (3 there is vertical wavelength of about 20 km in the Doppler velocity, particularly after midnight; (4 the lower (upper E-region Doppler velocities are influenced mainly by meridional winds (equatorial F-region vertical drifts. In addition, we have observed that the seasonal and daily occurrences of Piura F-region irregularities are similar to the occurrence of topside ESF irregularities over Jicamarca. The likelihood of occurrence of F-region irregularities over Piura and, therefore, topside ESF over Jicamarca is greater when there are no E-region irregularities over Piura. On the other hand, there is more probability of observing bottomtype/bottomside ESF irregularities over Jicamarca when E-region irregularities

  10. Horizontally resolved structures of polar mesospheric echoes obtained with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Zecha, Marius; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Singer, Werner

    2012-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes have been observed in Andenes/Norway (69°N, 16°E) for more than 18 years using the Alomar SOUSY and the ALWIN VHF radars. In 2011 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn completed the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System ({MAARSY}). The new radar is designed for atmospheric studies from the troposphere up to the lower thermosphere, especially for the investigation of horizontal structures of polar mesospheric echoes. The system is composed of an active phased antenna consisting of 433 array elements and an identical number of transceiver modules individually controllable in frequency, phase, and output power on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This arrangement allows very high flexibility of beam forming and beam steering with a symmetric 3.6° small radar beam and arbitrary beam pointing directions down to 30° off-zenith. The monitoring of polar mesosphere echoes using a vertical pointed radar beam has been continued already during the construction period of MAARSY in order to complete the long term data base available for Andenes. Additionally first multi-beam scanning experiments using up to 97 beams quasi-simultaneously in the mesosphere have been carried out during several campaigns starting in summer 2010. Sophisticated wind analysis methods such as an extended velocity azimuth display have been applied to retrieve additional parameters from the wind field, e.g. horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, stretching and shearing deformation. The results provide a first insight into the strong horizontal variability of scattering structures occurring in the polar mesosphere over Andenes during summer and winter time. The implementation of interferometric radar imaging methods offers further improvement of the horizontal and the vertical resolution.

  11. Observations of Mesospheric Turbulence by Rocket Probe and VHF Radar, Part 2.4A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royrvik, O.; Smith, L. G.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the Jicamarca VHF radar and from a Languir probe fine-structure on a Nike Orion rocket launched from Punto Lobos, Peru, have been compared. A single mesospheric scattering layer was observed by the radar. The Langmuir probe detected irregularities in the electron-density profile in a narrow region between 85.2 and 86.6 km. It appears from a comparison between these two data sets that turbulence in the neutral atmosphere is the mechanism generating the refractive index irregularities.

  12. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  13. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  14. On the angular dependence and scattering model of polar mesospheric summer echoes at VHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Svenja; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular dependence of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). Our results are based on multireceiver and multibeam observations using beam pointing directions with off-zenith angles up to 25° as well as on spatial correlation analysis (SCA) from vertical beam observations. We consider a beam filling effect at the upper and lower boundaries of PMSE in tilted beams, which determines the effective mean angle of arrival. Comparing the average power of the vertical beam to the oblique beams suggests that PMSE are mainly not as aspect sensitive as in contrast to previous studies. However, from SCA, times of enhanced correlation are found, indicating aspect sensitivity or a localized scattering mechanism. Our results suggest that PMSE consist of nonhomogeneous isotropic scattering and previously reported aspect sensitivity values might have been influenced by the inhomogeneous nature of PMSE.

  15. VHF radar observations of gravity waves at a low latitude

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    G. Dutta

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind observations made at Gadanki (13.5°N by using Indian MST Radar for few days in September, October, December 1995 and January, 1996 have been analyzed to study gravity wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Horizontal wind variances have been computed for gravity waves of period (2-6 h from the power spectral density (PSD spectrum. Exponential curves of the form eZ/H have been fitted by least squares technique to these variance values to obtain height variations of the irregular winds upto the height of about 15 km, where Z is the height in kilometers. The value of H, the scale height, as determined from curve fitting is found to be less than the theoretical value of scale height of neutral atmosphere in this region, implying that the waves are gaining energy during their passage in the troposphere. In other words, it indicates that the sources of gravity waves are present in the troposphere. The energy densities of gravity wave fluctuations have been computed. Polynomial fits to the observed values show that wave energy density increases in the troposphere, its source region, and then decreases in the lower stratosphere.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; waves and tides

  16. Measurements and simulation of ionospheric scattering on VHF and UHF radar signals: Channel scattering function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Neil C.; Cannon, Paul S.; Groves, Keith M.

    2009-02-01

    The design and operation of transionospheric VHF and UHF radars requires knowledge of amplitude and phase scintillation due to ionospheric scattering. Phase coherence is of particular importance where long coherent integration periods and large bandwidths are required. A thin phase screen, parabolic equation based, Trans-Ionospheric Radio Propagation Simulator (TIRPS) is described. Modeled channel scattering functions (CSFs) are compared to experimental VHF and UHF data derived from the Advanced Research Projects Agency Long-range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar on Kwajalein Island (9.4°N, 166.8°E). TIRPS quantitatively reproduces the experimental results, including the quasi-parabolic profile observed in the measured CSFs under strong turbulence conditions. Variations in the simulated CSF with ionospheric phase screen parameters are also presented. Under conditions of high integrated strength of turbulence (CkL), a low phase spectral index (p = 1), indicating relatively dense small-scale irregularities, produces pronounced range spreading. Conversely, when the spectral index is high (p = 4), indicative of strong focusing/defocusing by large-scale irregularities, there is increased Doppler spreading and, when the outer scale of irregularities is large, a greater likelihood of asymmetry of the CSF about the zero Doppler axis.

  17. VHF/UHF radar observations of tropical mesoscale convective systems over southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Several campaigns have been carried out to study the convective systems over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, using VHF and UHF radars. The height-time sections of several convective systems are investigated in detail to study reflectivity, turbulence and vertical velocity structure. Structure and dynamics of the convective systems are the main objectives of these campaigns. The observed systems are classified into single- and multi-cell systems. It has been observed that most of the convective systems at this latitude are multi-cellular in nature. Simultaneous VHF and UHF radar observations are used to classify the observed precipitating systems as convective, intermediary and stratiform regions. Composite height profiles of vertical velocities in these regions were obtained and the same were compared with the profiles obtained at other geographical locations. These composite profiles of vertical velocity in the convective regions have shown their peaks in the mid troposphere, indicating that the maximum latent heat is being released at those heights. These profiles are very important for numerical simulations of the convective systems, which vary significantly from one geographical location to the other. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Mesoscale meteorology; Convective processes – Radio science (Remote sensing

  18. A meteor head echo analysis algorithm for the lower VHF band

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    J. Kero

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an automated analysis scheme for meteor head echo observations by the 46.5 MHz Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar near Shigaraki, Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E. The analysis procedure computes meteoroid range, velocity and deceleration as functions of time with unprecedented accuracy and precision. This is crucial for estimations of meteoroid mass and orbital parameters as well as investigations of the meteoroid-atmosphere interaction processes. In this paper we present this analysis procedure in detail. The algorithms use a combination of single-pulse-Doppler, time-of-flight and pulse-to-pulse phase correlation measurements to determine the radial velocity to within a few tens of metres per second with 3.12 ms time resolution. Equivalently, the precision improvement is at least a factor of 20 compared to previous single-pulse measurements. Such a precision reveals that the deceleration increases significantly during the intense part of a meteoroid's ablation process in the atmosphere. From each received pulse, the target range is determined to within a few tens of meters, or the order of a few hundredths of the 900 m long range gates. This is achieved by transmitting a 13-bit Barker code oversampled by a factor of two at reception and using a novel range interpolation technique. The meteoroid velocity vector is determined from the estimated radial velocity by carefully taking the location of the meteor target and the angle from its trajectory to the radar beam into account. The latter is determined from target range and bore axis offset. We have identified and solved the signal processing issue giving rise to the peculiar signature in signal to noise ratio plots reported by Galindo et al. (2011, and show how to use the range interpolation technique to differentiate the effect of signal processing from physical processes.

  19. A discussion on the variations of MST/ST radar echo power with an atmospheric layer resolved by frequency domain interferometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. S.; Chu, Y. H.

    2000-11-01

    The relationship between an atmospheric layer and its VHF backscatter resolved by the frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique is investigated in this article. A theoretical expression connecting the radar echo power with the thickness and position of an atmospheric layer and the range weighting function of a matched filter is derived. It shows that the farther the layer locates from the central height of the radar volume, the weaker the echo power will be. This feature is attributed to the range weighting effect of the radar system. FDI observations also show that the echo power from the atmospheric layer located close to the central height of the radar volume is usually greater than that from the layer located at the edge of the volume, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the correlation between the echo power and layer position is negative (positive) if the layer locates in the upper (lower) part of the radar volume. This behavior is consistent with the theoretical prediction and can also be interpreted by the range weighting effect. It is also suggested that the power-position relation is capable of indicating the system bias causing the systematic error of FDI-estimated layer position. In addition, numerical simulation is performed in this article to examine the difference between the range weighting functions resulting from rectangular and nonrectangular radar pulses for a given receiver impulse response.

  20. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  1. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  2. First Measurements of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Tri-static Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a tri-static radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz, 0.67 m Bragg wavelength) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and passive receiving stations in Kiruna, (Sweden) and Sodankyla (Finland). The antennas at the receiving stations, originally part of the EISCAT tri-static UHF radar system at 930 MHz, have been refitted with new feeder systems at the VHF frequency of the transmitter in Tromso. The refitted radar system opens new opportunities to study PMSE for its own sake and as a tracer of the dynamics of the polar mesosphere, a region that is difficult to investigate by other means. The measurements show that very frequently both remote receiving antennas detect coherent signals that are much greater than the regular incoherent scattering due to thermal electrons and coinciding in time and space with PMSE measured by the transmitter station in Tromso. This represents further evidence that PMSE is not aspect sensitive, as was already indicated by a less sensitive radar system in a bi-static configuration, and implying that the underlying atmospheric turbulence, at least at sub-meter scales, is isotropic in agreement with Kolmogorov's hypothesis. Measurements also show that the vertical rate of fall of persistent features of PMSE is the same as the vertical line of sight velocity inferred from the doppler shift of the PMSE signals. This equivalence forms the basis for using PMSE as a tracer of the dynamics of the background mesosphere. Thus, it is possible to measure the 3-dimensional velocity field in the PMSE layer over the intersection volume of the three antennas. Since the signals have large signal-to-noise ratios (up to 30 dB), the inferred velocities have high accuracies and good time resolutions. This affords the possibility to make estimates of momentum flux in the mesosphere deposited by overturning gravity waves. Gravity wave momentum flux is believed to be the engine of a

  3. CFAR Detection from Noncoherent Radar Echoes Using Bayesian Theory

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    Wataru Suganuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new constant false alarm rate (CFAR detection method from noncoherent radar echoes, considering heterogeneous sea clutter. It applies the Bayesian theory for adaptive estimation of the local clutter statistical distribution in the cell under test. The detection technique can be readily implemented in existing noncoherent marine radar systems, which makes it particularly attractive for economical CFAR detection systems. Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate the detection performance and demonstrated that the proposed technique provides a higher probability of detection than conventional techniques, such as cell averaging CFAR (CA-CFAR, especially with a small number of reference cells.

  4. CFAR Detection from Noncoherent Radar Echoes Using Bayesian Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a new constant false alarm rate (CFAR detection method from noncoherent radar echoes, considering heterogeneous sea clutter. It applies the Bayesian theory for adaptive estimation of the local clutter statistical distribution in the cell under test. The detection technique can be readily implemented in existing noncoherent marine radar systems, which makes it particularly attractive for economical CFAR detection systems. Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate the detection performance and demonstrated that the proposed technique provides a higher probability of detection than conventional techniques, such as cell averaging CFAR (CA-CFAR, especially with a small number of reference cells.

  5. Pre-IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pre-IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles (BRMCR1B) data set contains Arctic and Antarctic radio echo-sounding measurements taken from the...

  6. On the relationship between aspect sensitivity, wave activity, andmultiple scattering centers of mesosphere summer echoes: a case study using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Chen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A mesosphere-summer-echo layer, observed by the OSWIN VHF radar (54.1°N, 11.8°E with vertical and 7° oblique radar beams, was examined using the method of coherent radar imaging (CRI. We disclosed the echo events having multiple scattering centers (MSC in the radar volume by means of the high angular resolution of the CRI technique and found that the MSC events occurred more frequently in the upper portion of the echo layer. More examinations showed that the characteristics were different between the upper and lower portions of the layer. For example, the differences in echo power between vertical and oblique beams changed mostly from positive to negative along the increase of altitude, and strong turbulent echoes were seen in the upper portion of the layer. These observations indicate that the aspect sensitivity of the echoes became less and less with the increase of altitude. Moreover, the scattering centers of the echoes were close to zenith for the lower portion of the layer but were usually several degrees from the zenith for the upper portion of the layer. Observable wave-like variation in the scattering center was also seen in the upper part of the layer. Based on these features, we drew some conclusions for this case study: (a the MSC events might result from the slanted layer/anisotropic structure tilted by short-wave activities, (b the tilt angle of the layer structure could be 6°–10°, causing the echo power received by the 7° oblique beam was larger than or comparable to that received by the vertical beam, and (c short-wave activities not only tilted the layer structure, but also induced isotropic irregularities.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics. Radio science (interferometry; instruments and techniques

  7. First Measurements of Aspect Sensitivity of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Bistatic Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Pinedo, H.; Havnes, O.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a bistatic radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and the receiving EISCAT_3D demonstrator array located in Kiruna, (Sweden). The receiving system is 234 km southeast from the transmitting radar and its line of sight to the mesosphere above Tromso has an elevation angle of 21 degrees implying an aspect angle of the scattered signals in that direction of 69 degrees. This is the first time that a truly bistatic configuration has been employed to measure the angle dependence of the scattering mechanism of PMSE which otherwise has been measured only in monostatic configurations. The bistatic configuration is unencumbered by drawbacks of the monostatic configuration that cannot reach angles greater than about 20 degrees due to antenna beam pattern degradation and the use of models to extrapolate the angle dependence of the scattered signals. Strong scattering was observed over prolonged periods on several days by the demonstrator array in July of 2011. These measurements are at variance with previous aspect angle measurements that have reported aspect angles no greater than about 15 degrees. These results indicate that the turbulent irregularities that produce the scattering have a high degree of isotropy, which is more in line with Kolmogorov's hypothesis of a universal scaling of turbulence based on the assumption of homogeneity and isotropy in the inertial regime of turbulence which applies also to the Batchelor regime (due to large Schmidt numbers) believed to be the case for PMSE.

  8. Wideband Radar Echo Frequency-domain Simulation and Analysis for High Speed Moving Targets

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    Ning Chao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A frequency-domain method is proposed for wideband radar echo simulation of high-speed moving targets. Based on the physical process of electromagnetic waves observing a moving target, a frequency-domain echo model of wideband radar is constructed, and the block diagram of the radar echo simulation in frequency-domain is presented. Then, the impacts of radial velocity and slant range on the matching filtering of LFM radar are analyzed, and some quantitative conclusions on the shift and expansion of the radar profiles are obtained. Simulation results illustrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. The influence of geomagnetic activity on mesospheric summer echoes in middle and polar latitudes

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    O. Zeller

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of mesospheric VHF radar echoes during summer months on geomagnetic activity has been investigated with observation data of the OSWIN radar in Kühlungsborn (54° N and of the ALWIN radar in Andenes (69° N. Using daily mean values of VHF radar echoes and of geomagnetic activity indices in superimposed epoch analyses, the comparison of both data sets shows in general stronger radar echoes on the day of the maximum geomagnetic activity, the maximum value one day after the geomagnetic disturbance, and enhanced radar echoes also on the following 2–3 days. This phenomenon is observed at middle and polar latitudes and can be explained by precipitating particle fluxes during the ionospheric post storm effect. At polar latitudes, the radar echoes decrease however during and one day after very strong geomagnetic disturbances. The possible reason of this surprising effect is discussed.

  10. The influence of geomagnetic activity on mesospheric summer echoes in middle and polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, O.; Bremer, J.

    2009-02-01

    The dependence of mesospheric VHF radar echoes during summer months on geomagnetic activity has been investigated with observation data of the OSWIN radar in Kühlungsborn (54° N) and of the ALWIN radar in Andenes (69° N). Using daily mean values of VHF radar echoes and of geomagnetic activity indices in superimposed epoch analyses, the comparison of both data sets shows in general stronger radar echoes on the day of the maximum geomagnetic activity, the maximum value one day after the geomagnetic disturbance, and enhanced radar echoes also on the following 2-3 days. This phenomenon is observed at middle and polar latitudes and can be explained by precipitating particle fluxes during the ionospheric post storm effect. At polar latitudes, the radar echoes decrease however during and one day after very strong geomagnetic disturbances. The possible reason of this surprising effect is discussed.

  11. Anisotropy of Doppler spectral parameters in the VHF radar observations at MU and White Sands

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    G. D. Nastrom

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant differences are found between the mean spectral widths from beams in the meridional plane and in the zonal plane at both the MU and the White Sands VHF radars. The spectral width in the beam directed perpendicular to the prevailing wind is greater than that in the beam parallel to the wind. The magnitudes of the differences in spectral width show a linear relationship with wind speed, with the greatest differences at the greatest wind speeds. The differences in spectral width show a positive correlation with the differences in backscattered power. The anisotropy in backscattered power is well-known and is usually attributed to aspect sensitivity effects. However, the anisotropy in spectral width does not appear to be due to the same mechanism, and while several hypotheses to account for this are considered, including finite range-volume effects, effects from the tilting of isentropic layers, and anisotropic turbulence effects, it is seen that each of these suggestions has its shortcomings.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques

  12. Anisotropy of Doppler spectral parameters in the VHF radar observations at MU and White Sands

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    G. D. Nastrom

    Full Text Available Significant differences are found between the mean spectral widths from beams in the meridional plane and in the zonal plane at both the MU and the White Sands VHF radars. The spectral width in the beam directed perpendicular to the prevailing wind is greater than that in the beam parallel to the wind. The magnitudes of the differences in spectral width show a linear relationship with wind speed, with the greatest differences at the greatest wind speeds. The differences in spectral width show a positive correlation with the differences in backscattered power. The anisotropy in backscattered power is well-known and is usually attributed to aspect sensitivity effects. However, the anisotropy in spectral width does not appear to be due to the same mechanism, and while several hypotheses to account for this are considered, including finite range-volume effects, effects from the tilting of isentropic layers, and anisotropic turbulence effects, it is seen that each of these suggestions has its shortcomings.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques

  13. Radar cross sections for mesospheric echoes at Jicamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Lehmacher

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radar cross sections (RCS of mesospheric layers at 50 MHz observed at Jicamarca, Peru, range from 10−18 to 10−16 m−1, three orders of magnitudes smaller than cross sections reported for polar mesospheric winter echoes during solar proton events and six orders of magnitude smaller than polar mesospheric summer echoes. Large RCS are found in thick layers around 70 km that also show wide radar spectra, which is interpreted as turbulent broadening. For typical atmospheric and ionospheric conditions, volume scattering RCS for stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence at 3 m are also in the range 10−18 to 10−16 m−1, in reasonable agreement with measurements. Moreover, theory predicts maximum cross sections around 70 km, also in agreement with observations. Theoretical values are still a matter of order-of-magnitude estimation, since the Bragg scale of 3 m is near or inside the viscous subrange, where the form of the turbulence spectrum is not well known. In addition, steep electron density gradients can increase cross-sections significantly. For thin layers with large RCS and narrow spectra, isotropic turbulence theory fails and scattering or reflection from anisotropic irregularities may gain relevance.

  14. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  15. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  16. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Engler

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar.

  17. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, N.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Strelnikov, B.

    2008-11-01

    Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar.

  18. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, N.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Strelnikov, B. [Rostock Univ., Kuehlungsborn (Germany). Leibniz Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    2008-07-01

    Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar. (orig.)

  19. Studies of polar mesosphere summer echoes at multiple sites using calibrated radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, Nimalan

    A 51.5 MHz VHF radar system, located at Resolute Bay in northern Canada has been monitoring Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) since 1997. This is currently the northernmost radar used to monitor PMSE in the North American sector. It has been recording a lower level of PMSE activity in this region, compared with the PMSE activity recorded by other high latitudes radars operating at similar frequencies. To investigate the reason for this, the radar system has been absolutely calibrated by means of cosmic sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. A general theory is developed in such a way that the calibration procedure can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world, provided the sky noise variations are known. PMSE backscatter cross-sections for the Resolute Bay radar are estimated, converted into an equivalent electron density structure function constant, C2N , and compared with three other radars located at Yellowknife and Andenes during simultaneous measurements. It was found that the estimated C2N for Resolute Bay is at least an order of magnitude lower than the estimated values at the other two locations. This leads us to conclude that the reason why PMSE strengths at Resolute Bay are weak compared with other sites is geophysical in origin, and not due to instrumental effects. The seasonal and diurnal variations of PMSE at Resolute Bay, and their connection to cold mesopause temperatures, are investigated on a long term basis, and compared with the observations at Andenes on a short term basis. Although the PMSE season is relatively short at Resolute Bay, the PMSE temporal variation pattern agrees with Andenes for at least one season. On the other hand, the two sites show a completely different picture for diurnal variations. While PMSE at Andenes show a clear diurnal variation, PMSE at Resolute Bay are modulated by high frequency oscillations. For the first time, a group of near identical SKiYMET meteor

  20. Characteristics of C-band meteorological radar echoes at Petrolina, Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Aragão, Maria Regina; Correia, Magaly De Fatima; Alves de Araújo, Heráclio

    2000-03-01

    A unique set of C-band meteorological radar echoes is analyzed. The data were obtained in Petrolina (9°24S, 40°30W), located in the semi-arid region of Northeast Brazil, from January to June 1985. The characteristics analyzed are echo areas, types and patterns.As in other tropical areas of the world, echoes with an area100 km2 dominated, making up 53% of the total number of echoes while echoes with 100 km2Petrolina surface and upper air data enable speculation that a system of frontal origin penetrating the radar area provided the dynamical forcing to form the bands in June. All five distinct patterns were more frequent in the southeast quadrant of the radar coverage. It is hypothesized that this preferential location may be explained, among other factors, by the interaction between the smooth relief and moisture advection by the southeasterly trade winds.

  1. Multifractal Modelling of Aircraft Echoes from Low-resolution Radars Based on Structural Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Sheng Li; Wei Xin Xie

    2013-01-01

    As a kind of complex targets, the nonrigid vibration and attitude change of an aircraft as well as the rotation of its rotating parts will induce complex nonlinear modulation on its echo from low-resolution radars. If one performs the multifractal analysis of measures on an aircraft echo, it may offer a fine description of the dynamic characteristics which induce the echo structure. On basis of introducing multifractal theory based on structural functions, the paper models real recorded aircr...

  2. Case study of stratospheric gravity waves of convective origin over Arctic Scandinavia. VHF radar observations and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechou, A. [La Reunion Univ., St. Denis Messag, Ile de La Reunion (France). Lab. de l' Atmosphere et des Cyclones; Arnault, J.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2013-03-01

    Orography is a well-known source of gravity and inertia-gravity waves in the atmosphere. Other sources, such as convection, are also known to be potentially important but the large amplitude of orographic waves over Scandinavia has generally precluded the possibility to study such other sources experimentally in this region. In order to better understand the origin of stratospheric gravity waves observed by the VHF radar ESRAD (Esrange MST radar) over Kiruna, in Arctic Sweden (67.88 N, 21.10 E), observations have been compared to simulations made using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) with and without the effects of orography and clouds. This case study concerns gravity waves observed from 00:00 UTC on 18 February to 12:00 UTC on 20 February 2007. We focus on the wave signatures in the static stability field and vertical wind deduced from the simulations and from the observations as these are the parameters which are provided by the observations with the best height coverage. As is common at this site, orographic gravity waves were produced over the Scandinavian mountains and observed by the radar. However, at the same time, southward propagation of fronts in the Barents Sea created short-period waves which propagated into the stratosphere and were transported, embedded in the cyclonic winds, over the radar site. (orig.)

  3. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms–1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms–1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms–1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms–1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm–1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  4. A statistical study of the polar mesosphere summer echoes overshoot effect with EISCAT VHF during the present solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted observational campaigns using EISCAT radars and the heater to modify the strength of the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). In 2003, Havnes et al. predicted and measured a PMSE overshoot effect. The overshoot effect was strong and frequently observed in the next years following its discovery, but afterwards it has become weaker and rarely observed. However, it seems that this effect has reappeared in our most recent summer campaign in 2013. We will show a statistical study of the occurrence and strength of the heating and the overshoot effect based on observations around the PMSE peak season in the years 2003-2013, this corresponds to approximately a solar cycle. It is know that a major factor controlling the electron heating at the PMSE layer is the electron density below it. It is plausible that the electron density has been unfavorable in the case when the PMSE overshoot was absent. The aim of this study is to verify if the occurrence of the PMSE overshoot and heating effects are correlated with changes in the electron density as determined by the phase of the solar cycle. However, we cannot exclude that other factors are at play.

  5. Digital controller for the Wave Propagation Laboratory's VHF and UHF wind-profiling radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.

    1984-09-01

    Principles are described for operation of a digital system that is used to control the operations of a multiple beam stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) radar system. The digital system, referred to as the radar controller, contains the digital logic for generating the necessary pulse sequences for modulation of the radar transmitter, gating the radar's receiver channels, and sequencing the antenna beams. The radar controller also performs digital-to-analog conversion and coherent averaging of the receiver necessary for signal detection in ST radars. The radar controller is controlled internally by a Z80 microprocessor, and the entire system functions as a peripheral device to a host minicomputer. Block diagrams and detailed circuit schematics for all the custom designed electronics are included.

  6. D region HF radar echoes associated with energetic particle precipitation and pulsating aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Milan et al. (2001 identified a class of narrow, slow-moving HF radar backscatter echoes which originate between altitudes of 80 and 100 km, the ionospheric D- and lower E-regions. These echoes appeared to be associated with the occurrence of pulsating aurora, which are known to be created by energetic electrons capable of penetrating to D region altitudes. In this study we show that these echoes are observed in tandem with enhancements in cosmic noise absorption (auroral absorption, additional evidence that energetic (>30 keV particle precipitation is responsible for generating the irregularities from which a radar can scatter. In addition, we show that the D region backscatter echoes occur predominantly in the post-midnight sector during substorm recovery phase, in common with auroral absorption events and pulsating aurora.

  7. PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars: Ice particles and their effect on ambient electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    2013-11-01

    It is now well understood that the occurrence of PMSE is closely connected to the presence of ice particles. These ice particles modify the ambient electron density by electron attachment which occasionally leads to large electron density depletions which have also been called ‘biteouts’. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the relative depth of such depletions which is usually expressed by the parameter Λ=|ZA|NA/ne. Here, |ZA|NA is the charge number density of ice particles and ne is the electron density. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the statistical distribution of Λ using measurements with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars. Based on 25 h of simultaneous observations, we derived a total of 757 Λ values based on 15 min of data each. In each of these cases, PMSE were observed with the EISCAT VHF-radar but not with the UHF-radar and the UHF-measurement were hence used to determine the electron density profile. From these 757 cases, there are 699 cases with Λ⪡1, and only 33 cases with Λ>0.5 (21 cases with Λ>1). A correlation analysis of Λ versus PMSE volume reflectivities further reveals that there is no strong dependence between the two parameters. This is in accordance with current PMSE-theory based on turbulence in combination with a large Schmidt-number. The maxima of Λ from each profile show a negative relationship with the undisturbed electron densities deduced at the same altitudes. This reveals that the variability of Λ mainly depends on the variability of the electron densities. In addition, variations of aerosol number densities may also play a role. Although part of the observations were conducted during the HF heating experiments, the so-called overshoot effects did not significantly bias our statistical results. In order to avoid missing biteouts because of a superposition of coherent and incoherent scatter in the UHF-data, we finally calculated spectral parameters n by applying a simple fit to auto

  8. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Olakunle Ogunjobi; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Judy Ann Elizabeth Stephenson; and William Tafon Sivla

    2015-01-01

    We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition) IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds...

  9. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  10. Calibrated measurements of PMSE strengths at three different locations observed with SKiYMET radars and narrow beam VHF radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W. K.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.

    2009-12-01

    While PMSE are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, debate still exists on their relative strengths as function of latitude and longitude. Different radar design and noise calibration procedures complicate comparison between sites. Here, we use radars at multiple sites, some with a common design, to better determine the radar backscatter cross-section, and hence compare PMSE strengths. Five radars at Yellowknife (62.5oN, 114.3oW), Andenes (69.3oN, 16.0oE) and Resolute Bay (75.0oN, 95.0oW) in the northern hemisphere were used to observe PMSE during July 2005. At Yellowknife, data were collected for thirteen days. In other two locations data were collected continuously for the full month of July. The radars were independently calibrated using the same method, and absolute backscatter cross-sections were determined. Resolute Bay is close to both the magnetic and geomagnetic north poles, and inside the auroral oval, while the other two sites are under the auroral oval on some occasions. Inter-comparison of the calibrated observations indicates that the strength of the PMSE at Yellowknife and Andenes are comparable, and both are significantly stronger than at Resolute Bay.

  11. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  12. KAGUYA Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) observation of lunar surface echo and its calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Ryeol Lee, Seung

    2015-04-01

    Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is an HF radar of which the center frequency of transmitted pulse is 5 MHz. LRS was installed to KAGUYA which flew to the Moon in 2007. During the operation period of 19 months, LRS performed radar sounding observation from the orbit at the nominal altitude of 100 km to cover whole surface of the Moon with its foot print. The total number of LRS observations (pulse transmissions) exceeded 10^8. We extracted the nadir surface echo out of each observation which made a surface echo map of the Moon, i.e. a mosaic image of the Moon of an HF frequency (5 MHz). The observed surface echoes carry information regarding lunar surface and that of shallow subsurface (near-surface) whose depth scale is smaller than the range resolution of the LRS (~ 150 m in vacuum). An inversion algorithm is applied to extract such information. However, inversion algorithms often assume a simple model of Fresnel reflection. One should remove the effect of surface roughness from the LRS data before practicing inversion. For this purpose, we carried out simulation of LRS observation to evaluate the surface roughness effect on the LRS data quantitatively. The simulation is based on Kirchhoff approximation theory. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of KAGUYA Terrain Camera (TC) mission was used in the simulation to simulate the actual lunar terrain. LRS observation simulation was performed in the range from -90 to 70 degrees in longitude and in the range from -30 to 70 degrees in latitude at every 0.1 degree interval in both directions. The simulation revealed 1) LRS surface echo observation is sensible to the surface terrain: even wrinkle ridges and small craters are well recognized in the mosaic image of simulation surface echo map. 2) Little difference was found in the mosaic image of an old mare surface and a young mare surface. 3) However, apparent difference was found in the shape of the distribution functions of echo intensity of an old mare surface and a young mare

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Echo Signals from Low-Flying Targets for Airborne Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyuan Man

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A demonstrated hybrid method based on the combination of half-space physical optics method (PO, graphical-electromagnetic computing (GRECO, and Monte Carlo method on echo signals from low-flying targets based on actual environment for airborne radar is presented in this paper. The half-space physical optics method , combined with the graphical-electromagnetic computing (GRECO method to eliminate the shadow regions quickly and rebuild the target automatically, is employed to calculate the radar cross section (RCS of the conductive targets in half space fast and accurately. The direct echo is computed based on the radar equation. The reflected paths from sea or ground surface cause multipath effects. In order to accurately obtain the echo signals, the phase factors are modified for fluctuations in multipath, and the statistical average value of the echo signals is obtained using the Monte Carlo method. A typical simulation is performed, and the numerical results show the accuracy of the proposed method.

  14. An Improved Scheme for Convective/Stratiform Echo Classification Using Radar Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Michael I.; Listemaa, Steven A.

    2000-12-01

    An improved algorithm for the partitioning of radar reflectivity into convective and stratiform rain classifications has been developed and tested using data from the Houston, Texas, Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler. The algorithm starts with output from the current operational version of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) convective/stratiform classification scheme for the ground-based validation sites and corrects the output based on physical characteristics of convective and stratiform rain diagnosed from the three-dimensional structure of the radar reflectivity field. The modified algorithm improved the performance of echo classification by correcting two main sources of error. Heavy stratiform rain, originally classified as convective, and the periphery of convective cores, originally classified as stratiform, were both reclassified by the modified algorithm. When applied to a large dataset of convective storms comprising squall lines, unorganized convection, and embedded convection, it was found that roughly 25% of the total echo area and 14% of the total rain volume were reclassified. The magnitudes of the differences between the original and modified algorithms varied with the morphology of the storm system, suggesting that the quality of current echo classification information supplied by the TRMM program could vary by location depending on the structure of the dominant precipitation systems within a given region. The analysis presented here helps to establish the level of uncertainty in the existing echo classification products available from TRMM.

  15. Meteor head echo polarization at 930 MHz studied with the EISCAT UHF HPLA radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wannberg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarization characteristics of 930-MHz meteor head echoes have been studied for the first time, using data obtained in a series of radar measurements carried out with the tristatic EISCAT UHF high power, large aperture (HPLA radar system in October 2009. An analysis of 44 tri-static head echo events shows that the polarization of the echo signal recorded by the Kiruna receiver often fluctuates strongly on time scales of tens of microseconds, illustrating that the scattering process is essentially stochastic. On longer timescales (> milliseconds, more than 90 % of the recorded events show an average polarization signature that is independent of meteor direction of arrival and echo strength and equal to that of an incoherent-scatter return from underdense plasma filling the tristatic observation volume. This shows that the head echo plasma targets scatter isotropically, which in turn implies that they are much smaller than the 33-cm wavelength and close to spherically symmetric, in very good agreement with results from a previous EISCAT UHF study of the head echo RCS/meteor angle-of-incidence relationship. Significant polarization is present in only three events with unique target trajectories. These all show a larger effective target cross section transverse to the trajectory than parallel to it. We propose that the observed polarization may be a signature of a transverse charge separation plasma resonance in the region immediately behind the meteor head, similar to the resonance effects previously discussed in connection with meteor trail echoes by Herlofson, Billam and Browne, Jones and Jones and others.

  16. Radar echo processing with partitioned de-ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2013-03-19

    The spurious-free dynamic range of a wideband radar system is increased by apportioning de-ramp processing across analog and digital processing domains. A chirp rate offset is applied between the received waveform and the reference waveform that is used for downconversion to the intermediate frequency (IF) range. The chirp rate offset results in a residual chirp in the IF signal prior to digitization. After digitization, the residual IF chirp is removed with digital signal processing.

  17. Temporal evolution of radar echoes associated with mesospheric dust clouds after turn-on of radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2012-03-01

    The initial perturbation of polar mesospheric summer echoes PMSEs during radio wave heating provides significant diagnostic information about the charged dust layer associated with the irregularity source region. Comparison between the results of computational models and the observation data can be used as a tool to estimate charged dust layer parameters. An analytical model is developed and compared to a more accurate computational model as a reference to investigate the possibilities for diagnostic information as well as insight into the physical processes after heater turn-on. During radio wave heating of the mesosphere, which modifies the background electron temperature, various temporal evolution characteristics of irregularity amplitude may be observed which depend on the background plasma parameters and the characteristics of the dust layer. Turn-on overshoot due to the dominant electron charging process and turn-on undershoot resulting from the dominant ambipolar diffusion process, that can occur simultaneously at different radar frequencies, have been studied. The maximum and minimum of the electron density irregularity amplitude and the time at which this amplitude has been achieved as well as the decay time of irregularity amplitude after the maximum amplitude are unique observables that can shed light on the physical processes after the turn-on of the pump heating and to diagnose the charged dust layer. The agreement between the computational and analytical results are good and indicate the simplified analytical model may be used to provide considerable insight into the heating process and serve as the basis for a diagnostic model after heater turn-on. Moreover, the work proposes that conducting PMSE active experiments in the HF and VHF band simultaneously may allow estimation of the dust density altitude profile, dust charge state variation during pump heating, and ratio of electron temperature enhancement in the irregularity source region.

  18. IceBridge Accumulation Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken over Greenland and Antarctica using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Accumulation Radar instrument....

  19. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  20. IceBridge Accumulation Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken over Greenland using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Accumulation Radar instrument. The data were...

  1. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  2. Detection-Discrimination Method for Multiple Repeater False Targets Based on Radar Polarization Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. W. ZONG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeat false targets (RFTs, created by the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM system of jammer, are widely used in practical to effectively exhaust the limited tracking and discrimination resource of defence radar. In this paper, common characteristic of radar polarization echoes of multiple RFTs is used for target recognition. Based on the echoes from two receiving polarization channels, the instantaneous polarization radio (IPR is defined and its variance is derived by employing Taylor series expansion. A detection-discrimination method is designed based on probability grids. By using the data from microwave anechoic chamber, the detection threshold of the method is confirmed. Theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that the method is valid and feasible. Furthermore, the estimation performance of IPRs of RFTs due to the influence of signal noise ratio (SNR is also covered.

  3. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the Northernmost MST Radar at Eureka (80 deg N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northern most geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80 deg N, 86 deg W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69 deg N, 16 deg E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  4. Evidence of Meteoroid Fragmentation in Specular Trail Echoes Observed Using Gadanki MST Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A.; Malhotra, A.; Patra, A. K.; Prasad, T. R.; Mathews, J. D.

