WorldWideScience

Sample records for vexing coleridge scholars

  1. Introduction. Coleridge and the Rule of Law

    OpenAIRE

    Michael John KOOY

    2013-01-01

    Coleridge and law? Of all the professions Coleridge had dealings with during the course of his life – poetry, divinity, journalism, education, medicine – he had least patience with law. Though, as a young man, he once contemplated taking up law, and later regretted not having done so, he tended to regard law as a profession driven by an anti-metaphysical bias, a prejudice that acquaintances like the jurists James Mackintosh and John Stoddart probably did little to dispel (Henry Crabb Robinson...

  2. CryoVex 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Forsberg, René; Skourup, Henriette

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the airborne part of the field work of the CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) 2008 and the processing of the collected datasets. The airborne part of the campaign was carried out by DTU Space (former Danish National Space Center, DNSC) using a Twin Otter chartered from...... Air Greenland. The main purpose was to collect coincident ASIRAS and laser elevation data form validation sites on land and sea ice and in addition offer logistical support to ground teams. Overflights of corner reflectors were done at main validation sites in order to calibrate the ASIRAS data...... processing has been done by DTU Space and AWI in cooperation. This report describes the airborne system, the field work, and the data processing together with short descriptions of each validation site. The data from AWI’s helicopter electromagnetic sea ice sounder (EM bird) are included along with the field...

  3. "Vexing" Questions: Rethinking the History of East LA Punk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunckel, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 the author co-curated (with Pilar Tompkins Rivas) the art exhibition "Vexing: Female Voices from East LA Punk" at the Claremont Museum of Art in Claremont, California. Part of his motivation, as a scholar, was to generate discourse about the punk scene in East Los Angeles from 1979 to 1984 and to stimulate further research in…

  4. The Logic of Reflection: Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "treatise on Logic"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Janet Sanders

    Though others discuss Coleridge's interest in science, light imagery, the phenomenon of reflection, and his references to Newton and Opticks,^1 this is the first study to examine Coleridge's art in terms of optics, its developing theories, and the nature-of-light debate. This study examines Coleridge's early predilection for visions, illusions, and the supernatural and demonstrates that he gradually shifts from the supernatural to the scientific aspects of "visions" and "illusions," concentrating on causes of illusions and the effects of their deceptive qualities rather than their mystical features. By the 1820's, his preoccupation with illusions had become an interest in optics, fueled, no doubt, by the increasing controversy of the nature-of-light debate and the number of advances in optics resulting from the efforts of its opponents to prove their theories. Tracing the development of the debate, its escalation in the early nineteenth century, and the formation of Coleridge's opinion concerning key issues of the debate, I outline the evolution of Coleridge's theory of reflection and examine the exposition of that theory in his treatise, Logic (1981). Finally, I analyze the relationship between the advances in optics and Coleridge's concepts of thought and knowledge and his notion of the mind as an instrument of knowledge. These ideas in turn, altered his opinions concerning the validity of knowledge resulting from philosophic debate, scientific experiment, and poetic exploration. ftn^1John Beer, "Coleridge and Wordsworth on Reflection," The Wordsworth Circle 20 (1989): 20-29; Coleridge the Visionary. London: Chatto and Windus, 1959; and Coleridge's Poetic Intelligence. London: Macmillan, 1977 and M. H. Abrams Natural Supernaturalism: Tradition and Revolution in Romantic Literature. New York: Norton, 1971; and "Coleridge's 'A Light in Sound': Science, Metascience, and Poetic Imagination." The Correspondent Breeze: Essays on English Romanticism. Eds. M. H. Abrams

  5. Meteor Beliefs Project: Notes from Coleridge and Doré

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2006-10-01

    Some meteorically-relevant lines from Coleridge's poem `The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' are discussed, presented with three of Dore's engraved illustrations to the poem, by way of concluding this Meteor Beliefs Project Hallowe'en Special.

  6. Phobias in Poetry: Coleridge's Ancient Mariner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satendra; Khetarpal, Abha

    2012-04-01

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner was written by Coleridge and is a classic poetry about retribution, punishment, guilt, and curse. Religious beliefs and delusions can arise from neurologic lesions and anomalous experiences, suggesting that at least some religious beliefs can be pathological. Looking at the poem through the psychiatric and psychological domain, the symbolism, the narration and the entire setting of the poem represents Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Mariner's reactions are beautifully portrayed from the psychoanalytic point of view and the literary piece shows claustrophobia, stygiophobia, dikephobia, and poinephobia. The mental stress of a person under a crisis situation has remarkably been evoked in this poem. This incredible piece of art expresses how the realization of divine love within oneself has the power to heal pain and suffer.

  7. Reimagining Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" through Visual and Performing Arts Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Judy Rowe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how students create their arts projects by responding to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner." In creating their arts projects, students incorporate film, painting, performance, and other arts in their imaginative and innovative responses to Coleridge's classic work. The author discusses…

  8. Sermones: Sobre los Lay Sermons de S. T. Coleridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo Ledesma

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Entre 1816 y 1817, un lapso de la historia inglesa política y socialmente complejo, Coleridge pública dos curiosos textos bajo el titulo de Sermones Laicos, además de su Biographia Literaria, una recopilación de sus poemas, una obra de teatro y una nueva edición de su periódico The Friend. Los Sermones son curiosos artefactos de interpretación de la cultura que utilizan los libros proféticos de la Biblia y las nociones fundamentales de la filosofía trascendental para leer los problemas socio políticos de la escena contemporánea. Esa difícil combinación en la figura del Intelectual-Profeta deja un molde para críticos futuros como Thomas Carlyle, Thomas De Quincey, Matthew Arnold y T.S. Eliot.

  9. Sermones: Sobre los Lay Sermons de S. T. Coleridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo Ledesma

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Entre 1816 y 1817, un lapso de la historia inglesa política y socialmente complejo, Coleridge pública dos curiosos textos bajo el titulo de Sermones Laicos, además de su Biographia Literaria, una recopilación de sus poemas, una obra de teatro y una nueva edición de su periódico The Friend. Los Sermones son curiosos artefactos de interpretación de la cultura que utilizan los libros proféticos de la Biblia y las nociones fundamentales de la filosofía trascendental para leer los problemas socio políticos de la escena contemporánea. Esa difícil combinación en la figura del Intelectual-Profeta deja un molde para críticos futuros como Thomas Carlyle, Thomas De Quincey, Matthew Arnold y T.S. Eliot.

  10. Erindringens poetik. William Wordsworth, S.T. Coleridge, Thomas De Quincey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lis

    Erindringens poetik tegner et litteratur- og idéhistorisk portræt af erindringen hos tre af den engelske romantiks største forfattere: William Wordsworth, S.T. Coleridge og Thomas De Quincey. I receptionen af de tre digtere, og af romantikken generelt, har erindringsmotivet stået i skyggen af...

  11. Google Scholar

    OpenAIRE

    Vine, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Rechercher sur Google Scholar Google Scholar : http://scholar.google.com Google Scholar est un moteur de recherche spécialisé dans la littérature universitaire lancé fin 2004, encore en version beta à la rédaction de cet article. Que trouvez-vous sur Google Scholar ? Bien que la couverture de Google Scholar ne puisse être définie avec précision, on peut dire que l’objectif est de retrouver les documents du web invisible du monde scientifique. La base de données est multidisciplinaire avec...

  12. BengaSaVex: A new computational genetic sequence extraction tool

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... DNA nucleotide subsequences within the genes of some microorganisms, evaluated the potential benefits and applications of identifying such repeated sequences, and finally, performed an in-silico comparative analysis between BengaSaVex and tandem repeat finder. Keywords: BengaSaVex, DNA, repetitive sequence ...

  13. Scholarly Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A selection of essays by 12 1983 Presidential Scholars entitled Opportunity in America; Under the Influence of High Fashion; Law and Human Freedom; The Effects of Computers in Education; Prejudice, Cultural Heritage, and National Unity; The Visual Artist in a Technological Society; Dorothy Meets Schopenhauer; Rise Above; and Mathematics as a…

  14. A Question of Evidence, or a Leap of Faith?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Did he or didn't he? The question is vexing Coleridge scholars. Did the author of "Christabel," "Kubla Khan," and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" compose a blank-verse translation of Goethe's "Faust" that was published anonymously in London in 1821? Two prominent Romanticists, Frederick Burwick and James C. McKusick, both Americans, believe they…

  15. The archetypal mandala: Visions of the self in the poetry of Coleridge, Eliot and Breytenbach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Deudney

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a preliminary survey of the visions of the s e lf in poetry. It is concerned with the transformation of consciousness as depicted by each of the three poets a Romantic, a Modernist and a Postmodernist poet respectively and expressed in specific poems with a cyclical nature. The romantic poet Coleridge's “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is taken as the first example. It is found to be an allegory of the metamorphosis of the poet’s temporal subjective consciousness into an ‘eternal ’ subject position in the narrated text. Eliot’s "Four Quartets" exemplifies the Modernist mode of consciousness as an 'anironic vision of unity' achieved by adhering to a religio-aesthetic meta-narrative. Breytenbach (1988:115 calls his volumes of prison poetry "The Undanced Dance". Taken as a whole "The Undanced Dance" has a structure which concurs with what Brodey (1971:4 calls "an Einsteinian time-space form of relations” and lures its readers into the trap of falling into postmodern quantum consciousness.

  16. Religious Musings de S. T. Coleridge: a theological and political interpretation for the romantic literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gavilán

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The poem Religious Musings, a Desultory Poem, Written on the Christmas Eve of 1794 (1794-96 by Samuel Taylor Coleridge describes the French Revolution as a divine event that opens up the first stage of the Millennium. The active relationship between schemes of interpretation and categories that proceeds from literature and theology during in the late eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth century is markedly important in order to analyze whereby romanticisms are constituted in Europe. In England, this connection has a distinctive feature since from the seventeenth century, the wars of religion, through government institutions –that is Parliament and the Crown- play a crucial role in politics. Coleridge’s later rejection of the millennial tradition of 1790’s literature, that which regards Revolution as a sign of the biblical prophesy’s fulfillment, occurs in time with the conservative turn of many poets that adhere to the high romanticism canon. Acknowledging the intensity of the link between the French Revolution and the rise of new forms of literary meanings, this article aims to look into the ways in which Religious Musings applies and elaborates upon theological concepts and subjects as a way of giving history a new significance.Keywords: literature – theology – revolution – history – romanticism.

  17. Opium as a Literary Stimulant: The Case of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In our era, the idea of a stimulant is synonymous with its biochemical properties. A stimulant, we think, is a substance that enhances the activity of the central and peripheral nervous systems. But in the eighteenth century, a new family of theories about the workings of stimulants took shape, based on exciting but erroneous assumptions. Proponents of these theories thought that many more diseases were "nervous" in origin than had previously been supposed. They hoped that the workings of the "nervous power" could be aided by the judicious use of stimulants and narcotics. Practitioners working within this broad "neuropathological" paradigm equated the workings of stimulation with those of gravity. Stimulation, they believed, was a kind of master principle in nature. Some hoped it would help refound medicine on Newtonian, mathematical lines. For patients, the most visible legacy of the neuropathological revolution was the abandonment of bloodletting or "cupping" and the increasingly widespread use of opium and alcohol in medical treatments. In this chapter, I explore the career of one of the most famous writers of the Romantic era, Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) who had the misfortune to live through this therapeutic revolution. I describe the circumstances under which he came to take opiates and the development of his opinions about their effect on him. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coleridge e il Novecento italiano: Luzi, Fenoglio e Giudici traduttori della Rime of the Ancient Mariner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Organte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Questo lavoro propone un’analisi stilistica comparativa delle prime tre versioni “d’autore” novecentesche della Rime of the Ancient Mariner – quella di Mario Luzi (1949, quella di Beppe Fenoglio (1955, e quella di Giovanni Giudici (1987, con lo scopo di valutare i rapporti di forza che agiscono di volta in volta fra la tradizione letteraria del testo di partenza, quella della cultura di arrivo e gli idioletti dei traduttori. Verranno dunque messe a confronto in primo luogo le scelte – radicalmente diverse – adottate per trasporre il complesso e rigoroso meccanismo metrico della Rime, i suoi versi brevi e fortemente cadenzati e il fitto sistema delle rime e delle rispondenze foniche. In un secondo momento verrà esaminato l’atteggiamento di ciascun traduttore di fronte alla lingua, e la rassegna delle scelte lessicali sarà, infine, mirata a vagliare le tonalità utilizzate per rendere la difficile miscela messa a punto da Coleridge tra vocabolario poetico e «language really used by men».This paper provides a comparative stylistic analysis of the first three translations “d’autore” of the Rime of the Ancient Mariner published in Italy in the 20th century by Mario Luzi (1949, Beppe Fenoglio (1955 and Giovanni Giudici (1987. Such analysis aims to appraise the relationships acting in the translation process among the literary tradition of the original text, the Italian culture, and the translators’ idiolects. Therefore, the essay will compare the differences among the choices adopted to transpose the complex and rigorous metric mechanism of Coleridge’s Rime, the short and strongly rhythmic verses, and the dense system of rhymes and phonic correspondences. Secondly, the attitude of each translator will be addressed concerning the language, while the review of the lexical choices will finally aim to examine the tonalities deployed to convey the difficult mixture of poetic dictionary and “language really used by man”.

  19. BengaSaVex: A new computational genetic sequence extraction tool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-21

    May 21, 2014 ... In summary, this paper details the algorithm underlying the development of BengaSaVex, describes the mecha- nism of data collection, explores the potential benefits of identifying DNA repeats in gene sequences of computa- tional biology related research, presents the results generated by the new tools ...

  20. Airborne Lidar and Radar Measurments In and Around Greenland CryoVEx 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Lars; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Skourup, Henriette

    This report describes the airborne part of the fieldwork performed as part of the CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) 2006 and the processing of the collected dataset. The airborne part of the campaign was carried out by the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) using a Twin-Otter chartered from...... Air Greenland. The main purpose was to collect coincident ASIRAS and laser data at validation sites placed on land ice and sea ice in the Arctic area and offer logistic support to ground teams. The data collected will be important for the understanding of CryoSat-2 radar signals. A number...... of overflights of corner reflectors both on sea ice and inland ice will aid this understanding and serve the calibration of ASIRAS. The airborne part of the CryoVEx 2006 campaign has successfully been carried out by DNSC during the period April 18 to May 18 and the gathered datasets are now stored and secured...

  1. Stressors Among CSPC Scholars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jose Ariel R. Ibarrientos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scholarships are offered by the college in order to help students to address their financial difficulties. They are subject to a rigid screening and the pressured imposed upon them may bring out a stressful experience that can affect their daily activities. The perceived social psychological academic economic and bureaucratic stressors were identified using the descriptive inferential method among the 203 scholars for school year 2013- 2014.Findings revealed that scholars are highly stressed with peoples high expectations on them as scholars and with various assignment imposed to them as scholars. Moreover scholars are stressed of fear of losing their scholarship. T-test shows that there is no significant difference on the stressors experienced by both the academic and non-academic scholars and so as to their coping mechanism. The proposed Stress Coping Mechanism Guide will help them to manage their stressors.

  2. Reclaiming the "Scholar" in Scholar-Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi; Oster, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    Scholars and practitioners continuously espouse the importance of research in student affairs work. This study empirically examined student affairs professionals' engagement in research. Results indicated that professionals desire to engage research, but struggle to do so regularly. Gender and education are not factors in level of research…

  3. Scholarly communication changing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2009-01-01

    the theoretical and empirical work of particular interest is presented. The theoretical framework can be divided into two: mappings of scholarly communication and theories of citing. The research findings are summarised in relation to both the overall research question and the theoretical framework......Abstract The dissertation aims at investigating the changing scholarly communication in general and more specifically the implications of open access on scholarly communication. The overall research question is: What are the effects of open access on scholarly communication? The dissertation...... consists of five empirical studies of various aspects of the implications of open access on scholarly communication. The five studies, published as journal articles, are bibliometric studies conducted on three different levels. The first level consists of two studies of a general, more explorative...

  4. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  5. In vivo excision, cloning, and broad-host-range transfer of large bacterial DNA segments using VEX-Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James W; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2007-01-01

    The performance of many bacterial genetic experiments would benefit from a convenient method to clone large sets of genes (20-100+ kb) and transfer these genes to a wide range of other bacterial recipients. The VEX-Capture technique allows such large genomic segments to be cloned in vivo onto a broad-host-range IncP plasmid that is able to self-transfer to a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria. The advantages of VEX-Capture are its efficiency, specificity, and use of common molecular biological techniques that do not require non-standard equipment and are easily applicable to many types of bacterial species. Here, we describe the VEX-Capture experimental protocol using Salmonella typhimurium as the source of the target DNA segment.

  6. Long-term Behaviour Of Venus Winds At Cloud Level From Virtis/vex Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Peralta, J.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Venus Express (VEX) mission has been in orbit to Venus for more than three years now. The VIRTIS instrument onboard VEX observes Venus in two channels (visible and infrared) obtaining spectra and multi-wavelength images of the planet. Images in the ultraviolet range are used to study the upper cloud at 66 km while images in the infrared (1.74 μm) map the opacity of the lower cloud deck at 48 km. Here we present an analysis of the overall dynamics of Venus’ atmosphere at both levels using observations that cover a large fraction of the VIRTIS dataset. We will present our latest results concerning the zonal winds, the overall stability in the lower cloud deck motions and the variability in the upper cloud. Meridional winds are also observed in the upper and lower cloud in the UV and IR images obtained with VIRTIS. While the upper clouds present a net meridional motion consistent with the upper branch of a Hadley cell the lower cloud present more irregular, variable and less intense motions in the meridional direction. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. RH acknowledges a "Ramón y Cajal” contract from MEC.

  7. Balancing between sensitization and repression: the role of opium in the life and art of Edgar Allan Poe and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iszáj, Fruzsina; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    The creative process contains both conscious and unconscious work. Therefore, artists have to face their unconscious processes and work with emotional material that is difficult to keep under control in the course of artistic creation. Bringing these contents of consciousness to the surface needs special sensitivity and special control functions while working with them. Considering these mechanisms, psychoactive substance can serve a double function in the case of artists. On the one hand, chemical substances may enhance the artists' sensitivity. On the other hand, they can help moderate the hypersensitivity and repress extreme emotions and burdensome contents of consciousness. The authors posit how the use of opiates could have influenced the life and creative work of Edgar Allan Poe and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

  8. Scholarly Communication and Bibliometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgman, Christine L.; Furner, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    This review of scholarly communication and bibliometrics discusses relational link analysis; evaluative link analysis; measures of evaluation for documents, people, journals, organizations, and nations; theoretical foundations of link analysis; author self-citation; quality; popularity; citation-worthiness; credit-worthiness; digital libraries;…

  9. Google Scholar Versus Metasearch Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeh, Tamar

    2006-01-01

    At the end of 2004, Google launched the beta version of a new service, Google Scholar, which provides a single repository of scholarly information for researchers. Will this service replace metasearch systems? Metasearch systems are based on just-in-time processing, whereas Google Scholar, like other federated searching systems, is based on just-in-case processing. This underlying technology, along with Google Scholar's exceptional capabilities, accords Google Scholar a unique position among other scholarly resources. However, a year after its beta release, Google Scholar is still facing a number of challenges that cause librarians to question its value for scholarly research. Nevertheless, it has become popular among researchers, and the library community is looking for ways to provide patrons with guidelines for the most beneficial manner of using this new resource. Metasearch systems have several advantages over Google Scholar. We anticipate that in the foreseeable future, libraries will continue to provid...

  10. A comparative analysis of the sea ice freeboard from CryoSat. CryoVEx and IceBridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Connor, Laurence N.; Farrell, Sinead L.

    The CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) has been conducted by ESA, to examine the uncertainties in the satellite measurement of e.g. sea ice thickness. In this study, we aim to estimate the sea ice freeboard from CryoSat-2, and compare it with the high-resolution Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS......) measurements collected along CryoSat-2 ground tracks from the CryoVEx 2012 campaign, together with NASA’s Operation IceBridge data. We will use the CryoSat SAR data level 1b (L1b) to discriminate the leads and from this, estimate the sea ice freeboard. Furthermore, we are looking at the CryoSat level 2 (L2...

  11. The VEX-93 environment as a hybrid tool for developing knowledge systems with different problem solving techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Valdés Ramos, Julio José; Hita Rensoli, Ramon María de; Peón Valdés, Katia; Hernández, Dania; García Martínez, Ada; Paredes, Raul; García, Yazna; Rodríguez, Alfredo

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes VEX-93 as a hybrid environment for developing knowledge-based and problem solver systems. It integrates methods and techniques from artificial intelligence, image and signal processing and data analysis, which can be mixed. Two hierarchical levels of reasoning contains an intelligent toolbox with one upper strategic inference engine and four lower ones containing specific reasoning models: truth-functional (rule-based), probabilistic (causal networks), fu...

  12. Scholarly Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsparg, Paul

    I review the background and some recent trends of a particular scholarly information network, arXiv.org, and discuss some of its implications for new scholarly publication models. If we were to start from scratch today to design a quality-controlled archive and distribution system for scientific and technical information, it could take a very different form from what has evolved in the past decade from pre-existing print infrastructure. Near-term advances in automated classification systems, authoring tools, and document formats will facilitate efficient datamining and long-term archival stability, and I discuss how these could provide not only more efficient means of accessing and navigating the information, but also more cost-effective means of authentication and quality control. Finally, I illustrate the use of machine learning techniques to analyze, structure, maintain, and evolve a large online corpus of academic literature. An emerging field of research can be identified as part of an existing corpus, permitting the implementation of a more coherent community structure for its network of practitioners.

  13. Protocols for Scholarly Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Pepe, Alberto; Pepe, Alberto; Yeomans, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has operated an institutional preprint repository for more than 10 years. The repository contains over 850,000 records of which more than 450,000 are full-text OA preprints, mostly in the field of particle physics, and it is integrated with the library's holdings of books, conference proceedings, journals and other grey literature. In order to encourage effective propagation and open access to scholarly material, CERN is implementing a range of innovative library services into its document repository: automatic keywording, reference extraction, collaborative management tools and bibliometric tools. Some of these services, such as user reviewing and automatic metadata extraction, could make up an interesting testbed for future publishing solutions and certainly provide an exciting environment for e-science possibilities. The future protocol for scientific communication should naturally guide authors towards OA publication and CERN wants to help reach a full...

  14. Google Scholar as the co-producer of scholarly knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, J.; Takseva, T.

    2013-01-01

    Search engines in general, and Google Scholar in particular, are co-producers of academic knowledge. They have a profound impact on the way knowledge is generated, transmitted, and distributed. This chapter first explores how Google Scholar works as a human-technological system in order to analyze

  15. Venus upper atmosphere winds traced by temperature and night ariglow distributions: VTGCM comparisons with PVO and VEX data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougher, Stephen; Brecht, Amanda; Parkinson, Chris; Rafkin, Scot; Foster, Ben

    New Venus upper atmosphere measurements from Venus Express (VEX), when examined in the light of previous Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and ground-based measurements, suggest that the dynamics of the Venus middle and upper atmospheres ( 80-200 km) is highly variable [e.g. Bertaux et al., 2007; Bougher et al., 1997; 2006; Gerard et al., 2008; Lellouch et al., 1997; Schubert et al., 2007]. A superposition of variable retrograde superrotating zonal (RSZ) winds and more stable subsolar-to-antisolar (SS-AS) winds is known to dominate the global dynamics of this region. Presently, key night airglow distributions (NO ultraviolet and O2 near-IR) and lower thermosphere temperature distributions are being used as excellent tracers of these changing global wind patterns. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermospheric general circulation model for Venus (VTGCM) has been upgraded to better simulate these night airglow and temperature distributions. The objectives of this modeling effort are to: (1) reproduce the observed mean structure of these features, thereby unfolding the average wind patterns, and (2) identify and quantify the importance of the processes that drive daily variations in the global circulation (i.e. planetary scale waves and tidal modes). The VTGCM is a three dimensional model that calculates temperatures, 3-component neutral winds, and the concentration of specific neutral and ion species. This model can also compute the O2 and NO night airglow intensity (horizontal) and volume emission rate (vertical) distributions for comparison to available PVO and VEX datasets. The most important change is the VTGCM bottom boundary, which has been lowered to 70 km near cloud tops. This upgrade insures that all possible dynamical influences that contribute to maintaining these airglow layers, and their variations, can be captured within the VTGCM domain. Model simulations for both VEX and PVO observing periods will be presented, illustrating the new VTGCM

  16. Small Particles in Cirrus (SPartICus) and Storm Peak Lab Validation Experiment (StormVEx) Science Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, Gerald [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The Small Particles in Cirrus (SPartICus) campaign took place from January through June, 2011 and the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) took place from November, 2011 through April, 2012. The PI of this project, Dr. Gerald Mace, had the privilege to be the lead on both of these campaigns. The essence of the project that we report on here was to conduct preliminary work that was necessary to bring the field data sets to a point where they could be used for their intended science purposes

  17. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2011-01-01

    Today's scholars face an outstanding array of choices when choosing search tools: Google Scholar, discipline-specific abstracts and index databases, library discovery tools, and more recently, Microsoft's re-launch of their academic search tool, now dubbed Microsoft Academic Search. What are these tools' strengths for the emerging needs of…

  18. Samuel Taylor Coleridge'in şiirlerinde evrensel düzen üzerine şüpheler : "Christabel" ve "Eski Denizcinin Şarkısı"

    OpenAIRE

    Tekinay, Aslı

    2000-01-01

    There is a dark strain which can be traced in the poetry of all the major nineteenth century English romantic poets: a scepticism about the ultimate purpose of man's life, a sense of having lost a metaphysical certainty and faith in the presence of a benevolent power who maintains harmony and order in the universe. Samuel Taylor Coleridge is one of them. In "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Christabel", he reveals a nightmarish vision of the universe where moral order seems to be replace...

  19. Visiting Scholars Program | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Visiting Scholars Program (VSP) is a scientific partnership program that offers extramural scientists access to the intellectual capital and state-of-the-art facilities of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR), the only na

  20. Student Perceptions of Scholarly Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Peganoff O'Brien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning the process of scholarly writing, including the significance of peer review, is an essential element in the preparation of students for professional practice. This descriptive research study, using Scholarship of Teaching and Learning methodology, explores one approach to teaching scholarly writing in an occupational science/occupational therapy curriculum. The writing assignment was designed to offer multiple points for feedback and revision and instructional features to reinforce learning. A survey of students [n = 169] participating in this scholarly writing project was conducted yearly to gather their perceptions of learning. The results revealed four key elements: instructional strategies are needed to support scholarly writing, students value explicit instructor feedback, a successful writing experience opens the possibility for students to write in their professional future, and students will develop the habits of a writer given structure and pedagogical considerations in the assignment construction. This experience shows students will work to achieve the expected standard for scholarship once writing is made an essential part of the course and their efforts are supported by scaffolding the assignment. Through this experience, it was also learned students need opportunities for repetition and practice to refine scholarly writing. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

  1. The future of scholarly communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David De Roure

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The academic publishing industry is set to celebrate 350 years of peer-reviewed scientific journals. However, there are significant shifts in the practice of scholarship, as scholars and citizens alike participate in an increasingly digital world. Is the scholarly article still fit for its purpose in this data-driven world, with new interdisciplinary methodologies and increasing automation? How might it be enhanced or replaced with new kinds of digital research objects, so as not to restrict innovation but rather create a flourishing sense-making network of humans and machines? The emerging paradigm of social machines provides a lens onto future developments in scholarship and scholarly collaboration, as we live and study in a hybrid physical-digital sociotechnical system of enormous and growing scale.

  2. Local Delivery of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) Generates Systemic Antitumor Immune Responses Enhanced by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesta, Achim K; Cooke, Keegan; Piasecki, Julia; Mitchell, Petia; Rottman, James B; Fitzgerald, Karen; Zhan, Jinghui; Yang, Becky; Le, Tiep; Belmontes, Brian; Ikotun, Oluwatayo F; Merriam, Kim; Glaus, Charles; Ganley, Kenneth; Cordover, David H; Boden, Andrea M; Ponce, Rafael; Beers, Courtney; Beltran, Pedro J

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Talimogene laherparepvec, a new oncolytic immunotherapy, has been recently approved for the treatment of melanoma. Using a murine version of the virus, we characterized local and systemic antitumor immune responses driving efficacy in murine syngeneic models.Experimental Design: The activity of talimogene laherparepvec was characterized against melanoma cell lines using an in vitro viability assay. Efficacy of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) (talimogene laherparepvec with the mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transgene) alone or in combination with checkpoint blockade was characterized in A20 and CT-26 contralateral murine tumor models. CD8(+) depletion, adoptive T-cell transfers, and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assays were used to study the mechanism of action (MOA) of systemic immune responses.Results: Treatment with OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) cured all injected A20 tumors and half of contralateral tumors. Viral presence was limited to injected tumors and was not responsible for systemic efficacy. A significant increase in T cells (CD3(+)/CD8(+)) was observed in injected and contralateral tumors at 168 hours. Ex vivo analyses showed these cytotoxic T lymphocytes were tumor-specific. Increased neutrophils, monocytes, and chemokines were observed in injected tumors only. Importantly, depletion of CD8(+) T cells abolished all systemic efficacy and significantly decreased local efficacy. In addition, immune cell transfer from OncoVEX(mGM-CSF)-cured mice significantly protected from tumor challenge. Finally, combination of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) and checkpoint blockade resulted in increased tumor-specific CD8(+) anti-AH1 T cells and systemic efficacy.Conclusions: The data support a dual MOA for OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) that involves direct oncolysis of injected tumors and activation of a CD8(+)-dependent systemic response that clears injected and contralateral tumors when combined with checkpoint inhibition. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6190-202. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American

  3. Romanian Scholarly Productivity: Recent History and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Bob; Badescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Romanian scholars, and others, have decried the quality and quantity of scholarly productivity from Romania. However, Romanian scholars face challenges of both tradition and resources as they try to westernize their higher education system. We analyzed data from two sources to compare Romanian scholarly productivity to that of other countries from…

  4. Current dynamics of scholarly publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, Gloria; Ramello, Giovanni B

    2015-02-01

    Scholarly publishing is an essential vehicle for actively participating in the scientific debate and for sustaining the invisible colleges of the modern research environment, which extend far beyond the borders of individual research institutions. However, its current dynamics have deeply transformed the scientific life and conditioned in new ways the economics of academic knowledge production. They have also challenged the perceived common sense view of scientific research. Analytical approach to set out a comprehensive framework on the current debate on scholarly publishing and to shed light on the peculiar organization and the working of this peculiar productive sector. The way in which scientific knowledge is produced and transmitted has been dramatically affected by the series of recent major technosocietal transformations. Although the effects are many, in particular the current overlap and interplay between two distinct and somewhat opposite stances-scientific and economic-tend to blur the overall understanding of what scholarly publishing is and produces distortion on its working which in turn affect the scientific activities. The outcome is thus a series of intended and unintended effects on the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The article suggests that a substantial transformation characterizes science today that seems more like a thrusting, entrepreneurial business than a contemplative, disinterested endeavor. In this essay, we provide a general overview of the pivotal role of the scholarly publishing in fostering this change and its pros and cons connected to the idiosyncratic interplay between social norms and market stances. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The Scholar as Public Intellectual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, William

    2011-01-01

    This article is written for scholars, researchers, and academic leaders who have a passion to share their knowledge outside the classroom, laboratory, or institution. They want to make a difference and believe that the information they possess and ideas they have to offer have a public importance. Based on his book "Pitch Perfect:…

  6. Annotation in Digital Scholarly Editions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, P.; Haentjens Dekker, R.

    2016-01-01

    Annotation in digital scholarly editions (of historical documents, literary works, letters, etc.) has long been recognized as an important desideratum, but has also proven to be an elusive ideal. In so far as annotation functionality is available, it is usually developed for a single edition and

  7. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  8. Finding and Recommending Scholarly Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin A.

    2014-05-01

    The rate at which scholarly literature is being produced has been increasing at approximately 3.5 percent per year for decades. This means that during a typical 40 year career the amount of new literature produced each year increases by a factor of four. The methods scholars use to discover relevant literature must change. Just like everybody else involved in information discovery, scholars are confronted with information overload. Two decades ago, this discovery process essentially consisted of paging through abstract books, talking to colleagues and librarians, and browsing journals. A time-consuming process, which could even be longer if material had to be shipped from elsewhere. Now much of this discovery process is mediated by online scholarly information systems. All these systems are relatively new, and all are still changing. They all share a common goal: to provide their users with access to the literature relevant to their specific needs. To achieve this each system responds to actions by the user by displaying articles which the system judges relevant to the user's current needs. Recently search systems which use particularly sophisticated methodologies to recommend a few specific papers to the user have been called "recommender systems". These methods are in line with the current use of the term "recommender system" in computer science. We do not adopt this definition, rather we view systems like these as components in a larger whole, which is presented by the scholarly information systems themselves. In what follows we view the recommender system as an aspect of the entire information system; one which combines the massive memory capacities of the machine with the cognitive abilities of the human user to achieve a human-machine synergy.

  9. Linking Social Networking Sites to Scholarly Information Portals by ScholarLib

    OpenAIRE

    Mutschke, Peter; Thamm, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Online Social Networks usually provide no or limited way to access scholarly information provided by Digital Libraries (DLs) in order to share and discuss scholarly content with other online community members. The paper addresses the potentials of Social Networking sites (SNSs) for science and proposes initial use cases as well as a basic bi-directional model called ScholarLib for linking SNSs to scholarly DLs. The major aim of ScholarLib is to make scholarly information provided by DLs acces...

  10. Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine: Addressing the Vexing Problem of Persistent Muscle Atrophy in the Chronically Torn Human Rotator Cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gretchen A; Ward, Samuel R

    2016-05-01

    Persistent muscle atrophy in the chronically torn rotator cuff is a significant obstacle for treatment and recovery. Large atrophic changes are predictive of poor surgical and nonsurgical outcomes and frequently fail to resolve even following functional restoration of loading and rehabilitation. New insights into the processes of muscle atrophy and recovery gained through studies in developmental biology combined with the novel tools and strategies emerging in regenerative medicine provide new avenues to combat the vexing problem of muscle atrophy in the rotator cuff. Moving these treatment strategies forward likely will involve the combination of surgery, biologic/cellular agents, and physical interventions, as increasing experimental evidence points to the beneficial interaction between biologic therapies and physiologic stresses. Thus, the physical therapy profession is poised to play a significant role in defining the success of these combinatorial therapies. This perspective article will provide an overview of the developmental biology and regenerative medicine strategies currently under investigation to combat muscle atrophy and how they may integrate into the current and future practice of physical therapy. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  11. Photometry of Venus upper clouds by Venus Monitoring Camera (VEx): spatial and temporal distributions of the retrieved aerosol parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygina, O. S.; Petrova, E. V.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    During 2006-2014 the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) onboard Venus Express (VEx) was imaging the Venus clouds in four narrow spectral channels. Around 350 000 wide-angle images of the planet were obtained covering almost all the latitudes, which allowed the knowledge on morphology and dynamics of the cloud deck of Venus to be substantially extended. In this report we summarise our retrievals from the all VMC dataset (obtained at small phase angles), and also for the full phase angle range in near-infrared. The first images of a full glory in unpolarized light on the upper cloud deck of Venus were obtained with VMC, which are of key importance for the phase function analysis of the Venus upper clouds: the angular positions of maximum and minimum are determined by the size of particles, and the brightness of the first peak depends on their refractive index (especially in NIR. From fitting the phase profiles with models, we have obtained the optical properties of the Venusian clouds (i.e. effective radius and variance of particles' size distribution, refractive index of aerosols, optical thickness of cloud layer and haze), and their spatial (in latitude) and temporal (in local time) variations.

  12. The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Tonette S.; Hatcher, Tim; Creswell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    "The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing" is a groundbreaking resource that offers emerging and experienced scholars from all disciplines a comprehensive review of the essential elements needed to craft scholarly papers and other writing suitable for submission to academic journals. The authors discuss the components of different types of…

  13. Journal Development, Scholar Development and Quality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of academic publishing, which are the very foundation of the reputation and value of scholarly work. Thus, at a conference on The Future of Scholarly Publishing in Stellenbosch, in October. 2017, a contributor to a forthcoming report on scholarly publishing by the Academy of. Sciences in South Africa (ASSAf), Prof. Johann ...

  14. Google Scholar Usage: An Academic Library's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Howard, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Google Scholar is a free service that provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly works and to connect patrons with the resources libraries provide. The researchers in this study analyzed Google Scholar usage data from 2006 for three library tools at San Francisco State University: SFX link resolver, Web Access Management proxy server,…

  15. Author Identifiers in Scholarly Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Simeon

    2010-01-01

    Bibliometric and usage-based analyses and tools highlight the value of information about scholarship contained within the network of authors, articles and usage data. Less progress has been made on populating and using the author side of this network than the article side, in part because of the difficulty of unambiguously identifying authors. I briefly review a sample of author identifier schemes, and consider use in scholarly repositories. I then describe preliminary work at arXiv to implement public author identifiers, services based on them, and plans to make this information useful beyond the boundaries of arXiv.

  16. The development of an instrument to measure the self-efficacy of students participating in VEX robotics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Trevor P.

    The number of robotics competitions has steadily increased over the past 30 years. Schools are implementing robotics competitions to increase student content knowledge and interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Companies in STEM-related fields are financially supporting robotics competitions to help increase the number of students pursuing careers in STEM among other reasons. These financial supporters and school administrations are asking what the outcomes of students participating in competitive robotics are. Few studies have been conducted to investigate these outcomes. The studies that have been conducted usually compare students in robotics to students not in robotics. There have not been any studies that compare students to themselves before and after participating in robotics competitions. This may be due to the lack of available instruments to measure student outcomes. This study developed an instrument to measure the self-efficacy of students participating in VEX Robotics Competitions (VRC). The VRC is the world's largest and fastest growing robotics competition available for middle and high school students. Self-efficacy was measured because of its importance to the education community. Students with higher self-efficacy tend to persevere through difficult tasks more frequently than students with low self-efficacy. A person's self-efficacy has major influence over what interests, activities, classes, college majors, and careers he or she will pursue in life. The self-efficacy survey instrument created through this study was developed through an occupational and task analysis (OTA), and initial content and face validity was established through the OTA process. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were also conducted to assist in instrument validation. The reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha. Face validity was established through the OTA process. Construct validity was established through the factor

  17. Google Scholar and Academic Libraries: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Karen A.; Mullen, Laura Bowering

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper updates the authors’ original 2005 study of Google Scholar’s integration into ARL libraries web sites. Had more ARL libraries added Google Scholar? Design/methodology/approach: The library homepages of the 113 ARL academic institutions were examined for paths or links to Google Scholar. The coding scheme focused on noting if Google Scholar appeared on the library homepage, in the OPAC, and on various database lists and subject guides. Findings: The 2007 data indi...

