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Sample records for vetiver essential oil

  1. Alternative to conventional extraction of vetiver oil: Microwave hydrodistillation of essential oil from vetiver roots (Vetiveria zizanioides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, H. S.; Altway, A.; Mahfud, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the extraction of essential oil from vetiver roots (Vetiveria zizanioides) has been carried out by using microwave hydrodistillation. In the extraction of vetiver oil using microwave hydrodistillation method is studied the effect of microwave power, feed to solvent (F/S) ratio and extraction time on the yield of vetiver oil. Besides, in this study can be seen that microwave hydrodistillation method offers important advantages over hydrodistillation, such as shorter extraction time (3 h vs. 24 h for hydrodistillation); better yields (0.49% vs. 0.46% for hydrodistillation); and environmental impact (energy cost is appreciably higher for performing hydrodistillation than that required for extraction using microwave hydrodistillation). Based on the analysis using GC-MS can be seen 19 components on vetiver oil that has been extracted using microwave hydrodistillation. In addition, GC-MS analysis showed that the main components of vetiver oil that has been extracted using microwave hydrodistillation method were β-Gurjunene (30.12%), α-Vetivone (20.12%), 4-(1-cyclohexenyl)-2-trimethylsilymethyl-1-buten-3-yne (13.52%) and δ-Selinene (7.27%).

  2. Modification of sleep-waking and electroencephalogram induced by vetiver essential oil inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania Cheaha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously, efficacy of essential oil application has been considered as non evidence based. In this study, we performed scientific research of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides essential oil inhalation. The results confirmed its beneficial properties with quantitative data of sleep-waking and EEG profiles. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 72-78

  3. Effect of calcium on growth performance and essential oil of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) grown on lead contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danh, Luu Thai; Truong, Paul; Mammucari, Raffaella; Foster, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effect of calcium on growth, survival, essential oil yield and chemical compositions of vetiver grass grown on lead contaminated soils. Calcium inform of CaCO3 (0, 2000, 4000, 6000 mg Ca kg(-1)) was added to river sand soils containing 4000 mg Pb kg(-1) dry soil. Results showed that, in the absence of calcium treatment, no plants survived after 2 weeks of cultivation, while the rest grew well to the end of the experimental period (42 weeks). Calcium treatments generally resulted in a slight decrease in biomass. Interestingly, an increase in calcium over 2000 mg kg(-1) did not result in a decrease in accumulation of lead in vetiver roots and shoots. The levels of lead in roots and shoots under calcium treatments were around 2000 and 90 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. The addition of CaCO3 did not improve vetiver essential oil yield and chemical composition compared to the control. A level of applied CaCO3 about half of the lead concentration in soils was sufficient to improve vetiver growth and survival, and accumulate high concentrations of lead in the roots. This finding can be applied for re-vegetation of lead contaminated soils using vetiver.

  4. Toxicity and growth inhibition potential of vetiver, cinnamon, and lavender essential oils and their blends against larvae of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Hanem F; Ali, Ali M; Abouelella, Galal A; Marawan, Marawan A; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Abbas, Rao Z; Vaz, Nelissa P; Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-02-08

    Myiasis induced by the sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata, represents a public health problem widely distributed throughout the world. L. sericata larval stages feed on both humans and animals. L. sericata adults and larvae can play a role in spreading agents of mycobacterial infections. It is critical to establish new and safe alternative methods of controlling L. sericata. The insecticidal effectiveness and growth inhibition potential of three commercially available essential oils (EOs), vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), as well as their blends, were tested against the second (L2) and third (L3) larval stages of L. sericata. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) oil was used as a carrier and tested on L2 and L3 larvae. To the best of our knowledge, all applied essential oils, except lavender, and oil blends were tested against L. sericata for the first time. All applied oils did not repel L2 from the treated liver but adversely affected their development. Contact treatments on L. sericata L3 indicated that vetiver and cinnamon oils significantly affected treated larvae. Total mortality rates were 93.33 and 95.56%, respectively. Furthermore, oil blends tested through contact assays killed larvae when used at higher concentrations; adult emergence was eliminated post-treatment with doses >30% for oil blend 1 and >10% for oil blend 2. Overall, cinnamon and vetiver oils (5%) were selected as reliable and cheap biopesticides for controlling larvae of L. sericata. The tested oils are inexpensive and represent new promising botanical insecticides in the fight against blowflies causing myiasis. © 2018 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Acaricidal properties of vetiver essential oil from Chrysopogon zizanioides (Poaceae) against the tick species Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Roseane Nunes de Santana; Nascimento Lima, Cecília Beatriz; Passos Oliveira, Alexandre; Albano Araújo, Ana Paula; Fitzgerald Blank, Arie; Barreto Alves, Péricles; Nascimento Lima, Rafaely; Albano Araújo, Vinícius; Santana, Alisson Silva; Bacci, Leandro

    2015-09-15

    Ticks are arthropods widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, which can transmit infectious agents also responsible for zoonoses. Excessive use of conventional acaricides has resulted in the onset of drug resistance by these parasites, thus the need to use alternative methods for their control. This study evaluated the acaricidal activities of Chrysopogon zizanioides (vetiver) essential oils containing different zizanoic and khuzimol (high and low acidity) acid concentrations on Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). To this aims, toxicity tests of different concentrations of examined essential oils were conducted on adult females and larval stages. Results showed that the essential oils of C. zizanioides with high and low acidity reduced oviposition of females, eggs hatch and larval survival, being more effective than some commercial products widely used to control these ectoparasites. These results indicate that the C. zizanoides essential oils are promising candidates as acaricidal agents and represent also an add value to vetiver oil with high acidity, which is commercially undervalued in the cosmetic industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality and Chemical Composition of Organic and Non-Organic Vetiver Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Kadarohman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vetiver oil (Vetiveria zizanoides has been used as perfume materials, cosmetics, fragrance soaps, anti-inflammation, repellent, and insecticidal agents. Organic vetiver oil has higher economical value than non-organic vetiver oil and it has been regarded to be able to compete in the global market. Therefore, studies have been carried out using 1 hectare of land and the first generation of organic vetiver oil has produced 0.57% of yield, greater than non-organic (0.50%. The quality of organic and non-organic vetiver oil was analyzed by Indonesian Standard (SNI parameter, pesticide residue test, chemical composition by GC/MS, and the appearance of vetiver root. In general, the result of organic and non-organic vetiver oil has fulfilled the national standard; the quality of organic vetiver oil was better than non-organic one. Physically, the appearance of organic vetiver root was better than non-organic vetiver root; organic vetiver root was denser, more appealing, and did not have any black spots. The pesticide residue of organic vetiver oil was lower than non-organic vetiver oil. Based on SNI test, vetiverol (oxygen compounds in organic vetiver oil was higher than non-organic vetiver oil.

  7. Quality and Chemical Composition of Organic and Non-Organic Vetiver Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Asep Kadarohman; Ratnaningsih Eko S.; Gebi Dwiyanti; Lela Lailatul K.; Ede Kadarusman; Ahmad Nur F.

    2014-01-01

    Vetiver oil (Vetiveria zizanoides) has been used as perfume materials, cosmetics, fragrance soaps, anti-inflammation, repellent, and insecticidal agents. Organic vetiver oil has higher economical value than non-organic vetiver oil and it has been regarded to be able to compete in the global market. Therefore, studies have been carried out using 1 hectare of land and the first generation of organic vetiver oil has produced 0.57% of yield, greater than non-organic (0.50%). The quality of organi...

  8. Avoidance behavior to essential oils by Anopheles minimus, a malaria vector in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excito-repellency tests were used to characterize behavioral responses of laboratory colonized Anopheles minimus, a malaria vector in Thailand, using four essential oils, citronella (Cymbopogom nadus), hairy basil (Ocimum americanum), sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum), vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides), ...

  9. Phytoremediation Potential of Vetiver System Technology for Improving the Quality of Palm Oil Mill Effluent

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    Negisa Darajeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil mill effluent (POME, a pollutant produced by the palm oil industry, was treated by the Vetiver system technology (VST. This technology was applied for the first time to treat POME in order to decrease biochemical oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD. In this study, two different concentrations of POME (low and high were treated with Vetiver plants for 2 weeks. The results showed that Vetiver was able to reduce the BOD up to 90% in low concentration POME and 60% in high concentration POME, while control sets (without plant only was able to reduce 15% of BOD. The COD reduction was 94% in low concentration POME and 39% in high concentration POME, while control just shows reduction of 12%. Morphologically, maximum root and shoot lengths were 70 cm, the number of tillers and leaves was 344 and 86, and biomass production was 4.1 kg m−2. These results showed that VST was effective in reducing BOD and COD in POME. The treatment in low concentration was superior to the high concentration. Furthermore, biomass of plant can be considered as a promising raw material for biofuel production while high amount of biomass was generated in low concentration of POME.

  10. Unravelling the scent of vetiver: identification of character-impact compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, Emilie; Baldovini, Nicolas; Brevard, Hugues; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Filippi, Jean-Jacques

    2014-11-01

    Vetiver oil is a highly esteemed basic ingredient of modern perfumery, but the nature of the constituents that really impart its typical and most sought woody-earthy scent has remained controversial. Indeed, vetiver oil is considered as one of the most complex essential oils, being mostly composed of several hundreds of sesquiterpene derivatives with a large structural diversity. Its complexity has hindered the direct identification of its odoriferous components. We thus aimed at using a combination of GC×GC/MS and GC-Olfactometry in order to identify most of its odor-impact constituents. The olfactory analysis of vetiver oil and vetiveryl acetate revealed a huge variety of odors in both products. While khusimone has almost unanimously been recognized as the most characteristic vetiver odorant, we have identified several even more important contributors to the typical vetiver character. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Evaluation of DEET and eight essential oils for repellency against nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eight commercially available essential oils (oregano, clove, thyme, vetiver, sandalwood, cinnamon, cedarwood, and peppermint) were evaluated for repellency against host-seeking nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Concentration- repellency response was established using the vertical ...

  12. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Cabo, Marta L; Rodríguez-Herrera, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils to remove the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus from food-processing facilities. The effectiveness of 19 essential oils against planktonic cells of S. aureus was firstly assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration. Planktonic cells showed a wide variability in resistance to essential oils, with thyme oil as the most effective, followed by lemongrass oil and then vetiver oil. The eight essential oils most effective against planktonic cells were subsequently tested against 48-h-old biofilms formed on stainless steel. All essential oils reduced significantly (p oils were the most effective, but high concentrations were needed to achieve logarithmic reductions over 4 log CFU/cm(2) after 30 min exposure. Alternatively, the use of sub-lethal doses of thyme oil allowed to slow down biofilm formation and to enhance the efficiency of thyme oil and benzalkonium chloride against biofilms. However, some cellular adaptation to thyme oil was detected. Therefore, essential oil-based treatments should be based on the rotation and combination of different essential oils or with other biocides to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Molecular and chemical characterization of vetiver, Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, R S; Zucchi, M I; Pinheiro, J B; Campos, J B; Pereira, A A; Bianchini, F G; Lima, R N; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Alves, P B; Blank, A F

    2015-08-14

    Due to the economic interests in vetiver, Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, molecular and chemical studies are essential to generate information for its sustainable exploitation. The aim of this study was to undertake a molecular and chemical characterization of vetiver accessions of the active germplasm bank of the Universidade Federal de Sergipe. The molecular characteristics of the accessions were studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, with a total of 14 primer combinations that generated 442 loci, allowing us to observe that these accessions have similar genomes. The vetiver accessions were divided into three distinct groups, where accession UFS-VET005 was the most differentiated and accession UFS-VET004 had the lowest essential oil content (0.70%). The content of the chemical constituents of the essential oils was observed to vary, with a predominance of khusimol, which ranged from 18.97 to 25.02%. It was possible to divide the vetiver accessions into two groups based on chemical composition, and these groups do not correlate with the molecular grouping. Therefore, it is necessary to perform molecular and chemical analyses to characterize vetiver accessions.

  14. Comparison of Pretreatment Methods on Vetiver Leaves for Efficient Processes of Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation by Neurospora sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restiawaty, E.; Dewi, A.

    2017-07-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential raw material for bioethanol production. Neurospora sp. can be used to convert lignocellulosic biomass into bioethanol because of its ability to perform simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, lignin content, degree of polymerization, and crystallinity of cellulose contained in lignocellulosic biomass can inhibit cellulosic-biomass digestion by Neurospora sp, so that a suitable pretreatment method of lignocellulosic biomass is needed. The focus of this research was to investigate the suitable pretreatment method for vetiver leaves (Vetiveria zizanioides L. Nash) used as a raw material producing bioethanol in the process of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) by Neurospora sp.. Vetiver plants obtained from Garut are deliberately cultivated to produce essential oils extracted from the roots of this plant. Since the vetiver leaves do not contain oil, some of harvested leaves are usually used for crafts and cattle feed, and the rest are burned. This study intended to look at other potential of vetiver leaves as a source of renewable energy. Pretreatments of the vetiver leaves were conducted using hot water, dilute acid, alkaline & dilute acid, and alkaline peroxide, in which each method was accompanied by thermal treatment. The results showed that the alkaline peroxide treatment is a suitable for vetiver leaves as indicated by the increase of cellulose content up to 65.1%, while the contents of hot water soluble, hemicellulose, lignin, and ash are 8.7%, 18.3%, 6.8%, and 1.1%, respectively. Using this pretreatment method, the vetiver leaves can be converted into bioethanol by SSF process using Neurospora sp. with a concentration of bioethanol of 6.7 g/L operated at room temperature.

  15. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ)

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    ... well as with standard treatments , for symptom management . Essential oils (also known as volatile oils) are the fragrant ( aromatic ) part found in many plants, often under the surface of leaves, bark, or peel. The fragrance is released if ...

  16. LCA of bioethanol and furfural production from vetiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jegannathan Kenthorai; Gnansounou, Edgard

    2015-06-01

    In this study a prospective life cycle assessment of biorefinery system from vetiver leaves was carried out to know the environmental benefits of this system over conventional systems considering the geographical context of India. The composition of vetiver leaves from the experimental analysis revealed that vetiver is rich in cellulose (32.6%), hemicellulose (31.5%) and lignin (17.3%) that could be used as a feedstock for biorefinery. The comparative life cycle assessment results show that the carbon dioxide emission and fossil oil depletion could be reduced by 95% and 23% respectively in case of standalone bioethanol system, and 99% and 17% respectively in case of bioethanol and furfural system compared to that of conventional petrol and furfural systems. The sensitivity study indicates that the impact could be further reduced if vetiver biomass is used as a source of energy in biorefinery plant instead to the coal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Antioxidant properties of essential oils].

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    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I

    2009-01-01

    By the method of capillary gas-liquid chromatography we studied antioxidant properties and stability during the storage of hexane solutions of 14 individual essential oils from black and white pepper (Piper nigrum L.), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans Houtt.), mace (Myristica fragrans Houtt), juniperberry (Juniperus communis L.), seed of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., var. dulce Thelling), caraway (Carvum carvi L.), dry leaves of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.), marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), laurel (Laurus nobilis L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and clove bud (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.). We assessed the antioxidant properties by the oxidation of aliphatic aldehyde (trans-2-hexenal) into the according carbon acid. We established that essential oils of garlic, clove bud, ginger and leaves of cinnamon have the maximal efficiency of inhibition of hexenal oxidation (80-93%), while black pepper oil has the minimal (49%). Antioxidant properties of essential oils with a high content of substituted phenols depended poorly on its concentration in model systems. We studied the changes in essential oils content during the storage of its hexane solutions for 40 days in the light and out of the light and compared it with the stability of essential oils stored for a year out of the light.

  18. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils

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    José Ferreira Sarmento-Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  19. Essential oils in broiler nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Kyung-woo

    2002-01-01

    Dietary antibiotics at low, subtherapeutic levels have been shown to improve growth performance in farm animals. However, there is a trend to look for alternatives to dietary antibiotics, due to occurrence of antibiotic-resistance bacteria. The present thesis explored the essential oils as the

  20. Contact and fumigant toxicity of plant essential oils and efficacy of spray formulations containing the oils against B- and Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon-Il; Chae, Song-Hwa; Youn, Hee-Sung; Yeon, Seong-Hum; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2011-09-01

    The contact + fumigant toxicity of 92 plant essential oils and control efficacy of 18 experimental spray formulations containing nine selected essential oils (0.5 and 0.1% sprays) and six commercial insecticides to females from B- and Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci were evaluated using vapour-phase mortality and spray bioassays. Garlic and oregano (LC50 , 0.15 mL cm(-3) ) were the most toxic oils against B- and Q-biotype females. Strong fumigant toxicity to both biotype females was also obtained from catnip, cinnamon bark, clove bud, clove leaf, davana, savory and vetiver Haiti oils (LC50 , 0.17-0.48 mL cm(-3) ). The 0.5% sprays of these oils (except for thyme red oil) resulted in 90-100% mortality against both biotype females. Only garlic applied as 0.1% spray provided 100% mortality. Spinosad 100 g L(-1) suspension concentrate (SC) treatment resulted in 92 and 95% mortality against both biotype females, whereas acetamiprid 80 g L(-1) wettable powder (WP), imidacloprid 80 g L(-1) SC, thiamethoxam 100 g L(-1) water-dispersible granule (WDG) and pyridaben 200 g L(-1) WP treatments resulted in 89-100% mortality against B-biotype females only. In the light of global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment, the essential oils described, particularly garlic, cinnamon bark and vetiver Haiti, merit further study as potential insecticides for the control of B. tabaci populations as fumigants with contact action. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Essential oils: from extraction to encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asbahani, A; Miladi, K; Badri, W; Sala, M; Aït Addi, E H; Casabianca, H; El Mousadik, A; Hartmann, D; Jilale, A; Renaud, F N R; Elaissari, A

    2015-04-10

    Essential oils are natural products which have many interesting applications. Extraction of essential oils from plants is performed by classical and innovative methods. Numerous encapsulation processes have been developed and reported in the literature in order to encapsulate biomolecules, active molecules, nanocrystals, oils and also essential oils for various applications such as in vitro diagnosis, therapy, cosmetic, textile, food etc. Essential oils encapsulation led to numerous new formulations with new applications. This insures the protection of the fragile oil and controlled release. The most commonly prepared carriers are polymer particles, liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Essential oils: renewal of interest and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigan, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils are complex mixtures of substances from vegetable matter, the definition of which is based on their method of extraction. They are characterized by their ambivalence, their ambiguity and their disparity: plant families from which essential oils are extracted are numerous; the composition of each essential oil depends not only on the family but also on the part of the plant from which it is extracted, and sometimes on the soil where the plant grows, or even on the time of the harvest. Gas chromatography is therefore necessary to characterize an essential oil. Essential oils can be found in cosmetics, in drugs, and in food. They are natural substances, but natural is not synonymous with harmless. Evaluation of the toxicity of essential oils and European regulation are underway.

  3. Antibacterial and antifungal properties of essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalemba, D; Kunicka, A

    2003-05-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances, and some questions concerning the safety of synthetic compounds have encouraged more detailed studies of plant resources. Essential oils, odorous and volatile products of plant secondary metabolism, have a wide application in folk medicine, food flavouring and preservation as well as in fragrance industries. The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been known for many centuries. In recent years (1987-2001), a large number of essential oils and their constituents have been investigated for their antimicrobial properties against some bacteria and fungi in more than 500 reports. This paper reviews the classical methods commonly used for the evaluation of essential oils antibacterial and antifungal activities. The agar diffusion method (paper disc and well) and the dilution method (agar and liquid broth) as well as turbidimetric and impedimetric monitoring of microorganism growth in the presence of tested essential oils are described. Factors influencing the in vitro antimicrobial activity of essential oils and the mechanisms of essential oils action on microorganisms are reported. This paper gives an overview on the susceptibility of human and food-borne bacteria and fungi towards different essential oils and their constituents. Essential oils of spices and herbs (thyme, origanum, mint, cinnamon, salvia and clove) were found to possess the strongest antimicrobial properties among many tested.

  4. Bioanalytical evaluation of Cinnamomum zeylanicum essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Jilani, Muhammad Idrees; Hanif, Muhammad Asif

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript describes the antioxidant activity of essential oil of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark extracted by supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE), hydro distillation and steam distillation. The cinnamon bark essential oil exhibited a wide range of total phenolic contents, total flavonoid contents, reducing power, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation and DPPH radical-scavenging activity (IC50). Bioactivity of cinnamon essential oil was assayed against various bacterial strains including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pastrurella multocida and Straphylococcus aureus and fungal strains including Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. More essential oil yield was obtained using SCFE in comparison to other methods. The oil extracted by SCFE was dominated by cinnamaldehyde, limonene, copaene, naphthalene, heptane, bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-1,3,5-triene and 2-propenal. Due to the presence of cinnamaldehyde in the essential oil of cinnamon bark it acts as a good antioxidant and antimicrobial agent.

  5. Propagação e conservação in vitro de vetiver In vitro propagation and conservation of vetiver grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiana C Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides é um capim perene com características físico-químicas e agronômicas importantes que o torna uma espécie destaque. De suas raízes é extraído um óleo essencial utilizado amplamente na produção de perfumes e devido à sua baixa volatilidade, como fixador de odor. Esse trabalho teve como objetivo desenvolver um protocolo de propagação e de conservação in vitro de vetiver. Para o ensaio de multiplicação in vitro testaram-se combinações dos reguladores de crescimento BAP e ANA. Na aclimatização foram testados substratos contendo pó de coco e/ou vermiculita suplementado com calcário, fertilizante NPK (3-12-6 e concentrações dos sais do meio MS. Nos ensaios de conservação in vitro foram avaliadas as temperaturas de 18 e 25°C, reguladores osmóticos (sacarose, manitol e sorbitol, o inibidor de crescimento ABA e diferentes concentrações dos sais MS. Verificou-se que a micropropagação de vetiver UFS-VET003 é promovida em meio MS líquido acrescido de 3,33 mg L-1 de BAP, sendo a etapa de enraizamento das brotações proporcionada em meio MS básico, também líquido. Para aclimatização recomenda-se o substrato PBC. A conservação in vitro é possível em meio MS semissólido com 25% dos sais MS e temperatura de 18°C por um período de 270 dias.Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides is a perennial grass which presents physicochemical and agronomic characteristics that highlights the importance of this species. From the roots of vetiver grass essential oil is extracted which is widely used for perfume production, and because of its low volatility it is used as fragrance fixer. We developed a protocol for in vitro propagation and conservation of vetiver grass. For the in vitro multiplication assay, combinations of the growth regulators BAP and NAA were tested. For acclimatization, substrates containing coconut coir and/or vermiculite, supplemented with limestone, NPK (3-12-6 fertilizer and the

  6. De novo assembly and characterization of root transcriptome in two distinct morphotypes of vetiver, Chrysopogon zizaniodes (L.) Roberty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakrabarty, Debasis; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Chauhan, Abhishek Singh; Indoliya, Yuvraj; Lavania, Umesh Chandra; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    .... Two distinct vetiver morphotypes have been identified in India, i.e., A. North Indian type characterized by thick and smooth fast growing roots that produce superior quality of laevorotatory oil; and B...

  7. Antibacterial activity of Rosa damascena essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basim, E; Basim, H

    2003-06-01

    The essential oil of Rosa damascena petals was evaluated for its antibacterial effects against three strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis spp. vesicatoria. The essential oil may be a potential control agent in the management of the disease caused by X.a. vesicatoria in tomato and pepper plants.

  8. Phytotoxic Activities of Mediterranean Essential Oils

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    Luiz Fernando Rolim de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested for their phytotoxic activity, at different doses, against the germination and the initial radicle growth of seeds of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa and Lepidium sativum. The essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae, Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae, Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare and Carum carvi (Apiaceae. The germination and radicle growth of tested seeds were affected in different ways by the oils. Thyme, balm, vervain and caraway essential oils were more active against both germination and radicle elongation.

  9. Essential oil content and composition of aniseed

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    Aćimović Milica G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field experiments were carried out during 2011 and 2012 in three localities in Vojvodina (Serbia with the application of six different fertilizer regimes aimed at determining the content and composition of the aniseed essential oil. It was found that the average essential oil content of aniseed, obtained by hydrodistillation, was 3.72%. The weather conditions during the year and the locality had a statistically significant effect on the essential oil content, while different source of fertilizers was not statistically significant for the essential oil content and its composition. Essential oil composition was determined using GC-MS technique, and a total of 15 compounds were identified. It was found that the major component was trans-anethole, 94.78% on the average, and the coefficient of variation was 2%. The second most abundant component was γ-himachalene with 2.53% (CV 28%. All other components were present in less than 1%.

  10. De novo assembly and characterization of root transcriptome in two distinct morphotypes of vetiver, Chrysopogon zizaniodes (L.) Roberty

    OpenAIRE

    Debasis Chakrabarty; Puneet Singh Chauhan; Abhishek Singh Chauhan; Yuvraj Indoliya; Umesh Chandra Lavania; Chandra Shekhar Nautiyal

    2015-01-01

    Vetiver, a perennial C4 grass, has long been known for its multifarious uses in perfumery, medicine and environmental protection. Two distinct vetiver morphotypes have been identified in India, i.e., A. North Indian type characterized by thick and smooth fast growing roots that produce superior quality of laevorotatory oil; and B. South Indian type with more number of thin and hairy roots that produce inferior quality of dextrorotatory oil. The two morphotypes were targeted for transcriptome ...