    2015-02-01

    Meteoroids are responsible for deposition of thousands of kilograms of annual mass flux in the Earth's upper atmosphere but the disintegration mechanisms of these bodies, and hence their composition, still remains a subject of debate in the meteor radar community. The role and significance of fragmentation as a meteoroid disintegration mechanism has been of particular interest in the past few years but in contrast to the head echoes, relatively little work has been done to study the effect and extent of fragmentation on trail echoes observed by the high power large aperture radars. Using the 53 MHz Gadanki MST radar, we present examples of radar meteor trails whose evolution cannot be explained with just the aid of classical meteor ablation theory. These examples are analyzed and discussed on a case-by-case basis and it is reported that the evolution of these trails can be explained with the help of fragmentation. This study will form the basis for future modeling efforts of fragmenting meteor trails and has important implications on the form in which the meteoroid mass is deposited in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Dustin Yewell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This document is a white paper marketing proposal for Echo™ is a data analysis platform designed for efficient, robust, and scalable creation and execution of complex workflows. Echo’s analysis management system refers to the ability to track, understand, and reproduce workflows used for arriving at results and decisions. Echo improves on traditional scripted data analysis in MATLAB, Python, R, and other languages to allow analysts to make better use of their time. Additionally, the Echo platform provides a powerful data management and curation solution allowing analysts to quickly find, access, and consume datasets. After two years of development and a first release in early 2016, Echo is now available for use with many data types in a wide range of application domains. Echo provides tools that allow users to focus on data analysis and decisions with confidence that results are reported accurately.

  6. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  7. Automatic system for radar echoes filtering based on textural features and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedir, Mehdia; Haddad, Boualem

    2017-10-01

    Among the very popular Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) have been retained to process Ground Echoes (GE) on meteorological radar images taken from Setif (Algeria) and Bordeaux (France) with different climates and topologies. To achieve this task, AI techniques were associated with textural approaches. We used Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Completed Local Binary Pattern (CLBP); both methods were largely used in image analysis. The obtained results show the efficiency of texture to preserve precipitations forecast on both sites with the accuracy of 98% on Bordeaux and 95% on Setif despite the AI technique used. 98% of GE are suppressed with SVM, this rate is outperforming ANN skills. CLBP approach associated to SVM eliminates 98% of GE and preserves precipitations forecast on Bordeaux site better than on Setif's, while it exhibits lower accuracy with ANN. SVM classifier is well adapted to the proposed application since the average filtering rate is 95-98% with texture and 92-93% with CLBP. These approaches allow removing Anomalous Propagations (APs) too with a better accuracy of 97.15% with texture and SVM. In fact, textural features associated to AI techniques are an efficient tool for incoherent radars to surpass spurious echoes.

  8. Geometric considerations of polar mesospheric summer echoes in tilted beams using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The radar is able to resolve PMSE at high spatial and temporal resolution and to perform pulse-to-pulse beam steering. In this experiment, 81 oblique beam directions were used with off-zenith angles up to 25°. For each beam pointing direction and range gate, coherent radar imaging was applied to determine the mean backscatter location. The location of the mean scatterer in the beam volume was calculated by the deviation from the nominal off-zenith angle of the brightest pixel. It shows that in tilted beams with an off-zenith angle greater than 5°, structures appear at the altitudinal edges of the PMSE layer. Our results indicate that the mean influence of the location of the maximum depends on the tilt of the beam and on the observed area of the PMSE layer. At the upper/lower edge of the PMSE layer, the mean backscatter has a greater/smaller off-zenith angle than the nominal off-zenith angle. This effect intensifies with greater off-zenith beam pointing direction, so the beam filling factor plays an important role in the observation of PMSE layers for oblique beams.

  9. On the occurrence and formation of multiple layers of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P.; Rapp, M.; Serafimovich, A.; Latteck, R.

    2005-03-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been studied at Andenes (69°N, 16°E), Norway, using VHF radar observations from 1994-1997 and since 1999. One remarkable feature of all PMSE is the fact that the radar echoes often occur in the form of two or more distinct layers that can persist for periods of up to several hours. Until now, the layering mechanism leading to these multiple structures is not well understood. Here we are studying the occurrence and the mean altitude distribution of these multiple layer events. To discuss the processes that are potentially responsible for the creation of these multiple structures, we apply a microphysical model of the generation and growth of mesospheric ice particles under the influence of temperature and wind variations caused by a long period gravity wave. Finally, this model approach is tested with gravity wave characteristics derived from MF and VHF radar wind measurements during the PMSE observations.

  10. First simultaneous lidar observations of sodium layers and VHF radar observations of E-region field-aligned irregularities at the low-latitude station Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sridharan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of atmospheric sodium (Na made by a resonance lidar and E-region field-aligned-irregularities (FAI made by the Indian MST radar, both located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and horizontal winds acquired by a SKiYMET meteor radar at Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E are used to investigate the relationship among sodium layer, FAI and neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. The altitudes and descent rates of higher altitude (~95 km Na layer and FAI agree quite well. The descending structures of the higher altitude Na layer and FAI are found to be closely related to the diurnal tidal phase structure in zonal winds observed over Trivandrum. At lower altitudes, the descent rate of FAI is larger than that of Na layer and zonal tidal phase. These observations support the hypothesis that the metallic ion layers are formed by the zonal wind shear associated with tidal winds and subsequently get neutralized to manifest in the form of descending Na layers. The descending FAI echoing layers are manifestation of the instabilities setting in on the ionization layer. In the present observations, the altitudes of occurrence of Na layer and FAI echoes being low, we surmise that it is quite possible that the FAI echoes are due to the descent of already formed irregularities at higher altitudes.

  11. The variability of the occurrence of the Field Aligned Irregularities in the middle-latitude F region using the VHF radar observation at Daejon, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Tae-yong, Y.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    The VHF radar observations at Daejeon in South Korea reveal the highly variable nature of the field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the middle-latitude F-region. Medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are suggested as the source of FAIs, however, the occurrence climatology of the FAIs cannot be fully explained by the existence of the MSTIDs. Moreover, the occurrence climatology of the FAIs with respect to local time (pre-midnight and post-midnight) likely to have separate onset mechanisms. We investigate the role of the ionospheric disturbances(MSTIDs, Equatorial Plasma Bubbles(EPBs)) in the creation of the FAIs using the radar data at Daejon , the total electron content maps over Japan acquired during 2010-2015. and the measurements of the ion density by Swarm (2014,2015). We assess the causal linkage of the occurrence of the FAIs by examining the correlative occurrence of MSTIDs in middle latitude F-region and EPB in low latitude F-region.

  12. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds are studied and presented in this paper. The occurrence probability of SuperDARN-PMSE on the day-to-day scale show, predominantly, diurnal variation, with a broader peak between 12 - 14 LT and distinct minimum of 22 LT. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate is high in the summer solstice. Seasonal variations show a connection between the SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate and mesospheric temperature from SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry. The seasonal trend for both meridional and zonal winds is very stable year-to-year. Analysis of the neutral wind variations indicates the importance of pole-to-pole circulations in SuperDARN-PMSE generation.

  13. Long term observations of polar mesospheric echoes at Andøya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Renkwitz, Toralf; Sommer, Svenja

    2016-04-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong enhancements of received signal power at very high radar frequencies occurring at altitudes between about 80 and 95 km at polar latitudes during summer. These echoes are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Thus the occurrence of PMSE contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapour content but also depends on the ionisation due to solar electromagnetic radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Continuous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) since 1994 using different VHF radars. The PMSE occurrence rate is positively correlated with the geomagnetic Ap index, however not correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation and shows a significant positive trend during the time interval from 1994 until 2012. VHF radar echoes have been observed also during winter times but in the mid mesosphere from about 55 to 85 km altitude. These so called polar mesosphere winter echoes (PMWE) have been observed continuously at Andøya since 2004 using the ALWIN VHF radar (until 2008) and the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System MAARSY (since 2011). Using the more sensitive MAARSY compared to the previous VHF radar systems operated at the site, results in more detections characterized by smaller volume reflectivity values down to 4 ṡ 10-18m-1. The end of the winter season is now hard to determine since mesospheric echoes have also been observed below altitudes of 80 km during non winter months, particularly around the end of May, i.e. the beginning of the polar mesospheric summer echo season. These observations indicate that the physical mechanism for creating the lower mesospheric echoes is present during the early summer months as well. We present results from long term observations of polar mesospheric

  14. Characteristics of the E - and F -region field-aligned irregularities in middle latitudes: Initial results obtained from the Daejeon 40.8 MHz VHF radar in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sil Kwak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary observations of the field-aligned-irregularities (FAIs in the E and F regions during the solar minimum (2009 - 2010 using the 40.8 MHz coherent backscatter radar at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude in South Korea. The radar, which consists of 24 Yagi antennas, observes the FAIs using a single beam with a peak power of 24 kW. The radar has been continuously operated since December 2009. Depending on the manner of occurrence of the backscatter echoes, the E-region echoes are largely divided into two types: quasi-periodic (QP and continuous echoes. Our observations show that the QP echoes occur frequently above an altitude of 105 km in the post-sunset period and continuous echoes occur preferentially around an altitude of 105 km in the post-sunrise period. QP echoes appear as striated discrete echoes for a period of about 10 - 20 min. The QP-type echoes occur more frequently than the continuoustype echoes do and the echo intensity of the QP type is stronger than that of the continuous type. In the F region, the FAIs occur at night at an altitude interval of 250 - 450 km. As time proceeds, the occurrence height of the FAIs gradually increases until early in the morning and then decreases. The duration of the F-region FAIs is typically a few hours at night, although, in rare cases, FAIs persist throughout the night or appear even after sunrise. We discuss the similarities and differences of the FAIs observed by the Daejeon radar in comparison with other radar observations.

  15. Observations of meteor-head echoes using the Jicamarca 50MHz radar in interferometer mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of recent observations of meteor-head echoes obtained with the high-power large-aperture Jicamarca 50MHz radar (11.95°S, 76.87°W in an interferometric mode. The large power-aperture of the system allows us to record more than 3000 meteors per hour in the small volume subtended by the 1° antenna beam, albeit when the cluttering equatorial electrojet (EEJ echoes are not present or are very weak. The interferometry arrangement allows the determination of the radiant (trajectory and speed of each meteor. It is found that the radiant distribution of all detected meteors is concentrated in relative small angles centered around the Earth's Apex as it transits over the Jicamarca sky, i.e. around the corresponding Earth heading for the particular observational day and time, for all seasons observed so far. The dispersion around the Apex is ~18° in a direction transverse to the Ecliptic plane and only 8.5° in heliocentric longitude in the Ecliptic plane both in the Earth inertial frame of reference. No appreciable interannual variability has been observed. Moreover, no population related to the optical (larger meteors Leonid showers of 1998-2002 is found, in agreement with other large power-aperture radar observations. A novel cross-correlation detection technique (adaptive match-filtering is used in combination with a 13 baud Barker phase-code. The technique allows us to get good range resolution (0.75km without any sensitivity deterioration for the same average power, compared to the non-coded long pulse scheme used at other radars. The matching Doppler shift provides an estimation of the velocity within a pulse with the same accuracy as if a non-coded pulse of the same length had been used. The velocity distribution of the meteors is relatively narrow and centered around 60kms-1. Therefore most of the meteors have an almost circular retrograde orbit around the Sun. Less than 8% of the velocities correspond to interstellar orbits

  16. Simultaneous optical and meteor head echo measurements using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY): Data collection and preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Krzeminski, Z.; Cooke, W.; Chau, J. L.

    2017-07-01

    The initial results of a two year simultaneous optical-radar meteor campaign are described. Analysis of 105 double-station optical meteors having plane of sky intersection angles greater than 5° and trail lengths in excess of 2 km also detected by the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) as head echoes was performed. These events show a median deviation in radiants between radar and optical determinations of 1.5°, with 1/3 of events having radiant agreement to less than one degree. MAARSY tends to record average speeds roughly 0.5 km/s and 1.3 km higher than optical records, in part due to the higher sensitivity of MAARSY as compared to the optical instruments. More than 98% of all head echoes are not detected with the optical system. Using this non-detection ratio and the known limiting sensitivity of the cameras, we estimate that the limiting meteoroid detection mass of MAARSY is in the 10-9-10-10 kg (astronomical limiting meteor magnitudes of +11 to +12) appropriate to speeds from 30 to 60 km/s. There is a clear trend of higher peak RCS for brighter meteors between 35 and -30 dBsm. For meteors with similar magnitudes, the MAARSY head echo radar cross-section is larger at higher speeds. Brighter meteors at fixed heights and similar speeds have consistently, on average, larger RCS values, in accordance with established scattering theory. However, our data show RCS ∝ v/2, much weaker than the normally assumed RCS ∝ v3, a consequence of our requiring head echoes to also be detectable optically. Most events show a smooth variation of RCS with height broadly following the light production behavior. A significant minority of meteors show large variations in RCS relative to the optical light curve over common height intervals, reflecting fragmentation or possibly differential ablation. No optically detected meteor occurring in the main radar beam and at times when the radar was collecting head echo data went unrecorded by MAARSY. Thus there does not

  17. Range imaging results from polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Marius; Hoffmann, Peter; Rapp, Markus; Chen, Jenn-Shyong

    The range resolution of pulsed radars is usually limited by the transmitting pulse length and the sampling time. The so-called range imaging (RIM) has been developed to reduce these lim-itations. To apply this method the radar operates alternately over a set of distinct frequencies. Then the phase differences of the receiving signals can be used for optimization methods to generate high-resolution maps of reflections as function of range insight the pulse length. The technique has been implemented on the ALWIN VHF radar in Andenes (69) and the OSWIN VHF radar in Kühlungsborn (54N). Here we present results of the RIM method from measurements in polar mesosphere summer echoes -PMSE. These strong radar echoes are linked to ice particle clouds in the mesopause region. The dynamic of the PMSE can be reflected very well by RIM. The movement of PMSE and the edges of the extension can be tracked with a high altitude resolution. Comparisons between simultaneous measurements by RIM and by standard radar techniques demonstrate the advan-tages of RIM. Wave structures can be identified with RIM whereas they are not detectable with the lesser resolution of the standard measurements. Gravity wave parameter associated with these variations are estimated using the simultaneous measured velocity field.

  18. Multi-radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes during the PHOCUS campaign on 20-22 July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.; Latteck, R.; Zecha, M.; Pinedo, H.; Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.

    2014-10-01

    During the PHOCUS rocket campaign, on 20-22 July 2011, the observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) were made by three mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radars, operating at about 50 MHz. One radar, ESRAD is located at Esrange in Sweden, where the rocket was launched, two other radars, MAARSY and MORRO, are located 250 km north-west and 200 km north of the ESRAD, respectively, on the other side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. We compared PMSE as measured by these three radars in terms of their strength, spectral width and wave modulation. Time-altitude maps of PMSE strength look very similar for all three radars. Cross-correlations with maximum values 0.5-0.6 were found between the signal powers over the three days of observations for each pair of radars. By using cross-spectrum analysis of PMSE signals, we show that some waves with periods of a few hours were observed by all three radars. Unlike the strengths, simultaneous values of PMSE spectral width, which is related to turbulence, sometimes differ significantly between the radars. For interpretation of the results we suggested that large-scale fields of neutral temperature, ice particles and electron density, which are more or less uniform over 150-250 km horizontal extent were ‘modulated’ by waves and smaller patches of turbulence.

  19. Studies of medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances using TIGER SuperDARN radar sea echo observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-S. He

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and diurnal variations in the direction of propagation of medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs have been investigated by analyzing sea echo returns detected by the TIGER SuperDARN radar located in Tasmania (43.4° S, 147.2° E geographic; –54.6°Λ. A strong dependency on local time was found, as well as significant seasonal variations. Generally, the propagation direction has a northward (i.e. equatorward component. In the early morning hours the direction of propagation is quite variable throughout the year. It then becomes predominantly northwest and changes to northeast around 09:00 LT. In late fall and winter it changes back to north/northwest around 15:00 LT. During the other seasons, northward propagation is very obvious near dawn and dusk, but no significant northward propagation is observed at noon. It is suggested that the variable propagation direction in the morning is related to irregular magnetic disturbances that occur at this local time. The changes in the MSTID propagation directions near dawn and dusk are generally consistent with changes in ionospheric electric fields occurring at these times and is consistent with dayside MSTIDs being generated by the Lorentz force. Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; wave propagation; ionospheric irregularities; signal processing

  20. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the northernmost MST radar at Eureka (80°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northernmost geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80°N, 86°W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and 33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69°N, 16°E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  1. Development of a passive VHF radar system using software-defined radio for equatorial plasma instability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuysuz, B.; Urbina, J.; Lind, F. D.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, a bistatic passive radar receiver system named "Coherent-scatter Atmospheric Passive Radar Imager (CAPRI)" is described. It is primarily designed to study the dynamics of the upper atmosphere by utilizing "transmitters of opportunity" as the RF target illuminators. CAPRI is constructed using the open source software-defined radio toolkit, GNU Radio, to meet the signal processing requirements in combination with the open source hardware, Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2, for data acquisition. The resultant system is highly flexible, and we present the details of the design as well as a performance analysis. CAPRI will be deployed in Peru, near the magnetic equator, for long-term operations in the area. FM stations near Lima, Peru, will be utilized with the targets of interest being the equatorial electrojet and the spread F. The results will then be compared to the Jicamarca Unattended Long-term investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere (JULIA) radar data, and CAPRI will be used to improve the simultaneous time and spatial coverage in the region in a more cost-effective manner.

  2. A Fast Motion Parameters Estimation Method Based on Cross-Correlation of Adjacent Echoes for Wideband LFM Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xiong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In wideband radar systems, the performance of motion parameters estimation can significantly affect the performance of object detection and the quality of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging. Although the traditional motion parameters estimation methods can reduce the range migration (RM and Doppler frequency migration (DFM effects in ISAR imaging, the computational complexity is high. In this paper, we propose a new fast non-parameter-searching method for motion parameters estimation based on the cross-correlation of adjacent echoes (CCAE for wideband LFM signals. A cross-correlation operation is carried out for two adjacent echo signals, then the motion parameters can be calculated by estimating the frequency of the correlation result. The proposed CCAE method can be applied directly to the stretching system, which is commonly adopted in wideband radar systems. Simulation results demonstrate that the new method can achieve better estimation performances, with much lower computational cost, compared with existing methods. The experimental results on real radar datasets are also evaluated to verify the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method compared to the state-of-the-art existing methods.

  3. Long-term changes of (polar) mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, J.; Hoffmann, P.; Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Zecha, M.

    2009-10-01

    Strong VHF radar echoes have been observed not only during summer months at polar latitudes (polar mesosphere summer echoes, PMSE) but also at middle latitudes (mesosphere summer echoes, MSE). These echoes are closely connected with small ice particles, thus containing information about mesospheric temperature and water vapour content. But the (P)MSE also depend on the ionisation due to solar wave radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Observations with VHF radars at Andenes (69.3°N; 16.0°E) since 1994 and at Kühlungsborn (54.6°N; 11.8°E) since 1998 are used for investigations of the solar and geomagnetic control of the (P)MSE as well as of possible long-term changes. The (P)MSE are positively correlated with the solar Lyman [alpha] radiation and the geomagnetic activity and have slightly positive trends. Due to the limited measuring period, the significance levels of the detected (P)MSE trends are small. Positive trends in noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) are in general agreement with (P)MSE trends.

  4. WHU VHF radar observations of the diurnal tide and its variability in the lower atmosphere over Chongyang (114.14° E, 29.53° N, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal tide (DT and its variability in the lower atmosphere over Chongyang (114.14° E, 29.53° N were studied based on the newly established Wuhan University (WHU VHF radar observations with the height intervals of 0.145 km (below 9 km and 0.58 km (above 9 km in the whole year of 2012. We find that the DT was the dominant tidal component and showed remarkable height and season variations. A prominent seasonally dependent height variability characteristic is that maximum DT amplitude usually occurs around 6 km in the winter and spring months, which might be due to the tidal wave energy concentration arising from the reflections from the strong eastward tropospheric jet around 13 km and the ground surface. Our results suggest that the background wind is a crucial cause for height variability and seasonal variability of DT. In April 2012, a notable strengthening of DT is observed. Meanwhile, the significant higher harmonics of tides, i.e., the semidiurnal, terdiurnal, and even quarterdiurnal tides, can also be observed, which has seldom been reported. Interestingly, these four tidal components displayed consistent short-term variability, implying that they were excited by the same dramatically varying tidal source. In addition, we identified two symptoms of the coupling of DT and planetary waves (PWs, which can also lead to the short-term DT variability. One is the sum and difference interactions between DT and PWs, causing the tidal amplitude short-term variability as a consequence of the energy exchange among the interacting waves. The other one is the modulation of DT by PWs, leading to that the amplitude of DT varies with the periods of the PWs.

  5. Heat flux and thermal conduction in O+ and H+ ion flows deduced from EISCAT-VHF radar observations in the high-latitude topside ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Taieb, Charley

    1994-06-01

    With two periods of EISCAT-VHF radar observations, magnetically quiet and moderately disturbed, we have calculated the H+ and O+ heat fluxes in using formulae of Wu and Taieb (1993), accounting not only for temperature gradients but also for pressure gradients, velocity gradients, and diffusion-thermal effects. They correspond to different physical processes that are calculated and compared between them. Then, the general features of the H+ and O+ ion thermal conductions are studied during the two periods of observation in the high-latitude topside ionosphere. The analysis of the two periods of measurements revealed the following trends, to be confirmed by further observations: (1) During the two periods the H+ heat flux Q2 is always upward in the altitude range from 600 km up to about 1000 km. It is larger during the quiet period than during the disturbed period. (2) The most important dominant mechanism for H+ heat flux is the diffusion-thermal effect due to the H+-O+ collision, with a correcting term due to the H+ temperature gradient. (3) The O+ heat flux is always downward in the same altitude range during the two periods of observations. The absolute value during the disturbed period is slightly larger than that during the quiet period. (4) The dominant mechanism for O+ heat flux is its temperature gradient, corrected by the coupling with the H+ ion. (5) The O+ thermal conduction is less important during the quiet period than during the disturbed period, while for the H+ thermal conduction it is the contrary. (6) The H+ thermal conduction increases with altitude below about 1000 km.

  6. The dynamical background of polar mesosphere winter echoes from simultaneous EISCAT and ESRAD observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available On 30 October 2004 during a strong solar proton event, layers of enhanced backscatter from altitudes between 55 and 75km have been observed by both ESRAD (52MHz and the EISCAT VHF (224MHz radars. These echoes have earlier been termed Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes, PMWE. After considering the morphology of the layers and their relation to observed atmospheric waves, we conclude that the radars have likely seen the same phenomenon even though the radars' scattering volumes are located about 220km apart and that the most long-lasting layer is likely associated with wind-shear in an inertio-gravity wave. An ion-chemistry model is used to determine parameters necessary to relate wind-shear induced turbulent energy dissipation rates to radar backscatter. The model is verified by comparison with electron density profiles measured by the EISCAT VHF radar. Observed radar signal strengths are found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude stronger than the maximum which can be expected from neutral turbulence alone, assuming that previously published results relating radar signal scatter to turbulence parameters, and turbulence parameters to wind shear, are correct. The possibility remains that some additional or alternative mechanism may be involved in producing PMWE, such as layers of charged dust/smoke particles or large cluster ions.

  7. IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) over...

  8. IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) over...

  9. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    OpenAIRE

    M. Smirnova; E. Belova; S. Kirkwood

    2012-01-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9–11° an...

  10. Effects on SuperDARN HF radar echoes of sudden impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we perform a statistical analysis of the ionospheric echo response observed by six radars of the SuperDARN network in the Northern Hemisphere, over 236 Sudden Impulses (SI of solar wind dynamic pressure events (from 1997 through 2000. For that purpose, we make use of MRS, the Mean Rate of Scattering, as a function of time during the SI event. We classify the events in sudden increases (I events, 144 cases and decreases (D events, 92 cases of the solar wind dynamic pressure. Moreover, we make use of the AE index to define two distinct conditions of the ionosphere under which each event may take place: Quiet and Disturbed. Regarding Quiet conditions, for both I and D events, we find that MRS displays an increase related to the SI time. On the contrary, for Disturbed conditions, D events display an increase in MRS, while I events show a clear dip. The similarity of response for I and D events under Quiet conditions is briefly discussed, but the smaller number of D events does not allow one to further analyse them. As for the I events, a latitudinal analysis shows that the MRS increase for Quiet conditions is seen both at low latitudes (60°–70° Λ and at high latitudes (70°–80° Λ; for Disturbed Is the MRS decrease is stronger at high latitudes. We suggest that the MRS increase for Quiet Is can be due to two different mechanisms: 1 a soft electron precipitation induced by Field Line Resonances (FLR or loss cone instability at lower latitudes; 2 an enlargement of the cusp at higher latitudes, which in turn may induce enhanced particle precipitation. For what concerns Disturbed Is, the MRS decrease can be produced by a higher energy electron precipitation (>1 keV, that enhances the electron density in the E and D regions. This provokes a strong absorbtion of the radio waves in the D region and a higher refraction in the E region, leading to a decrease in MRS, especially at higher latitudes. For I events a further classification

  11. Long-term changes of mesospheric summer echoes at polar and middle latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, J.; Hoffmann, P.; Höffner, J.; Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Zecha, M.; Zeller, O.

    2006-12-01

    Strong mesospheric VHF radar echoes can be observed during summer months mainly at polar latitudes (polar mesosphere summer echoes, PMSE) but with a reduced echo power also at middle latitudes (mesosphere summer echoes, MSE). This phenomenon of unexpected strong radar echoes is closely connected with the existence of small ice particles in the upper mesosphere and mesopause region. Therefore, these echoes contain information about the mesospheric temperature and water vapour content. But the strength of (P)MSE also depends on the level of ionisation due to incident solar wave radiation and precipitating high energetic particle fluxes. Using observations with VHF radars at Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E) since 1994 and at Kühlungsborn (54.6°N, 11.8°E) since 1998, the dependence of the strength of the (P)MSE on the solar and geomagnetic activity has been analysed and, in addition, possible long-term variations were derived. The special behaviour of the year 2002 is discussed in connection with an interhemispheric coupling due to enhanced planetary wave activity at the southern hemisphere winter season. There are some hints of small trends with increasing radar echo power and duration of the (P)MSE season in qualitative agreement with some changes of the observed occurrences rate of noctilucent clouds (NLC) and of the brightness of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). However, the significance levels of the derived trends are low, and in most cases the trends are not significantly different from zero.

  12. Polar mesosphere summer echoes: a comparison of simultaneous observations at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On 5 July 2005, simultaneous observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE were made using the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz and UHF (933 MHz radars located near Tromsø, Norway and the ALWIN VHF radar (53.5 MHz situated on Andøya, 120 km SW of the EISCAT site. During the short interval from 12:20 UT until 12:26 UT strong echoes at about 84 km altitude were detected with all three radars. The radar volume reflectivities were found to be 4×10−13 m−1, 1.5×10−14 m−1 and 1.5×10−18 m−1 for the ALWIN, EISCAT-VHF and UHF radars, respectively. We have calculated the reflectivity ratios for each pair of radars and have compared them to ratios obtained from the turbulence-theory model proposed by Hill (1978a. We have tested different values of the turbulent energy dissipation rate ε and Schmidt number Sc, which are free parameters in the model, to try to fit theoretical reflectivity ratios to the experimental ones. No single combination of the parameters ε and Sc could be found to give a good fit. Spectral widths for the EISCAT radars were estimated from the spectra computed from the autocorrelation functions obtained in the experiment. After correction for beam-width broadening, the spectral widths are about 4 m/s for the EISCAT-VHF and 1.5–2 m/s for the UHF radar. However, according to the turbulence theory, the spectral widths in m/s should be the same for both radars. We also tested an incoherent scatter (IS model developed by Cho et al. (1998, which takes into account the presence of charged aerosols/dust at the summer mesopause. It required very different sizes of particles for the EISCAT-VHF and UHF cases, to be able to fit the experimental spectra with model spectra. This implies that the IS model cannot explain PMSE spectra, at least not for monodisperse distributions of particles.

  13. Polar mesosphere summer echoes: a comparison of simultaneous observations at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On 5 July 2005, simultaneous observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE were made using the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz and UHF (933 MHz radars located near Tromsø, Norway and the ALWIN VHF radar (53.5 MHz situated on Andøya, 120 km SW of the EISCAT site. During the short interval from 12:20 UT until 12:26 UT strong echoes at about 84 km altitude were detected with all three radars. The radar volume reflectivities were found to be 4×10−13 m−1, 1.5×10−14 m−1 and 1.5×10−18 m−1 for the ALWIN, EISCAT-VHF and UHF radars, respectively. We have calculated the reflectivity ratios for each pair of radars and have compared them to ratios obtained from the turbulence-theory model proposed by Hill (1978a. We have tested different values of the turbulent energy dissipation rate ε and Schmidt number Sc, which are free parameters in the model, to try to fit theoretical reflectivity ratios to the experimental ones. No single combination of the parameters ε and Sc could be found to give a good fit. Spectral widths for the EISCAT radars were estimated from the spectra computed from the autocorrelation functions obtained in the experiment. After correction for beam-width broadening, the spectral widths are about 4 m/s for the EISCAT-VHF and 1.5–2 m/s for the UHF radar. However, according to the turbulence theory, the spectral widths in m/s should be the same for both radars. We also tested an incoherent scatter (IS model developed by Cho et al. (1998, which takes into account the presence of charged aerosols/dust at the summer mesopause. It required very different sizes of particles for the EISCAT-VHF and UHF cases, to be able to fit the experimental spectra with model spectra. This implies that the IS model cannot explain PMSE spectra, at least not for monodisperse distributions of particles.

  14. Retrieving mesospheric winds and gravity waves using high resolution radar measurements of polar mesospheric summer echoes with MAARSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Schult, C.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) located at the northern Norwegian island of Andøya (69.3 ° N, 16° E) observes polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) on a regular basis. This backscatter turned out to be an ideal tracer of atmospheric dynamics and to investigate the wind field at the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at high spatial and temporal scales. MAARSY is dedicated to explore the polar mesosphere at such high resolution and employs an active phased array antenna with the capability to steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis, which permits to perform systematic scanning of PMSE and to investigate the horizontal structure of the backscatter. The radar also uses a 16 channel receiver system for interferometric applications e.g. mean angle of arrival analysis or coherent radar imaging. Here we present measurements using these features of MAARSY to study the wind field at the MLT applying sophisticated wind analysis algorithms such as velocity azimuth display or volume velocity processing to derive gravity wave parameters such as horizontal wave length, phase speed and propagation direction. Further, we compare the interferometrically corrected and uncorrected wind measurements to emphasize the importance to account for likely edge effects using PMSE as tracer of the dynamics. The observations indicate huge deviations from the nominal beam pointing direction at the upper and lower edges of the PMSE altering the wind analysis.

  15. Mean characteristics of mesosphere winter echoes at mid- and high-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, O.; Zecha, M.; Bremer, J.; Latteck, R.; Singer, W.

    2006-06-01

    VHF radar observations are used to investigate different regions of the Earth's atmosphere. Strong echoes from the mesosphere are mainly observed during summer months at polar latitudes (polar mesosphere summer echoes [PMSE]), and less often at mid-latitudes (mesosphere summer echoes [MSE]). Interestingly, in recent years similar echoes have been observed during winter months ([polar] mesosphere winter echoes (P)MWE). This paper reports on VHF radar measurements between September and April at Andenes (2001 2005) and Kühlungsborn (2003 2005) to determine the mean features of (P)MWE at polar and mid-latitudes. The (P)MWE are a rare phenomenon with mean occurrence rates of about 2.9% in polar and only 0.3% in mid-latitudes, with a maximum occurrence height at 70.5 km for daytime and 77.5 km for nighttime echoes. The diurnal variation is characterised by a maximum near noon and minimum during nighttime. The seasonal variation of (P)MWE is weak with some indication of an increased number of PMWE during mid-winter. The occurrence rate of (P)MWE is positively correlated with the ionisation level of the D region of the ionosphere. Mainly high-energetic proton (and electron) fluxes and enhanced X-ray radiation are important for the existence of (P)MWE. The second factor for the existence of (P)MWE are irregularities of the refraction index of half the radar wavelength (about 3 m for the radars used in this paper). Neutral air turbulence due to breaking gravity waves seems to be an important process. Whether charged aerosol particles or partial reflections of infrasound have additionally to be considered to explain (P)MWE is currently a point of discussion in the literature.

  16. A comparison of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo observations from locations in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Sato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Koji; Renkwitz, Toralf

    2017-04-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) are observed with 50-MHz VHF radars at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere for more than 20 years. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) from 1999 until 2009 using the ALWIN radar and since 2011 using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. In 2011 the PANSY radar - a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scattering (MST/IS) radar - was installed at Syowa Station, Antartica (69.0°S, 39.4°E) and continues observation of PMSE were started in the austral summer period 2013/2014. Since both MAARSY and PANSY are high-power-large aperture radars mesospheric echoes are observed almost continuously during the summer seasons in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere now. We present a first comparison of PMSE observations obtained at both radar sites during a period of 6 boreal summers (Andøya, NH) and 3 austral summers (Syowa, SH) and discuss similarities and differences of seasonal and diurnal variations of PMSE occurrence frequencies and echo intensity.

  17. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  18. PMSE strength during enhanced D region electron densities: Faraday rotation and absorption effects at VHF frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jorge L.; Röttger, Jürgen; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we study the effects of absorption and Faraday rotation on measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). We found that such effects can produce significant reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the D region electron densities (Ne) are enhanced, and VHF radar systems with linearly polarized antennas are used. In particular we study the expected effects during the strong solar proton event (SPE) of July 2000, also known as the Bastille day flare event. During this event, a strong anti-correlation between the PMSE SNR and the D-region Ne was found over three VHF radar sites at high latitudes: Andøya, Kiruna, and Svalbard. This anti-correlation has been explained (a) in terms of transport effects due to strong electric fields associated to the SPE and (b) due to a limited amount of aerosol particles as compared to the amount of D-region electrons. Our calculations using the Ne profiles used by previous researchers explain most, if not all, of the observed SNR reduction in both time (around the SPE peak) and altitude. This systematic effect, particularly the Faraday rotation, should be recognized and tested, and possibly avoided (e.g., using circular polarization), in future observations during the incoming solar maximum period, to contribute to the understanding of PMSE during enhanced D region Ne.

  19. Mean winds of the upper middle atmosphere (60-110 km): A global distribution from radar systems (M.F., METEOR, VHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Massebeuf, M.; Fellous, J. L.; Elford, W. G.; Vincent, R. A.; Craig, R. L.; Roper, R. G.; Avery, S.; Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    Since the development of the last CIRA in 1972, the number of radars providing winds in the upper middle atmosphere has increased significantly. These systems fill the data gap between 60 km and 110 km. The radars include medium frequency (MF) radars or partial reflection systems giving data from 60/70 to 100/110 km; meteor radars, 80 to 110 km, and M.S.T. radars operating as meteor radars. Data from 12 locations are shown, which represent a good Northern Hemispheric (NH) North American chain, an Oceanian chain which is mainly in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), and some Western Europe data. Generally tidal oscillations have been removed from days or groups of days, and the remaining mean winds and longer period oscillations plotted as height-time contours. Composite cross sections from the years 1978 to 1982 were formed where possible so that only the major temporal features remain.

  20. Anisotropy of the permittivity field inferred from aspect-sensitive radar echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw some quantitative conclusions regarding the anisotropy of the clear-air back-scattering mechanism based on the measured variation of echo power with zenith angle. The measurements were made by the SOUSY group of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy at Lindau, FRG. They installed their 47-MHz transmitter and antenna feed in the 300-meter diameter reflector at Arecibo. The resulting 1.7-degree beam was stepped successively through seven 1.7-degree intervals from 1.7 to 11.7 degrees in zenith angle, obtaining about four minutes of data at each setting. This procedure was carried out in an eastward pointing azimuth and in a northward pointing azimuth, the entire set of measurements consuming an hour and twenty minutes. Range resolution was 150 meters.

  1. First observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. X.; Hu, H. Q.; Hosokawa, K.; Liu, R. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xing, Z. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We report the first observations of PMSE by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar in Antarctica and present a statistical analysis of PMSE from 2010 to 2012. The seasonal variations of occurrence are consistent with those before, with an obvious enhancement at the beginning of summer and a maximum several days after summer solstice. The special features of diurnal variations were observed because of high geomagnetic latitude of Zhongshan Station, which is that the maximum is near local midnight and the secondary maximum appears 1-2 h after the local noon. The results proved that the auroral particle precipitation plays a fairly important role in the PMSE occurrence.

  2. The proposed flatland radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  3. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Smirnova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9–11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  4. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, M.; Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.