  18. Scholar-Practitioner Leadership: A Conceptual Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scholar-practitioner leader operates reflexively in the boundaries between theory and practice, striving to create exemplars of democracy and social justice within schools while simultaneously meeting modern accountability demands. This article outlines a theoretical underpinning for scholar practitioner leadership and provides means of…

  19. Biomechanics Scholar Citations across Academic Ranks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudson Duane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: citations to the publications of a scholar have been used as a measure of the quality or influence of their research record. A world-wide descriptive study of the citations to the publications of biomechanics scholars of various academic ranks was conducted.

  20. Correlates of Scholarly Productivity among Counseling Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royalty, Georgia M.; Magoon, Thomas M.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed environmental and personality factors that correlate with high versus low scholarly productivity, utilizing the Scholarly Productivity Survey and Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory. Findings indicated clear patterns of differences between high and low producers. Subjects with different personality types endorsed research attitudes…

  1. Scholarly Communication in Africa Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Internet and new information and communication technologies (ICTs) have changed the way research is being conducted and disseminated. Open access paradigms have challenged the conventional business model of scholarly publishing, offering developing countries an opportunity to make their scholarly ...

  2. Constructing participatory journalism as a scholarly object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Meijer, I.C.; Sanders, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the emergence of ʺparticipatory journalismʺ as a scholarly object in the field of journalism studies. By conducting a genealogical analysis of 119 articles on participatory journalism, published between 1995 and September 2011, we analyze the development of scholarly

  3. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  4. MESUR: metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting ...

  5. Google Scholar and the Continuing Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Jared L.; Howell, Scott; Wright, Thomas C.; Dickson, Cody

    2009-01-01

    The recent introduction of Google Scholar has renewed hope that someday a powerful research tool will bring continuing education literature more quickly, freely, and completely to one's computer. The authors suggest that using Google Scholar with other traditional search methods will narrow the research gap between what is discoverable and…

  6. Scholarly Foraging and Network Discovery Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Blaise; Hert, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    Parallels between subsistence foraging and scholarly information seeking are described in the context of the World Wide Web. Suggests that the prevailing information retrieval paradigm does not capture the complex of behavior and stimuli that drives scholars' quests for new ideas and insights. Research questions are suggested by extended use of…

  7. 45 CFR 1801.63 - Scholar Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scholar Accountability. 1801.63 Section 1801.63 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Duration of Scholarship § 1801.63 Scholar Accountability. (a) A...

  8. Open access scholarly communication in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rhiza, Adni

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on Open Access Scholarly Communication in Malaysia, investigating their use of open access repositories, advocacy undertaken, and reasons for contribution to global scholarship. The outcome wills very much in line with the stipulations willing Scholarly on Open access that will preserve and disseminate digital materials created by, or associated with the university.

  9. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars, Part Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2012-01-01

    This two-part article considers how well some of today's search tools support scholars' work. The first part of the article reviewed Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search using a modified version of Carole L. Palmer, Lauren C. Teffeau, and Carrier M. Pirmann's framework (2009). Microsoft Academic Search is a strong contender when…

  10. Overcoming Some Threshold Concepts in Scholarly Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Sarah L.; Bernstein, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Scholarly teaching, the act of systematically examining the links between one's teaching and student learning, remains a challenging idea for many faculty members. We argue that two threshold concepts--teaching as an inquiry-based process and teaching as a public act--serve as powerful hurdles to the more wide spread adoption of scholarly teaching…

  11. Google Scholar Goes to School: The Presence of Google Scholar on College and University Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Chris; Neuhaus, Ellen; Asher, Alan

    2008-01-01

    This study measured the degree of Google Scholar adoption within academia by analyzing the frequency of Google Scholar appearances on 948 campus and library Web sites, and by ascertaining the establishment of link resolution between Google Scholar and library resources. Results indicate a positive correlation between the implementation of Google…

  12. MESUR metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Sompel, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Usage data is increasingly regarded as a valuable resource in the assessment of scholarly communication items. However, the development of quantitative, usage-based indicators of scholarly impact is still in its infancy. The Digital Library Research & Prototyping Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Research library has therefore started a program to expand the set of usage-based tools for the assessment of scholarly communication items. The two-year MESUR project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to define and validate a range of usage-based impact metrics, and issue guidelines with regards to their characteristics and proper application. The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting c...

  13. Electron density distribution and solar plasma correction of radio signals using MGS, MEX and VEX spacecraft navigation data and its application to planetary ephemerides

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, A K; Laskar, J; Issautier, K; Manche, H; Gastineau, M

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Express and Venus Express experienced several superior solar conjunctions. These conjunctions cause severe degradations of radio signals when the line of sight between the Earth and the spacecraft passes near to the solar corona region. The primary objective of this work is to deduce a solar corona model from the spacecraft navigation data acquired at the time of solar conjunctions and to estimate its average electron density. The corrected or improved data are then used to fit the dynamical modeling of the planet motions, called planetary ephemerides. We analyzed the radio science raw data of the MGS spacecraft using the orbit determination software GINS. The range bias, obtained from GINS and provided by ESA for MEX and VEX, are then used to derive the electron density profile. These profiles are obtained for different intervals of solar distances: from 12R to 215R for MGS, 6R to 71R for MEX and 12R to 154R for VEX. They are acquired for each spacecraft individually, for ingre...

  14. Snapshots of a Changing Scholarly Communications Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Prosser

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Almost two years after the formation of SPARC Europe, the LIBER pre-conference seminar in St Petersburg gave an excellent opportunity to review progress on the road to achieving the aims of SPARC Europe. The traditional models of scholarly communication are increasingly being shown to be antiquated and insufficiently flexible to adapt to the new environment. SPARC Europe calls for far reaching changes in the way we approach scholarly communications. The talks in the seminar provide snapshots of the changing environment. They highlight the activities being taken at all levels by a wide variety of stakeholders in the scholarly communications process: Small and society publishers are developing alternatives to inflexible and restrictive 'Big Deals'; funding bodies and research organisations worldwide are becoming aware of issues surrounding scholarly communication; institutional repositories are providing new communications channels; and libraries are investigating new directions and taking on new roles. This paper will expand on some of these recent developments.

  15. Measuring scholarly impact methods and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Rousseau, Ronald; Wolfram, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    This book is an authoritative handbook of current topics, technologies and methodological approaches that may be used for the study of scholarly impact. The included methods cover a range of fields such as statistical sciences, scientific visualization, network analysis, text mining, and information retrieval. The techniques and tools enable researchers to investigate metric phenomena and to assess scholarly impact in new ways. Each chapter offers an introduction to the selected topic and outlines how the topic, technology or methodological approach may be applied to metrics-related research. Comprehensive and up-to-date, Measuring Scholarly Impact: Methods and Practice is designed for researchers and scholars interested in informetrics, scientometrics, and text mining. The hands-on perspective is also beneficial to advanced-level students in fields from computer science and statistics to information science.

  16. Theories of informetrics and scholarly communication

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Scientometrics have become an essential element in the practice and evaluation of science and research, including both the evaluation of individuals and national assessment exercises. This book brings together the theories that guide informetrics and scholarly communication research. It is a timely and much needed compilation by leading scholars in the field, and covers all aspects that guide our understanding of authorship, citing, and impact.

  17. Use of Google Scholar in corpus-driven EAP research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezina, V.

    2012-01-01

    This primarily methodological article makes a proposition for linguistic exploration of textual resources available through the Google Scholar search engine. These resources (Google Scholar virtual corpus) are significantly larger than any existing corpus of academic writing. Google Scholar,

  18. Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC/VEx) 1 micron emissivity and Magellan microwave properties of crater-related radar-dark parabolas and other terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Shalygina, O. S.; Bondarenko, N. V.; Shalygin, E. V.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work is a comparative study of several typical radar-dark parabolas, the neighboring plains and some other geologic units seen in the study areas which include craters Adivar, Bassi, Bathsheba, du Chatelet and Sitwell, at two depths scales: the upper several meters of the study object available through the Magellan-based microwave (at 12.6 cm wavelength) properties (microwave emissivity, Fresnel reflectivity, large-scale surface roughness, and radar cross-section), and the upper hundreds microns of the object characterized by the 1 micron emissivity resulted from the analysis of the near infra-red (NIR) irradiation of the night-side of the Venusian surface measured by the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on-board of Venus Express (VEx).

  19. Scholar"ish": Google Scholar and Its Value to the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jerry E.; Hamilton, Michelle C.; Hauser, Alexandra; Janz, Margaret M.; Peters, Justin P.; Taggart, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    In scientific and academic circles, the value of Google Scholar as an information resource has received much scrutiny. Numerous articles have examined its search ability, but few have asked whether it has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars. This article takes a look at reliability factors that go into Google…

  20. Open Access Scholarly Publications as OER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the rationale, common practices, challenges, and some personal anecdotes from a journal editor on the production, use, and re-use of peer-reviewed scholarly articles as open educational resources (OER. The scholarly and professional discourse related to open educational resources has largely focused on open learning objects, courseware, and textbooks. However, especially in graduate education, articles published in scholarly journals are often a major component of the course content in formal education. In addition, open access journal articles are critical to expanding access to knowledge by scholars in the developing world and in fostering citizen science, by which everyone has access to the latest academic information and research results. In this article, I highlight some of the challenges, economic models, and evidence for quality of open access journal content and look at new affordances provided by the Net for enhanced functionality, access, and distribution.In the 17 years since I graduated with a doctorate degree, the climate and acceptance of open access publishing has almost reversed itself. I recall a conversation with my PhD supervisor in which he argued that publishing online was not a viable option as the product would not have permanency, scholarly recognition, or the prestige of a paper publication. His comments reflect the confusion between online resources and those described as open access, but as well illustrate the change in academic acceptance and use of open access products during the past decade. The evolution from paper to online production and consumption is a disruptive technology in which much lower cost and increased accessibility of online work opens the product to a completely new group of potential users. In the case of OER these consumers are primarily students, but certainly access to scholars from all parts of the globe and the availability to support citizen science (Silvertown, 2009

  1. Becoming University Scholars: Inside Professional Autoethnographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fernando; Sancho, Juana Maria; Creus, Amalia; Montane, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    This article shows part of the results of a research project: The Impact of Social Change in Higher Education Staff Professional Life and Work (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, SEJ2006-01876). The main aim of this project was to explore and understand how scholars establish a dialogue, resist, adapt themselves or adopt changes, in the…

  2. Scholars Reaching Outside Education for School Fixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a handful of education scholars have begun to cast a wider net for advice on how to engineer successful school turnarounds. The need for turnaround strategies that work is more timely than ever. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the list of schools identified to be in need of help grows longer by the year, making…

  3. On Reviewing and Writing a Scholarly Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, Jerry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides guidelines for reviewing and writing scholarly articles for the professional who reads and writes them for his/her own work and/or for publication in scientific journals. It outlines the purpose and contents of each section of a research article and provides a checklist for reviewing and writing a research article. This…

  4. Scholars See Comics as No Laughing Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Once fuel for mass book burnings, comic books are gaining a foothold in the nation's schools, with teachers seeing them as a learning tool and scholars viewing them as a promising subject for educational research. Evidence of the rising credibility of Spiderman, Batman, and Archie came last month when Fordham University's graduate school of…

  5. Scholar-Practitioner Leadership: A Conceptual Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scholar-practitioner leader operates reflexively in the boundaries between theory and practice, striving to create exemplars of democracy and social justice within schools while simultaneously meeting modern accountability demands. This article outlines a theoretical underpinning for scholarpractitioner leadership and provides means of operationalizing it in context

  6. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  7. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  8. Impacts of New Media on Scholarly Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Yehuda E.

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes a few key results of a workshop, held in the University of California Berkeley in June 2006, organized by the Center for New Media and supported by Elsevier, the leading publisher of scholarly journals. The workshop focused on the following questions: How will scientific publishing be affected by New Media? How will the new…

  9. Becoming University Scholars: Inside Professional Autoethnographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Hernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article shows part of the results of a research project: The Impact of Social Change in Higher Education Staff Professional Life and Work (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, SEJ2006-01876. The main aim of this project was to explore and understand how scholars establish a dialogue, resist, adapt themselves or adopt changes, in the process of constructing their professional identities. As the members of the research team were scholars ourselves, teaching and carrying out research in Spanish universities, we started this research by writing our own autoethnographies. As a result, we developed nine autoethnographies which give a complex and in-depth account of senior and junior scholars' journeys into their process of constructing their professional identity and working lives in a rapidly changing world. This article starts by giving a context to the research project and arguing the need for conducting autoethnographies. It goes on to discuss the process itself of writing autoethnographies in the context of a given research project. We then refer to the topics which have a bearing on how we have learnt to become scholars: our experience as university students, the beginning of the academic career, relationships with others, and the consequences of the mark of gender. We conclude with the lessons learnt around the dilemmas on writing autoethnographies.

  10. Two business professors receive Fulbright Scholar awards

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2005-01-01

    Virginia Tech Pamplin College of Business professors Larry French and Mahmood A. Khan have received Fulbright Scholar Awards to teach and conduct research abroad next year. Both faculty members teach in the MBA program at the university's Northern Virginia Center in metro Washington, D.C.

  11. Asa Grant Hilliard III: Scholar Supreme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William H.

    2008-01-01

    This integrative review uses two of Asa Grant Hilliard's books, "SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind" and "The Maroon Within Us: Selected Essays on African American Community Socialization", to discuss aspects of his scholarly legacy in teaching, history, and psychology. His scholarship is provocative. Hilliard rejected the supremacy of the…

  12. JSTOR and the Economics of Scholarly Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Describes JSTOR (journal storage), an electronic full-text database composed of pre-1990 issues of 10 scholarly journals in the fields of economics and history. Considers linking current issues to the archive; pricing; controls over access; institutional subscribers, including libraries and campus networks; individual subscribers; and budgeting in…

  13. Methodology, theoretical framework and scholarly significance: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology, theoretical framework and scholarly significance: An overview of International best practices in legal research. ... unpacks contemporary issues in an analytical manner; a clear and concise presentation of ideas with focus on effectiveness; adoption of tested theoretical frameworks to underpin new ideas; and a ...

  14. Scholarly Communication and Authorship Patterns in Language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... authorship pattern, rank list of frequently cited books and degree of research collaboration. A total of 5084 bibliographic references ... the countries with the highest rates of illiteracy. Since literacy liberates ... literature marginalizing other kinds of scholarly publications such as books, chapters in edited books ...

  15. The role of gender in scholarly authorship

    CERN Document Server

    West, Jevin D; King, Molly M; Correll, Shelley J; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2012-01-01

    Gender disparities appear to be decreasing in academia according to a number of metrics, such as grant funding, hiring, acceptance at scholarly journals, and productivity, and it might be tempting to think that gender inequity will soon be a problem of the past. However, a large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities re- reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain. For instance, even where raw publication counts seem to be equal between genders, close inspection reveals that, in certain fields, men predominate in the prestigious first and last author positions. Moreover, women are significantly underrepresented as authors of single-authored papers. Academics should be aware of the subtle ways that gender disparities can appear in scholarly authorship.

  16. Facilitating scholarly writing in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon; Dunn, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scholarly writing is a critical skill for faculty in academic medicine; however, few faculty receive instruction in the process. We describe the experience of 18 assistant professors who participated in a writing and faculty development program which consisted of 7 monthly 75-minute sessions embedded in a Collaborative Mentoring Program (CMP). Participants identified barriers to writing, developed personal writing strategies, had time to write, and completed monthly writing contracts. Participants provided written responses to open-ended questions about the learning experience, and at the end of the program, participants identified manuscripts submitted for publication, and completed an audiotaped interview. Analysis of qualitative data using data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing/verification showed that this writing program facilitated the knowledge, skills, and support needed to foster writing productivity. All participants completed at least 1 scholarly manuscript by the end of the CMP. The impact on participants' future academic productivity requires long-term follow-up.

  17. Open access and scholarly communication, part 4

    CERN Document Server

    Eden, Brad

    2009-01-01

    This fourth e-book on the subject of open access in the academic field includes a Latin American case study on open access penetration, a paper from Germany on the promotion of OA illustrated by a project at the University of Konstanz, and a case study on OA at Bioline International, a non-profit scholarly publications aggregator, distributor, publisher and publishing assistance service.

  18. Imagine Something Different: How a Group Approach to Scholarly Faculty Development Can Turn Joy-Stealing Competition Into Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    As academic institutions across the country raise the scholarly bar for retention, promotion, and tenure, academic leaders are being asked to scholar-ready nursing faculty. With the retirement of senior scholars and too few scholar-mentors to go around, leaders often find themselves squeezed between scholarly expectations on the rise and faculty groups less than ready to meet those expectations. Today's nursing faculty present a formidable scholarly development challenge. A diverse mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates from doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice programs, they come with a broad range of scholarly learning needs. These inequities not only leave many faculty feeling like scholar-impostors but also they can breed competitions that erode collegial bonds and sow the seeds of incivilities that steal scholarly joy, slow scholarly progress, and stress academic workplaces. What if leaders began imagining something different for themselves and with faculty groups? This is what can happen when leaders expand their perspective on scholarly faculty development from individual challenge to collective responsibility. More essay than research paper, this article describes how scholarly joy-stealing patterns can infiltrate faculty groups, shares thought leaders' visions for supportive scholarly communities, and offers strategies leaders can use to invite faculty groups to co-create cultures of scholarly caring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Paving new roads for scholarly communication

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Although electronic publishing has became mainstream, to a large extent the patterns of scholarly communication are still very similar to what we knew prior to the invention of the World Wide Web. Indeed, the most common method used by authors remains writing up the findings of research in an article to be published in a scholarly journal. Many communities want to make the next step, and CERN is acting as a hub in this change.   At the end of June, more than 250 librarians, IT engineers and information specialists from different communities and from all five continents gathered at the University of Geneva to participate in the CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication. Will nano-publications and triplets replace the classic journal articles? Will Mendeley become the new Facebook for scientists? Why do fewer than 10% of scientists, across all disciplines, publish their work in Open Access while actually 90% think Open Access would be beneficial for their field? These were the kind of...

  20. Transforming an idea into a scholarly project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lillian; Cullum, Sarah; Cheung, Gary; Friedman, Susan Hatters

    2018-01-01

    This article describes components of a workshop designed to orientate psychiatric trainees to the task of conducting a scholarly project. The aims are: to promote an approach that incorporates principles of adult learning to guide trainees who are undertaking research; to allow trainees to transform their ideas into more tangible research questions; and to enable supervisors to reflect on delivering similar content in scholarly project workshops. The workshop comprised: creating a safe space to explore ideas; discussing the process of posing a question or hypothesis; using group interactions to generate concepts; and considering personal values that influence the choice of research methodology to answer a question. Examples are provided from the workshop. The process enabled trainees to generate and distil ideas into more concrete questions and methods in three phases: introductory, exploratory and tangible. Adult learning principles may assist trainees to develop their ideas for a scholarly project into research questions that are relevant to clinical practice. Harnessing the creative potential of a peer collective may encourage deeper inquiry, shifts to a tangible output and a sustained interest in research.

  1. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  2. A Survey of Scholarly Data: From Big Data Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Samiya; Liu, Xiufeng; Shakil, Kashish A.

    2017-01-01

    of which, this scholarly reserve is popularly referred to as big scholarly data. In order to facilitate data analytics for big scholarly data, architectures and services for the same need to be developed. The evolving nature of research problems has made them essentially interdisciplinary. As a result...

  3. Ranking Scholarly Publishers in Political Science: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garand, James C.; Giles, Micheal W.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has documented how political scientists evaluate and rank scholarly journals, but the evaluation and ranking of scholarly book publishers has drawn less attention. In this article, we use data from a survey of 603 American political scientists to generate a ranking of scholarly publishers in political science. We used open-ended…

  4. Use of "Google Scholar" in Corpus-Driven EAP Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Vaclav

    2012-01-01

    This primarily methodological article makes a proposition for linguistic exploration of textual resources available through the "Google Scholar" search engine. These resources ("Google Scholar virtual corpus") are significantly larger than any existing corpus of academic writing. "Google Scholar", however, was not designed for linguistic searches…

  5. Google Scholar Users and User Behaviors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Gail

    2011-01-01

    The University of Mississippi Library created a profile to provide linking from Google Scholar (GS) to library resources in 2005. Although Google Scholar does not provide usage statistics for institutions, use of Google Scholar is clearly evident in looking at library link resolver logs. The purpose of this project is to examine users of Google…

  6. Nursing scholars appropriating new methods: the use of discourse analysis in scholarly nursing journals 1996-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2005-01-01

    database was analysed in order to identify what notions of discourse and discourse analysis are preferred by nursing scholars. The results showed that nursing scholars prefer approaches to discourse that resemble mainstream qualitative research avoiding social life and interaction. Explanations...

  7. STRATEGIES FOR STANDARDIZING SPELLING OF SCHOLARLY TERMINOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga E. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the spelling of scholarly terms from two points of view: as part of the terminology system and as part of common language. It is shown that multiple objective and subjective causes determine the inevitability of spelling variation in terminology and that all types of deviation from standards concern individual vocables, not rules. Particular attention is given to cases in which specialized terms enter common usage, sometimes leading to changes in their spelling and raising the need for standardization. We analyze previous standards of terminology in general spelling dictionaries, analyze them as part of common language norms and propose possible strategies for standardizing terminology. 

  8. Benner and the critics: promoting scholarly dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, S M

    2000-01-01

    The research and theorizing of Patricia Benner and colleagues have been very influential in nursing around the world. In recent years, however, her work has been challenged on both methodological and philosophical grounds, primarily from critical-hermeneutic and postmodernist perspectives. Critics have identified concerns about Benner's work, including sample limitations, decontextualized exemplars, the exclusion of social and political concerns, the problematic issues of experience and interpretation, and the unacknowledged position of the researcher. This article attempts to synthesize those critiques, and offers a comprehensive framework for constructive dialogue. Disciplinary maturity and scholarly integrity require critical reevaluation of influential texts and research programs.

  9. Cottrell Scholars Collaborative -- Integrating Research and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinova, Jairo

    2013-03-01

    Higher education reform needs to move towards a more interactive and integrated model, in which there is greater curricular emphasis in skill development, multi-discipline integration, and innovative connectivity, rather than traditional content driven curricula. This is even more crucial in STEM education, given our current slow down relative to other countries and the need to remain competitive in a global environment. Successful reforms require a seamless integration of research and teaching where education excellence and research excellence are not viewed by faculty as a zero sum game but as mutually benefitting ingredients of academic success. Cottrell scholars are selected among top ranking young academics with an equal passionate commitment to research excellence and education. Recently, these national group of academics sponsored by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement have created the Cottrell Scholars Collaborative (CSC) which aims at creating a self-supporting group that promotes integration of research and teaching at a national level with different initiatives. I will describe in these talk the aim of this group and the different sponsored projects that CSC is undertaking and the types of collective and individual efforts that are making a difference in sustainable education reform.

  10. The Work of Scholars: An Institutional Ethnography of a McNair Scholars' Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Terry, III

    2017-01-01

    The McNair Scholars Program continues to be pivotal towards increasing diversity within graduate schools in the USA, particularly within doctoral programmes. The programme provides underrepresented undergraduate students with opportunities to learn about research and applying to graduate schools, which otherwise might not be available for these…

  11. Learning Communities Faculty Scholars: An Online, Targeted Faculty Development Course to Promote Scholarly Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Hillary H.

    2016-01-01

    Many learning communities instructors seek professional development opportunities that foster their growth as teacher-scholars. Learning communities programs, therefore, have an opportunity to provide targeted, "just in time" training that allows for the immediate application of knowledge to a learning community setting, maximizing…

  12. Scholars at Risk: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, Hadi

    2006-04-01

    It has been five years since some 60 political activists; many scholars and university professors among them, with alleged links to the so-called ``nationalist-religious'' group and the Freedom Movement of Iran (FMI) were arrested in March and April 2001 on a series of charges including plotting to topple the Islamic establishment in Iran. Almost all of those detained were later released on bail and stood trials before different branches of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, and court of appeals. All sessions and hearings were held behind closed doors! Final verdicts have been gradually delivered, but the judiciary refuses to enforce the sentences, drop the charges, or return the bails. The whole case has been turned into a Sword of Damocles held over the heads of all political activists who happen to be critical of the system.

  13. John Aitken (d. 1790)--grinder or scholar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew H

    2003-11-01

    John Aitken attended the University of Edinburgh between 1763 and 1769 but did not graduate MD. He gained the membership (i.e. fellowship) of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1770, and was for two sessions Senior President of the Royal Medical Society. Between 1771 and 1790 he published numerous books and pamphlets on surgery, medicine, midwifery, anatomy and physiology. As a surgeon at the Royal Infirmary, from 1779, he lectured on most subjects in the medical curriculum. John Struthers was particularly scathing of Aitken's scholarship, and this article attempts to restore Aitken's reputation as a scholar and probably one of the first of the extra-academical lecturers, who taught both anatomy and surgery in Edinburgh from 1779 until his death in 1790.

  14. Electronic journals and scholarly communication: a citation and reference study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Harter

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The journal is fundamental to formal scholarly communication. This research reports highlights and preliminary findings from an empirical study of scholarly electronic journals. The purpose of the research is to assess the impact of electronic journals (e-journals on scholarly communication, by measuring the extent to which they are being cited in the literature, both print and electronic. The intent is to provide a snapshot of the impact e-journals were having on scholarly communication at a given point in time, roughly the end of 1995. This study provides one measure of that impact, specifically on the formal, as opposed to informal, communication process. The study also examines the forms in which scholars cite e-journals, the accuracy and completeness of citations to e-journals, and practical difficulties faced by scholars and researchers who wish to retrieve e-journals through the networks.

  15. ESA CryoVEx 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Henriette; Einarsson, Indriði; Forsberg, René

    over the Greenland ice sheet (the EGIG line and selected CryoSat‐2 ground tracks), together with Austfonna and Devon ice caps. At Austfonna and Devon ice caps ground teams measured ice and snow properties, and raised corner reflectors acting as a surface reference point to estimate the penetration......) and vertical photography to acquire data over sea‐ and land ice along CryoSat‐2 ground tracks. The airborne campaign was coordinated by DTU Space using the Norlandair Twin Otter (TF‐POF). 2) Sea ice thickness data obtained with an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounder conducted by Alfred Wegener...... CryoSat underflights covering distances from 81‐523 km. Of these, eight tracks were measured over sea ice north of CFS Alert, north of Station Nord and north of Svalbard to acquire data in areas representing different sea ice types and settings. Parts of the flights north of CFS Alert were coordinated...

  16. ESA CryoVEx 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Henriette; Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Einarsson, Indriði

    data obtained with an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounder conducted by Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) with fixed‐wing airplane (Polar‐5, Basler BT‐67). DTU Space airborne team visited five main validation sites: Devon ice cap (Canada), Austfonna ice cap (Svalbard), the EGIG line crossing...... with the ESA airborne Ku‐band interferometric radar (ASIRAS), coincident airborne laser scanner (ALS) and vertical photography to acquire data over sea‐ and land ice along CryoSat‐2 ground tracks. The airborne campaign was coordinated by DTU Space using the Norlandair Twin Otter (TF‐POF). 2) Sea ice thickness...... the Greenland Ice Sheet, as well as the sea ice north of CFS Alert (Ellesmere Island), and sea ice north off Svalbard. Selected tracks were planned to match CryoSat‐2 passes and a few of the sea ice flights out of CFS Alert were coordinated with AWI Polar‐5 carrying the AEM induction sounder and NASA...

  17. Scholarly, digital, open: an impossible triangle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Goodfellow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary approaches to the digital transformation of practice in university research and teaching sometimes assume a convergence between the digital and openness. This assumption has led to the idea of ‘digital open scholarship,’ which aims to open up scholarship to participants from outside academic scholarly communities. But scholarship, digitality and openness exist in tension with each other – we can see the individual features of each, but we cannot make sense of the whole picture. It resembles an ‘impossible triangle’. Particularly confounding is the tension between digital scholarship and open knowledge, where the former is focused on the creation by specialist communities of knowledge of a stable and enduring kind, whilst the latter is characterised by encyclopaedic knowledge and participation that is unbounded by affiliation or location. However, we need not be permanently thwarted by the apparent impossibility of this triangle. It is a stimulus to look critically at the contexts of practice in which a relationship between scholarship, digitality and openness is sought. Constructive examples of such critique can be found in the emerging research field of literacy and knowledge practice in the digital university.

  18. Plagiarism Continues to Affect Scholarly Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Tae

    2017-02-01

    I have encountered 3 cases of plagiarism as editor of the Journal of Korean Medical Science (JKMS). The first one was copying figures from a JKMS article without citation, the second was submission of a copied manuscript of a published article to JKMS, and the third was publishing a copied JKMS article in another journal. The first and third cases violated copyrights of JKMS, but the violating journals made no action on the misconduct. The second and third cases were slightly modified copies of the source articles but similarity check by the Crosscheck could not identify the text overlap initially and after one year reported 96% overlap for the second case. The similarity of the third case was reported 3%. The Crosscheck must upgrade its system for better reliable screening of text plagiarism. The copy of the second case was committed by a corrupt Chinese editing company and also by some unethical researchers. In conclusion, plagiarism still threatens the trustworthiness of the publishing enterprises and is a cumbersome burden for editors of scholarly journals. We require a better system to increase the vigilance and to prevent the misconduct.

  19. The big picture: scholarly publishing trends 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippa Smart

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is important for journal editors to keep up to date with the changes happening in the international journal environment to ensure that their own publications remain current and meet international expectations. Dramatic changes have taken place in the journals environment during the last two decades, frequently driven by technology but also by increased global participation in scholarly and scientific research and concern about the commercial influence on dissemination of knowledge. Technical solutions have attempted to address the growth in research but have sometimes added to the tsunami of information and increased the need to manage quality. To this end experiments with the traditional quality control and dissemination systems have been attempted, but news of improvements are frequently overshadowed by alarms about ethical problems. There is particular concern about some of the new publishers who are not adhering to established quality control and ethical practices. Within a potentially fragmenting system, however, there are also emerging collaborative projects helping to knit together the different elements of the publishing landscape to improve quality, linkages and access.

  20. Maintaining Scholarly Standards in Feminist Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Esterson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the editorial Introduction to Women, Science, and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies, published in 2001, can be found the exemplary statement that among the norms for acquiring scientific knowledge is “skepticism (all claims should be scrutinized for errors”. In this article, I address a section relating to historical contentions in the same volume that, I argue, fails to live up to this basic standard of scholarly research. It is now quite widely believed that Mileva Marić, Einstein’s first wife, played an active role in Einstein’s early scientific work until well after they married in 1903. Some commentators go so far as to argue that she coauthored his three major 1905 papers, while others contend that she solved the mathematical problems for him. I examine the claims made in relation to Marić in the section in question in the above-cited volume, and investigate the sources of the evidential claims that have been adduced to support them. I conclude that the several claims are without reliable evidential bases.

  1. Open Access Scholarly Journal Publishing in Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenyu Shen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research literature on open access (OA publishing has mainly dealt with journals publishing in English, and studies focusing on OA journals in other languages are less common. This article addresses this gap via a case study focusing on Chinese-language OA journals. It starts with the identification of the major characteristics of this market, followed by eight semi-structured interviews to explore the key motivations behind Chinese-language OA publishing and perceived barriers. The majority of Chinese OA journals are published in Chinese, and most of them are published by universities and scholarly societies. Nearly 80% of journals were launched before the digital age and were converted to OA later. The subject distribution is highly skewed towards the science, technology, engineering and medicine (STEM fields. Publishers are motivated to convert journals to OA by an expected increase in academic impact, which would also attract more submissions. The lack of a sufficient number of high-quality submissions is perceived as the largest barrier to the successful publishing of journals. The financial instability of journals is identified as the main obstacle hindering internationalisation. The central conclusions of the study are that Chinese-language OA journals need to increase their visibility in journal indexes such as the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ, and that an OA publishing platform (similar to the Latin American SciELO should be established for Chinese-language OA journals.

  2. The Lowell Observatory Predoctoral Scholar Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Lisa; Nofi, Larissa

    2018-01-01

    Lowell Observatory is pleased to solicit applications for our Predoctoral Scholar Fellowship Program. Now beginning its tenth year, this program is designed to provide unique research opportunities to graduate students in good standing, currently enrolled at Ph.D. granting institutions. Lowell staff research spans a wide range of topics, from astronomical instrumentation, to icy bodies in our solar system, exoplanet science, stellar populations, star formation, and dwarf galaxies. Strong collaborations, the new Ph.D. program at Northern Arizona University, and cooperative links across the greater Flagstaff astronomical community create a powerful multi-institutional locus in northern Arizona. Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope is operating at full science capacity and boasts some of the most cutting-edge and exciting capabilities available in optical/infrared astronomy. Student research is expected to lead to a thesis dissertation appropriate for graduation at the doctoral level at the student's home institution. For more information, see http://www2.lowell.edu/rsch/predoc.php and links therein. Applications for Fall 2018 are due by May 1, 2018; alternate application dates will be considered on an individual basis.

  3. Publishing scientific papers in scholarly journals | Ayensu | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The style and approach for publishing a scientific paper in a refereed or scholarly journal are presented to guide aspiring authors on procedures for preparing high quality manuscripts. The rigorous demand of peer review has been emphasized to illustrate the academic nature of scholarly publishing. The quality attributes of ...

  4. Perception of lecturers on the quality of scholarly publications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on perception of lecturers on the quality of scholarly publications and the challenges of scholarly publishing in Nigeria. Descriptive survey method was adopted for this study. The population of study comprised of the academic staff in the University of Ibadan, Nigeria.5 out of 9 faculties in the University of ...

  5. The present and future growth of scholarly publishing in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scholarly publishing in Africa, though still struggling to keep pace with the rest of the world, has made major progress. Many universities in Africa are seriously engaged in scholarly publishing, both in print and electronic formats. The outputs of research are constantly disseminated in universities, at conferences and during ...

  6. The Scholarly Journal in the Production and Dissemination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The scholarly journal has been a means of disseminating information and communicating acquired knowledge in Africa, as elsewhere. With the proliferation of tertiary institutions in Africa in the second half of the 20th century, the publication of scholarly journals in the continent has experienced much expansion. However ...

  7. Reconceptualising Diasporic Intellectual Networks: Mobile Scholars in Transnational Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiongqiong; Koyama, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore how Chinese scholars in the USA recount their transnational collaborations and linkages. Guided by post-colonial theories and cultural studies of transnational academic mobility, we utilise in-depth interviews to resituate the scholars' experiences within a discourse of diasporic intellectual networks. We argue that…

  8. Scholarly Communication in Africa Program | Page 2 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Internet and new information and communication technologies (ICTs) have changed the way research is being conducted and disseminated. Open access paradigms have challenged the conventional business model of scholarly publishing, offering developing countries an opportunity to make their scholarly ...

  9. Workplace Correlates and Scholarly Performance of Clinical Pharmacy Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, Paul W.; Creswell, John W.

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to develop a correlate model of 3-year scholarly performance of 296 clinical pharmacy faculty. Participants were surveyed concerning refereed research, grants/books research, and nonresearch scholarship. Eight correlates, including two related to the departmental workplace, emerged as significant factors in scholarly performance.…

  10. Why Should Scholars Keep Coming Back to John Dewey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    This essay attempts to explain why philosophers, philosophers of education, and scholars of democracy should keep coming back to John Dewey for insights and inspiration on issues related to democracy and education. Mordechai Gordon argues that there are four major reasons that contribute to scholars' need to keep returning to Dewey for inspiration…

  11. Higher Education Scholars' Participation and Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, G.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars participate in online social networks for professional purposes. In such networks, learning takes the form of participation and identity formation through engagement in and contribution to networked practices. While current literature describes the possible benefits of online participation, empirical research on scholars' use of online…

  12. Stewardship: A Biblical Model for the Formation of Christian Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julien C. H.; Scales, T. Laine

    2013-01-01

    This article explores theological dimensions of the academic vocation, taking its cue from the research undertaken by the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate, which envisions the scholar as a steward of an academic discipline. We contend, however, that the Christian scholar's sense of stewardship extends beyond one's academic…

  13. Google Scholar: The 800-Pound Gorilla in the Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    There is a "clash of civilizations" going on in the information field--a clash characterized by a brash upstart, Google, and its attendant creations, Google Scholar and Google Books, and the old guard represented by the library world. Librarians who deprecate Google Scholar or simply ignore the Google phenomenon do so at their own risk. Google…

  14. Acceptance and Usage of Open Access Scholarly Communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acceptance and Usage of Open Access Scholarly Communication by Postgraduate Students at the Sokoine University of Agriculture and the University of Dar es ... Low awareness of the OA concept, inadequate online scholarly communication skills, and the slow Internet connectivity were possible factors affecting the ...

  15. Scholar Quest: A Residency Research Program Aligned With Faculty Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R. Panchal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ACGME requires that residents perform scholarly activities prior to graduation, but this is difficult to complete and challenging to support. We describe a residency research program, taking advantage of environmental change aligning resident and faculty goals, to become a contributor to departmental cultural change and research development. Methods: A research program, Scholar Quest (SQ, was developed as a part of an Information Mastery program. The goal of SQ is for residents to gain understanding of scholarly activity through a mentor-directed experience in original research. This curriculum is facilitated by providing residents protected time for didactics, seed grants and statistical/staff support. We evaluated total scholarly activity and resident/faculty involvement before and after implementation (PRE-SQ; 2003-2005 and POST-SQ; 2007-2009. Results: Scholarly activity was greater POST-SQ versus PRE-SQ (123 versus 27 (p<0.05 with an incidence rate ratio (IRR=2.35. Resident and faculty involvement in scholarly activity also increased PRE-SQ to POST-SQ (22 to 98 residents; 10 to 39 faculty, p<0.05 with an IRR=2.87 and 2.69, respectively. Conclusion: Implementation of a program using department environmental change promoting a resident longitudinal research curriculum yielded increased resident and faculty scholarly involvement, as well as an increase in total scholarly activity.

  16. Scholarly Communication in Africa Program | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Internet and new information and communication technologies (ICTs) have changed the way research is being conducted and disseminated. Open access paradigms have challenged the conventional business model of scholarly publishing, offering developing countries an opportunity to make their scholarly ...