  11. HOW PROPERTIES OF EDIBLE OILS ARE IMPROVED BY ESSENTIAL OILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONIA AMARIEI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present paper is to find out whether the addition of essential oils determines better oxidation stability and positive change of sensory and hedonic perception of edible oils. The oxidation stability of sunflower, corn and grape seed oils was analyzed in the presence of antioxidants in essential oils of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, thyme (Thymus vulgaris and basil (Ocimum basilicum during storage, under conditions of accelerated oxidative processes (4 days, at 60 °C. The total phenolic compounds of these essential oils were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The DPPH method was used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of basil, rosemary and thyme essential oils in comparison with known synthetic antioxidant L(+-ascorbic acid. The addition of essential oils to edible oils, the amounts proposed in analyses, determines a favorable influence on their oxidation stability as well as their taste. The influence of addition of essential oils on the taste of edible oils was studied in two products consumed mainly at breakfast, bread and spinach leaves. The results recommend the use of these plant extracts as additives in edible oils rather than synthetic antioxidants.

  12. Drought and salt stress in Chrysopogon zizanioides leads to common and specific transcriptomic responses and may affect essential oil composition and benzylisoquinoline alkaloids metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja George

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses affect crop productivity worldwide. Understanding molecular mechanisms of plant abiotic stress tolerance is important for developing stress tolerant crop plants for sustaining crop productivity in future. Chrysopogon zizanioides (vetiver is a perennial C4 grass reported to be tolerant to water, salinity and submergence stress. Here, we subjected C. zizanioides seedlings to salt and drought stress and carried out whole transcriptome profiling of leaf and root tissues. Assessing the global transcriptome changes under drought and salt stress resulted in the identification of several genes contributing to stress response in this species. Overall, more transcriptomic changes were observed in leaf tissue compared to root tissue. The response to either stress manifested primarily as upregulation of gene expression in both leaf and root. The study identified stress responsive genes commonly and differently regulated under stress/tissue conditions. Several DEGs in our data were identified as enzymes involved in biosynthesis of essential oil components. The differential expression of these genes under drought and salt stress may affect the vetiver essential oil composition under these stresses. Similarly, several genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphin were found to be differentially expressing in our data. Our data may facilitate further molecular studies on stress tolerance of C. zizanioides. The DEGs from our results are potential candidates for understanding and engineering abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

  13. Influence of Essential Oils on Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątkowska, Elżbieta; Rusiecka-Ziółkowska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils are substances of plant origin used to produce cosmetics, to preserve and aromatize food. Recently, they have become more popular among scientists and doctors due to their germicidal, antifungal, antiviral and anti-parasitic properties. As a consequence, essential oils are regarded as the source of new therapeutic substances. Numerous publications have been written regarding their effect on microorganisms in vitro. There have also been reports regarding their use in therapy as an additive to the traditional medical treatment. Essential oils may have other properties with positive effect on health because they may have an influence on the central nervous system and human mental state. It should be, however, kept in mind that compounds of essential oils might also have side effects and lead, like antibiotics, to the selection of resistant pathogens. It is necessary to develop quality standards of obtaining and using these plant preparations, so that they may provide safe and effective assistance in the fight against human pathogens.

  14. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Akway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Meilan Lisangan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Akway. Akway (Drimys piperita Hook f. is a woody, evergreen andaromatic plan that was a member of winteraceae. This plant is used by Sougb tribe lived in Sururey village, District ofManokwari, to heal malaria and to enhance the vitality of body. The objectives of this research were to know the yieldof essential oil using water distillation of leaves and its chemical composition using gas chromatography and massspectroscopy (GC-MS. The results indicated that the yield of leaves essential oil by using water distillation was 0.2%.The essential oil composed by 49 compounds categorized by terpene and its derivatives 83.67%, derivatives of benzene4.08% and alifatic compounds 8.16%.

  15. Vetiver Grass: a potential tool for phytoremediation of iron ore mine site spoil dump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mukherjee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of mining has lead to the generation of a large amount of spoil dumps that has become dangerous to human health, wildlife and biodiversity. Thus it is essential that the post mining areas and waste land generated need to be rapidly vegetated. Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides (L. Roberty is a tropical plant which grows naturally in various soil conditions and is well known for its ability to resist DNA damage while growing on typically polluted soil conditions. The spoil dumps from the iron mine site is unstable and inhospitable for plant growth due to presence of various toxic heavy metals like - Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Cd etc. Vetiver system is an efficient bio-engineering tool for reclaiming such spoil dumps. There are 12 known species of Vetiver grass, and many hundreds of different cultivars that are exploited by users depending on need. In the present study we selected the polyploid infertile variety of vetiver and carried pot experiments. Vetiver plants grown on the iron ore mine spoil dump show distinct differences in their growth with fewer numbers of tillers, reduced chlorophyll content, upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and increased proline content. To investigate the level of DNA damage incurred and change in the genetic stability Comet assay and RAPD analysis were performed. Results confirmed that Vetiver grass can serve as a model species for phytoremediating the iron ore mine spoil dumps.

  16. REINVESTIGATION OF ESSENTIAL OIL CONTENT OF THAPSIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was dried under shade and subjected to hydrodistillation procedure as described in many references, to give 0.32g, 0.29g and 0.22 g of essential oil from flowers, leaves and stems respectively. 3. ANALYTICAL CONDITIONS. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The oil was analyzed by GC/MS using a Agilent ...

  17. Essential Oil of Otostegia integrifolia Benth: Composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antifungal activity of the oil was either comparable to or better than griseofulvin against most of the fungal pathogens tested. The study provides evidence for an excellent broadspectrum antimicrobial and significant antioxidant activity of O. integrifolia essential oil, a possible explanation for the traditional use of the plant.

  18. ANTIBACTERIAL PROFILE OF PEUCEDANUM LONGIFOLIUM ESSENTIAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budimir Ilić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Peucedanum longifolium Waldst. & Kit. (Apiaceae essential oil were examined, as well as the association between it and standard antibiotics. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used to analyze the chemical composition of the oil. The antibacterial activity of the oil was investigated by the broth microdilution method against thirteen bacterial strains. The interactions of the essential oil with three conventional antibiotics: tetracycline, streptomycin and chloramphenicol toward five selected bacterial strains were evaluated using the microdilution checkerboard assay. Monoterpene hydrocarbons (61.60%, with myrcene (15.88% as the dominant constituent, were the most abundant compound class of the essential oil of P. longifolium from Serbia. The researched essential oil exhibited slight antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strains in vitro. On the contrary, essential oil of P. longifolium posseses significant synergistic potential in combination with streptomycin and chloramphenicol (FIC indices in the range 0.21–0.87. Their combinations reduced the minimum effective dose of the antibiotic and, consequently, minimized its adverse side effects. In addition, investigated interactions are especially successful against Gram-negative bacteria, the pharmacological treatment of which is very difficult nowadays. These results indicate a method to enhance the efficacy of antibacterial drugs, especially against resistant bacterial strains.

  19. Postharvest quality of essential oil treated roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Mariano Manfredini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss of commercial quality during storage and transportation of roses is one of the factors that reflect on production costs, leading producers to preventively apply harmful chemicals, mainly to hamper Botrytis cinerea development and reduce further losses. An alternative to increase flower longevity without contaminating the environment with harmful chemicals is the use of natural products, such as essential oils, which have fungistatic and insecticide properties, as well as low toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of essential oils on the vase life of Rosa cv. Avalanche: 12 treatments were tested, resulting from the combination of 5 types of essential oils plus the control in two cold storage periods (2 to 6 days at 1 °C, 90-95% RH. The essential oils tested were eucalyptus, cinnamon, lemongrass and peppermint (1%, clove (0.1%, plus a control with distilled water. Application was made by spraying the flower buds. After storage at low temperatures, the flower stems were kept in a room (16 °C, 70% RH during 10 days for evaluation. Flower stems stored for 2 days in a cold chamber showed better means for darkening, turgor and bent neck, as well as a lower weight loss by the stems. The application of lemongrass essential oil at 1% caused burns on the petals, compromising quality and pot life. The essential oils of peppermint and eucalyptus allowed flower quality maintenance until the 10th day of evaluation. It is possible to conclude that post-harvest spraying with peppermint or eucalyptus essential oil at 1%, combined with cold storage for 2 days, provided greater longevity and quality for cv. Avalanche roses.

  20. Antitumor Phenylpropanoids Found in Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Andrade Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for new bioactive substances with anticancer activity and the understanding of their mechanisms of action are high-priorities in the research effort toward more effective treatments for cancer. The phenylpropanoids are natural products found in many aromatic and medicinal plants, food, and essential oils. They exhibit various pharmacological activities and have applications in the pharmaceutical industry. In this review, the anticancer potential of 17 phenylpropanoids and derivatives from essential oils is discussed. Chemical structures, experimental report, and mechanisms of action of bioactive substances are presented.

  1. Essential Oil of Betula pendula Roth. Buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Demirci

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Betula pendula Roth. buds was obtained using both hydrodistillation and microdistillation techniques and their chemical compositions were analyzed using both gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Overall, more than 50 compounds were identified representing 80% and 92% for hydrodistillation and microdistillation, respectively. The main components (by hydrodistillation and microdistillation, respectively found were α-copaene (12% and 10%, germacrene D (11% and 18% and δ-cadinene (11% and 15% in the analyzed essential oils. The microdistillation technique proved to be a useful tool and compliant alternative when compared to hydrodistillation.

  2. Evaluation of enhanced soil washing process and phytoremediation with maize oil, carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin, and vetiver grass for the recovery of organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from a pesticide factory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Liu, Zongtang; Ni, Ni; Chen, Yinwen; Gu, Chengang; Kengara, Fredrick Orori; Li, Huixin; Jiang, Xin

    2014-08-01

    An innovative ex situ soil washing technology was developed in this study to remediate organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and heavy metals in a mixed contaminated site. Elevated temperature (60 °C) combined with ultrasonication (40 kHz, 20 min) at 50 mL L(-1) maize oil and 45 g L(-1) carboxylmethyl-β-cyclodextrin were effective in extracting pollutants from the soil. After two successive washing cycles, the removal efficiency rates for total OCPs, mirex, endosulfans, chlordanes, Cd, and Pb were approximately 94.7%, 87.2%, 98.5%, 92.3%, 91.6%, and 87.3%, respectively. Cultivation of vetiver grass and addition of nutrients for 3 months further degraded 34.7% of the residual total OCPs and partially restored the microbiological functions of the soil. This result was indicated by the significant increase in the number, biomass C, N, and functioning diversity of soil microorganisms (p pollutants in the remediated soil was at an acceptable level. The proposed combined cleanup strategy proved to be effective and environmentally friendly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Essential Oils and Fragrances from Natural Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our body uses the aromatic molecules (essential oils) in two ways: (1) through our olfactory system which is connected to the brain where our most primal feelings .... Fixatives are scented components that act to hold the fragrance together and .... Gas chromatography alone is not a definitive tool for determin- ing the purity of ...

  4. Moldicidal properties of seven essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina W. Yang; Carol A. Clausen

    2006-01-01

    When wood and wood products are exposed to moisture during storage, construction or while in-service, mold growth can occur in 24 to 48 hours. Mold growth could be suppressed or prevented if wood was treated with an effective mold inhibitor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mold inhibiting properties of natural plant extracts such as essential oils....

  5. The essential oil of patchouli, Pogostemon cablin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van Teris A.; Joulain, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The leaves of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth. (Lamiaceae) are the source of patchouli essential oil, which is - with an annual production of about 1300 tonnes - an important and unique commodity in the fragrance industry. All the literature pertaining to patchouli was critically reviewed with

  6. ESSENTIAL OIL COMPOSITION OF FOUR ARTEMISIA SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    leaves of A. absinthium L. from Ethiopia (previously called A. rehan) and A. absinthium (from Europe) was also conducted. ... composition of the essential oils of A. schimperi, A. afra and A. abyssinica are mainly dominated by irregular monoterpenes: ... Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. [1].

  7. ESSENTIAL OIL OF Protium unifoliolatum (BURSERACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    ZOGHBI, Maria das G. B.; CUNHA, Emidio V. L. da; WOLTER FILHO, Wilson

    1993-01-01

    The major constituents of the leaf essential oil of P. unifoliolatumare trans-caryophyllene (37.45%), limonene (24.23%) and α-humulene (9.94%). O óleo essencial obtido das folhas frescas de P. unifoliolatumapresentou como constituintes principais trans-cariofileno (37,45%), limoneno (24,23%) e α-humuleno (9,94%).

  8. Essential Oils and Fragrances from Natural Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 4. Essential Oils and Fragrances from Natural Sources. Padma S Vankar. General Article Volume 9 Issue 4 April 2004 pp 30-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/04/0030-0041 ...

  9. essential oil as hatching egg disinfectant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... through the eggshell if the egg is contaminated with fecal ... through the eggshell upon contact with contaminated ... synthetic pesticides. One such method involves the use of plant-derived-products, such as plant essential oils, having antimicrobial effect. Keeping all these points in consideration, an attempt.

  10. Evaluation of essential oil composition and DNA diversity of mint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... cultivated for their essential oils. Essential oil composition from the leaves of M. spicata has been described pre- viously, such as carvone and menthone-rich oils (Sticher and Flőck 1968), carvone and neodihydrocarveol-rich oils. (Nagasawa et al., 1976a, b), dihydrocarveol and carvone- rich oils ...

  11. Essential oil polymorphism in finnish thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl-Biskup, E; Laakso, I

    1990-10-01

    Chemical polymorphism concerning the essential oils of the genus THYMUS is a widespread phenomenon, especially in the northern species. The two Finnish species, T. SERPYLLUM ssp. SERPYLLUM and T. SERPYLLUM ssp. TANAENIS, turned out to form four different chemotypes each, with hedycaryol, germacra-1(10),5-dien-4-ol, germacra-1(10),4-dien-6-ol, linalool, and linalyl acetate as type-characterizing compounds. Otherwise the oils of the two subspecies were similar containing myrcene, TRANS-beta-ocimene, beta-caryophyllene, and germacrene D as the main terpene hydrocarbons. 1,8-Cineol and camphor represented another great portion in both oils. If Finland is regarded as an area of T. SERPYLLUM (s.l.), a total of six types of plants can be defined with regard to the essential oil chemistry only. Including the frequency of these six types at the four areas investigated, a certain gradient from the south to the north can be seen. A most interesting aspect is the fact that the most frequent, linalyl acetate containing chemotype of the northern Lapland has nearly the same oil composition as T. PRAECOX ssp. ARCTICUS in Island, Norway, and Greenland.

  12. Designing of steam distillation system for essential oils

    OpenAIRE

    川崎, 聖司; 池間, 洋一郎; 國吉, 和男; 秋永, 孝義; Kawasaki, Seiji; Ikema, Youitirou; Kuniyoshi, Kazuo; Akinaga, Takayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Different processing methods are required to extract essential oils from different plants. Most oils are extracted using steam distillation, during which the plant tissues break down, the essential oils and water vapor are released, then collected and cooled. The volatile essential oil condenses, separates and is easily isolated. In this process the steam is prepared in a separate chamber and piped into the tank. This is especially good for plant materials with high boiling point oils.Essenti...

  13. Optimization of Steam Distillation of Essential Oil of Eucalyptus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    372. ISSN 0794- ... pharmaceuticals. Generally, essential oils are complex mixtures of hydrocarbon monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, hydrocarbon sesquiterpenes, oxygenated ... matrix, oil content and constituents affect the production.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of commercially available essential oils against Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Lalit Kumar D; Jawale, Bhushan Arun; Sharma, Sheeba; Sharma, Hemant; Kumar, C D Mounesh; Kulkarni, Pooja Adwait

    2012-01-01

    Many essential oils have been advocated for use in complementary medicine for bacterial and fungal infections. However, few of the many claims of therapeutic efficacy have been validated adequately by either in vitro testing or in vivo clinical trials. To study the antibacterial activity of nine commercially available essential oils against Streptococcus mutans in vitro and to compare the antibacterial activity between each material. Nine pure essential oils; wintergreen oil, lime oil, cinnamon oil, spearmint oil, peppermint oil, lemongrass oil, cedarwood oil, clove oil and eucalyptus oil were selected for the study. Streptococcus mutans was inoculated at 37ºC and seeded on blood agar medium. Agar well diffusion assay was used to measure antibacterial activity. Zone of inhibition was measured around the filter paper in millimeters with vernier caliper. Cinnamon oil showed highest activity against Streptococcus mutans followed by lemongrass oil and cedarwood oil. Wintergreen oil, lime oil, peppermint oil and spearmint oil showed no antibacterial activity. Cinnamon oil, lemongrass oil, cedarwood oil, clove oil and eucalyptus oil exhibit antibacterial property against S. mutans. The use of these essential oils against S. mutans can be a viable alternative to other antibacterial agents as these are an effective module used in the control of both bacteria and yeasts responsible for oral infections.

  15. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatherapy with the use of essential oils has been studied in cancer patients to help with symptom relief. Read about how aromatherapy massage or inhalation of essential oils have reduced symptoms in cancer patients in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Aromatherapy: Using Essential Oils as a Supportive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Debra; Jones, Tisha

    2017-02-01

    Essential oils can be a great adjunct to cancer care, aiding in the management of side effects, such as insomnia and nausea. Healthcare professionals should be knowledgeable about the quality and safety of essential oils when using them for clinical purposes. Using lesser quality essential oils and not understanding safety guidelines can negatively affect clinical outcomes. This article provides an overview of how nurses can help patients with cancer safely use essential oils as a supportive therapy.

  17. Extraction of Essential Oil from Cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zeylanicum)

    OpenAIRE

    Y.C.Wong; M. Y. Ahmad-Mudzaqqir; W.A. Wan-Nurdiyana

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamomum zeylanicum is one of the herbs and spices plants that come from cinnamon family which contains high quality of essential oil. In this study, the essential oil from plant Cinnamomum zeylanicum was extracted using two methods which were steam distillation and Soxhlex extraction. Steam distillation produced high quality essential oil extraction using separatory funnel. Soxhlet extraction produced essential oil in crude form using rotary evaporator to purify the extracted product. Cinn...

  18. Antiradical potential and antifungal activities of essential oils of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Essential oil composition. Essential oil was obtained by steam distillation for 5 h with a yield of 0.66%. GC and GC-MS analysis of essen- tial oil enabled the .... the plasma membrane (de Billerbeck et al., 2001;. Knobloch et al., 1989). From these results, it can be concluded that the essen- tial oil of C. latifolia ...

  19. Potential Development Essential Oil Production of Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alighiri, D.; Eden, W. T.; Supardi, K. I.; Masturi; Purwinarko, A.

    2017-04-01

    Indonesia is the source of raw essential oil in the world. Essential oils are used in various types of industries such as food and beverage, flavour, fragrance, perfumery, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. However, the development of Indonesian essential oil industry has not been encouraging for the production of essential oils, further it is unable to meet global demand. Besides that, the quality of volatile oil resulted cannot meet the international market standards. Based on the facts, the potential of Indonesian essential oils needs to be developed to provide added value, through increased production, improved quality and product diversification. One part of Indonesia having abundant of raw essential oil source is Central Java. Central Java has the quite large potential production of essential oils. Some essential oils produced from refining industry owned by the government, private and community sectors include cananga oils (Boyolali district), clove oils (Semarang district), patchouli oils (Brebes district, Pemalang district, and Klaten district). The main problem in the development of plants industries that producing essential oil in Central Java is low crops production, farming properties, quality of essential oils are diverse, providing poor-quality products and volatile oil price fluctuations. Marketing constraints of Central Java essential oils are quite complex supply chain. In general, marketing constraints of essential oils due to three factors, namely the low quality due to type of essential oil business that generally shaped small businesses with different capital and technology, domestic marketing is still a buyer-market (price determined by the buyer) because of weak bargaining position processors businessman, and prices fluctuate (domestic and foreign) due to uncontrolled domestic production and inter-country competition among manufacturers.

  20. The chemical composition and biological activities of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... In the present study, the essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus terebinthifolius was extracted using the hydrodistillation method. The oil yield obtained was 0.65%. Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis of the essential oil showed that the major constituents of the essential.

  1. Essential Oil Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Clinopodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine larvicidal activity of essential oil derived from Clinopodium gracile (Benth.) ... The essential oil has higher content of sesquiterpenoids (70.49 %) than monoterpenoids (12.21 %). The other principal compounds of the essential oil were germacrene D (20.59 %) .... and a small amount of dog or cat food.

  2. Chemical Composition and Insecticidal Activity of Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    essential oil of A. frigida aerial parts also possessed the same level of fumigant toxicity to the booklice as that of essential oils of. Foeniculum vulgare [16], Illicium pachyphyllum fruits [25], and Curcuma wenyujin rhizomes [26]. The foregoing suggest that the fumigant activity of the essential oil of A. frigida has some promise.

  3. Adsorption of essential oil components of Lavandula angustifolia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-08-13

    Aug 13, 2014 ... Lavandula angustifolia essential oil on sodium modified bentonite. Essential oils ... in the natural state or treated by various methods to improve some of .... Table 1. Identification results of the components and the percentage of each compound in essential oil. Product name. QI. Rt. Surface. Cx (µg/ml). KI.

  4. Comparative analysis of the essential oils from normal and hairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oils were extracted with steam distillation from normal and hairy roots of Panax japonicus C.A. Meyer. The constituents of essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that 40 and 46 kinds of compounds were identified from the essential oils of normal ...

  5. Essential oils: extraction, bioactivities, and their uses for food preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongnuanchan, Phakawat; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated liquids of complex mixtures of volatile compounds and can be extracted from several plant organs. Essential oils are a good source of several bioactive compounds, which possess antioxidative and antimicrobial properties. In addition, some essential oils have been used as medicine. Furthermore, the uses of essential oils have received increasing attention as the natural additives for the shelf-life extension of food products, due to the risk in using synthetic preservatives. Essential oils can be incorporated into packaging, in which they can provide multifunctions termed "active or smart packaging." Those essential oils are able to modify the matrix of packaging materials, thereby rendering the improved properties. This review covers up-to-date literatures on essential oils including sources, chemical composition, extraction methods, bioactivities, and their applications, particularly with the emphasis on preservation and the shelf-life extension of food products. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Prestes Lessa Fernandes Oliveira; Larissa Canhadas Bertan; Christiane Maciel Vasconcellos Barros De Rensis; Ana Paula Bilck; Priscila Cristina Bizam Vianna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to prepare whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil at different concentrations, and evaluate their properties and antimicrobial activity. Films were more flexible with increasing the concentration of oregano oil and water vapor permeability was higher in the films with oregano oil. Increasing the concentration of essential oil decreased the water solubility. The solubility of control film and film with 1.5% oregano oil was 20.2 and 14.0%, res...

  7. Phytochemical composition and biological activities of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil exhibited marked activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, but was not active against Clostridium perfringens up to the concentration of 100 g/ml. The essential oil also exhibited anti-oxidant activity. The significant antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of R. minima oil ...

  8. Essential Oil of Brachylaena hutchinsii Hutch from Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Brachylaena hutchinsii, essential oil, sesquiterpenes, antimicrobial activity. ... Screening of B. hutchinsii leaves from ... The oil is rich in caryophyllene (19.1 %), P-cubebene (1 5.5%), cis calamenene (10.5%) and .a-copaene (9.0%). Table 1. Antimicrobial of the essential oil of Brachylaena hutchinsii leavm-.

  9. The Design and Manufacturing of Essential oil Distillation Plant for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choice-Academy

    Abstract. The paper presents economic value of the design and manufacturing of essential oil production plant as a strategy for rural poverty alleviation in rural Ethiopia. The level of technology for small scale essential oil industry is characterized for rural community in Ethiopia. The adaptation of oil distillation technology for ...

  10. Quality assessment of essential oils of Eucalyptus globulus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the course of this study, essential oils of Eucalyptus globulus and three Boswellia rivae species were analyzed using GC-MS. Comparison of the chemical compositions of 1,8-cineole and α-pinene in the assessment of these oils' quality will help in the production of high value essential oils that will enhance the economic ...

  11. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil of Aerial Parts of Glycosmis parviflora (Sims) Little (Rutaceae) ... Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analysis (HP-5MS column) of the essential oil was performed and the toxicity of the oil determined by contact test. Results: A total of 37 ...

  12. Antifungal activity of Piper diospyrifolium Kunth (Piperaceae essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Heredia Vieira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro activity of the essential oil from Piper diospyrifolium leaves was tested using disk diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay showed significant potencial antifungal activity: the oil was effective against several clinical fungal strains. The majority compounds in the essential oil were identified as sesquiterpenoids by GC-MS and GC-FID techniques.

  13. Antidermatophytic activities of nine (9) essential oils | Kuiate | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungicidal effect was observed for the C. lusitanica (leaves) oil (2 mg/ml) against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Erigeron floribundus (leaves) oil (1 mg/ml) against Candida albicans and for oil of the flowering ends of C. lusitanica against Trichophyton mentagrophytes at 1 mg/ml. Finally, the essential oils of C. lusitanica ...