    2012-03-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997-2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9-3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9-11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  5. Electric field measurements of DC and long wavelength structures associated with sporadic-E layers and QP radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ohtsuki

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric field and plasma density data gathered on a sounding rocket launched from Uchinoura Space Center, Japan, reveal a complex electrodynamics associated with sporadic-E layers and simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic radar echoes. The electrodynamics are characterized by spatial and temporal variations that differed considerably between the rocket's upleg and downleg traversals of the lower ionosphere. Within the main sporadic-E layer (95–110 km on the upleg, the electric fields were variable, with amplitudes of 2–4 mV/m that changed considerably within altitude intervals of 1–3 km. The identification of polarization electric fields coinciding with plasma density enhancements and/or depletions is not readily apparent. Within this region on the downleg, however, the direction of the electric field revealed a marked change that coincided precisely with the peak of a single, narrow sporadic-E plasma density layer near 102.5 km. This shear was presumably associated with the neutral wind shear responsible for the layer formation. The electric field data above the sporadic-E layer on the upleg, from 110 km to the rocket apogee of 152 km, revealed a continuous train of distinct, large scale, quasi-periodic structures with wavelengths of 10–15 km and wavevectors oriented between the NE-SW quadrants. The electric field structures had typical amplitudes of 3–5 mV/m with one excursion to 9 mV/m, and in a very general sense, were associated with perturbations in the plasma density. The electric field waveforms showed evidence for steepening and/or convergence effects and presumably had mapped upwards along the magnetic field from the sporadic-E region below. Candidate mechanisms to explain the origin of these structures include the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Es-layer instability. In both cases, the same shear that formed the sporadic-E layer would provide the energy to generate the km-scale structures. Other possibilities

  6. Phase and group velocity tracing analysis of projected wave packet motion along oblique radar beams – qualitative analysis of QP echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kuo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave packets of atmospheric gravity waves were numerically generated, with a given characteristic wave period, horizontal wave length and projection mean wind along the horizontal wave vector. Their projection phase and group velocities along the oblique radar beam (vpr and vgr, with different zenith angle θ and azimuth angle φ, were analyzed by the method of phase- and group-velocity tracing. The results were consistent with the theoretical calculations derived by the dispersion relation, reconfirming the accuracy of the method of analysis. The RTI plot of the numerical wave packets were similar to the striation patterns of the QP echoes from the FAI irregularity region. We propose that the striation range rate of the QP echo is equal to the radial phase velocity vpr, and the slope of the energy line across the neighboring striations is equal to the radial group velocity vgr of the wave packet; the horizontal distance between two neighboring striations is equal to the characteristic wave period τ. Then, one can inversely calculate all the properties of the gravity wave responsible for the appearance of the QP echoes. We found that the possibility of some QP echoes being generated by the gravity waves originated from lower altitudes cannot be ruled out.

  7. The decay of radar echoes from meteors with particular reference to their use in the determination of temperature fluctuations near the mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jones

    Full Text Available The rate of decay of a radar echo from an ionised meteor train will be governed by the diffusion coefficient of the plasma and this in turn will depend on the temperature. Very recently the temperature fluctuations near the mesopause have been monitored by this means, by the recording of the decay times of underdense trains. The usual derivation of the precise expression relating the underdense echo decay time to the temperature contains two important assumptions, (i that the train is created with a Gaussian ionisation profile, and (ii that kinetic theory may be applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient. We investigate the effect of these assumptions, showing that the first assumption is unnecessary, an underdense backscatter echo decaying exponentially with a decay time equal to λ2/(32π2D, where λ is the wavelength and D the diffusion coefficient, independently of the initial distribution. However, the second assumption is shown to be incorrect, and whereas according to kinetic theory DT1/2/ρ, where T and ρ are the atmospheric temperature and density, the correct result is DTρ. This leads to an appreciable correction to the results for the temperature fluctuations.

  8. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Villain

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  9. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Villain

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  10. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE: Review of observations and current understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE are very strong radar echoes primarily studied in the VHF wavelength range from altitudes close to the polar summer mesopause. Radar waves are scattered at irregularities in the radar refractive index which at mesopause altitudes is effectively determined by the electron number density. For efficient scatter, the electron number density must reveal structures at the radar half wavelength (Bragg condition for monostatic radars; ~3 m for typical VHF radars. The question how such small scale electron number density structures are created in the mesopause region has been a longstanding open scientific question for almost 30 years. This paper reviews experimental and theoretical milestones on the way to an advanced understanding of PMSE. Based on new experimental results from in situ observations with sounding rockets, ground based observations with radars and lidars, numerical simulations with microphysical models of the life cycle of mesospheric aerosol particles, and theoretical considerations regarding the diffusivity of electrons in the ice loaded complex plasma of the mesopause region, a consistent explanation for the generation of these radar echoes has been developed. The main idea is that mesospheric neutral air turbulence in combination with a significantly reduced electron diffusivity due to the presence of heavy charged ice aerosol particles (radii ~5–50 nm leads to the creation of structures at spatial scales significantly smaller than the inner scale of the neutral gas turbulent velocity field itself. Importantly, owing to their very low diffusivity, the plasma structures acquire a very long lifetime, i.e., 10 min to hours in the presence of particles with radii between 10 and 50 nm. This leads to a temporal decoupling of active neutral air turbulence and the existence of small scale plasma structures and PMSE and thus readily explains observations proving the absence of neutral air turbulence at

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHF264 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF264 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF264P (Link to Original site) VHF...264F 606 VHF264Z 693 VHF264P 1279 - - Show VHF264 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-C/VHF264Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...264P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF264 (VHF264Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-C/VHF...DRRKNIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGDMRYMSCRADEQERGITIKSSSVSLHFEMPKEDKLPAGCTS

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHF181 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF181 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF181P (Link to Original site) VHF...181F 610 VHF181Z 416 VHF181P 1006 - - Show VHF181 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF181Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...181P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF181 (VHF181Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF...VKYKMVNFTIDQIRAIMDRRENIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKVSG DMRYMSCRADEQERGITIKSSSVSLHF

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHF777 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF777 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16283-1 VHF777P (Link to Original site) VHF...777F 474 VHF777Z 669 VHF777P 1123 - - Show VHF777 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF7-D/VHF777Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...777P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF777 (VHF777Q) /CSM/VH/VHF7-D/VHF...PNIIGVEHYKVATDVQKILXRI*itsryychfryg*fi *rpksncipcs*dstflittirscprxhqygr*ir*tlrlyq

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHF354 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF354 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF354P (Link to Original site) VHF...354F 617 VHF354Z 721 VHF354P 1318 - - Show VHF354 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF354Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...354P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF354 (VHF354Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF...no Acid sequence LSSAKKVKYKMVNFTIDQIRAIMDRRENIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGD

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHF590 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF590 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16306-1 VHF590P (Link to Original site) VHF...590F 115 VHF590Z 603 VHF590P 698 - - Show VHF590 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-D/VHF590Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...590P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF590 (VHF590Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-D/VHF5...qlphvlrqlk*sqnfhkkylkkvqeqqq--- ---rwifhrwccfqsthdamyflyqxfgslsw*snlxrpkist*xfyhifghfw*rls*l ss*ipi*lqkwysyv

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHF536 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF536 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16531-1 VHF536P (Link to Original site) VHF...536F 255 VHF536Z 685 VHF536P 920 - - Show VHF536 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-B/VHF536Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...536P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF536 (VHF536Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-B/VHF5...ti*mlhliskvmtvh*mslslfyggyfl*lsi*llwnysig qvvvcliksikxerllkstmt--- ---*erlcl*ilxlvsichf

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHF730 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF730 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15767-1 VHF730P (Link to Original site) VHF...730F 569 VHF730Z 718 VHF730P 1267 - - Show VHF730 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF7-B/VHF730Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...730P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF730 (VHF730Q) /CSM/VH/VHF7-B/VHF...QEKRIPVLNSMDANDSINKKA RISWPDGFKYFFVDNQAGDSESAKSGKNLPIQRDIELNWNGEAYEYSNSNYFPINGQXFN DVSYPV--- ---lhvvvvkxvhtlpvnvnqivhf

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHF649 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF649 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11031-1 VHF649P (Link to Original site) VHF...649F 562 VHF649Z 671 VHF649P 1213 - - Show VHF649 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF6-C/VHF649Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...649P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF649 (VHF649Q) /CSM/VH/VHF6-C/VHF...PNTPPTIKIELPSQSILKPSGQLKK*x* Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: i*qlvchlsivlfhhqviyphvlklekhf

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHF527 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF527 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF527P (Link to Original site) VHF...527F 571 VHF527Z 456 VHF527P 1007 - - Show VHF527 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-B/VHF527Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...527P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF527 (VHF527Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-B/VHF...AKKVKYKMVNFTIDQIRAIMDRRENIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGDMRYMSCRADEQXRGITIKSSSVSLHF

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHF294 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF294 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16441-1 VHF294P (Link to Original site) VHF...294F 573 VHF294Z 215 VHF294P 768 - - Show VHF294 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-D/VHF294Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...294P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF294 (VHF294Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-D/VHF2...ssfst*scisfttfry*gfsdctfr*fhfn**RFWFNMEQCII QWVMFYS--- ---DCHVSIKKFFKWWQRLDRWCCXXXSCXXXSWWFWFPTFLRIQISNXXY*k

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHF690 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF690 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11064-1 VHF690P (Link to Original site) VHF...690F 199 VHF690Z 419 VHF690P 598 - - Show VHF690 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF6-D/VHF690Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...690P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF690 (VHF690Q) /CSM/VH/VHF6-D/VHF6...vllksqsknqyl*hlikslidfinif*hgmhqiyhqrkkn*nq *k--- ---rrwfpr*rernhhfqlc*sts*rgcryw

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHF273 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF273 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11514-1 VHF273P (Link to Original site) VHF...273F 644 VHF273Z 678 VHF273P 1302 - - Show VHF273 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-D/VHF273Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...273P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF273 (VHF273Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-D/VHF...ctr*ccnvkdwchyssrl*syrs*ts*nrsifidr*iftsh*kdw**s llwfsnetr*skmcchcnwckhflwscckfstrnrrtwssssys*kywslly*fhrhlg

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHF243 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF243 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16423-1 VHF243P (Link to Original site) VHF...243F 580 VHF243Z 334 VHF243P 894 - - Show VHF243 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-B/VHF243Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...243P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF243 (VHF243Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-B/VHF2...AATCNAGATATTCCAGATTGGTTTGAAAAGATGG TACA sequence update 2002.10.25 Translated Amino Acid sequence ifihadkff*RISHF

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHF134 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF134 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF134P (Link to Original site) VHF...134F 533 VHF134Z 404 VHF134P 917 - - Show VHF134 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-B/VHF134Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...134P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF134 (VHF134Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-B/VHF1...cid sequence LSSAKKVKYKMVNFTIDQIRAIMDRRENIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGDMRYMSCRADEQERGITIKSSSVSLHFEMPKE

  5. Dicty_cDB: VHF892 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF892 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF892P (Link to Original site) VHF...892F 140 VHF892Z 417 VHF892P 537 - - Show VHF892 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF8-D/VHF892Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...892P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF892 (VHF892Q) /CSM/VH/VHF8-D/VHF8... Translated Amino Acid sequence TIKSSSVSLHFEMPXEDKLPAGCTSHEFLINLIDSPSHVDFS--- ---ELTASPNILEPIYLVEITAPENAIGGI

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHF479 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF479 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11426-1 VHF479P (Link to Original site) VHF...479F 629 VHF479Z 691 VHF479P 1300 - - Show VHF479 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF4-D/VHF479Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...479P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF479 (VHF479Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-D/VHF...EKNPQEWRWSGGFFVDSISDYVVKSRNTERPDHDSLLF HVNIKEKQGTHFIRIPLSSKESPPYIIQNDTQFKISFFQRDSPENIDYIEPKEKLCYGWD EPSAEYVL

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHF754 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF754 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16531-1 VHF754P (Link to Original site) VHF...754F 526 VHF754Z 624 VHF754P 1130 - - Show VHF754 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF7-C/VHF754Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...754P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF754 (VHF754Q) /CSM/VH/VHF7-C/VHF...ixnkmqwlkmlqvk*killk*ekvvslgiiftipf--- ---flvsichfnchc*itfccsrwnnlxllxfldsryllqw*

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHF461 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF461 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11551-1 VHF461P (Link to Original site) VHF...461F 646 VHF461Z 261 VHF461P 887 - - Show VHF461 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF4-C/VHF461Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...461P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF461 (VHF461Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-C/VHF4...TTAAATTATTAAAAATAGTAAATAAAAAAAA sequence update 2002.10.25 Translated Amino Acid sequence fyfifenfkthfhiiffl

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHF781 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF781 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16440-1 VHF781P (Link to Original site) VHF...781F 452 VHF781Z 680 VHF781P 1112 - - Show VHF781 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF7-D/VHF781Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...781P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF781 (VHF781Q) /CSM/VH/VHF7-D/VHF...vlkmmmlkf*xixftr*r Frame C: glldinkleeiik*rfhlfylfl*rlllayhfhkilfqlisktaligsnfnhyiqikmim y*l*iqdqrmf*kdqqmvv

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHF435 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF435 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF435P (Link to Original site) VHF...435F 616 VHF435Z 703 VHF435P 1299 - - Show VHF435 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF435Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...435P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF435 (VHF435Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF...AKKVKYKMVNFTIDQIRAIMDRRENIRNMSVIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGDMRYMSCRADEQERGITIKSSSVSLHF

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHF553 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF553 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16433-1 VHF553P (Link to Original site) VHF...553F 122 VHF553Z 533 VHF553P 635 - - Show VHF553 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-C/VHF553Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...553P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF553 (VHF553Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-C/VHF5...ed Amino Acid sequence syhfylfiy*IIIYLLNYYLLSCVNYLPINFNILYIY--- ---YVINLTLDGDNVNGFPKTVTVKPAPSXEQXYAEGEGLVKVF

  12. Dusty space plasma diagnosis using temporal behavior of polar mesospheric summer echoes during active modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmoudian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the effect of different plasma and dust parameters on Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE temporal behavior after turn-on and turn-off of radio wave heating and to use these responses to diagnose the properties of the dust layer. The threshold radar frequency and dust parameters for the enhancement or suppression of radar echoes after radio wave heating turn-on are investigated for measured mesospheric plasma parameters. The effect of parameters such as the electron temperature enhancement during heating, dust density, dust charge polarity, ion-neutral collision frequency, electron density and dust radius on the temporal evolution of electron irregularities associated with PMSE are investigated. The possible diagnostic information for various charged dust and background plasma quantities using the temporal behavior of backscattered radar power in active experiments is discussed. The computational results are used to make predictions for PMSE active modification experiments at 7.9, 56, 139, 224 and 930 MHz corresponding to existing radar facilities. Data from a 2009 VHF (224 MHz experiment at EISCAT is compared with the computational model to obtain dust parameters in the PMSE.

  13. Occurrence frequencies of polar mesosphere summer echoes observed at 69° N during a full solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Bremer, J.

    2013-07-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong enhancements of received signal power at very high radar frequencies occurring at altitudes between about 80 and 95 km at polar latitudes during summer. PMSE are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Thus the occurrence of PMSE contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapour content but also depends on the ionisation due to solar wave radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3° N, 16.0° E) from 1999 until 2008 using the ALWIN VHF radar at 53.5 MHz. In 2009 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn, Germany (IAP) started the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. The observation of mesospheric echoes could be continued in spring 2010 starting with an initial stage of expansion of MAARSY and is carried out with the completed installation of the radar since May 2011. Since both the ALWIN radar and MAARSY are calibrated, the received echo strength of PMSE from 14 yr of mesospheric observations could be converted to absolute signal power. Occurrence frequencies based on different common thresholds of PMSE echo strength were used for investigations of the solar and geomagnetic control of the PMSE as well as of possible long-term changes. The PMSE are positively correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation and the geomagnetic activity. The occurrence frequencies of the PMSE show slightly positive trends but with marginal significance levels.

  14. 3D measurements in the polar mesosphere using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, M.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Stober, G.; Latteck, R.

    2012-12-01

    Radars provide the opportunity of continuous measurements in the interesting area of the polar mesosphere. Usually the spatial resolution of measurements by pulsed VHF radars is limited by the radar beam width, transmitting pulse length, and sampling time. Due to these technical restrictions the typical small-scale structures in the mesosphere often cannot be resolved. Furthermore the quality of the estimation of dynamic atmosphere parameters is reduced if the position and direction of scatter returns cannot determined exactly. Radar interferometry methods have been developed to reduce these limitations. The coherent radar imaging method gives a high resolving image of the scatter structure insight the radar beam volume. In recent years the VHF radar MAARSY was installed in Andenes/Norway (69°N). This new radar was designed to allow improved three-dimensional observations in the atmosphere. It consists of 433 Yagis and allows a minimum beam width of about 4 degree. The beam direction can be changed pulse-by-pulse freely in azimuth angle and practicable up to 40 degree in zenith angle. The pulse length can be varied from a couple of km down to 50 m. Up to 16 receiving channels of spaced antennas can be used. In this presentation we show the detection of the angles-of-arrival of radar echoes and the correction of the wind measurements. We demonstrate the improvement of measurement results by using coherent radar imaging. The differences to the results of conventional methods depend on the beam width, range resolution, antenna distances, and beam tilting. We show that the application of interferometry is necessary to improve considerably the quality of 3D-measurement results. Furthermore we demonstrate the synthesis of high resolved images to get a real 3D image of the mesosphere.

  15. A preliminary test of the application of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) as a thunderstorm warning and location device for the FHA including a correlation with updrafts, turbulence, and radar precipitation echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a test of the use of a Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) remote display in the Patrick AFB RAPCON facility are presented. Agreement between LDAR and radar precipitation echoes of the RAPCON radar was observed, as well as agreement between LDAR and pilot's visual observations of lightning flashes. A more precise comparison between LDAR and KSC based radars is achieved by the superposition of LDAR precipitation echoes. Airborne measurements of updrafts and turbulence by an armored T-28 aircraft flying through the thunderclouds are correlated with LDAR along the flight path. Calibration and measurements of the accuracy of the LDAR System are discussed, and the extended range of the system is illustrated.

  16. Long-term variations of polar mesospheric summer echoes observed at Andøya (69°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Bremer, J.

    2017-10-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong radar signals received at very high radar frequencies at altitudes between about 80 and 95 km at polar latitudes during summer. PMSE are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Therefore, the occurrence of PMSE depends on the ionisation due to solar wave radiation and precipitating high energetic particle fluxes but also contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapour content. Long-time observations of these echoes can be used to conclude on long-term changes of these atmospheric parameters. Continuous observations of PMSE have been carried out on the North-Norwegian island And/oya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) using the ALOMAR SOUSY radar (1994-1997), the ALWIN VHF radar (1999-2008) and the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System MAARSY (since 2011). Since both the ALWIN radar and MAARSY are calibrated systems, the received echo strength of PMSE from 17 years of mesospheric observations (1999-2016) could be converted into absolute signal power. This data series could be extended to the years 1994 until 1997 on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio values derived during the years between 1994 and 2008. Seasonal mean values of PMSE occurrence for the time period from 1 June until 31 July have been derived and the resulting 23 years long data set was analyzed in dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity as well as analyzed for long-term trends. The PMSE occurrence rate is positively correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation (however low significance level) and the geomagnetic Ap index. After elimination of the solar and geomagnetically induced parts using different regression analysis methods, the PMSE data show a significant (χ = 92%-97%) positive trend during the observation period 1994 until 2016.

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHF163 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF163 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11129-1 VHF163P (Link to Original site) VHF1...63F 611 VHF163Z 654 VHF163P 1245 - - Show VHF163 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF1...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-C/VHF163Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF1...63P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF163 (VHF163Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-C/VHF1...nt alignments: (bits) Value VHF163 (VHF163Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-C/VHF163Q.Seq.d/ 2357 0.0 VHM584 (VHM584Q) /CSM/VH

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHF444 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (Link to library) VHF444 (Link to dictyBase) - G20601 DDB0204337 Contig-U12392-1 VHF444P (Link to Original...site) VHF444F 579 VHF444Z 213 VHF444P 772 - - Show VHF444 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF444 (Link...tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF444Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF444P (Link to Original site) Representative...Representative DNA sequence >VHF444 (VHF444Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF444Q.Seq.d/ CAAAAGAAATAAATAATTATGCCATCA...significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF444 (VHF444Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF444Q.Seq.d/ 1479 0.0 VHA836 (VHA836Q)

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHF338 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF338 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U14303-1 VHF338P (Link to Original site) VHF3...38F 208 VHF338Z 685 VHF338P 873 - - Show VHF338 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF338Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...38P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF338 (VHF338Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3...significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF338 (VHF338Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF338Q.Seq.d/ 1296 0.0 VHK267 (VHK267Q

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHF394 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF394 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF394P (Link to Original site) VHF3...94F 563 VHF394Z 417 VHF394P 960 - - Show VHF394 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF394Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...94P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF394 (VHF394Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF3...nt alignments: (bits) Value VHF394 (VHF394Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF394Q.Seq.d/ 1776 0

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHF340 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF340 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11939-1 VHF340P (Link to Original site) VHF3...40F 113 VHF340Z 506 VHF340P 599 - - Show VHF340 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF340Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...40P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF340 (VHF340Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3...Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF340 (VHF340Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHF329 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF329 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF329P (Link to Original site) VHF3...29F 618 VHF329Z 633 VHF329P 1231 - - Show VHF329 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF329Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...29P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF329 (VHF329Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3...s CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF329 (VHF329Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3

  3. VHF signal power suppression in stratiform and convective precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. McDonald

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that VHF clear-air radar return strengths are reduced during periods of precipitation. This study aims to examine whether the type of precipitation, stratiform and convective precipitation types are identified, has any impact on the relationships previously observed and to examine the possible mechanisms which produce this phenomenon. This study uses a combination of UHF and VHF wind-profiler data to define periods associated with stratiform and convective precipitation. This identification is achieved using an algorithm which examines the range squared corrected signal to noise ratio of the UHF returns for a bright band signature for stratiform precipitation. Regions associated with convective rainfall have been defined by identifying regions of enhanced range corrected signal to noise ratio that do not display a bright band structure and that are relatively uniform until a region above the melting layer.

    This study uses a total of 68 days, which incorporated significant periods of surface rainfall, between 31 August 2000 and 28 February 2002 inclusive from Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W. Examination suggests that both precipitation types produce similar magnitude reductions in VHF signal power on average. However, the frequency of occurrence of statistically significant reductions in VHF signal power are very different. In the altitude range 2-4 km stratiform precipitation is related to VHF signal suppression approximately 50% of the time while in convective precipitation suppression is observed only 27% of the time. This statistical result suggests that evaporation, which occurs more often in stratiform precipitation, is important in reducing the small-scale irregularities in humidity and thereby the radio refractive index. A detailed case study presented also suggests that evaporation reducing small-scale irregularities in humidity may contribute to the observed VHF signal

  4. VHF signal power suppression in stratiform and convective precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. McDonald

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that VHF clear-air radar return strengths are reduced during periods of precipitation. This study aims to examine whether the type of precipitation, stratiform and convective precipitation types are identified, has any impact on the relationships previously observed and to examine the possible mechanisms which produce this phenomenon. This study uses a combination of UHF and VHF wind-profiler data to define periods associated with stratiform and convective precipitation. This identification is achieved using an algorithm which examines the range squared corrected signal to noise ratio of the UHF returns for a bright band signature for stratiform precipitation. Regions associated with convective rainfall have been defined by identifying regions of enhanced range corrected signal to noise ratio that do not display a bright band structure and that are relatively uniform until a region above the melting layer. This study uses a total of 68 days, which incorporated significant periods of surface rainfall, between 31 August 2000 and 28 February 2002 inclusive from Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W. Examination suggests that both precipitation types produce similar magnitude reductions in VHF signal power on average. However, the frequency of occurrence of statistically significant reductions in VHF signal power are very different. In the altitude range 2-4 km stratiform precipitation is related to VHF signal suppression approximately 50% of the time while in convective precipitation suppression is observed only 27% of the time. This statistical result suggests that evaporation, which occurs more often in stratiform precipitation, is important in reducing the small-scale irregularities in humidity and thereby the radio refractive index. A detailed case study presented also suggests that evaporation reducing small-scale irregularities in humidity may contribute to the observed VHF signal suppression.

  5. The thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere during polar mesosphere winter echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.-J. Lübken

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2005, a total of 18 rockets were launched from the Andøya Rocket Range in Northern Norway (69° N into strong VHF radar echoes called 'Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes' (PMWE. The echoes were observed in the lower and middle mesosphere during large solar proton fluxes. In general, PMWE occur much more seldom compared to their summer counterparts PMSE (typical occurrence rates at 69° N are 1–3% vs. 80%, respectively. Our in-situ measurements by falling sphere, chaff, and instrumented payloads provide detailed information about the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere and therefore allow an unprecedented study of the background atmosphere during PMWE. There are a number of independent observations indicating that neutral air turbulence has caused PMWE. Ion density fluctuations show a turbulence spectrum within PMWE and no fluctuations outside. Temperature lapse rates close to the adiabatic gradient are observed in the vicinity of PMWE indicating persistent turbulent mixing. The spectral broadening of radar echoes is consistent with turbulent velocity fluctuations. Turbulence also explains the mean occurrence height of PMWE (~68–75 km: viscosity increases rapidly with altitude and destroys any small scale fluctuations in the upper mesosphere, whereas electron densities are usually too low in the lower mesosphere to cause significant backscatter. The seasonal variation of echoes in the lower mesosphere is in agreement with a turbulence climatology derived from earlier sounding rocket flights. We have performed model calculations to study the radar backscatter from plasma fluctuations caused by neutral air turbulence. We find that volume reflectivities observed during PMWE are in quantitative agreement with theory. Apart from turbulence the most crucial requirement for PMWE is a sufficiently large number of electrons, for example produced by solar proton events. We have studied the sensitivity of the radar echo strength on

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHF187 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF187 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16363-1 VHF187P (Link to Original site) VHF1...87F 549 VHF187Z 707 VHF187P 1236 - - Show VHF187 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF1...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF187Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF1...87P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF187 (VHF187Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF1...* Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF187 (VHF1

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHF368 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF368 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12673-1 VHF368P (Link to Original site) VHF3...68F 597 VHF368Z 746 VHF368P 1323 - - Show VHF368 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF368Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...68P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF368 (VHF368Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF3...ikfpknkii*nki k*nkiky Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF368 (VHF3

  8. Simultaneous observations of ESF irregularities over Indian region using radar and GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sripathi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present simultaneous observations of temporal and spatial variability of total electron content (TEC and GPS amplitude scintillations on L1 frequency (1.575 GHz during the time of equatorial spread F (ESF while the MST radar (53 MHz located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, Dip latitude 6.3° N, a low latitude station, made simultaneous observations. In particular, the latitudinal and longitudinal extent of TEC and L-band scintillations was studied in the Indian region for different types of ESF structures observed using the MST radar during the low solar activity period of 2004 and 2005. Simultaneous radar and GPS observations during severe ESF events in the pre-midnight hour reveal that significant GPS L band scintillations, depletions in TEC, and the double derivative of the TEC index (DROTI, which is a measure of fluctuations in TEC, obtained at low latitudes coincide with the appearance of radar echoes at Gadanki. As expected, when the irregularities reach higher altitudes as seen in the radar map during pre-midnight periods, strong scintillations on an L-band signal are observed at higher latitudes. Conversely, when radar echoes are confined to only lower altitudes, weak scintillations are found and their latitudinal extent is small. During magnetically quiet periods, we have recorded plume type radar echoes during a post-midnight period that is devoid of L-band scintillations. Using spectral slopes and cross-correlation index of the VHF scintillation observations, we suggest that these irregularities could be "dead" or "fossil" bubbles which are just drifting in from west. This scenario is consistent with the observations where suppression of pre-reversal enhancement (PRE in the eastward electric field is indicated by ionosonde observations of the height of equatorial F layer and also occurrence of low spectral width in the radar observations relative to pre-midnight period. However, absence of L-band scintillations during

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHF348 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF348 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U13926-1 VHF348P (Link to Original site) VHF3...48F 539 VHF348Z 473 VHF348P 992 - - Show VHF348 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF348Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...48P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF348 (VHF348Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3...ksxvlmliltck Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF3

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHF312 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF312 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15897-1 VHF312P (Link to Original site) VHF3...12F 543 VHF312Z 483 VHF312P 1006 - - Show VHF312 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF312Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...12P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF312 (VHF312Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF3... 4.0 %: extracellular, including cell wall 4.0 %: plasma membrane 4.0 %: peroxisomal >> prediction for VHF31

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHF375 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF375 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHF375P (Link to Original site) VHF3...75F 432 VHF375Z 670 VHF375P 1082 - - Show VHF375 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF375Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF3...75P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF375 (VHF375Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF3...pperekv*pqksqiltnstknskqfkshxsfqr*xsnlkk Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF3

  12. Similarities and differences in polar mesosphere summer echoes observed in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Morris, R. J.; Hocking, W. K.; Murphy, D. J.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Swarnalingam, N.

    2008-09-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed in the high latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere for several years using VHF radars located at Andenes/Norway (69° N, 16° E), Resolute Bay/Canada (75° N, 95° W), and Davis/Antarctica (69° S, 78° E). The VHF radars at the three sites were calibrated using the same methods (noise source and delayed transmitting signal) and identical equipment. Volume reflectivity was derived from the calibrated echo power and the characteristics of the seasonal variation of PMSE were estimated at the sites for the years 2004 to 2007. The largest peak volume reflectivity of about 2×10-9 m-1 was observed at Andenes compared with their counterparts at Davis (~4×10-11 m-1) and Resolute Bay (~6×10-12 m-1). The peak of the PMSE height distribution is 85.6 km at Davis which is about 1 km higher than at Andenes. At Resolute Bay the height distribution peaks at about 85 km but only a few layers were found below 84 km. The mean PMSE occurrence rate is 83% at Andenes, 38% at Davis with larger variability and only 18% at Resolute Bay (in late summer). The duration of the PMSE season varies at Andenes from 104 to 113 days and at Davis from 88 to 93 days. In general the PMSE seasons starts about 5 days later at Davis and ends about 10 days earlier compared to Andenes. In all three seasons the PMSE occurrence suddenly drops to a much lower level at Davis about 32 days after solstice whereas the PMSE season decays smoothly at Andenes. The duration of the PMSE season at Andenes and Davis is highly correlated with the presence of equatorward directed winds, the observed differences in PMSE occurrence are related to the mesospheric temperatures at both sites.

  13. Similarities and differences in polar mesosphere summer echoes observed in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Latteck

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been observed in the high latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere for several years using VHF radars located at Andenes/Norway (69° N, 16° E, Resolute Bay/Canada (75° N, 95° W, and Davis/Antarctica (69° S, 78° E. The VHF radars at the three sites were calibrated using the same methods (noise source and delayed transmitting signal and identical equipment. Volume reflectivity was derived from the calibrated echo power and the characteristics of the seasonal variation of PMSE were estimated at the sites for the years 2004 to 2007. The largest peak volume reflectivity of about 2×10−9 m−1 was observed at Andenes compared with their counterparts at Davis (~4×10−11 m−1 and Resolute Bay (~6×10−12 m−1. The peak of the PMSE height distribution is 85.6 km at Davis which is about 1 km higher than at Andenes. At Resolute Bay the height distribution peaks at about 85 km but only a few layers were found below 84 km. The mean PMSE occurrence rate is 83% at Andenes, 38% at Davis with larger variability and only 18% at Resolute Bay (in late summer. The duration of the PMSE season varies at Andenes from 104 to 113 days and at Davis from 88 to 93 days. In general the PMSE seasons starts about 5 days later at Davis and ends about 10 days earlier compared to Andenes. In all three seasons the PMSE occurrence suddenly drops to a much lower level at Davis about 32 days after solstice whereas the PMSE season decays smoothly at Andenes. The duration of the PMSE season at Andenes and Davis is highly correlated with the presence of equatorward directed winds, the observed differences in PMSE occurrence are related to the mesospheric temperatures at both sites.

  14. Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment (ShUREX): overview of the campaign with some preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantha, Lakshmi; Lawrence, Dale; Luce, Hubert; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Wilson, Richard; Mixa, Tyler; Yabuki, Masanori

    2017-12-01

    The Shigaraki unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-Radar Experiment (ShUREX) is an international (USA-Japan-France) observational campaign, whose overarching goal is to demonstrate the utility of small, lightweight, inexpensive, autonomous UAVs in probing and monitoring the lower troposphere and to promote synergistic use of UAVs and very high frequency (VHF) radars. The 2-week campaign lasting from June 1 to June 14, 2015, was carried out at the Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) Observatory in Shigaraki, Japan. During the campaign, the DataHawk UAV, developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and equipped with high-frequency response cold wire and pitot tube sensors (as well as an iMET radiosonde), was flown near and over the VHF-band MU radar. Measurements in the atmospheric column in the immediate vicinity of the radar were obtained. Simultaneous and continuous operation of the radar in range imaging mode enabled fine-scale structures in the atmosphere to be visualized by the radar. It also permitted the UAV to be commanded to sample interesting structures, guided in near real time by the radar images. This overview provides a description of the ShUREX campaign and some interesting but preliminary results of the very first simultaneous and intensive probing of turbulent structures by UAVs and the MU radar. The campaign demonstrated the validity and utility of the radar range imaging technique in obtaining very high vertical resolution ( 20 m) images of echo power in the atmospheric column, which display evolving fine-scale atmospheric structures in unprecedented detail. The campaign also permitted for the very first time the evaluation of the consistency of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in turbulent structures inferred from the spectral broadening of the backscattered radar signal and direct, in situ measurements by the high-frequency response velocity sensor on the UAV. The data also enabled other turbulence parameters such as the temperature

  15. On the necessary complexity of modeling of the Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo Overshoot Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebricher, Alexander; Havnes, Ove; Bast, Radovan

    2012-06-01

    Recent numerical studies of the Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo (PMSE) Overshoot Effect predict the basic shape of the Overshoot Characteristic Curve (OCC) to undergo dramatic changes as the frequency of the radar decreases. Principally, this may render earlier modeling, which assumed near-instantaneous diffusion of electrons and ions, moot and exacerbate algebraic analysis of OCC obtained in the future with, e.g. the MORRO-radar (56 MHz) and a synchronized radio wave emitter, both at or near the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Scientific Association's site in Ramfjordmoen near Tromsø, Norway. Since, however, by far the most observational results on the PMSE Overshoot Effect have been assembled with the help of the Very High Frequency (VHF, 224 MHz) radar and the an Ultra High Frequency (UHF, 929 MHz) radar, both at the EISCAT site, we examine more closely whether near-instantaneous diffusion is a valid assumption for these particular frequencies. We show that, indeed, the earlier less complex and analytically more accessible model can still be considered sufficient for most, if not all, existing experimental data.

  16. Foliage penetration radar detection and characterization of objects under trees

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of foliage penetration (FOPEN) radar, concentrating on both airborne military radar systems as well as earth resource mapping radars. It is the first concise and thorough treatment of FOPEN, covering the results of a decade-long investment by DARPA in characterizing foliage and earth surface with ultrawideband UHF and VHF synthetic aperture radar (SAR).