  17. Challenging Google, Microsoft Unveils a Search Tool for Scholarly Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Microsoft has introduced a new search tool to help people find scholarly articles online. The service, which includes journal articles from prominent academic societies and publishers, puts Microsoft in direct competition with Google Scholar. The new free search tool, which should work on most Web browsers, is called Windows Live Academic Search…

  18. New Realities for Scholarly Presses in Trying Economic Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakesley, David

    2014-01-01

    The author explains that Parlor Press is an independent publisher and distributor of scholarly and trade books in print and digital formats. It was founded in 2002 to address the need for an alternative scholarly, academic press attentive to emergent ideas and forms while maintaining the highest possible standards of quality, credibility, and…

  19. The number of scholarly documents on the public web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabsa, Madian; Giles, C Lee

    2014-01-01

    The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24%) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%.

  20. The number of scholarly documents on the public web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madian Khabsa

    Full Text Available The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24% are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%.

  1. The Number of Scholarly Documents on the Public Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabsa, Madian; Giles, C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24%) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%. PMID:24817403

  2. The Practice of Designing Qualitative Research on Educational Leadership: Notes for Emerging Scholars and Practitioner-Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses a gap in methodological writing, concerning typical practice in designing qualitative inquiry, especially in research on educational leadership. The article focuses on how qualitative research designs are actually developed and explores implications for scholars' work, especially for new scholars and for methods teachers.…

  3. Google Scholar and 100 Percent Availability of Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Pomerantz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses Google Scholar as an extension of Kilgour’s goal to improve the availability of information. Kilgour was instrumental in the early development of the online library catalog, and he proposed passage retrieval to aid in information seeking. Google Scholar is a direct descendent of these technologies foreseen by Kilgour. Google Scholar holds promise as a means for libraries to expand their reach to new user communities, and to enable libraries to provide quality resources to users during their online search process.

  4. Enhancing pediatric residents’ scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Pound

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. Objective: We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE program. Methods: We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Results: Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. Conclusions: By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes.

  5. Measuring the scholarly and judicial impact of accredited legal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    judgements) through the use of Google Scholar (GS) citations and Butterworth Lexis Nexis database respectively. The results of the study revealed variations in terms of the citation patterns of legal journals in legal scholarship and judicial rulings.

  6. Scholars on Twitter: who and how many are they?

    OpenAIRE

    Costas, Rodrigo; van Honk, Jeroen; Franssen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel methodology for identifying scholars with a Twitter account. By combining bibliometric data from Web of Science and Twitter users identified by Altmetric.com we have obtained the largest set of individual scholars matched with Twitter users made so far. Our methodology consists of a combination of matching algorithms, considering different linguistic elements of both author names and Twitter names; followed by a rule-based scoring system that weights the commo...

  7. Digital libraries: barriers or gateways to scholarly information?

    OpenAIRE

    Bryne, Alex

    2003-01-01

    Unprecedented desktop access to scholarly information has been made possible by the introduction of digital libraries. The powerful combination of digital publications, specialist and generalist databases, sophisticated search systems and portals enables scholars and students to rapidly examine a great variety of the literature in their own disciplines and those new to them. Access is available globally 24 hours a day without geographical limitation. But that access is not without limitations...

  8. Comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar literature searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Michael E; Evans, Dennis P

    2010-05-01

    Literature searches are essential to evidence-based respiratory care. To conduct literature searches, respiratory therapists rely on search engines to retrieve information, but there is a dearth of literature on the comparative efficiencies of search engines for researching clinical questions in respiratory care. To compare PubMed and Google Scholar search results for clinical topics in respiratory care to that of a benchmark. We performed literature searches with PubMed and Google Scholar, on 3 clinical topics. In PubMed we used the Clinical Queries search filter. In Google Scholar we used the search filters in the Advanced Scholar Search option. We used the reference list of a related Cochrane Collaboration evidence-based systematic review as the benchmark for each of the search results. We calculated recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) with 2 x 2 contingency tables. We compared the results with the chi-square test of independence and Fisher's exact test. PubMed and Google Scholar had similar recall for both overall search results (71% vs 69%) and full-text results (43% vs 51%). PubMed had better precision than Google Scholar for both overall search results (13% vs 0.07%, P searches with the Clinical Queries filter are more precise than with the Advanced Scholar Search in Google Scholar for respiratory care topics. PubMed appears to be more practical to conduct efficient, valid searches for informing evidence-based patient-care protocols, for guiding the care of individual patients, and for educational purposes.

  9. Semantic Web for Reliable Citation Analysis in Scholarly Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Tous

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the impact of scholarly artifacts is constrained by current unreliable practices in cross-referencing, citation discovering, and citation indexing and analysis, which have not kept pace with the technological advances that are occurring in several areas like knowledge management and security. Because citation analysis has become the primary component in scholarly impact factor calculation, and considering the relevance of this metric within both the scholarly publishing value chain and (especially important the professional curriculum evaluation of scholarly professionals, we defend that current practices need to be revised. This paper describes a reference architecture that aims to provide openness and reliability to the citation-tracking lifecycle. The solution relies on the use of digitally signed semantic metadata in the different stages of the scholarly publishing workflow in such a manner that authors, publishers, repositories, and citation-analysis systems will have access to independent reliable evidences that are resistant to forgery, impersonation, and repudiation. As far as we know, this is the first paper to combine Semantic Web technologies and public-key cryptography to achieve reliable citation analysis in scholarly publishing

  10. TELL ME HOW YOU SLEEP: SLEEP HABITS AND PROBLEMS IN PORTUGUESE PRE-SCHOLAR AND SCHOLAR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lopes

    2017-02-01

    Results: 107 pre-scholar and 122 scholar children were included (n=229, mean age 6,3 years. 54,1% were boys. 37,3% of children shared the bedroom with another relative . Mean bedtime was 21h:41m and mean wake-up time was 7h:20m. Mean sleep duration was 9.7hours, being longer in pre-scholars (pConclusion: In this study, children tend to fall asleep later and sleep less than in other studies. A high prevalence of sleep problems was found, specially in pre-scholar children, which claims a different approach of this subject in pediatrician´s clinical practice.

  11. Advanced psychotherapy training: psychotherapy scholars' track, and the apprenticeship model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E; Yager, Joel

    2013-07-01

    Guided by ACGME's requirements, psychiatric residency training in psychotherapy currently focuses on teaching school-specific forms of psychotherapy (i.e., cognitive-behavioral, supportive, and psychodynamic psychotherapy). On the basis of a literature review of common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes and experience with empirically supported and traditional psychotherapies, the authors aimed to develop an advanced contemporary and pragmatic approach to psychotherapy training for eight residents (two per PGY year) enrolled in a specialized Psychotherapy Scholars' Track within an adult general-residency program. The authors developed core principles and clinical practices, and drafted year-by-year educational goals and objectives to teach the psychotherapy scholars. Based on experiential learning principles, we also developed an individualized form of psychotherapy training, which we call "The Apprenticeship Model." The Psychotherapy Scholars' Track, and "Apprenticeship Model" of training are now in their third year. To date, authors report that scholars are highly satisfied with the structure and curriculum in the track. Trainees appreciate the protected time for self-directed study, mentored scholarship, and psychotherapy rotations. Patients and the Psychotherapy Scholars experience the "Apprenticeship Model" of psychotherapy training as authentic and compatible with their needs and resources. The Psychotherapy Scholars' Track developed and piloted in our general psychiatry residency is based on common factors, empirically-supported treatments, and use of experiential learning principles. Whether the Psychotherapy Scholars' Track and "Apprenticeship Model" will ultimately increase residents' psychotherapy skills and positively affect their ability to sustain postgraduate psychotherapy practice in varied settings requires long-term evaluation. The developers welcome empirical testing of the comparative effectiveness of this psychotherapy teaching approach

  12. A senior scholars forum can enhance the scholarship process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jeffrey I; Mitchell, Patricia M; Wilcox, Allison R; Linden, Judith A; Mycyk, Mark B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the educational value of an annual Senior Scholars Forum (SSF) of graduating Emergency Medicine resident participants and attendees. This study was conducted at an urban academic medical center with a PGY1-4 year residency program. After completion of the 2nd annual SSF, a web-based survey instrument was sent to all resident and faculty attendees. The instrument was a 3-part tool adapted from previous studies on postgraduate scholarship. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Forty-two of the 44 (95%) attendees completed the survey, including 100% of the PGY4 resident presenters. Prior to the SSF, 52% of respondents did not have a full understanding of senior scholarly activities. After the SSF, 67% reported an improved understanding and 88% had a better understanding of the scope of potential scholarly projects. Sixty-four percent reported the SSF introduced them to departmental resources available for completion of their own scholarly projects, and 69% would have liked to have heard the lessons communicated earlier in residency. Most (79%) agreed the SSF demonstrated the value of communal scholarly activities. Most senior residents (67%) felt most of the department would not know about their scholarship if they had not participated in the SSF. Our innovative SSF enhanced the scholarship process by allowing graduating senior residents an opportunity to share their scholarly productivity with a larger audience, provided attendees critical insights into the process of scholarship, and encouraged communal learning. Because the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and Residency Review Committee require all residents to participate in scholarly activity, other training programs may benefit from a similar educational experience.

  13. The Community Research Scholars Initiative: A Mid‐Project Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Earl; Sehgal, Ashwini R.; Fischer, Robert L.; Collins, Cyleste

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Community organizations addressing health and human service needs generally have minimal capacity for research and evaluation. As a result, they are often inadequately equipped to independently carry out activities that can be critical for their own success, such as conducting needs assessments, identifying best practices, and evaluating outcomes. Moreover, they are unable to develop equitable partnerships with academic researchers to conduct community‐based research. This paper reports on the progress of the Community Research Scholar Initiative (CRSI), a program that aims to enhance community research and evaluation capacity through training of selected employees from Greater Cleveland community organizations. The intensive 2‐year CRSI program includes didactic instruction, fieldwork, multiple levels of community and academic engagement, leadership training, and a mentored research project. The first cohort of CRSI Scholars, their community organizations, and other community stakeholders have incorporated program lessons into their practices and operations. The CRSI program evaluation indicates: the importance of careful Scholar selection; the need to engage executive leadership from Scholar organizations; the value of a curriculum integrating classwork, fieldwork, and community engagement; and the need for continual scholar skill and knowledge assessment. These findings and lessons learned guide other efforts to enhance community organization research and evaluation capacity. PMID:26073663

  14. Co-evolution of departmental research collaboration and scholarly outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David

    2012-12-01

    Understanding scientific collaboration networks can assist research centres to develop strategies to maximize productivity, and help diagnose the causes of low system productivity. The purpose of this study was to use social network analysis to better understand how research collaboration within a productive department impacts scholarly productivity individually and departmentally. Over a 13-year period, departmental faculty completed an annual survey describing their research collaborations and scholarly productivity. Data were analyzed using social network analysis. Quadratic assignment procedure regression assessed the predictive value that an individual's measures of centrality within the network and effective size of their own network (egonet) had each year in predicting each scholarly outcome. Simulation Investigation for Empirical Network Analysis software assessed the co-evolution of the collaborative network and scholarship. While no consistent patterns for individual's presentations were seen, individual's publications were associated with betweenness and eigenvector centrality, and effective egonet size. Grant submissions were associated with degree and eigenvector centrality, as well as effective egonet size. Departmentally, network dynamics depended upon the scholarship of those around you, but none of the forms of scholarship depended upon network characteristics. Of the three forms of scholarship, network dynamics depended primarily on publications in others. Although individual scholarship was dependent upon individual centrality and effective egonet size, research collaboration within the department depended upon reciprocity, transitivity and scholarly productivity of its constituent investigators. Scholarly dynamics, at a departmental level, did not depend upon network characteristics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. How do High Energy Physics scholars search their information?

    CERN Document Server

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Grey literature has always been the main conduit of scholarly communication for High-Energy Physics (HEP)researchers. An efficient way of searching and accessing this information is a central part of their research workflow. In 2007, a survey was conducted to understand which information resources HEP scholars use to find the information they need. The results of this survey are presented. Over 2000 answers, representing about one-tenth of the active HEP community, were collected and show that community-driven resources largely dominate the landscape, with commercial services serving only a small proportion of the users. In addition, HEP scholars appear to use different tools for different information needs, which are clearly prioritized. Finally, the results of the survey shed light on the future information needs of HEP scientists over the next five years.

  16. Learning Health Equity Frameworks within a Community of Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Beacham, Barbara; Bohinski, Julia M.; Brawner, Bridgette M.; Clements, Carla P.; Everett, Janine S.; Gomes, Melissa M.; Harner, Holly; McDonald, Catherine C.; Pinkston, Esther; Sommers, Marilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Scholars in nursing science have long espoused the concept of health equity without specifically using the term or dialoguing about the social determinants of health and social justice. In this paper, we describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a doctoral and post- doctoral seminar collective entitled Health Equity: Conceptual, Linguistic, Methodological and Ethical Issues. The course enabled scholars-in-training to consider the construct and its nuances and frame a personal philosophy of health equity. We offer an example of how a group of emerging scholars can engage in the important, but difficult discourse related to health equity. The collective provided a forum for debate, intellectual growth, and increased insight for students and faculty. We posit that the lessons learned by all participants have the potential to enrich doctoral and post-doctoral scientific training in nursing science and may serve as a model for other research training programs in the health sciences. PMID:21710960

  17. Scholarly Reputation Building: How does ResearchGate Fare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing a newly developed conceptual framework of the tasks and activities that comprise today’s digital scholarly undertaking and their potentially reputation building, maintaining and enhancing components, the efforts of ResearchGate in supporting scholars’ reputation building endeavours were put under the microscope. Not unexpectedly, RG performs well in regard to basic research activities. Clearly, too, with ten metrics at its disposal, RG is in a league of its own when it comes to monitoring individual research reputation. Where RG falls down is regarding scholarly activities that do not concern pure research and so especially teaching. Its claim to have created a new way of measuring reputation is only partially true because if it wants to do so genuinely then it needs to extend the range of scholarly activities covered. RG also falls short in informing members as to the nature and changes to its service and of embracing new actors, such as citizen scientists and amateur experts.

  18. Online Scholarly Conversations in General Education Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qijie; Wong, Ka-Wah

    2018-01-01

    In general education astronomy courses, many students are struggling with understanding the foundational concepts and theories in astronomy. One of the possible reasons is that, due the large class size, many of the courses are taught using a lecture mode, where human interactions and active learning are limited (Freeman et al., 2014). To address this challenge, we have applied the knowledge building framework (Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006) to design an online collaborative learning component, called Scholarly Conversations, to be integrated into a general education astronomy course at a public, comprehensive university.During Scholarly Conversations, students are treated as scholars to advance knowledge frontiers (Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006). The whole process involves the creation of new ideas and requires discourse and collective work for the advancement and creation of artifacts, such as theories and models (van Aalst, 2009). Based on the knowledge building principles (Scardamalia, 2002; Zhang, Scardamalia, Reeve, & Messina, 2009), several features have been built into Scholarly Conversations so that students are guided to deepen understanding of the astronomy concepts through three phases: knowledge sharing, knowledge construction and knowledge building, and reflections on learning growth (van Aalst, 2009; Cai, 2017). The online Scholarly Conversation is an extension of the lecture component of the general education astronomy course. It promotes student interactions and collaborative learning, and provides scaffolds for students to construct meanings of the essential concepts in astronomy through social learning and online technology. In this presentation, we will explain the specific design principles of the online Scholarly Conversation, and share the artifacts created to facilitate the online conversations in an general education astronomy course.Note: This project has been supported by the College of Education Research Grant Program at Minnesota State

  19. Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Romero, Ariel R.; McLaughlin, Stephen R.; Tzovaras, Bastian Greshake; Greene, Casey S.

    2017-01-01

    The website Sci-Hub provides access to scholarly literature via full text PDF downloads. The site enables users to access articles that would otherwise be paywalled. Since its creation in 2011, Sci-Hub has grown rapidly in popularity. However, until now, the extent of Sci-Hub’s coverage was unclear. As of March 2017, we find that Sci-Hub’s database contains 68.9% of all 81.6 million scholarly articles, which rises to 85.2% for those published in toll access journals. Coverage varies by discip...

  20. Ethnographic Ecclesiology and the Challenges of Scholarly Situatedness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte; Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard; Felter, Kirsten Donskov

    2015-01-01

    was carried out in a particular congregation in Copenhagen that has attracted many asylum seekers, primarily of Muslim background. The empirical work revealed that the scholars, as participant observers, experienced the situation in the congregation quite differently than did the refugees. Initially......, the scholars did not recognise conflicts and problems related to ethnicity, gender and class among the various groups of refugees. However, interviews based on the refugees’ documentation of their experiences with and within the congregation allowed different perspectives to be articulated. On one hand...

  1. Telepresence and Sexuality: A Review and a Call to Scholars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lombard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholars have examined the phenomenon of telepresence, a perceptual illusion of nonmediation experienced by media users, in a wide variety of contexts. This paper explores telepresence theory and research in the rarely examined but important context of sexually arousing media content. After defining key concepts, the paper presents reasons scholars should study telepresence in the context of sexuality, reviews the evolution of relevant media technologies and the nature of relevant telepresence responses, and considers potential theoretical contributions and avenues for future research in interpersonal communication, media studies, and presence scholarship.

  2. Artists as Scholars: The Research Behavior of Dance Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shannon Marie

    2016-01-01

    The research behaviors and library use of dance scholars are widely unknown, particularly in regard to issues of access to historical materials and new technology preferences. In the past thirty years, college and university dance departments in the United States have developed into independent, research-based programs. Despite the lack of current…

  3. Introducing the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy 2012 Scholar Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flintoff, Anne; Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    This commentary introduces David Kirk's paper entitled "Making a career in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy in the corporatized university: Reflections on hegemony, resistance, collegiality and scholarship", which was presented in the 2012 Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) "scholar lecture" at the British…

  4. Adviser's Manual of Federal Regulations Affecting Foreign Students and Scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, Washington, DC.

    A manual of U.S. immigration law and regulations pertaining to foreign students and scholars is presented to assist foreign student advisers. Overall topics include nonimmigrant status, student (F) status, exchange visitor (J) status, temporary worker or trainee (H) status, other nonimmigrant classes, and immigrant status. Specific areas include:…

  5. Scholarly social media profiles and libraries: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Ward

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to point out emerging roles and responsibilities for academic librarians with the potential of better integrating the library in the research process. In order to find out how to enhance the online reputation and discoverability of individual faculty members as well as their affiliated institutions, the authors worked side-by-side with researchers in the United States and Europe to explore, create, revise, and disambiguate scholarly profiles in various software applications. In an attempt to understand and organize scholarly social media, including new, alternative metrics, the authors reviewed and classified the major academic profile platforms, highlighting the overlapping elements, benefits, and drawbacks inherent in each. The consensus is that it would be time-consuming to keep one’s profile current and accurate on all of these platforms, given the plethora of underlying problems, also discussed in detail in the article. However, it came as a startling discovery that reluctance to engage with scholarly social media may cause a misrepresentation of a researcher’s academic achievements and may come with unforeseen consequences. The authors claim that current skills and competencies can secure an essential role for academic librarians in the research workflow by means of monitoring and navigating researcher profiles in scholarly social media in order to best represent the scholarship of their host institutions.

  6. Awareness and Use of Open Access Scholarly Publications by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the awareness and use of Open Access scholarly publications by postgraduate students of Faculty of Science in Ahmadu Bello University Zaria (ABU), Kaduna State, Nigeria. The study was guided by four research objectives namely to determine the channels of awareness of Open Access ...

  7. Accessibility and Usage of Scholarly Information Sources by Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at developing an understanding of the scholarly information sources and services that faculty members and postgraduate students in Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria accessed and used to support their research, teaching and learning. Three research questions and one hypothesis were formulated and ...

  8. The Costs and Potential Benefits of Alternative Scholarly Publishing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on a study undertaken for the UK Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), which explored the economic implications of alternative scholarly publishing models. Rather than simply summarising the study's findings, this paper focuses on the approach and presents a step-by-step account of the research process,…

  9. The Faculty Subculture, the Librarian Subculture, and Librarians' Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, William H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the influence of four predictor variables--university-wide research activity, faculty status (eligibility for sabbaticals), university control (public versus private), and enrollment--on the scholarly productivity of librarians at research universities in the United States. University-wide research activity is directly related…

  10. Mature Zionism: Education and the Scholarly Study of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Hanan A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to Israel education has emerged to counteract what has been a tendency to romanticize Israel by avoiding criticism; it presumes that Israel engagement has much to offer a meaningful Jewish identity, but only when encountered critically, taking into account Israel's many complexities. However, prevailing scholarly trends may not…

  11. Comments Worth Making: Supervising Scholarly Writing in Law School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajans, Elizabeth; Falk, Mary R.

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of writing instruction in law school begins with an overview of the writing process, then looks more closely at student and teacher roles at each stage, offering suggestions for students and teachers. It concludes with ideas about institutional and curricular change that might make scholarly writing in law school a more satisfying…

  12. Information-seeking behavior of social sciences scholars: A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the information-seeking behavior of scholars in the social sciences, based on the premise that information-seeking behavior follows universally applicable stages and patterns worldwide. The study was conducted at the Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research (NISER). Fifty eight active ...

  13. Personal Library Curation: An Ethnographic Study of Scholars' Information Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Smiljana; Cahoy, Ellysa Stern

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a Mellon Foundation-funded study conducted at Penn State University in University Park during Fall 2012 that explored scholars' information practices across disciplines encompassing the sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Drawing on results of the Web-based survey and ethnographic interviews, we present…

  14. Going Digital: The Transformation of Scholarly Communication and Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Isaac Hunter

    2008-01-01

    Not since the age of Gutenberg has an information upheaval so thoroughly disrupted the processes of scholarly knowledge creation, management and preservation as the digital revolution currently under way. Academic libraries have traditionally been structured to effectively facilitate the access, use and storage of mostly static, print-based…

  15. Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    that Hopps Scholars are challenged to demonstrate exceptional performance in the classroom , to participate in meaningful research experiences and are...Using robots to simulate user-engaged situations, Tufts University (Summer 2011) • Design and Use of Prescription Medication Scheduling Apps, Clemson

  16. Towards Web Documents Quality Assessment for Digital Humanities Scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Ceolin, D.; Noordegraaf, J.; Aroyo, L.; van Son, C.; Wolfgang, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for assessing the quality of Web documents, and a baseline of three quality dimensions: trustworthiness, objectivity and basic scholarly quality. Assessing Web document quality is a "deep data" problem necessitating approaches to handle both data size and complexity.

  17. Foreign Students and Scholars and the United States Tax System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David, II.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1992-93 school year more than 425,000 foreign students were studying in the United States. In addition, hundreds of foreign nationals were in the United States as visiting research scholars, lecturers, and professors. Offers a guide to help foreign nationals comply with the tax system while affording them the least possible tax…

  18. Arab Protests May Open Door for U.S. Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David L.; Wilhelm, Ian

    2011-01-01

    As protesters across the Arab world demand an end to autocratic regimes that have drained universities of resources and suffocated critical thinking, scholars see some hope of an Arab renaissance and a new opening for American involvement. From the ancient Library of Alexandria to a new Islamic-arts museum in Qatar that holds 700-year-old…

  19. Life as Death Scholars: Passion, Personality, and Professional Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schim, Stephanie Myers; Briller, Sherylyn; Thurston, Celia; Meert, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    In death-averse American society, the field of thanatology is often socially and academically isolating. The purpose of this article is to describe the experiences of a group of death scholars and share insights gained as members of an interdisciplinary team. They discuss the ways in which they have created a special "safe" space for death study…

  20. Use of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Fraser, Dave; Glatt, Vaida; Hohmann, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the growth of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics over a 12-month period and to investigate global patterns. Data was prospectively acquired from June 2013 to June 2014. Google Scholar queries specific to orthopedic surgery were performed at 90-day intervals. Demographic aspects of each user were also compiled, including gender, current location, and primary interests. To determine differences between the growth of Google Scholar public profile registrations and citation counts, as well as differences in growth in different regions, repeated measures of analysis of variance (RMANOVA) were used. RMANOVA revealed statistically significant differences ( p = 0.0001) for regional growth. The largest growth was observed in the United Kingdom ( p = 0.009, 289%), followed by the Asia-Pacific region ( p = 0.004, 177%) and "Other" ( p = 0.006, 172%). The mean growth per 90-day interval is 19.9% ( p = 0.003) and the mean 12-month growth is 107% ( p = 0.05). Statistically significant differences between gender (male vs. female) and basic and clinical sciences ( χ 2 = 22.4, p = 0.0001) were observed. This study suggests an exponential growth in the number of authors in the field of orthopedic surgery creating a Google Scholar public profile, and at the current rate participation doubles every 10.6 months.

  1. Scholars from Asia and Africa exchange knowledge at CPR South ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-10-17

    Oct 17, 2017 ... ... south's 2017 conference, drew activists, scholars, and former telecom regulators to Myanmar to exchange insights in August. Over the last ten years, the CPRsouth program has fostered the emergence of policy leaders with the skills and experience to engage in public interest research to inform policy.

  2. A Proposed Solution to the Scholarly Communications Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzle, Chad

    2005-01-01

    After reviewing the history and parameters of the scholarly communications crisis, particularly in regard to skyrocketing prices for journals in the natural sciences, the author reviews and rejects previously attempted solutions. He then employs the principles of game theory in proposing a new solution to the crisis.

  3. Just Google It. Digital Research Practices of Humanities Scholars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kemman (Max); M. Kleppe (Martijn); S. Scagliola (Stef)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe transition from analogue to digital archives and the recent explosion of online content offers researchers novel ways of engaging with data. The crucial question for ensuring a balance between the supply and demand-side of data is whether this trend connects to existing scholarly

  4. Preparing Emerging Doctoral Scholars for Transdisciplinary Research: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Susan Patricia; Nurius, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    Research models that bridge disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries are increasingly common as funders and the public push for effective responses to pressing social problems. Although social work is inherently an integrative discipline, there is growing recognition of the need to better prepare emerging scholars for sophisticated…

  5. Analysis of Scifinder Scholar and Web of Science Citation Searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Katherine M.

    2002-01-01

    With "Chemical Abstracts" and "Science Citation Index" both now available for citation searching, this study compares the duplication and uniqueness of citing references for works of chemistry researchers for the years 1999-2001. The two indexes cover very similar source material. This analysis of SciFinder Scholar and Web of…

  6. Graduate School Learning Curves: McNair Scholars' Postbaccalaureate Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, Scott; Gibson, Emily

    2011-01-01

    The federally funded Ronald B. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair Program) prepares first-generation, low-income, and underrepresented college undergraduates to pursue terminal graduate degrees. This study examines 22 McNair scholars' transitions into graduate school in an attempt to identify factors that influence alumni…

  7. Publishing scientific papers in scholarly journals | Ayensu | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rigorous demand of peer review has been emphasized to illustrate the academic nature of scholarly publishing. The quality attributes of a manuscript in terms of ... The rules, norms, ethics and standards of publishing in relation to copyrights and plagiarism are discussed. The published paper is recognized as the ...

  8. The Importance of Research and Scholarly Activity in Pharmacy Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Eli N; Stranges, Paul M; Maxwell, Whitney D; Bacci, Jennifer; Ashjian, Emily J; DeRemer, David L; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Norgard, Nicholas B; Dombrowski, Lauren; Parker, Robert B

    2016-12-01

    Regardless of practice setting, it is imperative that pharmacists be able to either participate in generating new knowledge or use the ever-expanding body of literature to guide patient care. However, competing priorities in Pharm.D. curricula and residency training programs have resulted in limited emphasis on acquiring research and scholarly skills. Factors likely contributing to this reduced focus include the lack of curricular and postgraduate training standards emphasizing the development of research skills, time to commit to scholarly activity, and accessibility to experienced mentors. Strategies for increasing scholarly activity for pharmacy students and residents should therefore continue to be a focus of professional degree and residency training programs. Several resources are available for academic planners, program directors, and institutions to augment scholarly experience for pharmacy trainees and clinicians. This commentary highlights the importance of providing research opportunities for students and residents, describes the potential barriers to these activities, and provides recommendations on how to increase the instruction and mentoring of trainees to generate and use research. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Young China Scholars Poverty Research Network: A bridge linking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... ... more about this successful Canada-China collaboration: "A strong competition" · Two-way learning · Declining poverty, rising inequality · Fresh insights · Mapping the network · One scholar's story · On the world stage · The CHIP surveys · "We chose the mentors carefully" · "The good work is collaborative" ...

  10. Google Scholar Search Performance: Comparative Recall and Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, William H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative evaluation of Google Scholar and 11 other bibliographic databases (Academic Search Elite, AgeLine, ArticleFirst, EconLit, GEOBASE, MEDLINE, PAIS International, POPLINE, Social Sciences Abstracts, Social Sciences Citation Index, and SocINDEX), focusing on search performance within the multidisciplinary field of…

  11. Measuring and Analyzing the Scholarly Impact of Experimental Evaluation Initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelini, Marco; Ferro, Nicola; Larsen, Birger

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation initiatives have been widely credited with contributing highly to the development and advancement of information access systems, by providing a sustainable platform for conducting the very demanding activity of comparable experimental evaluation in a large scale. Measuring the impact......, a methodology for measuring their scholarly impact, and tools exploiting visual analytics to analyze the outcomes....

  12. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  13. Student or Scholar? Transforming Identities through a Research Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassig, Carly J.; Dillon, Lisette H.; Diezmann, Carmel M.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role a writing group played in influencing the scholarly identities of a group of doctoral students by fostering their writing expertise. While the interest in writing groups usually centres on their potential to support doctoral students to publish, few studies have been conducted and written by the students themselves.…

  14. The Use of Google Scholar for Research and Research Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Linda R.; Werner, Jon M.; Campuzano, Mariela V.; Nimon, Kim

    2018-01-01

    The abundance of technological and Internet resources can both simplify and complicate a researcher's world. Such innovations place a burden on researchers to stay current with advances in technology and then discern the best technology tools to utilize. We first discuss benefits that Google Scholar can provide in the preparation of the literature…

  15. Adding Value to Scholarly Journals through a Citation Indexing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainab, A. N.; Abrizah, A.; Raj, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to relate the problems identified about scholarly journal publishing in Malaysia to establish motivation for the system development; to describe the design of MyCite, a Malaysian citation indexing system and to highlight the added value to journals and articles indexed through the generation of bibliometrics…

  16. Crying Foul: Scholars Examine the Consequences of Sports Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, scholars have increasingly joined with activists to challenge marketing aimed at children. It is a widely accepted belief that marketers have sold unhealthy foods as well as questionable toys and games, to the detriment of American children. Motivated by declining measures of child well-being, such as heightened obesity rates,…

  17. Selected risk factors for coronary heart disease in male scholars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A num.ber of risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) in 7 groups of South African male scholars aged between 15 and 20 years were surveyed. Selection of the groups was based on socioeconomic status and comprised urban and rural blacks, Indians of higher and lower socio-economic status, coloureds of higher ...

  18. 34 CFR 304.30 - Requirements for scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT TO IMPROVE SERVICES AND RESULTS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Conditions That Must Be... institution or agency designated in the scholarship; (b) Educational allowances. Not accept payment of educational allowances from any other entity if that allowance conflicts with the scholar's obligation under...

  19. Why Archivists Should Be Leaders in Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Archivists are challenged by many competing demands on their time. The rise of institutional repositories, often located in libraries rather than archives, and the concurrent increase in attention to the changes in scholarly communication may be perceived by archivists as being a demand that is too far from the archives' core mission to warrant…

  20. Questioning the Scholarly Discussion around Decentralization in Turkish Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Soner Onder

    2016-01-01

    From the beginning of Turkish Republic till date, Turkish Education System (TES) has been steered by a handful of politicians and civil servants, who enjoy maximum centralized authority. Over the years, therefore, centralized management has repeatedly been blamed for the deadlocks hampering progress in the TES. Turkish scholars often seem to find…

  1. Quality, Reach, and Impact of Open Scholarly Publishing in Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Open Access (defined as unrestricted access to articles published in scholarly journals via the Internet) is widespread in Latin America. ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and ...

  2. Economics of Scholarly Publishing: Exploring the Causes of Subscription Price Variations of Scholarly Journals in Business Subject-Specific Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2011-01-01

    This empirical research investigates subscription price variations of scholarly journals in five business subject-specific areas using the semilogarithmic regression model. It has two main purposes. The first is to address the unsettled debate over whether or not and to what extent commercial publishers reap monopoly profits by overcharging…

  3. Recommended Capacities for Educational Leadership: Pre-Reform Era Scholars versus Reform-Era Scholars versus National Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Taylor-Backor, Karen; Croteau, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed the scholarship on capacities for educational leadership for the past decade of the pre-reform era (1976-1985), as well as a recent decade of the reform era (2005-2015), and compared scholarship from both decades with the current Professional Standards for Educational Leaders. We found that scholars in the past decade of the pre-reform…

  4. Chinese management academics’ English-medium scholarly experience: Comparative perspectives on overseas-trained and home-trained scholars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyan Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report a study which was aimed to find out how overseas-trained Chinese management academics (CMAs compare with their home-trained counterparts in English-medium scholarly experience. Our data were drawn from a web-based questionnaire distributed following the conclusion of the biennial conference of the International Association of Chinese Management Research (IACMR held in 2014, the part of the conference program which featured English sessions, e-mail interviews with some questionnaire respondents, and observation at the conference site. Our findings comparatively illustrate the English-medium scholarly experience of the two cohorts of CMAs in terms of their participation in the English presentation sessions of IACMR2014, their use of English as university academics, and the relationship between English/Chinese-medium research productivity and self-perceived English abilities. Our study highlights heterogeneity among different groups of English as an Additional Language (EAL scholars and calls for more contextualized investigation of the diversified experiences of EAL scholars across countries and disciplines in this English-dominant academic world.

  5. Beyond bibliometrics harnessing multidimensional indicators of scholarly impact

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R

    2014-01-01

    Bibliometrics has moved well beyond the mere tracking of bibliographic citations. The web enables new ways to measure scholarly productivity and impact, making available tools and data that can reveal patterns of intellectual activity and impact that were previously invisible: mentions, acknowledgments, endorsements, downloads, recommendations, blog posts, tweets. This book describes recent theoretical and practical advances in metrics-based research, examining a variety of alternative metrics -- or "altmetrics" -- while also considering the ethical and cultural consequences of relying on metrics to assess the quality of scholarship. Once the domain of information scientists and mathematicians, bibliometrics is now a fast-growing, multidisciplinary field that ranges from webometrics to scientometrics to influmetrics. The contributors to Beyond Bibliometrics discuss the changing environment of scholarly publishing, the effects of open access and Web 2.0 on genres of discourse, novel analytic methods, and the e...

  6. Teaching surgical residents to evaluate scholarly articles: a constructivist approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, Tiffany; Hagglund, Karen; Edhayan, Elango

    2013-03-01

    The ability to critically appraise scholarly journals is an essential skill for surgical residents in their journey to being lifelong learners. Methods to teach evaluation of scholarly articles are scant in the educational literature. Residents completed a pre-test on evaluation of surgical literature. Two lectures on methodology and statistics followed. A board-certified surgeon and residents evaluated 7 articles using a scoring form. A post-test followed. Four additional sessions on evaluating surgical articles were held without the rating form. Residents completed a second post-test. Residents showed improved knowledge and skills on evaluating surgical literature on the first and second post-tests when compared with the pretest ( P constructivist Educational theory. There was a significant improvement in knowledge and the skills of literature evaluation, which persisted after the educational aid was removed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National and international scientific elites: an analysis of Chinese scholars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, F.; Larivière, V.; Julien, C.A.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the WoS with a national Chinese bibliometric database at the level of individual authors and measure the extent of the overlap of the group of authors that are the most active in the two data sources. The results indicate that Chinese scholars do not have homogeneous publication patterns: some very productive scholars mostly publish in international (WoS) journals while others prefer to diffuse their research results in national Chinese journals. Disciplines that are most international in scope exhibit a much higher level of overlap than those of the social sciences and humanities. These results suggest that the WoS does not accurately represent Chinese research activities, especially in social science and humanities, but that it also has a relative overlap with the Chinese national scientific literature in the natural and medical sciences. (Author)

  8. The Impact of Boundary Spanning Scholarly Publications and Patents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolin; Adamic, Lada A.; Tseng, Belle L.; Clarkson, Gavin S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human knowledge and innovation are recorded in two media: scholarly publication and patents. These records not only document a new scientific insight or new method developed, but they also carefully cite prior work upon which the innovation is built. Methodology We quantify the impact of information flow across fields using two large citation dataset: one spanning over a century of scholarly work in the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, and second spanning a quarter century of United States patents. Conclusions We find that a publication's citing across disciplines is tied to its subsequent impact. In the case of patents and natural science publications, those that are cited at least once are cited slightly more when they draw on research outside of their area. In contrast, in the social sciences, citing within one's own field tends to be positively correlated with impact. PMID:19688087

  9. The new scholarly universe: are we there yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Taylor

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite long-standing threats of disruption to scholarly publishing, the community has remained remarkably unchanged over the last two decades. However, underlying this apparent inertia, there is an alternative approach that may emerge over the next few years as known problems move into the foreground, and a number of key social and technical issues are resolved. Furthermore, the industry of science and scientific communication are not isolated from the current economic epoch: collaboration and cost-effectiveness are strong drivers for change. The technological components of this new scholarly universe – natural language processing, semantic technologies such as taxonomies, ontologies and linking – will come together with collaborative innovations inspired by Web 2.0 social media. The final components in recreating a new publishing model are identity and reward, and these are being resolved by the forthcoming Open Research and Contributor ID (ORCID project and the altmetrics movement respectively.

  10. The impact of boundary spanning scholarly publications and patents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human knowledge and innovation are recorded in two media: scholarly publication and patents. These records not only document a new scientific insight or new method developed, but they also carefully cite prior work upon which the innovation is built. METHODOLOGY: We quantify the impact of information flow across fields using two large citation dataset: one spanning over a century of scholarly work in the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, and second spanning a quarter century of United States patents. CONCLUSIONS: We find that a publication's citing across disciplines is tied to its subsequent impact. In the case of patents and natural science publications, those that are cited at least once are cited slightly more when they draw on research outside of their area. In contrast, in the social sciences, citing within one's own field tends to be positively correlated with impact.

  11. Towards an Open Infrastructure for Relating Scholarly Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Christopher; Couch, Philip; Johnson, Jon; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of useful relationships between scholarly assets on the web is challenging, both in terms generating the right metadata around the assets, and in connecting all relevant digital entities in chain of provenance accessible to the whole community. This paper reports the development of a framework and tools enabling scholarly asset relationships to be expressed in a standard and open way, illustrated with use-cases of discovering new knowledge across cohort studies. The framework uses Research Objects for aggregation, distributed databases for storage, and distributed ledgers for provenance. Our proposal avoids management by a single central platform or organization, instead leveraging the use of existing resources and platforms across natural partnerships. Our proposed infrastructure will support a wide range of users from system administrators to researchers.