  14. Toxicity of essential oil compounds against Exorista sorbillans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides and Ocimum species are potential candidates for management of Exorista sorbillans (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Culicidae), a serious pest of silkworm. Considering that the pure compounds in essential oil may exhibit efficacy against the parasitoid, contact and topical toxicity of 22 essential ...

  15. Supercritical Extraction Process of Allspice Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasvet Y. Andrade-Avila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allspice essential oil was extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 in a static process at three different temperatures (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K and four levels of pressure (100, 200, 300, and 360 bar. The amount of oil extracted was measured at intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h; the most extraction yield reached was of 68.47% at 318.15 K, 360 bar, and 6 h of contact time. In this supercritical extraction process, the distribution coefficient (KD, the mean effective diffusion coefficient (Def, the energy of activation (Ea, the thermodynamic properties (ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0, and the apparent solubility (S expressed as mass fraction (w/w were evaluated for the first time. At the equilibrium the experimental apparent solubility data were successfully correlated with the modified Chrastil equation.

  16. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Sfeir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tonsillitis. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 essential oils chemotypes from aromatic medicinal plants against S. pyogenes. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was investigated using disc diffusion method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of essential oils showing an important antibacterial activity was measured using broth dilution method. Out of 18 essential oils tested, 14 showed antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes. Among them Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon citratus, Thymus vulgaris CT thymol, Origanum compactum, and Satureja montana essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The in vitro results reported here suggest that, for patients suffering from bacterial throat infections, if aromatherapy is used, these essential oils, considered as potential antimicrobial agents, should be preferred.

  17. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Marrubium Vulgare L. Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Bayir, Burcu; Gündüz, Hatice; Usta, Tuba; Şahin, Esma; Özdemir, Zeynep; Kayır, Ömer; Sen, Özkan; Akşit, Hüseyin; Elmastaş, Mahfuz; Erenler, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    – The essential oils are significant for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. Marrubium vulgare L. has been used as a traditional medicine to treat the various illnesses. The chemical composition of the essential oil from leaves of Marrubium vulgare L.was obtained by steam distillation using the Clevenger apparatus. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituent of the oil was α-pinene (28.85%)

  18. Chemical composition and toxic activity of essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estragole (24.8%) and linalool (14.0%) are the two main components of the essential oil followed by 1,8-cineol (5.2%) and δ-guaiene (4.1%). The essential oil possesses strong fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais adults with an LC50 value of 10.05 mg/L air. The essential oil of C. incana also showed contact toxicity against ...

  19. Chemical composition and toxicities of essential oil of Illicium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The principal compounds in I. fargesii essential oil were α-terpineol (11.4%), carvone (10.9%), d-limonene (9.8%), trans-carveol (6.6%) and trans-pinocarveol (5.5%). The essential oil of I. fargesii possessed strong fumigant toxicity against the maize weevil with an LC50 value of 11.36 mg/L air. The essential oil of I. fargesii ...

  20. Essential Oils of Oregano: Biological Activity beyond Their Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayely Leyva-López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of oregano are widely recognized for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their antiviral and antifungal properties. Nevertheless, recent investigations have demonstrated that these compounds are also potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and cancer suppressor agents. These properties of oregano essential oils are of potential interest to the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the latest evidence regarding essential oils of oregano and their beneficial effects on health.

  1. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF CHAMOMILE ESSENTIAL OIL IN MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, D.; Juhás, Š. (Štefan); Bukovska, A.; Bujňáková, D.; Grešáková, L.; Koppel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Essential oils are plant secondary metabolites with positive pharmacological properties, e.g. anti-oxidative, antimicrobial or immunomodulative, but they can have toxic and allergic effects as well. The aim of this study was to analyze anti-inflammatory effects of chamomile essential oil dietary administration in carrageenan paw oedema and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis. Mice received chamomile essential oil in three concentrations (5000, 2500 and 1250 ppm) in the standard roden...

  2. Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects of Essential Oils from Coniferous Trees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Eui-Ju; Na, Ki-Jeung; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2004-01-01

    .... In the present study, we investigated the antibacterial and antifungal effects of essential oils extracted from the coniferous species Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, and Chamaecyparis obtusa...

  3. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amini, Jahanshir; Farhang, Vahid; Javadi, Taimoor; Nazemi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated...

  4. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kon K, Rai M. 2012. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 50-56. Essential oils (EOs from plants represent an alternative approach in combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One of the EOs with proven antibacterial properties is Thymus vulgaris EO. The purpose of the present work was to investigate in vitro antibacterial activity of T. vulgaris EO alone and in combination with other EOs. The activity of T. vulgaris EO was screened in combination with 34 EOs against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by disk diffusion method; then the most effective combinations were evaluated by broth microdilution method. Against S. aureus the synergistic effect was found in combination of T. vulgaris and Cinnamomum zeylonicum EOs with fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of 0.26; Juniperus communis and Picea abies EOs showed additive effect (FIC indexes were 0.74 and 0.78, respectively. Combination of T. vulgaris EO with Aniba rosaeodora and Melissa officinalis EOs demonstrated synergistic effect against E. coli (FIC indexes were 0.23 and 0.34, respectively; combination of T. vulgaris and Mentha piperita EOs was additive (FIC index 0.55. Therefore, combining T. vulgaris EO with other EOs has potential in further enhancing its antibacterial properties.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of peppermint essential oil (Mentha piperita L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapoval O.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Рurposе. To study antimicrobial activity of fume of the essential oil of peppermint against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods: The screening study of antimicrobial activity of solutions of essential oil by disk-diffusion method and activity of essential oil fume of own preparation and pharmaceutical form of oil according to standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Esсherichia coli and 12 clinical strains of staphylococci (6 methicillin-resistant and 6 methicillin-sensitive has been carried out. Results: Essential oil of own preparation and pharmaceutical form showed equal antimicrobial activity against strains of staphylococci. Essential oil of own preparation has been determined to reveal higher activity against gram-negative strains. Conclusion: Received data have proved the presence of antimicrobial activity against all strains of microorganisms and mostly against staphy-lococci

  6. Degradation of Zearalenone by Essential Oils under In vitro Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczak, Adam; Juś, Krzysztof; Marchwińska, Katarzyna; Gwiazdowska, Daniela; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Goliński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils are volatile compounds, extracted from plants, which have a strong odor. These compounds are known for their antibacterial and antifungal properties. However, data concerning degradation of mycotoxins by these metabolites are very limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of essential oils (cedarwood, cinnamon leaf, cinnamon bark, white grapefruit, pink grapefruit, lemon, eucalyptus, palmarosa, mint, thymic, and rosemary) on zearalenone (ZEA) reduction under various in vitro conditions, including the influence of temperature, pH, incubation time and mycotoxin and essential oil concentrations. The degree of ZEA reduction was determined by HPLC method. It was found that the kind of essential oil influences the effectiveness of toxin level reduction, the highest being observed for lemon, grapefruit, eucalyptus and palmarosa oils, while lavender, thymic and rosemary oils did not degrade the toxin. In addition, the decrease in ZEA content was temperature, pH as well as toxin and essential oil concentration dependent. Generally, higher reduction was observed at higher temperature in a wide range of pH, with clear evidence that the degradation rate increased gradually with time. In some combinations (e.g., palmarosa oil at pH 6 and 4 or 20°C) a toxin degradation rate higher than 99% was observed. It was concluded that some of the tested essential oils may be effective in detoxification of ZEA. We suggested that essential oils should be recognized as an interesting and effective means of ZEA decontamination and/or detoxification. PMID:27563298

  7. Bioactivity of Five Essential Oils Against Bruchidius incarnatus (Bohemann, 1833

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Ahmed FOUAD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the world, the faba bean beetle Bruchidius incarnatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae is an important insect-pest, especially on faba bean Vicia faba (Leguminosae and it can infest field crops and cause severe damage in storage. Essential oils can be an alternative method to synthetic insecticides for pest management, due to their efficiency and environmental safety. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the toxicity and repellent activity of essential oils of camphor (Eucalyptus globules, castor (Ricinus communis, cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, clove (Syzygium aromaticum and mustard (Brassica rapa against B. incarnatus adults. The treatments which contained essential oils at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4% and acetone (control were applied. All essential oils with 4% concentration repelled the B. incarnatus adult except castor oil. The percentage of repellence was higher when used essential oil of cinnamon with 2 and 4% concentration compared with other essential oils and concentrations. In residual film experiment, the cinnamon oil had the highest toxicity rate on B. incarnatus adult fallowed by clove, camphor, mustard and the lowest effect was by castor oil. Based on our results, I can conclude that essential oils of camphor, cinnamon, clove and mustard have potential for use in the integrated management of B. incarnatus adult.

  8. Degradation of zearalenone by essential oils under in vitro conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Perczak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are volatile compounds, extracted from plants, which have a strong odour. These compounds are known for their antibacterial and antifungal properties. However, data concerning degradation of mycotoxins by these metabolites are very limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of essential oils (cedarwood, cinnamon leaf, cinnamon bark, white grapefruit, pink grapefruit, lemon, eucalyptus, palmarosa, mint, thymic and rosemary on zearalenone reduction under various in vitro conditions, including the influence of temperature, pH, incubation time and mycotoxin and essential oil concentrations. The degree of zearalenone reduction was determined by HPLC method. It was found that the kind of essential oil influences the effectiveness of toxin level reduction, the highest being observed for lemon, grapefruit, eucalyptus and palmarosa oils, while lavender, thymic and rosemary oils did not degrade the toxin. In addition, the decrease in zearalenone content was temperature, pH as well as toxin and essential oil concentration dependent. Generally, higher reduction was observed at higher temperature in a wide range of pH, with clear evidence that the degradation rate increased gradually with time. In some combinations (e.g. palmarosa oil at pH 6 and 4 or 20C a toxin degradation rate higher than 99% was observed. It was concluded that some of the tested essential oils may be effective in detoxification of zearalenone.We suggested that essential oils should be recognized as an interesting and effective means of zearalenone decontamination and/or detoxification.

  9. Chemical composition of the essential oil of Commiphora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Santi, Claudio; Mwankie, Gildas Norbert Oball-Mond; Curini, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The essential oil composition of Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb) Engl. is reported for the first time. The oil is rich in sesquiterpenes, particularly furanosesquiterpenes (50.3%). GC-MS analysis of the oil permitted differentiation between C. erythraea and C. kataf, two often confused species.

  10. Chemical composition of essential oil from the leaves of Premna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oil of Premna coriacea leaves was investigated. Extraction by hydrodistillation followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) yielded 27 compounds representing 99.89% of the oil. The major volatile components of the oil were aromadendrene ...

  11. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Rosmarinus Officinalis L. Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Türkmen, Necla; Öz, Ayşenur; Sönmez, Aslı; Erol, Tuğçe; Gülümser, Deniz; Yurdakul, Burcu; Kayır, Ömer; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Erenler, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    – The chemical constituents of the essential oil from leaves of Rosmarinus officinalis L. was produced by steam distillation using the Clevenger apparatus. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituent of the oil was 1,8-cineole with 81.47% which is important for medicinal and pharmaceutical

  12. Antimicrobial activities of essential oils from Southern Africa against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the oils were determined by the microdilution technique. The killing kinetics of the oils was further evaluated against specific bacterial and fungal organisms. Both antifungal and antibacterial activities were observed from the essential oil of P. graveolens and M. peripeta ...

  13. The essential oil composition of Carthamus tinctorius L. flowers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The composition of the essential oil obtained from the dried flowers of Carthamus tinctorius L. growing in Iran was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS). 29 compounds were identified in the oil. The major compounds of the oil were ...

  14. easonal variation in the essential oil composition of origanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil of Origanum syriacum L. subsp. sinaicum Greuter and Burdet obtained by hydrodistillation during four seasons was analyzed by GC-MS. The composition of the oil showed qualitative and quantitative variation. Carvacrol was the major component (64.71%, 36.50%) in summer and spring oils, respectively.

  15. Chemistry and bacteriostatic activity of the essential oil and major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil produced via Clevenger equipment was chemically characterized with GC-MS and it revealed the presence of twenty four (24) isolates among which the monocyclic monoterpene (-)-Limonene (91.1 %) was found to be the chief element in the oil. The activities of the oils extracted through the two models ...

  16. Variation in the essential oil constituents of Pteronia incana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil of Pteronia incana was collected and was investigated on a monthly basis using GCMS. The oil volume and its constituents vary greatly with different time of sampling and distillation. The oil contains a high percentage of myrcene a-pinene, b-pinene with sabinene, a-terpinene, 1.8 cineole and limonene.

  17. Chemical Composition and Biological Properties of Essential Oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the composition of essential oils of two types of mint as well as compare the antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the two oils. Methods: Peppermint (M. piperita L.) and chocolate mint (M. piperita L.) oils were obtained by steam distillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus.

  18. The Design and Manufacturing of Essential oil Distillation Plant for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adaptation of oil distillation technology for essential oil production is proposed for small scale industrial entrepreneur. ... small scale manufacturing industry in the country do not have the capacity to manufacture the complete distillation plant system with the required precision for standard quality of oil at affordable cost.

  19. chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydro-distilled essential oil from Satureja biflora (Lamiaceae) growing in Kenya was analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and also evaluated for antimicrobial activity. Twenty two compounds which constitute 99.29 % of the total oil were identified. The oil was dominated by monoterpenes, which ...

  20. Comparative study of root, stalk and leaf essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The root, stalk and leaf essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus grown in Kaduna, North Central Nigeria were extracted separately by hydrodistillation and characterized by GC-MS. The chemical composition analysis by GC-MS of the oils allowed the identification of 34, 26 and 16 compounds respectively. In the three oils, the ...

  1. Essential Oils and Fatty Acids Composition of Dry Fruits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid was about 54% saturated and 46% unsaturated with omega-6 and omega-3 constituting 27% and omega-9 (20%). The effectiveness of T.tetraptera to the treatment of variety of ailments does not depend largely on the essential oils composition of the plant since the oil is dominated by acetic acid. Any essential ...

  2. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... This study was designed to examine the in vitro antioxidant activities of the essential oil and methanol extracts of rhizoma Alpinia officinarum (small galanga) from China. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and 46 constituents were identified. Methanol ...

  3. Chemical composition and insecticidal properties of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the insecticidal properties of essential oil from Mosla soochowensis aerial parts against two insect pests, Sitophilus zeamais and Tribolium castaneum. Methods: Hydro-distillation of M. soochowensis was used to extract the essential oil. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis was ...

  4. Persistence of active compounds of essential oils of Clausena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After the evaluation of their insecticidal activity the persistence of each essential oil was observed every 2 days till 14 days. After the disappearance of their insecticidal activities, essential oil was re-extracted and their residual compounds were identified from treated grain and flour. The major compounds of C. anisata are, ...

  5. Essential Oil Composition, Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    essential oils also produced concentraion dependant radical scavenging activities with IC50 values ranging between 5.96 and 37.01 μl/ml, and 0.57 and 3.88 μl/ml, in DPPH and deoxyribose degradation assays, respectively. The present study revealed that all the essential oils have the potential to be used as naturally ...

  6. Essential Oil Composition of Two Grammosciadium DC Species, G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate and compare the essential oil composition of two Grammosciadium species obtained by hydrodistillation. Methods: The essential oil of the aerial parts of two species was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

  7. Chemical composition of essential oil of exudates of Dryobalanops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the chemical composition of essential oil from the exudates of Dryobalanops aromatica from Malaysia. Methods: Exudate was collected from D. aromatica and subjected to fractional distillation to obtain essential oil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to characterize the ...

  8. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Properties of Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare Linnaeus (Lamiaceae) on the growth of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Methods: The chemical composition of the essential oil was investigated by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The minimum inhibitory ...

  9. Composition of the Essential Oil of Agastache foeniculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, I; Holm, Y; Hiltunen, R

    1989-06-01

    AGASTACHE FOENICULUM contains 0.1-0.3% essential oil and the main components are limonene, beta-caryophyllene, methylchavicol, and germacrene B (92% altogether). In addition 35 components, each accounting for less than 1% of the total essential oil, were identified.

  10. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of the Essential Oils of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Pulicaria inuloides and Ocimum forskolei essential oils. Methods: Steam distillation of the aerial parts of P. inuloides and O. forskolei was performed using a Clevenger apparatus. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry.

  11. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as natural antioxidant agents. So in this study, the effect of thyme, coriander and rosemary essential oils were evaluated on the reduction of peroxidase activity in apples (Malus domestica Mill. cv Golden delicious), (M. domestica Mill.

  12. Essential Oil Composition of Two Grammosciadium DC Species, G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Turk J Bot 2012; 36: 637-643. 7. Buchbauer G. The detailed analysis of essential oils leads to the understanding of their properties. Perfumer. & Flavourist 2000; 25: 64-67. 8. Tzakou O, Pitarokili D, Chinou IB, Harvala C. Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Salvia ringens. Planta Med 2001; 67: 81-83.

  13. Evaluation of Ocimum suave essential oil against anthropophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Ocimum suave essential oil against anthropophilic malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s after ten years ... The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective efficacy of freshly distilled and ten years old essential oil of Oc mum suave .... Journal of Natural products 44, 308-309. Hassanali, A., Lwande, W., ...

  14. Phytoconstituents and biological activities of essential Oil from Rhus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... ducted as previously described using a Hewlett Packard 6890 Gas. Chromatograph (Adams, 2001). Determination of the antibacterial activity of the essential oils. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was tested using the disc diffusion methods as previously described (Gundidza et al.,. 1993, Samie ...

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF BURSERA MORELENSIS RAMÍREZ ESSENTIAL OIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    M., Canales-Martinez; C.R., Rivera-Yañez; J., Salas-Oropeza; H.R., Lopez; M., Jimenez-Estrada; R., Rosas-Lopez; D.A., Duran; C., Flores; L.B., Hernandez; M.A., Rodriguez-Monroy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bursera morelensis, known as “Aceitillo”, is an endemic tree of Mexico. Infusions made from the bark of this species have been used for the treatment of skin infections and for their wound healing properties. In this work, we present the results of a phytochemical and antimicrobial investigation of the essential oil of B. morelensis. Materials and Methods: The essential oil was obtained by a steam distillation method and analyzed using GC-MS. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were evaluated. Results: GC-MS of the essential oil demonstrated the presence of 28 compounds. The principal compound of the essential oil was a-Phellandrene (32.69%). The essential oil had antibacterial activity against Gram positive and negative strains. The most sensitive strains were S. pneumoniae, V. cholerae (cc) and E. coli (MIC 0.125 mg/mL, MBC 0.25 mg/mL). The essential oil was bactericidal for V. cholera (cc). The essential oil inhibited all the filamentous fungi. F. monilifome (IC50 = 2.27 mg/mL) was the most sensitive fungal strain. Conclusions: This work provides evidence that confirms the antimicrobial activity of the B. morelensis essential oil and this is a scientific support about of traditional uses of this species. PMID:28480418

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OFBURSERA MORELENSISRAMÍREZ ESSENTIAL OIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Canales-Martinez; C R, Rivera-Yañez; J, Salas-Oropeza; H R, Lopez; M, Jimenez-Estrada; R, Rosas-Lopez; D A, Duran; C, Flores; L B, Hernandez; M A, Rodriguez-Monroy

    2017-01-01

    Bursera morelensis , known as "Aceitillo", is an endemic tree of Mexico. Infusions made from the bark of this species have been used for the treatment of skin infections and for their wound healing properties. In this work, we present the results of a phytochemical and antimicrobial investigation of the essential oil of B. morelensis . The essential oil was obtained by a steam distillation method and analyzed using GC-MS. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were evaluated. GC-MS of the essential oil demonstrated the presence of 28 compounds. The principal compound of the essential oil was a-Phellandrene (32.69%). The essential oil had antibacterial activity against Gram positive and negative strains. The most sensitive strains were S. pneumoniae , V. cholerae (cc) and E. coli (MIC 0.125 mg/mL, MBC 0.25 mg/mL). The essential oil was bactericidal for V. cholera (cc). The essential oil inhibited all the filamentous fungi. F. monilifome (IC 50 = 2.27 mg/mL) was the most sensitive fungal strain. This work provides evidence that confirms the antimicrobial activity of the B. morelensis essential oil and this is a scientific support about of traditional uses of this species.

  17. Effect of dietary oregano ( Origanum vulgare L.) essential oil on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of dietary oregano ( Origanum vulgare L.) essential oil on growth performance, cecal microflora and serum antioxidant activity of broiler chickens. ... In conclusion, OEO exerted growth promoting effects and also displayed potent antibacterial effects against cecal E. coli. Key words: Oregano essential oil, performance, ...

  18. Chemical Composition of Zanthoxylum avicennae Essential Oil and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the larvicidal activity of the essential oil derived from Zanthoxylum avicennae (Lam.) DC. (Rutaceae) leaves and stems against the larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse. Methods: Essential oil of Z. avicennae leaves and stems were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography ...

  19. Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oil Derived from Illicium henryi Diels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine larvicidal activity of the essential oil derived from Illicium henryi Diels. (Illiciaceae) leaf and stem against the larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse. Methods: The essential oil of I. henryi leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromaotography-mass ...

  20. Chemical composition of essential oil of Psidium cattleianum var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the essential oil composition of Psidium cattleianum var. lucidum from South Africa. The essential oils were extracted by ... The presence of many terpenic and ester compounds is thought to contribute to the unique flavor of the P. cattleianum var. lucidum leaves. Keywords: Psidium ...

  1. Evaluation of the lethality of Porophyllum ruderale essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil of flowers and leaves of Porophylum ruderale (Asteraceae) was investigated for its molluscicidal and larvicidal activities, and its toxicities to brine shrimps. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS analysis showed a total volatile content of 99.98% in the P.

  2. Antiradical potential and antifungal activities of essential oils of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigations were conducted to determine the chemical composition, antiradical and antifungal activities of the essential oil extracted from the fresh leaves of Citrus latifolia var. Tahiti from Cameroon against Phaeoramularia angolensis. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation was analysed by GC and GC/MS.

  3. Essential oil composition of different fractions of Piper guineense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mme ESTHER

    Key words: Piper guineense Schum. et Thonn., essential oil fractions, chemotypes, toxicity, repellency, ... The leaves are elliptical in shape and have a pleasant aroma when crushed. The spherical fruits (berries) are yellow becoming orange, red and finally black ... Insecticidal activities of the essential oil have been tested.

  4. Comparative essential oils composition and insecticidal effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative essential oils composition and insecticidal effect of different tissues of Piper capense L., Piper guineense Schum. et Thonn., Piper nigrum L. and Piper ... The essential oil obtained from the leaves of P. capense was largely composed of a-pinene (12.8%), -pinene (50.1%) and b-caryophyllene (12.4%). The most ...

  5. Antimicrobial and physico-chemical effects of essential oils on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives were to study the effect of two essential oils extracted from local plants Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A.Rich. and Pimenta racemosa (Mill.) ... Methodology and Results: At the first level, essential oils were extracted from the leaves of plants and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each one was detected ...

  6. Comparative analysis of the essential oils from normal and hairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-20

    Jan 20, 2011 ... The essential oils were extracted with steam distillation from normal and hairy roots of Panax japonicus. C.A. Meyer. The constituents of essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that 40 and 46 kinds of compounds were identified from the.

  7. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from plant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojević Svetomir Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with modeling the kinetics of essential oils extraction from plant materials by water and steam distillation. The experimental data were obtained by studying the hydrodistillation kinetics of essential oil from juniper berries. The literature data on the kinetics of essential oils hydrodistillation from different plant materials were also included into the modeling. A physical model based on simultaneous washing and diffusion of essential oil from plant materials were developed to describe the kinetics of essential oils hydrodistillation, and two other simpler models were derived from this physical model assuming either instantaneous washing followed by diffusion or diffusion with no washing (i.e. the first-order kinetics. The main goal was to compare these models and suggest the optimum ones for water and steam distillation and for different plant materials. All three models described well the experimental kinetic data on water distillation irrespective of the type of distillation equipment and its scale, the type of plant materials and the operational conditions. The most applicable one is the model involving simultaneous washing and diffusion of the essential oil. However, this model was generally inapplicable for steam distillation of essential oils, except for juniper berries. For this hydrodistillation technique, the pseudo first-order model was shown to be the best one. In a few cases, a variation of the essential oil yield with time was observed to be sigmoidal and was modeled by the Boltzmann sigmoid function.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil of Salvia officinalis L. collected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although, the major components of the essential oils extracted from plants grown at both altitudes were 1,8-cineol, camphor, borneol, α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, β-myrcene and caryophyllene, their percentage changed according to the altitude. S. officinalis essential oil was for its antibacterial activities by using Gram- ...

  9. Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oil Derived from Illicium henryi Diels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine larvicidal activity of the essential oil derived from Illicium henryi Diels (Illiciaceae) leaf and stem against the larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse. Methods: The essential oil of I. henryi leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromaotography-mass ...

  10. Chemical composition of essential oil from Psidium cattleianum var.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajuc

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... ~40 m on latitude (29 48′S) and longitude (30 56′E). Extraction of the essential oil. The essential oil from dried leaves of P. cattleianum var. lucidum was extracted using a modification of an established procedure. (Denny, 1989). Briefly, 100 g of milled leaves were hydrodistilled in a Clevenger apparatus.