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHF190 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F0-ATPase putative regulatory protein IF1 (if1) mRNA, complete cds; nuclear gene for mitochondrial produc...VH (Link to library) VHF190 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12594-1 - (Link to Original site) VHF1...90F 581 - - - - - - Show VHF190 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF190 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF190Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF190 (VHF190Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-D/VHF190Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTTCATTTTAAAAA

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHF331 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF331 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - - (Link to Original site) VHF3...31F 609 - - - - - - Show VHF331 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF331 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID... - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF3...31Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF3...31 (VHF331Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-B/VHF331Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAAAAAGTAAAGTACAAAATGGTTAATTTCA

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHF709 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF709 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15897-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF...709Z 602 - - - - Show VHF709 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF709 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF7-A/VHF709Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF709 (VHF709Q) /CSM/VH/VHF7-A/VHF709Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCGTCCAA...vestir Frame B: ---sknfttrsrlqlccsfnglxpr**rw*tnrqhyhg*cksiwsssfnlsryyw*yrcs ilpqiq*kwchhsnlpiw*wsflyhf

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHF236 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF236 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U14303-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF...236Z 611 - - - - Show VHF236 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF236 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-B/VHF236Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF236 (VHF236Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-B/VHF236Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTGCCATT...VQKISQELKHLT*tfvsylvlk Frame B: ---plvicc*ninvlhfveilsxhglay*xhcfplvlv*fqilsrmiqs

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHF140 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF140 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15309-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF...140Z 518 - - - - Show VHF140 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF140 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1-B/VHF140Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF140 (VHF140Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-B/VHF140Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCCGATAA...EDYINMQIKQLENSENSQELIQKLNEHLSEYKASVEEIKHNVQNN Frame C: ---iixvtlmlflqngilhfigviil

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHF507 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF507 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11594-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF...507Z 541 - - - - Show VHF507 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF507 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-A/VHF507Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF507 (VHF507Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-A/VHF507Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTACCAAT...nvhsmiwihvglxlvigx*sncfvttsfikst mmvllcstftmllkpsixwivvsmkkyf*clemnxhfw*sviki*knv

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHF321 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF321 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 - (Link to Original site) VHF...321F 617 - - - - - - Show VHF321 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF321 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF321Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF321 (VHF321Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF321Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAA...VIAHVDHGKTTLSDSLIQRAGIIADKV SGDMRYMSCRADEQERGITIKSSSVSLHFEMPKEDKLPAGCTSHEFLINLIDSPGHVDFS SEVTAALRVTDGALVVIDC

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHF866 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF866 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16600-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF...866Z 388 - - - - Show VHF866 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF866 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF8-C/VHF866Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF866 (VHF866Q) /CSM/VH/VHF8-C/VHF866Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXAAGCAGC...Frame C: ---qhnnifklafptiknftgvpmxfvmtnegdnlgnftvkthfakffstyyscgeaghh yfdsccn*y*qkqgckfhs*h*xkssrr*lcfxqnwfi

  5. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1–4 min and  ∼  20 m, respectively in the altitude range  ∼  1.27–4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters. The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHF155 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF155 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - VHF155P (Link to Original site) VHF155F 587 VHF1...55Z 643 VHF155P 1210 - - Show VHF155 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF155 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF1...-C/VHF155Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF155P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF155 (VHF155Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-C/VHF155Q.Seq.d/ ATTCTCGATACTGGAA

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHF392 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF392 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - VHF392P (Link to Original site) VHF392F 568 VHF3...92Z 375 VHF392P 923 - - Show VHF392 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF392 (Link ...to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3...-D/VHF392Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF392P (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF392 (VHF392Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF392Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAA

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHF366 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF366 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12131-1 | Contig-U13633-1 VHF3...66P (Link to Original site) VHF366F 590 VHF366Z 544 VHF366P 1114 - - Show VHF366 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...131-1 | Contig-U13633-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF3...66Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF366P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF366 (VHF3...66Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-C/VHF366Q.Seq.d/ AATAATTTATTATTATTATTAATAAGTAATAGAAATAAAAGATGGAACCAATTCCAGATA

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHF310 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF310 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF3...10Z 625 - - - - Show VHF310 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF310 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF310Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF310 (VHF310Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF310Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTCGTCAA...omology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF310 (VHF310Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF3

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHF315 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF315 (Link to dictyBase) - G20600 DDB0169270 Contig-U12450-1 VHF3...15P (Link to Original site) VHF315F 216 VHF315Z 353 VHF315P 549 - - Show VHF315 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF3...ontig-U12450-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-A/VHF3...15Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF315P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF315 (VHF315Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3...-A/VHF315Q.Seq.d/ ATTAAAAAACTTCTTACTTGGACACCCCTTTTATATATATAAATAAAAACTTCTAAATAT AAATCCCA

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHF381 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF381 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16508-1 - (Link to Original site) - - VHF3...81Z 645 - - - - Show VHF381 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF381 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF381Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF381 (VHF381Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF381Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCAACCAA...ignments: (bits) Value VHF381 (VHF381Q) /CSM/VH/VHF3-D/VHF381Q.Seq.d/ 1223 0.0 VHP767 (VHP767Q) /CSM/VH/VHP7

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHF210 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF210 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12400-1 | Contig-U16431-1 VHF...210P (Link to Original site) VHF210F 613 VHF210Z 636 VHF210P 1229 - - Show VHF210 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...400-1 | Contig-U16431-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-A/VHF...210Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF210P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF210 (VHF...210Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-A/VHF210Q.Seq.d/ AATAAAATGATAAGATCATCAATAAAAAATAAAATAACAACAACAAAAAGTTTATCATGT

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHF575 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF575 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15481-1 | Contig-U15981-1 VHF...575P (Link to Original site) VHF575F 586 VHF575Z 397 VHF575P 963 - - Show VHF575 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...81-1 | Contig-U15981-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF5-D/VHF...575Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF575P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF575 (VHF...575Q) /CSM/VH/VHF5-D/VHF575Q.Seq.d/ ATAATAATACAAAGAAGAAATGAAAAATATAAATAATAAAATTTTAAAGATTTTTATTCT

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHF296 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF296 (Link to dictyBase) - G23392 DDB0187414 Contig-U12449-1 VHF...296P (Link to Original site) VHF296F 241 VHF296Z 482 VHF296P 703 - - Show VHF296 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...ontig-U12449-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-D/VHF...296Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF296P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF296 (VHF296Q) /CSM/VH/VHF...2-D/VHF296Q.Seq.d/ GATTATCAGAAAGATTACATTATGAAATTATACCAGATTGTATTAAAATTATTGAAAGCT CAAAACAA

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHF436 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF436 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - VHF436P (Link to Original site) VHF436F 618 VHF...436Z 699 VHF436P 1297 - - Show VHF436 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF436 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF...4-B/VHF436Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF436P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF436 (VHF436Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-B/VHF436Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAA

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHF158 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF158 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - VHF158P (Link to Original site) VHF158F 608 VHF...158Z 693 VHF158P 1281 - - Show VHF158 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF158 (Link... to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF...1-C/VHF158Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF158P (Link to... Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF158 (VHF158Q) /CSM/VH/VHF1-C/VHF158Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAA

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHF847 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF847 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15351-1 | Contig-U16514-1 VHF...847P (Link to Original site) VHF847F 478 VHF847Z 709 VHF847P 1167 - - Show VHF847 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...351-1 | Contig-U16514-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF8-B/VHF...847Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF847P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF847 (VHF...847Q) /CSM/VH/VHF8-B/VHF847Q.Seq.d/ TATGATGTTCCACTTATAATTCAAACGGTTGCCAATAATAAATCAACAAAACTCANTCTT

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHF272 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF272 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15754-1 VHF272P (Link to Original site) VHF...272F 515 VHF272Z 603 VHF272P 1098 - - Show VHF272 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHF...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHF2-C/VHF272Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHF...272P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHF272 (VHF272Q) /CSM/VH/VHF2-C/VHF...id sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ixfssq**wnkkd*mihy*eiligrigvpm*vidngqlfvkimvvnhgptfhtimldhvh idgqrivlvdfvidfkifv*v*hf

  19. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  20. Small scale density variations of electrons and charged particles in the vicinity of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present small scale variations of electron number densities and particle charge number densities measured in situ in the presence of polar mesosphere summer echoes. It turns out that the small scale fluctuations of electrons and negatively charged particles show a strong anticorrelation down to the smallest scales observed. Comparing these small scale structures with the simultaneously measured radar signal to noise profile, we find that the radar profile is well described by the power spectral density of both electrons and charged particles at the radar half wavelength (=the Bragg scale. Finally, we consider the shape of the power spectra of the observed plasma fluctuations and find that both charged particles and electrons show spectra that can be explained in terms of either neutral air turbulence acting on the distribution of a low diffusivity tracer or the fossil remnants of a formerly active turbulent region. All these results are consistent with the theoretical ideas by Rapp and Lübken (2003 suggesting that PMSE can be explained by a combination of active and fossil neutral air turbulence acting on the large and heavy charged aerosol particles which are subsequently mirrored in the electron number density distribution that becomes visible to a VHF radar when small scale fluctuations are present.

  1. Comparison of Radar and In Situ Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zink, Florian

    2004-01-01

    We compare measurements of refractive index structure constant C (2)(n) and energy dissipation rate e by VHF radar with in situ observations by high-resolution thermosondes during a campaign near Adelaide, Australia, in August 1998...

  2. A study of some FMCW radar algorithms for target location at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Sven-Erik; Akeab, Imad K.

    2016-10-01

    FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous wave) radar is a simple and inexpensive technique for target location. The resolution is given by the available bandwidth and the directivity of the antenna. Resolution is not a problem at high frequencies, while at low frequencies (the HF and VHF band), and especially for mobile platforms, the required size of the antenna becomes impractical. In order to obtain the bearing of the targets, without relying on directivity, one may use a simple two-dimensional trilateration method that involves several platforms. Since this approach covers an area, rather than a sector, the range is reduced to some tens of kilometers. The VHF band and a bandwidth below 10 MHz is a good choice if the priority is to reduce radio interference. Fast targets, corresponding to a significant Doppler shift, have not been considered. The problem of ghost targets has been studied for both monostatic and multistatic radar. When there is a confluence of echoes, more bandwidth is required to maintain the accuracy of a few meters that is normally obtained in the simulation.

  3. Polar mesosphere summer echoes during the July 2000 solar protonevent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the solar proton event (SPE 14–16 July 2000 on Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE is examined. PMSE were observed by the Esrange VHF MST Radar (ESRAD at 67°53'N, 21°06'E. The 30MHz Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies IRIS in Kilpisjärvi (69°30'N, 20°47'E registered cosmic radio noise absorption caused by ionisation changes in response to the energetic particle precipitation. An energy deposition/ion-chemical model was used to estimate the density of free electrons and ions in the upper atmosphere. Particle collision frequencies were calculated from the MSISE-90 model. Electric fields were calculated using conductivities from the model and measured magnetic disturbances. The electric field reached a maximum of 91mV/m during the most intensive period of the geomagnetic storm accompanying the SPE. The temperature increase due to Joule and particle heating was calculated, taking into account radiative cooling. The temperature increase at PMSE heights was found to be very small. The observed PMSE were rather intensive and extended over the 80–90km height interval. PMSE almost disappeared above 86km at the time of greatest Joule heating on 15 July 2000. Neither ionisation changes, nor Joule/particle heating can explain the PMSE reduction. Transport effects due to the strong electric field are a more likely explanation. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmospheric dynamics, ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; solar radiation and cosmic ray effects

  4. Meridional motions of the afternoon radar aurora, auroral electrojets, and absorption patches under variable IMF conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The meridional motions of the CUTLASS HF and STARE VHF coherent echoes, IMAGE equivalent electrojet currents, and IRIS absorption patches during the postnoon/early-evening event of 14 February 2000 are presented. The motions were found to be synchronous, to a first approximation, for all instruments. The temporal correlation between motions in the radar and magnetometer data was exceptionally good, although spatially the areas with the E-region backscatter and most intense equivalent currents were not coincident, with the HF (VHF echoes being shifted 100–200km (20–50km equatorward (poleward. The meridional motions of the radar echoes and electrojet currents appeared to be controlled by the IMF Bz changes; the meridional propagation direction was equatorward (poleward during the intervals when the IMF was southward (northward, with one exception when the poleward progression continued after the IMF southward turning. We relate the observed meridional motion patterns to the polar cap expansion/contraction during variable IMF conditions and discuss the relative importance of two types of processes: the dayside reconnection and IMF-triggered substorms. We also investigate the irregularity Doppler velocity for the STARE (144MHz and CUTLASS (12MHz observations at large flow angles in the context of the eastward and westward electrojet systems. We show that the 144-MHz Doppler velocity is determined by a combination of two factors: the sense of electrojet currents and the aspect angle conditions within the STARE field of view. Finally, the behavior of small dayside enhancements of the IRIS absorption (up to 0.5dB at 38.2MHz accompanying the radar echoes and electrojet currents is examined. Since the velocity of the meridional displacements was close to that of the poleward/equatorward progressing intense currents, it is suggested that the absorption patches observed during the event were related to the heating of the E

  5. Graffiti echoes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Purcell, John

    2014-01-01

      Graffiti and street art are a kind of "voice" of the city. From the street-tagged neighborhoods to the grand billboards high in the air, graffiti seems to always echo what is happening in Los Angeles...

  6. McGill algorithm for precipitation nowcasting by lagrangian extrapolation (MAPLE) applied to the South Korean radar network. Part I: Sensitivity studies of the Variational Echo Tracking (VET) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Aldo; Zawadzki, Isztar; Kilambi, Alamelu; Lee, Hee Choon; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Gyuwon

    2010-08-01

    A Variational Echo Tracking (VET) technique has been applied to four months of archived data from the South Korean radar network in order to examine the influence of the various user-selectable parameters on the skill of the resulting 20-min to 4-h nowcasts. The latter are computed over a (512 × 512) array at 2-km resolution. After correcting the original algorithm to take into account the motion of precipitation across the boundaries of such a smaller radar network, we concluded that the set of default input parameters initially assumed is very close to the optimum combination. Decreasing to (5 sx 5) or increasing to (50 × 50) the default vector density of (25 × 25), using two or three maps for velocity determination, varying the relative weights for the constraints of conservation of reflectivity and of the smoothing of the velocity vectors, and finally the application of temporal smoothing all had only marginal effects on the skill of the forecasts. The relatively small sensitivity to significant variations of the VET default parameters is a direct consequence of the fact that the major source of the loss in forecast skill cannot be attributed to errors in the forecast motion, but to the unpredictable nature of the storm growth and decay. Changing the time interval between maps, from 20 to 10 minutes, and significantly increasing the reflectivity threshold from 15 to 30 dBZ had a more noticeable reduction on the forecast skill. Comparisons with the Eulerian "zero velocity" forecast and with a "single" vector forecast have also been performed in order to determine the accrued skill of the VET algorithm. Because of the extensive stratiform nature of the precipitation areas affecting the Korean peninsula, the increased skill is not as large as may have been anticipated. This can be explained by the greater extent of the precipitation systems relative to the size of the radar coverage domain.

  7. Similarities and differences in polar mesosphere summer echoes observed in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Latteck

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been observed in the high latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere for several years using VHF radars located at Andenes/Norway (69° N, 16° E, Resolute Bay/Canada (75° N, 95° W, and Davis/Antarctica (69° S, 78° E. The VHF radars at the three sites were calibrated using the same methods (noise source and delayed transmitting signal and identical equipment. Volume reflectivity was derived from the calibrated echo power and the characteristics of the seasonal variation of PMSE were estimated at the sites for the years 2004 to 2007. The largest peak volume reflectivity of about 2×10−9 m−1 was observed at Andenes compared with their counterparts at Davis (~4×10−11 m−1 and Resolute Bay (~6×10−12 m−1. The peak of the PMSE height distribution is 85.6 km at Davis which is about 1 km higher than at Andenes. At Resolute Bay the height distribution peaks at about 85 km but only a few layers were found below 84 km. The mean PMSE occurrence rate is 83% at Andenes, 38% at Davis with larger variability and only 18% at Resolute Bay (in late summer. The duration of the PMSE season varies at Andenes from 104 to 113 days and at Davis from 88 to 93 days. In general the PMSE seasons starts about 5 days later at Davis and ends about 10 days earlier compared to Andenes. In all three seasons the PMSE occurrence suddenly drops to a much lower level at Davis about 32 days after solstice whereas the PMSE season decays smoothly at Andenes. The duration of the PMSE season at Andenes and Davis is highly correlated with the presence of equatorward directed winds, the observed differences in PMSE occurrence are related to the mesospheric temperatures at both sites.

  8. First upper limits on the radar cross section of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Besson, D.; Blake, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gillman, W. H.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hanson, J. C.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jayanthmurthy, C.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kunwar, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Prohira, S.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rezazadeh-Reyhani, A.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Schurig, D.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takai, H.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Venkatesh, S.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-01-01

    TARA (Telescope Array Radar) is a cosmic ray radar detection experiment colocated with Telescope Array, the conventional surface scintillation detector (SD) and fluorescence telescope detector (FD) near Delta, Utah, U.S.A. The TARA detector combines a 40 kW, 54.1 MHz VHF transmitter and high-gain transmitting antenna which broadcasts the radar carrier over the SD array and within the FD field of view, towards a 250 MS/s DAQ receiver. TARA has been collecting data since 2013 with the primary goal of observing the radar signatures of extensive air showers (EAS). Simulations indicate that echoes are expected to be short in duration (∼ 10 μs) and exhibit rapidly changing frequency, with rates on the order 1 MHz/μs. The EAS radar cross-section (RCS) is currently unknown although it is the subject of over 70 years of speculation. A novel signal search technique is described in which the expected radar echo of a particular air shower is used as a matched filter template and compared to waveforms obtained by triggering the radar DAQ using the Telescope Array fluorescence detector. No evidence for the scattering of radio frequency radiation by EAS is obtained to date. We report the first quantitative RCS upper limits using EAS that triggered the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector. The transmitter is under the direct control of experimenters, and in a radio-quiet area isolated from other radio frequency (RF) sources. The power and radiation pattern are known at all times. Forward power up to 40 kW and gain exceeding 20 dB maximize energy density in the radar field. Continuous wave (CW) transmission gives 100% duty cycle, as opposed to pulsed radar. TARA utilizes a high sample rate DAQ (250 MS/s). TARA is colocated with a large state-of-the-art conventional CR observatory, allowing the radar data stream to be sampled at the arrival times of known cosmic ray events. Each of these attributes of the TARA detector has been discussed in detail in the literature [8]. A map

  9. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) studied at Bragg wavelengths of 2.8 m, 67 cm, and 16 cm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Markus; Strelnikova, Irina; Latteck, Ralph; Hoffmann, Peter; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Häggström, Ingemar; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2008-05-01

    We present observations of radar volume reflectivities under conditions of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) at three frequencies, i.e., 53.5, 224, and 930 MHz corresponding to Bragg wavelengths of 2.8, 0.67, and 0.16 m. These measurements were made with the ALWIN radar in Andenes and the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars in Tromsø. Contributions to the signal at 930 MHz by incoherent scatter are used to estimate electron number densities and their gradient at PMSE altitudes, and spectral width measurements of Doppler spectra recorded at 224 MHz are used to estimate the turbulent energy dissipation rate. We further derive a theoretical expression for the radar volume reflectivity for the case of turbulent scatter aided by a large Schmidt number (i.e., the current standard theory of PMSE) and show that our observations quantitatively agree with this theory if Schmidt numbers between 2500 and 5000 are assumed. We then show that these Schmidt numbers correspond to ice particles with radii in the range 20-30 nm which should frequently occur in the polar summer mesopause region. In addition, we show that for the short period when PMSE was observed at UHF frequencies the volume reflectivity is proportional to a factor determined by the turbulent energy dissipation rate, electron number density, and the electron number density gradient in agreement with theory. We consider our findings as strong support that PMSE at all considered frequencies is indeed created by turbulent scatter in the presence of a large Schmidt number. We finally highlight that ultimate proof of this concept will require the direct measurement of ice particle sizes in a PMSE environment probed by radars covering frequencies between 50 MHz and 1 GHz.

  10. Extraction of forest stand parameters from CARABAS VHF SAR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Fredrik [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Centre for Image Analysis

    1999-10-01

    Methods for extracting stand-wise forest parameters from CARABAS VHF SAR images have been developed and evaluated. CARABAS is a unique airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), developed by the Swedish Defence Research Establishment. It differs a lot from ordinary microwave radars by using wavelengths between 3.3 and 15 m, making the image intensity highly correlated to stem volume. Furthermore, by providing its own illumination source, the sensor operates independently of daylight and weather conditions. Empirical regression models have been developed for relating backscattering amplitude to stem volume, stem diameter, and tree height. To make comparison between CARABAS image data and forest parameters effective, a fully automatic geo-coding algorithm was developed. Image texture features have also been investigated. By using the variogram as a discriminating feature, CARABAS images and aerial images were segmented into homogeneous regions. Furthermore, a method for discriminating recently clear felled areas from forested areas, combining information from Almaz-1 SAR images and SPOT panchromatic data has also been developed, serving as a comparison to the main work of this thesis. For forest stands at near-horizontal ground, the results for estimating stem volume, stem diameter, and tree height from CARABAS image data are very satisfactory. The root mean square errors for the estimates are comparable to subjective ground-based inventories for dense forest stands. The methods and algorithms described in this thesis have been developed towards an operational remote sensing tool. Altogether, significant potential for mapping of forest characteristics exists using the CARABAS VHF SAR sensor 57 refs, 14 figs, 7 tabs

  11. Seasonal variations of long period oscillations in the mesosphere at high- and mid-latitudes and their relation to mesospheric summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Olof; Hoffmann, Peter; Bremer, Juergen; Singer, Werner

    Continuous MF and meteor radar observations allow detailed studies of the wind field in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, which is characterized by a high variability due to the presence of gravity and tidal waves as well as planetary waves. Here the seasonal variation of long period oscillations (periods of few days) is used to indicate the presence of transient planetary waves in the mesosphere at high and mid-latitudes. Our studies are based on wind measurements from meteor and MF radars at Andenes (69° N, 16° E) and Juliusruh (55° N, 13° E). These measurements are supplemented by mesospheric temperatures derived from meteor decay times. For investigations of wind and temperature oscillations wavelet analyses have been performed showing the seasonal varations of their preferred periods and amplitudes. The activity of oscillations with a period in the range 2 - 4 d have their maximum during summer while the long period ones (˜10 d) occur preferably in winter. Oscillations with periods of 4 - 7 d occur in every season. Such periods are not only observed in wind and temperature variations, but also in variations of (polar) mesosphere summer echos (P)MSE observed by VHF radars in Kuehlungsborn (54° N, 12° E) and Andenes. (P)MSE are connected with very cold temperatures where ice particles can exist. Due to an equatorward directed meridional temperature gradient variations of meridional wind and temperature are positively correlated. Generally radar echoes at mid latitudes are strongly affected by meridional wind variations due to a mean temperature around the frost point of water vapour. In contrast there is mostly no significant impact of the meridional wind on radar echoes at polar latitudes. A mean temperature well below the frost point and a weaker meridional temperature gradient than at mid latitudes are reasons for this reduced impact. But because of higher temperatures in 2002 long period temperature and meridional wind variations impact the PMSE

  12. Program of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS radar (PANSY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru; Nakamura, Takuji; Saito, Akinori; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Koji; Kohma, Masashi; Yamagishi, Hisao; Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The PANSY radar is the first Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter (MST/IS) radar in the Antarctic region. It is a large VHF monostatic pulse Doppler radar operating at 47 MHz, consisting of an active phased array of 1045 Yagi antennas and an equivalent number of transmit-receive (TR) modules with a total peak output power of 500 kW. The first stage of the radar was installed at Syowa Station (69°00‧S, 39°35‧E) in early 2011, and is currently operating with 228 antennas and modules. This paper reports the project's scientific objectives, technical descriptions, and the preliminary results of observations made to date. The radar is designed to clarify the role of atmospheric gravity waves at high latitudes in the momentum budget of the global circulation in the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, and to explore the dynamical aspects of unique polar phenomena such as polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) and polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). The katabatic winds as a branch of Antarctic tropospheric circulation and as an important source of gravity waves are also of special interest. Moreover, strong and sporadic energy inputs from the magnetosphere by energetic particles and field-aligned currents can be quantitatively assessed by the broad height coverage of the radar which extends from the lower troposphere to the upper ionosphere. From engineering points of view, the radar had to overcome restrictions related to the severe environments of Antarctic research, such as very strong winds, limited power availability, short construction periods, and limited manpower availability. We resolved these problems through the adoption of specially designed class-E amplifiers, light weight and tough antenna elements, and versatile antenna arrangements. Although the radar is currently operating with only about a quarter of its full designed system components, we have already obtained interesting results on the Antarctic troposphere, stratosphere and

  13. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4 stable stratospheric

  14. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHF476 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF476 (VHF476Q) /CSM/VH/VHF4-D/VHF476Q.Seq.d/ 198 2e-...46 own update 2003.10.17 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value...e 2008.10.29 Homology vs Protein Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54AX5) R

  16. Polar mesosphere summer echoes during the July 2000 solar protonevent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the solar proton event (SPE 14–16 July 2000 on Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE is examined. PMSE were observed by the Esrange VHF MST Radar (ESRAD at 67°53'N, 21°06'E. The 30MHz Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies IRIS in Kilpisjärvi (69°30'N, 20°47'E registered cosmic radio noise absorption caused by ionisation changes in response to the energetic particle precipitation. An energy deposition/ion-chemical model was used to estimate the density of free electrons and ions in the upper atmosphere. Particle collision frequencies were calculated from the MSISE-90 model. Electric fields were calculated using conductivities from the model and measured magnetic disturbances. The electric field reached a maximum of 91mV/m during the most intensive period of the geomagnetic storm accompanying the SPE. The temperature increase due to Joule and particle heating was calculated, taking into account radiative cooling. The temperature increase at PMSE heights was found to be very small.

    The observed PMSE were rather intensive and extended over the 80–90km height interval. PMSE almost disappeared above 86km at the time of greatest Joule heating on 15 July 2000. Neither ionisation changes, nor Joule/particle heating can explain the PMSE reduction. Transport effects due to the strong electric field are a more likely explanation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmospheric dynamics, ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; solar radiation and cosmic ray effects

  17. Enhanced horizontal extreme-echo speed occurrence leading to polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) increase at solar-wind pressure enhancement during high-speed solar wind stream events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kirkwood, S.; Kwak, Y.; Kim, K.; Shepherd, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    We report on horizontal extreme echo speeds (HEES, ≥ 300 ms^{-1}) observed in long-periodic polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) correlated with solar-wind speed in high speed solar wind streams (HSS) events. The observations were made from VHF 52 MHz radar measurements at Esrange (67.8°N, 20.4°E) between June 1-August 8 in 2006 and 2008. The periodicities of PMSE counts and the volume reflectivity primarily occur at 7, 9 and 13.5 days possibly by the effects of HSS, while the periodicities at 4-6 days are competitively coherent between planetary waves appearing in temperature and solar-wind speed during HSS events. The peaks of both HEES occurrence rate relative to PMSE and turbulence dominantly occur at solar-wind pressure enhancement with minor peaks continued under the passage of HSS over the magnetopause, followed by PMSE peaks in 1-3 days later. This study gives the results that the precipitating high-energetic particles (> 30 keV) during HSS likely induce D-region ionization involved with the consecutive processes of HEES, turbulence and PMSE. The turbulence evolved from the HEES can be explained with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which was observed in PMSE by Röttger et al. [11th International Workshop on technical and scientific aspects of MST Radar, 2006] and firstly simulated for PMSE generation by Hill et al. [Earth Planets Space, 1999]. The HEES is understood as the speed of fast moving ions, accelerated by strong electric field as Lee & Shepherd [JGR, 2010] suggested with the supersonic velocities persisting in polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) region observed at enhanced O(^1S) emission rate ( 10 kR) by WINDII/UARS satellite.

  18. Echo project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina; Carson, Rebecca; Kraus, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Echo project (ed. by Verina Gfader and Ruth Höflich) is an online publication and community board that developed from a visit to the Los Angeles Art Book fair in January 2014. It was on the occasion of a prior book project, titled Prospectus, that the editorial team had been invited by the LAABF...... Intellect and Financialization sets a conceptual ground for rethinking subjective freedom; an encounter with Another LA opens out a multitude of cartographies - revealing more discreet and politically dynamic movements in the urban grid; there are glimpses of Machine Project’s events, a visual story around...

  19. HF Radar Bistatic Measurement of Surface Current Velocities: Drifter Comparisons and Radar Consistency Checks

    OpenAIRE

    Lipa, Belinda; Whelan, Chad; Rector, Bill; Nyden, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We describe the operation of a bistatic HF radar network and outline analysis methods for the derivation of the elliptical velocity components from the radar echo spectra. Bistatic operation is illustrated by application to a bistatic pair: Both remote systems receive backscattered echo, with one remote system in addition receiving bistatic echoes transmitted by the other. The pair produces elliptical velocity components in addition to two sets of radials. Results are compared with drifter me...

  20. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF..., measured at the power input terminals to the transmitter, and the output power of the transmitter, terminated in a matching artificial load, must be measured at the end of 10 minutes of continuous operation...

  1. Coincident measurements of PMSE and NLC above ALOMAR (69° N, 16° E by radar and lidar from 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.-J. Lübken

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE and Noctilucent Clouds (NLC have been routinely measured at the ALOMAR research facility in Northern Norway (69° N, 16° E by lidar and radar, respectively. 2900 h of lidar measurements by the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar were combined with almost 18 000 h of radar measurements by the ALWIN VHF radar, all taken during the years 1999 to 2008, to study simultaneous and common-volume observations of both phenomena. PMSE and NLC are known from both theory and observations to be positively linked. We quantify the occurrences of PMSE and/or NLC and relations in altitude, especially with respect to the lower layer boundaries. The PMSE occurrence rate is with 75.3% considerably higher than the NLC occurrence rate of 19.5%. For overlapping PMSE and NLC observations, we confirm the coincidence of the lower boundaries and find a standard deviation of 1.26 km, hinting at very fast sublimation rates. However, 10.1% of all NLC measurements occur without accompanying PMSE. Comparison of occurrence rates with solar zenith angle reveals that NLC without PMSE mostly occur around midnight indicating that the ice particles were not detected by the radar due to the reduced electron density.

  2. An alternative explanation of PMSE-like scatter in MF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. L. Jones

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been reports in the literature that spaced-antenna MF radars may provide a source of data on Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE. Even though the expected scatter from PMSE at MF frequencies is very much weaker than at VHF, the wide distribution of sites and long duration of data sets for MF radar systems could provide valuable information about the occurrence of PMSE. This paper tests whether there is any evidence of PMSE in the profiles derived using the MF radar at Rothera, Antarctica, one of the few such radars at high southern latitudes. Over a year of data during 1997/1998 has been analysed for the occurrence of persistent features around midday in the altitude range 60-95km. Criteria were chosen to test the likelihood that some of the narrow peaks in the power profiles were manifestations of electron density structures associated with PMSE. Although a small number of persistent features were seen at altitudes of 80-85km that are typically associated with PMSE, there was no seasonality in their occurrence. A detailed analysis of specific days showed that two peaks were often seen with altitude separations consistent with the vertical wavelength of the diurnal tide. Persistent features were also detected at altitudes of 70km and 90km during the winter months, thus showing a quite different seasonality to that of PMSE. An estimate of the turbulence caused by the breaking of gravity waves that have propagated up from the lower atmosphere shows that at Rothera significant energy is deposited near 80km during summer, and near 70 and 90km during winter. This seasonal variability is driven by the screening effect of stratospheric winds, and it appears that breaking gravity wave dynamics, rather than PMSE phenomena, can explain many of the localised altitude features in the MF radar data.

  3. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and...

  4. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast...

  5. Range Sidelobe Response from the Use of Polyphase Signals in Spotlight Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    each returned echo from the targeted area. Results show the P1 and Frank codes to be the most promising based on the selected parameter presented in...Depiction of Radar Geometric Parameters ................................................60 Figure 40. Idealized Radar Echo ...defined in Table 2, along with the radar parameters , presented in Table 3, we generate an ideal radar echo by applying an FFT to the output of (59). This

  6. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  7. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  8. Multiband echo-shifted echo planar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyacioǧlu, R.; Schulz, J.; Norris, David Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To propose the technique multiband echo-shifted (MESH) echo planar imaging (EPI), which combines the principles of echo-shifted acquisition for two-dimensional multislice EPI, with both in-plane and multiband acceleration by means of partial parallel imaging techniques. Methods MESH EPI is

  9. IceBridge HiCARS 1 L1B Time-Tagged Echo Strength Profiles V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Antarctica radar sounder echo strength profiles from the Hi-Capability Radar Sounder (HiCARS) Version 1 instrument. The data were collected by...

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHF729 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF729 (VHF729Q) /CSM/VH/VHF...4-A/CHC421Q.Seq.d/ 139 9e-33 own update 2002.12.27 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value... 139 2e-29 1 dna update 2008.10.31 Homology vs Protein Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value

  11. Radar monitoring of heartbeats and respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Aardal, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    This thesis addresses the use of radar for heartbeat and respiration monitoring. Medical radar can be used for detecting vital signs at distances up to several meters. A medical radar works by transmitting electromagnetic waves towards a person, and receiving echoes reflected off the person. Vital signs appear as modulations in the radar data in period with the heartbeats and respiration. We have measured and analyzed these modulations. The ability to detect human heartbeats from a distanc...

  12. From ultrafast spectroscopy to bidirectional molecular switches: DHA/VHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidhammer, U.; De Waele, V.; Buntinx, G.; Riedle, E.

    The photoconversion from dihydroazulene (DHA) to vinylheptafulvene (VHF) is governed by two mechanisms: The ring opening proceeds on the excited energy surface on the picosecond time scale. It is followed by an intemal conversion to the VHF ground state that is accelerated by the presence of a conical intersection in the case of cyclopenta-DHA. This conical intersection hinders the photoinduced back reaction from the final VHF products. However, we successfully photoconverted the cyanophenyl-VHF-cis back to the DHA with a second delayed pulse. This opens the route to the development of bistable DHAs.

  13. Possible link of sudden onset and short-time periodic pulsation of polar mesosphere summer echoes to ULF Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations and solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kirkwood, S.; Kwak, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    The EISCAT VHF incoherent scatter radar in Tromsö, Norway, makes occasional observations of electron densities and Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes, in the summer polar D-region ionosphere. In one of those datasets, pulsating polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are observed, with periodicities in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) Pc5 band (1.6-6.7 mHz), following an abrupt increase of the radar reflectivity when a geomagnetic field excursion is started, in turn linked to dynamic pressure (Pdyn) enhancement in the solar wind. At the excursion of the magnetic field, at auroral altitudes of 90 km and above, electron density is abruptly enhanced, followed by a series of short-lived peaks, superimposed on an enhanced level. The short-lived peaks are likely a signature of transient Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations and associated energetic electron precipitation from pitch-angle scattering into the loss cone in the magnetosphere. At the same time, at altitudes around 80-90 km, a sharp increase of PMSE reflectivity occurs, 100 times greater than the increase of electron density, and is followed by pulsating PMSE reflectivity with periodicities in the Pc5 band, increasing and decreasing in magnitude during the course of the next hour. The increase of the pulsation magnitude may be attributed to an increase of high-energy electron precipitation flux ( >30 keV) penetrating to at least the height of maximum PMSE reflectivity. This study suggests that Pc5 pulsation bursts in both magnetic field and high energy electron precipitation could play a crucial role in producing PMSE fluctuations on minute-to-minute time scales.

  14. Variations in the occurrence of SuperDARN F region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghezelbash

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of F region ionospheric echoes observed by a number of SuperDARN HF radars is analyzed statistically in order to infer solar cycle, seasonal, and diurnal trends. The major focus is on Saskatoon radar data for 1994–2012. The distribution of the echo occurrence rate is presented in terms of month of observation and magnetic local time. Clear repetitive patterns are identified during periods of solar maximum and solar minimum. For years near solar maximum, echoes are most frequent near midnight during winter. For years near solar minimum, echoes occur more frequently near noon during winter, near dusk and dawn during equinoxes and near midnight during summer. Similar features are identified for the Hankasalmi and Prince George radars in the northern hemisphere and the Bruny Island TIGER radar in the southern hemisphere. Echo occurrence for the entire SuperDARN network demonstrates patterns similar to patterns in the echo occurrence for the Saskatoon radar and for other radars considered individually. In terms of the solar cycle, the occurrence rate of nightside echoes is shown to increase by a factor of at least 3 toward solar maximum while occurrence of the near-noon echoes does not significantly change with the exception of a clear depression during the declining phase of the solar cycle.

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHF823 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value VHF823 (VHF823Q) /CSM/VH/VH...186Q.Seq.d/ 86 1e-16 own update 2009. 4. 4 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value...-13 1 dna update 2008.10.31 Homology vs Protein Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value

  16. Development of wide band digital receiver for atmospheric radars using COTS board based SDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Digital receiver extracts the received echo signal information, and is a potential subsystem for atmospheric radar, also referred to as wind profiling radar (WPR), which provides the vertical profiles of 3-dimensional wind vector in the atmosphere. This paper presents the development of digital receiver using COTS board based Software Defined Radio technique, which can be used for atmospheric radars. The developmental work is being carried out at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Gadanki. The digital receiver consists of a commercially available software defined radio (SDR) board called as universal software radio peripheral B210 (USRP B210) and a personal computer. USRP B210 operates over a wider frequency range from 70 MHz to 6 GHz and hence can be used for variety of radars like Doppler weather radars operating in S/C bands, in addition to wind profiling radars operating in VHF, UHF and L bands. Due to the flexibility and re-configurability of SDR, where the component functionalities are implemented in software, it is easy to modify the software to receive the echoes and process them as per the requirement suitable for the type of the radar intended. Hence, USRP B210 board along with the computer forms a versatile digital receiver from 70 MHz to 6 GHz. It has an inbuilt direct conversion transceiver with two transmit and two receive channels, which can be operated in fully coherent 2x2 MIMO fashion and thus it can be used as a two channel receiver. Multiple USRP B210 boards can be synchronized using the pulse per second (PPS) input provided on the board, to configure multi-channel digital receiver system. RF gain of the transceiver can be varied from 0 to 70 dB. The board can be controlled from the computer via USB 3.0 interface through USRP hardware driver (UHD), which is an open source cross platform driver. The USRP B210 board is connected to the personal computer through USB 3.0. Reference (10 MHz) clock signal from the radar master oscillator

  17. Using polar mesosphere summer echoes and stratospheric/mesospheric winds to explain summer mesopause jumps in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Latteck, Ralph; Becker, Erich; Höffner, Josef; Murphy, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by ∼5 km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by ∼10 K at Davis (69°S). In this paper we present further observations which are closely related to this 'mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are strongly westward. Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies enhanced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex. Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. Our study also shows that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30 m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the transition of the stratospheric circulation. Unlike previously published results with polar mesospheric clouds, we find an overall poor correlation between PMSE onset and the date of the vortex breakdown.

  18. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised......Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  19. ARCB/GSSR M RADIO TELESC DERIVED RADAR MODEL UNIT MAP V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A model for Mars depolarized radar echo power that (1) matches the observed variation of total radar cross section with longitude and (2) produces model spectra that...

  20. Multimode/Multifrequency Low Frequency Airborne Radar Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design of multimode/multifrequency airborne radar suitable for imaging and subsurface sounding. The system operates at relatively low frequencies in the band ranging from VHF to UHF. It is able to work in two different modalities: (i nadir-looking sounder in the VHF band (163 MHz and (ii side-looking imager (SAR in the UHF band with two channels at 450 MHz and 860 MHz. The radar has been completely designed by CO.Ri.S.T.A. for what concerns the RF and the electronic aspect, and by the University of Calabria for what concerns the design, realization, and test of SAR antennas. The radar has been installed on a civil helicopter and its operation has been validated in flight in both sounder and imager modality. Preliminary surveys have been carried out over different areas of Campania region, South Italy.

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHF145 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF145 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15430-1 VHF145E (Link...) Clone ID VHF145 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15430-1 Ori...ology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AC116984 |AC116984.2 Dictyos... theta DNA for complete sequence of nucleomorph chromosome 2. 48 2e-07 2 ES451909 | PREDICTED: similar to PI...al 16.0 %: nuclear 8.0 %: vacuolar 8.0 %: endoplasmic reticulum 4.0 %: cytoskeletal >> prediction for VHF145

  2. Broadband Grounded Vertical Antennas for 30-180 MHZ (VHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-18

    antennas are well known for their broadband gain (monocone, bicone ) but are never combined with a monopole. An eccentric combination of broadband...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Broadband Grounded Vertical Antennas For 30-180 MZH (VHF) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...18 Attorney Docket No. 102536 1 of 17 BROADBAND GROUNDED VERTICAL ANTENNAS FOR 30-180 MHZ (VHF) STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST

  3. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation technology of wide-band radar targets based on scattering center model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL simulation technology can verify and evaluate the radar by simulating the radio frequency environment in an anechoic chamber. The HWIL simulation technology of wide-band radar targets can accurately generate wide-band radar target echo which stands for the radar target scattering characteristics and pulse modulation of radar transmitting signal. This paper analyzes the wide-band radar target scattering properties first. Since the responses of target are composed of many separate scattering centers, the target scattering characteristic is restructured by scattering centers model. Based on the scattering centers model of wide-band radar target, the wide-band radar target echo modeling and the simulation method are discussed. The wide-band radar target echo is reconstructed in real-time by convoluting the transmitting signal to the target scattering parameters. Using the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM system, the HWIL simulation of wide-band radar target echo with high accuracy can be actualized. A typical wide-band radar target simulation is taken to demonstrate the preferable simulation effect of the reconstruction method of wide-band radar target echo. Finally, the radar target time-domain echo and high-resolution range profile (HRRP are given. The results show that the HWIL simulation gives a high-resolution range distribution of wide-band radar target scattering centers.