  12. Open Access : a new opportunity for scholarly communication

    OpenAIRE

    Comba, Valentina

    2005-01-01

    Conference Overview - Introduction - A changing environment: reasons and conditions leading to the Open Access movement the crisis of scholarly communication in the late nineties: prices, technologies and policies - The main “players” reactions: publishers, authors, libraries (universities) - Steps forward: the Budapest “Manifesto”, the Paris Conference, the Berlin Declaration. - The debate and its evolution: the Open Access as an opportunity - Copyright and the relations...

  13. Deriving Competencies for Mentors of Clinical and Translational Scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Abedin, Zainab; Biskup, Ewelina; Silet, Karin; Garbutt, Jane M.; Kroenke, Kurt; Feldman, Mitchell D.; McGee, Richard; Fleming, Michael; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of research mentorship has been well established, the role of mentors of junior clinical and translational science investigators is not clearly defined. The authors attempt to derive a list of actionable competencies for mentors from a series of complementary methods. We examined focus groups, the literature, competencies derived for clinical and translational scholars, mentor training curricula, mentor evaluation forms and finally conducted an expert panel process in ...

  14. Scholarly publishing: The challenges facing the African university press

    OpenAIRE

    Ngobeni, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine the challenges that face the university press in Africa in general and South Africa in particular. It will start by examining the state of the university press in Africa, the state of the university press in South Africa, the challenges that face university presses, such as the declining purchasing of scholarly monographs by university libraries since the budgets of most university libraries are now spend on subscribing to expensive journals and serials, poorly pai...

  15. ISLAMIC BANKING AND SHARĪ'AH SCHOLARS IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muritala Kewuyemi KAREEM

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Compliance with sharī‘ah - rules is compulsory for all Islamic banks; and such compliance is monitored by sharī‘ah scholars. Therefore, the paper examines and gauges the level of understanding of Nigerian sharī‘ah scholars (the custodians of sharī‘ah rules in the country and their perceptions of the Islamic banking and its rules particularly interest (ribā. Survey method involving the use of purposive sampling was adopted to administer 1,040 copies of a questionnaire on the Nigerian Sharī‘ah scholars though some key people were also interviewed. The questionnaire which contains 19 items was designed to elicit information from them on issues such as their understanding of ribā, its uses in the Qur’an, Islamic banking products, collateral security and promotion (promos. Our findings revealed that the respondents (917 who considered usury to be forbidden were more than those who considered (871 interest to be forbidden. A large number of Sharī‘ah scholars (93.6% confused interest with usury which suggests that both interest and usury refer to ribā. Some believed that only usury refers to ribā (48.6% while most of the respondents (74.1% opined that all forms of interest are prohibited. About 73.7%, 86.3% and 27.6% of the respondents believed rahn (collateral security, innovating interest-free financial products and patronising conventional banks respectively were allowed. banking and finance.

  16. The Prevalence of Reading Difficulties among Children in Scholar Age

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Rosita Cecilia; Pierpaolo Vittorini; Vincenza Cofini; Ferdinando di Orio

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates the prevalence of reading difficulties among children in scholar age and analyses the socio-demographic characteristics of learners who presented reading difficulties in central Italy. A sample of 623 students 7-11 aged, was assessed with the Italian MT standardized tests. Information on gender, age, handedness, and other socio-demographic variables were also gathered. The study showed that 11% of learners presented poor comprehension skills. The reading speed difficult...

  17. YouTube Professors Scholars as Online Video Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how professors are becoming the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites end up opening the classroom and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web videos open a new form of public intellectualism to scholars looking to…

  18. Jakes Gerwel (1946-2012: Humble intellectual, scholar and leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Badat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Media commentaries and tributes on the passing of Jakes Gerwel were unanimous: South Africa has lost an exceptional humble intellectual, scholar and leader, and a good and great man who provided wise counsel to people in leadership positions in the higher education, political, business, sporting and philanthropic worlds. His death leaves a "big void" in South Africa. Antjie Krog wrote: "South Africa has lost its most broad-minded thinker and its most loyal critic who matters".

  19. Ranking and Mapping the Contributions by Overseas Chinese Strategy Scholars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Weiwen; Li, Peter Ping; Shu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The authors comment on an article by H. Jiao and colleagues regarding development of a ranking of overseas Chines strategy scholars in terms of their contributions to the strategy research. Topics include selection of 24 business journals ranked by the University of Texas at Dallas...... for their research; identifying authors who had published articles in periodicals such as "Management and Organization Review;" and development of a coding protocol and discussing coding procedure.....

  20. Scholarly Personal Narrative in the SoTL Tent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly personal narrative (SPN extends the available methodologies by which researchers conduct the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL. In this article, the authors define SPN, which interprets personal experience through scholarly frameworks, leveraging the power of reflective practice to understand the interpersonal dynamics of both the classroom and wider academic communities. SPN fosters disciplinary understandings of SoTL and bridges discourse barriers in order to illuminate the complex environments of teaching and learning. The article examines how widely-accepted definitions of scholarship apply to SPN and provides a scholarly approach for researchers to analyze personal experience as a pool of data, employ a range of analytical techniques, and identify significant results. Through an analysis of two articles, the authors discuss the usefulness of SPN both as a major and minor critical lens. The inclusion of SPN may enrich SoTL pluralism and contribute to the knowledge of the complex contexts and influences that shape instructors, learning environments, and student experiences.

  1. Impact of mentoring medical students on scholarly productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Husain, Qasim; Mauro, Kevin M; Folbe, Adam J; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2014-02-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate collaboration with medical students and other nondoctoral authors, and assess whether mentoring such students influences the academic productivity of senior authors. Six issues of the Laryngoscope and International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology (IFAR) were examined for the corresponding author of each manuscript, and whether any students were involved in authorship. The h-index of all corresponding authors was calculated using the Scopus database to compare the scholarly impact of authors collaborating with students and those collaborating exclusively with other physicians or doctoral-level researchers. Of 261 Laryngoscope manuscripts, 71.6% had exclusively physician or doctoral-level authors, 9.2% had "students" (nondoctoral-level authors) as first authors, and another 19.2% involved "student" authors. Corresponding values for IFAR manuscripts were 57.1%, 6.3%, and 36.5%. Corresponding authors who collaborated with students had higher scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, than those collaborating exclusively with physicians and doctoral-level scientists in both journals. Collaboration with individuals who do not have doctoral-level degrees, presumably medical students, has a strong association with scholarly impact among researchers publishing in the Laryngoscope and IFAR. Research mentorship of medical students interested in otolaryngology may allow a physician-scientist to evaluate the students' effectiveness and functioning in a team setting, a critical component of success in residency training, and may have beneficial effects on research productivity for the senior author. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. MESUR: USAGE-BASED METRICS OF SCHOLARLY IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The evaluation of scholarly communication items is now largely a matter of expert opinion or metrics derived from citation data. Both approaches can fail to take into account the myriad of factors that shape scholarly impact. Usage data has emerged as a promising complement to existing methods o fassessment but the formal groundwork to reliably and validly apply usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact is lacking. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded MESUR project constitutes a systematic effort to define, validate and cross-validate a range of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact by creating a semantic model of the scholarly communication process. The constructed model will serve as the basis of a creating a large-scale semantic network that seamlessly relates citation, bibliographic and usage data from a variety of sources. A subsequent program that uses the established semantic network as a reference data set will determine the characteristics and semantics of a variety of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact. This paper outlines the architecture and methodology adopted by the MESUR project and its future direction.

  3. Reference rot in scholarly statement: threat and remedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Burnhill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As the scholarly communication system evolves to become natively web based, citations now commonly include hyperlinks to content that is issued on the web. The content at the end of those hyperlinks is subject to what has been termed ‘reference rot’: a link may break or the content at the end of the link may no longer represent what was first noted as significant. Reference rot threatens both the usability of what is published and the long-term integrity of the scholarly record. The aim of the Hiberlink project has been to focus on this problem and then to compile and analyse a large corpus of full-text publications in order to quantify the extent of reference rot. The results are now out, and the task has shifted to alerting publishers and libraries on what to do in order to ensure that published web-based references do not rot over time. This has implications for the integrity of the scholarly record and for authors of that record. Fortunately, the Hiberlink project has progressed further than originally envisaged and has recommended remedies aimed at alleviating reference rot.

  4. A 5-year experience with an elective scholarly concentrations program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Green, Emily P.; Park, Yoon S.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Programs that encourage scholarly activities beyond the core curriculum and traditional biomedical research are now commonplace among US medical schools. Few studies have generated outcome data for these programs. The goal of the present study was to address this gap. Intervention The Scholarly Concentration (SC) Program, established in 2006 at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, is a 4-year elective program that not only encourages students to pursue scholarly work that may include traditional biomedical research but also seeks to broaden students’ focus to include less traditional areas. We compared characteristics and academic performance of SC students and non-SC students for the graduating classes of 2010–2014. Context Approximately one-third of our students opt to complete an SC during their 4-year undergraduate medical education. Because this program is additional to the regular MD curriculum, we sought to investigate whether SC students sustained the academic achievement of non-SC students while at the same time producing scholarly work as part of the program. Outcome Over 5 years, 35% of students elected to enter the program and approximately 81% of these students completed the program. The parameters that were similar for both SC and non-SC students were age at matriculation, admission route, proportion of undergraduate science majors, and number of undergraduate science courses. Most academic indicators, including United States Medical Licensing Examinations scores, were similar for the two groups; however, SC students achieved more honors in the six core clerkships and were more likely to be inducted into the medical school's two honor societies. Residency specialties selected by graduates in the two groups were similar. SC students published an average of 1.3 peer-reviewed manuscripts per student, higher than the 0.8 manuscripts per non-SC student (p=0.013). Conclusions An elective, interdisciplinary scholarly program with

  5. Close Reading and Slow Programming — Computer Code as Digital Scholarly Edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zundert, Joris J.

    2016-01-01

    Currently most digital scholarly editions are representational digital documentary editions, largely along the lines described by Elena Pierazzo (2015). Alternative theoretical perspectives take less document centric and more process analytical oriented approaches. Textual scholars have, for

  6. Scholarly Holds Lead over Popular and Instructional: Text Type Influences Epistemological Reading Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Isabel; Nuckles, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly scientific literature conveys epistemological assumptions scientists operate on. Popular scientific literature and instructional science texts deviate in their portrayal of science from these epistemological assumptions. Thus, scholarly scientific literature holds more potential for improving students' epistemological understanding…

  7. Organizational factors influencing scholarly performance : A multivariate study of biomedical research groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbree, M.; Horlings, E.; Groenewegen, P.; van der Weijden, I.C.M.; van den Besselaar, P.

    Bibliometric studies often measure and compare scholarly performance, but they rarely investigate why universities, departments, and research groups do have different performance. In this paper we try to explain differences in scholarly performance of research groups in terms of organizational

  8. The Electronic Journal: A Review of Trends and Their Implications for Scholarly Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Andrew M.

    The evolution of scholarly publishing is a good illustration of recent changes in technology. Many organizations are developing and operating electronic publishing systems that will change the way scholars, scientists, and technical professionals access information. Scholars obtain access to periodical literature in their fields through journal…

  9. Teaching Scholars Programs: Faculty Development for Educators in the Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Donald C.; Khakoo, Rashida; Miller, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article 1) provides an overview of formal Health Sciences Teaching Scholars Programs as presented in medical education literature and 2) presents information about an innovative multidiscipline Teaching Scholars Program. Method: Health Sciences Teaching Scholars Programs and similar programs were reviewed in the medical education…

  10. Open to Influence: What Counts as Academic Influence in Scholarly Networked "Twitter" Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the "h"-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open…

  11. The Evaluation of Scholarly Books as Research Output. Current Developments in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giminez-Toledo, Elea; Mañana-Rodriguez, Jorge; Engels, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The relevance and value of books in scholarly communication from both sides, the scholars who chose this format as a communication channel and the instances assessing the scholarly and scientific output is undisputed. Nevertheless, the absence of worldwide comprehensive databases covering the ite...

  12. Beyond Gatekeepers of Knowledge: Scholarly Communication Practices of Academic Librarians and Archivists at ARL Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R.; Tsou, Andrew; Naslund, Sara; Hauser, Alexandra; Brandon, Melissa; Winter, Danielle; Behles, Cody; Finlay, S. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Librarians and archivists are intimately involved in scholarly communication systems, both as information providers and instructors. However, very little is known regarding their activities as scholars. This study seeks to examine the scholarly communication practices of librarians and archivists, the role that tenure plays in scholarly…

  13. International Proceedings 2013 of Malaysia-Japan Academic Scholar Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Osamu; Bostamam, Anas; Ling, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The selected papers included in this proceedings on Malaysia-Japan Academic Scholar Conference (MJASC) 2013, are related to nano-science engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical and electronic engineering, computer science, information technology etc. This proceedings will be a source of research findings for Malaysia and Japan specifically, and other countries in general, especially among researchers, industry sectors and government policy makers. It will be served as a resourceful reference and platform to reflect the significant of the Look East Policy outcomes and products.

  14. What savvy open scholars 
know and do

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A.

    2017-01-01

    Virginia Tech "Destination Areas Global Speaker Series"https://news.lib.vt.edu/2017/10/12/open-doors-for-research-learning-and-creativity-the-second-iteration-of-dagss/An open scholar’s work can be accessed and read earlier, and by more people. It can be quickly cited and built upon, and is more likely to have impact. Open access doesn’t require paying hefty author fees: savvy scholars use preprint servers, institutional repositories, and archival data repositories to make their work visible ...

  15. A Study of Innovative Features in Scholarly Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of the Internet has triggered tremendous changes in the publication of scientific peer-reviewed journals. Today, journals are usually available in parallel electronic versions, but the way the peer-review process works, the look of articles and journals, and the rigid and slow publication schedules have remained largely unchanged, at least for the vast majority of subscription-based journals. Those publishing firms and scholarly publishers who have chosen the more radical option of open access (OA), in which the content of journals is freely accessible to anybody with Internet connectivity, have had a much bigger degree of freedom to experiment with innovations. Objective The objective was to study how open access journals have experimented with innovations concerning ways of organizing the peer review, the format of journals and articles, new interactive and media formats, and novel publishing revenue models. Methods The features of 24 open access journals were studied. The journals were chosen in a nonrandom manner from the approximately 7000 existing OA journals based on available information about interesting journals and include both representative cases and highly innovative outlier cases. Results Most early OA journals in the 1990s were founded by individual scholars and used a business model based on voluntary work close in spirit to open-source development of software. In the next wave, many long-established journals, in particular society journals and journals from regions such as Latin America, made their articles OA when they started publishing parallel electronic versions. From about 2002 on, newly founded professional OA publishing firms using article-processing charges to fund their operations have emerged. Over the years, there have been several experiments with new forms of peer review, media enhancements, and the inclusion of structured data sets with articles. In recent years, the growth of OA publishing has also been

  16. Open access – deus ex machina for publishing scholarly journals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Hebrang Grgić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the evolution of scholarly communication through scholarly journals. It gives a short overview of the historical development, starting from the first journals in the 17th century to problems in the 20th century (such as increase in the number of journals, problems of accessibility, visibility, and journal access crisis. The open access (OA movement is described. It arose from the “old tradition” facing new technologies and was supposed to be the solution to the journal crisis that culminated in 1990s. The idea, defined in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to assure free and unrestricted online availability of peer-reviewed journal literature. The beginnings of formal scholarly communication, back in 1665, had similar ideas of making research results available to the widest possible public. The idea was excellent – removing access barriers would increase visibility, impact and quality of research. Research has shown that OA articles have better impact and visibility (Lawrence, Brody, Harnad, Haajem, etc.. However, publishing scientific information has its costs. New models have been developed, some of them causing new restrictions and barriers. The most popular model is the author-pays model (article processing charges, APC – if authors can afford to pay the processing charges, their work is published and thus more visible and more citable. However, if they cannot, a new problem arises – some research results, although valuable, are not published in open access and therefore they have lower visibility and impact. Another problem is the phenomenon of the so-called predatory publishers. Those publishers use the APC model but neglect quality control mechanisms in order to make profit. Their criteria for publishing are not positive peer-reviews but payments made by authors or their institutions. Predatory publishers’ practices are not only unethical, but also illegal, and they are a great threat to the

  17. Embracing Videos in Scholarly Publishing: The IOP Publishing Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Belsole, Elena; Dacey, James P; Navas, John

    2016-01-01

    In scholarly publishing video content has emerged in recent years as a way of conveying results beyond the written article. In 2010 New Journal of Physics started a pilot project on “video abstracts” as a means to innovate and offer authors opportunities to showcase their work. Today other IOP Publishing journals also offer this option to authors. IOP Publishing’s e-book programme also has adopted video abstracts and includes embedded video and multimedia in the e-books them...

  18. The New Landscape of Ethics and Integrity in Scholarly Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B.

    2016-12-01

    Scholarly peer-reviewed publications serve five major functions: They (i) have served as the primary, useful archive of scientific progress for hundreds of years; (ii) have been one principal way that scientists, and more recently departments and institutions, are evaluated; (iii) trigger and are the source of much communication about science to the public; (iv) have been primary revenue sources for scientific societies and companies; and (v) more recently play a critical and codified role in legal and regulatory decisions and advice to governments. Recent dynamics in science as well as in society, including the growth of online communication and new revenue sources, are influencing and altering particularly the first four core functions greatly. The changes in turn are posing important new challenges to the ethics and integrity of scholarly publishing and thus science in ways that are not widely or fully appreciated. For example, the expansion of electronic publishing has raised a number of new challenges for publishers with respect to their responsibility for curating scientific knowledge and even preserving the basic integrity of a manuscript. Many challenges are realted to new or expanded financial conflicts of interest related to the use of metrics such as the Journal Impact Factor, the expansion of alternate business models such as open access and advertising, and the fact that publishers are increasingly involved in framing communication around papers they are publishing. Solutions pose new responsibilities for scientists, publishers, and scientific societies, especially around transparency in their operations.

  19. An Overview on Evaluating and Predicting Scholarly Article Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Bai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly article impact reflects the significance of academic output recognised by academic peers, and it often plays a crucial role in assessing the scientific achievements of researchers, teams, institutions and countries. It is also used for addressing various needs in the academic and scientific arena, such as recruitment decisions, promotions, and funding allocations. This article provides a comprehensive review of recent progresses related to article impact assessment and prediction. The review starts by sharing some insight into the article impact research and outlines current research status. Some core methods and recent progress are presented to outline how article impact metrics and prediction have evolved to consider integrating multiple networks. Key techniques, including statistical analysis, machine learning, data mining and network science, are discussed. In particular, we highlight important applications of each technique in article impact research. Subsequently, we discuss the open issues and challenges of article impact research. At the same time, this review points out some important research directions, including article impact evaluation by considering Conflict of Interest, time and location information, various distributions of scholarly entities, and rising stars.

  20. The changing landscape of scholarly publishing: will radiation research survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Jere; Whipple, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    As a society published journal, Radiation Research has been a successful and enduring project of the Radiation Research Society (RRS). In 59 years of publication, the journal has produced 732 issues and 10,712 articles. As a nonprofit organization, RRS, like most societies, has used revenues from subscriptions to support, in part, the life of the organization (meetings, conferences and grants to new scholars). The model for scientific publishing, however, continues to evolve. Radiation Research has weathered the rise of electronic publishing, consolidation in the commercial publishing industry, the aggregation of library subscriptions and library subscription cuts. Recent years have seen dramatic changes in how scholarly publishing is financed and new funder and institution policies will accelerate these changes. The growth of open access to journal articles reflects the information habits of readers and facilitates the dissemination of new knowledge. The Radiation Research Society, however, will need to account for and adapt to changes in the publishing market if it intends to support the communication of peer reviewed scholarship in the future.

  1. Gender disparities in leadership and scholarly productivity of academic hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Marisha; Frank, Maria G; Keniston, Angela; Chadaga, Smitha R; Czernik, Zuzanna; Echaniz, Marisa; Griffith, Jennifer; Mintzer, David; Munoa, Anna; Spence, Jeffrey; Statland, Barbara; Teixeira, Joao Pedro; Zoucha, Jeff; Lones, Jason; Albert, Richard K

    2015-08-01

    Gender disparities still exist for women in academic medicine but may be less evident in younger cohorts. Hospital medicine is a new field, and the majority of hospitalists are gender disparities exist in leadership and scholarly productivity for academic hospitalists and to compare the findings to academic general internists. Prospective and retrospective observational study. University programs in the United States. Gender distribution of (1) academic hospitalists and general internists, (2) division or section heads for both specialties, (3) speakers at the 2 major national meetings of the 2 specialties, and (4) first and last authors of articles from the specialties' 2 major journals We found equal gender representation of hospitalists and general internists who worked in university hospitals. Divisions or sections of hospital medicine and general internal medicine were led by women at 11/69 (16%) and 28/80 (35%) of university hospitals, respectively (P = 0.008). Women hospitalists and general internists were listed as speakers on 146/557 (26%) and 291/580 (50%) of the presentations at national meetings, respectively (P gender disparities exist in leadership and scholarly productivity. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C; McBride, Angela Barron; Etcher, LuAnn; Deming, Katie

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program was created to address the nursing shortage via development of the next generation of national leaders in academic nursing. The leadership training combined development at the scholar's home institution with in-person didactic and interactive sessions with notable leaders in nursing and other disciplines. A curriculum matrix, organized by six domains, was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. What set this program apart is that it immersed junior faculty in concerted leadership development with regard to all aspects of the faculty role so that teaching interactively, making use of the latest in information technology, giving testimony before a policy-making group, participating in strategic planning, and figuring out how to reduce the budget without jeopardizing quality were all envisioned as part of the faculty role. The domains covered by this program could easily be used as the framework to plan other leadership-development programs for the next generation of academic leaders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Opening access to African scholarly content: Stellenbosch University's AOARI platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Reggie Raju

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Africa is viewed as a consumer of the world's knowledge production. A significant factor influencing this status is the low research output, with the main contributor to this status being minimum access to scholarly content to support research. Stellenbosch University, a leading research institution on the African continent, is committed to contributing to changing this status quo through the distribution of its own research output utilizing open sources. Given the challenges that have plagued Africa in developing processes for the distribution of their research, Stellenbosch University has developed the African Open Access Repository Initiative (AOARI which uses open source software for two platforms that support the ‘green’ and ‘gold’ route to sharing scholarly literature: Ubuntu is used as the operating system, DSpace is used for its repository and Open Journal Systems for its publication platform. It is anticipated that AOARI will be the bridge that facilitates the sharing of research output and nurtures a culture of research production in Africa.

  4. Analysis of Scholarly Communication Activities in Buddhism and Buddhist Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Magnone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge regarding the exchange of academic information on religious contexts. The objective of this informational study was to perform an overall analysis of all Buddhism-related communications collected in the Web of Science (WoS from 1993 to 2011. The studied informational parameters include the growth in number of the scholarly communications, as well as the language-, document-, subject category-, source-, country-, and organization-wise distribution of the communications. A total of 5407 scholarly communications in this field of study were published in the selected time range. The most preferred WoS subject category was Asian Studies with 1773 communications (22.81%, followed by Religion with 1425 communications (18.33% and Philosophy with 680 communications (8.75%. The journal with the highest mean number of citations is Numen: International Review for the History of Religions—with 2.09 citations in average per communication. The United States was the top productive country with 2159 communications (50%, where Harvard University topped the list of organization with 85 communications (12%.

  5. Sugar continues to vex Estonia, Latvia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo saatis Euroopa Komisjoni volinikule põllumajanduse alal kirja, milles palus kodumajapidamistes tarvitatava suhkru mahaarvamist koguvarudest. Läti meedia teatas, et Euroopa Komisjon võib anda rohkem aega suhkruvarudest vabanemiseks

  6. Open access and the future of scholarly communication

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Katherine A

    It is impossible to imagine the future of academic libraries without an extensive consideration of open access the removal of price and permission barriers from scholarly research online. As textbook and journal subscription prices continue to rise, improvements in technology make online dissemination of scholarship less expensive, and faculty recognize the practical and philosophical appeal of making their work available to wider audiences. As a consequences, libraries have begun to consider a wide variety of open access flavors and business models. These new possibilities have significant impact on both library services and collection policies, and the call for new skills within library staffing. Volume 9 of the series Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library is the first of two addressing the topic of open access in academic libraries and focuses on policy and infrastructure for libraries that wish to provide leadership on their campus in the transition to more open forms of scholarship. Chapters in the ...

  7. Scholarly information discovery in the networked academic learning environment

    CERN Document Server

    Li, LiLi

    2014-01-01

    In the dynamic and interactive academic learning environment, students are required to have qualified information literacy competencies while critically reviewing print and electronic information. However, many undergraduates encounter difficulties in searching peer-reviewed information resources. Scholarly Information Discovery in the Networked Academic Learning Environment is a practical guide for students determined to improve their academic performance and career development in the digital age. Also written with academic instructors and librarians in mind who need to show their students how to access and search academic information resources and services, the book serves as a reference to promote information literacy instructions. This title consists of four parts, with chapters on the search for online and printed information via current academic information resources and services: part one examines understanding information and information literacy; part two looks at academic information delivery in the...

  8. An introduction to using QR codes in scholarly journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hwa Chang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Quick Response (QR code was first developed in 1994 by Denso Wave Incorporated, Japan. From that point on, it came into general use as an identification mark for all kinds of commercial products, advertisements, and other public announcements. In scholarly journals, the QR code is used to provide immediate direction to the journal homepage or specific content such as figures or videos. To produce a QR code and print it in the print version or upload to the web is very simple. Using a QR code producing program, an editor can add simple information to a website. After that, a QR code is produced. A QR code is very stable, such that it can be used for a long time without loss of quality. Producing and adding QR codes to a journal costs nothing; therefore, to increase the visibility of their journals, it is time for editors to add QR codes to their journals.

  9. The women in science and engineering scholars program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Etta Z.; Guy, Lori Ann

    1989-01-01

    The Women in Science and Engineering Scholars Program provides scientifically talented women students, including those from groups underrepresented in the scientific and technical work force, with the opportunity to pursue undergraduate studies in science and engineering in the highly motivating and supportive environment of Spelman College. It also exposes students to research training at NASA Centers during the summer. The program provides an opportunity for students to increase their knowledge of career opportunities at NASA and to strengthen their motivation through exposure to NASA women scientists and engineers as role models. An extensive counseling and academic support component to maximize academic performance supplements the instructional and research components. The program is designed to increase the number of women scientists and engineers with graduate degrees, particularly those with an interest in a career with NASA.

  10. The Library Publishing Coalition: organizing libraries to enhance scholarly publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kalikman Lippincott

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Library-based publishing efforts are gaining traction in academic and research libraries across the world, primarily in response to perceived gaps in the scholarly publishing system. Though publishing is a new area of work for libraries, it is often a natural outgrowth of their existing infrastructure and skill sets, leveraging the institutional repository as publishing platform and repositioning librarians’ skills as information managers. For decades, these initiatives were primarily ad hoc and local, limiting the potential for library publishing to effect significant change. In 2013, over 60 academic and research libraries collectively founded the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC, a professional association expressly charged with facilitating knowledge sharing, collaboration and advocacy for this growing field. This article offers an overview of library publishing activity, primarily in the US, followed by an account of the creation and mission of the LPC, the first professional association dedicated wholly to the support of library publishers.

  11. GRAMMATICAL ERRORS FOUND IN ARTICLES’ ABSTRACTS OF INDONESIAN SCHOLARLY JOURNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Wulandari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to know the grammatical errors found in the articles’ abstracts of scholarly journals published by one of Indonesian Islamic State Colleges in 2008-2010. The theory used to analyze the data in this case study is Burt and Kiparsky’s theory, namely Surface Strategy Taxonomy. This theory devides errors into errors of omission, errors of addition, errors of misformation and errors of misordering. This results of the study show that there are 172 items of grammatical errors. The most frequent type of grammatical error is omission with the total number is 72 items or 41.9%. The second is errors of misformation which consist of 57 items or 33.1%. The next is errors of addition (27 items or 15.7% and finally is errors of misordering as the least number of errors with 16 items or 9.3%

  12. The scholarly rebellion of the early Baker Street Irregulars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mills

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work provides and analyzes an early institutional history of the pioneering Sherlock Holmes American fan club, the Baker Street Irregulars (BSI. Using the publications and records of these devoted Sherlockians, I track the BSI's development from a speakeasy gathering in 1934 to a national organization by the mid-1940s. This growth was built on a foundation of Victorian nostalgia and playful humor. Yet at the same time the members of the Irregulars took their fandom seriously, producing Sherlockian scholarship and creating an infrastructure of journals, conferences, and credentialing that directly mimicked the academy. They positioned themselves in contrast to prevailing scholarly practices of the period, such as New Criticism. I trace both how their fan practices developed over time and how this conflict with the academy led to many of the BSI's defining characteristics.

  13. Identifying Anomalous Citations for Objective Evaluation of Scholarly Article Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Bai

    Full Text Available Evaluating the impact of a scholarly article is of great significance and has attracted great attentions. Although citation-based evaluation approaches have been widely used, these approaches face limitations e.g. in identifying anomalous citations patterns. This negligence would inevitably cause unfairness and inaccuracy to the article impact evaluation. In this study, in order to discover the anomalous citations and ensure the fairness and accuracy of research outcome evaluation, we investigate the citation relationships between articles using the following factors: collaboration times, the time span of collaboration, citing times and the time span of citing to weaken the relationship of Conflict of Interest (COI in the citation network. Meanwhile, we study a special kind of COI, namely suspected COI relationship. Based on the COI relationship, we further bring forward the COIRank algorithm, an innovative scheme for accurately assessing the impact of an article. Our method distinguishes the citation strength, and utilizes PageRank and HITS algorithms to rank scholarly articles comprehensively. The experiments are conducted on the American Physical Society (APS dataset. We find that about 80.88% articles contain contributed citations by co-authors in 26,366 articles and 75.55% articles among these articles are cited by the authors belonging to the same affiliation, indicating COI and suspected COI should not be ignored for evaluating impact of scientific papers objectively. Moreover, our experimental results demonstrate COIRank algorithm significantly outperforms the state-of-art solutions. The validity of our approach is verified by using the probability of Recommendation Intensity.

  14. Otolaryngology Residency Program Research Resources and Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Jennifer A; Hamill, Chelsea S; Nicholas, Brian D; Ryan, Jesse T

    2017-06-01

    Objective To delineate research resources available to otolaryngology residents and their impact on scholarly productivity. Study Design Survey of current otolaryngology program directors. Setting Otolaryngology residency programs. Subjects and Methods An anonymous web-based survey was sent to 98 allopathic otolaryngology training program directors. Fisher exact tests and nonparametric correlations were used to determine statistically significant differences among various strata of programs. Results Thirty-nine percent (n = 38) of queried programs responded. Fourteen (37%) programs had 11 to 15 full-time, academic faculty associated with the residency program. Twenty (53%) programs have a dedicated research coordinator. Basic science lab space and financial resources for statistical work were present at 22 programs (58%). Funding is uniformly provided for presentation of research at conferences; a minority of programs (13%) only funded podium presentations. Twenty-four (63%) have resident research requirements beyond the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate of preparing a "manuscript suitable for publication" prior to graduation. Twenty-five (67%) programs have residents with 2 to 3 active research projects at any given time. None of the investigated resources were significantly associated with increased scholarly output. There was no uniformity to research curricula. Conclusions Otolaryngology residency programs value research, evidenced by financial support provided and requirements beyond the ACGME minimum. Additional resources were not statistically related to an increase in resident research productivity, although they may contribute positively to the overall research experience during training. Potential future areas to examine include research curricula best practices, how to develop meaningful mentorship and resource allocation that inspires continued research interest, and intellectual stimulation.

  15. Identifying Anomalous Citations for Objective Evaluation of Scholarly Article Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaomei; Xia, Feng; Lee, Ivan; Zhang, Jun; Ning, Zhaolong

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of a scholarly article is of great significance and has attracted great attentions. Although citation-based evaluation approaches have been widely used, these approaches face limitations e.g. in identifying anomalous citations patterns. This negligence would inevitably cause unfairness and inaccuracy to the article impact evaluation. In this study, in order to discover the anomalous citations and ensure the fairness and accuracy of research outcome evaluation, we investigate the citation relationships between articles using the following factors: collaboration times, the time span of collaboration, citing times and the time span of citing to weaken the relationship of Conflict of Interest (COI) in the citation network. Meanwhile, we study a special kind of COI, namely suspected COI relationship. Based on the COI relationship, we further bring forward the COIRank algorithm, an innovative scheme for accurately assessing the impact of an article. Our method distinguishes the citation strength, and utilizes PageRank and HITS algorithms to rank scholarly articles comprehensively. The experiments are conducted on the American Physical Society (APS) dataset. We find that about 80.88% articles contain contributed citations by co-authors in 26,366 articles and 75.55% articles among these articles are cited by the authors belonging to the same affiliation, indicating COI and suspected COI should not be ignored for evaluating impact of scientific papers objectively. Moreover, our experimental results demonstrate COIRank algorithm significantly outperforms the state-of-art solutions. The validity of our approach is verified by using the probability of Recommendation Intensity.

  16. Coleridge and Melancholy: The Case of the Wedding-guest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John KOOY

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available It is an infinite merit to be able to despair. (Kierkegaard Sickness Unto Death 45Most readers of Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798 agree that the poem’s pre-modern character — its gothic setting, archaic spelling, supernatural machinery and pre-Reformation religious imagery — is an ironic contrast to the Mariner’s modern existential condition, that of inhabiting a world in which meaning is not objectively given but subjectively projected. Nowhere is this latter more sharply...

  17. The impact of fellowship training on scholarly productivity in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ann M; Gupta, Arjun B; John, Elizabeth S; Lopez, Santiago A; Lee, Brian; Lambert, William Clark

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of dermatology residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships to augment their knowledge in dermatology subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellowship training affects the scholarly impact of academic dermatologists, as measured by the h-index. A secondary objective was to compare scholarly productivity among different dermatology subspecialties. Overall, fellowship training is associated with increased scholarly impact; however, when stratifying for academic rank and years of publication activity, this difference does not exist.

  18. Peace Culture to deal with the scholar and social problems of ADHD children

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Martínez Colodro

    2015-01-01

    This Reserach Work is focused on social and scholar problems of ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) children, provoked for the excess of activity, lack of attention, impulsivity, bad behaviour and the difficulties to solve a problem by themselves. So that, we are going to speak about the social and scholar problems of these children with relation to the peace and the violence, and the importance to solve the conflicts peacefully to improve the scholar coexistence with an education...

  19. Scholarly communications a history from content as king to content as kingmaker

    CERN Document Server

    Regazzi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Scholarly Communications: A History from Content as King to Content as Kingmaker traces the development of scholarly communications from the creation of the first scientific journal through the wide diversity of professional information services today. Unlike any other book, this work is an authoritative history by the past President of Elsevier and current Professor at Long Island University, which examines the changing nature of scholarly communication throughout its history, including its research importance as well as its business value.

  20. Therapeutic abortion in Islam: contemporary views of Muslim Shiite scholars and effect of recent Iranian legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Hedayat, K M; Shooshtarizadeh, P; Raza, M

    2006-01-01

    Abortion is forbidden under normal circumstances by nearly all the major world religions. Traditionally, abortion was not deemed permissible by Muslim scholars. Shiite scholars considered it forbidden after implantation of the fertilised ovum. However, Sunni scholars have held various opinions on the matter, but all agreed that after 4 months gestation abortion was not permitted. In addition, classical Islamic scholarship had only considered threats to maternal health as a reason for therapeu...

  1. A glance on presence of Shahid Beheshti University scholars in Research Gate

    OpenAIRE

    A.Reza Asnafi

    2016-01-01

    Using web 2.0 capabilities in research fields have provided various facilities for scholars. By these capabilities, people can interact together and share their publications with large range of other scholars. Current research aim is study on presence of Presence of Shahid Beheshti University Scholars in Research Gate. Used approach in this paper is Scientometrics with Altmetrics method. For data gathering, page of Shahid Beheshti University in Research Gate was used. Findings indicated that ...

  2. 學術傳播與書目計量學 Scholarly Communication and Bibliometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-yueh Tsay

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available 無The investigation of scholarly communication is the study of how scholars use and disseminate information through formal and informal channels and bibliometrics employs mathematical and statistical methods to study libraries andbibliographical records resulting from scholarly communication. This articlediscusses the evolution of scientific research, research communication cycle, theformal communication channels (including primary and secondary sources bywhich research results are disseminated, informal methods of communication as well as the studies of invisible colleges and research specialties.

  3. Understanding Why Scholars Hold Different Views on the Influences of Video Games on Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, C. J.; Colwell, J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite decades of research, no scholarly consensus has been achieved regarding the potential impact of video games on youth aggression or other public health concerns. In recent years, hypotheses have been raised that scholarly opinions on video games may resemble past moral panics, with attitudes reflective of generational conflicts. These hypotheses are tested in a sample of 175 criminologists, psychologists and media scholars, examining both overall negative attitudes about video games an...

  4. Ranking of Croatian Researchers from Several Disciplines Using Google Scholar Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the h-index and the total number of citations in (natural sciences, techniques and humanities in this article the best 10 Croatian researchers is ranked. The list may be formed based on the h-index and the total number of citations, given in Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish Program and Google Scholar. Data for the first 10 researchers are presented. Google Scholar is the most complete. Therefore, to define a single indicator, h-index calculated by Google Scholar may be a good and simple one. The author chooses the Google Scholar database as it is the broadest one.