  11. Chemical composition and biological studies of the essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and biological studies of the essential oil of Thymus decussatus benth growing in Egypt. A A El-Hela. Abstract. The essential oil of Thymus decussatus Benth herb growing in Egypt was prepared by hydro distillation of the dried herb and analyzed by GC/ MS. It revealed the presence of 12 peaks, which ...

  12. Composition of the Essential Oil of Clausena Suffruticosa Leaf and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the essential oil content of Clausena suffruticosa leaf for its in-vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities. Methods: The essential oil of Clausena suffruticosa leaf was extracted by hydrodistillation using a modified Clevenger-type apparatus and was analyzed by GC-MS using electron impact ...

  13. Essential oil composition of four Artemisia species from Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil composition of four Artemisia species, namely A. schimperi Sch. Bip. ex Engl. A. abyssinica Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. (previously called A. rehan) from Ethiopia has been studied. The essential oil obtained from A. absinthium (seedling from Europe) grown in two places ...

  14. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oils and their components are becoming increasingly popular as naturally occurring antioxidant agents. In this work, the composition of essential oil in Artemisia herba-alba from southwest Tunisia, obtained by hydrodistillation was determined by GC/MS. Eighteen compounds were identified with the main ...

  15. Encapsulation of Essential Oils of Piper Nigrum and Monodora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 140.02 and 1:5 clearly soluble respectively for and 1.21, 0.9021, 1.4950, 9.64, 75.32, 118.64 and 1:5 clearly respectively for . The two essential oil samples were well retained in the gum Arabic encapsulation matrices. Keywords: Monodora, African nutmeg, essential oil, Black Pepper, Piper nigrum, flavour encapsulation.

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL OF Myrtus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... MATERIAL AND METHODS. 2.1. ... About 20 compounds, representing 82.75% of the essential oil (EO), were identified. GC/MS analyses revealed that this EO is characterized by high levels of oxygenated ... The monoterpenes are widespread components of the essential oils and used as fragrances and.

  17. Analysis of essential oils by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masada, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The book is in two parts: first part Essential Oil includes compositae; labiatae; verbenaceae; oleaceae; umbelliferae; myrtaceae; euphorbiaceae; rutaceae; geraniaceae; rosaceae; lauraceae; myristicaceae; anonaceae; santalaceae; moraceae; piperaceae; zingiberaceae; araceae; gramineae; and cupressaceae written in English and Japanese. Part two includes essential oil; gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry written in Japanese. (DP)

  18. Essential Oil Compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Salleh, Farediah Ahmad * , Khong Heng Yen, Razauden Mohamed Zulkifli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have been largely employed for human need due to their antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities. At present, approximately 3000 essential oils are known, 300 of which are commercially important. Essential oils or some of their components are used in perfumes and make-up products, sanitary products, dentistry, agriculture, as food preservers and additives, and as natural remedies. The essential oil compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae family have been investigated for many years. In the recent years, studies on the essential oils of the species have been progressing and many of them have reported interesting pharmacological activities. In this article, we summarized and updated the chemical compositions and biological activities of Malaysian Lauraceae. Throughout our literature review, only four genera which are Lindera, Beilschmiedia, Litsea, and Cinnamomum have been studied for their essential oil compositions in Malaysia. They were found to contain mainly safrole, eugenol, linalool, camphor, benzyl benzoate or cinnamaldehyde as major components. There were significant priorities to find out the details of the chemical compositions of the essential oils from Malaysian Lauraceae. Therefore, more clinical studies on the toxicity of the essential oil of the species are also crucial to ensure their safety and to assess their eligibility to be used as the sources of modern medicines.

  19. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli strains to essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oils are frequently used for flavour and fragrance in the perfume, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. They are also suitable raw material for production of new synthetic agents. The antibacterial activity of the essential oils obtained by steam distillation of Rosmarinus officinalis L and Eucalyptus globules ...

  20. antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the essential oils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Belmimoun A, Meddah B, Meddah A.T.T and Sonnet P

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... INTRODUCTION. There is a popularity and scientific interest to screen essential oils and extracts of plants used medicinally in all over the world [1]. The main volatile constituents of the essential oils have been used historically in the pharmaceutical, food and perfume industries because of their antibacterial ...

  1. Microbicide activity of clove essential oil (Eugenia caryophyllata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nuñez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Clove essential oil, used as an antiseptic in oral infections, inhibits Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as yeast. The influence of clove essential oil concentration, temperature and organic matter, in the antimicrobial activity of clove essential oil, was studied in this paper, through the determination of bacterial death kinetics. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the microorganisms selected for a biological test. To determine the temperature effect, they were assayed at 21° and 37° C. The concentration coefficient was determined with 0.4%, and 0.2% of essential oil. The influence of the presence of organic matter was determined with 0.4% of essential oil. The results obtained demonstrated that Escherichia coli were more sensitive even though the essential oil exerted a satisfactory action in three cases. In the three microbial species, 0.4% of essential oil at 21º C have reduced the bacterial population in 5 logarithmic orders. Organic matter reduces the antibacterial activity even though the bactericide efficacy was not lost. Clove essential oil can be considered as a potential antimicrobial agent for external use

  2. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained from the needles of Pinus caribaea by ... chemical compositions of essential oil of many Pinus species .... Synergistic bactericidal effect of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde or thymol and refrigeration of inhibit Bacillus cereus in carrot broth. Food Microbiol.

  3. Comparative Chemical And Analgesic Properties Of Essential Oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical and analgesic comparison of essential oils of Cymbopogon nardus (L) Rendle of Benin and Congo was investigated. The Chemical analysis wa carried out by using GS/MS for identification of components of the two essential oils while acetic acid-induced writhings, hot plate and tail flick test models were used ...

  4. Essential oils as fumigants for bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Petri dish assays, fumigation of a pyrethroid-susceptible strain of bed bugs Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) with various essential oils resulted in mortality that approached or equaled 100%, after 5 days. However, when bed bugs were exposed to the same essential oils in sealed, comme...

  5. Isolation of nematicidal constituents from essential oil of Kaempferia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the nematicidal activities of the essential oil of Kaempferia galanga rhizomes and its isolated constituents against Heterodera avenae. Methods: Essential oil of K. galanga rhizomes was obtained by hydrodistillation and characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analysis using ...

  6. Antitumour Activity of the Microencapsulation of Annona vepretorum Essential Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, Larissa M; Menezes, Leociley R A; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina B C; Dias, Rosane B; Rocha, Clarissa A Gurgel; Soares, Milena B P; Neto, Albertino F S; Nascimento, Magaly P; Campos, Adriana F; Silva, Lidércia C R C E; Costa, Emmanoel V; Bezerra, Daniel P

    2016-03-01

    Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae), popularly known as 'bruteira', has nutritional and medicinal uses. This study investigated the chemical composition and antitumour potential of the essential oil of A. vepretorum leaf alone and complexed with β-cyclodextrin in a microencapsulation. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and analysed using GC-MS and GC-FID. In vitro cytotoxicity of the essential oil and some of its major constituents in tumour cell lines from different histotypes was evaluated using the alamar blue assay. Furthermore, the in vivo efficacy of essential oil was demonstrated in mice inoculated with B16-F10 mouse melanoma. The essential oil included bicyclogermacrene (35.71%), spathulenol (18.89%), (E)-β-ocimene (12.46%), α-phellandrene (8.08%), o-cymene (6.24%), germacrene D (3.27%) and α-pinene (2.18%) as major constituents. The essential oil and spathulenol exhibited promising cytotoxicity. In vivo tumour growth was inhibited by the treatment with the essential oil (inhibition of 34.46%). Importantly, microencapsulation of the essential oil increased in vivo tumour growth inhibition (inhibition of 62.66%). © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  7. Chemical composition of the essential oil of whole plant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    distillation extraction method previously described [4], the essential oil was obtained from. 500 g of the dried whole plants boiled in a required amount of distilled water. Then the essential oil was dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, and filtered through 0.22 μm membrane. Finally it was stored in a sealed brown reagent.

  8. The essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bmayekiso

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... hydro-distillation during summer and winter months. Both essential oils were analyzed by gas .... Hydro-distillation of leaves and branches of S. hippifolium yielded an essential oil which was light blue in .... to the out-membrane structure of Gram-negative bacteria. (Delamare et al., 2005; Page et al., 1997).

  9. Activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum essential oil and ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial effects of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) essential oil and ethanolic extract against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were studied in the present study. The essential oil and ethanolic fraction of C. zeylanicum showed ...

  10. Essential oil composition and bioactivity of Thuja orientalis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition of the essential oil extracted by hydro-distillation using Clevenger apparatus from aerial parts of Thuja orientalis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis grown in Ondo State, Nigeria was analysed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry technique. Toxicity of the essential oils using anti-feedant and ...

  11. Volatile constituents of essential oils of Eleocharis pauciflora (Light ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation of the volatile compounds of essential oils of Eleocharis pauciflora (Light) Link and Eleocharis uniglumis (Link) J.A. Shultes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) led to the identification of 20 and 23 compounds, respectively. The presented essential oils were characterized by the abundance ...

  12. Chemical composition and antinociceptive effects of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia. tournefortii (EOGT) in various experimental models. Methods: The essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia tournefortii was extracted using steam distillation method median lethal dose (LD50) of EOGT was evaluated ...

  13. Insecticidal effect of kaolin powder flavoured with essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insecticidal effect of kaolin powder flavoured with essential oils of Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) and Annona senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) on ... Purified and pulverized kaolin was flavoured with essential oils of A. Senegalensis Pers. and L. camara (Lam) obtained through vapour distillation. Adults C. serratus ...

  14. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro antioxidant activities of the essential oil and methanol extracts of rhizoma Alpinia officinarum (small galanga) from China. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and 46 constituents were identified. Methanol extract from rhizoma A.

  15. Chemical composition of essential oil from Psidium cattleianum var.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajuc

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... The aim of this study was to investigate the essential oil composition of Psidium cattleianum var. lucidum from South Africa. The essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation and the components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine the chemical ...

  16. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SWEET

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... Essential oils and their components are becoming increasingly popular as naturally occurring antioxidant agents. In this work, the composition of essential oil in Artemisia herba-alba from southwest Tunisia, obtained by hydrodistillation was determined by GC/MS. Eighteen compounds were identified with ...

  17. Economic Analysis of Production of Essential Oil using Steam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the economical analysis of producing essential oil from leafy part of Eucalyptus citriodora plant using steam distillation technology. The specific objectives were to examine the viability or otherwise of this method of producing essential oil in terms of net profit generated, return on investment and pay ...

  18. Transfer of terpenes from essential oils into cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejonklev, J.; Løkke, M.M.; Larsen, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    properties, but very little work exists on the transfer of their volatile compounds into milk. Lactating Danish Holstein cows with duodenum cannula were used. Gastrointestinal exposure was facilitated by infusing the essential oils, mixed with deodorized sesame oil, into the duodenum cannula. Two levels were......The objective of this study was to investigate the transfer of volatile terpenes from caraway seed and oregano plant essential oils into cow's milk through respiratory and gastrointestinal exposure. Essential oils have potential applications as feed additives because of their antimicrobial...

  19. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils on pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Aparecida do Couto

    2017-11-01

    riparia (misty plume bush have proved effectiveness and an immense applicability, this research studied the use of those essential oils, aiming the effectiveness against plant pathogens. The plants were collected from Universidade do Vale do Sapucaí, Pouso Alegre (MG. The fungi’s samples belong to the mycology collection from the institution and the tests were based on the mycelial development comparison of the control fungi on the dishes with essential oils. Notice that the inhibition caused by the oils over fungi’s mycelial developing and the analysis of the data have been made through Turkey’s statistic. From the data analyzed, it was possible to realize that the citronella’s grass essential oil was efficient to control the mycelial development of fungi analyzed, followed by, in order of efficiency, the eucalyptus oil, the weeping bottlebrush oil and the misty plume bush oil.

  20. Washing of cut persimmon with thyme or lemon essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almela, Celia; Castelló, María L; Tarrazó, José; Ortolá, María D

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a minimally processed persimmon product by applying different concentrations of thyme essential oil or lemon essential oil on the product in order to increase its shelf life. Essential oils were applied on cut persimmon in a preliminary stage of immersion, and the samples were then stored at 4 ℃ for seven days. Moisture content, soluble solids content, antioxidant capacity, total phenols, pH, optical and mechanical properties and microbiology counts were periodically analysed. Noteworthy was that the application of thyme essential oil in the washing stage improved the preservation of the fruits' colour. All samples would be considered safe according to microbiology requirements and based on the period of study, regardless of the type of essential oil applied. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. [Chemical components from essential oil of Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Kai; Ge, Fa-Huan

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the chemical compositions of Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves essential oil extracted by steam distillation. The essential oil of Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrum, and the relative content of each component was determined by area normalization method. 128 peaks were separated and 95 compounds were identified, which weighed 97.75%. The main chemical components of the essential oil were phytol (42.15%), squalene (16.81%), what's more pentadecanal (6.17%), pentadecanoic acid (4.49%), 3, 7, 11, 15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol (3.83%), phytone (2.05%) and the other 74 chemical compositions were firstly identified from the essential oil of Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves. The chemical compositions of Pandanu samaryllifolius leaves essential oil was systematically, deeply isolated and identified for the first time. This experiment has provided scientific foundation for further utilization of Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves.

  2. Microwave-assisted extraction of essential oils from herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Ugarte, Gabriel Abraham; Juárez-Becerra, Gladys Paola; Sosa-Morales, María Elena; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) has been recognized as a technique with several advantages over other extraction methods, such as reduction of costs, extraction time, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions. In this study, MAE was performed to obtain essential oils from two different herbs (basil and epazote). A factorial design was conducted in order to determine the effect of solvent quantity, power, and heating time on essential oil yields. Chemical composition, physical properties and yield percentage of essential oils from MAE were compared with essential oils obtained by steam distillation (SD). Amount of solvent and heating time significantly affected the yields (p essential oils from basil and epazote were not affected by the extraction method (MAE or SD), with similar yielding obtained by both methods (p < 0.05).

  3. Peran Rumput Vetiver (Chrysopogon Zizanioides) Dalam Fitoremediasi Pencemaran Perairan Sungai

    OpenAIRE

    Komarawidjaja, Wage; Garno, Yudhi Soetrisno

    2016-01-01

    Dalam rangka memperbaiki kualitas perairan Sungai, vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides) telah ditanampada kawasan bantaran Sungai CIkapundung selama 63 hari. Dua wadah dialiri dengan sumber air yangberbeda, yaitu air sungai dan air tanah (sumur). Produksi biomassa diukur setiap 20 harian sekali,dengan fokus pengukuran pada pertumbuhan tunas dan akar vetiver. Secara umum, pertumbuhan tunasdan akar vetiver yang ditanam pada wadah yang dialiri air sungai tumbuh lebih baik (panjang) daripadavetiver ...

  4. [Phytochemical evaluation of essential oils, medicinal plants and their preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberkovics, E; Kéry, A; Marczal, G; Simándi, B; Szöke, E

    1998-05-01

    A surway is presented on the authors' work in the field of volatile oil research. The gas chromatographic method previously used for analysis of essential oils was transformed to capillary gas chromatographic conditions. The method is also suitable for separation of compound-pairs frequently occurring in essential oils (peppermint, rosemary, lavender, sage, clary sage, thyme oils). Beside the gas chromatographic analysis of essential oils, which was necessary for their standardization and qualification, the influence of different extraction methods and some biological facts e.g. the ontogenesis on the change of essential oil composition are also discussed. It has been established that the water steam distillation from acidic medium can be more advantageous than the traditional one, if the volatile terpene derivatives were bound in form of glycosides or dimeric quajazolide lactons were present in plant (oregano, Sideritis, wormwood oils). Comparing the composition of essential oil obtained by water steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) it was found that the SFE fractions are richer in ester constituents because the possibility of hydrolysis is reduced, and the oils are more valuable than the classic oils. On the other hand, when the transformation processes are important (chamomile), the distillation is the better method. The change of essential oil composition of Ocimum basilicum L. and Anthriscus cerefolium L. was also studied during the vegetation period. It has been established that in budding and early flowering stages the basil oil was rich in monoterpenes; the quantity of sesquiterpenes and phenylpropane derivatives increased only in later stadiums. Finally the extraction and analytical processes are discussed which are used for standardization of complex plant preparations which contained essential oil as active agent and represented various medicinal forms.

  5. Essential oil of Algerian Eucalyptus citriodora: Chemical composition, antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, H; Moghrani, H; Benelmouffok, A; Kellou, D; Maachi, R

    2015-12-01

    Essential oil of Eucalyptus citriodora is a natural product which has been attributed for various medicinal uses. In the present investigation, E. citriodora essential oil was used to evaluate its antifungal effect against medically important dermatophytes. Essential oil from the Algerian E. citriodora leaves was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The antifungal effect of E. citriodora essential oil was evaluated against four dermatophytes: Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum using disc diffusion method, disc volatilization method, and agar dilution method. The chemical composition of the oil revealed the presence of 22 compounds accounting for 95.27% of the oil. The dominant compounds were citronellal (69.77%), citronellol (10.63%) and isopulegol (4.66%). The disc diffusion method, MIC and MFC determination, indicated that E. citriodora essential oil had a higher antifungal potential against the tested strains with inhibition zone diameter which varied from (12 to 90mm) and MIC and MFC values ranged from (0.6 to 5μL/mL and 1.25 to 5μL/mL) respectively. The M. gypseum was the most resistant to the oil. The results of the present study indicated that E. citriodora essential oil may be used as a new antifungal agent recommended by the pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of Starch Edible Films with Different Essential Oils Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šuput Danijela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated properties of starch-based edible films with oregano and black cumin essential oil addition. Essential oils addition positively affected film swelling (decreased due to essential oil addition, mechanical properties (tensile strength decreased while elongation at break increased, and water vapor barrier properties (decreased along with essential oils addition. Control film did not have any biological activity, which proves the need for essential oils addition in order to obtain active packaging. Oregano oil was more effective in terms of biological activity. Endothermal peak, above 200°C, represents total thermal degradation of edible films. Diffraction pattern of control film showed significant destruction of A-type crystal structure. Addition of essential oils resulted in peak shape change: diffraction peaks became narrower. Principal Component Analysis has been used to assess the effect of essential oils addition on final starch-based edible films characteristics with the aim to reveal directions for the film characteristics improvement, since the next phase will be optimal film application for food packaging.

  7. Essential Oils: Sources of Antimicrobials and Food Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Abhay K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Pooja; Tripathi, Nijendra N.; Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2017-01-01

    Aromatic and medicinal plants produce essential oils in the form of secondary metabolites. These essential oils can be used in diverse applications in food, perfume, and cosmetic industries. The use of essential oils as antimicrobials and food preservative agents is of concern because of several reported side effects of synthetic oils. Essential oils have the potential to be used as a food preservative for cereals, grains, pulses, fruits, and vegetables. In this review, we briefly describe the results in relevant literature and summarize the uses of essential oils with special emphasis on their antibacterial, bactericidal, antifungal, fungicidal, and food preservative properties. Essential oils have pronounced antimicrobial and food preservative properties because they consist of a variety of active constituents (e.g., terpenes, terpenoids, carotenoids, coumarins, curcumins) that have great significance in the food industry. Thus, the various properties of essential oils offer the possibility of using natural, safe, eco-friendly, cost-effective, renewable, and easily biodegradable antimicrobials for food commodity preservation in the near future. PMID:28138324

  8. Antimicrobial effect of essential oils: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Sadeghi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the harmful effects of chemical foods preservatives on human body, it is crucial to find out safe antimicrobials among essential oils and herbs. This study aimed to address the effects of different essential oils on various bacterial species through a systematic review. A wide range of published papers in national and international data bases have been searched for the relevant articles. For this reason, the keywords used in searching were: "essential oils in food", "antimicrobial effect" and "vegetable oils". Among 462 retrieved articles, 76 papers were selected for further reviewing based on their title and abstracts. Based on results, the antimicrobial effects of different essential oils on pathogenic and spoilage organisms were compared. Moreover, the most effective as well as the least effective essential oils on microbial growth were identified. It was concluded that essential oils are more effective on gram positive bacteria rather than gram negatives. Besides, it was evident that some essential oils negatively affected the useful organisms such as lactobacilli.

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacimuthu Savarimuthu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. Methods: The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20 using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the active essential oils were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 25.6 mg/ml. Results: Out of 21 essential oils tested, 19 oils showed antibacterial activity against one or more strains. Cinnamon, clove, geranium, lemon, lime, orange and rosemary oils exhibited significant inhibitory effect. Cinnamon oil showed promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria. In general, B. subtilis was the most susceptible. On the other hand, K. pneumoniae exhibited low degree of sensitivity. Conclusion: Majority of the oils showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. However Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Cinnamon oil can be a good source of antibacterial agents.

  10. Antimicrobial Effects of Several Essential Oil from Aromatic Plants

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    Felicia TUŢULESCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs have been long recognized for their antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal and antioxidant properties. The present research aimed to study the antimicrobial effects of some volatile oils from aromatic plants (sweet basil and dill against several microorganisms, namely Bacillus subtilis, Alternaria alternata and Penicillium expansum. The oils have been extracted through distillation procedures and the antimicrobial action of the oils was assessed through the disc diffusion method. The best effect against the Bacillus subtilis strain has occurred when the essential oil of dill was undiluted. Regarding the the Alternaria species, it was noted that dill volatile oil has acted in an efficient way only undiluted. As the oil's concentration decreased, the strain becomed resistant. The sweet basil oil has proven to be highly effective when acting against the Bacillus strain. By volatilization, the sweet basil oil produced a strong antimicrobial effect, even in control disc, in which it was noticed a small development of colonies comparing with the dill oil. The results indicated that the sweet basil essential oil exerted an antimicrobial effect both against the tested bacteria and moulds, while the dill oil had a great inhibitory action on Bacillus subtilis and Alternaria alternata, but was less efficient against Penicillium expansum.

  11. Commercial Essential Oils as Potential Antimicrobials to Treat Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Ané

    2017-01-01

    Essential oils are one of the most notorious natural products used for medical purposes. Combined with their popular use in dermatology, their availability, and the development of antimicrobial resistance, commercial essential oils are often an option for therapy. At least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1500 combinations. This review explores the fundamental knowledge available on the antimicrobial properties against pathogens responsible for dermatological infections and compares the scientific evidence to what is recommended for use in common layman's literature. Also included is a review of combinations with other essential oils and antimicrobials. The minimum inhibitory concentration dilution method is the preferred means of determining antimicrobial activity. While dermatological skin pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have been well studied, other pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Brevibacterium species have been sorely neglected. Combination studies incorporating oil blends, as well as interactions with conventional antimicrobials, have shown that mostly synergy is reported. Very few viral studies of relevance to the skin have been made. Encouragement is made for further research into essential oil combinations with other essential oils, antimicrobials, and carrier oils. PMID:28546822

  12. Biological Activities of Three Essential Oils of the Lamiaceae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Nieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to improve the sensory characteristics of food, to act as preservatives and for their nutritional and healthy properties. Herbs and spices are generally recognized as safe (GRAS and are excellent substitutes for chemical additives. Essential oils are mixtures of volatile compounds obtained, mainly by steam distillation, from medicinal and aromatic plants. They are an alternative to synthetic additives for the food industry, and they have gained attention as potential sources for natural food preservatives due to the growing interest in the development of safe, effective, natural food preservation. Lamiaceae is one of the most important families in the production of essential oils with antioxidants and antimicrobial properties. Aromatic plants are rich in essential oils and are mainly found in the Mediterranean region, where the production of such oils is a profitable source of ecological and economic development. The use of essential oils with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to increase the shelf life of food is a promising technology, and the essential oils of the Lamiaceae family, such as rosemary, thyme, and sage, have been extensively studied with respect to their use as food preservatives. Regarding the new applications of essential oils, this review gives an overview of the current knowledge and recent trends in the use of these oils from aromatic plants as antimicrobials and antioxidants in foods, as well as their biological activities, future potential, and challenges.

  13. Biological Activities of Three Essential Oils of the Lamiaceae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Gema

    2017-08-23

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to improve the sensory characteristics of food, to act as preservatives and for their nutritional and healthy properties. Herbs and spices are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and are excellent substitutes for chemical additives. Essential oils are mixtures of volatile compounds obtained, mainly by steam distillation, from medicinal and aromatic plants. They are an alternative to synthetic additives for the food industry, and they have gained attention as potential sources for natural food preservatives due to the growing interest in the development of safe, effective, natural food preservation. Lamiaceae is one of the most important families in the production of essential oils with antioxidants and antimicrobial properties. Aromatic plants are rich in essential oils and are mainly found in the Mediterranean region, where the production of such oils is a profitable source of ecological and economic development. The use of essential oils with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to increase the shelf life of food is a promising technology, and the essential oils of the Lamiaceae family, such as rosemary, thyme, and sage, have been extensively studied with respect to their use as food preservatives. Regarding the new applications of essential oils, this review gives an overview of the current knowledge and recent trends in the use of these oils from aromatic plants as antimicrobials and antioxidants in foods, as well as their biological activities, future potential, and challenges.