  4. Infrasound - the cause of strong Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kirkwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The ESRAD 52-MHz and the EISCAT 224-MHz radars in northern Scandinavia observed thin layers of strongly enhanced radar echoes from the mesosphere (Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes - PMWE during a solar proton event in November 2004. Using the interferometric capabilities of ESRAD it was found that the scatterers responsible for PMWE show very high horizontal travel speeds, up to 500 ms-1 or more, and high aspect sensitivity, with echo arrival angles spread over as little as 0.3°. ESRAD also detected, on some occasions, discrete scattering regions moving across the field of view with periodicities of a few seconds. The very narrow, vertically directed beam of the more powerful EISCAT radar allowed measurements of the spectral widths of the radar echoes both inside the PMWE and from the background plasma above and below the PMWE. Spectral widths inside the PMWE were found to be indistinguishable from those from the background plasma. We propose that scatter from highly-damped ion-acoustic waves generated by partial reflection of infrasonic waves provides a reasonable explanation of the characteristics of the very strong PMWE reported here.

  5. Infrasound - the cause of strong Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kirkwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The ESRAD 52-MHz and the EISCAT 224-MHz radars in northern Scandinavia observed thin layers of strongly enhanced radar echoes from the mesosphere (Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes - PMWE during a solar proton event in November 2004. Using the interferometric capabilities of ESRAD it was found that the scatterers responsible for PMWE show very high horizontal travel speeds, up to 500 ms-1 or more, and high aspect sensitivity, with echo arrival angles spread over as little as 0.3°. ESRAD also detected, on some occasions, discrete scattering regions moving across the field of view with periodicities of a few seconds. The very narrow, vertically directed beam of the more powerful EISCAT radar allowed measurements of the spectral widths of the radar echoes both inside the PMWE and from the background plasma above and below the PMWE. Spectral widths inside the PMWE were found to be indistinguishable from those from the background plasma. We propose that scatter from highly-damped ion-acoustic waves generated by partial reflection of infrasonic waves provides a reasonable explanation of the characteristics of the very strong PMWE reported here.

  6. Probability distribution functions of echo signals from meteorological targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    Simple expressions are obtained for the laws and moments of the probability distributions of averaged echo signals from meteorological targets at the output of a logarithmic radar receiver. Here, the distribution function is assumed to be represented in the form of an Edgeworth series.

  7. Anechoic chamber for VHF and UHF bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takao; Sugiura, Akira; Harima, Katsushige; Masuzawa, Hiroshi

    1995-06-01

    Built in 1969, the anechoic chamber of CRL has been used to the fullest by researchers in many fields such as EMI, EMC, antenna design, standard of electric field intensity, and type approval testing. In particular, in the early days of space development in Japan, many satellite-born antennas were developed in this anechoic chamber. However, a quarter of a century has passed since its construction and deteriorated performance due to superannuation sometimes caused difficulties in experiments conducted in the chamber. In 1993, CRL constructed a Measuring Facility for Radio Research (MFRR) and the anechoic chamber for VHF-UHF bands was remodeled as one of the sub-facilities of MFRR. The remodeling work included full replacement of the electromagnetic shielding, absorbers and measurement system. Since the remodeled anechoic chamber is being used not only for EMI tests but also for other purposes, a full-anechoic chamber has been adopted. In addition the chamber has been designed for the frequency range between 30 MHz and 10 GHz. After the remodeling work, the performance of the chamber is greatly improved. The average shielding factor is better than 85 dB for all frequency ranges and the unwanted reflection characteristic is -30 dB for frequencies above 1 GHZ. This paper summarizes the remodeling work, and the specifications and performance of the remodeled anechoic chamber.

  8. Ultimate VHF Broadband Interferometer Zen KAWASAKI and Manabu AKITA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Z.; Akita, M.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning Research Group of Osaka University (LRGOU) has been developing an interferometer for thunderstorm monitoring during these two decades. When LRGOU initiated this project, many related scientists claimed that LRGOU's system was a time of arrival and it must be a sophisticated TOA system. However the key technology of the system were broad band and digital data processing, and it is named the VHF broad band digital interferometer (BDITF), because the phase difference of Fourier components played the very important role. Then the BDITF finally has been realized as a quasi-real time lightning monitoring system, and LRGOU has been operating their BDITFs around Osaka area. Since the BDITF captures the VHF impulses associated with lightning discharges by amplitude triggering, it occasionally misses one of the bi-directional leader progressions because of relatively small amplitude VHF impulses mainly emitted by positive leader tips. All of high density of VHF pulses associated with recoil leaders may not be recorded. Then the ordinary BDITF is able to be accepted as the practical operational system, but from the aspect of science it has been sioriously expected to be improved its performance. To overcome the difficulty New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT) and LRGOU have started the joint project, and a continuous recording system for digital signals is adopted [M. Stock et al, and M Akita et al,]. The field campaigns have been conducting in New Mexico and in Japan, and successful observations are accomplished. The algorithm to identify individual VHF pulses associated with lightning discharges from back ground noise and/or artificial noise, the dispersion of phase differences for all Fourier components is examined. In case by of small dispersion it is concluded that analyzed VHF pulse has high possibility to be emitted by lightning discharges. This interpretation means that the recorded VHF pulse shape might maintain without deformation during

  9. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  10. First simultaneous and co-located measurements of the overshoot effect in the Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes at 56 and 224 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Senior, A.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M.; Kosch, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first observations at 56 MHz (MORRO radar) of the overshoot effect in the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) when they are subject to artificial high power HF pulsed waves (Heating). Statistics indicate that there is an overall overshoot at this frequency despite of the high fluctuation of the backscatter. Simultaneous and co-located PMSE measurements at 224 MHz (EISCAT VHF radar) show also the overshoot effect. This experimental campaign was done around the peak of the PMSE season in 2013. The overall effect of the active modification of the PMSE strength is studied through the overshoot characteristic curve (OCC). At 224 MHz, available PMSE OCC measurements and modeling results indicate that during Heating the time scale of electron diffusion is shorter than the charging of dust particles. In this way, the free electron Bragg scatter structures surrounding dust particles are dispersed right after the Heating is turned on and leading to a decrease of the PMSE strength which can be followed by a recovery due to a slight increase of dust particle charging while the pulse is still active. Once the Heating is turned-off, the electrons cool down almost instantaneously and adopt the spatial distribution defined by dust particles, which at this time they are expected to be more charged due to influx of electrons. A highlight in this study is that we found some particular cases at 56MHz and 224MHz indicating that dust charging may overcome the diffusion process. This condition is known as the onset overshoot in which the backscatter increases after the heater was switched on. We have resorted to available models of the PMSE OCC at these two frequencies for finding similarities with our observations; especially those related to the onset overshoot. Through this evaluation we provide discussions about the differences between present measurements and model results, and plausible interpretation of physical conditions of particles and processes constituting

  11. Happy birthday Echo!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    You are reading the number hundred and one (no. 101) edition of our bulletin Echo. Just over four years ago, on 27th March 2006, the first untitled edition was published (Fig. 1 on the left). The title Echo appeared on the second edition on 10th April 2006 (Fig. 1 in the centre). Today (see Fig. 1 on the right), the layout is slightly different, but the structure of each edition has remained more or less the same: an editorial informing you of the important issues, followed by articles on club life, cultural activities (exhibitions and conferences), information from GAC-EPA, and special offers for our members.     Fig. 1 : Nos. 1, 2 and 100 of our twice-monthly publication Echo Echo was created in March 2006 when, much to our regret, CERN official communication and that of your representatives were separated. November 2009 saw a return to normal practice, and since then the CERN st...

  12. Echo 11 conjunctivitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Spalton, D J; Palmer, S; Logan, L C

    1980-01-01

    We describe a case of Echo 11 virus infection producing a moderately severe conjunctivitis in a laboratory worker who had handled infected material. This virus has previously been known to cause systemic disease, sometimes fatal, in children.

  13. Maps | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Trends | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. From VHF to UHF CMOS-MEMS Monolithically Integrated Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teva, Jordi; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Uranga, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of microresonators exhibiting resonance frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands, fabricated using the available layers of the standard and commercial CMOS technology, AMS-0.35mum. The resonators are released in a post-CMOS process cons...

  16. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel... the operating station. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. ...

  17. Radio echo sounding data analysis of the Shackleton Ice Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Baskaradas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, our initial results are presented for the interpretation of the radio echo sounding data collected over the Shackleton Ice Shelf and adjacent ice sheet (East Antarctica during the 2003/2004 Australian-Italian expedition. The Shackleton Ice Shelf is one of the larger ice shelves of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The radar survey provided data relating to ice thickness and bed morphology of the outlet glaciers, and thickness of their floating portions. The glacier grounding lines were determined by assessment of the basal echo characters. The information derived is compared with data from the BEDMAP database and from other sources.

  18. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR)

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, A. R.; P. G. Brown; Jones, J.; Ellis, K.J.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The radar system described here (CMOR) comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction) of the meteo...

  19. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  20. Lunar cartography with the Apollo 17 ALSE radar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiernan, M.; Roth, L.; Thompson, T. W.; Elachi, C.; Brown, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar position differences between thirteen craters in Mare Serenitatis were computed from VHF radar-imagery obtained by the Lunar Sounder instrument flown on the Apollo 17 command module. The radar-derived position differences agree with those obtained by conventional photogrammetric reductions of Apollo metric photography. This demonstrates the feasibility of using the Apollo Lunar Sounder data to determine the positions of lunar features along the Apollo 17 orbital tracks. This will be particularly useful for western limb and farside areas, where no Apollo metric camera pictures are available.

  1. Further developments of EISCAT as an MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The principal capabilities of EISCAT as an MST radar were described. Since the VHF transmitter of the EISCAT system is not yet delivered, only the UHF system could be used for radar experiments. Considerable developments in the year 1983 have now strongly improved the reliability of the operations. Most of the experiments were and will be done to investigate the high latitude ionosphere and thermosphere, but some time was also devoted to observations of the lower and middle atmosphere, particularly during the MAP/WINE compaign.

  2. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  3. Interpretation of MST radar returns from clear air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the scattering and reflection mechanisms that give rise to the MST radar echoes from the clear air is essential in the correct interpretation of the data about winds, waves, turbulence and stability in the atmosphere. There are two main aspects: the nature of the targets the radar sees and their generation mechanisms; and the signatures of the radar signals returned from the different targets. Volume scatterings from isotropic or anisotropic turbulence, and partial reflections from horizontally stratified, sharp refractive index gradients are believed the main contributors to radar echoes. Combined effects from all the mechanisms probably produce the observed data. The signature of the echo signals for these different scatterers under realistic experimental conditions should be studied. It is hoped from these studies, the nature of the targets can be better understood, and related to atmospheric dynamic processes.

  4. Echo Boom Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  5. Echo movement and evolution from real-time processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary experimental data on the effectiveness of conventional radars in measuring the movement and evolution of meteorological echoes when the radar is connected to a programmable real-time processor are examined. In the processor programming is accomplished by conceiving abstract machines which constitute the actual programs used in the methods employed. An analysis of these methods, such as the center of gravity method, the contour-displacement method, the method of slope, the cross-section method, the contour crosscorrelation method, the method of echo evolution at each point, and three-dimensional measurements, shows that the motions deduced from them may differ notably (since each method determines different quantities) but the plurality of measurement may give additional information on the characteristics of the precipitation.

  6. Modern Radar Techniques for Geophysical Applications: Two Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiasamy, B. J.; Bianchi, C.; Sciacca, U.; Tutone, G.; Zirizzotti, A.; Zuccheretti, E.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade of the evolution of radar was heavily influenced by the rapid increase in the information processing capabilities. Advances in solid state radio HF devices, digital technology, computing architectures and software offered the designers to develop very efficient radars. In designing modern radars the emphasis goes towards the simplification of the system hardware, reduction of overall power, which is compensated by coding and real time signal processing techniques. Radars are commonly employed in geophysical radio soundings like probing the ionosphere; stratosphere-mesosphere measurement, weather forecast, GPR and radio-glaciology etc. In the laboratorio di Geofisica Ambientale of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Rome, Italy, we developed two pulse compression radars. The first is a HF radar called AIS-INGV; Advanced Ionospheric Sounder designed both for the purpose of research and for routine service of the HF radio wave propagation forecast. The second is a VHF radar called GLACIORADAR, which will be substituting the high power envelope radar used by the Italian Glaciological group. This will be employed in studying the sub glacial structures of Antarctica, giving information about layering, the bed rock and sub glacial lakes if present. These are low power radars, which heavily rely on advanced hardware and powerful real time signal processing. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Shume

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity, and 2011 (moderate solar activity. In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20 min (most frequent lead times. Using several years (seasons and solar cycle of lead (or lag and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  8. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  9. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  10. On the factors controlling occurrence of F-region coherent echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Danskin

    Full Text Available Several factors are known to control the HF echo occurrence rate, including electron density distribution in the ionosphere (affecting the propagation path of the radar wave, D-region radio wave absorption, and ionospheric irregularity intensity. In this study, we consider 4 days of CUTLASS Finland radar observations over an area where the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar has continuously monitored ionospheric parameters. We illustrate that for the event under consideration, the D-region absorption was not the major factor affecting the echo appearance. We show that the electron density distribution and the radar frequency selection were much more significant factors. The electron density magnitude affects the echo occurrence in two different ways. For small F-region densities, a minimum value of 1 × 1011 m-3 is required to have sufficient radio wave refraction so that the orthogonality (with the magnetic field lines condition is met. For too large densities, radio wave strong "over-refraction" leads to the ionospheric echo disappearance. We estimate that the over-refraction is important for densities greater than 4 × 1011 m-3. We also investigated the backscatter power and the electric field magnitude relationship and found no obvious relationship contrary to the expectation that the gradient-drift plasma instability would lead to stronger irregularity intensity/echo power for larger electric fields.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; auroral ionosphere

  11. Radar observations of ionospheric irregularities at Syowa Station, Antarctica: a brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We briefly overview the radar observations that have been made for 30 years at Syowa Station, Antarctica for studying small-scale electron-density irregularities in the southern high-latitude E- and F-region ionosphere. Some observational results (i.e., long-term variations of radio aurora, Doppler spectra with narrow spectral widths and low Doppler velocities, and simultaneous observations of radar and optical auroras from VHF radars capable of detecting 1.3- to 3-m scale irregularities are presented. A new 50-MHz radar system equipped with phased-antenna arrays began operation in February 1995 to observe two-dimensional behaviours of E-region irregularities. An HF radar experiment also began in February 1995 to explore decameter-scale E- and F-region irregularities in the auroral zone and polar cap. These two radars will contribute to a better understanding of the ionospheric irregularities and ionospheric physics at southern high latitudes.

  12. Experimentelles FMCW-Radar zur hochfrequenten Charakterisierung von Windenergieanlagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Karsten; Werner, Jens; Schwartau, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    During the increasing dissemination of renewable energy sources the potential and actual interference effects of wind turbine plants became obvious. Turbines reflect the signals of weather radar and other radar systems. In addition to the static radar echoes, in particular the Doppler echoes are to be mentioned as an undesirable impairment Keränen (2014). As a result, building permit is refused for numerous new wind turbines, as the potential interference can not be reliably predicted. As a contribution to the improvement of this predictability, measurements are planned which aim at the high-frequency characterisation of wind energy installations. In this paper, a cost-effective FMCW radar is presented, which is operated in the same frequency band (C-band) as the weather radars of the German weather service. Here, the focus is on the description of the hardware design including the considerations used for its dimensioning.

  13. Preliminary Study on Active Modulation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes with the Radio Propagation in Layered Space Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengguo; Li, Hailong; Fu, Luyao; Wang, Maoyan

    2016-06-01

    Radar echoes intensity of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) is greatly affected by the temperature of dusty plasma and the frequency of electromagnetic wave about the radar. In this paper, a new method is developed to explain the active experiment results of PMSE. The theory of wave propagation in a layered media is used to study the propagation characteristics of an electromagnetic wave at different electron temperatures. The simulation results show that the variation tendency of the reflected power fraction almost agrees with the results observed by radar in the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT). The radar echoes intensity of PMSE greatly decreases with the increase of the radio frequency and the enhancement of the electron temperature. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097 and 41304119) and by the National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment, China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation (CRIRP)

  14. MU head echo observations of the 2010 Geminids: radiant, orbit, and meteor flux observing biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report Geminid meteor head echo observations with the high-power large-aperture (HPLA Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar in Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E. The MU radar observation campaign was conducted from 13 December 2010, 08:00 UTC to 15 December, 20:00 UTC and resulted in 48 h of radar data. A total of ~ 270 Geminids were observed among ~ 8800 meteor head echoes with precisely determined orbits. The Geminid head echo activity is consistent with an earlier peak than the visual Geminid activity determined by the International Meteor Organization (IMO. The observed flux of Geminids is a factor of ~ 3 lower than the previously reported flux of the 2009 Orionids measured with an identical MU~radar setup. We use the observed flux ratio to discuss the relation between the head echo mass–velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of meteor showers and the mass threshold of the MU radar.

  15. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Vierinen, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products, such as wind fields. This type of a radar would also be useful for over-the-horizon radar, ionosondes, and observations of field-aligned-irregularities.

  16. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  17. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  18. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theingi Win Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum for detection in non-Gaussian nature. The theory of target detection in Gaussian distributed clutter has been well established and the closed form of the detection performances can be easily obtained. However that is not the case in non-Gaussian clutter distributions. The operation of radar detection is determined by radar detection theory with different types of Swerling target models such as Swerling I II III IV and V. By using MATLAB these signal detection techniques are developed.

  19. Direct Visual and Radar Methods for the Detection, Quantification, and Prediction of Bird Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-30

    radar echoes were dubbed "angels" by the opera- tors. Not until 1941, when G. C. Varley identified some angel echoes as Gannets (Morus bassanus...is particularly true for the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean southeast of the United States. Gauthreaux (1972) found that along the northern...p. Richardson, W. J. 1974a. Spring migration over Puerto Rico and the western Atlantic : A radar study. Ibis 116: 172-193. Richardson, W. J. 1974b

  20. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  1. Very Compact and Broadband Active Antenna for VHF Band Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Taachouche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An active receiving antenna with small size consisting of a monopole loaded with a transistor bipolar is presented in this paper. A transistor is used in order to miniaturize the receiving active antenna size in VHF band. The vertical size of the structure is equal to λ/175, where λ is the wavelength at the lower frequency of the bandwidth. Despite the very small size of the antenna, the frequency bandwidth is very wide and the gain is suitable for FM application with sensitive receivers.

  2. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Webster

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar system described here (CMOR comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction of the meteor that, together with the time of occurrence, lead to an estimate of the orbit of the original meteoroid. Some equipment details are presented along with a method used to determine the orbits. Representative echoes are shown and observations on the 2002 Leonid shower presented.

  3. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  4. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  5. E-region decameter-scale plasma waves observed by the dual TIGER HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER HF radars regularly observe E-region echoes at sub-auroral magnetic latitudes 58°–60° S including during geomagnetic storms. We present a statistical analysis of E-region backscatter observed in a period of ~2 years (late 2004–2006 by the TIGER Bruny Island and Unwin HF radars, with particular emphasis on storm-time backscatter. It is found that the HF echoes normally form a 300-km-wide band at ranges 225–540 km. In the evening sector during geomagnetic storms, however, the HF echoes form a curved band joining to the F-region band at ~700 km. The curved band lies close to the locations where the geometric aspect angle is zero, implying little to no refraction during geomagnetic storms, which is an opposite result to what has been reported in the past. The echo occurrence, Doppler velocity, and spectral width of the HF echoes are examined in order to determine whether new HF echo types are observed at sub-auroral latitudes, particularly during geomagnetic storms. The datasets of both TIGER radars are found to be dominated by low-velocity echoes. A separate population of storm-time echoes is also identified within the datasets of both radars with most of these echoes showing similar characteristics to the low-velocity echo population. The storm-time backscatter observed by the Bruny Island radar, on the other hand, includes near-range echoes (r<405 km that exhibit some characteristics of what has been previously termed the High Aspect angle Irregularity Region (HAIR echoes. We show that these echoes appear to be a storm-time phenomenon and further investigate this population by comparing their Doppler velocity with the simultaneously measured F- and E-region irregularity velocities. It is suggested that the HAIR-like echoes are observed only by HF radars with relatively poor geometric aspect angles when electron density is low and when the electric field is particularly

  6. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  7. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  8. Simultaneous observations of noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Hosokawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports simultaneous observations of visible noctilucent clouds (NLC and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at Syowa Station (69°01′S, 38°61′E in Antarctica. During a 1.5 h interval from 2000 to 2130 UT (2300 to 0030 LT on Feb. 11, 2009, visible NLC were observed south of Syowa Station. The oblique sounding HF radar of SuperDARN at Syowa Station simultaneously observed peculiar echoes in the closest two range gates. The echoes had a small Doppler velocity and a narrow spectral width, which are consistent with the characteristics of PMSE in the SuperDARN data. The simultaneous appearance of the visible NLC and peculiar near-range echoes observed by the HF radar suggests that the echoes were actually a signature of PMSE in the HF band. In addition, the data from the simultaneous measurements show that the spatial distributions of NLC and PMSE in the HF band were collocated with each other, which implies that oblique sounding HF radar is a useful tool for estimating the two-dimensional horizontal distribution of PMSE.

  9. Spin echo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bernd André; Weigel, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The spin echo sequence is a fundamental pulse sequence in MRI. Many of today's applications in routine clinical use are based on this elementary sequence. In this review article, the principles of the spin echo formation are demonstrated on which the generation of the fundamental image contrasts T1, T2, and proton density is based. The basic imaging parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) and their influence on the image contrast are explained. Important properties such as the behavior in multi-slice imaging or in the presence of flow are depicted and the basic differences with gradient echo imaging are illustrated. The characteristics of the spin echo sequence for different magnetic field strengths with respect to clinical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Radar history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  11. Radar Remote Sensing of Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsherbini, Adel A.

    An Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) system to map the bedrock topography underneath the sand in deserts and arid areas is presented. It is anticipated to greatly increase the efficiency of oil field and ground water exploration as well as environmental and archaeological studies. The proposed system consists of two InSAR subsystems, one operating at Ka-band to map the sand topography and the other operates in the VHF band to map the subsurface topography. It is shown that conventional InSAR processing produces unacceptable error in height estimation since it does not account for the refraction and the different propagation velocity in the sand. Thus, a new inversion algorithm is developed which can be used to accurately estimate the bedrock topography for arbitrary sand and bedrock geometries. The inversion algorithm is verified experimentally using a scaled model in the lab. One of the main concerns was the use of conventional SAR focusing techniques for imaging the subsurface region. This can result in significant image degradation and lower limit on the minimum achievable azimuth resolution. Thus, a new subsurface iterative focusing technique is developed to address these challenges. One of the main practical system implementation issues is the antenna design for the VHF system since very wideband and very compact antennas are desired. Thus a number of compact and low profile Ultra-Wideband antennas are also developed. These antennas have sub-wavelength sizes and most of them have bandwidths exceeding one octave. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML parametric estimation of overlapped Doppler echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Boyer

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the area of overlapped echo data processing. In such cases, classical methods, such as Fourier-like techniques or pulse pair methods, fail to estimate the first three spectral moments of the echoes because of their lack of resolution. A promising method, based on a modelization of the covariance matrix of the time series and on a Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML estimation of the parameters of interest, has been recently introduced in literature. This method has been tested on simulations and on few spectra from actual data but no exhaustive investigation of the SML algorithm has been conducted on actual data: this paper fills this gap. The radar data came from the thunderstorm campaign that took place at the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center (NAIC in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, in 1998.

  13. Spectral polarimetric radar clutter suppression to enhance atmospheric echoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, C.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    The clutter present in the Doppler spectra of atmospheric targets can be removed by using polarimetry. The purpose is to suppress the Doppler velocity bins where spectral polarimetric parameters have atypical values. This procedure largely improves profiles of moments and polarimetric parameters of

  14. Synthetic Radar Echoes in the Presence of Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-06-22

    t~r..e ’ýexjerimente.1) o 12 tMc/sec .5.8 IjASOC un we: 0,37 1 9 1 16 C 6 I2 02 0 Z4 17 0 0-0!>41 C 10 (video bandwidth limi~ting The I f’ narrowva4...Aa stated. this is about 2 db smaller thmn the signsl that can be se’n 100% of the time However, suzh a signal is stijl an eyceedingly amall Increase...1, 0.3, 0.1 tsee were chosen; the i-f b1-ndwitth w- verled from 12’, l:c/’se- to 17 Mc/sec in four steps; the intensity of the jamming (.arrier

  15. FMCW Radar Performance for Atmospheric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ince

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-modulated continuous-wave radars (FMCW have been used in the investigation of the atmosphere since the late 1960’s. FMCW radars provide tremendous sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to their pulsed counterparts and are therefore attractive for clear-air remote-sensing applications. However, these systems have some disadvantages and performance limitations that have prevented their widespread use by the atmospheric science community. In this study, system performance of atmospheric FMCW radar is analyzed and some measurement limitations for atmospheric targets are discussed. The effects of Doppler velocities and spectral widths on radar performance, radar’s near-field operation, and parallax errors for two-antenna radar systems are considered. Experimental data collected by the highresolution atmospheric FMCW radar is used to illustrate typical performance qualitatively based on morphological backscattered power information. A post-processing based on single-lag covariance differences between the Bragg and Rayleigh echo is applied to estimate clear-air component from refractive index turbulence and perform quantitative analysis of FMCW radar reflectivity from atmospheric targets.

  16. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results.

  17. Detecting and Mitigating Wind Turbine Clutter for Airspace Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  18. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  19. Miniaturization for ultrathin metamaterial perfect absorber in the VHF band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuyen, Bui Xuan; Tung, Bui Son; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Ki Won; Chen, Liang-Yao; Lam, Vu Dinh; Lee, Youngpak

    2017-03-01

    An efficient resolution for ultrathin metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) is proposed and demonstrated in the VHF radio band (30-300 MHz). By adjusting the lumped capacitors and the through vertical interconnects, the absorber is miniaturized to be only λ/816 and λ/84 for its thickness and periodicity with respect to the operating wavelength (at 102 MHz), respectively. The detailed simulation and calculation show that the MPA can maintain an absorption rate over 90% in a certain range of incident angle and with a wide variation of capacitance. Additionally, we utilized the advantages of the initial single-band structure to realize a nearly perfect dual-band absorber in the same range. The results were confirmed by both simulation and experiment at oblique incidence angles up to 50°. Our work is expected to contribute to the actualization of future metamaterial-based devices working at radio frequency.

  20. State Statistics | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  1. Watershed Statistics | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  2. VHF SoOp (Signal of Opportunity) Technology Demonstration for Soil Moisture Measurement Using Microwave Hydraulic Boom Truck Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Alicia; Deshpande, Manohar; O'Neill, Peggy; Miles, Lynn

    2017-04-01

    A goal of this research is to test deployable VHF antennas for 6U Cubesat platforms to enable validation of root zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimation algorithms for signal of opportunity (SoOp) remote sensing over the 240-270 MHz frequency band. The proposed work provides a strong foundation for establishing a technology development path for maturing a global direct surface soil moisture (SM) and RZSM measurement system over a variety of land covers. Knowledge of RZSM up to a depth of 1 meter and surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter on a global scale, at a spatial resolution of 1-10 km through moderate-to-heavy vegetation, is critical to understanding global water resources and the vertical moisture gradient in the Earth's surface layer which controls moisture interactions between the soil, vegetation, and atmosphere. Current observations of surface SM from space by L-band radiometers (1.4 GHz) and radars (1.26 GHz) are limited to measurements of surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter through moderate amounts of vegetation. This limitation is mainly due to the inability of L-band signals to penetrate through dense vegetation and deep into the soil column. Satellite observations of the surface moisture conditions are coupled to sophisticated models which extrapolate the surface SM into the root zone, thus providing an indirect estimate rather than a direct measurement of RZSM. To overcome this limitation, low-frequency airborne radars operating at 435 MHz and 118 MHz have been investigated, since these lower frequencies should penetrate denser vegetation and respond to conditions deeper in the soil. This presentation describes a new and less expensive technique for SM as well as RZSM direct measurement using Signal of Opportunity transmitters. Being less expensive and needing only passive simple RF receiver, the SoOp concept has the potential for being used for space borne applications, thus providing global SM and RZSM measurements. This study will describe

  3. Characteristics of Convective Clouds Observed by a Doppler Radar at Naqu on Tibetan Plateau during the GAME-Tibet IOP

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi, UYEDA; Hiroyuki, Yamada; Junichi, Horikomi; Ryuichi, Shirooka; Shuji, Shimizu; Liu, Liping; Ken'ichi, Ueno; Hideyuki, FUJII; Toshio, Koike; Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University : (Present affiliation)Institute for Hydrospheric-Atmospheric Sciences; Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University : (Present affiliation)Frontier Observation Research System for Global Change; Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University : (Present affiliation)Toshiba Corporation; Hokkaido National Agricultural Experiment Statian : (Present affiliation)Frontier Observation Research System for Global Change; Earth Observation Research Center, NASDA; Lanzhou Institute of Plateau Atmosphereic Physics, CAS : (Present affiliation)Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences

    2001-01-01

    In order to reveal the characteristics of convective clouds over the Tibctan Plateau, we carried out Doppler radar observations of the clouds in the suburbs of Naqu city (45OO m ASL) , which is located in thc central part of the Tibetan Plateau, from 27 May to 19 September 1998, during the intensive observation period of. the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment in Tibet Diurnal variation of the radar echo area and echo-top height were remarkable throughout the intensive observation period Indicati...

  4. Nonlinear theory of transverse beam echoes

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Tanaji; Li, Yuan Shen

    2017-01-01

    Transverse beam echoes can be excited with a single dipole kick followed by a single quadrupole kick. They have been used to measure diffusion in hadron beams and have other diagnostic capabilities. Here we develop theories of the transverse echo nonlinear in both the dipole and quadrupole kick strengths. The theories predict the maximum echo amplitudes and the optimum strength parameters. We find that the echo amplitude increases with smaller beam emittance and the asymptotic echo amplitude ...

  5. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  6. Tropical echo-top height for precipitating clouds observed by multiple active instruments aboard satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yilun; Fu, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    The echo-top height observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) has been used by some studies as an approximate calculation of the precipitating-cloud-top height to simulate radiative forcing or to identify overshooting convection. However, due to the low sensitivity ( 17 dBZ) of PR, the PR-echo-top height is lower than the actual precipitating-cloud-top height. Here, the echo-top heights of the tropical precipitating cloud detected by PR, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) were investigated to evaluate the underestimation of the PR-echo-top height to the actual precipitating-cloud-top height. The results show that there were significant spatial variations in the underestimates of precipitating-cloud-top height by PR. The model simulation showed that these underestimates led to an underestimation of the radiative forcing of the Earth system, the relative error of which was 10% with 1-km underestimation and 20% to 80% with 7-km underestimation when the cloud optical thickness was fixed to 10. Therefore, the underestimates of precipitating-cloud-top height by PR should be taken into consideration when using PR-echo-top height.

  7. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) a southern hemisphere perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. J.; Murphy, D. J.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Holdsworth, D. A.

    The existence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes PMSE in the Southern Hemisphere SH has recently been confirmed using HF radar Ogawa et al 2002 MST radar Morris et al 2004 and a Dynasonde Jarvis et al 2005 following earlier observations using MST radar Woodman et al 1999 These studies spanned the geographic latitudes 62 1 r S Machu Picchu 68 6 r S Davis 69 0 r S Syowa and 75 5 r S Halley Bay The emerging array of SH SuperDARN radars provide an opportunity to extend the spatial coverage of PMSE observations An understanding of the occurrence and intensity of PMSE against latitude in the SH is needed to facilitate a comparison with the better spatial coverage of Northern Hemisphere NH PMSE observations Such a comparison will contribute to the ongoing debate as to whether PMSE can provide a proxy for mesosphere temperature and thus shed light on the existence of any interhemispheric asymmetry or otherwise in the polar mesosphere regions The argument for different polar mesosphere environments spawned in part by the reported lack of SH PMSE observations Recent PMSE reflectivity and intensity results from Davis 68 6 r S and Andenes 69 0 r N are given The characteristics and morphology of PMSE events above these Antarctic stations are considered in the context of the thermal and dynamical state of the mesosphere as deduced from satellite i e SABER and AURA and radar i e MF and MST observations respectively A brief account of recent coincident PMSE MST radar and Polar Mesospheric Cloud PMC

  8. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  9. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Chris; Lerch, Kieran; Lucente, Mark; Meza-Galvan, Jesus; Mitchell, Dan; Ruedin, Josh; Williams, Spencer; Zollars, Byron

    2016-01-01

    All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several timescales, from nanoseconds to years. These intensity fluctuations echo off bodies and structures in the star system. We posit that it is possible to take advantage of these echoes to detect, and possibly image, Earth-scale exoplanets. Unlike direct imaging techniques, temporal measurements do not require fringe tracking, maintaining an optically-perfect baseline, or utilizing ultra-contrast coronagraphs. Unlike transit or radial velocity techniques, stellar echo detection is not constrained to any specific orbital inclination. Current results suggest that existing and emerging technology can already enable stellar echo techniques at flare stars, such as Proxima Centauri, including detection, spectroscopic interrogation, and possibly even continent-level imaging of exoplanets in a variety of orbits. Detection of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars appears to be extremely challenging, but cannot be fully quantified without additional data on micro- and millisecond-scale intensity fluctuations of the Sun. We consider survey missions in the mold of Kepler and place preliminary constraints on the feasibility of producing 3D tomographic maps of other structures in star systems, such as accretion disks. In this report we discuss the theory, limitations, models, and future opportunities for stellar echo imaging.

  10. An Overview on Development of Passive Radar Based on the Low Frequency Band Digital Broadcasting and TV Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Xian-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the detection principle and characteristics of passive radar, this paper describes the development of passive radar based on the low frequency band (HF/VHF/UHF digital broadcasting and TV signal. Based on the radio coverage ratio and technical features of digital broadcasting and TV signals, the research status in abroad, especially in Europe, is introduced at first, on experimental systems, technical parameters, and comparative experiments. Then the latest development of passive radars, in different frequency bands in China, both theory and experimental study are presented. Followed is the commentary on the key techniques and problems of Digital Broadcasting-based Passive Radar (DBPR, including the waveform’s properties and its modification, reference signal extraction, multipath clutter rejection, target detection, tracking, and fusion as well as real-time signal processing. Finally, the prospects of development and application of this kind of passive radar are discussed.

  11. Polarimetric radar characteristics of storms with and without lightning activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes the cloud microphysics in different layers of storms as a function of three-dimensional total lightning density. A mobile X-band polarimetric radar and very high frequency (VHF) sources from Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations during the 2011/2012 Brazil spring-summer were used to determine the microphysical signatures of radar vertical profiles and lightning density. This study quantified the behavior of 5.3 million vertical profiles of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and correlation coefficient (ρHV). The principal changes in the polarimetric variables occurred only for VHF source rate density greater than 14 VHF sources per km2 in 4 min. These storms showed an enhanced positive KDP in the mixed 1 layer (from 0 to -15°C) probably associated with supercooled liquid water signatures, whereas regions with negative ZDR and KDP and moderate ZH in the mixed 2 layer (from -15 to -40°C) were possibly associated with the presence of conical graupel. The glaciated (above -40°C) and upper part of the mixed 2 layers showed a significant trend to negative KDP with an increase in lightning density, in agreement with vertical alignment of ice particle by the cloud electric field. A conceptual model that presents the microphysical signatures in storms with and without lightning activity was constructed. The observations documented in this study provide an understanding of how the combinations of polarimetric variables could help to identify storms with different lightning density and vice versa.

  12. Capabilities and limitations of EISCAT as an MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottger, J.; Baron, M.; Folkestad, K.

    1983-01-01

    The European Incoherent Scatter Radar Facility also has facilities which can be used for coherent scatter research of the middle atmosphere. The observatory consists of two independent systems which allow observations of the upper, middle, and lower atmosphere: a tristatic UHF radar capable of vector drift measurements, and a monostatic VHF system. The characteristics of the components are are described including inter-site communication, on-line displays, and the real-time operating system. Analysis of about 60 hours of middle atmosphere observations in 1982 indicate that EISCAT's capabilities to measure mesospheric parameters should improve during moderately or strongly disturbed conditions, enabling measurement of profiles of wind velocity, electron density, and temperature/collision frequency, and in some instances, ion masses. Because of not yet optimized transmit-receive switching, some limitations exist in the monostatic mode when observing coherent scattering in the stratosphere at short ranges.

  13. High Resolution Software Defined Radar System for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Software Radio Peripheral USRP NI2920, a software defined transceiver so far mainly used in Software Defined Radio applications, is adopted in this work to design a high resolution L-Band Software Defined Radar system. The enhanced available bandwidth, due to the Gigabit Ethernet interface, is exploited to obtain a higher slant-range resolution with respect to the existing Software Defined Radar implementations. A specific LabVIEW application, performing radar operations, is discussed, and successful validations are presented to demonstrate the accurate target detection capability of the proposed software radar architecture. In particular, outdoor and indoor test are performed by adopting a metal plate as reference structure located at different distances from the designed radar system, and results obtained from the measured echo are successfully processed to accurately reveal the correct target position, with the predicted slant-range resolution equal to 6 m.