  5. Library of Cards: Reconnecting the Scholar and the Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mita Williams

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a presentation I gave at the Access Conference in Toronto, Ontario on September 10th, 2015. Both the presentation and this paper are explorations in three parts. The first part is a short history lesson on the use of paper cards by scholars and librarians, which led to the introduction of the “Scholar’s Box.” The second part asks the question: Can we consider Zotero as the Scholar’s Box of the digital age when it cannot capture important metadata such as linked open data? It is recognized that this is not just a shortcoming of Zotero: research is surprisingly still very difficult to share between scholars, libraries, and writing tools. This is due to an inability to capture the “invisible text” when we copy and paste citations from one application to another. The third part establishes that the digital card is now the dominant design pattern of web and mobile, and notes that these systems are largely restricted to proprietary platforms, which restricts the movement of cards between systems. This paper then suggests how we might transform the historical Scholar’s Box, by using HTML5 index cards from Cardstack.io as a means to bring new forms of sharing on the web, and, in doing so, reconnect the scholar to the library. Cet article est basé sur un exposé que j’ai donné à Access Conference à Toronto le 10 septembre 2015. L’exposé et cet article sont des explorations en trois parties. La première partie est une leçon d’histoire courte sur l’usage des cartes en papier par les spécialistes et les bibliothécaires, qui a mené à l’introduction du “Scholar’s Box”. La seconde partie pose la question: Est-ce que nous pouvons considérer Zotero comme le “Scholar’s Box” de l’âge numérique, même s’il ne peut pas capturer des métadonnées importantes telles que les données liées ouvertes? On reconnaît que ce n’est pas seulement une lacune de Zotero: étonnement, la recherche est

  6. Enhancing Critical Thinking Via a Clinical Scholar Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Vicki; McComb, Sara A; Kirkpatrick, Jane M

    2017-11-01

    Safety, quality improvement, and a systems perspective are vital for nurses to provide quality evidence-based care. Responding to the call to prepare nurses with these perspectives, one school of nursing used a clinical scholar approach, enhanced by systems engineering to more intentionally develop the ability to clinically reason and apply evidence-based practice. A two-group, repeated-measures control trial was used to determine the effects of systems engineering content and support on nursing students' clinical judgment and critical thinking skills. Findings indicated this approach had a positive effects on student's clinical judgment and clinical reasoning skills. This approach helped students view health care issues from a broader perspective and use evidence to guide solution development, enhancing the focus on evidence-based practice, and quality improvement. Intentional integration of an evidence-based, systems perspective by nursing faculty supports development of nurses who can function safely and effectively in the current health care system. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(11):679-682.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Scholars in the Nineties: Actors, Subjects, Spectators or Hostages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gil Antón

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Gil questions the role played by Mexican university academics in the transformation of higher education during the nineties. After outlining the general context of change and its importance, the author proposes avoiding the false dichotomy between restoring the past or installing, without reflective mediation, a schematic future. He suggests taking into consideration the current national academic body composed of several generations of scholars. Three phases are established in terms of the modification of academic activities during the last decades of the twentieth century, and the changes in the level of higher education are considered. Dr. Gil asks if the academics have been actors, subjects, spectators or hostages-both in regard to regulations governing their activity and in the modifications of university processes and structure. The essay ends by proposing a general agenda for research in the field of university studies, and emphasizes two problems: the need for a detailed description of the type and depth of changes, and the definition of the academic as a central actor in institutional life. 

  8. Deriving competencies for mentors of clinical and translational scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Zainab; Biskup, Ewelina; Silet, Karin; Garbutt, Jane M; Kroenke, Kurt; Feldman, Mitchell D; McGee, Richard; Fleming, Michael; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-06-01

    Although the importance of research mentorship has been well established, the role of mentors of junior clinical and translational science investigators is not clearly defined. The authors attempt to derive a list of actionable competencies for mentors from a series of complementary methods. We examined focus groups, the literature, competencies derived for clinical and translational scholars, mentor training curricula, mentor evaluation forms and finally conducted an expert panel process in order to compose this list. These efforts resulted in a set of competencies that include generic competencies expected of all mentors, competencies specific to scientists, and competencies that are clinical and translational research specific. They are divided into six thematic areas: (1) Communication and managing the relationship, (2) Psychosocial support, (3) Career and professional development, (4) Professional enculturation and scientific integrity, (5) Research development, and (6) Clinical and translational investigator development. For each thematic area, we have listed associated competencies, 19 in total. For each competency, we list examples that are actionable and measurable. Although a comprehensive approach was used to derive this list of competencies, further work will be required to parse out how to apply and adapt them, as well future research directions and evaluation processes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Prevalence of Reading Difficulties among Children in Scholar Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosita Cecilia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the prevalence of reading difficulties among children in scholar age and analyses the socio-demographic characteristics of learners who presented reading difficulties in central Italy. A sample of 623 students 7-11 aged, was assessed with the Italian MT standardized tests. Information on gender, age, handedness, and other socio-demographic variables were also gathered. The study showed that 11% of learners presented poor comprehension skills. The reading speed difficulties were more common than the reading correctness problems: about 7% of children vs 1% were dyslexics due to slow reading. There were no significant differences regarding gender, age. However, dominant hand and the school location seemed to affect the speed difficulties and the comprehension problems. The analyses showed that attending a school located in a rural area was statistically associated with the reading difficulties. Left-handed children were more likely to be slow decoders and/or poor comprehenders. These findings may be used in the early diagnosis of poor readers. These difficulties often have a chronic progression with substantial psychosocial limitations and psychological stress, so children with reading difficulties should be identified as early as possible.

  10. Evolution of the scholarly mega-journal, 2006-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Bo-Christer

    2018-01-01

    Mega-journals are a new kind of scholarly journal made possible by electronic publishing. They are open access (OA) and funded by charges, which authors pay for the publishing services. What distinguishes mega-journals from other OA journals is, in particular, a peer review focusing only on scientific trustworthiness. The journals can easily publish thousands of articles per year and there is no need to filter articles due to restricted slots in the publishing schedule. This study updates some earlier longitudinal studies of the evolution of mega-journals and their publication volumes. After very rapid growth in 2010-2013, the increase in overall article volumes has slowed down. Mega-journals are also increasingly dependent for sustained growth on Chinese authors, who now contribute 25% of all articles in such journals. There has also been an internal shift in market shares. PLOS ONE, which totally dominated mega-journal publishing in the early years, currently publishes around one-third of all articles. Scientific Reports has grown rapidly since 2014 and is now the biggest journal.

  11. Discourses on sex differences in medieval scholarly Islamic thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelrab, Sherry Sayed

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how medical authorities in medieval Islamic society understood and analyzed Greek authorities on the differences between men and women and their mutual contributions to the process of reproduction. As this research illustrates, such thinkers' interpretations of sex differences did not form a consistent corpus, and were in fact complex and divergent, reflecting, and contributing to, the social and cultural constructs of gender taken up by European authors in the Middle Ages. While some scholars have argued for a "one sex" view of human beings in the medieval period, a close reading of Islamic medical authors shows that the plurality and complexity of ideas about sex differences and the acceptance of the flexibility of barriers between the sexes make it difficult to assume that the biological knowledge about sex differences formed a unitary ideological foundation for a system of gender hierarchy. It is clear, however, that whatever their differences, medieval Islamic discussions of sex differences implicitly or explicitly emphasized the inferiority of the female body.

  12. Normalizing Google Scholar data for use in research evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingers, John; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Using bibliometric data for the evaluation of the research of institutions and individuals is becoming increasingly common. Bibliometric evaluations across disciplines require that the data be normalized to the field because the fields are very different in their citation processes. Generally, the major bibliographic databases such as Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus are used for this but they have the disadvantage of limited coverage in the social science and humanities. Coverage in Google Scholar (GS) is much better but GS has less reliable data and fewer bibliometric tools. This paper tests a method for GS normalization developed by Bornmann et al. (J Assoc Inf Sci Technol 67:2778-2789, 2016) on an alternative set of data involving journal papers, book chapters and conference papers. The results show that GS normalization is possible although at the moment it requires extensive manual involvement in generating and validating the data. A comparison of the normalized results for journal papers with WoS data shows a high degree of convergent validity.

  13. Building Coalitions with NGOs: Religion Scholars and Disability Justice Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jo Iozzio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Council of Churches (WCC, an organization of 348 member churches, is a model of coalition building particularly through its support of individuals, churches, and their ministries for the inclusion, participation, and contributions of people with disabilities in its ecumenical work. The Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN informs one of the initiatives of the WCC—faith in Jesus Christ and communion fellowship—in the journey toward visible unity and justice for people who were too often missing the banquet of a church of all and for all. EDAN and other international disability advocates have most recently embedded its agenda of inclusion into the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The United Nations explicitly recognizes the Human Rights for persons with disabilities and, with the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006, has raised protections against discrimination, exploitation, and abuse of people with disabilities to the level of international law. The World Health Organization works collaboratively in gathering data and local analyses of efforts to minimize preventable disability and maximize rehabilitation program availability with partners across the globe. These organizations, global in nature, have benefitted from the insights raised by people with disabilities and scholars working at the intersections of disability, religion, and justice. This essay examines the efficacy and opportunities of international coalitions available with these organizations so as to challenge the ethics of simple accommodations with a more robust social justice of affirmation and advocacy for people with disabilities: a new paradigm for our churches and our world.

  14. The scholarly impact of doctoral research conducted in the field of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the scholarly impact of knowledge generated as part of doctoral studies in the field of education in South Africa. The transition rate of the 97 doctoral theses completed in the various fields of education in South Africa in 2008 into peer-reviewed articles and chapters in scholarly books, ...

  15. The Citation Landscape of Scholarly Literature in LGBT Studies: A Snapshot for Subject Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antell, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a citation analysis of the scholarly literature of LGBT Studies. EBSCO's LGBT Life database was used to gather a sample of 4,321 citations from core scholarly journals in the field of LGBT Studies, covering the time period 1974 to 2010. The analysis reveals that, although LGBT Studies as an area of scholarship…

  16. A Survey on Chinese Scholars' Adoption of Mixed Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchun

    2018-01-01

    Since the 1980s when mixed methods emerged as "the third research methodology", it was widely adopted in Western countries. However, inadequate literature revealed how this methodology was accepted by scholars in Asian countries, such as China. Therefore, this paper used a quantitative survey to investigate Chinese scholars' perceptions…

  17. Resisting Erasure and Developing Networks of Solidarity: "Testimonios" of Two Puerto Rican Scholars in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Roldán, Carmen M.; Quiñones, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we share findings from a critical qualitative study aimed at better understanding the ways that language, history, and geography mediate our work and identities as educational researchers. As scholars whose particular sociocultural and political histories are often absent in scholarly discussions about language and education, we…

  18. The Cultural Ecology of Scholar-Practitioner Leaders: An Ethnographic Study of Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this critical ethnographic study was to examine the nature and meaning of cultural ecology in relation to preparing scholar-practitioner leaders. The ethnography focused on how the discourses and practices within the disciplinary setting of leadership preparation shape the identity of social scholar-practitioner leaders. The…

  19. Fostering Scholarly Discussion and Critical Thinking in the Political Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests strategies for promoting scholarly discussion and critical thinking in political science classes. When scholars study politics they are engaged in an investigation into the dynamics of governance, not a debate over personal political beliefs. The problem with a politicized classroom is that it gives students a false…

  20. The Changing Economic Model of Scholarly Publishing: Uncertainty, Complexity and Multi-media Serials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John

    1998-01-01

    Discusses scholarly publishing, comparing traditional, 80s, and present models of scholarly publishing; outlines economic factors characterizing the models: costs of production, subscription decline, numbers of articles published, editorial expenses and fees, office expenses, pressure for profit, start-up costs of new journals; and describes how…

  1. On Scholarly Communication and the Digital Humanities: An Interview with Kathleen Fitzpatrick

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Lopez; Fred Rowland; Kathleen Fitzpatrick

    2015-01-01

    In Brief: At Temple University Libraries (TUL), librarian Fred Rowland began conducting interviews and sharing them as streaming audio through TUL’s website in 2007. The following interview transcript with digital humanities scholar Kathleen Fitzpatrick offers insight into her work and a discussion about the future of scholarly communication. An introduction has been added to the […

  2. An Analysis of Scholar Athlete Attitudes and Behaviors, and Academic Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Ann Savona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how, and to what extent, attitudes and behaviors of collegiate elite scholar athletes vary from attitudes and behaviors of non-elite scholar athletes and their academic success. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature with new information about academically successful athletes. The study…

  3. Becoming a Scholar: Everything I Needed to Know I Learned on Sabbatical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranville, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The essence of being a faculty member is to be a scholar. And, the work of a scholar is to think. However, the demands of academic life correlated with mid-career concerns can form a distraction away from this essential activity. As such, the goal of this essay is to discuss matters of professional development for tenured business professors at…

  4. Measuring the Leadership Styles and Scholarly Productivity of Nursing Department Chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Ranae Bohan

    1996-01-01

    Self-perceived leadership styles of nursing department chairpersons (n=106) were correlated with their scholarly productivity. A majority viewed themselves as having a "participating" leadership style with most of the remaining having a "selling" style. A majority felt pressure to engage in scholarly activities. (JOW)

  5. Open access initiative and its effect on the quality of scholarly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mostly peer-reviewed articles published between the years 2000-2006 that discuss the Open Access (OA) Movement and its effects on the quality of scholarly communication were used. The peer-review process was critically analyzed for the importance it plays in scholarly literature. The findings indicate that the present ...

  6. Networked Scholarship and Motivations for Social Media Use in Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Stefania; Ranier, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Research on scholars' use of social media suggests that these sites are increasingly being used to enhance scholarly communication by strengthening relationships, facilitating collaboration among peers, publishing and sharing research products, and discussing research topics in open and public formats. However, very few studies have investigated…

  7. Transforming School and Society: Examining the Theoretical Foundations of Scholar-Practitioner Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Keri

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine, using the tenets of cultural theory, critical theory, constructivist theory, and transformational theory as a lens, selected theoretical foundations of the scholar-practitioner. These foundations form the framework for understanding the nature of the scholar-practitioner construct and provide insight into…

  8. Workplace Correlates and Scholarly Performance of Clinical Pharmacy Faculty. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, Paul W.; Creswell, John W.

    This study examined workplace correlates (departmental and college) of scholarly performance in 296 college faculty members from 67 schools of pharmacy in the United States. The study estimated a model of 3-year scholarly performance through the exploration of six sets of correlates: demographic; affiliation; collaboration; research experiences…

  9. The Current State of European Studies in North America and of Scholarly Publishing in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacken, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Relates how scholarly publishing in Western Europe feeds into North America. Discusses globalization, regionalism, and particularism; new models and research methodology; Biblio-Darwinism (survival of the fittest publishing languages) and the language of the imprint; differing academic infrastructures of Europe; booming scholarly-title production;…

  10. Using Google Scholar to Estimate the Impact of Journal Articles in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the potential of Google Scholar as an alternative or complement to the Web of Science and Scopus for measuring the impact of journal articles in education. Three handbooks on research in science education, language education, and educational technology were used to identify a sample of 112 accomplished scholars. Google…

  11. Author, Editor, Engineer — Code & the Rewriting of Authorship in Scholarly Editing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zundert, Joris J.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the relation of software creation to scholarship, particularly within the domain of textual scholarship and the creation of (digital) scholarly editions. To this end, both scholarly editing and the creation of software are considered with regard to the individual relationship

  12. The Formation of Community-Engaged Scholars: A Collaborative Approach to Doctoral Training in Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mark R.; Park, Soojin Oh; Tieken, Mara Casey

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Mark R. Warren, Soojin Oh Park, and Mara Casey Tieken explore the training and development of community-engaged scholars in doctoral programs in education. Community-engaged scholars working in the field of education collaborate with families, teachers, and communities to support their efforts to address educational inequities,…

  13. Chinese Visiting Scholars' Academic Socialization in US Institutions of Higher Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mo; Chao, Xia; Kuntz, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Socialization as a theoretical concept has been increasingly applied to higher education over the past several decades. However, little research examines international visiting scholars' overseas academic socialization experiences. Rooted in socialization theory, this one-year qualitative study explores 15 Chinese visiting scholars' lived…

  14. Professional Ethics Education for Future Teachers: A Narrative Review of the Scholarly Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Schwimmer, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a narrative review of the scholarly writings on professional ethics education for future teachers. Against the background of a widespread belief among scholars working in this area that longstanding and sustained research and reflection on the ethics of teaching have had little impact on the teacher education curriculum, the…

  15. Connecting Genres and Languages in Online Scholarly Communication: An Analysis of Research Group Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzón, María José

    2017-01-01

    Blogs provide an open space for scholars to share information, communicate about their research, and reach a diversified audience. Posts in academic blogs are usually hybrid texts where various genres are connected and recontextualized; yet little research has examined how these genres function together to support scholars' activity. The purpose…

  16. Scholarly Learning as Vocation: A Study of Community and Broad Access Liberal Arts College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we extended Neumann's scholarly learning theory (2009)?and Hansen's theory on vocation (1994, 1995) to explore the scholarly learning of faculty members employed at institutional types not typically recognized for faculty work beyond teaching. Through interviews with 22 participants, we studied the content of and reasons for…

  17. Librarians in Transition: Scholarly Communication Support as a Developing Core Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Steve; Bruns, Todd A.; Duffin, Kirstin I.

    2017-01-01

    Modern digital scholarship requires faculty to navigate an increasingly complex research and publication world. Liaison librarians are uniquely suited to assist faculty with scholarly communication needs, yet faculty do not identify the library as a provider of these services. Proactive promotion of scholarly communication services by librarians…

  18. Scholarly Communication in Transition: Evidence for the Rise of a Two-Tier System

    OpenAIRE

    D. Zhao

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents major findings from a research project that attempts to systematically compare Web-based and print-journal-based scholarly communication, highlighting some considerable differences between the two formats of communication, which provide evidence for the rise of a “two-tier” scholarly communication system. Implications for Open Access are also discussed.

  19. Making Use of Foucault in a Study of Specific Parrhesiastic Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckaby, M. Francyne

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe how I made use of Foucault theoretically and methodologically in a study of five specific parrhesiastic scholars. Such scholars challenge hegemony in educational policies and practices, and advocate for educational reform and societal structures that move toward equity instead of marginalization. The article begins by…

  20. When Scholarly Publishing Goes Awry: Educating Ourselves and Our Patrons about Retracted Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    Retracted articles, articles that violate professional ethics, are an unsettling, yet integral, part of the scholarly publishing process seldom discussed in the academy. Unfortunately, article retractions continue to rise across all disciplines. Although academic librarians consistently provide instruction on scholarly publishing, little has been…

  1. Uncertainty in Action: Observing Information Seeking within the Creative Processes of Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Theresa Dirndorfer

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This paper discusses the role uncertainty plays in judgments of the meaning and significance of ideas and texts encountered by scholars in the context of their ongoing research activities. Method: Two experienced scholars were observed as part of a two-year ethnographic study of their ongoing research practices. Layered…

  2. What Do Undergraduate Students Know about Scholarly Communication? A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Catherine Fraser; Hensley, Merinda Kaye

    2017-01-01

    Amid movements that recognize undergraduate students as knowledge creators, transformative work is being done at the intersection of information literacy and scholarly communication. Absent from the literature so far is research related to students' perception and understanding of scholarly communication. This paper reports a mixed methods study…

  3. Report Cites Rough Patches in Scholarly Presses' Transition to Online Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Annual reports aren't exactly beach reading, but for anyone interested in the current condition of scholarly communication, the just-published 2007 report of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation--particularly the essay on "Scholarly Publishing Initiatives" by Donald J. Waters and Joseph S. Meisel--is a page turner. The foundation's deep pockets and…

  4. Google Scholar as replacement for systematic literature searches: good relative recall and precision are not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, Martin; Vach, Werner; Motschall, Edith

    2013-10-26

    Recent research indicates a high recall in Google Scholar searches for systematic reviews. These reports raised high expectations of Google Scholar as a unified and easy to use search interface. However, studies on the coverage of Google Scholar rarely used the search interface in a realistic approach but instead merely checked for the existence of gold standard references. In addition, the severe limitations of the Google Search interface must be taken into consideration when comparing with professional literature retrieval tools.The objectives of this work are to measure the relative recall and precision of searches with Google Scholar under conditions which are derived from structured search procedures conventional in scientific literature retrieval; and to provide an overview of current advantages and disadvantages of the Google Scholar search interface in scientific literature retrieval. General and MEDLINE-specific search strategies were retrieved from 14 Cochrane systematic reviews. Cochrane systematic review search strategies were translated to Google Scholar search expression as good as possible under consideration of the original search semantics. The references of the included studies from the Cochrane reviews were checked for their inclusion in the result sets of the Google Scholar searches. Relative recall and precision were calculated. We investigated Cochrane reviews with a number of included references between 11 and 70 with a total of 396 references. The Google Scholar searches resulted in sets between 4,320 and 67,800 and a total of 291,190 hits. The relative recall of the Google Scholar searches had a minimum of 76.2% and a maximum of 100% (7 searches). The precision of the Google Scholar searches had a minimum of 0.05% and a maximum of 0.92%. The overall relative recall for all searches was 92.9%, the overall precision was 0.13%. The reported relative recall must be interpreted with care. It is a quality indicator of Google Scholar confined to

  5. Open Access Forever -- Or Five Years, Whichever Comes First: Progress on Preserving the Digital Scholarly Record

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    As the migration of scholarly communication from print to digital continues to progress rapidly, and as Open Access to that research literature and related data becomes more common, the challenges of insuring that the scholarly record remain available over time becomes more urgent. There has been good progress on those challenges in recent years, but many problems remain. The current state of the curation and preservation of digital scholarship over its entire lifecycle will be reviewed, and progress on problems of specific interest to scholarly communication will be examined. The difficulty of curating the digital scholarly record and preserving it for future generations has important implications for the movement to make that record more open and accessible to the world, so this a timely topic for those who are interested in the future of scholarly communication. View Mackensie Smith's biography

  6. Roles of scholars in the practice of combating-desertification: a case study in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Lan, Zhiyong; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the perceived importance of scholars' participation in combating-desertification programs in northwest China and analyzed the underlying factors and mechanisms. Our results show that, while various experts, professors, and researchers have participated in combating-desertification programs, their actions were often not effective. Only those scholars who understood the local situations adequately had important and positive impacts. These scholars served as information brokers between the governments and other stakeholders, entrepreneurial activity organizers for farmers, governmental representatives, or advocators for local affairs themselves. They played indispensible roles in facilitating efforts in combating desertification. The study also identified key factors that led to the success of scholars' participation in combating-desertification activities. Our findings have practical implications for improving the effectiveness of scholars' participation in land restoration and environmental management.

  7. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  8. A PRACTICAL ONTOLOGY FOR THE LARGE-SCALE MODELING OF SCHOLARLY ARTIFACTS AND THEIR USAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The large-scale analysis of scholarly artifact usage is constrained primarily by current practices in usage data archiving, privacy issues concerned with the dissemination of usage data, and the lack of a practical ontology for modeling the usage domain. As a remedy to the third constraint, this article presents a scholarly ontology that was engineered to represent those classes for which large-scale bibliographic and usage data exists, supports usage research, and whose instantiation is scalable to the order of 50 million articles along with their associated artifacts (e.g. authors and journals) and an accompanying 1 billion usage events. The real world instantiation of the presented abstract ontology is a semantic network model of the scholarly community which lends the scholarly process to statistical analysis and computational support. They present the ontology, discuss its instantiation, and provide some example inference rules for calculating various scholarly artifact metrics.

  9. Avenues into Food Planning: A Review of Scholarly Food System Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    This review summarizes several avenues of planning inquiry into food systems research, revealing gaps in the literature, allied fields of study and mismatches between scholarly disciplines and the food system life cycle. Planners and scholars in associated fields have identified and defined problems in the food system as 'wicked' problems, complex environmental issues that require systemic solutions at the community scale. While food justice scholars have contextualized problem areas, planning scholars have made a broad case for planning involvement in solving these wicked problems while ensuring that the functional and beneficial parts of the food system continue to thrive. This review maps the entry points of scholarly interest in food systems and planning's contributions to its study, charting a research agenda for the future.

  10. Open Access Forever - Or Five Years, Whichever Comes First Progress on Preserving the Digital Scholarly Record

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Bjørnshauge, Lars

    2007-01-01

    As the migration of scholarly communication from print to digital continues to progress rapidly, and as Open Access to that research literature and related data becomes more common, the challenges of insuring that the scholarly record remain available over time becomes more urgent. There has been good progress on those challenges in recent years, but many problems remain. The current state of the curation and preservation of digital scholarship over its entire lifecycle will be reviewed, and progress on problems of specific interest to scholarly communication will be examined. The difficulty of curating the digital scholarly record and preserving it for future generations has important implications for the movement to make that record more open and accessible to the world, so this a timely topic for those who are interested in the future of scholarly communication.

  11. The Art of Thinking: Using Collage to Stimulate Scholarly Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Simmons

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrating the arts into higher education pedagogy provides an opportunity for cultivating rich ideas and high-level thinking, capitalizing on the creativity that every person already possesses and uses (Livingston, 2010. As Newton and Plummer (2009 note “the use of the creative arts as pedagogical strategy enables individuals to better understand themselves, [and] to stimulate thinking” (p. 75.We extend that premise to examine the impact of an arts activity on scholarly thinking. Our exploratory study examines academics’ (graduate students and educators identity and role constructs (Kelly, 1955 to understand to what extent engaging in arts-based activities supports meaning-making and conceptualizing research questions. We asked participants to reflect on collages they created, how the collage process supported their research conceptualization, challenges they encountered, and their overall reflections on the process as an adjunct to written scholarly work. We show that the process of creating collages supported participants in making their tacit knowledge explicit, in reflecting at meta-cognitive levels, and in transforming their thinking, often in ways they anticipated would affect their future practice.L’intégration des arts dans la pédagogie de l’enseignement supérieur offre l’occasion de cultiver de riches idées et rend possible une réflexion d’ordre supérieur qui permet de capitaliser sur la créativité que chaque personne possède déjà et utilise (Livingston, 2010. Comme le font remarquer Newton et Plummer (2009, « l’usage des arts créatifs en tant que stratégies pédagogiques permet aux gens de mieux se comprendre et de stimuler la réflexion. » (p. 75Nous élargissons cette prémisse pour examiner l’impact d’une activité artistique sur la pensée savante. Notre étude exploratoire examine l’identité d’universitaires (étudiants de cycles supérieurs et éducateurs et les constructions de r

  12. The Health Equity Scholars Program: Innovation in the Leaky Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole C; Wrighting, Diedra M; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo; Becker, Joan; Hayman, Laura; Lewis, Barbara; Mignon, Sylvia; Rokop, Megan E; Sweet, Elizabeth; Torres, Marie Idali; Watanabe, Paul; Woods, Cedric

    2017-05-19

    Despite attempts to increase enrollment of under-represented minorities (URMs: primarily Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American students) in health professional programs, limited progress has been made. Compelling reasons to rectify this situation include equity for URMs, better prepared health professionals when programs are diverse, better quality and access to health care for UMR populations, and the need for diverse talent to tackle difficult questions in health science and health care delivery. However, many students who initiate traditional "pipeline" programs designed to link URMs to professional schools in health professions and the sciences, do not complete them. In addition, program requirements often restrict entry to highly qualified students while not expanding opportunities for promising, but potentially less well-prepared candidates. The current study describes innovations in an undergraduate pipeline program, the Health Equity Scholars Program (HESP) designed to address barriers URMs experience in more traditional programs, and provides evaluative outcomes and qualitative feedback from participants. A primary outcome was timely college graduation. Eighty percent (80%) of participants, both transfer students and first time students, so far achieved this outcome, with 91% on track, compared to the campus average of 42% for all first time students and 58-67% for transfers. Grade point averages also improved (p = 0.056) after program participation. Graduates (94%) were working in health care/human services positions and three were in health-related graduate programs. Creating a more flexible program that admits a broader range of URMs has potential to expand the numbers of URM students interested and prepared to make a contribution to health equity research and clinical care.

  13. Exemplum and Wundertier: Three Concepts of the Scholarly Persona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi Algazi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The current proliferation of the term ‘persona’, especially in the history of science and scholarship, might conceal the fact that it is often used in three distinct senses. One, more akin to its use in literature and media studies, denotes an individual person’s crafted image; a second notion of persona concerns ‘what it takes to be’ a worthy philosopher, a ‘true’ historian and so forth. Here, persona stands for a set of regulative ideals made flesh, of a commitment to shared moral and cognitive values. In a third sense, broader and more heteronomous than the second, persona is understood as a cultural template for a codified social role - the man of letters, the scientist and so on - emerging at the intersection of contradictory social forces: not a neat embodiment of a group of practitioners’ shared values, but more a shaky historical compromise, sometimes an exemplum, sometimes a Wundertier and often both. After surveying briefly the three concepts, their uses and some of the problems they pose, the paper exemplifies the third notion by discussing Johannes Kepler’s conscious attempts to grapple with the scholarly personae available to him. Exemplum en Wundertier. Drie concepten van de wetenschappelijke personaHet huidige gebruik van de term ‘persona’ in de wetenschapsgeschiedenis lijkt te verhullen dat het eigenlijk op drie verschillende manieren wordt ingevuld. De eerste, in overeenstemming met het gebruik in literatuur- en mediastudies, is het beeld dat een individu van zichzelf presenteert; de tweede verwijst naar ‘wat het betekent’ om een filosoof te zijn, of een ‘echte’ historicus. Hier staat persona voor vleesgeworden idealen, voor een onderwerping aan gedeelde morele en cognitieve waarden. Op een derde wijze, die breder en heterogener is dan de tweede, wordt persona begrepen als een cultureel sjabloon voor een gecodeerde sociale rol - de geleerde, de wetenschapper - dat op het snijvlak van tegengestelde

  14. Therapeutic abortion in Islam: contemporary views of Muslim Shiite scholars and effect of recent Iranian legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, K M; Shooshtarizadeh, P; Raza, M

    2006-01-01

    Abortion is forbidden under normal circumstances by nearly all the major world religions. Traditionally, abortion was not deemed permissible by Muslim scholars. Shiite scholars considered it forbidden after implantation of the fertilised ovum. However, Sunni scholars have held various opinions on the matter, but all agreed that after 4 months gestation abortion was not permitted. In addition, classical Islamic scholarship had only considered threats to maternal health as a reason for therapeutic abortion. Recently, scholars have begun to consider the effect of severe fetal deformities on the mother, the families and society. This has led some scholars to reconsider the prohibition on abortion in limited circumstances. This article reviews the Islamic basis for the prohibition of abortion and the reasons for its justification. Contemporary rulings from leading Shiite scholars and from the Sunni school of thought are presented and reviewed. The status of abortion in Muslim countries is reviewed, with special emphasis on the therapeutic abortion law passed by the Iranian Parliament in 2003. This law approved therapeutic abortion before 16 weeks of gestation under limited circumstances, including medical conditions related to fetal and maternal health. Recent measures in Iran provide an opportunity for the Muslim scholars in other countries to review their traditional stance on abortion. PMID:17074823

  15. Croatian Medical Journal citation score in Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sember, Marijan; Utrobicić, Ana; Petrak, Jelka

    2010-04-01

    To analyze the 2007 citation count of articles published by the Croatian Medical Journal in 2005-2006 based on data from the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Web of Science and Scopus were searched for the articles published in 2005-2006. As all articles returned by Scopus were included in Web of Science, the latter list was the sample for further analysis. Total citation counts for each article on the list were retrieved from Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The overlap and unique citations were compared and analyzed. Proportions were compared using chi(2)-test. Google Scholar returned the greatest proportion of articles with citations (45%), followed by Scopus (42%), and Web of Science (38%). Almost a half (49%) of articles had no citations and 11% had an equal number of identical citations in all 3 databases. The greatest overlap was found between Web of Science and Scopus (54%), followed by Scopus and Google Scholar (51%), and Web of Science and Google Scholar (44%). The greatest number of unique citations was found by Google Scholar (n=86). The majority of these citations (64%) came from journals, followed by books and PhD theses. Approximately 55% of all citing documents were full-text resources in open access. The language of citing documents was mostly English, but as many as 25 citing documents (29%) were in Chinese. Google Scholar shares a total of 42% citations returned by two others, more influential, bibliographic resources. The list of unique citations in Google Scholar is predominantly journal based, but these journals are mainly of local character. Citations received by internationally recognized medical journals are crucial for increasing the visibility of small medical journals but Google Scholar may serve as an alternative bibliometric tool for an orientational citation insight.

  16. Teaching, Learning and Interning: From Teaching Internships to Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Herteis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mount Allison University, with about 2,400 students, is a small, undergraduate Liberal Arts and Science university with a long history of faculty-student collaboration in both research and cocurricular activities. In 2005, Mount Allison introduced the Undergraduate Teaching Internship Program in which professors and senior students collaborate in instruction. The program has quickly become for its faculty participants an important springboard for teaching innovation and scholarship. Almost immediately after its introduction, it became clear that the Undergraduate Teaching Internship Program addressed two distinct but overlapping needs—the first was predictable, the second less so: (a it presented opportunities for senior students to develop skills, knowledge and values that transcend those normally associated with undergraduate education; and (b it provided a mechanism whereby faculty could engage in scholarly reflection on teaching and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning projects. In the 5 years since its inception, internship has become not simply a peripheral program but a strong thread woven into the fabric of the university culture. While outlining some constraints of the program, this descriptive paper explains the many ways in which internship has resulted in productive, mutually beneficial collaborations between interns and their supervising professors, encouraging an even more pervasive dialogue about teaching.L’Université Mount Allisson est un petit établissement qui offre des cours dans les domaines des arts et des sciences à environ 2400 étudiants de premier cycle. Son personnel enseignant et ses étudiants collaborent depuis longtemps aux activités de recherche et aux activités parallèles au programme. En 2005, l’Université a mis sur pied le programme de stages en enseignement au premier cycle où les professeurs et les étudiants qui en sont à leur dernière année d’étude collaborent à l

  17. The Outcomes of Chinese Visiting Scholars' Experiences at Canadian Universities: Implications for Faculty Development at Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Jiang, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the outcomes of the overseas experiences of Chinese visiting scholars and the implications of visiting scholar programs for faculty development at Chinese universities. On the basis of semi-structured interviews with 17 returned Chinese visiting scholars who spent six to 12 months in a faculty of education at one of five…

  18. Toward a Notion of the Archive of the Future: Impressions of Practice by Librarians, Archivists, and Digital Humanities Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Tanya; Hagenmaier, Wendy; Knies, Jennie Levine

    2013-01-01

    With this piece, we seek to interrogate the sites at which library, archival, and scholarly work occurs in order to consider the changing nature of the future of the archive. First, we consider the work of the archive from the perspective of the long-standing tradition of scholarly publication and scholarly editing in archives and libraries.…

  19. The practice of scholarly communication correspondence networks between Central and Western Europe, 1550-1700

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanek, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Digital humanities have become an integral part of the academic landscape, providing scholars with unique opportunities to explore the past in imaginative and innovative ways. Demonstrating the exciting possibilities of such approaches, this volume draws upon the increasing availability of on-line primary sources to highlight on-going research reconstructing the scholarly and scientific networks of communication that flourished across early-modern Europe. Following an introductory essay providing an overview of recent developments in European intellectual studies, twelve scholars - from Austria, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland and the United Kingdom - provide a selection of wide-ranging chapters united by a focus on comparisons between key correspondence networks. Fully exploiting the possibilities provided by online databases - the searchability of big data and new methods of visualisation - each essay reflects upon the relationships between scholarly institutions such as libraries, universitie...

  20. Il Lexicon of Scholarly Editing: una bussola nella Babele delle tradizioni filologiche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spadini, E.; Dillen, Wout; Zanardo, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the Lexicon of Scholarly Editing, a multilingual digital lexicon of philological terms, that aims to facilitate the international exchange, gathering definitions from the variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to textual criticism, textkritik, critique textuelle,

  1. Peace Culture to deal with the scholar and social problems of ADHD children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia Martínez Colodro

    2015-01-01

    .... So that, we are going to speak about the social and scholar problems of these children with relation to the peace and the violence, and the importance to solve the conflicts peacefully to improve...

  2. JSTOR's Journal-Archiving Service Makes Fans of Librarians and Scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Describes how JSTOR, the non-profit group that creates digital archives of journals, has attracted strong support from librarians and scholars, but that some find it too expensive or the elimination of paper copies potentially risky. (EV)

  3. The ADMSEP Education Scholars Program: a novel approach to cultivating scholarship among psychiatry educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susan W

    2014-06-01

    The author describes the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry's Education Scholars Program, a 2-year longitudinal, guided mentorship program, anchored by didactic instruction in the fundamental concepts of educational scholarship.

  4. New Initiatives for Electronic Scholarly Publishing: Academic Information Sources on the Internet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramalho Correia, Ana Maria; Teixeira, Jose C

    2004-01-01

    This paper will trace the evolution of scholarly communication from the 17th century up to electronic journals, e-prints, e-scripts, electronic theses and dissertations and other digital collections...

  5. Pamplin College faculty listed among the world's top 50 tourism scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2009-01-01

    The world's top 50 tourism scholars include hospitality and tourism management faculty at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, according to a study published recently in "Tourism Management" journal.

  6. Major Trends in Research: 22 Leading Scholars Report on their Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Leading scholars outline current research directions in anthropology, sociology, psychology, chemistry, art history, history, philosophy, linguistics, nuclear energy, business, mathematics, engineering, Afro-American studies, cognitive science, economics, literature, music, political science, Jewish studies, education, law, and biology. (MSE)

  7. Information and Communication Technologies and Informal Scholarly Communication: A Review of the Social Oriented Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Da-Yu; Lin, Chi-Shiou

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and analyzes findings from research on computer mediated informal scholarly communication. Ten empirical research papers, which show the effects and influences of information & communication technologies (ICTs), or the effects of social contexts on ICTs use in informal scholarly communication, were analyzed and compared. Types of ICTs covered in those studies include e-mails, collaboratories, and electronic forums. The review shows that most of the empirical studies exami...

  8. Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0531 TITLE: Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0531 Cancer Scholars Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam Kisailus, PHD; Wendy Huss, PHD ; Richard Hershberger, MBA, PHD; Anna Allen PHD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  9. The new dissemination of knowledge: digital libraries and institutional roles in scholarly publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie Owen, John

    2002-01-01

    Technological developments in areas such as digitization and networking are changing scholarly communication in fundamental ways. This paper describes the most important changes and their impacts on the various actors in the information chain. Its main argument is that the responsibility for scholarly communication is shifting from functional actors such as publishers and libraries to a more integral responsibility held by the academic community itself. Publishers and libraries would then cha...