  14. Commercial Essential Oils as Potential Antimicrobials to Treat Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ané Orchard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are one of the most notorious natural products used for medical purposes. Combined with their popular use in dermatology, their availability, and the development of antimicrobial resistance, commercial essential oils are often an option for therapy. At least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1500 combinations. This review explores the fundamental knowledge available on the antimicrobial properties against pathogens responsible for dermatological infections and compares the scientific evidence to what is recommended for use in common layman’s literature. Also included is a review of combinations with other essential oils and antimicrobials. The minimum inhibitory concentration dilution method is the preferred means of determining antimicrobial activity. While dermatological skin pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have been well studied, other pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Brevibacterium species have been sorely neglected. Combination studies incorporating oil blends, as well as interactions with conventional antimicrobials, have shown that mostly synergy is reported. Very few viral studies of relevance to the skin have been made. Encouragement is made for further research into essential oil combinations with other essential oils, antimicrobials, and carrier oils.

  15. Biological Activities of Three Essential Oils of the Lamiaceae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Gema

    2017-01-01

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to improve the sensory characteristics of food, to act as preservatives and for their nutritional and healthy properties. Herbs and spices are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and are excellent substitutes for chemical additives. Essential oils are mixtures of volatile compounds obtained, mainly by steam distillation, from medicinal and aromatic plants. They are an alternative to synthetic additives for the food industry, and they have gained attention as potential sources for natural food preservatives due to the growing interest in the development of safe, effective, natural food preservation. Lamiaceae is one of the most important families in the production of essential oils with antioxidants and antimicrobial properties. Aromatic plants are rich in essential oils and are mainly found in the Mediterranean region, where the production of such oils is a profitable source of ecological and economic development. The use of essential oils with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to increase the shelf life of food is a promising technology, and the essential oils of the Lamiaceae family, such as rosemary, thyme, and sage, have been extensively studied with respect to their use as food preservatives. Regarding the new applications of essential oils, this review gives an overview of the current knowledge and recent trends in the use of these oils from aromatic plants as antimicrobials and antioxidants in foods, as well as their biological activities, future potential, and challenges. PMID:28930277

  16. Antioxidant and antibacterial properties of the Melissa officinalis essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mahmodi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing drug resistance in microorganisms and concerns for side effects of chemical preservatives, especially in the food industry, have led to extensive studies on novel potential agents with natural origin. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of the Melissa officinalis essential oil. Methods: This experimental study was carried out at Islamic Azad University, Saveh Branch in 2012-2013. The essential oil was extracted from different parts of the plant (leaves, stem and flower by hydrodistillation. The essential oil was phytochemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. Antibacterial properties were examined by disc diffusion and microtiter plates. Antioxidant activity was examined by diphenyl-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay. Findings: E-Citral in leaves, 2-Cyclohexen-1-one, 2-methyl-5-(1-methylethenyl in stem, and Trans-Carveol in flower were the major components identified in the Melissa officinalis. Among different parts essential oil, the highest and the lowest antibacterial activity were related to leaves and stem, respectively. The largest diameter of the inhibition growth zone for Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was related to the leaves essential oil. The highest antioxidant activity was related to the leaves essential oil in DPPH assay. Conclusion: With regards to the results, the Melissa officinalis essential oil can be used as a natural preservative for increasing the shelf life of foods.

  17. [Essential oils for the nutrition of poultry, swine and ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendarp, H

    2005-10-01

    Essential oils are very complex mixtures of volatile, lipophilic compounds originating from plants. Due to their lipophility they posses a good intestinale and percutane absorption. Under external application essential oils demonstrate antiphlogistic or rubefacient to pro-inflammatority activities. Orally intake they stimulate the secretion of digestive enzymes and increase gastric and intestinal motility. Moreover they show spasmolytic, expectorative and diuretic activities. Besides antimicrobial properties on bacteria and fungi have been observed in vitro and in vivo. Due to their various effects essential oils increasingly gain attention in animal nutrition and are discussed to be alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. In some studies essential oils have been reported to reduce intestinal pathogens in broilers and piglets. When administered to ruminants essential oils decrease ruminal ammonia production by suppression the growth of deaminative microorganisms. However, the observed effects on growth performance are inconsistent among studies. In conclusion, there are still some unanswered questions concerning the mode of action, metabolic pathway and optimal dosage of essential oils in different animal species. Further scientific research is therefore needed to use essential oils effectivly in livestock feeding.

  18. Chemical Components of Four Essential Oils in Aromatherapy Recipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kamkaen, Narisa; Watthanachaiyingcharoen, Rith; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on characterization of the chemical components of an aromatherapy recipe. The formulation consisted of four blended essential oils; rosemary oil, eucalyptus oil, pine oil and lime oil (volume ratio 6 : 2 : 1 : 1). The single and combination essential oils were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analysis of GC-MS data revealed that several components exist in the mixture. The five most important components of the blended essential oils were 1,8-cineole (35.6 %), α-pinene (11.1%), limonene (9.6%), camphor (8.4%), and camphene (6.6%). The main components of rosemary oil were 1,8-cineole (37.3%), α-pinene (19.3%), camphor (14.7%), camphene (8.8%), and β-pinene (5.5%); of eucalyptus oil 1,8-cineole (82.6%) followed by limonene (7.4%), o-cymene (4.3%), γ-terpinene (2.7%), and α-pinene (1.5%); of pine oil terpinolene (26.7%), α-terpineol (20.50%), 1-terpineol (10.8%), α-pinene (6.0%), and γ-terpineol (5.3%); and of lime oil limonene (62.9%), γ-terpinene (11.5%), α-terpineol (7.6%), terpinolene (6.0%), and α-terpinene (2.8%). The present study provided a theoretical basis for the potential application of blended essential oils to be used as an aromatherapy essential oil recipe. GC-MS serves as a suitable and reliable method for the quality control of the chemical markers.

  19. Essential Oil Composition from Oleogum Resin of Soqotraen Commiphorakua

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    Nasser A. Awadh Ali

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The major constituents of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the oleogum resin of Commiphora kua Vollesen were identified by GC-MS. Sixteen constituents were detected from the essential oil, which constituted about (90.5% of the total amount. Major constituents of the oil were α- cadinol (33.0%, g -cadinene (22.5%, d -cadinene (17.0%, isocaryophyllene (3.7%, allo-aromadendrene (2.8%, α-muurolene (2.7%, and α-humulene (2.4%. The Oil of Commiphora kua showed moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum

  20. Chemical variability in the essential oil of Hyptis suaveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, N R; Campos, I F; Ferreira, H D; Portes, T A; Santos, S C; Seraphin, J C; Paula, J R; Ferri, P H

    2001-07-01

    The essential oils of Hyptis suaveolens plants collected from 11 localities of the Brazilian Cerrado region were investigated by GC-MS. Sabinene, limonene, biclyclogermacrene, beta-phellandrene and 1,8-cineole were the principal constituents. The results were submitted to principal component and chemometric cluster analysis which allowed three groups of essential oils to be distinguished with respect to the content of p-mentha-2,4(8)-diene, limonene/beta-phellandrene/gamma-terpinene and germacrene D/bicyclogermacrene. In patterns of geographic variation in essential oil composition indicated that the sesquiterpenes are mainly produced in the samples grown at lower latitudes.

  1. The Effect of Essential Oils on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Ozdikmenli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are widespread through the world in spite of developing technology. S. aureus is an important pathogen causing food intoxications besides hospital infections by its antibiotic resistant strains. Nowadays, there has been worldwide increasing concern on usage of natural products to control microorganisms. One of these natural products is essential oils. They are produced from plants especially from spices and composed of many components and volatiles. This review summarizes informative literature on essential oils and their mode of antimicrobial action. In addition, current knowledge on in vitro researches on antibacterial activity of essential oils and food applications to control S. aureus has been discussed.

  2. Chemical stability of extra-virgin olive oil added with oregano essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Claudia M; Nepote, Valeria; Grosso, Nelson R

    2011-09-01

    Extra virgin olive oil is highly consumed and well known for its nutritional and health benefits. However, it is fatty food highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the preserving effect of oregano (Origanum vulgare L. spp vulgare called "oregano compacto") essential oil on physical and chemical properties in extra virgin olive oil during storage. Oregano essential oil composition was analyzed by GC-MS. This essential oil was added into extra virgin olive oil at 0.05%. The samples were stored in 3 different conditions: darkness, light exposure, and temperature (60 °C). Chemical indicators of lipid oxidation (peroxide value, p-anisidine value, conjugated dienes, free fatty acidity, and carotenoid and chlorophyll contents) were measured. High content in carvomenthol (22.52%), terpinolene (19.77%), thymol (13.51%), and γ-terpinene (10.30%) were detected in oregano essential oil. Olive oil samples without oregano essential oil stored at 60 °C and exposure at artificial light had the highest peroxide values during storage. Higher p-anisidine and K232 values after day 7 of storage were detected in temperature, darkness, and light exposure treatments. Light treatment was the main factor that degraded chlorophyll causing loss of color. The highest chlorophyll content (3.87 mg/kg) was observed in olive oil with essential oil at the end of storage. In general, olive oil samples added with oregano essential oil had lower peroxide, conjugated dienes, and p-anisidine values and higher chlorophyll and carotenoid contents during storage. Oregano essential oil retards lipid oxidation process in olive oil prolonging its shelf life. Oregano essential oil was and is used with the purpose of flavoring and aromatizing food. This essential oil due to its composition has shown antioxidant activity. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) are thought to be promoters of carcinogenesis

  3. Antioxidant activity of oregano essential oil (Origanum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević, Lj.P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil obtained from oregano (Origanum vulgare L. by Clevenger-type hydrodistillation and hydromodulus 1:10 m/v during 180 minutes, has been investigated in this work. Qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil was determined by GC-MS and GC-FID spectrometry. Antioxidant activity of the obtained oil was examined spectrophotometrically by DPPH test (after 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes of incubation and TBA-MDA assay. The yield of essential oil was 4.1 mL/100 g of plant material. Seven components were identified: α-thujene, myrcene, α-terpinene, o-cymene, γ-terpinene, thymol and carvacrol. The major components were thymol (45% and carvacrol (37.4%. Oil incubated for 60 minutes has shown the best antioxidant activity according to DPPH test. The concentrations of essential oil, required for neutralization of 50% of initial DPPH radical concentration (EC50, were 0.761, 0.590, 0.360 and 0.326 mg/mL, after 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes of incubation, respectively. Lipid peroxidation inhibition of 92.3% was achieved by 1.35 mg/mL essential oil concentration. The results obtained indicate that oregano essential oil is a good source of natural antioxidants with potential application in food and pharmaceutical industries, as a safer alternative to the synthetic antioxidants.

  4. Antifungal Effect of Essential Oils against Fusarium Keratitis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Mónika; Fekete, Ildikó Pálma; Böszörményi, Andrea; Singh, Yendrembam Randhir Babu; Selvam, Kanesan Panneer; Shobana, Coimbatore Subramanian; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Kredics, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Galgóczy, László

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antifungal effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Citrus limon, Juniperus communis, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gaultheria procumbens, Melaleuca alternifolia, Origanum majorana, Salvia sclarea, and Thymus vulgaris essential oils against Fusarium species, the most common etiologic agents of filamentous fungal keratitis in South India. C. zeylanicum essential oil showed strong anti-Fusarium activity, whereas all the other tested essential oils proved to be less effective. The main component of C. zeylanicum essential oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, was also tested and showed a similar effect as the oil. The in vitro interaction between trans-cinnamaldehyde and natamycin, the first-line therapeutic agent of Fusarium keratitis, was also investigated; an enhanced fungal growth inhibition was observed when these agents were applied in combination. Light and fluorescent microscopic observations revealed that C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde reduces the cellular metabolism and inhibits the conidia germination. Furthermore, necrotic events were significantly more frequent in the presence of these two compounds. According to our results, C. zeylanicum essential oil/trans-cinnamaldehyde provides a promising basis to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of Fusarium keratitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Biological Activities and Composition of Ferulago carduchorum Essential Oil

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    Fereshteh Golfakhrabadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ferulago carduchorum Boiss and Hausskn belongs to the Apiaceae family. This plant grows in west part of Iran that local people added it to dairy and oil ghee to delay expiration date and give them a pleasant taste. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, acetyl cholinesterase inhibition, cytotoxic, larvicidal activities and composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum.Methods: Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE inhibitory, larvicidal activities and chemical composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum were investigated. Besides, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of essential oil were tested using DPPH, microdilution method and MTT assay, respectively.Results: The major components of essential oil were (z-β-ocimene (43.3%, α-pinene (18.23% and bornyl acetate (3.98%. Among 43 identified components, monoterpenes were the most compounds (84.63%. The essential oil had noticeable efficiency against Candida albicans (MIC= 2340 μg ml-1 and it was effective against Anophelesstephensi with LC50 and LC90 values of 12.78 and 47.43 ppm, respectively. The essential oil could inhibit AChE (IC50= 23.6 μl ml-1. The essential oil showed high cytotoxicity on T47D, HEP-G2 and HT-29 cell lines (IC50< 2 μg ml-1.Conclusion: The essential oil of F. carduchorum collected from west of Iran had anti-Candida, larvicidal and cytotoxicity effects and should be further investigated in others in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

  6. Hydrodistillation extraction time effect on essential oil yield, composition, and bioactivity of coriander oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Astatkie, Tess; Schlegel, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a major essential oil crop grown throughout the world. Coriander essential oil is extracted from coriander fruits via hydrodistillation, with the industry using 180-240 min of distillation time (DT), but the optimum DT for maximizing essential oil yield, composition of constituents, and antioxidant activities are not known. This research was conducted to determine the effect of DT on coriander oil yield, composition, and bioactivity. The results show that essential oil yield at the shorter DT was low and generally increased with increasing DT with the maximum yields achieved at DT between 40 and 160 min. The concentrations of the low-boiling point essential oil constituents: α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, myrcene, para-cymene, limonene, and γ-terpinene were higher at shorter DT (essential oil constituent, linalool, was 51% at DT 1.15 min, and increased steadily to 68% with increasing DT. In conclusion, 40 min DT is sufficient to maximize yield of essential oil; and different DT can be used to obtain essential oil with differential composition. Its antioxidant capacity was affected by the DT, with 20 and 240 min DT showing higher antioxidant activity. Comparisons of coriander essential oil composition must consider the length of the DT.

  7. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C) for subsequent experiments. Analysis of the essential oil. Capillary gas chromatography was performed using Hewlett–Packard 5890 gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector and fused silica capillary column HP-5 (5 % ...

  8. Comparative study of the chemical composition of the essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , epicarp and mesocarp of Annona senegalensis Pers., oulotricha Le Thomas subspecies (Annonaceae), growing in Brazzaville (Congo), were analyzed by CG and CG-MS. These oils essentially contain sesquiterpenic compounds (58.3 ...

  9. Comparative study of the chemical composition of the essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    , epicarp and mesocarp of Annona senegalensis Pers., oulotricha Le Thomas subspecies (Annonaceae), growing in. Brazzaville (Congo), were analyzed by CG and CG-MS. These oils essentially contain sesquiterpenic.

  10. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF ROSEMARY ESSENTIAL OIL AGAINST FOODSTUFFS FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vallone

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils are well known for their antibacteric, antomycotic and insecticide effects. In this research the antomycotic activity of Rosemary essential oil has been tested in vitro versus different moulds, common contaminants of food and feed, as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus ustus, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium aurantio-griseum, Fusarium moniliforme. The Rosemary essential oil tested (produced in Sardegna, Italy shows a different efficacy against various moulds and his activity seems to be produced by borneol, α-pinene, eucalyptol, camphor and limonene. Aspergillus and Penicillium are the genus showing an important inhibition of their development in vitro. Rosemary essential oil for these natural properties can be used as antimycotic additive to extended shelf-life of many foodstuffs.

  11. Essential oil components of orange peels and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Anna; Di Stefano, Vita; Di Martino, Enrica; Schillaci, Domenico; Schicchi, Rosario

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the orange peel of 12 cultivars of Citrus sinensis from central-eastern Sicily was employed to obtain essential oils and extracts. The ones were extracted through steam distillation, the others through extraction in hexane. Chemical constituents were evaluated in terms of qualitative and quantitative analyses by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Fifty-four components were identified in the steam essential oils and 44 in the extracts. In all the cultivars, the main component is d-limonene (73.9-97%); discrete percentages of linalool, geraniol and nerol were also found. Cluster analysis based on essential oils composition showed a certain degree of affinity between cultivars of the same type. The antimicrobial activity was investigated against three micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). 'Sanguinello' and 'Solarino Moro' essential oils are significantly active against L. monocytogenes, while 'Valencia' hexanic extract against all the tested micro-organisms.

  12. Antimutagenic and antioxidant potentials of Teucrium ramosissimum essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier, Mohamed Ben; Boubaker, Jihed; Neffati, Aicha; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Bouhlel, Ines; Kilani, Soumaya; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Ghedira, Kamel

    2010-07-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of the essential oil extracted from the aerial parts of Teucrium ramosissimum were evaluated by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, and TA1535, with and without exogenous metabolic activation (S9 fraction). The T. ramosissimum essential oil showed no mutagenic effect. In contrast, our results established that it possessed antimutagenic effects against sodium azide (SA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD). The antioxidant capacity of the tested essential oil was evaluated using enzymatic, i.e., the xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay, and nonenzymatic systems, i.e., the nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT)/riboflavin and the DPPH assays. A moderate free radical-scavenging activity was observed towards DPPH(.) and O2(.-). In contrast, T. ramosissimum essential oil showed no effect for all the tested concentrations in the X/XOD assay.

  13. Essential Oil of Brachylaena hutchinsii Hutch from Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential Oil of Brachylaena hutchinsii Hutch from Tanzania: Antimicrobial Activity and Composition. MM Oliva, MS Demo, RS Malele, CK Mutayabarwa, JW Mwangi, GN Thoithi, IO Kibwage, SM Faillaci, RL Scrivanti, AG Lopez, JA Zygadlo ...

  14. Eryngium foetidum L. Essential Oils: Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Paul S.; Essien, Emmanuel E.; Ntuk, Samuel J.; Choudhary, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Eryngium foetidum essential oils from Nigeria were investigated for the first time in order to ascertain their potency as natural antioxidants. E. foetidum is an aromatic and medicinal herb used in ethno-medicine and as a traditional spice for foods. Methods: The hydro-distilled oils of E. foetidum were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Free radical scavenging capacity of the volatile oils was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)...

  15. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Hyptis suaveolens Essential Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Nantitanon, Witayapan; Chowwanapoonpohn, Sombat; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2007-01-01

    The essential oil of Hyptis suaveolens obtained by steam distillation was examined for its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. The antioxidant activity was determined by means of the DPPH radical scavenging test and ABTS free radical decolorization assay. Results from both methods indicate that the antioxidant activity of H. suaveolens oil is time and concentration dependent. The antioxidant potential of H. suaveolens oil determined by the DPPH method expressed as IC50 was 3.72 mg/ml wh...

  16. Cytotoxic evaluation of essential oil from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Saulo Luis da; Figueiredo,Patrícia Maria; Yano,Tomomasa

    2007-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam is a plant popularly used as antimicrobial, for malaria and inflammatory treatment. The essential oil of Z. rhoifolium was extracted and its cytotoxic effects against HeLa (human cervical carcinoma), A-549 (human lung carcinoma), HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma), Vero (monkey kidney) cell lines and mice macrophages were evaluated. Some of the terpenes of its essential oil (ß-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, alpha -pinene, myrcene and linalool) were also tested to ve...

  17. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahanshir Amini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC₅₀ values (ppm of plant essential oils and fungicides were measured. In greenhouse, soil infested with Phytophthora species was treated by adding 50 ml of essential oils and fungicides (100 ppm. Disease severity was determined after 28 days. Among two tested plant essential oils, C. citratus had the lowest EC₅₀ values for inhibition of the mycelial growth of P. capsici (31.473, P. melonis (33.097 and P. drechsleri (69.112, respectively. The mean EC₅₀ values for Metalaxyl-Mancozeb on these pathogens were 20.87, 20.06 and 17.70, respectively. Chemical analysis of plant essential oils by GC-MS showed that, among 42 compounds identified from C. citratus, two compounds β-geranial (α-citral (39.16% and z-citral (30.95% were the most abundant. Under the greenhouse condition, Metalaxyl-Mancozeb caused the greatest reduction in disease severity, 84.2%, 86.8% and 92.1% on melon, cucumber, and pepper, respectively. The C. citratus essential oil reduced disease severity from 47.4% to 60.5% compared to the untreated control (p≤0.05. Essential oils of O. basilicum had the lowest effects on the pathogens under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. These results show that essential oils may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from Phytophthora diseases.

  18. Chemical composition of the essential oil of whole plant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the essential oil on proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, with L02 and HeLa cells serving as control groups. Results: GC-MS results show that the essential oil of E. dense contains 40 components. Thirty seven ...

  19. Acaricidal Effect of Foam Soap Containing Essential Oil of Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acaricidal effect of foam soap containing essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum leaves was tested on Rhipicephalus lunulatus in western highland of Cameroon. Five doses of essential oil (0.00; 0.04; 0.06; 0.08; 0.10 μl/g) with four replications for each dose were tested in vitro. Each replication consisted of 10 ticks in Petri dish ...

  20. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Jahanshir; Farhang, Vahid; Javadi, Taimoor; Nazemi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC50) values (ppm) of plant essential oils and fungicides were measured. In greenhouse, soil infested with Phytophthora species was treated by adding 50 ml of essential oils and fungicides (100 ppm). Disease severity was determined after 28 days. Among two tested plant essential oils, C. citratus had the lowest EC50 values for inhibition of the mycelial growth of P. capsici (31.473), P. melonis (33.097) and P. drechsleri (69.112), respectively. The mean EC50 values for Metalaxyl-Mancozeb on these pathogens were 20.87, 20.06 and 17.70, respectively. Chemical analysis of plant essential oils by GC-MS showed that, among 42 compounds identified from C. citratus, two compounds β-geranial (α-citral) (39.16%) and z-citral (30.95%) were the most abundant. Under the greenhouse condition, Metalaxyl-Mancozeb caused the greatest reduction in disease severity, 84.2%, 86.8% and 92.1% on melon, cucumber, and pepper, respectively. The C. citratus essential oil reduced disease severity from 47.4% to 60.5% compared to the untreated control (p≤0.05). Essential oils of O. basilicum had the lowest effects on the pathogens under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. These results show that essential oils may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from Phytophthora diseases. PMID:26889111

  1. Anti-ulcer activity of essential oil constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francisco de Assis; Andrade, Luciana Nalone; de Sousa, Elida Batista Vieira; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2014-05-05

    Essential oils have attracted considerable worldwide attention over the last few decades. These natural products have wide-ranging pharmacological activities and biotechnological applications. Faced with the need to find new anti-ulcer agents and the great effort on the development of drugs for the treatment of ulcers, in this review, the anti-ulcer activities of 21 bioactive compounds found in essential oils are discussed.

  2. Variability of the essential oil of Viola etrusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamini, Guido; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Morelli, Ivano

    2003-03-01

    Essential oils obtained from different populations of Viola etrusca from Italy have been analysed to verify the phenotypic discontinuity observed in a previous study. All of the essential oils contained methyl salicylate as a main constituent. However, multivariate analysis showed differences among some populations, in particular between northern and southern ones. Results suggest that this species could be undergoing a slow schizogenetic differentiation process due to its genetic isolation.

  3. Essential Oils of Oregano: Biological Activity beyond Their Antimicrobial Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Nayely Leyva-López; Erick P. Gutiérrez-Grijalva; Gabriela Vazquez-Olivo; J. Basilio Heredia

    2017-01-01

    Essential oils of oregano are widely recognized for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their antiviral and antifungal properties. Nevertheless, recent investigations have demonstrated that these compounds are also potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and cancer suppressor agents. These properties of oregano essential oils are of potential interest to the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the latest evidence regarding ess...

  4. Chemical composition and mosquito larvicidal activities of Salvia essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jija; Thoppil, John E

    2011-05-01

    Vector control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. In this context, essential oils have received much attention as potentially useful bioactive compounds against insects. Therefore, our present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils from the aerial parts of Salvia elegans Vahl, Salvia dorisiana Standl., Salvia splendens Sello ex J.A. Schult Blue Ribbon, and S. splendens Sello ex J.A. Schult Scarlet Sage Red (Lamiaceae) against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae). The mosquito larvicidal activities of the essential oils and chemical composition of four taxa of Salvia are investigated in this article for the first time. Chemical compositions of essential oils obtained from four taxa of Salvia were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), GC-FID, and the effects of essential oils on fourth instar larvae of A. albopictus were investigated. The main components identified from each Salvia essential oils were as follows: spathulenol (38.73%) and caryophyllene (10.32%) from S. elegans; ledol (45.8%) and 4,4'-[(p-phenylene)diisopropylidene]diphenol (17.38%) from S. dorisiana; β-cubebene (22.9%), and caryophyllene (12.99%) from S. splendens Blue Ribbon; phytol (41.46%) and cyclooctasulfur (24.88%) from S. splendens Scarlet Sage Red. The essential oils of S. elegans and S. splendens Blue Ribbon had excellent inhibitory larvicidal effect against A. albopictus larvae, and their LC(50) values in 24 h were 46.4 ppm (LC(90) = 121.8 ppm) and 59.2 ppm (LC(90) = 133.0 ppm), respectively. These findings demonstrate that the essential oils of these Salvia species could be considered as the powerful candidates to bring about useful botanicals so as to prevent the resurgence of mosquito vectors.