  14. First observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Ronald F.; Balsley, Ben B.; Aquino, Fredy; Flores, Luis; Vazquez, Edilberto; Sarango, Martin; Huaman, Mercedes M.; Soldi, Hector

    1999-10-01

    A 25-kW peak power 50-MHz radar was installed at the Peruvian base on King George Island, Antarctica (62°S), in early 1993. A search for polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) was made during late January and early February of the first year of operation with negative results. These results have been reported in the literature [Balsley et al., 1993; 1995]. We report here results obtained during the austral summer of the second year (1994) of operation. Observations during the second year were begun earlier, i.e., closer to the austral summer solstice. PMSEs were observed during this period, albeit the echoes were much weaker than what one would expect based on earlier Poker Flat radar results at a comparable latitude (65°N) in the Northern Hemisphere. A large and measurable asymmetry in PMSE strength in the two hemispheres therefore exists. We explain this asymmetry by postulating a difference in summer mesopause temperatures between the two hemispheres of ~7.5 K. This difference has been estimated using an empirical relationship between the variations of the Poker Flat PMSE power as a function of temperature given by the mass spectrometer incoherent scatter extended (MSISE-90) model.

  15. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference

  16. Polar mesosphere winter echoes during MaCWAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kirkwood

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available During the MaCWAVE winter campaign in January 2003, layers of enhanced echo power known as PMWE (Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes were detected by the ESRAD 52 MHz radar on several occasions. The cause of these echoes is unclear and here we use observations by meteorological and sounding rockets and by lidar to test whether neutral turbulence or aerosol layers might be responsible. PMWE were detected within 30 min of meteorological rocket soundings (falling spheres on 5 separate days. The observations from the meteorological rockets show that, in most cases, conditions likely to be associated with neutral atmospheric turbulence are not observed at the heights of the PMWE. Observations by instrumented sounding rockets confirm low levels of turbulence and indicate considerable small-scale structure in charge density profiles. Comparison of falling sphere and lidar data, on the other hand, show that any contribution of aerosol scatter to the lidar signal at PMWE heights is less than the detection threshold of about 10%.

  17. VHF SoOp (Signal of Opportunity) Technology Demonstration for Soil Moisture Measurement Using Microwave Hydraulic Boom Truck Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; Deshpande, M.; O'Neill, P. E.; Miles, L.

    2017-01-01

    A goal of this research is to test deployable VHF antennas for 6U Cubesat platforms to enable validation of root zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimation algorithms for signal of opportunity (SoOp) remote sensing over the 240-270 MHz frequency band. The proposed work provides a strong foundation for establishing a technology development path for maturing a global direct surface soil moisture (SM) and RZSM measurement system over a variety of land covers. Knowledge of RZSM up to a depth of 1 meter and surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter on a global scale, at a spatial resolution of 1-10 km through moderate-to-heavy vegetation, is critical to understanding global water resources and the vertical moisture gradient in the Earths surface layer which controls moisture interactions between the soil, vegetation, and atmosphere. Current observations of surface SM from space by L-band radiometers (1.4 GHz) and radars (1.26 GHz) are limited to measurements of surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter through moderate amounts of vegetation. This limitation is mainly due to the inability of L-band signals to penetrate through dense vegetation and deep into the soil column. Satellite observations of the surface moisture conditions are coupled to sophisticated models which extrapolate the surface SM into the root zone, thus providing an indirect estimate rather than a direct measurement of RZSM. To overcome this limitation, low-frequency airborne radars operating at 435 MHz and 118 MHz have been investigated, since these lower frequencies should penetrate denser vegetation and respond to conditions deeper in the soil.

  18. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals

  19. Long-term changes of polar mesosphere summer echoes at 69°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Bremer, J.

    2013-09-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong enhancements of received signal power at very high radar frequencies occurring at altitudes between about 80 and 95km at polar latitudes during summer. PMSE are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Thus, the occurrence of PMSE contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapor content but also depends on the ionization due to solar electromagnetic radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian Island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) from 1994 until 2008 using the ALOMAR SOUSY and the ALWIN radar at 53.5MHz. In 2009, the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn, Germany started the installation of the Middle Atmosphere ALOMAR Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. The observation of mesospheric echoes could be continued in spring 2010 starting with an initial stage of expansion of MAARSY and is carried out with the completed installation of the radar since May 2011. Since both the ALWIN radar and MAARSY are calibrated, the received echo strength of PMSE from 14 years of mesospheric observations (1999-2012) could be converted into absolute signal power. This data series could be extended to the years 1994 until 1997 on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio values derived during the years between 1994 and 2008. The PMSE occurrence rate is positively correlated with the geomagnetic Ap index (significance level χ=85-95%), however, is not correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation. Using different regression analysis methods, the PMSE occurrence rates show a significant positive trend during the time interval from 1994 until 2012 (χ=95-99%).

  20. MST radar data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastrom, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    One atmospheric variable which can be deduced from stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar data other than wind speed and direction is C sub n sup 2, related to the eddy dissipation rate. The computation of C sub n sup 2 makes use of the transmitted power (average, or peak plus duty cycle), the range of the echoes, and the returned power. The returned power can be calibrated only if a noise source of known strength is imposed; e.g., in the absence of absolute calibration, one can compare the diurnal noise signal with the galactic sky temperature. Thus to compute C sub n sup 2 one needs the transmitter power, the returned signal as a function of height, and the returned noise at an altitude so high that it is not contaminated by any signal. Now C sub n sup 2 relates with the amount of energy within the inertial subrange, and for many research studies it may be desirable to relate this with background flow as well as shears or irregularities on the size of the sample volume. The latter are quantified by the spectral width.

  1. Superluminal light echoes in astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falla, D F; Floyd, M J; Potter, A G [Department of Physics, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-01

    The echo produced when a light 'pulse' from a stellar source (e.g. a nova or supernova) is reflected by circumstellar or interstellar material can appear as a luminous ring expanding at a rate that can be superluminal, i.e. having an apparent motion within the source, transverse to the observer's line of sight, at a speed greater than that of light. 'Light-echo optics' applied to the star RS Puppis and its nebula suggests that when nebular features in peripheral regions of circumstellar-shell images are observed, superluminal effects are not evident; however, such observations can give the stellar distance from the observer. Light-echo optics for an interstellar plane sheet, inclined to the observer's line of sight, can be applied to Nova GK Persei 1901 and SN 1987A, which show superluminal effects. For SN 1987A, an intense thermal x-ray source should be produced in AD 2003, when the advancing supernova ejecta interact with a circumstellar ring, 250 light days in radius: the arc-shaped x-ray image, while not actually a 'radiation echo', should expand at a superluminal rate for about 75 days from the time of its first appearance, and also for the same time before the completion of its 'circuit' around the ring.

  2. Dance of the Light Echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart. The light echoes are colored and the surrounding clouds of dust are gray. In figure 1, dramatic changes are highlighted in phenomena referred to as light echoes (colored areas) around the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (center). Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. In figure 1, this apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 11,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia. This composite consists of six processed images taken over a time span of three years. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Bluer colors represent an earlier time and redder ones, a later time. The progression of the light echo through the dust can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps. This light echo is the largest ever seen

  3. Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms. Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane

  4. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  5. Efficient Estimation of Spectral Moments and the Polarimetric Variables on Weather Radars, Sonars, Sodars, Acoustic Flow Meters, Lidars, and Similar Active Remote Sensing Instruments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method for estimation of Doppler spectrum, its moments, and polarimetric variables on pulsed weather radars which uses over sampled echo components at a rate...

  6. TRMM Ground Validation Calibrated QC Radar Reflectivity Full Volume Scan L1C 1 hour V7 (TRMM_1C51) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the 1C51 algorithm is to remove non-meteorological radar echoes that adversely affect the quality of higher level products, such as clutter associated...

  7. HF Doppler radar observations of sporadic E at an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. S. R. K. N Sarma

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available 5.5 MHz HF Doppler radar observations of Sporadic E over an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam (17.7° N, 83.3° E and Dip 20° with 10 s resolution showed quasi-periodic variations of the echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with periods of a few minutes to a few tens of minutes. The echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with time in different range bins of the ES echo showed variations which are some times similar and some times significantly different in successive range bins at intervals of 7.5 km. The ES echo occurs with the height of maximum echo strength in the range of 100 km to 120 km and some times at 130 km. The altitude variation of the average Doppler velocity is highly variable and the height of maximum echo strength is not the same as the height of maximum Doppler velocity. Observations of ES echoes at different times of the day are presented to bring out the differences between the day and night time ES echoes. The relationship between Radar and ES parameters derived from Ionograms is poorer than that of mid latitudes which is quite consistent with the expectations based on gradient drift instability.

  8. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  9. Artificial intelligence techniques for clutter identification with polarimetric radar signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tanvir; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; Han, Dawei; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2012-06-01

    The use of different artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for clutter signals identification in the context of radar based precipitation estimation is presented. The clutter signals considered are because of ground clutter, sea clutter and anomalous propagation whereas the explored AI techniques include the support vector machine (SVM), the artificial neural network (ANN), the decision tree (DT), and the nearest neighbour (NN) systems. Eight different radar measurement combinations comprising of various polarimetric spectral signatures — the reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), differential propagation phase (ΦDP), cross-correlation coefficient (ρHV), velocity (V) and spectral width (W) from a C-band polarimetric radar are taken into account as input vectors to the AI systems. The results reveal that all four AI classifiers can identify the clutter echoes with around 98-99% accuracy when all radar input signatures are used. As standalone input vectors, the polarimetric textures of the ΦDP and the ZDR have also demonstrated excellent skills distinguishing clutter echoes with an accuracy of 97-98% approximately. If no polarimetric signature is available, a combination of the texture of ZH, V and W representing typical measurements from a single-polarization Doppler radar may be used for clutter identification, but with a lower accuracy when compared to the use of polarimetric radar measurements. In contrast, the use of ZH or W alone is found less reliable for clutter classification. Among the AI techniques, the SVM has a slightly better score in terms of various clutter identification indicators as compared to the others. Conversely, the NN algorithm has shown a lower performance in identifying the clutter echoes correctly considering the standalone radar signatures as inputs. Despite this, the performance among the different AI techniques is comparable indicating the suitability of the developed systems, and this is further supported when

  10. Simplified formulae for the estimation of offshore wind turbines clutter on marine radars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Olatz; Cañizo, Josune; Angulo, Itziar; Jenn, David; Danoon, Laith R; Guerra, David; de la Vega, David

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact that offshore wind farms may cause on nearby marine radars should be considered before the wind farm is installed. Strong radar echoes from the turbines may degrade radars' detection capability in the area around the wind farm. Although conventional computational methods provide accurate results of scattering by wind turbines, they are not directly implementable in software tools that can be used to conduct the impact studies. This paper proposes a simple model to assess the clutter that wind turbines may generate on marine radars. This method can be easily implemented in the system modeling software tools for the impact analysis of a wind farm in a real scenario.

  11. Echo-free and relatively echo-free 'renal sinus lipomatosis'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suramo, I.; Paeivaensalo, M.; Myllylae, V.

    1983-05-01

    Eleven echo-free and 37 relatively echo-free peripelvic lesions, primarily interpreted as sinus lipomatosis by experienced sonologists, were examined using CT. Eight echo-free lesions proved to be cysts and only three ''fibrous fat''. Hypodense peripelvic fat accumulations were not totally echo-free in any of the cases, but tended to show up weak echos.

  12. Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    free" measurements on the same or previous orbits. The Scatterometer is an integral part of the radar. The proposed system which is currently called...Right Arrays SATELLITE ( I ATOMOS PHERE/ SWATHWI DTH Figure 3.1.1 Metrad Coverage 18 4 05. 4 1-4 " -u a . .4 c4 641 C Ov31 N -4 a ~ U . - I.44m 41 44...application is not a study objective, but could be considered as part of an experimental program utilizing scatterometer, radiometer and high resolution

  13. PENUMBUHAN LAPISAN TIPIS SILIKON MIKROKRISTAL TERHIDROGENASI DENGAN TEKNIK HWC-VHF-PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Usman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Telah dikembangkan teknik HWC-VHF-PECVD (Hot Wire Cell Very High Frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition untuk menumbuhkan lapisan tipis silikon mikrokristal terhidrogenasi (mc-Si:H. Dari hasil penumbuhan lapisan tipis yang dilakukan, teknik HWC-VHF-PECVD memperlihatkan laju deposisi yang lebih tinggi dibandingkan laju deposisi lapisan tipis yang diperoleh dari teknik PECVD maupun teknik VHF-PECVD konvensional. Berdasarkan hasil pengukuran XRD dan SEM, lapisan yang diperoleh pada temperatur filamen yang rendah masih berstruktur amorf. Indikasi yang mengarah pada pembentukan lapisan tipis berstruktur mikrokristalin mulai terlihat pada temperatur filamen ≥ 500oC, dimana puncak-puncak di fraksi spektrum XRD untuk orientasi kristalin tertentu mulai terbentu, sejalan dengan pembentukan butiran-butiran kristalin dari hasil foto SEM permukaan lapisan-lapisan tersebut.

  14. Ensemble Classification for Anomalous Propagation Echo Detection with Clustering-Based Subset-Selection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansoo Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several types of non-precipitation echoes appear in radar images and disrupt the weather forecasting process. An anomalous propagation echo is an unwanted observation result similar to a precipitation echo. It occurs through radar-beam ducting because of the temperature, humidity distribution, and other complicated atmospheric conditions. Anomalous propagation echoes should be removed because they make weather forecasting difficult. In this paper, we suggest an ensemble classification method based on an artificial neural network and a clustering-based subset-selection method. This method allows us to implement an efficient classification method when a feature space has complicated distributions. By separating the input data into atomic and non-atomic clusters, each derived cluster will receive its own base classifier. In the experiments, we compared our method with a standalone artificial neural network classifier. The suggested ensemble classifier showed 84.14% performance, which was about 2% higher than that of the k-means clustering-based ensemble classifier and about 4% higher than the standalone artificial neural network classifier.

  15. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  16. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  17. Longitudinal collective echoes in coasting particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khateeb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal ballistic and collective beam echoes with diffusion effects are investigated theoretically. In the presence of the space-charge impedance, the collective echo amplitude is obtained as a closed form expression. In contrast to the ballistic case, the collective echo amplitude consists of one maximum at time t_{echo}. The echo amplitude grows up and damps down with a rate proportional to the Landau damping rate of space-charge waves. The effect of weak diffusion is found to modify the ballistic and the collective echo amplitudes in the same manner. This effect of diffusion was confirmed using a “noiseless,” grid-based simulation code. As a first application the amount of numerical diffusion in our simulation code was determined using the echo effect.

  18. Nonlinear theory of transverse beam echoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji; Li, Yuan Shen

    2017-10-04

    Transverse beam echoes can be excited with a single dipole kick followed by a single quadrupole kick. They have been used to measure diffusion in hadron beams and have other diagnostic capabilities. Here we develop theories of the transverse echo nonlinear in both the dipole and quadrupole kick strengths. The theories predict the maximum echo amplitudes and the optimum strength parameters. We find that the echo amplitude increases with smaller beam emittance and the asymptotic echo amplitude can exceed half the initial dipole kick amplitude. We show that multiple echoes can be observed provided the dipole kick is large enough. The spectrum of the echo pulse can be used to determine the nonlinear detuning parameter with small amplitude dipole kicks. Simulations are performed to check the theoretical predictions. In the useful ranges of dipole and quadrupole strengths, they are shown to be in reasonable agreement.

  19. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar, LMA, and NLDN Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Brunning, Eric C.; Blakeslee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Four electrified snowfall cases are examined using total lightning measurements from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) from Huntsville, AL and Washington D.C. In each of these events, electrical activity was in conjunction with heavy snowfall rates, sometimes exceeding 5-8 cm hr-1. A combination of LMA, and NLDN data also indicate that many of these flashes initiated from tall communications towers and traveled over large horizontal distances. During events near Huntsville, AL, the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) C-band polarimetric radar was collecting range height indicators (RHIs) through regions of heavy snowfall. The combination of ARMOR polarimetric radar and VHF LMA observations suggested contiguous layer changes in height between sloping aggregate-dominated layers and horizontally-oriented crystals. These layers may have provided ideal conditions for the development of extensive regions of charge and resultant horizontal propagation of the lightning flashes over large distances.

  20. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, R.; Othman, M. Abou Bakr [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Allen, C. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Beard, L. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Belz, J. [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Besson, D. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskaya Shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Byrne, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A. [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Gillman, W.H. [Gillman and Associates, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 (United States); Hanlon, W. [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hanson, J. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Jayanthmurthy, C. [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kunwar, S. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Larson, S.L. [Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States); Myers, I., E-mail: isaac@cosmic.utah.edu [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Prohira, S.; Ratzlaff, K. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Sokolsky, P. [University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E #201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2014-12-11

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  1. A partial 45 MHz sky temperature map obtained from the observations of five ST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Campistron

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A sky temperature map at 45 MHz covering declination between + 30° and + 60°  is presented. The sampling in right ascension is 20 min (~5° and 2°  in declination in most of the map. The originality of the work was to use cosmic emission measurements from five VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radars collected during long periods of routine meteorological surveys. This map, which has an accuracy in temperature of about 600 K, is intended first for radar reflectivity calibration and system performance monitoring. The presence of two strong radio sources, Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A, can also serve as the verification of the beam diagram, beam width, and beam pointing direction of the antenna. Finally, this work is an attempt to show the potentiality of ST radar for astronomical purposes.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques – Radio science (radio astronomy

  2. ECHO parameters of diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, A; Khojeini, Ev; Larson, Df

    2008-09-01

    Most patients with cardiac disease have diastolic dysfunction which is characterized by impaired diastolic filling and/or abnormal diastolic relaxation. The trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) used routinely during open-heart surgical procedures has exceptional resolution that may permit the identification and grading of diastolic dysfunction. The goal of this study was to determine which echocardiography (ECHO) parameters can best describe diastolic dysfunction due to myocardial remodeling and fibrosis. Baseline transthoracic ECHO was performed on 3-month-old C57BL/6J female mice followed by administration of isoproterenol (2 microg/g/d) for 6 days. On day 7, transthoracic ECHO was performed to determine the change of left ventricular (LV) inflow parameters due to isoproterenol-mediated cardiac remodeling. The mid-LV region was stained with picrosirius red to quantify myocardial fibrosis and demonstrated a 5-fold increase in cardiac fibrosis (p = 0.002). LV mass was increased by 36% (p = 0.0016). Mitral valve flow Doppler peak velocities E and A were measured from a 4-chamber view. The E/A ratio did not change, but the E deceleration time, velocity time integral of the E-A complex (E-A VTI), E/E-A VTI ratio, isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), and diastolic time all significantly increased. The corresponding tissue Doppler parameter, Ea/Aa ratio, decreased by 25% (p = 0.035). The left atrial dimension and the ECHO index of left atrial pressure (E/Ea) significantly increased (p < 0.02). These data suggest that, with a long-axis and a 4-chamber view, the clinician can adequately determine diastolic function in the open-heart surgical patient.

  3. Independence of echo-threshold and echo-delay in the barn owl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S Nelson

    Full Text Available Despite their prevalence in nature, echoes are not perceived as events separate from the sounds arriving directly from an active source, until the echo's delay is long. We measured the head-saccades of barn owls and the responses of neurons in their auditory space-maps while presenting a long duration noise-burst and a simulated echo. Under this paradigm, there were two possible stimulus segments that could potentially signal the location of the echo. One was at the onset of the echo; the other, after the offset of the direct (leading sound, when only the echo was present. By lengthening the echo's duration, independently of its delay, spikes and saccades were evoked by the source of the echo even at delays that normally evoked saccades to only the direct source. An echo's location thus appears to be signaled by the neural response evoked after the offset of the direct sound.

  4. Independence of echo-threshold and echo-delay in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brian S; Takahashi, Terry T

    2008-01-01

    Despite their prevalence in nature, echoes are not perceived as events separate from the sounds arriving directly from an active source, until the echo's delay is long. We measured the head-saccades of barn owls and the responses of neurons in their auditory space-maps while presenting a long duration noise-burst and a simulated echo. Under this paradigm, there were two possible stimulus segments that could potentially signal the location of the echo. One was at the onset of the echo; the other, after the offset of the direct (leading) sound, when only the echo was present. By lengthening the echo's duration, independently of its delay, spikes and saccades were evoked by the source of the echo even at delays that normally evoked saccades to only the direct source. An echo's location thus appears to be signaled by the neural response evoked after the offset of the direct sound.

  5. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xiong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF. Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars.

  6. Superluminal light echoes in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Falla, D F; Potter, A G

    2003-01-01

    The echo produced when a light 'pulse' from a stellar source (e.g. a nova or supernova) is reflected by circumstellar or interstellar material can appear as a luminous ring expanding at a rate that can be superluminal, i.e. having an apparent motion within the source, transverse to the observer's line of sight, at a speed greater than that of light. 'Light-echo optics' applied to the star RS Puppis and its nebula suggests that when nebular features in peripheral regions of circumstellar-shell images are observed, superluminal effects are not evident; however, such observations can give the stellar distance from the observer. Light-echo optics for an interstellar plane sheet, inclined to the observer's line of sight, can be applied to Nova GK Persei 1901 and SN 1987A, which show superluminal effects. For SN 1987A, an intense thermal x-ray source should be produced in AD 2003, when the advancing supernova ejecta interact with a circumstellar ring, 250 light days in radius: the arc-shaped x-ray image, while not ...

  7. The HET Echo Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, W.; Robinson, E. L.; Hill, G.; Shields, G.; Wills, B.; Brandt, N.; Eracleous, M.; Kollatschny, W.; Horne, K.; Gallo, L.

    2000-12-01

    The ``HET Echo Mapping Project'' is a new research program that is using the echo mapping technique to probe supermassive black holes and their environments in AGN. Its primary goals are to: (1) Map the size, geometry, and the flow of the BLR gas; (2) Make direct dynamical estimates of the mass of the black hole using the measured geometry and kinematics of the BLR; (3) Map higher luminosity AGN (at redshifts z ~2.3--2.8), probing accretion onto black holes that are 10--100 times more massive than could previously be studied; (4) Measure the temporal evolution of BLR structure. The Project relies on two key elements: (1) We are using the new, queue--scheduled, 9--m ``HET'' telescope to obtain superb data. Previous projects were limited by the noisy and non--uniform data produced by the small telescopes (1--2.5 m) that were used. (2) We will carry out full 2--dimensional (velocity--resolved) echo mapping. Most previous attempts have only been able to produce 1--D maps. Details and initial results from the Project will be presented. This project is supported in part by the NSF.

  8. Mars radar clutter and surface roughness characteristics from MARSIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Whitten, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    Radar sounder studies of icy, sedimentary, and volcanic settings can be affected by reflections from surface topography surrounding the sensor nadir location. These off-nadir ;clutter; returns appear at similar time delays to subsurface echoes and complicate geologic interpretation. Additionally, broadening of the radar echo in delay by surface returns sets a limit on the detectability of subsurface interfaces. We use MARSIS 4 MHz data to study variations in the nadir and off-nadir clutter echoes, from about 300 km to 1000 km altitude, R, for a wide range of surface roughness. This analysis uses a new method of characterizing ionospheric attenuation to merge observations over a range of solar zenith angle and date. Mirror-like reflections should scale as R-2, but the observed 4 MHz nadir echoes often decline by a somewhat smaller power-law factor because MARSIS on-board processing increases the number of summed pulses with altitude. Prior predictions of the contributions from clutter suggest a steeper decline with R than the nadir echoes, but in very rough areas the ratio of off-nadir returns to nadir echoes shows instead an increase of about R1/2 with altitude. This is likely due in part to an increase in backscatter from the surface as the radar incidence angle at some round-trip time delay declines with increasing R. It is possible that nadir and clutter echo properties in other planetary sounding observations, including RIME and REASON flyby data for Europa, will vary in the same way with altitude, but there may be differences in the nature and scale of target roughness (e.g., icy versus rocky surfaces). We present global maps of the ionosphere- and altitude-corrected nadir echo strength, and of a ;clutter; parameter based on the ratio of off-nadir to nadir echoes. The clutter map offers a view of surface roughness at ∼75 m length scale, bridging the spatial-scale gap between SHARAD roughness estimates and MOLA-derived parameters.

  9. Investigation of the relationship between optical auroral forms and HF radar E region backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The SuperDARN HF radars have been employed in the past to investigate the spectral characteristics of coherent backscatter from L-shell aligned features in the auroral E region. The present study employs all-sky camera observations of the aurora from Husafell, Iceland, and the two SuperDARN radars located on Iceland, Þykkvibær and Stokkseyri, to determine the optical signature of such backscatter features. It is shown that, especially during quiet geomagnetic conditions, the backscatter region is closely associated with east-west aligned diffuse auroral features, and that the two move in tandem with each other. This association between optical and radar aurora has repercussions for the instability mechanisms responsible for generating the E region irregularities from which radars scatter. This is discussed and compared with previous studies investigating the relationship between optical and VHF radar aurora. In addition, although it is known that E region backscatter is commonly observed by SuperDARN radars, the present study demonstrates for the first time that multiple radars can observe the same feature to extend over at least 3 h of magnetic local time, allowing precipitation features to be mapped over large portions of the auroral zone.Key words: Ionosphere (particle precipitation; plasma waves and instabilities

  10. Low probability of intercept-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of low probability of intercept (LPI)-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems, where the radar system optimizes the transmitted waveform such that the interference caused to the cellular communication systems is strictly controlled. Assuming that the precise knowledge of the target spectra, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of signal-dependent clutters, the propagation losses of corresponding channels and the communication signals is known by the radar, three different LPI based criteria for radar waveform optimization are proposed to minimize the total transmitted power of the radar system by optimizing the multicarrier radar waveform with a predefined signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) constraint and a minimum required capacity for the cellular communication systems. These criteria differ in the way the communication signals scattered off the target are considered in the radar waveform design: (1) as useful energy, (2) as interference or (3) ignored altogether. The resulting problems are solved analytically and their solutions represent the optimum power allocation for each subcarrier in the multicarrier radar waveform. We show with numerical results that the LPI performance of the radar system can be significantly improved by exploiting the scattered echoes off the target due to cellular communication signals received at the radar receiver.

  11. Low probability of intercept-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of low probability of intercept (LPI)-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems, where the radar system optimizes the transmitted waveform such that the interference caused to the cellular communication systems is strictly controlled. Assuming that the precise knowledge of the target spectra, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of signal-dependent clutters, the propagation losses of corresponding channels and the communication signals is known by the radar, three different LPI based criteria for radar waveform optimization are proposed to minimize the total transmitted power of the radar system by optimizing the multicarrier radar waveform with a predefined signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) constraint and a minimum required capacity for the cellular communication systems. These criteria differ in the way the communication signals scattered off the target are considered in the radar waveform design: (1) as useful energy, (2) as interference or (3) ignored altogether. The resulting problems are solved analytically and their solutions represent the optimum power allocation for each subcarrier in the multicarrier radar waveform. We show with numerical results that the LPI performance of the radar system can be significantly improved by exploiting the scattered echoes off the target due to cellular communication signals received at the radar receiver.

  12. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Galilean satellites of jupiter: 12.6-centimeter radar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D B; Chandler, J F; Pettengill, G H; Shapiro, I I

    1977-05-06

    Observations of the Galilean satellites with the radar system at the Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico, show that their surfaces are highly diffuse scatterers of radio waves of length 12.6 centimeters; spectra of the radar echoes are asymmetric and broad. The geometric radar albedos for the outer three satellites-0.42 +/- 0.10, 0.20 +/- 0.05, and 0.09 +/- 0.02 for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, respectively-show about the same relative decreases as do the optical albedos, although the latter presumably bear only on material much nearer the surface. Radii of 1420 +/- 30, 2640 +/- 80, and 2360 +/- 70 kilometers for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto were determined from the radar data and are in good agreement with the corresponding optically derived values. Io, observed successfully only once, appears to have an albedo comparable to Ganymede's, but no radius was estimated for it.

  14. A laser radar experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-09-01

    An experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using a laser radar for long-range target acquisition and tracking is discussed. A CO2 laser was used to collect range Doppler images, while a medium-power argon ion laser was employed for angular tracking. Laser-radar operation is outlined with emphasis on isotopic laser radars. Laser-radar imaging is covered, and a laser-radar range equation is given. Experimental laser-radar transmitter, receiver, and telescope are described. A 35-foot long surface-to-air missile and payload were tracked in the experiment, with the laser radar acquiring the targets as they reached 480 km in altitude, 750 km from the radar site. The 4-ft-diameter aperture laser-radar telescope provided the resolution and range accuracy equivalent to that of a 120-ft microwave radar antenna.

  15. [Extra echo spaces: what do they represent?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, T

    1984-01-01

    The echocardiographic diagnosis of pericardial effusion is based on the assumption that "echo-free spaces" observed behind the posterior wall of the left ventricle are surrounded by epicardium and pericardial echoes. However, inexplicable extra echo spaces (EES) which may either be echo-dense or echo-free are observed in many asymptomatic patients. These EES often show no changes in their sizes or contours during lengthy follow-up studies. Therefore, we propose a hypothesis that subepicardial fat rather than effusions may be the cause of such EES. According to this hypothesis, a border zone of myocardium and subepicardial fat produces a linear echo which has been misinterpreted as an epicardial echo. Furthermore, a dense, broad band-like echo behind the posterior wall of the left ventricle believed to be a pericardial echo is a fusion echo caused by epicardium, pericardium and pleura. Differentiating EES as due either to subepicardial fat or pericardial effusion is difficult echocardiographically; however, CT scans can differentiate them due to their differing CT values. The echocardiographic diagnosis of pericardial effusion is more easily made among young patients who do not have appreciable subepicardial fat, or massive pericardial effusions causing pendulum-like movements of the heart.

  16. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    class of radars, because it accounts for the large variability of hydrometeors reflectivity and vertical hydrometeors positioning (echo-top), which is strongly influenced by the high location of the radar. The ARCOM procedure is in addition embedded in a multistep quality control framework, which also includes the calibration on raingauge observations, and can be summarized as follow: 1) correction of both LAWR and raingauge observations for known errors (e.g. magnetron decay and heated-related water loss) 2) evaluation of the local Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) as estimator of the linear correlation between raingauge and LAWR observations (logarithmic receiver); 3) computation of the local ACF in the form of the local linear regression coefficient between raingauge and LAWR observations; 4) calibration of the ARCOM, i.e. definition of the parametrization able to reproduce the spatial variability of ACF as function of the local sP, being the PCCs used as weight in the calibration procedure. The resulting calibrated ARCOM finally allows, in any ungauged mountain spot, to convert LAWR observations into precipitation rate. The temporal and the spatial transferability of the ARCOM are evaluated via split-sample and a take-one-out cross validation. The results revealed good spatial transferability and a seasonal bias within 7%, thus opening new opportunities for local range distributed measurements of precipitation in mountain regions.

  17. Accurate step-FMCW ultrasound ranging and comparison with pulse-echo signaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Singh, Rahul S.; Lee, Michael; Cox, Brian P.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Lee, Hua

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a method setup for high-frequency ultrasound ranging based on stepped frequency-modulated continuous waves (FMCW), potentially capable of producing a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to traditional pulse-echo signaling. In current ultrasound systems, the use of higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) to enhance resolution lowers signal quality due to frequency-dependent attenuation. The proposed ultrasound signaling format, step-FMCW, is well-known in the radar community, and features lower peak power, wider dynamic range, lower noise figure and simpler electronics in comparison to pulse-echo systems. In pulse-echo ultrasound ranging, distances are calculated using the transmit times between a pulse and its subsequent echoes. In step-FMCW ultrasonic ranging, the phase and magnitude differences at stepped frequencies are used to sample the frequency domain. Thus, by taking the inverse Fourier transform, a comprehensive range profile is recovered that has increased immunity to noise over conventional ranging methods. Step-FMCW and pulse-echo waveforms were created using custom-built hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and dual-channel super heterodyne receiver, providing high SNR and in turn, accuracy in detection.

  18. Air Shower Detection by Bistatic Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. Abou Bakr; Allen, C.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Ikeda, D.; Kunwar, S.; Lundquist, J. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Myers, I.; Nakamura, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sokolsky, P.; Takai, H.; Terasawa, T.; Thomson, G. B.

    2011-09-01

    Progress in the field of high-energy cosmic rays is currently limited by the rarity of the most interesting rays striking the Earth. Indeed, the continuation of the field beyond the current generation of observatories may become financially and practically impossible if new ways are not found to achieve remote coverage over large portions of the Earth's surface. We describe the development of an observatory based on such a new technique: the remote sensing via bistatic radar technology of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We build on pilot studies performed by MARIACHI which have demonstrated that air shower radar echoes are detectable, the opportunity afforded by the location of the Northern Hemisphere's largest ``conventional'' cosmic ray observatory (The Telescope Array) in radio-quiet western Utah, and the donation of analog television transmission equipment to this effort by a local television station.

  19. Design VHF Antennas for Space Borne Receivers for SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar

    2017-01-01

    Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane.

  20. A VHF Class E DC-DC Converter with Self-Oscillating Gate Driver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Toke Meyer; Christensen, Søren K.; Knott, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and design of a DC-DC converter topology which is operational at frequencies in the Very High Frequency (VHF) band ranging from 30 MHz − 300 MHz. The presented topology, which consists of a class E inverter, class E rectifier, and self-oscillating gate driver, is...

  1. Beam echoes in the presence of coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Axel [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-10-03

    Transverse beam echoes could provide a new technique of measuring diusion characteristics orders of magnitude faster than the current methods; however, their interaction with many accelerator parameters is poorly understood. Using a program written in C, we explored the relationship between coupling and echo strength. We found that echoes could be generated in both dimensions, even with a dipole kick in only one dimension. We found that the echo eects are not destroyed even when there is strong coupling, falling o only at extremely high coupling values. We found that at intermediate values of skew quadrupole strength, the decoherence time of the beam is greatly increased, causing a destruction of the echo eects. We found that this is caused by a narrowing of the tune width of the particles. Results from this study will help to provide recommendations to IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator) for their upcoming echo experiment.

  2. On auroral dynamics observed by HF radar: 1. Equatorward edge of the afternoon-evening diffuse luminosity belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations and modelling are presented which illustrate the ability of the Finland CUTLASS HF radar to monitor the afternoon-evening equatorward auroral boundary during weak geomagnetic activity. The subsequent substorm growth phase development was also observed in the late evening sector as a natural continuation of the preceding auroral oval dynamics. Over an 8 h period the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a narrow (in range and persistent region of auroral F- and (later E-layer echoes which gradually moved equatorward, consistent with the auroral oval diurnal rotation. This echo region corresponds to the subvisual equatorward edge of the diffuse luminosity belt (SEEL and the ionospheric footprint of the inner boundary of the electron plasma sheet. The capability of the Finland CUTLASS radar to monitor the E-layer SEEL-echoes is a consequence of the nearly zero E-layer rectilinear aspect angles in a region 5–10° poleward of the radar site. The F-layer echoes are probably the boundary blob echoes. The UHF EISCAT radar was in operation and observed a similar subvisual auroral arc and an F-layer electron density enhancement when it appeared in its antenna beam.Key words: Ionsophere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  3. On auroral dynamics observed by HF radar: 1. Equatorward edge of the afternoon-evening diffuse luminosity belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    Full Text Available Observations and modelling are presented which illustrate the ability of the Finland CUTLASS HF radar to monitor the afternoon-evening equatorward auroral boundary during weak geomagnetic activity. The subsequent substorm growth phase development was also observed in the late evening sector as a natural continuation of the preceding auroral oval dynamics. Over an 8 h period the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a narrow (in range and persistent region of auroral F- and (later E-layer echoes which gradually moved equatorward, consistent with the auroral oval diurnal rotation. This echo region corresponds to the subvisual equatorward edge of the diffuse luminosity belt (SEEL and the ionospheric footprint of the inner boundary of the electron plasma sheet. The capability of the Finland CUTLASS radar to monitor the E-layer SEEL-echoes is a consequence of the nearly zero E-layer rectilinear aspect angles in a region 5–10° poleward of the radar site. The F-layer echoes are probably the boundary blob echoes. The UHF EISCAT radar was in operation and observed a similar subvisual auroral arc and an F-layer electron density enhancement when it appeared in its antenna beam.

    Key words: Ionsophere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  4. Results of the first continuous meteor head echo survey at polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schult, Carsten; Stober, Gunter; Janches, Diego; Chau, Jorge L.

    2017-11-01

    We present the first quasi continuous meteor head echo measurements obtained during a period of over two years using the Middle Atmosphere ALOMAR Radar System (MAARSY). The measurements yield information on the altitude, trajectory, vector velocity, radar cross section, deceleration and dynamical mass of every single event. The large statistical amount of nearly one million meteor head detections provide an excellent overview of the elevation, altitude, velocity and daily count rate distributions during different times of the year at polar latitudes. Only 40% of the meteors were detected within the full width half maximum of the specific sporadic meteor sources. Our observation of the sporadic meteors are compared to the observations with other radar systems and a meteor input function (MIF). The best way to compare different radar systems is by comparing the radar cross section (RCS), which is the main detection criterion for each system. In this study we aim to compare our observations with a MIF, which provides information only about the meteoroid mass. Thus, we are using a statistical approach for the elevation and velocity dependent visibility and a specific mass selection. The predicted absolute count rates from the MIF are in a good agreement with the observation when it is assumed that the radar system is only sensitive to meteoroids with masses higher than one microgram. The analysis of the dynamic masses seems to be consistent with this assumption since the count rate of events with smaller masses are low and decrease even more by using events with relatively small errors.