  10. Islamic founding principles on organ transplantation and the evolution of Islamic scholarly opinions on the subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuddus, R H

    2014-01-01

    Muslims constitute about one-fourth of the human population, and a significant fraction of the organ recipients identify themselves as Muslims. A large fraction of the Muslim population is devout but unclear regarding the religious principles on organ donation and transplantation and is dependent on scholars' and imams' opinions. The Qur'an, the authentic Prophetic Traditions, and expert opinions on the subject were investigated. The sources of the Islamic founding principles on organ donation and transplantation are the Qur'an, the Prophetic Traditions, Usulul Fiqh or expert opinions based on the Qur'an and Traditions, and Maslaha or the principles of public interest deduced by the scholars. Some Muslim scholars, mostly from the Indian subcontinent, opine that live organ donation, extraction of organs from dead persons, and transplantation are prohibited. Many Arab scholars and Muslim scholars settled in the western hemisphere opine that live organ donation, organ extraction from dead persons, and transplantation are permitted, but organ donation must be a voluntary act of charity. Of late, the Iranian imams/scholars have recognized that the national government may acquire live donor organs for a uniform compensation and equitably distribute the acquired organs to patients with failing organs. The current Islamic working principles on transplantation medicine are nonuniform, transitory, and somewhat detached from the bulk of the population. How such heterogeneity is affecting transplantation medicine, and organ donation in particular, among Muslim populations warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Building scholarly writing capacity in the doctor of nursing practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a systematic teaching/learning approach to scholarly writing in the doctor of nursing practice program. The SMART Approach to building scholarly writing capacity in nursing consists of Strategies, Methods, and Assessment of Outcomes, Related to Teaching/Learning. The strategies include reiterating standards of excellence, building the discipline, dispelling fears, empowering with knowledge, facilitating independence, and celebrating excellence. Methods include scholarly writing assessment, planning and structure, evaluation and feedback, doing and redoing, mentoring for publication, and reiterating knowledge dissemination. The SMART Approach can achieve six key outcomes. Students who experience the developmental approach become stronger writers, and they achieve better course grades. Student evaluations of teaching suggest that this developmental approach is valuable, and faculty teaching is rated highly. Following manuscript development, students understand the relationship between didactic content and mentored activities that promote scholarly writing independence. Students learn that every professional activity provides a potential writing experience. Scholarly writing in nursing is a necessary skill set that can be learned. The SMART Approach to building scholarly writing capacity in nursing is effective because it uses a "guide by the side" approach as compared with traditional "sage on stage" principles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical literature searches: a comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Eva; Nugent, Rebecca; Wang, Helen; Cevik, Cihan; Nugent, Kenneth

    2012-09-01

    Medical literature searches provide critical information for clinicians. However, the best strategy for identifying relevant high-quality literature is unknown. We compared search results using PubMed and Google Scholar on four clinical questions and analysed these results with respect to article relevance and quality. Abstracts from the first 20 citations for each search were classified into three relevance categories. We used the weighted kappa statistic to analyse reviewer agreement and nonparametric rank tests to compare the number of citations for each article and the corresponding journals' impact factors. Reviewers ranked 67.6% of PubMed articles and 80% of Google Scholar articles as at least possibly relevant (P = 0.116) with high agreement (all kappa P-values Google Scholar articles had a higher median number of citations (34 vs. 1.5, P Google Scholar searches often identify different articles. In this study, Google Scholar articles were more likely to be classified as relevant, had higher numbers of citations and were published in higher impact factor journals. The identification of frequently cited articles using Google Scholar for searches probably has value for initial literature searches. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Muslim Scholars' Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceived Barriers Towards Polio Immunization in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Salman, Saad; Ayub, Maria; Aqeel, Talieha; Haq, Noman-Ul; Saleem, Fahad; Khan, Muhammad Ubaid

    2017-04-01

    Pakistan is one of the two countries where polio remains endemic. Among multiple reasons of polio prevalence, false religious beliefs are accounted as major barriers towards polio immunization in Pakistan. Within this context, religious scholars are now engaged in polio immunization campaigns to dismantle the myths and battle the resurgence of polio in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes and perceived barriers of Muslim scholars towards polio immunization in Pakistan. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Muslim scholars was conducted in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. From October to December 2015, a convenience sample of 770 Muslim scholars was recruited from the local mosques and religious institutions to participate in this study. Knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers were assessed by using self-administered, anonymous and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive and regression analyses were used to express the results with p Pakistan. The findings showed poor knowledge of Muslim scholars towards polio; however, their attitudes were positive towards polio immunization. More studies are required to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Muslim scholars at the national level to validate the findings of this study.

  14. [Google Scholar and the h-index in biomedicine: the popularization of bibliometric assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Clavijo, A; Delgado-López-Cózar, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the features, benefits and limitations of the new scientific evaluation products derived from Google Scholar, such as Google Scholar Metrics and Google Scholar Citations, as well as the h-index, which is the standard bibliometric indicator adopted by these services. The study also outlines the potential of this new database as a source for studies in Biomedicine, and compares the h-index obtained by the most relevant journals and researchers in the field of intensive care medicine, based on data extracted from the Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar. Results show that although the average h-index values in Google Scholar are almost 30% higher than those obtained in Web of Science, and about 15% higher than those collected by Scopus, there are no substantial changes in the rankings generated from one data source or the other. Despite some technical problems, it is concluded that Google Scholar is a valid tool for researchers in Health Sciences, both for purposes of information retrieval and for the computation of bibliometric indicators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Anthropometric evolution and classification of pre-scholar and scholar students from public education: Relation to food of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Aparecida Pissaia Savitsky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Program of Scholar Feeding (Programa Nacional de Alimentação do Escolar- PNAE attend students from public education, aiming the physical, mental and academic development by a ideal alimentation and nutritional education. In Brazil, as in other countries, infant obesity is increasing and there are low weight students and structural deficit, due to several factors including inadequate alimentation. The adiposity excess observed in children is associated to lipolytic profile, arterial pressure, high glucose and consequently higher risk for cardiovascular diseases, hypertension and diabetes despite chronic diseases non-transmitted (DCNT. Considering the change on the morbid-mortality profile and nutrition of todays population, this study aimed to evaluated and classify the risks of child obesity in students of public education system, from pre-school and elementary school at Nova Odessa (CMEIs, EMEIs e EMEFs comparing the results from last year evaluation. The methodology used comprehend the measurements of weight/height of 3549 students, classified in 979 students from CMEIs e EMEIs (0 to 6 years old and 2570 students from EMEF (6 to 12 years old in comparison to results obtained 2010 and 2011. The evaluators were trained and all used a digital platform–like weight scale and an inelastic metric tape. The Z-score was used to evaluate the indices for weight and height (w/h, height and age relationship (H/A and the corporal mass indice (CMI, according to OMS classification. Data were analyzed by the Epiinfo Nutrition (CDC, 2008. Statistical comparison were done using the BioEstat 5.0 program. Results showed for 2011 children from 0 to 6 years old, 2.13% had low stature or risk (H/A; 5.9%, low weight or risk and 7.64% obesity or risk (W/H. For children from 6 to 12 years old, 1.56% with low stature or risk (H/A; 4.44% presented low weight or risk (W/H and 30.33% with obesity or risk (CMI/A. Data from 2011 in comparison to 2010 showed a

  16. Christian and Buddhist approach to religious exclusivity. Do interfaith scholars have it right?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. McCoy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Buddhist-Christian interfaith scholars1 are quick to denounce what they perceive as religious exclusivity. So when it comes to the major views on just how true and salvific the religions can be, it is no surprise that Exclusivism is ruled out automatically. What is surprising is how inevitable it is that when Buddhist-Christian interfaith scholars commit to any view – whether Inclusivism, Pluralism, or Relativism – they themselves end up committing the sin of exclusivity. Whatever view they entertain turns out to be too exclusivistic for somebody, by having too particular a saviour (Exclusivism, too particular a salvation (Inclusivism, too particular a metaphysics (Pluralism, or too sceptical a religious outlook (Relativism.2 To make matters worse, the further the interfaith scholar cycles away from Exclusivism in an attempt to elude exclusivity, the further she wanders not only from Christianity, but from Buddhism as well. Thus, by attempting to unite the two religions, the interfaith scholar finds herself at odds with both sides. Truly, it seems the interfaith scholar has no place to lay her head. By consulting interfaith scholars’ own writings, this paper describes their dilemma in finding such a place.

  17. Achieving human and machine accessibility of cited data in scholarly publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Starr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility and reusability of research results is an important concern in scientific communication and science policy. A foundational element of reproducibility and reusability is the open and persistently available presentation of research data. However, many common approaches for primary data publication in use today do not achieve sufficient long-term robustness, openness, accessibility or uniformity. Nor do they permit comprehensive exploitation by modern Web technologies. This has led to several authoritative studies recommending uniform direct citation of data archived in persistent repositories. Data are to be considered as first-class scholarly objects, and treated similarly in many ways to cited and archived scientific and scholarly literature. Here we briefly review the most current and widely agreed set of principle-based recommendations for scholarly data citation, the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (JDDCP. We then present a framework for operationalizing the JDDCP; and a set of initial recommendations on identifier schemes, identifier resolution behavior, required metadata elements, and best practices for realizing programmatic machine actionability of cited data. The main target audience for the common implementation guidelines in this article consists of publishers, scholarly organizations, and persistent data repositories, including technical staff members in these organizations. But ordinary researchers can also benefit from these recommendations. The guidance provided here is intended to help achieve widespread, uniform human and machine accessibility of deposited data, in support of significantly improved verification, validation, reproducibility and re-use of scholarly/scientific data.

  18. Achieving human and machine accessibility of cited data in scholarly publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Joan; Castro, Eleni; Crosas, Mercè; Dumontier, Michel; Downs, Robert R.; Duerr, Ruth; Haak, Laurel L.; Haendel, Melissa; Herman, Ivan; Hodson, Simon; Hourclé, Joe; Kratz, John Ernest; Lin, Jennifer; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nurnberger, Amy; Proell, Stefan; Rauber, Andreas; Sacchi, Simone; Smith, Arthur; Taylor, Mike; Clark, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility and reusability of research results is an important concern in scientific communication and science policy. A foundational element of reproducibility and reusability is the open and persistently available presentation of research data. However, many common approaches for primary data publication in use today do not achieve sufficient long-term robustness, openness, accessibility or uniformity. Nor do they permit comprehensive exploitation by modern Web technologies. This has led to several authoritative studies recommending uniform direct citation of data archived in persistent repositories. Data are to be considered as first-class scholarly objects, and treated similarly in many ways to cited and archived scientific and scholarly literature. Here we briefly review the most current and widely agreed set of principle-based recommendations for scholarly data citation, the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (JDDCP). We then present a framework for operationalizing the JDDCP; and a set of initial recommendations on identifier schemes, identifier resolution behavior, required metadata elements, and best practices for realizing programmatic machine actionability of cited data. The main target audience for the common implementation guidelines in this article consists of publishers, scholarly organizations, and persistent data repositories, including technical staff members in these organizations. But ordinary researchers can also benefit from these recommendations. The guidance provided here is intended to help achieve widespread, uniform human and machine accessibility of deposited data, in support of significantly improved verification, validation, reproducibility and re-use of scholarly/scientific data. PMID:26167542

  19. Achieving human and machine accessibility of cited data in scholarly publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Joan; Castro, Eleni; Crosas, Mercè; Dumontier, Michel; Downs, Robert R; Duerr, Ruth; Haak, Laurel L; Haendel, Melissa; Herman, Ivan; Hodson, Simon; Hourclé, Joe; Kratz, John Ernest; Lin, Jennifer; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nurnberger, Amy; Proell, Stefan; Rauber, Andreas; Sacchi, Simone; Smith, Arthur; Taylor, Mike; Clark, Tim

    Reproducibility and reusability of research results is an important concern in scientific communication and science policy. A foundational element of reproducibility and reusability is the open and persistently available presentation of research data. However, many common approaches for primary data publication in use today do not achieve sufficient long-term robustness, openness, accessibility or uniformity. Nor do they permit comprehensive exploitation by modern Web technologies. This has led to several authoritative studies recommending uniform direct citation of data archived in persistent repositories. Data are to be considered as first-class scholarly objects, and treated similarly in many ways to cited and archived scientific and scholarly literature. Here we briefly review the most current and widely agreed set of principle-based recommendations for scholarly data citation, the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (JDDCP). We then present a framework for operationalizing the JDDCP; and a set of initial recommendations on identifier schemes, identifier resolution behavior, required metadata elements, and best practices for realizing programmatic machine actionability of cited data. The main target audience for the common implementation guidelines in this article consists of publishers, scholarly organizations, and persistent data repositories, including technical staff members in these organizations. But ordinary researchers can also benefit from these recommendations. The guidance provided here is intended to help achieve widespread, uniform human and machine accessibility of deposited data, in support of significantly improved verification, validation, reproducibility and re-use of scholarly/scientific data.

  20. Measuring the leadership styles and scholarly productivity of nursing department chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, R B

    1996-01-01

    Self-perceived leadership styles of nursing department chairpersons were correlated with their scholarly productivity. The sample consisted of the 106 nursing department chairpersons from National League for Nursing (NLN)-accredited baccalaureate and higher-degree programs in 10 midwestern states. Hersey and Blanchard's Situational Leadership Model was used as the conceptual framework. Their LEAD-Self instrument was used to measure leadership styles, range, and adaptability. In addition, the Scholarly Productivity Index (SPI) was used to measure the nursing chairpersons' involvement in prepublication and research, publication, editorial, and other scholarly activities. College size and status (public or private) were among the variables examined to assess a relationship or group differences. A majority of nursing department chairpersons viewed themselves as having a "participating" leadership style. Most of the remaining chairpersons viewed themselves as having a "selling" leadership style. Study participants viewed their backup leadership styles to be in a reverse order from their primary leadership styles with the "selling" leadership style the most frequently used backup style and "participating" the second most frequently used style. Chairpersons from public nursing schools reported significantly greater numbers of scholarly activities than did chairpersons from private nursing schools. Chairpersons who had held their positions for less than 5 years tended to have a "participating" leadership style. A majority of nursing department chairpersons in the study reported that they felt institutional pressure to engage in scholarly activities.

  1. Promoting academic excellence through leadership development at the University of Washington: the Teaching Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne; Ambrozy, Donna; Pinsky, Linda E

    2006-11-01

    The University of Washington Teaching Scholars Program (TSP) was established in 1995 to prepare faculty for local and national leadership and promote academic excellence by fostering a community of educational leaders to innovate, enliven, and enrich the environment for teaching and learning at the University of Washington (UW). Faculty in the Department of Medical Education and Biomedical Informatics designed and continue to implement the program. Qualified individuals from the UW Health Sciences Professional Schools and foreign scholars who are studying at the UW are eligible to apply for acceptance into the program. To date, 109 faculty and fellows have participated in the program, the majority of whom have been physicians. The program is committed to interprofessional education and seeks to diversify its participants. The curriculum is developed collaboratively with each cohort and comprises topics central to medical education and an emergent set of topics related to the specific interests and teaching responsibilities of the participating scholars. Core sessions cover the history of health professions education, learning theories, educational research methods, assessment, curriculum development, instructional methods, professionalism, and leadership. To graduate, scholars must complete a scholarly project in curriculum development, faculty development, or educational research; demonstrate progress towards construction of a teaching portfolio; and participate regularly and actively in program sessions. The TSP has developed and nurtured an active cadre of supportive colleagues who are transforming educational practice, elevating the status of teaching, and increasing the recognition of teachers. Graduates fill key teaching and leadership positions at the UW and in national and international professional organizations.

  2. Shapley values for assessing research production and impact of schools and scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Richard S J

    2012-03-01

    Performance measures of individual scholars tend to ignore the context. I introduce contextualised metrics: cardinal and ordinal pseudo-Shapley values that measure a scholar's contribution to (perhaps power over) her own school and her market value to other schools should she change job. I illustrate the proposed measures with business scholars and business schools in Ireland. Although conceptually superior, the power indicators imply a ranking of scholars within a school that is identical to the corresponding conventional performance measures. The market value indicators imply an identical ranking within schools and a very similar ranking between schools. The ordinal indices further contextualise performance measures and thus deviate further from the corresponding conventional indicators. As the ordinal measures are discontinuous by construction, a natural classification of scholars emerges. Averaged over schools, the market values offer little extra information over the corresponding production and impact measures. The ordinal power measure indicates the robustness or fragility of an institution's place in the rank order. It is only weakly correlated with the concentration of publications and citations.

  3. Follow-up of participants in the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Scholars' Program, 2006 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mindy Ching Wan; Sey, Michael Sl; Gregor, Jamie; Wong, Clarence

    2014-02-01

    The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) Scholars' Program (previously known as the Bright Lights Course) is designed to encourage trainees to consider a subspecialty career in gastroenterology. A formal analysis of the Scholars' Program performed in 2007 revealed that 82% of participants invited to the program pursued or were planning to pursue a career in gastroenterology. The positive results are consistent with the CAG's strategic plan of developing "the next generation of gastroenterology clinical practitioners, researchers, educators, and leaders" and to "attract, train, and retain the best and the brightest to gastroenterology". The present study was a follow-up analysis of participants in the Scholars' Program between 2006 and 2012. Although 93.1% of participants had an interest in gastroenterology before attending the Scholars' Program, the majority (68.7%) reported a greater interest in gastroenterology after the program. Similar to the study from 2007, the present study again illustrates the importance and success of the Scholars' Program in generating interest and retaining candidates in gastroenterology.

  4. Diversity dynamics: The experience of male Robert Wood Johnson Foundation nurse faculty scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Abraham A; Farley, Jason E; Gillespie, Gordon L; Hickman, Ronald; Hodges, Eric A; Lyder, Courtney; Palazzo, Steven J; Ruppar, Todd; Schiavenato, Martin; Pesut, Daniel J

    Managing diversity dynamics in academic or clinical settings for men in nursing has unique challenges resulting from their minority status within the profession. The purpose of this study was to share challenges and lessons learned identified by male scholars in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program and suggest strategies for creating positive organizations promoting inclusive excellence. Multiple strategies including informal mentored discussions and peer-to-peer dialogue throughout the program, formal online surveys of scholars and National Advisory Committee members, and review of scholar progress reports were analyzed as part of the comprehensive evaluation plan of the program. Diversity dynamic issues include concerns with negative stereotyping, microaggression, gender intelligence, and differences in communication and leadership styles. Male nurse faculty scholars report experiencing both opportunities and challenges residing in a predominately female profession. This article attempts to raise awareness and suggest strategies to manage diversity dynamics in service of promoting the development of a culture of health that values diversity and inclusive excellence for both men and women in academic, research, and practice contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The endangered clinical teacher-scholar: a promising update from one dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Marnie; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-04-01

    Clinical dental faculty members' lack of scholarly activity not only impacts their ability to be promoted and retained in their institutions but limits the contributions they could make to clinical discovery. Contributing factors to this situation include the lack of purposeful mentoring and the widespread faculty shortages, which increase faculty workloads. One way to address this challenge is to develop and implement formal mentoring programs, endorsed by the dental school's administration, that use reward structures in which novice clinical faculty members are teamed with faculty members experienced in scholarly activity. The Clinical Research Scholars Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine has been in existence since 2008. Preliminary data from this program suggest that this has been a successful plan for increasing the scholarly activity of the clinical teacher-scholar. Although not without limitations, this program may serve as a model for other schools to consider as they encourage their own clinical faculty members to undertake research initiatives. Similar programs at dental schools across the country can enhance discovery, research, and treatment by expanding the number of researchers who are addressing the public's oral and systemic health needs.

  6. What does it means to be a critical scholar? A metalogue between science education doctoral students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cian, Heidi; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Lyons, Renee; Alston, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This manuscript is written in response to Lydia Burke and Jesse Bazzul's article Locating a space of criticality as new scholars in science education. As doctoral students finding our place in the culture of science education, we respond by discussing our journeys towards the development of a scholarly identity, with particular focus on whether or how we see ourselves as critical scholars. Since each of us authoring this paper has a different perspective, a metalogue format is utilized to ensure all of our voices and journeys are represented. We use the Burke and Bazzul article as a platform for conversations about challenges faced for emerging scholars in the field of science education and explore how we see our role in responding to these challenges. Specifically, we discuss the barriers to publication, dissemination of research to practitioners, and how to approach these problems from a grounding in critical theory. As a result of our conversations, we conclude that there is a need to reshape the field of science education to invite more unorthodox research perspectives, methodologies, and publication formats. To do so, the issues we explore require a continued conversation between emerging scholars, practicing researchers, and practicing educators.

  7. Early Career Researchers Demand Full-text and Rely on Google to Find Scholarly Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodríguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Świgoń, M. (2017. Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1, 19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/leap.1087 Abstract Objective – To examine the attitudes and information behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs when locating scholarly information. Design – Qualitative longitudinal study. Setting – Research participants from the United Kingdom, United States of America, China, France, Malaysia, Poland, and Spain. Subjects – A total 116 participants from various disciplines, aged 35 and younger, who were holding or had previously held a research position, but not in a tenured position. All participants held a doctorate or were in the process of earning one. Methods – Using structured interviews of 60-90 minutes, researchers asked 60 questions of each participant via face-to-face, Skype, or telephone interviews. The interview format and questions were formed via focus groups. Main Results – As part of a longitudinal project, results reported are limited to the first year of the study, and focused on three primary questions identified by the authors: where do ECRs find scholarly information, whether they use their smartphones to locate and read scholarly information, and what social media do they use to find scholarly information. Researchers describe how ECRs themselves interpreted the phrase scholarly information to primarily mean journal articles, while the researchers themselves had a much expanded definition to include professional and “scholarly contacts, ideas, and data” (p. 22. This research shows that Google and Google Scholar are widely used by ECRs for locating scholarly information regardless of discipline, language, or geography. Their analysis by country points to currency and the combined breadth-and-depth search experience that Google provides as

  8. Altmetrics in the wild: Using social media to explore scholarly impact

    CERN Document Server

    Priem, Jason; Hemminger, Bradley M

    2012-01-01

    In growing numbers, scholars are integrating social media tools like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley into their professional communications. The online, public nature of these tools exposes and reifies scholarly processes once hidden and ephemeral. Metrics based on this activities could inform broader, faster measures of impact, complementing traditional citation metrics. This study explores the properties of these social media-based metrics or "altmetrics", sampling 24,331 articles published by the Public Library of Science. We find that that different indicators vary greatly in activity. Around 5% of sampled articles are cited in Wikipedia, while close to 80% have been included in at least one Mendeley library. There is, however, an encouraging diversity; a quarter of articles have nonzero data from five or more different sources. Correlation and factor analysis suggest citation and altmetrics indicators track related but distinct impacts, with neither able to describe the complete picture of scholarly use alo...

  9. CITATION ANALYSIS OF URBAN PLANNING SCHOLARS IN THE U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a complete citation analysis for the field of urban planning in the U.S. Urban planning is multi-disciplinary with a rich tradition of debate about the knowledge domain of both research and practice. Urban planning includes consideration of social, economic, technological, environmental, and political systems that are highly sophisticated, which therefore has an extensive body of scholarship. The article argues that Google Scholar is an appropriate source of citation data for urban planning and includes a brief example of one urban planning scholar to demonstrate GS citation patterns. This is followed by the results of a descriptive analysis showing general patterns of citation activity for urban planning schools. A greater depth of analysis is required to better understand the dynamics of these scholarly activities.

  10. Science diplomacy: Investigating the perspective of scholars on politics-science collaboration in international affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähnrich, Birte

    2017-08-01

    Science diplomacy is a widely practiced area of international affairs, but academic research is rather sparse. The role of academia within this field of politics-science interaction has hardly been considered. This article analyzes this scholarly perspective: Based on a literature review, a case study of a German science diplomacy program is used to explore objectives, benefits, and constraints of science diplomacy for participating scholars. While political approaches suggest an ideal world where both sides profit from the collaboration, the findings of the case study point to another conclusion which shows that the interaction of scholars and officials in science diplomacy is far more complex. Thus, the contribution is regarded as both a useful starting point for further research and for a critical reflection of academics and politicians in science diplomacy practice to gauge what can be expected from the collaboration and what cannot.

  11. Variation in number of hits for complex searches in Google Scholar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichor Matthijs Bramer, BSc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Google Scholar is often used to search for medical literature. Numbers of results reported by Google Scholar outperform the numbers reported by traditional databases. How reliable are these numbers? Why are often not all available 1,000 references shown? Methods: For several complex search strategies used in systematic review projects, the number of citations and the total number of versions were calculated. Several search strategies were followed over a two-year period, registering fluctuations in reported search results. Results: Changes in numbers of reported search results varied enormously between search strategies and dates. Theories for calculations of the reported and shown number of hits were not proved. Conclusions: The number of hits reported in Google Scholar is an unreliable measure. Therefore, its repeatability is problematic, at least when equal results are needed.

  12. The Scholar as Judge: A Contested Persona in Nineteenth-Century Orientalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan Engberts 

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Templates of scholarship, or scholarly personae, mattered to nineteenth-century scholars. A template that appealed to many of them was the ideal of the scholar as an impartial judge. However, there was no agreement about how exactly this ideal was to be understood. Should you be allowed to judge your peers, or should you limit yourself to judging their work? Should the verdict be rendered in public, or should it be a private matter? Michael Jan de Goeje (1836-1909, professor of oriental language in Leiden, was one of the scholars struggling with the judicial ideal. His discussion of this ideal with his peers, especially with his Strasburg colleague Theodor Nöldeke (1836-1930, demonstrates that scholarly personae are not just theoretical constructs used by present-day historian, but also representations of the aspirations of past scholars. De geleerde als rechter. Een omstreden persona in het negentiende-eeuwse oriëntalisme Sjablonen van wetenschappelijkheid, of wetenschappelijke personae, waren van groot belang voor negentiende-eeuwse geleerden. Een sjabloon dat veel van hen aansprak was het ideaal van de geleerde als een onpartijdige rechter. Er was echter geen overeenstemming over hoe dit ideaal begrepen diende te worden. Zou het geoorloofd moeten zijn om een oordeel te vellen over je collega’s of zou je je moeten beperken tot een oordeel over hun werk? Zou het vonnis in het openbaar uitgesproken mogen worden of zou dit een privéaangelegenheid moeten zijn? Michael Jan de Goeje (1836-1909, hoogleraar voor oosterse talen in Leiden, was één van de geleerden die worstelden met het rechterlijke ideaal. Zijn discussies over dit ideaal met zijn collega’s, voornamelijk met de Straatsburgse hoogleraar Theodor Nöldeke (1836-1930, tonen aan dat wetenschappelijke personae niet slechts theoretische constructen van hedendaagse historici zijn, maar ook een beeld geven van de aspiraties van geleerden in het verleden.

  13. Is Industry Funding Associated with Greater Scholarly Impact Among Academic Neurosurgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Kilic, Suat; Yoo, Nicholas G; Mcleod, Thomas; Svider, Peter F; Baredes, Soly; Folbe, Adam J; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2017-07-01

    To determine the relationship between industry payments and scholarly impact among academic neurosurgeons. Faculty names and academic rank data were obtained from department websites, bibliometric data were obtained from the Scopus database, and industry payment data were obtained from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services open payments database (openpayments.cms.gov). The h-index was used to estimate scholarly impact. Payments were classified as "general," "associated research," and "research payments." Subgroup analyses were done for academic rank, fellowship training, and sex. Among 1008 academic neurosurgeons, scholarly impact was greater among individuals receiving associated research industry support compared with those not receiving it. Scholarly impact also was greater among individuals who received more than $10,000 of any type of industry support compared with individuals who received less than that or no payment. This association also was seen in fellowship-trained surgeons. Female neurosurgeons were less likely than male neurosurgeons to get industry funding and were likely to get less funding. There is a strong association between associated research funding from industry and scholarly impact among academic neurosurgeons. It's unclear whether this association is a result of funding facilitating more research projects that eventually lead to more high-impact publications, if industry is providing more funding to academic neurosurgeons with greater scholarly impact, or whether it represents intrinsic academic activity among a group of neurosurgeons who are more likely to be academically productive and procure funding from all potential sources to increase this activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing the scholar CanMEDS role in residents using critical appraisal techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Kassam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this brief report, we describe two ways in which we assessed the Scholar CanMEDS role using a method to measure residents’ ability to complete a critical appraisal.  These were incorporated into a modified OSCE format where two stations consisted of 1 critically appraising an article and 2 critiquing an abstract. Method: Residents were invited to participate in the CanMEDS In-Training Exam (CITE through the Office of Postgraduate Medical Education. Mean scores for the two Scholar stations were calculated using the number of correct responses out of 10. The global score represented the examiner’s overall impression of the resident’s knowledge and effort.  Correlations between scores are also presented between the two Scholar stations and a paired sample t-test comparing the global mean scores of the two stations was also performed. Results: Sixty-three of the 64 residents registered to complete the CanMEDS In-Training Exam including the two Scholar stations.  There were no significant differences between the global scores of the Scholar stations showing that the overall knowledge and effort of the residents was similar across both stations (3.8 vs. 3.5, p = 0.13.  The correlation between the total mean scores of both stations (inter-station reliability was also non-significant (r = 0.05, p = 0.67.  No significant differences between senior residents and junior residents were detected or between internal medicine residents and non-internal medicine residents. Conclusion: Further testing of these stations is needed and other novel ways of assessing the Scholar role competencies should also be investigated.

  15. Innovation in Scholarly Communication Vision and Projects from High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter; Mele, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    Having always been at the forefront of information management and open access, High-Energy Physics (HEP) proves to be an ideal test-bed for innovations in scholarly communication including new information and communication technologies. Three selected topics of scholarly communication in High-Energy Physics are presented here: A new open access business model, SCOAP3, a world-wide sponsoring consortium for peer-reviewed HEP literature; the design, development and deployment of an e-infrastructure for information management; and the emerging debate on long-term preservation, re-use and (open) access to HEP data.

  16. Innovation in scholarly communications. Vision and projects from High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuer, R.D.; Holtkamp, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Mele, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    Having always been at the forefront of information management and open access, High-Energy Physics (HEP) proves to be an ideal test-bed for innovations in scholarly communication including new information and communication technologies. Three selected topics of scholarly communication in High-Energy Physics are presented here: A new open access business model, SCOAP, a world-wide sponsoring consortium for peer-reviewed HEP literature; the design, development and deployment of an e-infrastructure for information management; and the emerging debate on long-term preservation, re-use and (open) access to HEP data. (orig.)

  17. Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Article Editorial

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a Russian language translation of the ICMJE Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals. Updated in December 2016. This translation was prepared by V. Dengin with support from Media Sphera Publishing Group (academic editor Saygitov R.T., technical editors Solovova M.N., Shoshina M.N.. The ICMJE has not endorsed nor approved the contents of this translation. The official version of the Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals is located at www.icmje.org. Users should cite this official version when citing the document.

  18. Examining China’s Assertiveness through the Eyes of Chinese IR Scholars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huiyun; He, Kai

    China’s assertive diplomacy in recent years has ignited intense debates among International Relations (IR) scholars. Some argue that China’s assertive behavior is rooted in its perception of increasing power and capabilities. Others suggest that it is U.S. policies that triggered China’s assertive...... reactions. Relying on an original survey of China’s IR scholars conducted in Beijing in 2013 and using structural equation modeling (SEM), we empirically examine Chinese IR scholars’ attitude towards Chinese power versus the United States, their perceptions of U.S. policy in Asia, and their preference...

  19. Finding the Chinese-American Self in Scholarly Activities and Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyong Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As intellectual immigrants, many of the overseas Chinese librarians have a second advanced degree in a subject area and are active in research and scholarly publication. They are in a unique position to promote Chinese culture in a foreign cultural environment and to find their identities through their scholarly activities. The paper is an attempt to showcase some important research outcomes by overseas Chinese librarians. It illustrates how overseas Chinese librarians bring more perspectives in understanding different cultures of East and West. Their achievements in publishing and research have become part of their self-expression as Chinese-Americans.

  20. Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI4, CERN - Geneva, Switzerland, 20th-22nd October 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The workshop is a forum that is more for activists rather than theorists or administrators. It brings together people who are at the forefront of scholarly communication change. The workshop is intended as a forum for technological issues associated with scholarly communication and will take place every second year in alternation with the Nordic Conference on Scholarly Communication .LIBER, CERN, SPARC and SPARC Europe, OSI, and the OAi announce the 4th OAi workshop.

  1. Der Einsatz von Google Scholar dargestellt an ausgewählten Universitätsbibliotheken im Raum Wien

    OpenAIRE

    Kurz, Natascha

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years a number of academic search engines have been developed to simplify the search for academic documents. Examples of such search engines are SciTopia, Worldwidescience and Google Scholar amongst others, but this paper only focuses on the tracing service of Google. Google Scholar scans exclusively academic documents but payment is required if someone wants to download the full text of a document. However, Google Scholar permits access to all abstracts of the documents. This...

  2. Paths of Discovery: Comparing the Search Effectiveness of EBSCO Discovery Service, Summon, Google Scholar, and Conventional Library Resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asher, A. D; Duke, L. M; Wilson, S

    2013-01-01

      In 2011, researchers at Bucknell University and Illinois Wesleyan University compared the search efficacy of Serial Solutions Summon, EBSCO Discovery Service, Google Scholar, and conventional library database...

  3. Towards an easier creation of three-dimensional data for embedding into scholarly 3D PDF (Portable Document Format) files

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The Portable Document Format (PDF) allows for embedding three-dimensional (3D) models and is therefore particularly suitable to communicate respective data, especially as regards scholarly articles...

  4. Social Media and the 21st-Century Scholar: How You Can Harness Social Media to Amplify Your Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa M; Stukus, David; Leppink, Jimmie; Duque, Lina; Bigham, Blair L; Mehta, Neil; Thoma, Brent

    2017-11-15

    To many physicians and professionals, social media seems to be a risky business. However, recent literature has shown that there is potential to enhance your scholarly brand by engaging your stakeholders online. In this article, we discuss the opportunities presented to modern scholars by social media. Using case studies, we highlight two success stories around how scientists and scholars might use social media to enhance their careers. We also outline five key steps you can follow to build and manage your scholarly presence online. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Undoing the sleights of hand: Prophets and scholars – two mythic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By comparing the historical recalibration of the myth of the Mother of the Gods in Athens with the scholarly construction of the mysteries in nineteenth and twentieth century religio-historical scholarship, this essay argues that just as primary practitioners of religious discourse engage in religious mythmaking, so too do ...

  6. The evaluation of scientific monograph and publisher's role: the spanish project Scholarly Publishers Indicators (SPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Capaccioni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the issue about the quality assessment of scientific monograph and the role of publishers in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences, focusing on the Spanish project Scholarly Publishers Indicators (SPI. This project was born to identify and explore specific quality indicators for scientific books, starting from the opinion of SSH Spanish experts.

  7. A nineteenth-century Ottoman Kurdish scholar in South Africa: Abu Bakr Efendi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, M.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Coming from a region where the three major languages of Islam meet, Kurdish `ulama have often played the role of cultural brokers between the Arabic, Persian and Turkish speaking worlds. Scholars and mystics such as Ibrahim al-Kurani, Mawlana Khalid, Muhammad Amin al-Kurdi and Said-i Nursi played

  8. The Impact of High School on the Leadership Development of African American Male Scholar-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Rhema; Harrison, C. Keith; Bukstein, Scott; Martin, Brandon E.; Lawerence, Malia; Parks, Cliff

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how the high school setting assisted the leadership development of African American males. Additionally, we explored how the leadership developed in high school was applied in the post-high school setting. We utilized purposeful sampling to identify and recruit African American male scholar-athletes (N =…

  9. A Bibliometric Study of Scholarly Articles Published by Library and Information Science Authors about Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandbois, Jennifer; Beheshti, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to gain a greater understanding of the development of open access practices amongst library and information science authors, since their role is integral to the success of the broader open access movement. Method: Data were collected from scholarly articles about open access by library and information science authors…

  10. Education Scholars' Perceptions and Practices toward Open Access Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingford, Lori Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Although open access publishing has been available since 1998, we know little regarding scholars' perceptions and practices toward publishing in open access outlets, especially in the social science community. Open access publishing has been slow to penetrate the field of education, yet the potential impact of open access could make this…

  11. Entrepreneurial University: Concurrent Practices in the US Business Higher Education System A Romanian Fulbright Scholar's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunescu, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses a model of entrepreneurial university embraced by American business schools as perceived by a Romanian Fulbright scholar. The purpose of this study was to highlight the practices pursued by the US entrepreneurial universities in their journey towards increasing performance excellence and strengthening the prestige of the…

  12. Scholarly Productivity and Impact of School Psychology Faculty in APA-Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.; Kranzler, John H.; Daley, Matt L.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to conduct a normative assessment of the research productivity and scholarly impact of tenured and tenure-track faculty in school psychology programs accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Using the PsycINFO database, productivity and impact were examined for the field as a whole and by…

  13. Institutions and Scholars Face Ethical Dilemmas over Pursuit of Research with Commercial Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1987-01-01

    Increased university efforts to help faculty members transfer the results of their research from the laboratory to the marketplace are posing ethical dilemmas for both institutions and scholars. Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing is cited, as are biotechnology developments, and secrecy and competitiveness issues. (LB)

  14. Building Scholarly Writers: Student Perspectives on Peer Review in a Doctoral Writing Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Margaret Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Peer review was used as a primary pedagogical tool in a scholarly writing course for social work doctoral students. To gauge student response to peer review and learning as a result of peer review, the instructor used narrative analysis to organize student comments into themes. Themes identified included initial trepidation, "no pain, no…

  15. Talking with Scholars: Developing a Research Environment for Oral History Collections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kemman (Max); S. Scagliola (Stef); F.M.G. de Jong (Franciska); R.J.F. Ordelman (Roeland)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractScholars are yet to make optimal use of Oral History collections. For the uptake of digital research tools in the daily working practice of researchers, practices and conventions commonly adhered to in the subfields of the humanities should be taken into account during development,

  16. Indigenous Australian autobiography and the question of genre: an analysis of scholarly discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Haag

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the different genre applications to Indigenous Australian autobiographies. Scholarship has not employed a consistent genre designation for this literature. This article identifies the reasons for a particular genre choice in scholarship and draws on interviews with scholars and authors to test their motivation for either adopting or rejecting the term 'autobiography' for Indigenous life narratives.