  5. Essential oil extract from Moringa oleifera roots as cowpea seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Moringa oleifera (Lam.) roots essential oil extract on the survival of Callosobruchus maculatus. Behaviour of Hexane extract of powdered Moringa oleifera roots was obtained by the Soxhlet extraction method. Moringa roots oil extract was applied at dosages of 0.5 l, ...

  6. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Myrtus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gum paint formulation was found to be an oil-in-water emulsion with an optimal pseudoplastic viscosity (120 - 340 centpoises with 200 - 50 shear stress per min). Keywords: essential oil, Myrtus communis, antimicrobial activity, formulation, gum paint. Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Journal Vol. 25 (1) 2007: pp. 72-76 ...

  7. Phytochemical and antimicrobial studies on essential oils of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... Volatile constituents of the dried fruits of. Citrus aurantifolia from Iran. J. Med. Arom. Plant Sci. 25(2): 400-401. Orafidiya LO (1993). The effect of autoxidation of Lemon-grass oil on it's antibacterial activity. Phytother. Res. 7(3): 269-271. Ozcan M (2003). Effect of essential oils of some plants used as thyme.

  8. Inhibitory effect of essential oil on aflatoxin activities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... Inhibitory effects of Thyme oils on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus. Food Control,15: 479-483. Rasoli I, Fakoor MH, Yadegarinia D, Gachkar L, Allameh A, Rezaei MB. (2008). Antimycotoxigenic characteristics of Rosmarinus officinalis and Trachyspermum copticum L. essential oils.

  9. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of essential oil of Lippia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the larvicidal activity of essential oil of Lippia kituiensis leaves against larvae of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The oil was obtained by hydro-distillation of fresh leaves and analysed using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Analysis showed that sesquiterpenes were dominant ...

  10. Biological activity and phytoconstituents of essential oil from fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oil was extracted from fresh leaves of Eriosema englerianum by hydrodistillation and its major phytoconstituents determined by GC-MS. The major phytoconstituents were O-cymene, terpinolene and ascaridole with a yield of 0.28%. Antimicrobial activity of the oil was tested against nine human bacterial pathogens ...

  11. Economic Analysis of Production of Essential Oil using Steam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Essential oils are the odoriferous constituents of plants. They occur in various sites of the plant anatomy and in some cases are found throughout the plant organs and in other cases are restricted to specific sites. These parts of plant organs include flower, fruits, leaves, roots, seeds and bark. (UNIDO, 1983). The oils are form ...

  12. Insecticidal Activity of Essential Oil of Cinnamomum cassia and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the insecticidal activity of the essential oil of Cinnamomum cassis and its main constituent compound, trans-cinnamaldehyde, against the booklice, Liposcelis bostrychophila. Methods: Steam distillation of C. cassis twigs was carried out using a Clavenger apparatus in order to obtain the volatile oils.

  13. Antioxidant activities of Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oils of Rosmarinus officinalis L. growing in a rural area within the Nkonkobe Municipality of the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were extracted using the solvent free microwave extractor (SFME) and hydro-distillation (HD) methods. The antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of the obtained oils were tested ...

  14. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of essential oil of Lantana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil was tested for antibacterial activity against 6 strains, using disc diffusion method, and for cytotoxicity using brine-shrimp lethality assay. The oil showed moderate activity against Candida albican, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus aureus. These activities support ...

  15. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum L. growing in Eastern Kenya. ... aeruginosae, Salmonella typhi, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis) bacteria and a pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. The oil had pronounced antibacterial and antifungal activities on all the

  16. Essential oil composition of different fractions of Piper guineense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oil fractions from dried seed powder of Piper guineense were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and evaluated for their insecticidal effects on Sitophilus oryzae L. The GC-MS analysis showed quantitative and qualitative differences between the oil fractions. Chromatographic results ...

  17. Composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... E. coli (0.8% v/v) was obtained. It was observed that essential oil and seed extracts of F. vulgare exhibit different degree of antimicrobial activities depending on the doses applied. Therefore, fennel oil could be a source of pharmaceutical materials required for the preparation of new therapeutic and antimicrobial agents.

  18. Chemical compositions and mosquito repellency of essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , respectively against female Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes. The repellency activity of essential oil from leaves were significantly higher than from stem bark, but less than that of the standard citronella oil used (RC50 = 4.1×10-6 mg/cm2).

  19. CONSTITUENTS OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL OF CHIMONANTHUS ERA GRANCE LINDLE

    OpenAIRE

    KATAYOUN JAVIDN1A; RAMTN MIRI; MARYAM CHERIKI ABBAS SHAFIEE

    1999-01-01

    The constituent of the essential oil ofChimonanthus fragrance Lindle (Calycanthaceae) were characterized by GLC and GC/MS. Twenty components representing 97% of the oil composition of which fifteen were sesquiterpenes were identified. The major components were p-Elemene, p-Caryophyllene, y-Cadinene, y-Bisabolene, p-EIemenone and a-Eudesmol.

  20. Comparative analysis of essential oil contents of Juniperus excelsa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cones/berries of Juniperus excelsa from three provenances in Balochistan, Pakistan were collected and essential oil was extracted by solvent method. Oil contents were analyzed on gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Identification and quantification was made by using Wiley and NIST spectral library and HP ...

  1. Insecticidal activity of essential oil of Cinnamomum cassia and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the insecticidal activity of the essential oil of Cinnamomum cassis and its main constituent compound, trans-cinnamaldehyde, against the booklice, Liposcelis bostrychophila. Methods: Steam distillation of C. cassis twigs was carried out using a Clavenger apparatus in order to obtain the volatile oils.

  2. the essential oils of coriandrum sativum l. grown in ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant materials. The dried coriander fruit samples were obtained from the major commercial sources, Bale and Gonder. The samples were authenticated by Dr ... Twenty one compounds comprising 97% of the essential oils were identified by. GC and GC/MS. The composition of the oils was dominated by a monoterpene.

  3. The effect of an essential oil combination derived from selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of an essential oil combination derived from selected herbs growing wild in Turkey on broiler performance. ... The oil in the EOC was extracted from different herbs growing in Turkey. The EOC at 24 ... The EOC, a feed additive of natural origin, may be considered as a potential growth promoter in broiler production.

  4. The chemical composition and biological activities of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... (2007) from S. terebinthifolius fruits collected from Minas. Gerais state, in Brazil. These authors described essential oil yield of 4.65% w/w after 3 h of extraction, in relation to just dry fruit weight. The differences in the oil yield could be due to the geographical difference as well as the differences that may exist ...

  5. Mining the essential oils of the Anthemideae | Teixeira da Silva ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerous members of the Anthemideae are important cut-flower and ornamental crops, as well as medicinal and aromatic plants, many of which produce essential oils used in folk and modern medicine, the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. These oils and compounds contained within them are used in the ...

  6. Phytoconstituents and biological activities of essential Oil from Rhus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study determined the major phytoconstituents, the antioxidant and the antimicrobial activities of Rhus lancea essential oil against eight bacterial and four fungal species. The yield was 0.18% and the major phytoconstituents found were µ-pinene, benzene and d-3-carene. The oil exhibited remarkable ...

  7. Leaf Essential oils of Salvia nilotica and Salvia schimperi : Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The compositions of the essential oils of the leaves of Salvia nilotica and Salvia schimperi were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results of the analyses indicated that the components of the two oils are qualitatively similar with significant quantitative differences. Twenty-seven compounds ...

  8. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabodh Satyal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1 linalool; (2 borneol; (3 geraniol; (4 sabinene hydrate; (5 thymol; (6 carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%; the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%; the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%; and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%. A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris.

  9. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Setzer, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris. PMID:28231164

  10. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  11. The Types of Essentials Oil Components Isolated From the Leaves of Citrus Aurantifolia and Citrus Nobilis

    OpenAIRE

    Wulandari, Mutiara Juni; Mohammad Anwar Jamaludin,, Lailatul Riska, Agustin Laela Prunama; Mumun Nurmilawati, Indra Fauzi

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil or known as the eteris oil (etheric oil) was result from secondary metabolism of a plant. In general essential oil contains of citronellal, Citronelal, Citronelol, Limonen, β-Pinene dan sabinene. The components essential oil derived from citrus plants commonly used by perfume industry, on other hand it is used as essentials oil orange flavour addition in some drinks and food, and also as an antioxidant and anti cancer. One of the essential oil is produced by Citrus aurantifolia ...

  12. Evaluation of vetiver grass for radiocesium absorption ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nualchavee Roongtanakiat

    2017-06-01

    The Surat Thani vetiver plantlets were cultured in 134Cs solution with a concentration of 5 MBq/L for different periods. The results of the radiographic image, PSL signals and the radioactivity levels in the vetiver samples strongly indicated that vetiver could absorb a greater amount of 134Cs when the period of culture was longer. After vetiver culture periods of 3 d, 6 d, 9 d, 12 d, 15 d and 18 d, the activity of 134Cs in the cultured solutions declined to 98.0%, 93.2%, 88.6%, 78.1%, 70.7% and 65.5%, respectively. These values indicated that vetiver could remediate 134Cs in the cultured solution by 2.0%, 6.8%, 11.4%, 21.9%, 29.3% and 34.5% for the respective durations.

  13. Whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Prestes Lessa Fernandes Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to prepare whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil at different concentrations, and evaluate their properties and antimicrobial activity. Films were more flexible with increasing the concentration of oregano oil and water vapor permeability was higher in the films with oregano oil. Increasing the concentration of essential oil decreased the water solubility. The solubility of control film and film with 1.5% oregano oil was 20.2 and 14.0%, respectively. The addition of 1% of oregano oil improved the resistance of the films. The tensile strength for the control film was 66.0 MPa, while for the film with 1% of oregano oil was 108.7 MPa. Films containing 1.5% oregano oil showed higher antimicrobial activity. The zone of inhibition ranged from 0 to 1.7 cm. The results showed that the whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil has potential application as active packaging.

  14. Transfer of terpenes from essential oils into cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejonklev, J; Løkke, M M; Larsen, M K; Mortensen, G; Petersen, M A; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transfer of volatile terpenes from caraway seed and oregano plant essential oils into cow's milk through respiratory and gastrointestinal exposure. Essential oils have potential applications as feed additives because of their antimicrobial properties, but very little work exists on the transfer of their volatile compounds into milk. Lactating Danish Holstein cows with duodenum cannula were used. Gastrointestinal exposure was facilitated by infusing the essential oils, mixed with deodorized sesame oil, into the duodenum cannula. Two levels were tested for each essential oil. Respiratory exposure was facilitated by placing the animal in a chamber together with a sponge soaked in the essential oils. All exposures were spread over 9h. Milk samples were collected immediately before and after exposure, as well as the next morning. Twelve monoterpenes and 2 sesquiterpenes were analyzed in essential oils and in milk samples using dynamic headspace sampling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the essential oils, almost all of the terpenes were detected in both essential oils at various levels. For caraway, the monoterpenes limonene, carvone, and carvacrol were most abundant; in oregano, the monoterpenes carvacrol and ρ-cymene were most abundant. For almost all treatments, an immediate effect was detected in milk, whereas little or no effect was detected in milk the following day. This suggests that the transfer into milk of these volatile terpenes is fast, and that the milk will not be influenced when treatment is discontinued. Principal component analysis was used to elucidate the effect of the treatments on the terpene profile of the milk. Terpene content for treatment milk samples was characterized by the same terpenes found in the treatment essential oil used for that animal, regardless of pathway of exposure. The terpenes appear to be transferred unaltered into the milk, regardless of the pathway of exposure

  15. In vitro activity of ten essential oils against Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of alternative approaches in ectoparasite management is currently required. Essential oils have been demonstrated to exhibit fumigant and topical toxicity to a number of arthropods. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential efficacy of ten essential oils against Sarcoptes scabiei. Methods The major chemical components of the oils were identified by GC-MS analysis. Contact and fumigation bioassays were performed on Sarcoptes mites collected from experimentally infected pigs. For contact bioassays, essential oils were diluted with paraffin to get concentrations at 10, 5, and even 1% for the most efficient ones. The mites were inspected under a stereomicroscope 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180min after contact. For fumigation bioassay, a filter paper was treated with 100 μL of the pure essential oil. The mites were inspected under a stereomicroscope for the first 5min, and then every 5min until 1h. Results Using contact bioassays, 1% clove and palmarosa oil killed all the mites within 20 and 50min, respectively. The oils efficacy order was: clove > palmarosa > geranium > tea tree > lavender > manuka > bitter orange > eucalyptus > Japanese cedar. In fumigation bioassays, the efficacy order was: tea tree > clove > eucalyptus > lavender > palmarosa > geranium > Japanese cedar > bitter orange > manuka. In both bioassays, cade oil showed no activity. Conclusion Essential oils, especially tea tree, clove, palmarosa, and eucalyptus oils, are potential complementary or alternative products to treat S. scabiei infections in humans or animals, as well as to control the mites in the environment.

  16. Distillation time effect on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Cantrell, Charles L; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is one of the most widely grown essential oil crops in the world. Commercial extraction of lavender oil is done using steam distillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the length of the distillation time (DT) on lavender essential oil yield and composition when extracted from dried flowers. Therefore, the following distillation times (DT) were tested in this experiment: 1.5 min, 3 min, 3.75 min, 7.5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min, 150 min, 180 min, and 240 min. The essential oil yield (range 0.5-6.8%) reached a maximum at 60 min DT. The concentrations of cineole (range 6.4-35%) and fenchol (range 1.7-2.9%) were highest at the 1.5 min DT and decreased with increasing length of the DT. The concentration of camphor (range 6.6-9.2%) reached a maximum at 7.5-15 min DT, while the concentration of linalool acetate (range 15-38%) reached a maximum at 30 min DT. Results suggest that lavender essential oil yield may not increase after 60 min DT. The change in essential oil yield, and the concentrations of cineole, fenchol and linalool acetate as DT changes were modeled very well by the asymptotic nonlinear regression model. DT may be used to modify the chemical profile of lavender oil and to obtain oils with differential chemical profiles from the same lavender flowers. DT must be taken into consideration when citing or comparing reports on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

  17. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

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    Kanniah Rajasekaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, and C. gloeosporioides, and three insects, the azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta. Hedychium oils were rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (0.1%–42%, linalool (<0.1%–56%, a-pinene (3%–17%, b-pinene (4%–31%, and (E-nerolidol (0.1%–20%. Hedychium oils had no antifungal effect on C. gloeosporioides, C. fragariae, and C. acutatum, but most Hedychium oils effectively killed azalea lace bugs. The oils also show promise as an adult mosquito repellent, but they would make rather poor larvicides or adulticides for mosquito control. Hedychium oils acted either as a fire ant repellent or attractant, depending on plant genotype and oil concentration.

  18. Recovery of aroma compounds from orange essential oil

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    Haypek E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the recovery of aroma compounds present in the orange essential oil using experimental data from CUTRALE (a Brazilian Industry of Concentrated Orange Juice. The intention was to reproduce the industrial unit and afterwards to optimize the recovery of aroma compounds from orange essential oil by liquid-liquid extraction. The orange oil deterpenation was simulated using the commercial software PRO/II 4.0 version 1.0. The UNIFAC model was chosen for the calculation of the activity coefficients.

  19. Essential Oils of Root of Stahlianthus campanulatus O. Kuzt

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    Do N. Dai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of volatiles from the root of Stahlianthus campanulatus O. Kuzt (Zingiberaceae has been studied. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC (FID and GC-MS. The components by identified by MS libraries and their LRIs. The major constituents of the oil were stahlianthusone (27.6%, a -copaene (16.7% and camphor (14.7%. The chemical compositions of the essential oil of S. campanulatus are being reported for the first time.

  20. GC Analyses of Salvia Seeds as Valuable Essential Oil Source

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    Mouna Ben Taârit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of seeds of Salvia verbenaca, Salvia officinalis, and Salvia sclarea were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and GC-mass spectrometry. The oil yields (w/w were 0.050, 0.047, and 0.045% in S. verbenaca, S. sclarea, and S. officinalis, respectively. Seventy-five compounds were identified. The essential oil composition of S. verbenaca seeds showed that over 57% of the detected compounds were oxygenated monoterpenes followed by sesquiterpenes (24.04% and labdane type diterpenes (5.61%. The main essential oil constituents were camphor (38.94%, caryophyllene oxide (7.28%, and 13-epi-manool (5.61%, while those of essential oil of S. officinalis were α-thujone (14.77%, camphor (13.08%, and 1,8-cineole (6.66%. In samples of S. sclarea, essential oil consists mainly of linalool (24.25%, α-thujene (7.48%, linalyl acetate (6.90%, germacrene-D (5.88%, bicyclogermacrene (4.29%, and α-copaene (4.08%. This variability leads to a large range of naturally occurring volatile compounds with valuable industrial and pharmaceutical outlets.

  1. Biological Activities of the Essential Oil from Erigeron floribundus

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    Riccardo Petrelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Erigeron floribundus (Asteraceae is an herbaceous plant widely used in Cameroonian traditional medicine to treat various diseases of microbial and non-microbial origin. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro biological activities displayed by the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of E. floribundus, namely the antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. Moreover, we investigated the inhibitory effects of E. floribundus essential oil on nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NadD, a promising new target for developing novel antibiotics, and Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for Human African trypanosomiasis. The essential oil composition was dominated by spathulenol (12.2%, caryophyllene oxide (12.4% and limonene (8.8%. The E. floribundus oil showed a good activity against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone diameter, IZD of 14 mm, minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC of 512 µg/mL. Interestingly, it inhibited the NadD enzyme from S. aureus (IC50 of 98 µg/mL, with no effects on mammalian orthologue enzymes. In addition, T. brucei proliferation was inhibited with IC50 values of 33.5 µg/mL with the essential oil and 5.6 µg/mL with the active component limonene. The essential oil exhibited strong cytotoxicity on HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 14.89 µg/mL, and remarkable ferric reducing antioxidant power (tocopherol-equivalent antioxidant capacity, TEAC = 411.9 μmol·TE/g.

  2. Essential oil composition of wild growing Sage from R. Macedonia

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    Gjoshe Stefkov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze and identify the essential oil composition of S. officinalis populations growing in Republic of Macedonia and to evaluate these data according to different standards’ requirements for, commercially most utilized, Dalmatian sage. The essential oil yield, obtained after hydrodestilation from leaves, of three different populations of Salvia officinalis L. from Republic of Macedonia was determined, varying from 1.40 to 3.46%. The GC/FID/MS analysis of the composition of the essential oils revealed 63, 57 and 51 components in Galicica Mtn., Jablanica Mtn. and Karaorman Mtn. sage populations, respectively. The main components of the oil, in all three samples, were the terpene hydrocarbons, encompassing the monoterpenes: camphor (13.15 - 25.91%, α-thujone (19.25 - 26.33%, β-thujone (2.03 - 5.28%, 1,8-cineole (6.51 – 13.60%, α-pinene (0.93 – 1.47%, borneol (1.07 – 4.67%, then sesquiterpenes: trans (E-caryophyllene (1.72 – 5.33%, α-humulene (2.89 – 7.99%, viridiflorol (4.27 – 7.99%, and the diterpene manool (2.13 - 3.79%. Thus, our results for the essential oil composition of sage complied with the reference values specified in the DAC 86 monograph for Salvia essential oil.

  3. Assessing the antibiotic potential of essential oils against Haemophilus ducreyi.

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    Lindeman, Zachary; Waggoner, Molly; Batdorff, Audra; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2014-05-27

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the bacterium responsible for the genital ulcer disease chancroid, a cofactor for the transmission of HIV, and it is resistant to many antibiotics. With the goal of exploring possible alternative treatments, we tested essential oils (EOs) for their efficacy as antimicrobial agents against H. ducreyi. We determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), Eugenia caryophyllus (clove) and Thymus satureioides (thyme) oil against 9 strains of H. ducreyi using the agar dilution method. We also determined the minimum lethal concentration for each oil by subculturing from the MIC plates onto fresh agar without essential oil. For both tests, we used a 2-way ANOVA to evaluate whether antibiotic-resistant strains had a different sensitivity to the oils relative to non-resistant strains. All 3 oils demonstrated excellent activity against H. ducreyi, with MICs of 0.05 to 0.52 mg/mL and MLCs of 0.1-0.5 mg/mL. Antibiotic-resistant strains of H. ducreyi were equally susceptible to these 3 essential oils relative to non-resistant strains (p=0.409). E. caryophyllus, C. verum and T. satureioides oils are promising alternatives to antibiotic treatment for chancroid.

  4. HIGH PRESSURE PHASE EQUILIBRIUM: PREDICTION OF ESSENTIAL OIL SOLUBILITY

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    CARDOZO-FILHO Lúcio

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a method to predict the solubility of essential oils in supercritical carbon dioxide. The method is based on the formulation proposed in 1979 by Asselineau, Bogdanic and Vidal. The Peng-Robinson and Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equations of state were used with the van der Waals mixing rules with two interaction parameters. Method validation was accomplished calculating orange essential oil solubility in pressurized carbon dioxide. The solubility of orange essential oil in carbon dioxide calculated at 308.15 K for pressures of 50 to 70 bar varied from 1.7± 0.1 to 3.6± 0.1 mg/g. For same the range of conditions, experimental solubility varied from 1.7± 0.1 to 3.6± 0.1 mg/g. Predicted values were not very sensitive to initial oil composition.

  5. Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa.

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    Jin, Yinzhe; Han, Dandan; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung-Ho

    2010-03-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction and hydrodistillation (HD) were used to determine the essential oil composition of the trunks and leaves of Chamaecyparis obtusa. The optimal extraction conditions for the oil yield within the experimental range of variables examined were temperature 50 degrees C, pressure 12 MPa, carbon dioxide flow rate 40 mL/min and extraction time 90 min. The maximum measured extraction yield was 2.9%. Entrainer solvents, such as methanol in water, had no additional effect on the extraction of essential oils. The chemical composition of the essential oils was analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were alpha-terpinyl acetate (>10.9%), 1-muurolol (>13.2%) and elemol (>8.1%). Sesquiterpenoids formed the major class of compounds present.

  6. Amtimicrobial activity of essential oil of Melissa officinalis L, Lamiaceae

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    Aničić Nada V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melissa officinalis was investigated in this paper. The essential oil was obtained by the principle of water and steam and analyzed by GC and GC-MS using FID and MSD. The main components of the oil of Melissa officinalis were geranial (17.30%, neral (14.70% and citronellal (10.70%. The antimicrobial properties were tested against the following bacterial species: B subtilis, B.cereus Bifidobacterium sp., Corynobacterium sp., E. coli, Klebsiella sp., L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, Listeria monocytogenes, P. vulgaris, P. aerugenosa, S. enteritidis, Shigella sp., S. aureus, and fungi Candida albicans, Alternarija sp. and Aspergillus niger. The diffusion technique was used for testing: the antimicrobial activity, and the MIC was determined by the broth dilution method. The essential oil of M. officinalis showed high antimicrobial activity.

  7. [Chemical composition of the essential oil from melissa].

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    Tittel, G; Wagner, H; Bos, R

    1982-10-01

    Different oil-samples of Melissa officinalis L. were analysed by capillary GC/MS, using fused silica columns and E.I.-Mass-spectrometry. Comparing the observed mass-spectra with those of a spectral collection, 70 compounds of the oil were identified. Geranial, neral, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, citronellal, geranyl-acetate, beta-caryophyllene, and beta-caryophyllene-oxide comprise about 96%. The fingerprint of the capillary gas-chromatogramm permitted differentiation of the essential oil of Melissa officinalis, Cymbopogon winterianus and Nepeta cataria var. citriodora., as well as a standardisation of pharmaceutical preparations containing Melissa oil.

  8. Essential oil of Curcuma longa inhibits Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoi; Chang, Byoung-Soo; Ra, Ji-Young; Moon, Hae-Dalma; Seo, Bo-Ra; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) has been used as a spice in foods and as an antimicrobial in Oriental medicine. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of an essential oil isolated from C. longa on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), which is an important bacterium in dental plaque and dental caries formation. First, the inhibitory effects of C. longa essential oil on the growth and acid production of S. mutans were tested. Next, the effect of C. longa essential oil on adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HAs) was investigated. C. longa essential oil inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mg/mL. The essential oil also exhibited significant inhibition of S. mutans adherence to S-HAs at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. The essential oil of C. longa inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. The components of C. longa essential oil were then analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the major components were α-turmerone (35.59%), germacrone (19.02%), α-zingiberene (8.74%), αr-turmerone (6.31%), trans-β-elemenone (5.65%), curlone (5.45%), and β-sesquiphellandrene (4.73%). These results suggest that C. longa may inhibit the cariogenic properties of S. mutans. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. ENTEROCOCCI AND THEIR RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS AND THYME ESSENTIAL OIL

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    Viera Ducková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are important part of microflora of food animal origin. They have positive (probiotic effect, production flavor compounds during food ripening and also negative (production biogenic amine, antibiotic resistance, biofilm production properties. The aim of this work was to determine resistance to different concentrations of thyme essential oil and antibiotic resistance of enterococci isolated from pork (n=3 and poultry (n=17. The antibiotic resistance of isolates was determined by disc diffusion method and the antibacterial effect of thyme essential oil was assayed by a microdilution method in 96-well microtitration plates after determination of absorbance at 630 nm (A630. Of 20 tested enterococci, 85 % were resistant to tetracycline, 35 % to erythromycin, 15 % to ampicillin and 5 % to gentamicin. No resistance to vancomycin was detected. All tested strains of enterococci were able to grow and reproduce at concentrations of thyme essential oil 0.033 % and 0.066 %. Inhibitory effect of thyme essential oil began at a concentration of 0.099 %, but only for 10 % of the tested strains. Even the highest concentration tested thyme essential oil 0.166 % did not inhibit all the tested strains, because 25 % of enterococcal strains continued to grow. No correlation between antibiotic resistance and resistance to the thyme essential oil was detected for tested enterococci. The thyme essential oil has potential for using in food industry to inhibit spoilage or pathogenic microorganisms, but it is necessary to test antimicrobial activity in other in vitro and in vivo experiments and also in experiments with impact on the sensory properties of food.