  5. Methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis of bird migration with a tracking radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, B.; Steidinger, P.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of analyzing bird migration by using tracking radar are discussed. The procedure for assessing the rate of bird passage is described. Three topics are presented concerning the grouping of nocturnal migrants, the velocity of migratory flight, and identification of species by radar echoes. The height and volume of migration under different weather conditions are examined. The methods for studying the directions of migration and the correlation between winds and the height and direction of migrating birds are presented.

  6. Regional Attenuation Correction of Weather Radar Using a Distributed Microwave-Links Network

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xue; Xi-chuan Liu; Tai-chang Gao; Chang-ye Yang; Kun Song

    2017-01-01

    The complex temporal-spatial variation of raindrop size distribution will affect the precision of precipitation quantitative estimates (QPE) produced from radar data, making it difficult to correct echo attenuation. Given the fact that microwave links can obtain the total path attenuation accurately, we introduce the concept of regional attenuation correction using a multiple-microwave-links network based on the tomographic reconstruction of attenuation coefficients. Derived from the radar-ba...

  7. Testing VHF/GPS collar design and safety in the study of free-roaming horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail H Collins

    Full Text Available Effective and safe monitoring techniques are needed by U.S. land managers to understand free-roaming horse behavior and habitat use and to aid in making informed management decisions. Global positioning system (GPS and very high frequency (VHF radio collars can be used to provide high spatial and temporal resolution information for detecting free-roaming horse movement. GPS and VHF collars are a common tool used in wildlife management, but have rarely been used for free-roaming horse research and monitoring in the United States. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the design, safety, and detachment device on GPS/VHF collars used to collect free-roaming horse location and movement data. Between 2009 and 2010, 28 domestic and feral horses were marked with commercial and custom designed VHF/GPS collars. Individual horses were evaluated for damage caused by the collar placement, and following initial observations, collar design was modified to reduce the potential for injury. After collar modifications, which included the addition of collar length adjustments to both sides of the collar allowing for better alignment of collar and neck shapes, adding foam padding to the custom collars to replicate the commercial collar foam padding, and repositioning the detachment device to reduce wear along the jowl, we observed little to no evidence of collar wear on horses. Neither custom-built nor commercial collars caused injury to study horses, however, most of the custom-built collars failed to collect data. During the evaluation of collar detachment devices, we had an 89% success rate of collar devices detaching correctly. This study showed that free-roaming horses can be safely marked with GPS and/or VHF collars with minimal risk of injury, and that these collars can be a useful tool for monitoring horses without creating a risk to horse health and wellness.

  8. An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

  9. Molecular Switching in Confined Spaces: Effects of Encapsulating the DHA/VHF Photo-Switch in Cucurbiturils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Å.; Rasmussen, Brian; Andersen, Nicolaj N.

    2017-01-01

    complexes, the kinetics of the thermal VHF-to-DHA back-reaction is accelerated, while in CB8 inclusion complexes, the kinetics is slowed down as compared to the free photo-switch. The effect of the CB encapsulation of the photo-switch can be effectively canceled by introducing a guest that binds the CB more...... strongly. According to DFT calculations, a stabilization of the reactive s-cis VHF conformer relative to the s-trans VHF appears to be a contributing factor responsible for the accelerated back-reaction when encapsulated in CB7....

  10. Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Marquette, Brandeis

    2017-05-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to generation of a desired waveform profile in the form of a spectrum of apparently random noise (e.g., white noise or colored noise), but with precise spectral characteristics. Hence, a waveform profile that could be readily determined (e.g., by a spoofing system) is effectively obscured. Obscuration is achieved by dividing the waveform into a series of chips, each with an assigned frequency, wherein the sequence of chips are subsequently randomized. Randomization can be a function of the application of a key to the chip sequence. During processing of the echo pulse, a copy of the randomized transmitted pulse is recovered or regenerated against which the received echo is correlated. Hence, with the echo energy range-compressed in this manner, it is possible to generate a radar image with precise impulse response.

  11. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  12. Regional Attenuation Correction of Weather Radar Using a Distributed Microwave-Links Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex temporal-spatial variation of raindrop size distribution will affect the precision of precipitation quantitative estimates (QPE produced from radar data, making it difficult to correct echo attenuation. Given the fact that microwave links can obtain the total path attenuation accurately, we introduce the concept of regional attenuation correction using a multiple-microwave-links network based on the tomographic reconstruction of attenuation coefficients. Derived from the radar-based equation, the effect of rainfall distribution on the propagation of radar and microwave link signals was analyzed. This article focuses on modeling of the tomographic reconstruction of attenuation coefficients and regional attenuation correction algorithms. Finally, a numerical simulation of regional attenuation correction was performed to verify the algorithms employed here. The results demonstrate that the correction coefficient (0.9175 falls between the corrected and initial field of radar reflectivity factor (root mean square error, 2.3476 dBz; average deviation, 0.0113 dBz. Compared with uncorrected data, the accuracy of the corrected radar reflectivity factor was improved by 26.12%, and the corrected rainfall intensity distribution was improved by 51.85% validating the region attenuation correction algorithm. This method can correct the regional attenuation of weather radar echo effectively and efficiently; it can be widely used for the radar attenuation correction and the promotion of quantitative precipitation estimation by weather radar.

  13. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  14. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  15. Minimum complexity echo state network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Ali; Tino, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) refers to a new class of state-space models with a fixed state transition structure (the reservoir) and an adaptable readout form the state space. The reservoir is supposed to be sufficiently complex so as to capture a large number of features of the input stream that can be exploited by the reservoir-to-output readout mapping. The field of RC has been growing rapidly with many successful applications. However, RC has been criticized for not being principled enough. Reservoir construction is largely driven by a series of randomized model-building stages, with both researchers and practitioners having to rely on a series of trials and errors. To initialize a systematic study of the field, we concentrate on one of the most popular classes of RC methods, namely echo state network, and ask: What is the minimal complexity of reservoir construction for obtaining competitive models and what is the memory capacity (MC) of such simplified reservoirs? On a number of widely used time series benchmarks of different origin and characteristics, as well as by conducting a theoretical analysis we show that a simple deterministically constructed cycle reservoir is comparable to the standard echo state network methodology. The (short-term) MC of linear cyclic reservoirs can be made arbitrarily close to the proved optimal value.

  16. How to misuse echo contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missios Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary intracardiac tumours are rare, there are however several entities that can mimic tumours. Contrast echocardiography has been suggested to aid the differentiation of various suspected masses. We present a case where transthoracic echocardiography completely misdiagnosed a left atrial mass, partly due to use of echo contrast. Case presentation An 80 year-old woman was referred for transthoracic echocardiography because of one-month duration of worsening of dyspnoea. Transthoracic echocardiography displayed a large echodense mass in the left atrium. Intravenous injection of contrast (SonoVue, Bracco Inc., It indicated contrast-enhancement of the structure, suggesting tumour. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed, however, a completely normal finding in the left atrium. Subsequent gastroscopy examination showed a hiatal hernia. Conclusion It is noteworthy that the transthoracic echocardiographic exam completely misdiagnosed what seemed like a left atrial mass, which in part was an effect of the use of echo contrast. This example highlights that liberal use of transoesophageal echocardiography is often warranted if optimal display of cardiac structures is desired.

  17. An imaging interferometry capability for the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric imaging (aperture synthesis imaging is a technique used by radio astronomers to achieve angular resolution that far surpasses what is possible with a single large aperture. A similar technique has been used for radar imaging studies of equatorial ionospheric phenomena at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present plans for adding an interferometric imaging capability to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, a capability which will contribute significantly to several areas of active research, including naturally and artificially enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and their detailed relation in space and time to optical phenomena, polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE, and meteor studies. Interferometry using the two antennas of the ESR has demonstrated the existence of extremely narrow, field-aligned scattering structures, but having only a single baseline is a severe limitation for such studies. Building additional IS-class antennas at the ESR is not a trivial task. However, the very high scattering levels in enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and PMSE means that a passive receiver antenna of more modest gain should still be capable of detecting these echoes. In this paper we present simulations of what an imaging interferometer will be capable of observing for different antenna configurations and brightness distributions, under ideal conditions, using two different image inversion algorithms. We also discuss different antenna and receiver technologies.

  18. An imaging interferometry capability for the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric imaging (aperture synthesis imaging is a technique used by radio astronomers to achieve angular resolution that far surpasses what is possible with a single large aperture. A similar technique has been used for radar imaging studies of equatorial ionospheric phenomena at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present plans for adding an interferometric imaging capability to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, a capability which will contribute significantly to several areas of active research, including naturally and artificially enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and their detailed relation in space and time to optical phenomena, polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE, and meteor studies.

    Interferometry using the two antennas of the ESR has demonstrated the existence of extremely narrow, field-aligned scattering structures, but having only a single baseline is a severe limitation for such studies. Building additional IS-class antennas at the ESR is not a trivial task. However, the very high scattering levels in enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and PMSE means that a passive receiver antenna of more modest gain should still be capable of detecting these echoes.

    In this paper we present simulations of what an imaging interferometer will be capable of observing for different antenna configurations and brightness distributions, under ideal conditions, using two different image inversion algorithms. We also discuss different antenna and receiver technologies.

  19. Planetary surface characterization from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, Anne; Planetary Radar Team of the Arecibo Observatory

    2017-10-01

    We present a new method to investigate the physical properties of planetary surfaces using dual-polarization radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased radically during the last five years, allowing us to compare the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. There has also been progress in the laboratory studies of the materials that are relevant to asteroids and comets.In a typical planetary radar measurement a circularly polarized signal is transmitted using a frequency of 2380 MHz (wavelength of 12.6 cm) or 8560 MHz (3.5 cm). The echo is received simultaneously in the same circular (SC) and the opposite circular (OC) polarization as the transmitted signal. The delay and doppler frequency of the signal give highly accurate astrometric information, and the intensity and the polarization are suggestive of the physical properties of the target's near-surface.The radar albedo describes the radar reflectivity of the target. If the effective near-surface is smooth and homogeneous in the wavelength-scale, the echo is received fully in the OC polarization. Wavelength-scale surface roughness or boulders within the effective near-surface volume increase the received echo power in both polarizations. However, there is a lack in the literature describing exactly how the physical properties of the target affect the radar albedo in each polarization, or how they can be derived from the radar measurements.To resolve this problem, we utilize the information that the diffuse components of the OC and SC parts are correlated when the near-surface contains wavelength-scale scatterers such as boulders. A linear least-squares fit to the detected values of OC and SC radar albedos allows us to separate the diffusely scattering part from the quasi-specular part. Combined with the spectro-photometric information of the target and laboratory studies of the permittivity-density dependence, the method provides us with a

  20. A system for mapping sources of VHF and electric field pulses from in-cloud lightning at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ewen M.; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1991-01-01

    The literature concerning VHF radiation and wideband electric fields from in-cloud lightning is reviewed. VHF location systems give impressive radio images of lightning in clouds with high spatial and temporal resolution. Using systems based on long and short baseline time-or-arrival and interferometry, workers have detected VHF sources that move at speeds of 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) m/s. The more slowly moving sources appear to be associated with channel formation but the physical basis for the higher speeds is not clear. In contrast, wideband electric fields are directly related to physical parameters such as current and tortuosity. A long baseline system is described to measure simultaneously VHF radiation and wideband electric fields at five stations at Kennedy Space Center. All signals are detected over remote, isolated ground planes with fiber optics for data transmission. The modification of this system to map rapidly varying dE/dt pulses is discussed.

  1. Investigation into the Effects of VHF and UHF Band Radiation on Hewlett-Packard (HP) Cesium Beam Frequency Standards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickens, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation into reports which have indicated that exposure to VHF and UHF band radiation has adverse effects on the frequency stability of HP cesium beam frequency standards...

  2. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  3. Photon echo relaxation in molecular mixed crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsma, Thijs Jitse

    1978-01-01

    In dit proefschrift worden foton-echo experimenten beschreven, toegepast op molekulaire mengkristallen. De primaire doelstelling van het onderzoek was om met behulp van foton-echo experimenten nieuwe informatie te verkrijgen over de relaxatie processen die optreden in molekulaire mengkristallen bij

  4. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  5. Investigation into the effects of VHF and UHF band radiation on Hewlett-Packard (HP) Cesium Beam Frequency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation into reports which have indicated that exposure to VHF and UHF band radiation has adverse effects on the frequency stability of HP cesium beam frequency standards. Tests carried out on the basis of these reports show that sources of VHF and UHF radiation such as two-way hand held police communications devices do cause reproducible adverse effects. This investigation examines reproducible effects and explores possible causes.

  6. Antarctic meteor observations using the Davis MST and meteor radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, David A.; Murphy, Damian J.; Reid, Iain M.; Morris, Ray J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the meteor observations obtained using two radars installed at Davis (68.6°S, 78.0°E), Antarctica. The Davis MST radar was installed primarily for observation of polar mesosphere summer echoes, with additional transmit and receive antennas installed to allow all-sky interferometric meteor radar observations. The Davis meteor radar performs dedicated all-sky interferometric meteor radar observations. The annual count rate variation for both radars peaks in mid-summer and minimizes in early Spring. The height distribution shows significant annual variation, with minimum (maximum) peak heights and maximum (minimum) height widths in early Spring (mid-summer). Although the meteor radar count rate and height distribution variations are consistent with a similar frequency meteor radar operating at Andenes (69.3°N), the peak heights show a much larger variation than at Andenes, while the count rate maximum-to-minimum ratios show a much smaller variation. Investigation of the effects of the temporal sampling parameters suggests that these differences are consistent with the different temporal sampling strategies used by the Davis and Andenes meteor radars. The new radiant mapping procedure of [Jones, J., Jones, W., Meteor radiant activity mapping using single-station radar observations, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 367(3), 1050-1056, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.10025.x, 2006] is investigated. The technique is used to detect the Southern delta-Aquarid meteor shower, and a previously unknown weak shower. Meteoroid speeds obtained using the Fresnel transform are presented. The diurnal, annual, and height variation of meteoroid speeds are presented, with the results found to be consistent with those obtained using specular meteor radars. Meteoroid speed estimates for echoes identified as Southern delta-Aquarid and Sextantid meteor candidates show good agreement with the theoretical pre-atmospheric speeds of these showers (41 km s -1 and 32 km s -1

  7. Characterizing Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo Edge Effect Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2013-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) form in the summer mesopause region, between altitudes of 80 and 90 km. This phenomenon occurs in this region because of the extremely cold temperatures that allow for ice particles to develop, sediment, and grow to sizes as large as ~20 nm. Because these ice particles are immersed in the plasma of the D-region, electrons can attach to the ice surfaces and charge them. There are two trains of thought when it comes to the backscatter seen in sounding rocket and radar measurements of PMSEs. The first assumes that the structure of the PMSEs is driven by turbulent velocity fields and that radar detections are due to turbulent scattering. The second theory on the scatter from PMSE structures is that the echoes result from multiple sharp small-scale ledges that produce an edge scatter. In decomposing sounding rocket data, results have indicated that both scattering mechanisms play a role in PMSE backscatter. However, whereas the turbulent scatter theory is well developed, the physics behind the sharp-edge phenomena in the edge scattering theory has not been explained to date. We investigate the formation of the sharp edges in electron density detected by sounding rockets and in backscattered power detected by ground-based radars during PMSE regions by exploring the initial process by which PMSEs form using a one dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation, adapted from the Plasma Theory and Simulation Group at UC Berkley, starts with the ice particles immersed in a warm electron-ion plasma and allows for the charging process of the ice particles. Starting with an initial Gaussian distribution of ice particles, we show that as the ice particles charge, they increase in mass more quickly (i.e. accumulate more electrons and ions) at the edges of the PMSE structure. This increased mass decreases the diffusion rates of the edges and 'freezes' the edges of the PMSE. This result demonstrates that the reason for the

  8. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  9. Software Radar Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the definition and the key features of Software Radar, which is a new concept, are proposed and discussed. We consider the development of modern radar system technology to be divided into three stages: Digital Radar, Software radar and Intelligent Radar, and the second stage is just commencing now. A Software Radar system should be a combination of various modern digital modular components conformed to certain software and hardware standards. Moreover, a software radar system with an open system architecture supporting to decouple application software and low level hardware would be easy to adopt "user requirements-oriented" developing methodology instead of traditional "specific function-oriented" developing methodology. Compared with traditional Digital Radar, Software Radar system can be easily reconfigured and scaled up or down to adapt to the changes of requirements and technologies. A demonstration Software Radar signal processing system, RadarLab 2.0, which has been developed by Tsinghua University, is introduced in this paper and the suggestions for the future development of Software Radar in China are also given in the conclusion.

  10. Optimal form and frequency of presentation of radar data on clouds and phenomena connected with them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Y. M.; Divinskaya, B. S.

    1975-01-01

    The available data on the space and time structure of the radio echoes from different clouds is examined. On the basis of their analysis, a basis is given for the optimal form of presentation and the operational quality of renewal of radar information used for operational purposes in ZGMO and the TGMTs.

  11. Airborn Ku-band polarimetric radar remote sensing of terrestrial snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon H. Yueh; Steve J. Dinardo; Ahmed Akgiray; Richard West; Donald W. Cline; Kelly Elder

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of the Ku-band polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT) data acquired from five sets of aircraft flights in the winter months of 2006-2008 for the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX-II) in Colorado are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radar echoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation in...

  12. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  13. Modeling the Meteoroid Input Function at Mid-Latitude Using Meteor Observations by the MU Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, Steven; Janches, Diego; Close, Sigrid; Sparks, Jonathan; Nakamura, Takuji; Nesvorny, David

    2012-01-01

    The Meteoroid Input Function (MIF) model has been developed with the purpose of understanding the temporal and spatial variability of the meteoroid impact in the atmosphere. This model includes the assessment of potential observational biases, namely through the use of empirical measurements to characterize the minimum detectable radar cross-section (RCS) for the particular High Power Large Aperture (HPLA) radar utilized. This RCS sensitivity threshold allows for the characterization of the radar system s ability to detect particles at a given mass and velocity. The MIF has been shown to accurately predict the meteor detection rate of several HPLA radar systems, including the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR), as well as the seasonal and diurnal variations of the meteor flux at various geographic locations. In this paper, the MIF model is used to predict several properties of the meteors observed by the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar, including the distributions of meteor areal density, speed, and radiant location. This study offers new insight into the accuracy of the MIF, as it addresses the ability of the model to predict meteor observations at middle geographic latitudes and for a radar operating frequency in the low VHF band. Furthermore, the interferometry capability of the MU radar allows for the assessment of the model s ability to capture information about the fundamental input parameters of meteoroid source and speed. This paper demonstrates that the MIF is applicable to a wide range of HPLA radar instruments and increases the confidence of using the MIF as a global model, and it shows that the model accurately considers the speed and sporadic source distributions for the portion of the meteoroid population observable by MU.

  14. VHF/UHF/microwave LOS terrestrial propagation and system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, T. K.

    1986-10-01

    The telecommunication frequency range under discussion is from 30 MHz up to tens of GHz. For military communications this means the use of systems such as Combat Net Radio, Single-Channel Radio Access, Tactical and Fixed Radio Relay, Air-Ground-Air Systems, Common User Information Systems and Tactical Satellite. For civil communications the systems are not dissimilar - mobile radio, fixed radio relay systems, Air Traffic Control, etc. Of course there is a considerable amount of broadcasting and there are military and civil radar systems in these frequency bands. The spectrum range from 30 MHz to about 5 GHz is for the military in particular, prime spectrum; wide bandwidths (hence digital transmission) can be achieved, most propagation mechanisms are relatively stable and most of this part of the spectrum can be used by tactical systems either operating on the move or moving frequently to new sites. In addition to considerations of wanted performance and necessary characteristics such as ECM, the military systems are designed to meet requirements for rapid deployment in an environment which is difficult and unpredictable from the electromagnetic environment, topographic, and meteorological aspects.

  15. Broadband VHF observations for lightning impulses from a small satellite SOHLA-1 (Maido 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Ushio, T.; Kawasaki, Z.; Hidekazu, H.; Aoki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Lightning Research Group of Osaka University (LRG-OU) has been developing VHF Broadband Digital Interferometer (DITF) to image precise lightning channels and monitor lightning activity widely. The feature of broadband DITF is its ultrawide bandwidth (from 25MHz to 100MHz) and implicit redundancy for estimating VHF source location. LRG-OU considers an application of the broadband DITF to the spaceborne measurement system and joins the SOHLA (Space Oriented Higashi-Osaka Leading Associate) satellite project. The SOHLA satellite project represents a technology transfer program to expand the range of the space development community in Japan. The objective is to get SMEs (Small and Medium sized manufacturing Enterprises) involved in small space projects and new space technologies. Under the cooperative agreement, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) intends to contribute to socio-economic development by returning its R&D results to society, and SOHLA tries to revitalize the local economy through the commercialization of versatile small satellites. According to the agreement, JAXA provides SOHLA its technical information on small satellites and other technical assistance for the development of the small satellites, SOHLA-1. The prime objective of the SOHLA-1 program is to realize low-cost and short term development of a microsatellite which utilizes the components and bus technologies of JAXA’s MicroLabSat. SOHLA-1 is a spin-stabilized microsatellite of MicroLabSat heritage (about 50 kg). The spin axis is fixed to inertial reference frame. The spin axis (z-axis) lies in the plane containing the solar direction and the normal to the orbital plane. LRG-OU takes responsibility for a science mission of SOHLA-1. To examine the feasibility of the DITF receiving VHF lightning impulses in space, LRG-OU proposes the BMW (Broadband Measurement of Waveform for VHF Lightning Impulses). BMW consists of a single pair of an antenna, a band-pass filter, an amplifier, and an

  16. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  17. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  18. Comparison study of Lightning VHF interferometric and LF time-of-arival maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, A.; Stock, M.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ushio, T.

    2016-12-01

    Lightning discharges radiate broad band frequency electromagnetic waves from ULF to UHF. Using sensors which detect this radiation is an effective technique to detect lightning flashes, even if they are in a cloud. If multiple sensors are present, a lightning flash can be located using various techniques. At low frequencies, the power radiated by lightning is very high, but because the wavelengths are long, the location resolution is somewhat low. At very high frequencies, the wavelengths are much shorter allowing for much better location resolution, but the power radiation is also much lower, making it more difficult to detect. The VHF band is a good compromise between good location resolution, and good detection efficiency. One technique to locate VHF signals from lightning is interferometry. Using this technique, the signals arriving at three or more VHF broadband antennas are coherently combined to produce an image of the lightning flash. The current generation broadband lightning interferometer being developed in Japan by RAIRAN and the University of Osaka called Lightning Interferometer via VHF Emission (LIVE). Currently, LIVE is installed in Kaizuka, a city to the south of Osaka, near Osaka Bay to observe Japanese summer lightning. In the current study, we are comparing the high detail, 2-dimensional lightning maps produced by LIVE to the lower detail, 3-dimensional maps produced by a low frequency time-of-arrival system called the Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorms (BOLT). In order to better compare the data, a new GPS timing device is being developed for LIVE to allow high absolute timing accuracy without sacrificing one of the 4 high speed digitizer channels. The objectives of the study are to better understand Japanese summer lightning, and to prepare for a future campaign as part of the GLM validation study.

  19. Type-1 echoes from the mid-latitude E-Region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents more data on the properties of type-1 irregularities in the nighttime mid-latitude E-region ionosphere. The measurements were made with a 50-MHz Doppler radar system operating in Crete, Greece. The type-1 echoes last from several seconds to a few minutes and are characterized by narrow Doppler spectra with peaks corresponding to wave phase velocities of 250–350 m/s. The average velocity of 285 m/s is about 20% lower than nominal E-region ion-acoustic speeds, probably because of the presence of heavy metallic ions in the sporadic-E-layers that appear to be associated with the mid-latitude plasma instabilities. Sometimes the type-1 echoes are combined with a broad spectrum of type-2 echoes; at other times they dominate the spectrum or may appear in the absence of any type-2 spectral component. We believe these echoes are due to the modified two-stream plasma instability driven by a polarization electric field that must be larger than 10 mV/m. This field is similar in nature to the equatorial electrojet polarization field and can arise when patchy nighttime sporadic-E-layers have the right geometry.

  20. Intercontinental Bistatic Radar Test Observation of Asteroid 1998 WT24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; DiMartino, M.; Saba, L.; Delbo, M.; Ostro, S.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Orlati, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first intercontinental planetary radar test performed in Italy observing the near Earth asteroid (NEA) 33342 (1998 WT24) in December 2001 by means of the bistatic configurations Goldstone (California, USA)-Medicina (Italy) and Evpatoria (Ukraine)-Medicina. The experiment goal was to characterize the system for realtime radar follow-up observations of NEAs and artificial orbiting debris, in the framework of a feasibility study which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope, at present under construction, also as a planetary radar facility. We report the preliminary results of the radar observations carried out by the IRA-CNR (Instituto di Radioastronomia - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) and the OATo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino) groups, aimed at exploring the scientific potentials of a new space radar program, using the existing facilities in Italy. The planetary radar technique is uniquely capable of investigating geometry and surface properties of various solar system objects, demonstrating advantages over the optical methods in its high spatial resolution and ability to obtain three-dimensional images. A single radar detection allows to obtain extremely accurate orbital elements, improving the instantaneous positional uncertainties by orders of magnitude with respect to an optically determined orbit. Radar is a powerful means to spatially resolve NEAs by measuring the distribution of the echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) with extreme precision in each coordinate, as it provides detailed information about the target physical properties like size, shape, rotation, near-surface bulk density and roughness and internal density distribution. The Medicina 32m antenna had been successfully used for the first time as the receiving part of a bistatic configuration during a test experiment (September 2001) held to check the capabilities of the entire data acquisition system. This test was possible

  1. The effect of polarization on radar detection of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, V.; Walker, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    The polarization dependence of lightning echoes received with a 23-cm wavelength radar is estimated theoretically and experimentally. The reduction in the lightning radar cross-section due to the transmission of circular polarization instead of linear is measured to be about 4 dB and is much smaller than the 15-30 dB reduction in reflectivity of weak precipitation regions. The 8.7 dB average reduction in reflectivity maxima has been observed. This leads to an increase in the detected lightning flash rate by as much as 40%. The radar cross-section ratio of circular to linear polarization obtained experimentally suggests that lightning elements tend to be horizontally oriented.

  2. Automatic Classification of Offshore Wind Regimes With Weather Radar Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trombe, Pierre-Julien; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Weather radar observations are called to play an important role in offshore wind energy. In particular, they can enable the monitoring of weather conditions in the vicinity of large-scale offshore wind farms and thereby notify the arrival of precipitation systems associated with severe wind...... and amplitude) using reflectivity observations from a single weather radar system. A categorical sequence of most likely wind regimes is estimated from a wind speed time series by combining a Markov-Switching model and a global decoding technique, the Viterbi algorithm. In parallel, attributes of precipitation...... systems are extracted from weather radar images. These attributes describe the global intensity, spatial continuity and motion of precipitation echoes on the images. Finally, a CART classification tree is used to find the broad relationships between precipitation attributes and wind regimes...

  3. Macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin Li; Dengyu Qiao; Ye Li

    2014-01-01

    Radar has the advantage of being able to detect hidden individuals, which can be used in homeland security, disaster rescue, and healthcare monitoring-related applications. Human macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar is studied in this paper. First, a frequency domain analysis is carried out to show that the macro-motion yields a bandpass signal in slow-time. Second, the FTFW (fast-time frequency windowing), which has the advantage of avoiding the measuring range reduction, and the HLF (high-pass linear-phase filter), which can preserve the motion signal effectively, are proposed to preprocess the radar echo. Last, a threshold decision method, based on the energy detector structure, is presented.

  4. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-11-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes.

  5. Quality characterization of reflectivity and radial velocity observed by Indian Doppler weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarjyothi, Kasimahanthi; Dutta, Devajyoti; Devarajan, Preveen Kumar; George, John P.; Rajagopal, Ekkattil N.

    2017-07-01

    Static and dynamic quality index (QI) maps are generated as the base products of Doppler weather radar (DWR). The quality characterization of radar reflectivity and radial velocity in terms of their QI is presented for the operational DWRs in India. A static composite QI has been generated using the maximum method. These static maps enable the detection of a low QI region in advance for the Indian radars. The QI of reflectivity is above 0.5 in all regions except in the regions of blockage, high attenuation due to rain, and beam broadening, whereas the QI of radial velocity is good for values >0.8 except for the ambiguous region and the region affected by nonmeteorological echoes. This shall help in the quick preprocessing of radar observations, since the regions of low QI can be masked. A sample case of gridded radar rainfall is presented by employing the QI scheme.

  6. Typical disturbances of the daytime equatorial F region observed with a high-resolution HF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Blanc

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available HF radar measurements were performed near the magnetic equator in Africa (Korhogo 9°24'63''N–5°37'38''W during the International Equatorial Electrojet Year (1993–1994. The HF radar is a high-resolution zenithal radar. It gives ionograms, Doppler spectra and echo parameters at several frequencies simultaneously. This paper presents a comparative study of the daytime ionospheric structures observed during 3 days selected as representative of different magnetic conditions, given by magnetometer measurements. Broad Doppler spectra, large echo width, and amplitude fluctuations revealed small-scale instability processes up to the F-region peak. The height variations measured at different altitudes showed gravity waves and larger-scale disturbances related to solar daytime influence and equatorial electric fields. The possibility of retrieving the ionospheric electric fields from these Doppler or height variation measurements in the presence of the other possible equatorial ionospheric disturbances is discussed.

  7. Photon Echoes from Retinal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip James Maddigan

    This thesis focuses on the ultrafast isomerization reaction of retinal in both rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, examples of sensory and energy transduction proteins that exploit the same photoactive chromophore for two very different functions. In bacteriorhodopsin, retinal isomerizes from an all-trans to 13-cis conformation as the primary event in light- driven proton pumping. In the visual pigment rhodopsin, the retinal chromophore isomerizes from an 11-cis to all-trans geometry as the primary step leading to our sense of vision. This diversity of function for nominally identical systems raises the question as to just how optimized are these proteins to arrive at such drastically different functions? Previous work has employed transient absorption spectroscopy to probe retinal protein photochemistry, but many of the relevant electronic and nuclear dynamics of isomerization are masked by inhomogeneous broadening effects and strong spectral overlap between reactant and photoproduct states. This work exploits the unique properties of two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy to deconvolve inhomogeneous broadening and spectral overlap effects and fully reveal the dynamics that direct retinal isomerization in proteins. In bacteriorhodopsin, vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate results in a surface crossing event prior to the conventional conical intersection associated with isomerization to the J intermediate. In rhodopsin, however, a similarly early vibrationally-mediated barrier crossing event is observed, resulting in spectral signals consistent with the known photoproduct state appearing an order of magnitude faster than determined from conventional transient absorption measurements. The competing overlapping spectral signals that obscured the initial dynamics when probed with transient absorption spectroscopy are now clearly resolved with two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. These experiments illustrate the critical role of the protein in directing

  8. Detection of Intact Lava Tubes at Marius Hills on the Moon by SELENE (Kaguya) Lunar Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, T.; Haruyama, J.; Miyake, W.; Kumamoto, A.; Ishiyama, K.; Nishibori, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Crites, Sarah T.; Michikami, T.; Yokota, Y.; Sood, R.; Melosh, H. J.; Chappaz, L.; Howell, K. C.

    2017-10-01

    Intact lunar lava tubes offer a pristine environment to conduct scientific examination of the Moon's composition and potentially serve as secure shelters for humans and instruments. We investigated the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) data at locations close to the Marius Hills Hole (MHH), a skylight potentially leading to an intact lava tube, and found a distinctive echo pattern exhibiting a precipitous decrease in echo power, subsequently followed by a large second echo peak that may be evidence for the existence of a lava tube. The search area was further expanded to 13.00-15.00°N, 301.85-304.01°E around the MHH, and similar LRS echo patterns were observed at several locations. Most of the locations are in regions of underground mass deficit suggested by GRAIL gravity data analysis. Some of the observed echo patterns are along rille A, where the MHH was discovered, or on the southwest underground extension of the rille.

  9. Distributed Subarray Antennas for Multifunction Phased-Array Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Chih-heng

    2003-01-01

    ...) and Very High Frequency (VHF) applications. By combining distributed subarrays located on the available areas of a constrained platforms, the MFAR and VHF DSA can achieve increased resolution and potential reductions in cost and complexity...

  10. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of HfErO films deposited by simultaneous RF and VHF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Tongda, Nanjing (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); He, H.J.; Zhang, Z.; Jin, C.G.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y.Y.; Ye, C. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Zhuge, L.J. [Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Analysis and Testing Center, Suzhou (China); Wu, X.M. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-01-23

    HfErO films are deposited on Si substrates by simultaneous radio frequency (RF) and very high frequency (VHF) magnetron sputtering technique. The content of the doped ingredient of Er and the body composition of HfO{sub x} are, respectively, controlled through the VHF and RF powers. Low content of Er doping in the HfErO films can be achieved, because the VHF source of 27.12 MHz has higher ion energy and lower ion flux than the RF source resulting in low sputtering rate in the magnetron sputtering system. The structure, optical properties and thermal stability of the HfErO films are investigated in this work. Results show that the doped content of Er is independently controlled by the VHF power. The oxygen vacancies are created by the Er incorporation. The hafnium in the HfErO films forms mixed valence of Hf{sup 2+} and Hf{sup 4+}. The HfErO films are composed with the structures of HfO{sub 2}, HfO and ErO{sub x}, which can be optimized through the VHF power. At high VHF power, the Hf-Er-O bonds are formed, which demonstrates that the Er atoms are doped into the lattice of HfO{sub 2} in the HfErO films. The HfErO films have bad thermal stability as the crystallization temperature decreases from 900 to 800 C. After thermal annealing, cubic phase of HfO{sub 2} are stabilized, which is ascribed to the oxygen vacancies creation by the Er incorporation. The optical properties such as the refractive index and the optical band gap of the HfErO films are optimized by the VHF power. (orig.)

  11. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS. R.

    2005-05-16

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time {tau} after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2{tau} thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering.

  12. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  13. Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ECHO provides integrated compliance and enforcement information for about 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide. Its features range from simple to advanced,...

  14. Echoes of Kerr-like wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.; Goelen, Frederik; Hertog, Thomas; Vercnocke, Bert

    2018-01-01

    Structure at the horizon scale of black holes would give rise to echoes of the gravitational wave signal associated with the postmerger ringdown phase in binary coalescences. We study the waveform of echoes in static and stationary, traversable wormholes in which perturbations are governed by a symmetric effective potential. We argue that echoes are dominated by the wormhole quasinormal frequency nearest to the fundamental black hole frequency that controls the primary signal. We put forward an accurate method to construct the echoes' waveform(s) from the primary signal and the quasinormal frequencies of the wormhole, which we characterize. We illustrate this in the static Damour-Solodukhin wormhole and in a new, rotating generalization that approximates a Kerr black hole outside the throat. Rotation gives rise to a potential with an intermediate plateau region that breaks the degeneracy of the quasinormal frequencies. Rotation also leads to late-time instabilities that, however, fade away for small angular momentum.

  15. Time Delay Estimation Algoritms for Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Simak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The following case study describes how to eliminate echo in a VoIP network using delay estimation algorithms. It is known that echo with long transmission delays becomes more noticeable to users. Thus, time delay estimation, as a part of echo cancellation, is an important topic during transmission of voice signals over packetswitching telecommunication systems. An echo delay problem associated with IP-based transport networks is discussed in the following text. The paper introduces the comparative study of time delay estimation algorithm, used for estimation of the true time delay between two speech signals. Experimental results of MATLab simulations that describe the performance of several methods based on cross-correlation, normalized crosscorrelation and generalized cross-correlation are also presented in the paper.

  16. TRISP: Three axes spin echo spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Keller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available TRISP, operated by the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, is a high-resolution neutron spectrometer combining the three axes and neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE techniques.

  17. Water Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dashboards found on the Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  18. Optimal Echo Spacing for Multi-Echo Imaging measurements of Bi-exponential T2 relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Adrienne N.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Calculations, analytical solutions, and simulations were used to investigate the trade-off of echo spacing and receiver bandwidth for the characterization of bi-exponential transverse relaxation using a multi-echo imaging pulse sequence. The Cramer-Rao lower bound of the standard deviation of the four parameters of a two-pool model were computed for a wide range of component T2 values and echo spacing. The results demonstrate that optimal echo spacing (TEopt) is not generally the minimal avai...

  19. First modulation of high-frequency polar mesospheric summer echoes by radio heating of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Rietveld, M. T.; Scales, W. A.; Kosch, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    The first high-frequency (HF, 8 MHz) observations of the modulation of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) by artificial radio heating of the ionosphere are presented and compared to observations at 224 MHz and model predictions. The experiments were performed at the European Incoherent Scatter facility in northern Norway. It is shown that model results are in qualitative and partial quantitative agreement with the observations, supporting the prediction that with certain ranges of ice particle radii and concentration, PMSE at HF radar wavelengths can be enhanced by heating due to the dominance of dust charging over plasma diffusion.