  17. Using Reciprocal Peer Review to Help Graduate Students Develop Scholarly Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Betsy; Major, Claire Howell

    2008-01-01

    We developed an innovative instructional method to actively engage students in writing and critiquing scholarly work. We tested the effectiveness of this pedagogy using a mixed methods research design. Compared to control group peers, students in the experimental classes perceived gains in their own writing, research ability, and motivation to…

  18. Recruitment of Underrepresented Minority Researchers into HIV Prevention Research: The HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erica L.; Griffith, Sam B.; Jennings, Larissa; Dyer, Typhanye V.; Mayer, Kenneth; Wheeler, Darrell

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Most U.S. investigators in the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) have been of majority race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Research participants, in contrast, have been disproportionately from racial/ethnic minorities and men who have sex with men (MSM), reflecting the U.S. epidemic. We initiated and subsequently evaluated the HPTN Scholars Program that mentors early career investigators from underrepresented minority groups. Scholars were affiliated with the HPTN for 12–18 months, mentored by a senior researcher to analyze HPTN study data. Participation in scientific committees, trainings, protocol teams, and advisory groups was facilitated, followed by evaluative exit surveys. Twenty-six trainees have produced 17 peer-reviewed articles to date. Research topics typically explored health disparities and HIV prevention among black and Hispanic MSM and at-risk black women. Most scholars (81% in the first five cohorts) continued HIV research after program completion. Alumni reported program-related career benefits and subsequent funding successes. Their feedback also suggested that we must improve the scholars' abilities to engage new research protocols that are developed within the network. Mentored engagement can nurture the professional development of young researchers from racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. Minority scientists can benefit from training and mentoring within research consortia, whereas the network research benefits from perspectives of underrepresented minority scientists. PMID:29145745

  19. Numeracy: Open-Access Publishing to Reduce the Cost of Scholarly Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Chavez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Each fiscal year, as academic librarians throughout the United States prepare materials budgets, a national “groan” ensues. Regardless of their format (i.e. print or digital, serial subscription costs are escalating, in the process impacting the role of the library in advancing scholarly communication . This paper examines some of the economic issues concerning open-access (OA journal publishing. The importance of quantitative literacy is suggested for librarians and academics seeking a better understanding of alternatives to traditional journal subscription models and to anyone considering ventures into OA publishing. Quantitative literacy is essential for managing alternatives to the rising cost of scholarly communication.The OA movement is gaining traction at the national level, following mandates from the National Institutes of Health and at some large research universities that host institutional repositories. Science faculty has been engaged in scholarly communication OA models since the 1970s. More broadly, discussions in academe have focused on OA and its impact on peer review, promotion and tenure, intellectual property rights, and measures of institutional and faculty productivity. Studies concerning the OA movement’s economics are most commonly reported in academic librarianship literature, a trend that may serve as a barrier to a broader understanding of OA’s role in scholarly communication. This paper provides background information on the crisis in serials costs and suggests that metrics favor OA models publishing models. A concluding proposal concerning library-funded OA serial collections is offered as a catalyst for further discussions.

  20. Scholarly Performance and Related Variables: A Comparison of Pharmacy Practice Faculty and Department Chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of 296 pharmacy practice faculty and 57 department heads concerning scholarship found differences between the groups in age, experience, tenure, and workload. Administrators found the department environment more supportive and resources more satisfactory than did faculty. The groups produced about the same amount of scholarly work.…

  1. Enhancing Scholarly Publications: Developing Hybrid Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankowski, N.W.; Scharnhorst, A.; Tatum, Z.; Tatum, C.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing publications has a long history but is gaining acceleration as authors and publishers explore electronic tablets as devices for dissemination and presentation. Enhancement of scholarly publications, in contrast, more often takes place in a Web environment and is coupled with presentation

  2. Research Productivity and Scholarly Impact of APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs: 2005-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, John H.; Grapin, Sally L.; Daley, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the research productivity and scholarly impact of faculty in APA-accredited school psychology programs using data in the PsycINFO database from 2005 to 2009. We ranked doctoral programs on the basis of authorship credit, number of publications, and number of citations. In addition, we examined the primary publication outlets of…

  3. Academic performance of day scholars versus boarders in pharmacology examinations of a medical school in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Rizwan; Shinwari, Laiyla; Izzat, Saadia

    2016-09-01

    To compare the academic performance of day scholar and boarder students in Pharmacology examinations. This comparative study was conducted at Rehman Medical College, Peshawar, Pakistan, from June to September, 2015. It comprised third-year medical students of the sessions 2013-14 and 2014-15.The record of the results of examinations, which had already been conducted, were assessed. All the exams had two components, i.e. multiple-choice questions and short-essay questions. Students were categorised into 4 groups according to their academic performance: those who got 80% marks (Group 4). SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Of the 200 students, 159(79.5%) were day scholars and 41(20.5%) were boarders. In multiple-choice questions, 29(70.7%) boarder students were in Group 2, while none of them was in Group 4. In short-essay questions, 11(26.8%) of them were in Group 1 and 17(41.5%) in Group 2. Results of day scholars' multiple-choice questions exams showed 93(58.5%) were in Group 2 and 2(1.3%) in Group 4. In short-essay questions, 63(39.6%) were in Group 2 (p>o.o5 each). No significant difference was found between the academic performance of boarders and day scholars.

  4. Growing together: a qualitative study of leading nurse scholars in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turale, S; Klunklin, A; Chontawan, R

    2010-06-01

    Asia-Pacific nursing education and research is growing but little is known about the nature and development of nursing scholarship in the region. This qualitative study explored the perspectives of 14 leading Thai scholars about the development, facilitators and barriers relating to Thailand's nursing scholarship. In-depth interviews were digitally recorded, and data were subjected to content analysis. Five themes arose: (1) growing together, (2) visionary leadership, (3) external support to grow nurse scholars, (4) developing nursing through research, and (5) barriers to scholarship. A history of visionary nursing leadership was revealed, underpinned by leaders' values of growing nursing together. Resource sharing among universities, and a significant number of scholarships for study abroad were major facilitators of scholarship growth. Barriers to scholarship included high teaching loads, especially for newly graduated faculty; a low rate of research publications; not enough mentorship for research and changes to teaching practice; and a wide range of different agencies providing courses for entry to practice. Scholarship development in Thailand is a role model for a number of South-East Asian countries, with inclusiveness and collaboration to facilitate the growth of nursing education inside and outside of the country as a hallmark of its character. However, against a backdrop of nursing shortages, Thai scholars are challenged, in the future, to produce meaningful research outcomes, including publications of studies; to collaborate with other health professionals; change practices to overcome high teaching loads; and provide the much needed mentorship for young scholars.

  5. The Necessity of the Faculty Mentor in the Development of the Artist-Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, William R.

    A faculty mentor is that person in the university theatre department who initiates students into not only the world of subject matter but also the world of scholarly and academic action. A mentor trains a "thinker of the theatre" to take a place in the intelligentsia that is responsible for producing art and retaining the stewardship of artistic…

  6. Undoing the sleights of hand: Prophets and scholars – two mythic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    The answers to these questions are quite diverse, depending on the ideological position and localisation of the .... scholarly production” (to coin a phrase in imitation of Pierre Bourdieu) as the matrixed – and “martricising” ... “reflexive sociology” which brings into purview both the object of perception/knowledge and the act of ...

  7. Web Usage Mining Analysis of Federated Search Tools for Egyptian Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Khaled A.; Hassan, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the behaviour of the Egyptian scholars while accessing electronic resources through two federated search tools. The main purpose of this article is to provide guidance for federated search tool technicians and support teams about user issues, including the need for training. Design/methodology/approach: Log…

  8. Understanding the Information Needs of Academic Scholars in Agricultural and Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppu, Pali U.; Gruber, Anne Marie

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the information needs of faculty and graduate students in agricultural and biological sciences. Qualitative research methods, interviews and focus groups, were used to examine what types of information these scholars need for their research, teaching and learning, how they seek that information, and perceptions. The…

  9. Presencia de los repositorios digitales de la UNMSM en Google Scholar: 2005-2015

    OpenAIRE

    Alhuay-Quispe, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Este artículo analiza la presencia de los repositorios digitales de la UNMSM en el buscador académico Google Scholar a partir de la identificación de la cantidad de citas y documentos indexados por cada repositorio y publicados entre 2005-2015. Los repositorios estudiados son Ateneo, Cybertesis y Revistas de Investigación.

  10. Apprenticeship in Scholarly Publishing: A Student Perspective on Doctoral Supervisors’ Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although a large body of literature has suggested that doctoral supervisors play an important role in their students’ attempts at scholarly publishing, few studies have focused specifically on what roles they play. This study sought to address this gap by zooming in on the various roles a group of Chinese doctoral students found their supervisors playing in their scholarly publishing endeavors. Our analysis revealed four important roles played by the supervisors: ‘prey’ searchers, managers, manuscript correctors and masters. The results showed that the supervisors not only facilitated the doctoral students’ publishing output, but also fostered their apprenticeship in scholarly publishing and the academic community. However, the results also unveiled a general unavailability of sorely-needed detailed and specific guidance on students’ early publishing attempts and some supervisors’ limited ability to correct students’ English manuscripts. These findings underscore the important contributions doctoral supervisors can make to their students’ academic socialization. They also suggest a need for external editorial assistance with doctoral students’ English manuscripts and ample opportunities for their scaffolded initiation into the tacit conventions and practices of scholarly publishing.

  11. Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Use of Scholarly Network for Doctoral Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ronald; Hassell, Deliesha

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Community Network (DC) is a learner driven, scholarly community designed to help online doctoral learners successfully complete their dissertation and program of study. While digital natives grew up in an environment immersed in technology, digital immigrants adapted to this environment through their ability to learn and adjust to…

  12. Creating Inclusive Space for Aboriginal Scholars and Scholarship in the Academy: Implications for Employment Equity Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Many Canadian universities report an under-representation of Aboriginal scholars in their professoriate. Employment equity policy seeks to redress the under-representation of marginalized groups in the Canadian workforce, including Aboriginal peoples. This article presents the findings of a case study which sought to examine, from the perspective…

  13. Comparison of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar: strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Pitsouni, Eleni I; Malietzis, George A; Pappas, Georgios

    2008-02-01

    The evolution of the electronic age has led to the development of numerous medical databases on the World Wide Web, offering search facilities on a particular subject and the ability to perform citation analysis. We compared the content coverage and practical utility of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. The official Web pages of the databases were used to extract information on the range of journals covered, search facilities and restrictions, and update frequency. We used the example of a keyword search to evaluate the usefulness of these databases in biomedical information retrieval and a specific published article to evaluate their utility in performing citation analysis. All databases were practical in use and offered numerous search facilities. PubMed and Google Scholar are accessed for free. The keyword search with PubMed offers optimal update frequency and includes online early articles; other databases can rate articles by number of citations, as an index of importance. For citation analysis, Scopus offers about 20% more coverage than Web of Science, whereas Google Scholar offers results of inconsistent accuracy. PubMed remains an optimal tool in biomedical electronic research. Scopus covers a wider journal range, of help both in keyword searching and citation analysis, but it is currently limited to recent articles (published after 1995) compared with Web of Science. Google Scholar, as for the Web in general, can help in the retrieval of even the most obscure information but its use is marred by inadequate, less often updated, citation information.

  14. Shadow Scholars and the Rise of the Dissertation Service Industry: Can We Maintain Academic Integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeffry L.

    2016-01-01

    Notable interest was generated when Dave Tomar's book, "The Shadow Scholar: How I Made a Living Helping College Kids Cheat," was first published. While ghostwriters and paper mills have long been part of the academic landscape, a far more ominous enterprise has appeared that targets master's and doctoral students seeking assistance with…

  15. Undoing the sleights of hand: Prophets and scholars – two mythic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    such as this, namely this is a reflection on the nature of scholarly or academic inquiry. The second phrase ..... of horizontal and vertical relationships running from significant others such as parent vis-à-vis child, ...... Romantic idealizes some place or state: Italy, India, the North America, fantasy worlds, the forest, night, the ...

  16. Google Scholar makes it Hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306025; van Kreveld, Marc|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07492253X

    2014-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal prole pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are the

  17. Google Scholar makes it hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.; van Kreveld, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal profile pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are

  18. JSTOR: A Non-Profit Working To Redefine Access to the Scholarly Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1997-01-01

    As costs of subscriptions to scholarly journals rise, libraries struggle to house their collections. Journal Storage (JSTOR) is building a reliable and comprehensive archive of important literature, filling the gaps in existing collections of backfiles, fostering preservation, increasing access, finding ways to reduce storage and care costs, and…

  19. Socrates in the Boardroom: Why Research Universities Should Be Led by Top Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Amanda H.

    2009-01-01

    "Socrates in the Boardroom" argues that world-class scholars, not administrators, make the best leaders of research universities. Amanda Goodall cuts through the rhetoric and misinformation swirling around this contentious issue--such as the assertion that academics simply don't have the managerial expertise needed to head the world's leading…

  20. Interdisciplinary promises versus practices in medicine: the decoupled experiences of social sciences and humanities scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mathieu; Paradis, Elise; Kuper, Ayelet

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores social scientists' and humanities (SSH) scholars' integration within the academic medical research environment. Three questions guided our investigation: Do SSH scholars adapt to the medical research environment? How do they navigate their career within a culture that may be inconsistent with their own? What strategies do they use to gain legitimacy? The study builds on three concepts: decoupling, doxa, and epistemic habitus. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with SSH scholars working in 11 faculties of medicine across Canada. Participants were selected through purposeful and snowball sampling. The data were analyzed by thematic content analysis. For most of our participants, moving into medicine has been a challenging experience, as their research practices and views of academic excellence collided with those of medicine. In order to achieve some level of legitimacy more than half of our participants altered their research practices. This resulted in a dissonance between their internalized appreciation of academic excellence and their new, altered, research practices. Only six participants experienced no form of challenge or dissonance after moving into medicine, while three decided to break with their social science and humanities past and make the medical research community their new home. We conclude that the work environment for SSH scholars in faculties of medicine does not deliver on the promise of inclusiveness made by calls for interdisciplinarity in Canadian health research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of Monte Carlo simulation: a scientometric analysis of scholarly literature

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia; Bell, Zane W; Dressendorfer, Paul V

    2010-01-01

    A scientometric analysis of Monte Carlo simulation and Monte Carlo codes has been performed over a set of representative scholarly journals related to radiation physics. The results of this study are reported and discussed. They document and quantitatively appraise the role of Monte Carlo methods and codes in scientific research and engineering applications.

  2. What Is Critical Theory? An Essay for the Uninitiated Organizational Communication Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tricia L.

    This paper explores and attempts to answer some of the fundamental questions and challenges brought against organizational communication scholars who follow the critical tradition. Specifically addressed in the paper are the following issues: (1) the vocabulary of critical theory; (2) assumptions and goals of critical theory; (3) critical theory…

  3. Education Scholars' Evolving Uses of Twitter as a Conference Backchannel and Social Commentary Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Royce; Veletsianos, George

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly community faces a lack of large-scale research examining how students and professors use social media in authentic contexts and how such use changes over time. This study uses data mining methods to better understand academic Twitter use during, around, and between the 2014 and 2015 American Educational Research Association annual…

  4. Institutional Repositories, Open Access, and Scholarly Communication: A Study of Conflicting Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena; Chawner, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The Open Access movement of the past decade, and institutional repositories developed by universities and academic libraries as a part of that movement, have openly challenged the traditional scholarly communication system. This article examines the growth of repositories around the world, and summarizes a growing body of evidence of the response…

  5. Institutional Repositories: Faculty Deposits, Marketing, and the Reform of Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Ronald C.; Wilson, Myoung C.

    2008-01-01

    This study explores faculty deposits in institutional repositories (IR) within selected disciplines and identifies the diverse navigational paths to IR sites from library Web site homepages. The statistical relationship between the development of an IR and the presence of a Web site dedicated to the reform of traditional scholarly communication is…

  6. Thinking and Caring about Indigenous Peoples' Human Rights: Swedish Students Writing History beyond Scholarly Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to national and international guidelines, schools should promote historical thinking and foster moral values. Scholars have debated, but not analysed in depth in practice, whether history education can and should hold a normative dimension. This study analyses current human rights education in two Swedish senior high school groups, in…

  7. Augmented reality as a tool for mobile learning and a method for scholarly dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Mielcke

    The aim of this paper is to present the innovative potentials that occur when we combine the assets of smartphones, techniques of augmented reality, and the distribution of scholarly knowledge. I argue that there is a two-way potential embedded in this triad, as it offers new paths for learning...

  8. A Literature Exercise Using Scifinder Scholar for the Sophomore-Level Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Ian J.

    2005-01-01

    An exercise developed for use in the sophomore organic course that introduces students to the process of searching "Chemical Abstracts" with SciFinder Scholar using chiral auxiliaries as example compounds is described. The exercise provides a direct introduction to the chemical literature for students at an early stage of their undergraduate…

  9. Peace Culture to deal with the scholar and social problems of ADHD children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martínez Colodro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This Reserach Work is focused on social and scholar problems of ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder children, provoked for the excess of activity, lack of attention, impulsivity, bad behaviour and the difficulties to solve a problem by themselves. So that, we are going to speak about the social and scholar problems of these children with relation to the peace and the violence, and the importance to solve the conflicts peacefully to improve the scholar coexistence with an education based on a Peace Culture. In order to this, it has collected information through 20 mixed questionnaires in the Granada’s AMPACHICO Association (Association of parents with hyperactive and with a behaviour disorder children and teenagers, record classroom observation and three semi-structured interviews to a mother with an ADHD child, his teacher and the own boy. For this analysis, it has extracted the serious problems of these children and how the influence in the scholar coexistence and social and family environment is underlining the necessity of promoting the Peace Culture in every school.

  10. Building Research Partnerships with Health Care Organizations: The Scholar Award Model in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Karen J.; Robertson, Patricia; Allred, Kelly; Andrews, Diane; Waldrop, Julee

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of limited funding, researchers need strategic alliances to launch or sustain programs of research to significantly impact the nation's health. This article presents a collaborative model, the Scholar Award Model, which is based on a strategic alliance between a College of Nursing in a research-intensive university and a…

  11. Online Corpus Tools in Scholarly Writing: A Case of EFL Postgraduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamjani, Sedigheh Shakib; Razavi, Ommehoney Fazel; Hussin, Habsah

    2017-01-01

    Some studies have reported the positive outcome of using concordancers and dictionaries in (ESL) context. This study aims to examine how an EFL writer consulted with concordancers and dictionaries along with Google and Google Scholar when engaging in academic writing at university level. The researcher investigated a non-English-major postgraduate…

  12. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Impact of the Gates Millennium Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation began an innovative scholarship program that provides full financial support to low-income minority students across the United States. The Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program has already awarded more than 10,000 scholarships to exceptional students, with the ultimate goal of funding at least…

  13. Painting the Emerging Image: Portraits of Family-Informed Scholar Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxis, Sophie; Janson, Christopher; Jamison, Rudy; Whaley, Keon

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we, two professors and two students of educational leadership, embrace the pedagogies of community engagement through the ecologies of self, organization, and community. In this article, we explore the development of community-engaged scholars and practitioners through two distinct lenses: faculty who facilitate engaged learning…

  14. A Universe of Information, One Citation at a Time: How Students Engage with Scholarly Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, Carrie; Wittig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    We spend hours teaching students where to go to find resources, but how do students really use those scholarly resources--and other resources--in their papers? Inspired by the Citation Project, University of Richmond liaison librarians examined First-Year Seminar papers to see what types of sources students used in their writing, how they…

  15. Supporting Emerging Scholars: Lessons from Editing a Special Issue of "Action in Teacher Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Clift, Renee T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we draw from our year-long experience of assisting scholars who are new to publishing in transforming their work from a dissertation or conference paper to final production. We reflect on the importance of guiding, editing and prompting authors and offer advice on what we have learned about doing so.

  16. McNair Scholars' Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Graduate Experience: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Senetta F.; Benson, Susan Kushner; Johnson-Whitt, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, racial and gender disparities persist in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. These disparities are most notable at the doctoral level and are also found in the doctoral outcomes of Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program participants (Scholars) despite opportunities designed to promote…

  17. The McNair Scholars Program as an Agent of Socialization in the Doctoral Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens, Cheryl Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Interventions such as the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair Scholars Program) are among the national strategies for promoting doctoral degree attainment amongst first-generation college students from low socioeconomic backgrounds or groups underrepresented in graduate education. This study aimed to understand how…

  18. Alain LeRoy Locke at Oxford: The First African-American Rhodes Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey C.

    2001-01-01

    Alain LeRoy Locke was the first African American chosen as a Rhodes scholar. He went to Oxford University planning to leave issues of race behind him in the United States. Oxford's selection committee was shocked to discover he was black. Locke found that racism followed him everywhere, and he dedicated himself to advancing the cause of the black…

  19. The Historical Ideal-Type as a Heuristic Device for Academic Storytelling by Sport Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutka, Patrick; Seifried, Chad

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research endeavor is to take the previous calls of sport scholars to expand into alternative research approaches (e.g., history, case study, law reviews, philosophy, etc.) and to show how storytelling can be an effective tool through the use of a heuristic device. The present analysis attempts to focus on the usage of the…

  20. 'Read ten thousand books, walk ten thousand miles': geographical mobility and capital accumulation among Chinese scholars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, M.W.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28131263X

    2013-01-01

    International movements of scientists and researchers have become more common in the increasingly inter-connected global knowledge economy. Geographic mobility is often perceived as a key to academic excellence and career advancement by scholars, especially in advanced economies. In China, where

  1. Talking With Scholars: Developing a Research Environment for Oral History Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemman, Max; Scagliola, Stef; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.

    Scholars are yet to make optimal use of Oral History collections. For the uptake of digital research tools in the daily working practice of researchers, practices and conventions commonly adhered to in the subfields of the humanities should be taken into account during development, in order to

  2. The Power of Dialogue and Meaningful Connectedness: Conversations between Two Female Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganga, Christine W.; Beck, Makini

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the power of dialogue and meaningful connectedness from their perspectives as female scholars of color. They draw from the feminist co-mentoring literature, which encourages equal balance of power among participants where each person takes on the role of teacher and learner, or mentor and mentee, since both have…

  3. Synesthesia and the Phenomenological Experience: Implications for Ecological Mindfulness and Beginning Scholars in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Phenomenological experiences based on an openness to the synesthesia of natural environments are a powerful pathway to the development of erotic relationships with and within a place. These relationships are beneficial for beginning scholars and those taking new jobs who find themselves adapting to a new place and career. First, I describe the…

  4. Framing International Development Education in the Post-2015 Era: Suggestions for Scholars and Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to build a series of frameworks for understanding social and educational changes that have the potential to inform the preparation of future international development education scholars and practitioners. It begins with a description of the main trends driving contemporary development education. This is followed by a…

  5. [Review of:] Digital Scholarly Editing. Theories, Models and Methods. Elena Pierazzo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spadini, E.; Sichani, Anna-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Digital Scholarly Editing (DSE) stands as a long-awaited and timely contribution to the field. A valuable addition to an already vast canon on the subject, it remains one of the rare instances of a systematic investigation of a field which, while still undergoing a phase of experimentation, has now

  6. Comparative Recall and Precision of Simple and Expert Searches in Google Scholar and Eight Other Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, William H.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of simple and expert searches in Google Scholar (GS), EconLit, GEOBASE, PAIS, POPLINE, PubMed, Social Sciences Citation Index, Social Sciences Full Text, and Sociological Abstracts. It assesses the recall and precision of 32 searches in the field of later-life migration: nine simple keyword searches and 23…

  7. African-American Women in the Professoriate: Addressing Social Exclusion and Scholarly Marginalization through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Jones, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    African-American women and other underrepresented faculty members often report experiences of social exclusion and scholarly marginalization in mainstream institutions of higher education. This lack of inclusion challenges their retention and hinders them from becoming productive members of the professoriate, positioning them at a disadvantage for…

  8. Altmetrics - A Collated Adjunct Beyond Citations for Scholarly Impact: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Prasad, Monika; Gupta, Ritu; Singla, Ashish; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Dhama, Kuldeep; Ali, Irfan; Niraj, Lav Kumar

    2017-06-01

    In emerging Figures, scholars are unifying social media tools like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley into their professional communications. The online, open nature of these tools reveals the scholarly action to be clear and unambiguous. Metrics which is set on these activities could enlighten broader, faster measures of impact, supplementing traditional citation metrics. The present review aims to analyse the correlation of altmetrics with the traditional citations in medical research. The search strategy used a combination of controlled vocabulary and free text terms. The main database searched were PubMed, PubMed Central, Cochrane Review, Embase and Google Scholar from 2010 to 2016. Out of the total 78 titles appeared seven articles fulfilled the criteria and were selected for the review. The positive correlation between altmetrics and traditional citations indicates that the two are not entirely different from each other and are familiar with each other. Altmetrics are usually accessible earlier and enable us to evaluate the social impact of scholarly research, almost at the actual time. Much work is needed to develop this research which will focus on the clarity of the impact signal. Thus newer dimensions, such as altmetrics and article-level metrics are an effort to explore the influence of research across the worldwide population.

  9. CMS Young Researchers Award 2013 and Fundamental Physics Scholars Award from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    Photo 2: CMS Fundamental Physics Scholars (FPSs) 1st prize: Joosep Pata, from Estonian National Institue of Chemical Physics and Biophysics / Photo 1 and 3: CMS Young Researchers Award. From left to right: Guido Tonelli, Colin Bernet, Andre David, Oliver Gutsche, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Andrea Petrucci, Joe Incandela and Jim Virdee

  10. Scholarly Productivity of School Psychology Faculty Members in Specialist-Level Programs: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Runia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly productivity of school psychology faculty members in specialist-level only programs was examined. Information was gathered from the School Psychology Program Information portion of the website for the National Association of School Psychologists. A total of 137 specialist-level only school psychology programs were identified.…

  11. Delineating Research Forums for Business and Management Education Scholars: The Business and Management Education Influence Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.; Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The authors used bibliometric analysis to create indices for both the percentage of articles a journal publishes on business and management education (BME) research and the relative scholarly impact an article is likely to have after being published in that journal. They envision that the dissemination of these indices will be helpful for scholars…

  12. Raising the Library's Impact Factor: A Case Study in Scholarly Publishing Literacy for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Samantha; Detmering, Robert; Martinez, George; Johnson, Anna Marie

    2017-01-01

    Graduate students across disciplines feel pressure to publish their scholarship, but they are often unsure how to go about it, partly due to a lack of explicit training in this area. This article discusses the collaborative development of a semester-long Publishing Academy, designed to promote knowledge of scholarly publishing and increase the…

  13. Scaffolding Learning for Practitioner-Scholars: The Philosophy and Design of a Qualitative Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Julie; Samkian, Artineh

    2017-01-01

    We present our approach to a qualitative research methods course to prepare practitioner-scholars for their dissertation and independent research. We explain how an instructor's guide provides consistency and rigor, and in-class activities to scaffold learning, and helps faculty connect the content to students' out-of-school lives. We explain how…

  14. Building a scholar in writing (BSW): A model for developing students' critical writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Annette; Zanchetta, Margareth; Velasco, Divine; Pon, Gordon; Hassan, Aafreen

    2015-11-01

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of writing in developing reflective thinking skills, transforming knowledge, communicating expressions, and filling knowledge gaps. However, difficulties with higher order processing and critical analysis affect students' ability to write critical and thoughtful essays. The Building a Scholar in Writing (BSW) model is a 6-step process of increasing intricacies in critical writing development. Development of critical writing is proposed to occur in a processed manner that transitions from presenting simple ideas (just bones) in writing, to connecting ideas (connecting bones), to formulating a thesis and connecting key components (constructing a skeleton), to supporting ideas with evidence (adding muscle), to building creativity and originality (adding essential organs), and finally, developing strong, integrated, critical arguments (adding brain). This process symbolically represents the building of a scholar. The idea of building a scholar equates to progressively giving life and meaning to a piece of writing with unique scholarly characteristics. This progression involves a transformation in awareness, thinking, and understanding, as well as advancement in students' level of critical appraisal skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The integration of open access journals in the scholarly communication system: Three science fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2009-01-01

    The greatest number of open access journals (OAJs) is found in the sciences and their influence is growing. However, there are only a few studies on the acceptance and thereby integration of these OAJs in the scholarly communication system. Even fewer studies provide insight into the differences...

  16. Scholarly Communication and the Dilemma of Collective Action: Why Academic Journals Cost Too Much

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzler, John

    2017-01-01

    Why has the rise of the Internet--which drastically reduces the cost of distributing information--coincided with drastic increases in the prices that academic libraries pay for access to scholarly journals? This study argues that libraries are trapped in a collective action dilemma as defined by economist Mancur Olson in "The Logic of…

  17. Top Cited Scholars in Multicultural Counseling: A Citation Analysis of Journal Articles in PsycINFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The area of multicultural counseling is a sub-field of the counseling profession and research in this specialty has proliferated at a rapid pace over the past 20 years. In order to gauge emergent trends in multicultural counseling, researchers have conducted content analyses of scholarly documents like journals and books. A related methodology…

  18. Scholarly Publishing in the Internet Age: A Citation Analysis of Computer Science Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrum, Abby A.; McCain, Katherine W.; Lawrence, Steve; Giles, C. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of changes in scholarly communication due to the World Wide Web focuses on a comparison of two views of information production and use in computer-related research based on citation analysis of publications on the Web using autonomous citation indexing and a parallel citation analysis of traditional journal literature. (Author/LRW)

  19. 76 FR 80418 - Request for Information: Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications Resulting From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... of access to these publications is required to maximize U.S. economic growth and improve the... benefit of public access policies to U.S. taxpayers, and their investment in the peer-reviewed literature..., publishers, Federal agencies, and libraries? (7) Besides scholarly journal articles, should other types of...

  20. The Mayo Innovation Scholars Program: Undergraduates Explore the Science and Economics of Medical Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, John J.; Jansen, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The Mayo Innovation Scholars Program introduces undergraduates to technology transfer in biomedical sciences by having teams of students from multiple disciplines (e.g., biology, chemistry, economics, and business) analyze inventions in development at the Mayo Clinic. Over 6 months, teams consult with inventors, intellectual property experts, and…

  1. Selected risk factors for coronary heart disease in m.ale scholars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected risk factors for coronary heart disease in m.ale scholars from. the major South African population groups. H. c. SEFfEL, M. s. ASVAT, B. I. JOFFE, F. J. RAAL, v. R. PANZ, w. J. H. VERMAAK, M. E. LOOCK, M. c. RAJPUT, M. A. K. OMAR,. M. s. JEENAH, K. STEYN, P. J. BECKER for the Seven Schools' Study Group.

  2. Are Resource Treasures Hidden from Scholars in Our Libraries? What Is the Access to Ephemera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, M. Therese

    1973-01-01

    Items of ephemera may be important as illustrative or documentary material for author and scholar. In order for libraries to make this material available there must be access by catalog, index, or browsing. A survey of selected libraries probes the approach used by them in handling such items. (2 references) (Author)

  3. Writing and Publishing in a Blended Learning Environment to Develop Students' Scholarly Digital Ethos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogleman, Jay; Niedbala, Mona Anne; Bedell, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    How do educators leverage students' fluency with ubiquitous information and communication sources to foster a scholarly digital ethos? This article describes a blended learning environment designed to engage first-year students in 21st-century emerging forms of scholarship and publication. The authors describe an effort to reverse the millennials'…

  4. WPA as Rhetor: Scholarly Production and the Difference a Discipline Makes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Debra Frank

    2009-01-01

    This article defines applied rhetorical work as integral to the intellectual work of writing program administration and asks our professional organizations to classify it as such within our position statements. With a specific case, it offers a generative framework for representing and assessing the work's scholarly commons for professional…

  5. From Herb Garden to Wiki: Responding to Change in Naturopathic Education through Scholarly Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Airdre; O'Reilly, Meg

    2012-01-01

    The study of naturopathy in Australia has undergone a number of significant changes that have impacted dramatically on scholarly and academic practice. Naturopathic education has shifted from apprenticeship style with a charismatic teacher, to several private colleges offering advanced diplomas/degrees with Government accreditation, and into the…

  6. China Policy Options in a Post Crisis World : Young China Scholars ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project builds on an earlier phase, Poverty and Inequality Research Network for China (103310). It is motivated by ongoing debate in China concerning the global economic crisis. The grant will enable young scholars to contribute to the debate by undertaking new research on the impact of the financial crisis and ...

  7. Music to Our Eyes: Google Books, Google Scholar, and the Open Content Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Kirstin

    2010-01-01

    The Internet has changed how scholars perform their research. With more and more content available online that is fully searchable (often even for free), it is not surprising that students and others may turn there first before coming to the library. This study aims to identify the utility of three of the largest free access points to print…

  8. "Fight the Power": An Exploration of the Black Student Activist Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinney, Dominick Nelson

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation explored the lived experiences of eight Black Student Activist Scholars on the campus of a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Through the use of Critical Race Theory, and Sociopolitical Development, it was discovered that Black students understand their activist and civic engagement to be that of a "duty of…

  9. Reflections on the Uses of the Academic Journal in Socialization of the New Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Syraj; Poston-Escue, Carlee

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of developing learning communities or communities of practice to optimize the learning experiences of education professionals has been well documented in the recent research literature. Less consideration has been made for the development of academic scholars. This essay considers an existing paradigm within the academy, the academic…

  10. Google Scholar versus PubMed in locating primary literature to answer drug-related questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Maisha Kelly; Lauderdale, Stacy A; Kendrach, Michael G; Woolley, Thomas W

    2009-03-01

    Google Scholar linked more visitors to biomedical journal Web sites than did PubMed after the database's initial release; however, its usefulness in locating primary literature articles is unknown. To assess in both databases the availability of primary literature target articles; total number of citations; availability of free, full-text journal articles; and number of primary literature target articles retrieved by year within the first 100 citations of the search results. Drug information question reviews published in The Annals of Pharmacotherapy Drug Information Rounds column served as targets to determine the retrieval ability of Google Scholar and PubMed searches. Reviews printed in this column from January 2006 to June 2007 were eligible for study inclusion. Articles were chosen if at least 2 key words of the printed article were included in the PubMed Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) database, and these terms were searched in both databases. Twenty-two of 33 (67%) eligible Drug Information Rounds articles met the inclusion criteria. The median number of primary literature articles used in each of these articles was 6.5 (IQR 4.8, 8.3; mean +/- SD 8 +/- 5.4). No significant differences were found for the mean number of target primary literature articles located within the first 100 citations in Google Scholar and PubMed searches (5.1 +/- 3.9 vs 5.3 +/- 3.3; p = 0.868). Google Scholar searches located more total results than PubMed (2211.6 +/- 3999.5 vs 44.2 +/- 47.4; p = 0.019). The availability of free, full-text journal articles per Drug Information Rounds article was similar between the databases (1.8 +/- 1.7 vs 2.3 +/- 1.7; p = 0.325). More primary literature articles published prior to 2000 were located with Google Scholar searches compared with PubMed (62.8% vs 34.9%; p = 0.017); however, no statistically significant differences between the databases were observed for articles published after 2000 (66.4 vs 77.1; p = 0.074). No significant differences

  11. An Evaluation of iMetric Studies through the Scholarly Influence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Soheili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the topics studied in the context of scientometrics, the issue of the scholarly influence is of special interest. This study tries to test the components in the scholarly influence model based on iMetrics studies, and also to find potential relations among these components. The study uses a bibliometric methodology. Since the researchers aim to determine the relationship between variables, this research is of correlation type. The initial data of this study, which comprises 5944 records in the field of iMetrics during 1978-2014, have been retrieved from Web of Science. To calculate the most of measures involved in each kind of influence, the researchers used UCINet and BibExcel software moreover, some indices have been calculated manually using Excel. After calculating all measures included in three types of influence, the researchers used the Smart PLS to test both the model and research hypotheses. The results of data analysis using the software Smart PLS confirmed the scholarly influence model and indicated significant correlation between the variables in the model. To be more precise, findings uncovered that social influence is associated with both ideational and venue influence. Moreover, the venue influence is associated with ideational influence. If researchers test the scholarly influence model in some other areas and led to positive outcomes, it is hoped that the policy-makers use a combination of variables involved in the model as a measure to evaluate the scholarly influence of researchers and to decision-makings related to purposes such as promotion, recruitment, and so on.

  12. An untold story: The important contributions of Muslim scholars for the understanding of human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Malak A; Ziermann, Janine M; Diogo, Rui

    2017-06-01

    It is usually assumed that Galen is one of the fathers of anatomy and that between the Corpus Galenicum and the Renaissance there was no major advance in anatomical knowledge. However, it is also consensually accepted that Muslim scholars had the intellectual leadership from the 8th/9th to 13th centuries, and that they made remarkable progresses in numerous scientific fields including medicine. So, how is it possible that they did not contribute to advance human anatomy during that period? According to the dominant view, Muslim scholars exclusively had a passive role: their transmission of knowledge from the Greeks to the West. Here, we summarize, for the first time in a single paper, the studies of major Muslim scholars that published on human anatomy before Vesalius. This summary is based on analyses of original Arabic texts and of more recent publications by anatomists and historians, and on comparisons between the descriptions provided by Galen and by these Muslim scholars. We show that Arabic speakers and Persians made important advances in human anatomy well before Vesalius. The most notable exception concerns the muscular system: strikingly, there were apparently neither advances made by Muslims nor by Westerners for more than 1000 years. Unbiased discussions of these and other related issues, and particularly of the mainly untold story about the major contributions of Muslim scholars to anatomy, are crucial to our knowledge of the history of anatomy, biology and sciences, and also of our way of thinking, biases, and prejudices. Anat Rec, 300:986-1008, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Cambia Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program: Conversations with Emerging Leaders in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Bernacki, Rachelle; Cooper, Zara; Grudzen, Corita; Izumi, Seiko; Lafond, Deborah; Lam, Daniel; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Tjia, Jennifer; Walter, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing workforce shortage and leadership scarcity in palliative care to adequately meet the demands of individuals with serious illness and their families. To address this gap, the Cambia Health Foundation launched its Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program in 2014, an initiative designed to identify, cultivate, and advance the next generation of palliative care leaders. This report intends to summarize the second cohort of Sojourns Scholars' projects and their reflection on their leadership needs. This report summarizes the second cohort of sojourns scholars' project and their reflection on leadership needs. After providing a written reflection on their own projects, the second cohort participated in a group interview (fireside chat) to elicit their perspectives on barriers and facilitators in providing palliative care, issues facing leadership in palliative care in the United States, and lessons from personal and professional growth as leaders in palliative care. They analyzed the transcript of the group interview using qualitative content analysis methodology. Three themes emerged from descriptions of the scholars' project experience: challenges in palliative care practice, leadership strategies in palliative care, and three lessons learned to be a leader were identified. Challenges included perceptions of palliative care, payment and policy, and workforce development. Educating and collaborating with other clinicians and influencing policy change are important strategies used to advance palliative care. Time management, leading team effort, and inspiring others are important skills that promote effectiveness as a leader. Emerging leaders have a unique view of conceptualizing contemporary palliative care and shaping the future. Providing comprehensive, coordinated care that is high quality, patient and family centered, and readily available depends on strong leadership in palliative care. The Cambia Scholars Program represents a unique opportunity.