  10. Potential of sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators

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    Jailson do C. Alves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies concerning the tolerance, absorption and distribution of heavy metals in plants are essential for the success of phytoremediation programs. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the potential of the sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators. The species were grown in nutrient solution containing increasing doses of Pb (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg L-1 during a 30-day exposure period. A completely randomized split-plot design was used, with a 4 x 5 factorial and three replicates. Significant reductions of dry matter of the root, shoot and whole plant were found in the all species under study as a function of the increased Pb doses. Vetiver showed higher tolerance to Pb contamination; sunflower and castor bean had intermediate tolerance and the common buckwheat proved to be the most sensitive species. The concentration and total content of Pb in plant compartments were significantly affected by the increased Pb doses in solution, and higher accumulation of this element was observed, in general, in the roots of the studied species. Common buckwheat proved to be not much promising for Pb-phytoremediation programs; sunflower showed potential for Pb phytoextraction and castor bean and vetiver were the most appropriate for Pb phytostabilization.

  11. Impact of essential oils on mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea

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    Slavko Grgić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 22 essential oils (anise, thyme, cumin, peppermint, lavender, sage, lemon balm, rosemary, myrtle, cinnamon leaf, basil, white pine, eucalyptus, cedar, bergamot, mandarin, cypress, patchouli, ginger, bitter orange, sandalwood, camphor on the growth of gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea. The experiment was performed in vitro on PDA medium in 2 repetitions. Oils were applied in three amounts (3, 5 and 7 μl, and the mycelial growth was measured after three and nine days of incubation. All oils, except oils of bitter orange, sandalwood and camphor, have shown a certain antifungal activity. Compared to the water control, thyme and anise oil have shown the best antifungal activity, while for oils of bitter orange, sandalwood and camphor a stimulating effect on a growth of fungus B. cinerea was determined.

  12. SEDATION OF NILE TILAPIA WITH ESSENTIAL OILS: TEA TREE, CLOVE, EUCALYPTUS, AND MINT OILS

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    FABRÍCIO PEREIRA REZENDE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have been extensively used in many commercial applications, one of them being anesthetics. The effect of four essential oils (tea tree, clove, eucalyptus, and mint oils on the sedation, recovery, and behavioral stress of Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus was evaluated. The sedative solutions, prepared with essential oils and anhydrous ethanol (1:4, were used for fish management procedures at a dose of 7.4 mL L - 1 in a completely randomized block design with four treatments and seven replicates. The means were compared using Scott – Knott test (P < 0.05. Clove oil was found to be the most suitable oil for the immobilization of Nile tilapia; however, behavioral observations indicate that tea tree oil was the most efficient in reducing stress.

  13. Authentication of Concentrated Orange Essential Oils Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

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    López Muñoz, G. A.; Balderas López, J. A.; López González, R. F.

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PS) was used to study the thermal diffusivity and its relation with the composition in folded (concentrated) cold-pressed Mexican orange essential oils. A linear relation between the amplitude (on a semi-log scale) and phase, as functions of the sample thickness, for PS was obtained through a theoretical model to fit the experimental data for thermal-diffusivity measurements in concentrated orange essential oils. Experimental results showed a linear increase in thermal-diffusivity values with the folding degree: 5-fold, 10-fold, 20-fold, and 35-fold due to a decrease in terpenes (mainly D-limonene) related with the folding process that can be correlated with the thermal diffusivity of the orange essential oils. The obtained values in this study and those previously reported (see Int. J. Thermophys. 32, 1066, 2011) showed the possibility of using this thermal property to make distinctions between citrus oils obtained by different extraction processes and also between concentrated citrus oils. This provides the viability of a new complementary method for this purpose, contrasting with the use of density and refraction index, physical properties commonly used in the authentication of citrus essential oils.

  14. Essential oils used in aromatherapy: A systemic review

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    Babar Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, use of alternative and complementary therapies with mainstream medicine has gained the momentum. Aromatherapy is one of the complementary therapies which use essential oils as the major therapeutic agents to treat several diseases. The essential or volatile oils are extracted from the flowers, barks, stem, leaves, roots, fruits and other parts of the plant by various methods. It came into existence after the scientists deciphered the antiseptic and skin permeability properties of essential oils. Inhalation, local application and baths are the major methods used in aromatherapy that utilize these oils to penetrate the human skin surface with marked aura. Once the oils are in the system, they remodulate themselves and work in a friendly manner at the site of malfunction or at the affected area. This type of therapy utilizes various permutation and combinations to get relief from numerous ailments like depression, indigestion, headache, insomnia, muscular pain, respiratory problems, skin ailments, swollen joints, urine associated complications etc. The essential oils are found to be more beneficial when other aspects of life and diet are given due consideration. This review explores the information available in the literature regarding therapeutic, medical, cosmetic, psychological, olfactory, massage aromatherapy, safety issues and different plants used in aromatherapy. All the available information was compiled from electronic databases such as Academic Journals, Ethnobotany, Google Scholar, PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, and library search.

  15. Acceptance and storage of fresh cheese made with essential oils

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    Joelmir Grassi Presente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the acceptance and conservation of Minas fresh cheese with essential oils added of oregano and ginger in its formulation. The quality of the milk used as raw material was evaluated for pH, acidity, alizarol, total solids, density, and total microbial load. The cheeses produced were characterized as pH, acidity, moisture, lipids, proteins and ashes. The cheeses were also evaluated by sensorial affective tests using hedonic and attitude scales, in order to determine the acceptance and purchase intention by judges. The count of total aerobic mesophilic microorganisms was used to estimate the shelf-life of cheeses. The milk used as raw material is presented within the quality standards required by legislation. The cheeses made with essential oils showed pH and acidity around 6.9 and 0.87%, respectively, 57.6% moisture, 31.3% lipids, 11.4% protein and 0.9% ash. The cheese added essential oil of oregano and the control cheese were those given by the judges the best values for acceptance (7.5 and 7.6, respectively and purchase intention (4.2 and 4.4 respectively. Regarding the estimated shelf-life, the cheeses added essential oil of oregano and ginger had lower overall microbial load values compared to the control (no oil and mixed (two oils addition, presented counts values with up 106 UFC/g only from the 28th day of storage.

  16. Tick repellent substances in the essential oil of Tanacetum vulgare.

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    Pålsson, Katinka; Jaenson, Thomas G T; Baeckström, Peter; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2008-01-01

    The repellent effect of the essential oils of flower heads of the aromatic plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare L. (Asteraceae), originating from Sweden, was tested against host-seeking nymphs of the common tick Ixodes ricinus (L.). The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation (SD) and by using an online solvent extraction separation setup. Further fractionations of the SD oils were obtained by medium-pressure liquid chromatography on silica gel. The volatiles of the essential oils and the fractions that exhibited strong tick repellency (90-100%) were collected by solid phase microextraction and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chemical analyses of the oils show that the populations of T. vulgare from Uppsala and Stockholm may represent different chemotypes, but that they exhibited similar tick repellency. Main volatiles detected from oils of T. vulgare collected at Uppsala were alpha-pinene (27%), beta-pinene (11%), pinocamphone (11%), 1,3,3-trimethylcyclohex-1-ene-4-carboxaldehyde (11%), and 1,8-cineole (10%). In the sample collected in Stockholm, the main components were beta-thujone (39%) and camphor (23%) followed by alpha-thujone (11%) and 1,8-cineole (8%). When constituents in the oils, e.g., alpha-terpineol, 4-terpineol, alpha+beta-thujone, 1,8-cineol, verbenol, and verbenone, were tested separately (each diluted 0.5%, vol:vol), 64-72% tick repellency was obtained.

  17. Chemical Composition and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Blepharocalyx salicifolius

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    Fabiana Barcelos Furtado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a source of biologically active molecules that have an important role in drug discovery. The aromatic plant Blepharocalyx salicifolius has a diverse chemical constitution but the biological activities of its essential oils have not been thoroughly investigated. The aims of this paper were to evaluate in vitro cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of an essential oil from leaves of B. salicifolius and to identify its main chemical constituents. The essential oil was extracted by steam distillation, chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and biological activities were performed by a microdilution broth method. The yield of essential oil was 0.86% (w/w, and the main constituents identified were bicyclogermacrene (17.50%, globulol (14.13%, viridiflorol (8.83%, γ-eudesmol (7.89% and α-eudesmol (6.88%. The essential oil was cytotoxic against the MDA-MB-231 (46.60 μg·mL−1 breast cancer cell line, being more selective for this cell type compared to the normal breast cell line MCF-10A (314.44 μg·mL−1. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity results showed that this oil does not act by inducing cell death, but rather by impairment of cellular metabolism specifically of the cancer cells. Furthermore, it presented antifungal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (156.25 μg·mL−1 but was inactive against other fungi and bacteria. Essential oil from B. salicifolius showed promising biological activities and is therefore a source of molecules to be exploited in medicine or by the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Chemical Composition and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Blepharocalyx salicifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Fabiana Barcelos; Borges, Bruna Cristina; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Garces, Hans Garcia; Almeida Junior, Luiz Domingues de; Alves, Fernanda Cristina Bérgamo; Silva, Claudio Vieira da; Fernandes Junior, Ary

    2018-01-04

    Natural products represent a source of biologically active molecules that have an important role in drug discovery. The aromatic plant Blepharocalyx salicifolius has a diverse chemical constitution but the biological activities of its essential oils have not been thoroughly investigated. The aims of this paper were to evaluate in vitro cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of an essential oil from leaves of B. salicifolius and to identify its main chemical constituents. The essential oil was extracted by steam distillation, chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and biological activities were performed by a microdilution broth method. The yield of essential oil was 0.86% (w/w), and the main constituents identified were bicyclogermacrene (17.50%), globulol (14.13%), viridiflorol (8.83%), γ-eudesmol (7.89%) and α-eudesmol (6.88%). The essential oil was cytotoxic against the MDA-MB-231 (46.60 μg·mL-1) breast cancer cell line, being more selective for this cell type compared to the normal breast cell line MCF-10A (314.44 μg·mL-1). Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity results showed that this oil does not act by inducing cell death, but rather by impairment of cellular metabolism specifically of the cancer cells. Furthermore, it presented antifungal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (156.25 μg·mL-1) but was inactive against other fungi and bacteria. Essential oil from B. salicifolius showed promising biological activities and is therefore a source of molecules to be exploited in medicine or by the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. Ultrasound pretreatment as an alternative to improve essential oils extraction

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    Flávia Michelon Dalla Nora

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Essential oils are substances originated from plants in general. These compounds are well known to have a high biological activity, specially the antioxidant and antimicrobial. Several extraction techniques are employed to obtain these substances. However, the majority of these techniques require a long extraction time. In this sense, innovative and alternative extraction techniques, such as ultrasound, have recently been the target of studies. In view of the small amount of publications using ultrasonic pretreatment, this review aimed to congregate current relevant information on ultrasound-assisted extraction of essential oils. In this sense, theoretical aspects, such as the main factors that influence the performance of this technique as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the use of ultrasound as an environmental friendly alternative technique to improve the extraction of essential oil in comparison to traditional methods, are shown. Considering the available studies in the literature on essential oil extraction using ultrasonic pretreatment, low frequencies ranged from 20 to 50kWz and times ranged from 20 to 40min were used. The use of ultrasonic pretreatment represents a time reduction to near 70% in relation to the conventional hydrodistillation. Also, these conditions enabled a growth in the extraction of bioactive compounds and consequently improving the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of essential oils.

  20. Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil: antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Anwar, Farooq; Chatha, Shahzad Ali Shahid; Jabbar, Abdul; Mahboob, Shahid; Nigam, Poonam Singh

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate and compare the antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil, native to Pakistan. The essential oil content from the leaves of R. officinalis was 0.93 g 100g-1. The GC and GC-MS analysis revealed that the major components determined in R. officinalis essential oil were 1,8-cineol (38.5%), camphor (17.1%), α-pinene (12.3%), limonene (6.23%), camphene (6.00%) and linalool (5.70%). The antiproliferative activity was tested against two cancer (MCF-7 and LNCaP) and one fibroblast cell line (NIH-3T3) using the MTT assay, while, the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the reduction of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and measuring percent inhibition of peroxidation in linoleic acid system. The disc diffusion and modified resazurin microtitre-plate assays were used to evaluate the inhibition zones (IZ) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of R. officinalis essential oil, respectively. It is concluded from the results that Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil exhibited antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:24031588

  1. Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil: antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ijaz Hussain

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate and compare the antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil, native to Pakistan. The essential oil content from the leaves of R. officinalis was 0.93 g 100g-1. The GC and GC-MS analysis revealed that the major components determined in R. officinalis essential oil were 1,8-cineol (38.5%, camphor (17.1%, α-pinene (12.3%, limonene (6.23%, camphene (6.00% and linalool (5.70%. The antiproliferative activity was tested against two cancer (MCF-7 and LNCaP and one fibroblast cell line (NIH-3T3 using the MTT assay, while, the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the reduction of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH and measuring percent inhibition of peroxidation in linoleic acid system. The disc diffusion and modified resazurin microtitre-plate assays were used to evaluate the inhibition zones (IZ and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of R. officinalis essential oil, respectively. It is concluded from the results that Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil exhibited antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

  2. Antimicrobial potential of essential oil from Pastinaca sativa L.

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    Matejić, J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Pastinaca sativa L. (Apiaceae essential oil. The aerial parts of plants were collected at Kopaonik Mountain (Serbia and the essential oil has been isolated by hydrodistillation from this plant material. Essential oil was dominated by (Z-β-ocimene (10.8%, hexyl butanoate (10.4%, (E-β-farnesene (6.1% and lavandulyl acetate (5.2%. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was investigated using a micro-well dilution assay against the most common human gastrointestinal pathogenic microbial strains: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteritidis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and yeast Candida albicans. The results showed that minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentrations of essential oil ranged from 0.72 μg/ml (for the most sensitive B. cereus to above 92.5 mg/ml for S. enteritidis and L. monocytogenes. This finding suggests that P. sativa may be considered as a natural source of antimicrobial agents.

  3. De novo assembly and characterization of root transcriptome in two distinct morphotypes of vetiver, Chrysopogon zizaniodes (L.) Roberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Debasis; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Chauhan, Abhishek Singh; Indoliya, Yuvraj; Lavania, Umesh Chandra; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-12-18

    Vetiver, a perennial C4 grass, has long been known for its multifarious uses in perfumery, medicine and environmental protection. Two distinct vetiver morphotypes have been identified in India, i.e., A. North Indian type characterized by thick and smooth fast growing roots that produce superior quality of laevorotatory oil; and B. South Indian type with more number of thin and hairy roots that produce inferior quality of dextrorotatory oil. The two morphotypes were targeted for transcriptome analysis to understand the contribution of genetic background on oil quality and root morphology. Sample A showed enhanced activity of flavonoid and terpenoid biosynthesis related genes, i.e. ERF, MYB, bHLH, bZIP and WRKY. Interestingly, expression analysis revealed that the genes involved in sesquiterpene biosynthesis pathway were up regulated in Sample A. Moreover, some of the genes involved in mevalonate pathway of sesquiterpene biosynthesis were unique to Sample A. Our results also demonstrated several transcripts involved in root development and hormonal regulation being up regulated in Sample A. To validate gene expression results of RNA-seq data, 20 transcripts were validated by qRT-PCR experiment. The present study provided an important start point for further discovery of genes related to root oil quality in different ecotypes of vetiver.

  4. Evaluation of massage with essential oils on childhood atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C; Lis-Balchin, M; Kirk-Smith, M

    2000-09-01

    Childhood atopic eczema is an increasingly common condition in young children. As well as being irritating to the child, it causes sleepless nights for both the child and the family and leads to difficulties in parental relationships and can have severe effects on employment. A group of eight children, born to professional working mothers were studied to test the hypothesis that massage with essential oils (aromatherapy) used as a complementary therapy in conjunction with normal medical treatment, would help to alleviate the symptoms of childhood atopic eczema. The children were randomly allocated to the massage with essential oils group and both counselled and massaged with a mixture of essential oils by the therapist once a week and the mother every day over a period of 8 weeks. The preferred essential oils, chosen by the mothers for their child, from 36 commonly used aromatherapy oils, were: sweet marjoram, frankinsence, German chamomile, myrrh, thyme, benzoin, spike lavender and Litsea cubeba. A control group of children received the counselling and massage without essential oils. The treatments were evaluated by means of daily day-time irritation scores and night time disturbance scores, determined by the mother before and during the treatment, both over an 8 week period; finally general improvement scores were allocated 2 weeks after the treatment by the therapist, the general practitioner and the mother. The study employed a single case experimental design across subjects, such that there were both a within-subject control and between-subjects control, through the interventions being introduced at different times. The results showed a significant improvement in the eczema in the two groups of children following therapy, but there was no significant difference in improvement shown between the aromatherapy massage and massage only group. Thus there is evidence that tactile contact between mother and child benefits the symptoms of atopic eczema but there is no

  5. Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles for essential oil encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Erick F; Paula, Haroldo C B; de Paula, Regina C M

    2014-01-01

    Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles were prepared via spray-drying, aiming at the development of a biopolymer blend for encapsulation of an essential oil. Nanoparticles were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic volume, surface charge, Lippia sidoides essential oil content and release profile, in addition to being analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis (TGA/DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. Nanoparticles in solution were found to have averaged sizes in the range 223-399 nm, and zeta potential values ranging from -30 to -36 mV. Encapsulated oil levels varied from 1.9 to 4.4% with an encapsulation efficiency of up to 55%. The in vitro release profile showed that between 45 and 95% of oil was released within 30-50h. Kinetic studies revealed that release pattern follow a Korsmeyer-Peppas mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Essential oil composition of Inula britannica L. from Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Milka; Trendafilova, Antoaneta; Ivanova, Viktoria; Danova, Kalina; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2017-07-01

    The separately distilled flowers (F) and leaves' (L) essential oils of Inula britannica L. were investigated using capillary gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 83 constituents, representing 96.91% (F) and 96.73% (L) of the total oils, were registered. The oils were rich in terpenoids (57.85% and 77.28%), of which sesquiterpenoids dominated. The main constituents of the essential oils were viridiflorol (7.17%-8.20%) and himachalol (3.45%-8.71%) followed by 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone (5.43%-2.95%), 13-tetradecanolide (3.93%-4.87%) and 3-methyl-4-propyl-2,5-furandione (4.06%-0.29%).

  7. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  8. Citrus bergamia essential oil: from basic research to clinical application

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    Michele eNavarra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau, also known as Bergamot, is a plant belonging to the Rutaceae family, defined as a hybrid of bitter orange and lemon. It is an endemic plant of the Calabria region (Italy. Bergamot fruit is primarily used for the extraction of its essential oil (bergamot essential oil: BEO, employed in perfume, cosmetics, food and confections.The aim of this review was to collect recent data from the literature on Citrus bergamia essential oil and, through a critical analysis, focus on safety and the beneficial effects on human health. Clinical studies on the therapeutic applications of BEO exclusively focus on the field of aromatherapy, suggesting that its use can be useful for reducing anxiety and stress.

  9. Antifungal activity of essential oil from Artemisia afra Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundidza, M

    1993-07-01

    Artemisia afra is indigenous to the eastern highlands of Zimbabwe where it is used in folk medicine. Hydro-distilled volatile oil from the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antifungal activity against 10 fungal species using the dry weight method. The results obtained showed that the essential oil exhibited significant activity against Aspergillus ochraceus, Candida albicans, Alternaria alternata, Geotrichum candidum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrium and Aspergillus parasiticus.

  10. Seasonal variability of essential oils of Eugenia uniflora leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Deomar P.; Santos, Suzana C.; Seraphin, José C.; Ferri, Pedro H.

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influence on the chemical composition of essential oils of Eugenia uniflora leaves with red-orange fruit colour biotype has indicated the presence of two oil clusters in the two seasons of the Brazilian Cerrado. Cluster I included samples collected during dry months (April-September) which were characterized by the highest percentages of spathulenol (10%) and caryophyllene oxide (4.1%). In cluster II, whose samples were collected during wet months (October-March), the major constitue...

  11. Essential oil composition of four Artemisia species from Ethiopia

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    N. Asfaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil composition of four Artemisia species, namely A. schimperi Sch. Bip. ex Engl. A. abyssinica Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. (previously called A. rehan from Ethiopia has been studied. The essential oil obtained from A. absinthium (seedling from Europe grown in two places in Ethiopia (Addis Ababa and Butajira was also analyzed for comparison. Morphological study on the leaves of A. absinthium L. from Ethiopia (previously called A. rehan and A. absinthium (from Europe was also conducted. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by capillary GC and GC/MS. Forty three compounds representing 76 to 94% of the oils were identified. The composition of the essential oils of A. schimperi, A. afra and A. abyssinica are mainly dominated by irregular monoterpenes: yogomi alcohol (13.5-37.6%, artemisyl acetate (12.7-35.5%, and artemisia ketone (2.3-13.2%. The composition of the oil of A. absinthium (previously A. rehan however, differs from the other three species in having camphor (21.2-28.3% and davanone (21.3-26.5% as major components. The composition of A. absinthum (Europe was found to have β-thujone (42.3-66.4% and chamazulene (11.3-24.2% as major components. The study indicated that the composition of the essential oil of A. absinthium (previously A. rehan is not only different from the other three species but also from A. absinthium from Europe and does not belong to any of the chemotypes described for the species in the literature. The morphological study on the leaves also showed that it differs from that of A. absinthium from Europe. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v29i1.11

  12. Chemical composition and antimicrobial evaluation of Achillea aucheri essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The majority of the Achillea spp. are used as medicinal plants with therapeutic applications worldwide. Achillea aucheri was selected in our study to assess its essential oil chemical composition along with antimicrobial evaluation. Methods: The essential oil of A. aucheri achieved through hydrodistillation, was analyzed via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Afterwards, the microbial growth inhibitory property of the A. aucheri essential oil was determined using the agar disk-diffusion method against five Gram-positive strains (Staphylococus aureus, Staphylococus epidermidis, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, three Gram-negative bacteria (Eschrichia coli, Psedumonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and a fungus (Candida albicans. Besides, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the sensitive strains were determined by broth dilution method to evaluate the inhibitory properties.Results: The GC-MS analysis, allowed us to identify 28 compounds, representing 98.1% of the total essential oil. The main components of the oil were identified as α-thujone (45.6%, artemisia alcohol (26.5% and yomogi alcohol (8.8%. The findings of the antimicrobial assay indicated that S. aureus was the most sensitive strain with the strongest inhibition zone of 31.5 ± 0.5 and MIC of 2.5 % v/v, followed by S. epidermidis and M. luteus, respectively.Conclusion: Overall, A. aucheri essential oil possessed potential antibacterial and antioxidant activities that could be attributed to the high content of oxygenated monoterpenes present in the oil which requisite for further exploration of the compounds in charge, considering the growing statistics of bacterial resistance worldwide.

  13. Formulation of essential oil-loaded chitosan–alginate nanocapsules

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    Dheebika Natrajan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring polymers such as alginate (AL and chitosan (CS are widely used in biomedical and pharmaceutical fields in various forms such as nanoparticles, capsules, and emulsions. These polymers have attractive applications in drug delivery because of their biodegradability, biocompatibility, and nontoxic nature. The pharmaceutical applications of essential oils such as turmeric oil and lemongrass oil are well-known, and their active components, ar-turmerone and citral, respectively, are known for their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic properties. However, these essential oils are unstable, volatile, and insoluble in water, which limits their use for new formulations. Therefore, this study focuses on developing a CS–AL nanocarrier for the encapsulation of essential oils. The effects of process parameters such as the effect of heat and the concentrations of AL and CS were investigated. Various physicochemical characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy were performed. Results of characterization studies showed that 0.3 mg/mL AL and 0.6 mg/mL CS produced minimum-sized particles (<300 nm with good stability. It was also confirmed that the oil-loaded nanocapsules were hemocompatible, suggesting their use for future biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Furthermore, the antiproliferative activity of turmeric oil- and lemongrass oil-loaded nanocapsules was estimated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay in A549 cell lines and it was found that both the nanoformulations had significant antiproliferative properties than the bare oil.