  20. Search Results Help - Air | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  1. Water Pollution Search | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  2. Detailed Facility Report | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  3. Water Pollution Search (beta) | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  4. Watershed Statistics Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  5. Drinking Water Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  6. Mobile Bay.pdf | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  7. Search Results Help - Biosolids | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  8. Technical Users Background Document | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  9. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  10. Partly cloudy with a chance of migration: Weather, radars, and aeroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilson, Phillip B.; Frick, Winifred F.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Howard, Kenneth W.; Larkin, Ronald P.; Diehl, Robert H.; Westbrook, John K.; Kelly, T. Adam; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Aeroecology is an emerging scientific discipline that integrates atmospheric science, Earth science, geography, ecology, computer science, computational biology, and engineering to further the understanding of biological patterns and processes. The unifying concept underlying this new transdisciplinary field of study is a focus on the planetary boundary layer and lower free atmosphere (i.e., the aerosphere), and the diversity of airborne organisms that inhabit and depend on the aerosphere for their existence. Here, we focus on the role of radars and radar networks in aeroecological studies. Radar systems scanning the atmosphere are primarily used to monitor weather conditions and track the location and movements of aircraft. However, radar echoes regularly contain signals from other sources, such as airborne birds, bats, and arthropods. We briefly discuss how radar observations can be and have been used to study a variety of airborne organisms and examine some of the many potential benefits likely to arise from radar aeroecology for meteorological and biological research over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Radar systems are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the advent of innovative signal processing and dual-polarimetric capabilities. These capabilities should be better harnessed to promote both meteorological and aeroecological research and to explore the interface between these two broad disciplines. We strongly encourage close collaboration among meteorologists, radar scientists, biologists, and others toward developing radar products that will contribute to a better understanding of airborne fauna.

  11. Radar study of coupling processes between mid-latitude ionospheric E and F regions based on the FERIX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Aoki, Yuichi; Saito, Susumu

    In the ionosphere, conductivity parallel to the geomagnetic field is so high that such polarization electric fields are easily mapped along the field line for several hundred kilometers. Field aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the E- and F- regions are expected to be electromagnetically coupled. We conducted FERIX (F- and E- Region Ionosphere Coupling Study) 2 observation campaign in 2007. We located a portable radar at Sakata to observe E-region FAI (E-FAI), while the MU radar in Shigaraki observed F-region FAI (F-FAI). We applied the radar imaging technique for both radars, and studied the horizontal structures of both E- and F- regions FAIs in more detail. We also operated a bistatic receiving site at Maze, Niigata to expand observation region of the LTPR. We found that the F-FAI shows northwest-southeast wavefront with small structures of 20-30 km. E-FAI were enhanced and showed northwest-southwest wavefront structures when F-FAI echoes were observed by the MU radar. The radar imaging observations revealed that smaller echo patches of E-FAI tend to appear at the edge of, or surrounding area of the F-FAI echoes.

  12. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  13. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  14. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  15. Echoes from a Dying Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    When a passing star is torn apart by a supermassive black hole, it emits a flare of X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical light. What can we learn from the infrared echo of a violent disruption like this one?Stellar DestructionOptical (black triangles) and infrared (blue circles and red squares) observations of F010042237. Day 0 marks the day the optical emission peaked. The infrared emission rises steadily through the end of the data. [Dou et al. 2017]Tidal disruption events occur when a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole. After tidal forces pull the star apart, much of the stellar matter falls onto the black hole, radiating briefly in X-ray, ultraviolet and optical as it accretes. This signature rise and gradual fall of emission has allowed us to detect dozens of tidal disruption events thus far.One of the recently discovered candidate events is a little puzzling. Not only does the candidate in ultraluminous infrared galaxy F010042237 have an unusual host most disruptions occur in galaxies that are no longer star-forming, in contrast to this one but its optical light curve also shows an unusually long decay time.Now mid-infrared observations of this event have beenpresented by a team of scientists led by Liming Dou (Guangzhou University and Department of Education, Guangdong Province, China), revealing why this disruption is behaving unusually.Schematic of a convex dusty ring (red bows) that absorbs UV photons and re-emits in the infrared. It simultaneously scatters UV and optical photons into our line of sight. The dashed lines illustrate the delays at lags of 60 days, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years. [Adapted from Dou et al. 2017]A Dusty Solution?The optical flare from F010042237s nucleus peaked in 2010, so Dou and collaborators obtained archival mid-infrared data from the WISE and NEOWISE missions from 2010 to 2016. The data show that the galaxy is quiescent in mid-infrared in 2010 but in data from three years later, the infrared emission has

  16. Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope is the collection of weather radar imagery for the period prior to the beginning of the Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system...

  17. Storm Motion Tracking Over The Arno River Basin Through Multiscale Radar Reflectivity Classification and Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facheris, L.; Tanelli, S.; Giuli, D.

    A method is presented for analyzing the storm motion through the application of a nowcasting technique based on radar echoes tracking through multiscale correlation. The application of the correlation principle to weather radar image processing - the so called TREC (Tracking Radar Echoes by Correlation) and derived algorithms - is de- scribed in [1] and in references cited therein. The block matching approach exploited there is typical of video compression applications, whose purpose is to remove the temporal correlation between two subsequent frames of a sequence of images. In par- ticular, the wavelet decomposition approach to motion estimation seems particularly suitable for weather radar maps. In fact, block matching is particularly efficient when the images have a sufficient level of contrast. Though this does not hold for original resolution radar maps, it can be easily obtained by changing the resolution level by means of the wavelet decomposition. The technique first proposed in [2] (TREMC - Tracking of Radar Echoes by means of Multiscale Correlation) adopts a multiscale, multiresolution, and partially overlapped, block grid which adapts to the radar reflec- tivity pattern. Multiresolution decomposition is performed through 2D wavelet based filtering. Correlation coefficients are calculated taking after preliminary screening of unreliable data (e.g. those affected by ground clutter or beam shielding), so as to avoid strong undesired motion estimation biases due to the presence of stationary features. Such features are detected by a previous analysis carried out as discussed in [2]. In this paper, motion fields obtained by analyzing precipitation events over the Arno river basin are compared to the related Doppler velocity fields in order to identify growth and decay areas and orographic effects. Data presented have been collected by the weather radar station POLAR 55C sited in Montagnana (Firenze-Italy), a polarimetric C-band system providing absolute and

  18. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  19. Mid-latitude E-region bulk motions inferred from digital ionosonde and HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delloue

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-latitude E-region there is now evidence suggesting that neutral winds play a significant role in driving the local plasma instabilities and electrodynamics inside sporadicE layers. Neutral winds can be inferred from coherent radar backscatter measurements of the range-/azimuth-time-intensity (RTI/ATI striations of quasi-periodic (QP echoes, or from radar interferometer/imaging observations. In addition, neutral winds in the E-region can be estimated from angle-of-arrival ionosonde measurements of sporadic-E layers. In the present paper we analyse concurrent ionosonde and HF coherent backscatter observations obtained when a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI was operated under a portion of the field-of-view of the Valensole high frequency (HF radar. The Valensole radar, a mid-latitude radar located in the south of France with a large azimuthal scanning capability of 82° (24° E to 58° W, was used to deduce zonal bulk motions of QP echoing regions using ATI analysis. The CADI was used to measure angle-of-arrival information in two orthogonal horizontal directions and thus derive the motion of sporadic-E patches drifting with the neutral wind. This paper compares the neutral wind drifts of the unstable sporadic-E patches as determined by the two instruments. The CADI measurements show a predominantly westward aligned motion, but the measured zonal drifts are underestimated relative to those observed with the Valensole radar.

  20. MARIACHI - Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Helio

    2006-04-01

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with energies in excess of 10^20eV (100 EeV) have been detected by several experiments. They present a conundrum whose solution may provide insight into the origins and evolution of the universe. There are no known sources within our galaxy or those close to us that could accelerate particles to these almost macroscopic energies, and yet the turn-on of pion production through the interactions of high energy charged particles with the 2.7K microwave background provides a strong limit for propagation from greater distances. The detection of UHECR to date has been accomplished either by detection of the particles from the extensive air showers by ground arrays or by means of detection of the light produced by the EAS in the atmosphere from Cerenkov radiation. MARIACHI (Mixed Apparatus for Radar Investigation of Cosmic-rays of High Ionization) is an innovative concept that will explore the detection of UHECR by bi-static radar using VHF transmitters. If successful, the MARIACHI technique will allow for detection of UHECR economically over much larger areas than currently possible, and might provide for detection of the associated ultra high energy neutrino flux. MARIACHI is also innovative in that ground array detectors that will initially confirm the radio signals are scintillator arrays to be built and operated by high school students and teachers. We will present the present status of the experiment.

  1. Refraction and Faraday rotation in the incoherent scatter radar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpynev, Boris G.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we consider the radiolocation equation for the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) method; the equation accounts for refraction effect and Faraday rotation in the VHF frequency domain. Our research shows that we cannot ignore refraction in processing the incoherent scatter data when lag-product is used to obtain the ionospheric characteristics. Effect of refraction can explain some uncertainties that arise during processing and interpretation of the ISR data. This effect shows that together with the "ion line" of incoherent scatter spectrum, a relatively small "electron line" also plays a significant role in forming the ionosphere response. The "electron line" behaves as an additional "radar induced" wideband radiolocation signal affected by refraction and Faraday rotation; it depends on the ionosphere temperature and ion composition. The presence of a wideband "electron line" produces specific distortions of the ISR spectrum during 3D-forming of the ionosphere response inside the ISR antenna diagram pattern. During testing, we found that the signal from the ISR "electron line" can be measured at much higher altitudes comparing to the "ion line." Hence, to improve the incoherent scatter technique, we can take the "electron line" and refraction into account.

  2. Enhanced radar precipitation estimates using a combined clutter and beam blockage correction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornasiero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Weather radar observations are currently the most reliable method for remote sensing of precipitation. However, a number of factors affect the quality of radar observations and may limit seriously automated quantitative applications of radar precipitation estimates such as those required in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP data assimilation or in hydrological models. In this paper, a technique to correct two different problems typically present in radar data is presented and evaluated. The aspects dealt with are non-precipitating echoes – caused either by permanent ground clutter or by anomalous propagation of the radar beam (anaprop echoes – and also topographical beam blockage. The correction technique is based in the computation of realistic beam propagation trajectories based upon recent radiosonde observations instead of assuming standard radio propagation conditions. The correction consists of three different steps: 1 calculation of a Dynamic Elevation Map which provides the minimum clutter-free antenna elevation for each pixel within the radar coverage; 2 correction for residual anaprop, checking the vertical reflectivity gradients within the radar volume; and 3 topographical beam blockage estimation and correction using a geometric optics approach. The technique is evaluated with four case studies in the region of the Po Valley (N Italy using a C-band Doppler radar and a network of raingauges providing hourly precipitation measurements. The case studies cover different seasons, different radio propagation conditions and also stratiform and convective precipitation type events. After applying the proposed correction, a comparison of the radar precipitation estimates with raingauges indicates a general reduction in both the root mean squared error and the fractional error variance indicating the efficiency and robustness of the procedure. Moreover, the technique presented is not computationally expensive so it seems well suited to be

  3. Improved Detection of Human Respiration Using Data Fusion Basedon a Multistatic UWB Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Lv

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the feasibility for improved detection of human respiration using data fusion based on a multistatic ultra-wideband (UWB radar. UWB-radar-based respiration detection is an emerging technology that has great promise in practice. It can be applied to remotely sense the presence of a human target for through-wall surveillance, post-earthquake search and rescue, etc. In these applications, a human target’s position and posture are not known a priori. Uncertainty of the two factors results in a body orientation issue of UWB radar, namely the human target’s thorax is not always facing the radar. Thus, the radial component of the thorax motion due to respiration decreases and the respiratory motion response contained in UWB radar echoes is too weak to be detected. To cope with the issue, this paper used multisensory information provided by the multistatic UWB radar, which took the form of impulse radios and comprised one transmitting and four separated receiving antennas. An adaptive Kalman filtering algorithm was then designed to fuse the UWB echo data from all the receiving channels to detect the respiratory-motion response contained in those data. In the experiment, a volunteer’s respiration was correctly detected when he curled upon a camp bed behind a brick wall. Under the same scenario, the volunteer’s respiration was detected based on the radar’s single transmitting-receiving channels without data fusion using conventional algorithm, such as adaptive line enhancer and single-channel Kalman filtering. Moreover, performance of the data fusion algorithm was experimentally investigated with different channel combinations and antenna deployments. The experimental results show that the body orientation issue for human respiration detection via UWB radar can be dealt well with the multistatic UWB radar and the Kalman-filter-based data fusion, which can be applied to improve performance of UWB radar in real applications.

  4. Challenges to Airborne and Orbital Radar Sounding in the Presence of Surface Clutter: Lessons Learned (so far) from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. W.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The search for life and in-situ resources for exploration on Mars targets both liquid and solid water, whether distributed or in reservoirs. Massive surface ice may cover potential habitats or other features of great interest. Ice-rich layering in the high latitudes holds clues to the climatic history of the planet. Multiple geophysical methods will clearly be necessary to fully characterize these various states of water (and other forms of ice), but radar sounding will be a critical component of the effort. Orbital radar sounders are already being employed and plans for surface-based and suborbital, above-surface radar sounders are being discussed. The difficulties in interpreting data from each type of platform are quite different. Given the lack of existing orbital radar sounding data from any planetary body, the analysis of airborne radar sounding data is quite useful for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of above-surface radar sounding on Mars. In addition to over 300,000 line-km of data collected over the Antarctic ice sheet by airborne radar sounding, we have recently analyzed data from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where conditions and features emulate Mars in several respects. These airborne radar sounding data were collected over an ice-free area of Taylor Valley, ice-covered lakes, Taylor Glacier, and Beacon Valley. The pulsed radar (52.5 - 67.5 MHz chirp) was coherently recorded. Pulse compression and unfocused SAR processing were applied. One of the most challenging aspects of above-surface radar sounding is the determination of echo sources. This can, of course, be problematic for surface-based radar sounders given possible subsurface scattering geometries, but it is most severe for above-surface sounders because echoes from cross-track surface topography (surface clutter) can have similar time delays to those from the subsurface. We have developed two techniques to accomplish the identification of this surface clutter in single-pass airborne

  5. Detection of Hail Storms in Radar Imagery Using Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Melinda; Gurung, Iksha; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, hail was responsible for 3.5 billion and 23 million dollars in damage to property and crops, respectively, making it the second costliest weather phenomenon in the United States. In an effort to improve hail-prediction techniques and reduce the societal impacts associated with hail storms, we propose a deep learning technique that leverages radar imagery for automatic detection of hail storms. The technique is applied to radar imagery from 2011 to 2016 for the contiguous United States and achieved a precision of 0.848. Hail storms are primarily detected through the visual interpretation of radar imagery (Mrozet al., 2017). With radars providing data every two minutes, the detection of hail storms has become a big data task. As a result, scientists have turned to neural networks that employ computer vision to identify hail-bearing storms (Marzbanet al., 2001). In this study, we propose a deep Convolutional Neural Network (ConvNet) to understand the spatial features and patterns of radar echoes for detecting hailstorms.

  6. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-20

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system.

  7. Adaptive Waveform Design for Cognitive Radar in Multiple Targets Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of cognitive radar (CR waveform optimization design for target detection and estimation in multiple extended targets situations is investigated. This problem is analyzed in signal-dependent interference, as well as additive channel noise for extended targets with unknown target impulse response (TIR. To address this problem, an improved algorithm is employed for target detection by maximizing the detection probability of the received echo on the promise of ensuring the TIR estimation precision. In this algorithm, an additional weight vector is introduced to achieve a trade-off among different targets. Both the estimate of TIR and transmit waveform can be updated at each step based on the previous step. Under the same constraint on waveform energy and bandwidth, the information theoretical approach is also considered. In addition, the relationship between the waveforms that are designed based on the two criteria is discussed. Unlike most existing works that only consider single target with temporally correlated characteristics, waveform design for multiple extended targets is considered in this method. Simulation results demonstrate that compared with linear frequency modulated (LFM signal, waveforms designed based on maximum detection probability and maximum mutual information (MI criteria can make radar echoes contain more multiple-target information and improve radar performance as a result.

  8. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  9. Aspects of Radar Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lüneburg, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is a tutorial introduction to the phenomenological theory of radar polarimetry for the coherent scatter case emphasizing monostatic backscattering and forward scattering (transmission). Characteristic similarities and differences between radar polarimetry and optical polarimetry and the role of linear and antilinear operators (time-reversal) are pointed out and typical polarimetric invariants are identified.

  10. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  11. Decoders for MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  12. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  13. Ringing effects eliminated spin echo in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Li, Peng; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Shanmin

    2013-08-01

    Two types of ringing effects eliminated spin echo sequences have been introduced. To achieve the task, two additional 90° pulses with proper phase cycles are placed at the beginning of the pulse sequences. The spin echo time is calculated with the perturbation method to the first order, i.e. taking into account only the dipolar secular term. The non-secular term causes an imaginary part of the FID, leading to an unsymmetrical NMR spectrum. This effect, according to a symmetry of NMR sequences under phase inversion, can be compensated by inverting all the x and -x or y and -y phases. The properties of the symmetry are derived based on the theory of density matrix. In addition, the non-secular term also results in a small drop (several per cent) of the echo amplitude, but it nearly does not affect the echo time. With these pulse sequences we are able to get a spectrum with an echo delay only 1.1 μs without distortion using a Bruker AVANCE III NMR instrument.

  14. Measurements methodology for evaluation of Digital TV operation in VHF high-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudwell Chaves de Almeida, M.; Vladimir Gonzalez Castellanos, P.; Alfredo Cal Braz, J.; Pereira David, R.; Saboia Lima de Souza, R.; Pereira da Soledade, A.; Rodrigues Nascimento Junior, J.; Ferreira Lima, F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental setup of field measurements carried out for evaluating the operation of the ISDB-TB (Integrated Services Digital Broadcasting, Terrestrial, Brazilian version) standard digital TV in the VHF-highband. Measurements were performed in urban and suburban areas in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Besides the direct measurements of received power and environmental noise, a measurement procedure involving the injection of Gaussian additive noise was employed to achieve the signal to noise ratio threshold at each measurement site. The analysis includes results of static reception measurements for evaluating the received field strength and the signal to noise ratio thresholds for correct signal decoding.

  15. Forming and detection of digital watermarks in the System for Automatic Identification of VHF Transmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Шишкін

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Forming and detection algorithms for digital watermarks are designed for automatic identification of VHF radiotelephone transmissions in the maritime and aeronautical mobile services. An audible insensitivity and interference resistance of embedded digital data are provided by means of OFDM technology jointly with normalized distortions distribution and data packet detection by the hash-function. Experiments were carried out on the base of ship’s radio station RT-2048 Sailor and USB ADC-DAC module of type Е14-140M L-CARD in the off-line processing regime in Matlab medium

  16. Luminous phenomena and electromagnetic VHF wave emission originated from earthquake-related radon exhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, A.; Tobo, I.; Omori, Y.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalous luminous phenomena and electromagnetic wave emission before or during earthquakes have been reported (e.g., the 1965 Matsushiro earthquake swarm). However, their mechanism is still unsolved, in spite of many models for these phenomena. Here, we propose a new model about luminous phenomena and electromagnetic wave emission during earthquake by focusing on atmospheric radon (Rn-222) and its daughter nuclides (Po-218 and Po-214). Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214 are alpha emitters, and these alpha particles ionize atmospheric molecules. A light emission phenomenon, called 'the air luminescence', is caused by de-excitation of the ionized molecules of atmospheric nitrogen due to electron impact ionization from alpha particles. The de-excitation is from the second positive system of neutral nitrogen molecules and the first negative system of nitrogen molecule ion. Wavelengths of lights by these transitions include the visible light wavelength. So based on this mechanism, we proposed a new luminous phenomenon model before or during earthquake: 1. The concentration of atmospheric radon and its daughter nuclides increase anomalously before or during earthquakes, 2. Nitrogen molecules and their ions are excited by alpha particles emitted from Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214, and air luminescence is generated by their de-excitation. Similarly, electromagnetic VHF wave emission can be explained by ionizing effect of radon and its daughter nuclides. Boyarchuk et al. (2005) proposed a model that electromagnetic VHF wave emission is originated when excited state of neutral clusters changes. Radon gas ionizes atmosphere and forms positively and negatively charged heavy particles. The process of ion hydration in ordinary air can be determined by the formation of complex chemically active structures of the various types of ion radicals. As a result of the association of such hydration radical ions, a neutral cluster, which is dipole quasi-molecules, is formed. A neutral cluster

  17. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the first two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-X510 network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  18. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  19. Principles of modern radar radar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scheer, James A

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Radar Applications is the third of the three-volume seriesof what was originally designed to be accomplished in one volume. As the final volumeof the set, it finishes the original vision of a complete yet bounded reference for radartechnology. This volume describes fifteen different system applications or class ofapplications in more detail than can be found in Volumes I or II.As different as the applications described, there is a difference in how these topicsare treated by the authors. Whereas in Volumes I and II there is strict adherence tochapter format and leve

  20. Bistatic-radar estimation of surface-slope probability distributions with applications to the moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M. N.; Tyler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for extracting surface-slope frequency distributions from bistatic-radar data has been developed and applied to the lunar surface. Telemetry transmissions from orbiting Apollo spacecraft were received on the earth after reflection from the lunar surface. The echo-frequency spectrum was related analytically to the probability distribution of lunar slopes. Standard regression techniques were used to solve the inverse problem of finding slope distributions from observed echo-frequency spectra. Data taken simultaneously at two wavelengths, 13 and 116 cm, have yielded diverse slope statistics.

  1. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry in polar mesosphere summer echoes and temperature at 69° latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ray J.; Klekociuk, Andrew R.; Latteck, Ralph; Singer, Werner; Holdsworth, David A.; Murphy, Damian J.

    2009-03-01

    An inter-hemispheric asymmetry is found in the characteristics of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) and upper mesosphere temperatures at conjugate latitudes (~69°) above Antarctica and the Arctic. The second complete mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar summer observation season at Davis (68.6°S) revealed that PMSE occur less frequently, with lower strength and on average 1 km higher compared with their northern counterparts at Andenes (69.3°N). We consider the thermodynamic state of the mesosphere for conjoining hemispheric summers based on satellite and ground-based radar measurements, and show the mesopause region near ~80-87 km of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) to be up to 7.5 K warmer than its Northern Hemisphere (NH) counterpart. We show that this is consistent with our observation of asymmetries in the characteristics of PMSE and demonstrate how the mesosphere meridional wind field influences the existence and strength of the echoes in both hemispheres.

  2. Non-magnetic aspect sensitive auroral echoes from the lower E region observed at 50 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüster

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Backscatter from E-region irregularities was observed at aspect angles close to 90° (almost parallel to the direction of the magnetic field using the ALOMAR SOUSY radar at Andoya/Norway. Strong electric fields and increased E-region electron temperatures simultaneously measured with the incoherent scatter facility EISCAT proved that the Farley-Buneman plasma instability was excited. In addition, strong particle precipitation was present as inferred from EISCAT electron densities indicating that the gradient drift instability may have been active, too. Backscatter at such large aspect angles was not expected and has not been observed before. The characteristics of the observed echoes, however, are in many aspects completely different from usual auroral radar results: the Doppler velocities are only of the order of 10 m/s, the half-width of the spectra is around 5 m/s, the echoes originate at altitudes well below 100 km, and they seem to be not aspect-sensitive with respect to the magnetic field direction. We, therefore, conclude that the corresponding irregularities are not caused by the mentioned instabilities and that other mechanism have to be invoked.Key words. Ionosphere (plasma waves and instabilities; ionosphere irregularities; particle precipitaion · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  3. Atmospheric Characteristics Inferred from Acoustic Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gregory Stewart

    The work in this thesis examined data collected from a 3-axis Doppler acoustic radar system. The majority of these data were collected at sub-tropical Australian sites where vigorous convective activity was sometimes encountered during the day. In all, several weeks of data were recorded. A brief discussion of this remote-sensing technique is presented, together with a description of the equipment used and the sites at which data were collected. The fundamental data consisted of the recorded spectra of individual atmospheric echoes. Methods for extracting low-level information from these methods are discussed. The extracted data are further processed with several aims. Some interdependences between spectral parameters that may complicate routine processing are isolated and discussed. The behaviour of the three major descriptors of the echo spectra, echo power, spectral broadening and Doppler-shift are then discussed in detail. Profiles, distributions and diurnal variations of these variables are discussed for each site. Some relationships between the behaviour of these parameters and conventional atmospheric turbulence indicators are explored. Agreement with theoretical prediction was generally good. A method of using spectral broadening to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is discussed in detail. Results are presented which suggest that this method may have promise. The data were collected during collaborative periods of intensive study. The main aim of the principle investigators during these studies was the evaluation of the local atmospheric behaviour and turbulence levels. Significant site-dependent characteristics were found in the data from the various sites or under differing weather conditions at the same site. It was found that these characteristics could be readily detected using longterm or site-averaged data, a form of presentation which may be more amenable to use in local pollution dispersion models.

  4. Flash propagation and inferred charge structure relative to radar-observed ice alignment signatures in a small Florida mesoscale convective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Michael I.; Zounes, Zackery; Addison Alford, A.; Carrie, Gordon D.; Pilkey, John T.; Uman, Martin A.; Jordan, Douglas M.

    2017-08-01

    A series of vertical cross sections taken through a small mesoscale convective system observed over Florida by the dual-polarimetric SMART radar were combined with VHF radiation source locations from a lightning mapping array (LMA) to examine the lightning channel propagation paths relative to the radar-observed ice alignment signatures associated with regions of negative specific differential phase (KDP). Additionally, charge layers inferred from analysis of LMA sources were related to the ice alignment signature. It was found that intracloud flashes initiated near the upper zero-KDP boundary surrounding the negative KDP region. The zero-KDP boundary also delineated the propagation path of the lightning channel with the negative leaders following the upper boundary and positive leaders following the lower boundary. Very few LMA sources were found in the negative KDP region. We conclude that rapid dual-polarimetric radar observations can diagnose strong electric fields and may help identify surrounding regions of charge.

  5. Doppler radar spectral width broadening due to beamwidth and wind shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Nastrom

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral width observed by Doppler radars can be due to several effects including the atmospheric turbulence within the radar sample volume plus effects associated with the background flow and the radar geometry and configuration. This study re-examines simple models for the effects due to finite beamwidth and vertical shear of the horizontal wind. Analytic solutions of 1- and 2-dimensional models are presented. Comparisons of the simple 2-dimensional model with numerical integrations of a 3-dimensional model with a symmetrical Gaussian beam show that the 2-dimensional model is usually adequate. The solution of the 2-dimensional model gives a formula that can be applied easily to large data sets. Analysis of the analytic solutions of the 2-dimensional model for off-vertical beams reveals a term that has not been included in mathematical formulas for spectral broadening in the past. This term arises from the simultaneous effects of the changing geometry due to curvature within a finite beamwidth and the vertical wind shear. The magnitude of this effect can be comparable to that of the well-known effects of beam-broadening and wind shear, and since it can have either algebraic sign, it can significantly reduce (or increase the expected spectral broadening, although under typical conditions it is smaller than the beam-broadening effect. The predictions of this simple model are found to be consistent with observations from the VHF radar at White Sands Missile Range, NM.

  6. Doppler radar spectral width broadening due to beamwidth and wind shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Nastrom

    Full Text Available The spectral width observed by Doppler radars can be due to several effects including the atmospheric turbulence within the radar sample volume plus effects associated with the background flow and the radar geometry and configuration. This study re-examines simple models for the effects due to finite beamwidth and vertical shear of the horizontal wind. Analytic solutions of 1- and 2-dimensional models are presented. Comparisons of the simple 2-dimensional model with numerical integrations of a 3-dimensional model with a symmetrical Gaussian beam show that the 2-dimensional model is usually adequate. The solution of the 2-dimensional model gives a formula that can be applied easily to large data sets. Analysis of the analytic solutions of the 2-dimensional model for off-vertical beams reveals a term that has not been included in mathematical formulas for spectral broadening in the past. This term arises from the simultaneous effects of the changing geometry due to curvature within a finite beamwidth and the vertical wind shear. The magnitude of this effect can be comparable to that of the well-known effects of beam-broadening and wind shear, and since it can have either algebraic sign, it can significantly reduce (or increase the expected spectral broadening, although under typical conditions it is smaller than the beam-broadening effect. The predictions of this simple model are found to be consistent with observations from the VHF radar at White Sands Missile Range, NM.

  7. How can dolphins recognize fish according to their echoes? A statistical analysis of fish echoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Yovel

    Full Text Available Echo-based object classification is a fundamental task of animals that use a biosonar system. Dolphins and porpoises should be able to rely on echoes to discriminate a predator from a prey or to select a desired prey from an undesired object. Many studies have shown that dolphins and porpoises can discriminate between objects according to their echoes. All of these studies however, used unnatural objects that can be easily characterized in human terminologies (e.g., metallic spheres, disks, cylinders. In this work, we collected real fish echoes from many angles of acquisition using a sonar system that mimics the emission properties of dolphins and porpoises. We then tested two alternative statistical approaches in classifying these echoes. Our results suggest that fish species can be classified according to echoes returning from porpoise- and dolphin-like signals. These results suggest how dolphins and porpoises can classify fish based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  8. Gradient Based Adaptive Algorithm for Echo Cancellation from Recorded Echo Corrupted Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal Mahbub

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An offline single channel acoustic echo cancellation (AEC scheme is proposed based on gradient based adaptive least mean squares (LMS algorithm considering a major practical application of echo cancellation system for enhancing recorded echo corrupted speech data. The unavailability of a reference signal makes the problem of single channel adaptive echo cancellation to be extremely difficult to handle. Moreover, continuous feedback of the echo corrupted signal to the input microphone can significantly degrade the quality of the original speech signal and may even result in howling. In order to overcome these problems, in the proposed scheme, the delayed version of the echo corrupted speech signal is considered as a reference. An objective function is thus formulated and thereby a modified LMS update equation is derived, which is shown to converge to the optimum Wiener-Hopf solution. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated in terms of both subjective and objective measures via extensive experimentation on several real-life echo corrupted signals and very satisfactory performance is obtained.

  9. Search Results Help - Water | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available. Search Results Help explains how to navigate the search results page and describes the data presented.

  10. Characterizing Englacial Attenuation and Grounding Zone Geometry Using Airborne Radar Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, D. M.; Grima, C.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of warm ocean water on ice sheet retreat and stability is a one of the primary drivers and sources of uncertainty for the rate of global sea level rise. One critical but challenging observation required to understand and model this impact is the location and extent of grounding ice sheet zones. However, existing surface topography based techniques do not directly detect the location where ocean water reaches (or breaches) grounded ice at the bed, which can significantly affect ice sheet stability. The primary geophysical tool for directly observing the basal properties of ice sheets is airborne radar sounding. However, uncertainty in englacial attenuation from unknown ice temperature and chemistry can lead to erroneous interpretation of subglacial conditions from bed echo strengths alone . Recently developed analysis techniques for radar sounding data have overcome this challenge by taking advantage of information in the angular distribution of bed echo energy and joint modeling of radar returns and water routing. We have developed similar approaches to analyze the spatial pattern and character of echoes to address the problems of improved characterization of grounding zone geometry and englacial attenuation. The spatial signal of the transition from an ice-bed interface to an ice-ocean interface is an increase in bed echo strength. However, rapidly changing attenuation near the grounding zone prevents the unambiguous interpretation of this signal in typical echo strength profiles and violates the assumptions of existing empirical attenuation correction techniques. We present a technique that treat bed echoes as continuous signals to take advantage of along-profile ice thickness and echo strength variations to constrain the spatial pattern of attenuation and detect the grounding zone transition. The transition from an ice-bed interface to an ice-ocean interface will also result in a change in the processes that determine basal interface morphology (e

  11. An HF and lower VHF spectrum assessment system exploiting instantaneously wideband capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rod I.; Singh, Malkiat; Earl, Fred

    2017-09-01

    We report on a spectral environment evaluation and recording (SEER) system, for instantaneously wideband spectral capture and characterization in the HF and lower VHF band, utilizing a direct digital receiver coupled to a data recorder. The system is designed to contend with a wide variety of electromagnetic environments and to provide accurately calibrated spectral characterization and display from very short (ms) to synoptic scales. The system incorporates a novel RF front end involving automated gain and equalization filter selection which provides an analogue frequency-dependent gain characteristic that mitigates the high dynamic range found across the HF and lower VHF spectrum. The system accurately calibrates its own internal noise and automatically subtracts this from low variance, external spectral estimates, further extending the dynamic range over which robust characterization is possible. Laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that the implementation of these concepts has been effective. Sensitivity to varying antenna load impedance of the internal noise reduction process has been examined. Examples of software algorithms to provide extraction and visualization of spectral behavior over narrowband, wideband, short, and synoptic scales are provided. Application in HF noise spectral density monitoring, spectral signal strength assessment, and electromagnetic interference detection is possible with examples provided. The instantaneously full bandwidth collection provides some innovative applications, and this is demonstrated by the collection of discrete lightning emissions, which form fast ionograms called "flashagrams" in power-delay-frequency plots.

  12. Ku-Band radar penetration into Snow over Arctic Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Stefan; Stenseng, Lars; Helm, Veit

    Sea ice freeboard measurements are of great interest for basin-scale ice mass balance monitoring. Typically, laser- and radar-altimeters are used for freeboard retrieval in operational systems such as aircrafts and satellites. For laser beams it can be assumed that the dominant reflector...... is the snow/air interface, whereas radar waves interact with the variable physical properties of the snow cover on the Arctic sea ice. In addition, radar elevation measurements may vary for different retracker algorithms, which determine the track point of the scattered echo power distribution. Since accurate...... knowledge of the reflection horizon is critical for sea ice thickness retrieval, validation data is necessary to investigate the penetration of radar waves into the snow for the upcoming CryoSat-2 mission. Furthermore, the combination of both optical and RF wavelengths might be used to derive snow thickness...

  13. Detecting Weather Radar Clutter by Information Fusion With Satellite Images and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    A method for detecting clutter in weather radar images by information fusion is presented. Radar data, satellite images, and output from a numerical weather prediction model are combined and the radar echoes are classified using supervised classification. The presented method uses indirect...... information on precipitation in the atmosphere from Meteosat-8 multispectral images and near-surface temperature estimates from the DMI-HIRLAM-S05 numerical weather prediction model. Alternatively, an operational nowcasting product called 'Precipitating Clouds' based on Meteosat-8 input is used. A scale......-space ensemble method is used for classification and the clutter detection method is illustrated on a case of severe sea clutter contaminated radar data. Detection accuracies above 90 % are achieved and using an ensemble classification method the error rate is reduced by 40 %....

  14. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  15. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  16. Imaging observations of nighttime mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities by an MU radar ultra-multi-channel system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs were studied by using the middle-and-upper atmosphere (MU radar ultra-multi-channel system with the radar imaging technique. On 12 June 2006, F-region FAI echoes with a period of about one hour were observed intermittently. These echoes were found to be embedded in medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs observed as variations of total electron content (TEC. The echoes drifting away from (toward the radar were observed in the depletion (enhancement phase of the MSTID. The Doppler velocity of the echoes is consistent with the range rates in the the range-time-intensity (RTI maps. Fine scale structures with a spatial scale of 10 km or less were found by the radar imaging analysis. Those structures with positive Doppler velocities (moving away from the radar appeared to drift north- (up- westward, and those with negative Doppler velocities south- (down- eastward approximately along the wavefronts of the MSTID. FAIs with positive Doppler velocities filling TEC depletion regions were observed.

  17. Shaping Asteroid with Genetic Evolution (SAGE) using lightcurve and radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinski, Grzegorz; Bartczak, Przemyslaw

    2016-10-01

    We are presenting new module added to SAGE (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) algorithm (Bartczak et.al, 2014) which employs radar echo images.Asteroids can be observed using many ground-based techniques, some of which allow for direct shape observations ( eg. stellar occultations, adaptive optics imaging). One interesting, information-rich technique is radar imaging. It provides insights about surface properties, sizes, pole orientations and shapes of asteroids (Ostro, 2012). Radar echo images can be used both for modelling asteroids and testing results from lightcurve inversion methods. We aim to use radar images in SAGE algorithm the same way we use lightcurves.Genetic algorithm starts with the sphere and random values for pole orientation. Then, by introducing small, random changes to the model parameters, a population of shapes and spin states is created. Subsequently, best model from the population is chosen and process is repeated until stable solution is reached. Assuming even distribution of mass we calculate center of mass and moment of inertia for each model.For every intermediate step model we calculate synthetic lightcurves and compare it with observations with χ2 test. Following the same principle, we create simulated radar echo images for a model and compare them with the observed ones. Both χ2 values for lightcurve and radar are then used as a benchmark for choosing the best model in given population. The best one found serves as a starting model for the next generation of randomly modified models.We are showing a model of 1996HW1 obtained using the described method.

  18. FPGA Sequencer for Radar Altimeter Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Pollard, Brian D.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2011-01-01

    A sequencer for a radar altimeter provides accurate attitude information for a reliable soft landing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This is a field-programmable- gate-array (FPGA)-only implementation. A table loaded externally into the FPGA controls timing, processing, and decision structures. Radar is memory-less and does not use previous acquisitions to assist in the current acquisition. All cycles complete in exactly 50 milliseconds, regardless of range or whether a target was found. A RAM (random access memory) within the FPGA holds instructions for up to 15 sets. For each set, timing is run, echoes are processed, and a comparison is made. If a target is seen, more detailed processing is run on that set. If no target is seen, the next set is tried. When all sets have been run, the FPGA terminates and waits for the next 50-millisecond event. This setup simplifies testing and improves reliability. A single vertex chip does the work of an entire assembly. Output products require minor processing to become range and velocity. This technology is the heart of the Terminal Descent Sensor, which is an integral part of the Entry Decent and Landing system for MSL. In addition, it is a strong candidate for manned landings on Mars or the Moon.

  19. Calculations on resonance spin-echo coils

    CERN Document Server

    Prokudaylo, S B; Keller, T; Bleuel, M; Axtner, M; Selvachev, A

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the coils used for a resonance spin-echo spectrometer is simulated to obtain the optimum parameters. The possibility to use a round wire instead of a flat band for coil production is explored. The parameters of the static bootstrap coils were varied in a 2D approach and a better configuration than one actually uses was found. (orig.)

  20. Pesticide Dashboard Help | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dashboards found on the Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website are specialized to track both facility and agency performance as they relate to compliance with and enforcement of environmental standards under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).