  14. Scholarly Discord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinelli, Lara

    2009-01-01

    Even with President Barack Obama's promises to close the Guantanamo Bay detention camp and withdraw troops from Iraq, the subject of torture keeps making the news. With all that detainees have had to endure during their incarcerations--the recent memos detail stress positions, cramped confinement, and waterboarding, among other tactics--perhaps…

  15. Scholarly Publishing's Evolving Landscape: Impact Metrics, Electronic-Only Journals, and Open Access in Journalism and Communication Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Joe S.; Foote, Jody Bales

    2016-01-01

    This study surveys the landscape of scholarly publishing, with particular emphasis on scholarly journals in the communication discipline, measuring the shift to electronic publishing in six selected disciplines and exploring two other important emerging topics: open-access publishing and new journal citation metrics. The goals are to inform…

  16. Scholar-Practitioner Inquiry as International Action Research: Surveying Leadership Perceptions of Principals in the Toledo District of Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Wesley D.; Gill, Peggy B.; Brown, Lakesha

    2011-01-01

    The scholar-practitioner approach to leadership has the potential for effectiveness in developing countries through contextual understanding of unique circumstances. The purpose of this study was to survey leadership perceptions of principals in the Toledo District of Belize. This data, in the tradition of scholar-practitioner involvement, was…

  17. Advances in Digital Scholarly Editing : Papers presented at the DiXiT conferences in The Hague, Cologne, and Antwerp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, P.; Capellotto, Anna; Dillen, Wout; Fischer, Franz; Kelly, Aodhán; Mertgens, Andreas; Sichani, Anna-Maria; Spadini, E.; Van Hulle, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    As the papers in this volume testify, digital scholarly editing is a vibrant practice. Scholarly editing has a long-standing tradition in the humanities. It is of crucial importance within disciplines such as literary studies, philology, history, philosophy, library and information science, and

  18. Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Scholars in Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences: Effects on Quality of Mentoring Interactions and Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Chaudron, Linda; Trief, Paula M.; LaGuardia, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Daryl; Goodman, Steven R.; Morse, Gene D.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Mentors rarely receive education about the unique needs of underrepresented scholars in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. We hypothesized that mentor-training and peer-mentoring interventions for these scholars would enrich the perceived quality and breadth of discussions between mentor-protégé dyads (i.e., mentor-protégé pairs). Our…

  19. Inequality in the Scientific Community: The Effects of Cumulative Advantage among Social Scientists and Humanities Scholars in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keuntae; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide a balanced perspective for understanding inequality in research productivity among Korean scholars in humanities and social sciences. Specifically, we examine cumulative advantage over the careers of a sample of Korean social scientists and humanities scholars (N = 8933). Descriptive analyses indicated…

  20. 45 CFR 2526.25 - Is a participant in an approved Summer of Service position or approved Silver Scholar position...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... position or approved Silver Scholar position who does not complete an approved term of service eligible to... § 2526.25 Is a participant in an approved Summer of Service position or approved Silver Scholar position.... An individual released for any reason prior to completing an approved term of service in a Silver...

  1. Skills Needed to Survive and Thrive as a Scholar in the 21st Century: Information, Knowledge, and Publication Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Simone C. O.

    2013-01-01

    The changes in the way our work is created, published, and disseminated have implications for our own professional development and require us to be aware of the necessary skills. In this article, I identify three important skills scholars need to have and tools to be effective, efficient, and productive scholars in the 21st century: information…

  2. Transition to Independence: Characteristics and Outcomes of Mentored Career Development (KL2) Scholars at Clinical and Translational Science Award Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Carol; Schwartz, Lisa S; Toto, Robert; Merchant, Carol; Fair, Alecia S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2017-04-01

    To describe the transition from mentored to independent research funding for clinical and translational scholars supported by institutional KL2 Mentored Career Development programs. In 2013, faculty leaders at Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions completed an online survey, reporting characteristics of scholars in their KL2 programs from 2006 to 2013. The primary outcome variable was a report that the scholar had received independent funding as a principal investigator. Data analysis included descriptive summaries and mixed-effects regression models. Respondents from 48 institutions (of 62 eligible; 77%) provided information about 914 KL2 scholars. Of those, 620 (68%) were medical doctors, 114 (12%) had other clinical training, and 177 (19%) were nonclinician PhDs. Fifty-three percent (487) were female; 12% (108/865) were members of racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in medicine (URM). After completing KL2 training, 96% (558/582) remained engaged in research. Among scholars who completed KL2 training two or more years earlier, 39% (149/374) received independent funding. Independent funding was from non-National Institutes of Health (NIH) sources (120 scholars) more often than from NIH (101 scholars). The odds of a nonclinician attaining independent funding were twice those of a clinician (odds ratio 2.05; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.78). Female and URM scholars were as likely as male and non-URM scholars to attain independent funding. KL2 programs supported the transition to independent funding for clinical and translational scientists. Female and URM scholars were well represented. Future studies should consider non-NIH funding sources when assessing the transition to research independence.

  3. Harold Guetzkow: A Scholar's Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Chadwick F.

    2011-01-01

    During our 14 years together at Northwestern University, Harold Guetzkow was at the same time my colleague, creative teacher, and helpful personal friend. I used his simulation in my undergraduate courses. His research and personal suggestions provided creative insights for my research at UN Headquarters. He provided younger colleagues with…

  4. Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alang, Sirry; McAlpine, Donna; McCreedy, Ellen; Hardeman, Rachel

    2017-05-01

    We investigated links between police brutality and poor health outcomes among Blacks and identified five intersecting pathways: (1) fatal injuries that increase population-specific mortality rates; (2) adverse physiological responses that increase morbidity; (3) racist public reactions that cause stress; (4) arrests, incarcerations, and legal, medical, and funeral bills that cause financial strain; and (5) integrated oppressive structures that cause systematic disempowerment. Public health scholars should champion efforts to implement surveillance of police brutality and press funders to support research to understand the experiences of people faced with police brutality. We must ask whether our own research, teaching, and service are intentionally antiracist and challenge the institutions we work in to ask the same. To reduce racial health inequities, public health scholars must rigorously explore the relationship between police brutality and health, and advocate policies that address racist oppression.

  5. Scholarly metrics under the microscope from citation analysis to academic auditing

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bibliometrics the quantitative analysis of publications, authors, bibliographic references, and related concepts has never been greater, as universities, research councils, national governments, and corporations seek to identify robust indicators of research effectiveness. In Scholarly Metrics Under the Microscope, editors Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto bring together and expertly annotate a wealth of previously published papers, harvested from a wide range of journals and disciplines, that provide critical commentary on the use of metrics, both established and emerging, to assess the quality of scholarship and the impact of research. The expansive overview and analysis presented in this remarkable volume will be welcomed by any scholar or researcher who seeks a deeper understanding of the role and significance of performance metrics in higher education, research evaluation, and science policy.

  6. A Compound Object Authoring and Publishing Tool for Literary Scholars based on the IFLA-FRBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gerber

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents LORE (Literature Object Re-use and Exchange, a light-weight tool which is designed to allow literature scholars and teachers to author, edit and publish compound information objects encapsulating related digital resources and bibliographic records. LORE enables users to easily create OAI-ORE-compliant compound objects, which build on the IFLA FRBR model, and also enables them to describe and publish them to an RDF repository as Named Graphs. Using the tool, literary scholars can create typed relationships between individual atomic objects using terms from a bibliographic ontology and can attach metadata to the compound object. This paper describes the implementation and user interface of the LORE tool, as developed within the context of an ongoing case study being conducted in collaboration with AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource, which focuses on compound objects for teaching and research within the Australian literature studies community.

  7. Digital Libraries for Humanities Scholars: An empirical study of users’ information behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ju L. Chang

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available While user-centered design has been emphasized, much of the discussion of digital libraries is concerned about choosing Web-based technology to create a digitized collection and establish related infrastructure. An investigation into the potential users of a community-based digital library suggests that some critical social, ecological and cultural aspects of information-related behavior of those users need to be taken into account for a digital library to accomplish its goals. This paper reports on an empirical study of scholarly communication among users of the Taiwan Historical Archives and how those scholars and researchers find and use information. Several design principles are suggested based on the findings of such user study.[Article content in Chinese

  8. Scholarly communication : the role of oai in the context of open access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alice Baptista

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses Open Access to scientific knowledge and its impacts on research. It overviews some of the major issues regarding the use of information technologies in scholarly communication activities, highlighting recent issues such as repository selfarchiving (green road and Open Access journals (golden road. Such issues are focused both as a reaction of researchers to the current business models of commercial scholarly publishers and as an awareness of the increasingly impact of documents available in Open Access. It adds to this discussion information about the necessary policies to fully implement Open Access. Authors describe the main technology facilities that support Open Access, such as OAI compliant Repositories and Journal Management systems. Moreover, future perspectives that should guide academic and government policies, decisions and actions that can assure Open Access, particularly in Portuguese Speaking Countries, are discussed.

  9. Reflections of a TMS International Scholar: Sharing Research across Cultures and Continents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-19

    Here, I was honored to be selected as the 2017 Japan Institute of Metals (JIM)/TMS Young Leaders International Scholar, an opportunity made possible by the TMS Foundation. One of the benefits of receiving this award for me was traveling to Japan to visit the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and attending the 2017 JIM Annual Spring Meeting, held at the Tokyo Metropolitan University.

  10. Advocating for continuing nursing education in a pediatric hospital: the Prince Scholar and Sabbatical Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhac, A M; Goodwin, L D

    2000-01-01

    As nurses gain more experience, they often question the basis of nursing practice and want to find the most current and accepted methods of providing nursing care. Attending seminars, conferences, and continuing education programs is often difficult because of financial and staffing constraints. The authors describe the design and implementation of two funded programs--the Prince Scholars and Sabbatical Programs--that support continuing nursing education in a pediatric tertiary hospital.

  11. Culture for Violence: The Strategic Impact of the Olmsted Scholar Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR Major Thomas A. Walsh is a 2003 graduate of the University of Richmond, where he majored in leadership studies and political...create a cadre of warrior-statesmen who were equipped, through cultural immersion, with language and cultural skills and a uniquely broad...language and cultural skills . Interviews with retired and active senior military officers reveal that participation in the Olmsted Scholar Program

  12. Are industry financial ties associated with greater scholarly impact among academic otolaryngologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Bobian, Michael; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    In response to concerns regarding physician-industry relationships, the Physician Sunshine Act of 2010 was passed in an effort to increase transparency and accountability. Our objective was to determine whether there is an association between industry support and scholarly impact among academic otolaryngologists. Faculty listings, academic rank, and fellowship training of academic otolaryngologists were accessed from departmental websites. H-indices, number of publications, and publication range (years) of each individual were calculated using the Scopus database. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments database was used to determine industry payments during 2014 to each otolaryngologist. Of 1,515 otolaryngologists, 65.4% received industry support and 15.8% received support > $1,000. No difference in impact, as measured by the h-index, was noted upon comparison of those receiving support and those who did not (P > 0.05). Individuals receiving > $1,000 had higher h-indices and total publications than those receiving $1,000 had greater scholarly impact among most subspecialties. Industry contributions increased with advancing experience. Receiving industry contributions greater than $1,000 is associated with greater scholarly impact among academic otolaryngologists. In a smaller surgical specialty, such as otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, direct industry research support-as well as indirect contributions through the support of educational programs, consulting, and other expenses-potentially impacts scholarly discourse; these findings do not reflect a causal relationship and may require further characterization. NA Laryngoscope, 127:87-94, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Awareness about E-Learning among Agricultural Research Scholars of Banaras Hindu University

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji Lal Bairwa; Kerobim Lakra; Pradeep Joliya; Saket Kushwaha; Dheeraj Mishra

    2014-01-01

    The present study is emphasized on find out the awareness level and perception about e- learning among agricultural research scholars at Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (Uttar Pradesh) India. This research study is based on the primary source of data which was collected from fifty respondents through structured questionnaire during the year 2013. Statistical tools such as frequency, percentage, and standard deviation were used to analyze the data for making interpretation. In this study, i...

  14. Electronic theses and dissertations: a review of this valuable resource for nurse scholars worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, L M

    2009-06-01

    A worldwide repository of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) could provide worldwide access to the most up-to-date research generated by masters and doctoral students. Until that international repository is established, it is possible to access some of these valuable knowledge resources. ETDs provide a technologically advanced medium with endless multimedia capabilities that far exceed the print and bound copies of theses and dissertations housed traditionally in individual university libraries. CURRENT USE: A growing trend exists for universities worldwide to require graduate students to submit theses or dissertations as electronic documents. However, nurse scholars underutilize ETDs, as evidenced by perusing bibliographic citation lists in many of the research journals. ETDs can be searched for and retrieved through several digital resources such as the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (http://www.ndltd.org), ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (http://www.umi.com), the Australasian Digital Theses Program (http://adt.caul.edu.au/) and through individual university web sites and online catalogues. An international repository of ETDs benefits the community of nurse scholars in many ways. The ability to access recent graduate students' research electronically from anywhere in the world is advantageous. For scholars residing in developing countries, access to these ETDs may prove to be even more valuable. In some cases, ETDs are not available for worldwide access and can only be accessed through the university library from which the student graduated. Public access to university library ETD collections is not always permitted. Nurse scholars from both developing and developed countries could benefit from ETDs.

  15. Google Scholar, Scopus and the Web of Science: a longitudinal and cross-disciplinary comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Harzing, Anne-Wil; Alakangas, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive comparison of the coverage of the three major bibliometric databases: Google Scholar, Scopus and the Web of Science. Based on a sample of 146 senior academics in five broad disciplinary areas, we therefore provide both a longitudinal and a cross-disciplinary comparison of the three databases.\\ud \\ud Our longitudinal comparison of eight data points between 2013 and 2015 shows a consistent and reasonably stable quarterly growth for bot...

  16. AAO-HNSF CORE grant acquisition is associated with greater scholarly impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Folbe, Adam J; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether receiving funding from the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Centralized Otolaryngology Research Efforts (CORE) grant program is associated with career choice (in terms of practice setting) and scholarly impact. Examination of bibliometrics among academic otolaryngologists, including CORE grants funding history. An Internet search was conducted to determine the current practice setting and, for academic otolaryngologists, academic rank of individuals receiving CORE grants since 1985. The Scopus database was used to determine scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, and publication experience (in years) of these practitioners along with a "control" cohort of nonfunded academic otolaryngologists. Of 432 unique individuals receiving CORE grant funding since 1985, 44.4% are currently academicians. This cohort had a higher h-index (mean, 11.9; median, 10; interquartile range [IQR], 6-18) than their non-CORE grant-funded academic peers (mean, 9.2; median, 7; IQR, 3-13; P = .002) and colleagues who are not currently in academic practice (mean, 4.4; median, 3; IQR, 0-6; P CORE grant-funded academic otolaryngologists had a statistically higher scholarly impact on controlling for academic rank and among practitioners with greater than 10 years of publication experience. No statistical differences in academic promotion patterns were noted between those with and those without a CORE grant funding history. Procurement of an AAO-HNSF CORE grant is associated with greater scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index. This relationship persists among practitioners with more than 10 years of publication experience, as well as upon comparison of CORE grant-funded and non-CORE grant-funded otolaryngologists at all academic ranks. Practitioners awarded these grants may be more likely to go into and remain in academic practice.

  17. Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Geller, Stacie; Regensteiner, Judith G; Raymond, Nancy; Nagel, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors-current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs-to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

  18. Asia-Pacific nursing scholarship development: qualitative exploration of nurse scholars in Taiwan (Republic of China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turale, Sue; Shih, Fu-Jin; Klunklin, Areewan; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Ito, Misae; Nakao, Fujiko

    2010-09-01

    From the perspective of scholars, to describe a contemporary view of the development, facilitators of and barriers to nursing scholarship in Taiwan, to enhance policy-making about research, education and practise development. Nursing scholarship in the Asia-Pacific region is in different stages of development, depending on in-country resources and socio-economic conditions. Little is known about the facilitators or barriers to nursing scholarship in some of these countries, including Taiwan, where nursing education has changed considerably over the last decade. A qualitative exploratory design. The study used snowballing to identify scholars who underwent semi-structured in-depth interviews. These were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to content analysis. Interviews were held with 12 scholars and six major themes arose: 'fulfilling our missions'; 'active research productivity'; 'low levels of collaborative research'; 'increasing demands on time'; 'gender issues' and 'developing effective collaborative networks across Taiwan and Asia'. Participants described Taiwanese scholarship development in terms of fulfilling the missions of universities; trying to balance work and culturally relevant family responsibilities, against a background of decreasing pressures to produce more qualified nurses and being more research productive in rapidly changing and challenging work environments. Taiwan's nursing scholarship is in a dynamic early stage of development, with increasing graduate programmes and research productivity, evidenced by rising international publications and the research productivity indexes of academics. However, scholars are facing increasing pressure because of high workloads and balancing family and work responsibilities. Understanding scholarship development and its facilitators and barriers in Taiwan helps inform policy makers, the higher education sector and nurses in the country and across the region about what needs to be done to

  19. Scholarly context not found: one in five articles suffers from reference rot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Klein

    Full Text Available The emergence of the web has fundamentally affected most aspects of information communication, including scholarly communication. The immediacy that characterizes publishing information to the web, as well as accessing it, allows for a dramatic increase in the speed of dissemination of scholarly knowledge. But, the transition from a paper-based to a web-based scholarly communication system also poses challenges. In this paper, we focus on reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift to which references to web resources included in Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM articles are subject. We investigate the extent to which reference rot impacts the ability to revisit the web context that surrounds STM articles some time after their publication. We do so on the basis of a vast collection of articles from three corpora that span publication years 1997 to 2012. For over one million references to web resources extracted from over 3.5 million articles, we determine whether the HTTP URI is still responsive on the live web and whether web archives contain an archived snapshot representative of the state the referenced resource had at the time it was referenced. We observe that the fraction of articles containing references to web resources is growing steadily over time. We find one out of five STM articles suffering from reference rot, meaning it is impossible to revisit the web context that surrounds them some time after their publication. When only considering STM articles that contain references to web resources, this fraction increases to seven out of ten. We suggest that, in order to safeguard the long-term integrity of the web-based scholarly record, robust solutions to combat the reference rot problem are required. In conclusion, we provide a brief insight into the directions that are explored with this regard in the context of the Hiberlink project.

  20. Static Ranking of Scholarly Papers using Article-Level Eigenfactor (ALEF)

    OpenAIRE

    Wesley-Smith, Ian; Bergstrom, Carl T.; West, Jevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Microsoft Research hosted the 2016 WSDM Cup Challenge based on the Microsoft Academic Graph. The goal was to provide static rankings for the articles that make up the graph, with the rankings to be evaluated against those of human judges. While the Microsoft Academic Graph provided metadata about many aspects of each scholarly document, we focused more narrowly on citation data and used this contest as an opportunity to test the Article Level Eigenfactor (ALEF), a novel citation-based ranking...

  1. Factors underlying students’ appropriate or inappropriate use of scholarly sources in academic writing, and instructors’ responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sivell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available At first glance it is surprising that – in remarkable contrast to grammatical or lexical failings which, while certainly not viewed as insignificant, are rarely greeted with outright anger or hostility – inappropriate documentation of scholarly sources so frequently provokes very harsh penalties. Rather than the constructively pedagogical approach that one would expect with regard to other defects in writing, why do we so often witness a rush to negative evaluation of what may, after all, be evidence of nothing more culpable than misinformation, confusion, or oversight? Much has of course been written about possible remedies for ineffective use of scholarly sources and, on the other hand, about available monitoring and punishment for deliberate plagiarism; so, in a sense, the alternatives appear quite simple. However, decisions about when to adopt a more pedagogical or a more disciplinary viewpoint are complicated by difficult and potentially emotional factors that can disrupt calm, confident and well-reasoned judgment. Thus, this paper will focus not on pedagogical or disciplinary strategies, whichever may be considered suitable in a given case, but on a framework for thorough reflection earlier in the thinking process. It will explore multiple perspectives on possible origins for the innocent if maladroit mishandling of scholarly sources, with a view to highlighting a number of informative but potentially neglected reference points – a cognitive psychological perspective on human error and error management, plausible ambiguities in determining what actually constitutes plagiarism, and communication challenges – that may enter into the instructor’s final determination.

  2. Mixed Method Study Examines Undergraduate Student Researchers’ Knowledge and Perceptions About Scholarly Communication Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Goertzen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Riehle, C. F., & Hensley, M. K. (2017. What do undergraduate students know about scholarly communication?: A mixed methods study. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 17(1, 145–178. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/pla.2017.0009 Abstract Objective – To examine undergraduate student researchers’ perception and understanding of scholarly communication practices and issues. Design – Mixed method study involving a survey and semi-structured interviews. Setting – Two major undergraduate universities in the Midwest region of the United States. Subjects – Undergraduate students who participated in or had completed undergraduate research experiences with faculty mentors. Method – The method was first approved by Institutional Review Board offices at both campuses involved in the study. Then, students received invitations to participate in a survey via email (Campus 1 = 221 students; Campus 2 = 345 students. Identical online surveys ran separately on each campus; both remained open for a period of three weeks. All respondents received a reminder email one week before the survey closed. Participants answered twelve questions related to demographics and scholarly communication practices. The survey examined knowledge and experience across five areas: the peer review process, author and publisher rights, publication and access models, impact of research, and data management. All students who completed the survey were entered in a drawing for a $50 Amazon card. The response rates were 34.8% (Campus 1 and 18.6% (Campus 2. Surveys on both campuses were administered using different software: campus 1 utilized Qualtrics survey software while campus 2 used an institution-specific survey software. Data sets were normed and merged later in the study to enable comparison and identify broad themes. Survey respondents were also invited to participate in a 15 to 20 minute follow-up interview and were compensated with a $20 Amazon gift card. The

  3. Becoming a scholar: Everything I needed to know I learned on sabbatical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Maranville

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The essence of being a faculty member is to be a scholar. And, the work of a scholar is to think. However, the demands of academic life correlated with mid-career concerns can form a distraction away from this essential activity. As such, the goal of this essay is to discuss matters of professional development for tenured business professors at teaching-oriented universities. These faculty members are at particular risk of a career plateau accompanied by diminished productivity and satisfaction. Employing autoethnographic methods, the author reflects on his personal experience and posits initiatives for career revitalization, positing that professional development is vital at this career stage. The essay postulates that professional development begins with the creation of a thinking agenda that defines the scholar’s field of study and the particular projects to be studied. The author concludes by stating that neither teaching nor publishing is the essence of a self-actualized faculty member; rather, teaching and publishing are channels for the knowledge work of the scholar. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i1.163

  4. Research Publishing by Library and Information Science Scholars in Pakistan: A Bibliometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali, Muhammad Yousuf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly communication plays a significant role in the development and dissemination of research outputs in library and information science (LIS. This study presents findings from a survey which examines the key attributes that characterize the publishing by Pakistani LIS scholars, i.e. academics and professionals, in national journals. A pilot-tested, electronic questionnaire was used to collect the data from the target population. 104 respondents (or 69.3% of target provided feedback on areas such as number of articles published, number of citations, and the nature of any collaboration with other authors. The findings of this survey revealed that, among the various designated regions of Pakistan, the Punjab region was the most highly represented. In articles published in national journals, there was a clear preference among all respondents to collaborate with at least one other author. The citation metrics for LIS articles in national journals were relatively low (30.22%, which aligns with Scimago’s Journal and Country Rankings. The uptake of social scholarly networks mirrors international trends. Respondents were asked to score factors which could impact negatively on their ability to undertake research and/or publish the results. The study recommends that concerned stakeholders work together, as appropriate, to address concerns. In addition, it recommends that further research be undertaken to define patterns of Pakistani co-authorship in the social sciences.

  5. Comparing Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar from an Environmental Sciences perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie S. Adriaanse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a macro- and micro-level comparison of the citation resources Web of Science (WOS, Scopus and Google Scholar (GS for the environmental sciences scholarly journals in South Africa during 2004-2008. The macro-level measuring instruments consisted of 26 evaluation criteria with the following broad categories: content, access, services, interface, searching, search results, cost, citation and analytical tools, and linking abilities. The micro-level measuring instrument’s evaluation criteria represented the data fields of the journal records to establish comprehensivity. The macro-level evaluation results indicated that Scopus surpassed both WOS and GS whereas the micro-level evaluation results indicated that WOS surpassed both Scopus and GS. Based on the macro- and micro-level evaluation results the study was able to establish that GS is not yet a substitute but rather a supplementary citation resource for the fee-based WOS and/or Scopus for the South African international accredited scholarly environmental sciences journals during the period 2004-2008.

  6. The role of the library in scholarly publishing: The University of Manchester experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Bains

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of networked digital methods of scholarly dissemination has transformed the role of the academic library in the context of the research life cycle. It now plays an important role in the dissemination of research outputs (e.g. through repository management and gold open access publication processing as well as more traditional acquisition and collection management. The University of Manchester Library and Manchester University Press have developed a strategic relationship to consider how they can work in partnership to support new approaches to scholarly publishing. They have delivered two projects to understand researcher and student needs and to develop tools and services to meet these needs. This work has found that the creation of new journal titles is costly and provides significant resourcing challenges and that support for student journals in particular is mixed amongst senior academic administrators. Research has suggested that there is more value to the University in the provision of training in scholarly publishing than in the creation of new in-house journal titles. Where such titles are created, careful consideration of sustainable business models is vital.

  7. The Scholarly Influence of Orthopaedic Research According to Conventional and Alternative Metrics: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaniew, Nathan; Adili, Anthony F; Ghert, Michelle; Khan, Moin; Madden, Kim; Smith, Christopher; Bhandari, Mohit

    2017-05-01

    Researchers are experiencing an innovative shift toward online distribution of their work, and metrics related to online scholarly influence are gaining importance. Our objectives were to determine which types of online activity are most prevalent in orthopaedics, to identify associated factors, and to explore a complementary approach to measuring overall scholarly influence using online activity and conventional citations. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of surgical or nonsurgical interventions in participants with, or at specific risk for, injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system. We collected data on online activity in social media, mainstream media, blogs, forums, and other sources from a commercial provider of alternative metric data for medical journals. We tested associations with use of negative binomial regression. We identified 1,697 trials, published between 2011 and 2014, that had a total of 12,995 conventional citations and 15,068 online mentions. The median number of online mentions of each trial was 2 (interquartile range, 0 to 5). Twitter (82%) and Facebook (13%) mentions were the most prevalent types of online activity. Counts of online mentions correlated with conventional citations (r = 0.11, p impact factor, higher author h-index values, and less risk of bias (p Facebook and is associated with increasing time since publication, journal impact factor, and author h-index values, and less risk of bias. Institutions, publishers, funding agencies, and clinicians may consider a complementary approach to measuring scholarly influence that weights online mentions and conventional citations equally.

  8. On the Peripheries of Scholarly Infrastructure: A look at the Journals Using Open Journal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperin, J.P.; Stranack, K.; Garnett, A.

    2016-07-01

    Although there have been calls for scholarly infrastructure to be inclusive, new layers of infrastructure are built without a clear understanding of the breadth of scholarly journals that lie on the peripheries of the existing infrastructure. In the hopes that future infrastructure can take a wider range of journals into account, this paper presents the results of an effort to track the number, location, and rate of publication of journals using Open Journal Systems, an open source manuscript management and publication system built by the Public Knowledge Project. The method employed, which involves a combination of scanning weblogs, scraping webpages, and harvesting metadata, has yielded an estimated 9,828 journals that have collectively published 2,565,300 articles since 1990. These journals are distributed across 136 countries on 6 continents, and, in 2015, around a fifth of the OJS journals were published in low or low-middle income countries, and over a third in upper-middle income countries, suggesting that the majority of OJS journals are on the on the “periphery” of today's global scholarly infrastructure. As infrastructure and services continue to be developed, this paper argues, it is necessary to look to such journal so that the infrastructure that is built can be developed in a way that is truly inclusive of the global nature of scholarship. (Author)

  9. Guideposts and Roadblocks to the Career-Long Scholarly Engagement of Physical Education Teacher Education Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berei, Catherine P; Pratt, Erica; Parker, Melissa; Shephard, Kevin; Liang, Tanjian; Nampai, Udon; Neamphoka, Guntima

    2017-12-01

    Scholarship is essential for the growth and development of the physical education field. Over time, scholarship expectations have changed, forcing faculty members to alter time spent for research, teaching, and service. Social-cognitive career theory (SCCT) presents a model for understanding performance and persistence in an occupational environment. The interconnected aspects of SCCT have different emphasis related to self-efficacy, outcome expectations, or personal goals pursuit. This study explored physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty members' continuing engagement in scholarly activity through SCCT. Data collection included interviews with 9 senior PETE faculty members who met the criteria for "productive scholars over time." Curriculum vitae were collected to verify productivity. Data analysis revealed guidepost themes that included collaborating, finding balance, defining a research process, and maintaining a strong work ethic. Roadblocks encountered included other obligations and lack of support for research. Participants demonstrated strong self-efficacy; held high, positive expectations for success; and set very specific, clear, and deliberate goals. Participant behavior was moderated by their personal attributes (capacity to build relationships, set goals, and maintain interest and passion) and was tempered by the environments in which they worked. Fostering similar behaviors has the potential to guide future and current PETE faculty members in creating supportive and encouraging atmospheres for sustained productivity. The lack of literature relating to this topic warrants the need for more research exploring the influential factors and benefits gained from sustained scholarly productivity over time for PETE faculty members.

  10. ScholarlyStats@MedUniVienna: Are usage statistics now a piece of cake? / ScholarlyStats@MedUniVienna: Nutzungsstatistik leicht gemacht?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dollfuss, Helmut

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources standardized usage data from publishers of electronic library resources. Notwithstanding the collection of differently formated usage data from a variety of platforms to piece together an all-encompassing usage report is still cumbersome. MPS technologies is offering exactly this kind of service. The company collects usage data from publisher platforms on behalf of the library and pulls them together into uniform spreadsheet reports. Additionally several statisistical analysis are generated based on the consolidated reports. Since 2007 the university library at the Medical University Vienna holds a contract with MPS Technologies. The following report will give insight into service coverage, functionality results and experience with ScholarlyStats. Furthermore a few points are listed which have to be considered and discussed in the library before signing this contract.

  11. The Trident Scholar Program: Year-Long Undergraduate Research Projects at the United States Naval Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Stone, D. M.; Campbell, D. T.

    2000-05-01

    The Trident Scholar Program allows undergraduate students at the U.S. Naval Academy to carry out advanced-level research in their senior year. This program was begun in 1963 and has provided an important opportunity for the most elite students, with five to fifteen students out of a class of a thousand participating each year. The program gives students the opportunity to explore all aspects of scientific research. First, the prospective scholar must write a proposal for the project. The student defends the proposal in front of two committees: a division-level committee as well as an academy-wide committee. Finally, the project must gain approval from the Academic Dean and Provost. Once approved, the Trident Scholar may be awarded a small budget and is released from some course credits. In addition, the academy-wide committee makes on-sight inspections midyear. At the end of the year, each Trident Scholar must write a professional-quality paper, create a display presentation and give an oral presentation to the whole Academy. With these goals in mind, MIDN Campbell decided to pursue a hands-on project using the newly renovated observatory. He found a project that was both scientifically interesting and doable on a short timescale. An Earth impact with an asteroid has potentially devastating consequences. In order to avoid global destruction, astronomers have been attempting to map out the orbits of all possibly hazardous Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) for the past two decades. Although there are a number of astronomers devoted to discovering new NEAs, there are very few who are tracking these discoveries, therefore many recently identified NEAs are routinely lost. Therefore, a Trident Scholar Project tracking NEAs is both a service to the astronomy community as well as an important experience for the student. MIDN Campbell completed his scientific goals, and along the way he improved the observatory at the U. S. Naval Academy. Most importantly, this experience has

  12. ScholarLens: extracting competences from research publications for the automatic generation of semantic user profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sateli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Motivation Scientists increasingly rely on intelligent information systems to help them in their daily tasks, in particular for managing research objects, like publications or datasets. The relatively young research field of Semantic Publishing has been addressing the question how scientific applications can be improved through semantically rich representations of research objects, in order to facilitate their discovery and re-use. To complement the efforts in this area, we propose an automatic workflow to construct semantic user profiles of scholars, so that scholarly applications, like digital libraries or data repositories, can better understand their users’ interests, tasks, and competences, by incorporating these user profiles in their design. To make the user profiles sharable across applications, we propose to build them based on standard semantic web technologies, in particular the Resource Description Framework (RDF for representing user profiles and Linked Open Data (LOD sources for representing competence topics. To avoid the cold start problem, we suggest to automatically populate these profiles by analyzing the publications (co-authored by users, which we hypothesize reflect their research competences. Results We developed a novel approach, ScholarLens, which can automatically generate semantic user profiles for authors of scholarly literature. For modeling the competences of scholarly users and groups, we surveyed a number of existing linked open data vocabularies. In accordance with the LOD best practices, we propose an RDF Schema (RDFS based model for competence records that reuses existing vocabularies where appropriate. To automate the creation of semantic user profiles, we developed a complete, automated workflow that can generate semantic user profiles by analyzing full-text research articles through various natural language processing (NLP techniques. In our method, we start by processing a set of research articles for a

  13. Design and Development of a Web Based Digital Repository for Scholarly Communication: A Case of NM‐AIST Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiwasi J. Mgonzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutional repositories are essential research infrastructures for research ‐based universities. A properly dimensioned institutional repository has the potential to increase research impact and enhance the visibility of an institution through its scholarly outputs. The aim of the study reported in this paper was to design and develop a web‐based digital repository for scholarly communications using NM‐AIST as a case study. The system was developed using open source software. Findings obtained from system validation tests show that the system is a viable solution to the major challenges encountered in the management and sharing of scholarly information at the institution.

  14. The Higher-Ed Organizational-Scholar Tension: How Scholarship Compatibility and the Alignment of Organizational and Faculty Skills, Values and Support Affects Scholar's Performance and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra-Rojas, Milagros; Mu, Enrique; Gaskin, James; Lingham, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Scholars and institutions alike are concerned with academic productivity. Scholars not only further knowledge in their professional fields, they also bring visibility and prestige to themselves and their institutions, which in turn attracts research grants and more qualified faculty and graduate students. Many studies have been done on scholar productivity, and many of them focus on individual factors such as gender, marital status, and individual psychological characteristics. Also, a few studies are concerned about scholars' well-being. We propose a causal model that considers the compatibility of the scholarship dimensions valued by scholars and institutions and their academic alignment with actual institutional recognition and support. We test our causal model with data from a survey of 803 faculty participants. Our findings shed light on how the above academic factors affect not just academic productivity but also a scholar's well-being. Importantly, we show that academic alignment plays a crucial mediating role when predicting productivity and well-being. These results have important implications for university administrators who develop, and faculty who work under, policies designed to foster professional development and scholarship.

  15. A Review of Scholarly and Research Work in Physical Education in China during the First Decade of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haiyong; Li, Youqiang; Wu, Xueping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe published scholarly and research work to determine the extent to which they contributed to the physical education reform during 2000-2010 in China. Using an analytical reasoning approach, we analyzed 730 scholarly articles on K-12 physical education published in the 6 top kinesiology scholarly journals.…

  16. Building a Community of Scholars: One Cohort's Experience in an Online and Distance Education Doctor of Philosophy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lynnea H; Jeffery, Alvin D; Nimmagadda, Heather; Werthman, Jennifer Ann; Jordan, Kasey

    2015-11-01

    Online and distance education is becoming increasingly common in higher education. As students explore graduate programs, they are often overwhelmed with the variety of program delivery options available. For graduate students pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), a particular concern relates to building a community of scholars and how to do so through an online and distance learning program. Through a review of literature and personal stories, this article will highlight innovative strategies utilized by a cohort of PhD students related to online and distance learning and developing a community of scholars. PhD students developed a community of scholars using innovative strategies to communicate and collaborate. Building a community of scholars is possible through online and distance education using simple forms of technology to connect and collaborate. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. A framework for assessing impact of units of scholarly communication based on OAI-PMH harvesting of usage information

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Sompel, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    The wide-spread implementation of institutional repositories (IR), digital libraries, preprint services, and open access journals has dramatically changed the communication options that are available to scholars. At the same time, scholarship itself is becoming digital, thereby fundamentally extending the notion of a unit of scholarly communication beyond journal papers to include multimedia files, data sets, simulations, visualizations, etc. Meanwhile, the evaluation of scholarly performance remains bound to the use of citation data derived from a subset of all available communication channels (pre-selected journals), and an ever decreasing subset of all communicated units (journal papers). Clearly, there is a need for frameworks that allow measuring scholarly activity and its impact in the context of this new reality. We discuss the architecture of a system that is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that aims at determining impact and prestige rankings on the basis of aggregated usage dat...

  18. COMPARING HEDGES USED BY ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN SCHOLARS IN PUBLISHED RESEARCH ARTICLES: A CORPUS-BASED STUDY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I Nyoman Suka Sanjaya; Anak Agung Raka Sitawati; Ni Ketut Suciani

    2015-01-01

      The study examines whether English and Indonesian research articles written by their respective native speaker scholars are significantly different from each other in terms of the number of hedges used...

  19. Framing Effects in the Coverage of Scientology versus Germany: Some Thoughts on the Role of Press and Scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Brigitte Schön

    2001-01-01

    "Scientology might be one weird religion, but the German reaction to it is weirder still - not to mention disturbing." 2 This is how Richard Cohen of the Washington Post describes the controversy of Scientology vs. Germany, and he adds, "[...] the treatment of Scientologists is both inexplicable and troubling." 3 The inexplicable or rather as yet unexplained could usually be expected to raise the attention of scholars, especially if there is a troubling thrill to it. However, German scholars ...

  20. Outcomes in refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results from the international SCHOLAR-1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Michael; Neelapu, Sattva S; Farooq, Umar; Van Den Neste, Eric; Kuruvilla, John; Westin, Jason; Link, Brian K; Hay, Annette; Cerhan, James R; Zhu, Liting; Boussetta, Sami; Feng, Lei; Maurer, Matthew J; Navale, Lynn; Wiezorek, Jeff; Go, William Y; Gisselbrecht, Christian

    2017-10-19

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Although 5-year survival rates in the first-line setting range from 60% to 70%, up to 50% of patients become refractory to or relapse after treatment. Published analyses of large-scale outcome data from patients with refractory DLBCL are limited. SCHOLAR-1, an international, multicohort retrospective non-Hodgkin lymphoma research study, retrospectively evaluated outcomes in patients with refractory DLBCL which, for this study, was defined as progressive disease or stable disease as best response at any point during chemotherapy (>4 cycles of first-line or 2 cycles of later-line therapy) or relapsed at ≤12 months from autologous stem cell transplantation. SCHOLAR-1 pooled data from 2 phase 3 clinical trials (Lymphoma Academic Research Organization-CORAL and Canadian Cancer Trials Group LY.12) and 2 observational cohorts (MD Anderson Cancer Center and University of Iowa/Mayo Clinic Lymphoma Specialized Program of Research Excellence). Response rates and overall survival were estimated from the time of initiation of salvage therapy for refractory disease. Among 861 patients, 636 were included on the basis of refractory disease inclusion criteria. For patients with refractory DLBCL, the objective response rate was 26% (complete response rate, 7%) to the next line of therapy, and the median overall survival was 6.3 months. Twenty percent of patients were alive at 2 years. Outcomes were consistently poor across patient subgroups and study cohorts. SCHOLAR-1 is the largest patient-level pooled retrospective analysis to characterize response rates and survival for a population of patients with refractory DLBCL. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.