  14. Evaluation of bacterial resistance to essential oils and antibiotics after exposure to oregano and cinnamon essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Raquel; Nerín, Cristina; Gómez-Lus, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are excellent antimicrobial agents sometimes used in active food packaging. This work studies the susceptibility of 48 clinical isolates and 12 reference strains of Gram-negative bacilli to oregano essential oil, cinnamon essential oil, and combinations of both. Furthermore, the tendency of the clinical isolates to develop resistance to these EOs and to different antibiotics after sequential oregano or cinnamon exposure was studied. For this purpose, antibiotic susceptibility (through disk diffusion assays and minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] determination) and oregano and cinnamon susceptibility (through MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration [MBC] determination) were compared after 50 passages in the presence or absence of subinhibitory concentrations of oregano and cinnamon essential oils. The results showed that all strains were susceptible to both EOs and their combination independently of the antibiotic resistance profile. In addition, neither synergistic nor antagonistic effects were observed between oregano and cinnamon essential oils at the concentrations tested. After the sequential exposure to both EOs, only Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, and Proteus mirabilis treated with oregano changed their antibiotic resistance profile and/or increased their resistance to this EO. However, the changes in antibiotic and oregano resistance were not related.

  15. Use of oregano ( Origanum onites L.) essential oil as hatching egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After chemical analysis, the main constituents of oregano essential oil were carvacrol, linalool, para-cymene and -terpinene. The lowest microbial counts on eggs were obtained from oregano essential oil. Microbial inhibition increased with the increasing essential oil concentrations. Essential oil exposure times had no ...

  16. 40 CFR 454.50 - Applicability; description of the essential oils subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... essential oils subcategory. 454.50 Section 454.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Essential Oils Subcategory § 454.50 Applicability; description of the essential oils subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of essential oils. ...

  17. Antifungal Properties of Chenopodium ambrosioides Essential Oil Against Candida Species

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    Gerard Vilarem

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of the aerial part (leaves, flowers and stem of Chenopodium ambrosioides was obtained by hydrodistillation and its chemical composition analyzed by GC and GC/MS, which permitted the identification of 14 components, representing 98.8% of the total oil. Major components were α-terpinene (51.3%, p-cymene (23.4% and p-mentha-1,8-diène (15.3%. The antifungal properties of this essential oil were investigated in vitro by the well diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The in vitro antifungal activity was concentration dependent and minimum inhibitory concentration values varied from 0.25 to 2 mg/mL. The in vivo antifungal activity was evaluated on an induced vaginal candidiasis rat model. The in vivo activity of the oil on mice vaginal candidiasis was not dose-dependent. Indeed, all the three tested doses; 0.1%, 1% and 10% led to the recovery of mice from the induced infection after 12 days of treatment. The effect of the essential oil on C. albicans ATCC 1663 fatty acid profile was studied. This oil has a relatively important dose-dependent effect on the fatty acids profile.

  18. Carbonyl species characteristics during the evaporation of essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Lai, Yen-Ming; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2010-06-01

    Carbonyls emitted from essential oils can affect the air quality when they are used in indoors, especially under poor ventilation conditions. Lavender, lemon, rose, rosemary, and tea tree oils were selected as typical and popular essential oils to investigate in terms of composition, thermal characteristics and fifteen carbonyl constituents. Based on thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, the activation energy was 7.6-8.3 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.7 and the frequency factor was 360-2838 min -1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, and propionaldehyde were the dominant carbonyl compounds, and their concentrations were 0.034-0.170 ppm. The emission factors of carbonyl compounds were 2.10-3.70 mg g -1, and acetone, propionaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde accounted for a high portion of the emission factor of carbonyl compounds in essential oil exhaust. Some unhealthy carbonyl species such as formaldehyde and valeraldehyde, were measured at low-temperature during the vaporization of essential oils, indicating a potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  19. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil

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    Pavel Novy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae, is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47% as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%, myristic acid (4.71%, linalool (4.65%, and anethole (4.09%. The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Schinus molle Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundidza, M

    1993-11-01

    The essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus molle isolated by hydrodistillation was tested for antibacterial activity using the hole plate diffusion method and for antifungal activity using the mycelium or single cell growth inhibition method. Results obtained showed that the volatile oil exhibited significant activity against the following bacterial species: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Leuconostoc cremoris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium sporogenes, Acinetobacter calcoacetica, Escherichia coli, Beneckea natriegens, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis and Brochothrix thermosphacata. The fungal species Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata exhibited significant sensitivity to the volatile oil.

  1. Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oils from Thymus vulgaris

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    S.A.B. Vieira de Melo

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris leaves was studied using experimental data recently obtained in the Florys S.p.A. laboratory. Mass transfer coefficients in the supercritical and solid phases from extraction curves at 40°C and 20 MPa were evaluated using a mathematical model based on the local adsorption equilibrium of essential oil on lipid in leaves. The adsorption equilibrium constant was fitted to these experimental data, and internal and external mass transfer resistances were calculated, allowing identification of the mechanism controlling the extraction process.

  2. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil: Chemistry and biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Mr. Shyamapada; Mandal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum) is one of the most useful essential oil bearing spices as well as medicinal plants, belonging to the family Umbelliferae/Apiaceae. The leaves and seeds of the plant are widely used in folk medicine in addition to its use as a seasoning in food preparation. The C. sativum essential oil and extracts possess promising antibacterial, antifungal and anti-oxidative activities as various chemical components in different parts of the plant, which thus play a great r...

  3. Antifungal activities of selected essential oils against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici 1322, with emphasis on Syzygium aromaticum essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Rajendran, Sasireka; Srivastava, Ankit; Sharma, Satyawati; Kundu, Bishwajit

    2017-03-01

    The antifungal effects of four essential oils viz., clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), mint (Mentha × piperita) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) were evaluated against wilt causing fungus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici 1322. The inhibitory effect of oils showed dose-dependent activity on the tested fungus. Most active being the clove oil, exhibiting complete inhibition of mycelial growth and spore germination at 125 ppm with IC50 value of 18.2 and 0.3 ppm, respectively. Essential oils of lemongrass, mint and eucalyptus were inhibitory at relatively higher concentrations. The Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of clove oil was 31.25 ppm by broth microdilution method. Thirty one different compounds of clove oil, constituting approximately ≥99% of the oil, were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. The major components were eugenol (75.41%), E-caryophyllene (15.11%), α-humulene (3.78%) and caryophyllene oxide (1.13%). Effect of clove oil on surface morphology of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici 1322 was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM observation revealed shrivelled hyphae while AFM observation showed shrunken and disrupted spores in clove oil treated samples. In pots, 5% aqueous emulsion of clove oil controlled F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici 1322 infection on tomato plants. This study demonstrated clove oil as potent antifungal agent that could be used as biofungicide for the control of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in both preventive and therapeutic manner. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Toxicity of essential and non-essential oils against the chewing louse, Bovicola (Werneckiella) ocellatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, R; Wall, R

    2012-10-01

    The toxicity of six plant essential oils to the chewing louse, Bovicola (Werneckiella) ocellatus collected from donkeys, was examined in laboratory bioassays. The oils examined were: tea-tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), peppermint (Mentha piperita), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labillardiere), clove bud (Eugenia caryophyllata) and camphor (Cinnamomum camphora). All except camphor oil showed high levels of toxicity, with significant dose-dependent mortality and an LC(50) at concentrations of below 2% (v/v). Hundred percent mortality was achieved at concentrations of 5-10% (v/v). Two essential oil components: eugenol and (+)-terpinen-4-ol showed similar levels of toxicity. The data suggest that these botanical products may offer environmentally and toxicologically safe, alternative veterinary pediculicides for the control of ectoparasitic lice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spin trapping studies of essential oils in lipid systems

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    Makarova Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report the results of a spin trapping ESR study of four essential oils widely used for skin care products such as creams and bath salts. The studied essential oils are Rosmarini aetheroleum (rosemary, Menthae piperitae aetheroleum (mint, Lavandulae aetheroleum (lavender, and Thymi aetheroleum (thyme. Fenton reaction in the presence of ethanol was used to generate free radicals. The N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN was used as a spin trap. In the Fenton reaction, the rosemary oil had the lowest effect on radical adduct formation as compared to the reference Fenton system. Since essential oils are known to be lipid soluble, we also conducted studies of essential oils in Fenton reaction in the presence of lipids. Two model lipids were used, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC. The obtained results suggested that in the presence of DOPC lipids, the •OH and PBN/•CHCH3(OH radicals are formed in both phases, that is, water and lipids, and all the studied essential oils affected the Fenton reaction in a similar way. Whereas, in the DPPC system, the additional type of PBN/X (aN = 16.1 G, aH = 2.9 G radical adduct was generated. DFT calculations of hyperfine splittings were performed at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p/EPR-II level of theory for the set of c-centered PBN adducts in order to identify PBN/X radical.

  6. Inhibition of lard oxidation by fractions of different essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos, Mladen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit lard oxidation by the essential oils of Origanum vulgare L. spp. hirtum , Thymus vulgaris L., Thymus serpyllum L., Satureja montana L. and Satureja cuneifolia Ten. was examined. Except Satureja cuneifoila Ten. essential oil, all the essential oils studied showed a strong phenolic profile characterized by the presence of phenolic monoterpenes - thymol and carvacrol. The Rancimat method has been applied on lard spiked with essential oils and their fractions. The ability of the essential oils tested and their fractions to act as inhibitors of the lipid oxidation process was lower in comparison with reference antioxidants (BHA and BHT, ascorbic acid and a -tocopherol. The antioxidant effect of the antioxidants tested was dose-dependent. Induction time of pure lard is not effected by the quantity of the oil sample in the reacting system.Se examinó la capacidad de los aceites esenciales de Origanum vulgare L. spp. hirtum , Thymus vulgaris L., Thymus serpyllum L., Satureja montana L. y Satureja cuneifolia Ten. para inhibir la oxidación de la manteca de cerdo pura. Excepto Satureja cuneifolia Ten., todos los aceites esenciales mostraron un acusado perfil fenólico caracterizado por la presencia de fenoles monoterpénicos- timol y carvacrol. El método Rancimat ha sido aplicado a manteca de cerdo sembrada con los aceites esenciales y sus fracciones. La capacidad de los aceites y sus fracciones para actuar como inhibidores de la oxidación de lípidos fue menor en comparación con la de antioxidante sintéticos (BHA y BHT, ácido ascórbico y a -tocoferol. El efecto antioxidante de las sustancias ensayadas dependió de la dosis. El periodo de inducción de la manteca de cerdo pura no se afectó por la cantidad de muestra presente en el sistema de reacción.

  7. The effects of evaporating essential oils on indoor air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huey-Jen; Chao, Chung-Jen; Chang, Ho-Yuan; Wu, Pei-Chih

    Essential oils, predominantly comprised of a group of aromatic chemicals, have attracted increasing attention as they are introduced into indoor environments through various forms of consumer products via different venues. Our study aimed to characterize the profiles and concentrations of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when evaporating essential oils indoors. Three popular essential oils in the market, lavender, eucalyptus, and tea tree, based on a nation-wide questionnaire survey, were tested. Specific aromatic compounds of interest were sampled during evaporating the essential oils, and analyzed by GC-MS. Indoor carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), and particulate matters (PM 10) were measured by real-time, continuous monitors, and duplicate samples for airborne fungi and bacteria were collected in different periods of the evaporation. Indoor CO (average concentration 1.48 vs. 0.47 ppm at test vs. background), CO 2 (543.21 vs. 435.47 ppm), and TVOCs (0.74 vs. 0.48 ppm) levels have increased significantly after evaporating essential oils, but not the PM 10 (2.45 vs. 2.42 ppm). The anti-microbial activity on airborne microbes, an effect claimed by the use of many essential oils, could only be found at the first 30-60 min after the evaporation began as the highest levels of volatile components in these essential oils appeared to emit into the air, especially in the case of tea tree oil. High emissions of linalool (0.092-0.787 mg m -3), eucalyptol (0.007-0.856 mg m -3), D-limonene (0.004-0.153 mg m -3), ρ-cymene (0.019-0.141 mg m -3), and terpinene-4-ol-1 (0.029-0.978 mg m -3), all from the family of terpenes, were observed, and warranted for further examination for their health implications, especially for their potential contribution to the increasing indoor levels of secondary pollutants such as formaldehyde and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in the presence of ozone.

  8. Eryngium foetidum L. Essential Oils: Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul S; Essien, Emmanuel E; Ntuk, Samuel J; Choudhary, Mohammad I

    2017-04-28

    Background: Eryngium foetidum essential oils from Nigeria were investigated for the first time in order to ascertain their potency as natural antioxidants. E. foetidum is an aromatic and medicinal herb used in ethno-medicine and as a traditional spice for foods. Methods: The hydro-distilled oils of E. foetidum were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Free radical scavenging capacity of the volatile oils was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Results: Leaf volatile oil contained a high proportion of ( E )-2-Dodecenal (28.43%), 13-tetradecenal (27.45%), dodecanal (14.59%) and 2,4,5-trimethylbenzaldehyde (10.77%); the stem oil comprised of dodecanal (20.21%), 2,4,5-trimethylbenzaldehyde (18.43%) and ( E )-2-dodecenal (8.27%), while 2,4,5-trimethylbenzaldehyde (56.08%), 13-tetradecenal (9.26%) and ( E )-2-dodecenal (7.65%) were the most dominant in the root oil. The IC 50 values for the leaf, stem and root oils were 56 µg/mL, 46µg/mL and 54.5 µg/mL respectively in the DPPH assay while the leaf oil exhibited the highest reducing potential among the test oils in the FRAP assay. Conclusions: The Nigerian E. foetidum volatile oils contain high amount of acyclic aldehydes and aromatic compounds. The oils are a potential source of natural antioxidant as demonstrated by their strong antioxidant activity.

  9. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae) Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Othman, Siti Nur Atiqah; Hassan, Muhammad Aizam; Nahar, Lutfun; Basar, Norazah; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Sarker, Satyajit D.

    2016-01-01

    This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae) endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME). Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1) as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%), C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%), and C. microcarpa (94.0%), while sabinene (19) was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%). In addition, citronellal (20) (61.7%–72.5%), linalool (18) (56.5%), and hedycaryol (23) (19.0%) were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species. PMID:28930124

  10. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Atiqah Md Othman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME. Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1 as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%, C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%, and C. microcarpa (94.0%, while sabinene (19 was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%. In addition, citronellal (20 (61.7%–72.5%, linalool (18 (56.5%, and hedycaryol (23 (19.0% were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  11. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae) Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Othman, Siti Nur Atiqah; Hassan, Muhammad Aizam; Nahar, Lutfun; Basar, Norazah; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2016-06-03

    This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae) endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME). Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1) as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%), C. grandis (81.6%-96.9%), and C. microcarpa (94.0%), while sabinene (19) was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%-48.5%). In addition, citronellal (20) (61.7%-72.5%), linalool (18) (56.5%), and hedycaryol (23) (19.0%) were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of six constituents of essential oil from Salvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonboli, Ali; Babakhani, Babak; Mehrabian, Ahmad Reza

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of three Salvia species, i.e. S. santolinifolia, S. hydrangea and S. mirzayanii, essential oils were investigated. The essential oils were obtained from the aerial parts of plants and analyzed by GC-MS. The main constituents of aforementioned species were alpha-pinene (72.4%), beta-pinene (6.6%) and limonene (5.3%); beta-caryophyllene (25.1%), 1,8-cineol (15.2%) and caryophyllene oxide (11.5%); alpha-terpinenyl acetate (22.6%), 1,8-cineol (21.2%) and linalool (8.9%), respectively. Bioassays exhibited that the property of the oil of S. myrzayanii was superior to others. The antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Salvia species may well be due to the presence of synergy between six tested compounds (linalool, 1,8-cineol, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-caryophyllene and limonene) and other constituents of the oils with various degrees of antimicrobial activity. Among these, linalool and 1,8-cineol had the highest antimicrobial activity.

  13. Essential-oil diversity of Salvia tomentosa Mill. in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlidou, Effie; Karousou, Regina; Lazari, Diamanto

    2014-08-01

    Salvia tomentosa essential oils from Greece were studied for the first time here. The oils from five populations growing in Mediterranean pine forests on the island of Thassos (northern Aegean Sea) and from 14 populations situated in deciduous forests in Thrace (northeastern Greek mainland) were investigated. Their essential-oil contents ranged from 1.1 to 3.3% (v/w, based on the dry weight of the plant material). The populations from Thassos had high contents of α-pinene (18.0 ± 2.9%), 1,8-cineole (14.7 ± 3.0%), cis-thujone (14.0 ± 6.9%), and borneol (12.8 ± 2.2%) and smaller amounts of camphene, camphor, and β-pinene, whereas the populations from Thrace showed high α-pinene (16.7 ± 4.0%), β-pinene (22.8 ± 4.5%), camphor (18.3 ± 4.3%), and camphene (10.3 ± 2.4%) contents, much lower 1,8-cineole and borneol amounts, while cis-thujone was completely lacking. The comparison of the present results with published data showed that oils having cis-thujone as one of the main compounds were reported for the first time here. Multivariate statistical analyses indicate that the observed essential-oil variation was related to geographical and environmental factors. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. Calli Essential Oils Synergize with Lawsone against Multidrug Resistant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh S. M. Soliman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The fast development of multi-drug resistant (MDR organisms increasingly threatens global health and well-being. Plant natural products have been known for centuries as alternative medicines that can possess pharmacological characteristics, including antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activities of essential oil (Calli oil extracted from the Calligonum comosum plant by hydro-steam distillation was tested either alone or when combined with lawsone, a henna plant naphthoquinone, against MDR microbes. Lawsone showed significant antimicrobial activities against MDR pathogens in the range of 200–300 µg/mL. Furthermore, Calli oil showed significant antimicrobial activities against MDR bacteria in the range of 180–200 µg/mL, Candida at 220–240 µg/mL and spore-forming Rhizopus fungus at 250 µg/mL. Calli oil’s inhibition effect on Rhizopus, the major cause of the lethal infection mucormycosis, stands for 72 h, followed by an extended irreversible white sporulation effect. The combination of Calli oil with lawsone enhanced the antimicrobial activities of each individual alone by at least three-fold, while incorporation of both natural products in a liposome reduced their toxicity by four- to eight-fold, while maintaining the augmented efficacy of the combination treatment. We map the antimicrobial activity of Calli oil to its major component, a benzaldehyde derivative. The findings from this study demonstrate that formulations containing essential oils have the potential in the future to overcome antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Screening of some essential oils against Trichosporon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniyal, Veena; Saxena, Seema; Bhatt, R P

    2013-01-01

    White Piedra is a superficial mycoses characterized by nodules on the hair shaft, caused by the basidiomycetous yeast Trichosporon species. In this study 25 essential oils were extracted and screened against two Trichosporon species i.e. Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon cutaneum. Both these fungi procured from MTCC Chandigarh were maintained on yeast malt agar plates and tubes at 25 degrees C. Two screening methods viz., agar well diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentration were adopted for the study. The results showed that the maximum anti-yeast activity against T. asahii and T. cutaneum was demonstrated by oil of Mentha piperita showing full inhibition of both the fungi, Melaleuca alternifolia with an inhibition zone of 45 and 40 mm, Cymbopogon winterians with inhibition zone of 45 and 45 mm and Cymbopogon flexuosus with 35 and 30 mm inhibition zones. The oil of Trachyspermum ammi exhibited 10 and 20 mm, Abelmoschus moschatus exhibited 30 and 20 mm, Salvia sclarea showed 20 and 18 mm and Jasminum officinale exhibited 25 and 15 mm inhibition zones showing moderate activity. The oil of Cyperus scariosus, Pogostemon patchouli and Rosa damascene showed no inhibition zone against both the fungi while Vetiveria zizanoides exhibited no inhibition in case of T. asahii and inhibition zone of 10 mm in case of T. cutaneum demonstrating comparatively low activity against both the fungi. These results support that the essential oils can be used to cure superficial mycoses and these oils may have significant role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

  16. The efficacy of essential oils as natural preservatives in vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Kazempour, Nastaran; Mahboubi, Atefeh

    2014-12-01

    The efforts for finding the natural preservatives with nontoxicity and nonirritancy have encouraged the scientists to research among the medicinal plants. The preservative efficacy of Daucus carota, Ferula gummosa, Eugenium caryophyllata, Oliveria decumbens, Pelargonium graveolens, Ziziphora tenuir, Acorus calamus, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils on challenge test's pathogens and on pathogen's inoculated vegetable oil was evaluated by antimicrobial effectiveness test. Carotol (46%), β-pinene (62.7%), eugenol (78.4%), thymol (50.6%), cis-asarone (27.5%), thymol (50.1%), and α-terpineol (19.5%) were the primary main components of D. carota, F. gummosa, E. caryophyllata, T. ammi, A. calamus, O. decumbens, and Z. tenuir essential oils, respectively. A. niger was more sensitive microorganism to oils. The antimicrobial activity of O. decumbens oil was the highest. Different concentrations of essential oils were added to the vegetable oil. The results of test on the vegetable oil showed that the combination of O. decumbens and P. graveolens oils (0.5:0.5%) had enough efficacies as natural preservative in vegetable oil.

  17. COMPOSITION OF STEMBARK ESSENTIAL OIL FROM SALVIA MACROSIPHON BOISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIROUZ MATLOUBI-MOGHADDAM

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Salvia macrosiphon boiss (Labiatae was prepared by steam distillation and analyzed by GC and coupled GC/MS. Twenty substances out of about thirty-three detected components were identified. The major constituents were sesquiterpenes (69.5%, a-Gurjunene (11%, P-Cubebene (10.6%, Germacrene-B (7%.

  18. Composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... Bases Farmaco- logicas de la Terapeutica Medica Panamericana, Mexico DF. Lawrence BM (1992). Progress in essential oils. Perfume and Flavor 17: 44-46. Muckenstrum B, Foechterlen D, Reduron JP, Danton P, Hildenbrand M. (1997). Pythochemical and chemotaxonomic studies of Foeniculum vulgare ...

  19. Effect of lavender ( Lavandula Stoechas ) essential oil on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of lavender ( Lavandula Stoechas ) essential oil on growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and antioxidant status of broilers. ... Based on the data, it can be concluded that LEO could be used as a growth promoter in broiler nutrition with potential improvements in breast meat quality. Keywords: ...

  20. Antimycobacterial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the antimycobacterial, antioxidant and the cytotoxic activities of the essential oil from the gall part of Pistacia atlantica Desf from Algeria. Materials and Methods: The antimycobacterial activity was evaluated by the broth microdilution method against three species of ...

  1. essential oil extract from moringa oleifera roots as cowpea seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ESSENTIAL OIL EXTRACT FROM MORINGA OLEIFERA ROOTS AS COWPEA. SEED PROTECTANT AGAINST COWPEA BEETLE. O.Y. ALABI and M.M. ADEWOLE. Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Corresponding author: alabi.jummy@gmail.com, jmkalabi@yahoo.

  2. Effects of oregano essential oil and attapulgite on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of a blend of oregano essential oil (OEO) (as a source of natural antibacterial growth-promoting substances) and attapulgite (as a source of toxin-binder and as an antidiarrhoeal agent) on growth performance, intestinal microbiota, and intestinal morphometry in broiler ...

  3. Phytochemical and antimicrobial studies on essential oils of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of the volatile constituents of five different plant essential oils, that is, Ocimum sanctum (leaves), Eucalyptus globulus (leaves), Mentha arvensis (leaves), Citrus lemon (fruit epicarp) and Citrus maxima (fruit epicarp) was evaluated in vitro against seven bacteria (Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, ...

  4. Antimicrobial Activity Of Essential Oils Of Xylopia aethiopica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xylopia aethiopica is a medicinal plant of great repute in West Africa which produces a variety of complex chemical compounds. The fresh and dried fruits, leaf, stem bark and root bark essential oils showed various degrees of activity against the Gram positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram ...

  5. Antimicrobial and physico-chemical effects of essential oils on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-03-31

    Mar 31, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Objectives: Milk and milk products are known to be the good media for development of many microorganisms. Some essential oils are known to have antimicrobial activities against bacteria, mould and fungi. With the aim of contributing to the preservation of the fermented dairy products, the ...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Myrtus Communis L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of microbial resistance to antibiotics is a global concern. The present study was carried out to determine the composition and the antimicrobial potential of the essential oil of Myrtus communis L. against 13 pathogenic strains responsible of many infections. The results show that levels of MIC observed ...

  7. Comparative study of the antifungal activity of some essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the antimould activity of oregano, thyme, rosemary and clove essential oils and some of their main constituents: eugenol, carvacrol and thymol against Aspergillus niger. This antifungal activity was assessed using broth dilution, disc diffusion and micro atmosphere methods. In both agar diffusion ...

  8. Effect of selected essential oil plants on bacterial wilt disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-03-25

    Mar 25, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: Bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a major constrain to production of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). Control of bacterial wilt is very difficult as there are no effective curative chemicals. This study was aimed at investigating the potential roles of essential oil ...

  9. Essential oil of Ocimum grattissimum (Labiatae) as Sitophilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ocimum grattissimum L. (Labiatae) leaves are widely eaten as a vegetable in Nigeria, and in the eastern parts, are traditionally used in post-harvest protection and relieving stomach aches. The effect of the essential oil of O. grattissimum leaves on Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was assessed ...

  10. Chemical Composition and Insecticidal Activity of the Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    was dried over anhydrous Na2SO4 and kept in a refrigerator (4 °C) pending subsequent experiments. Analysis of the essential oils. Capillary gas chromatography was performed using Hewlett–Packard 5890 gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector and fused silica capillary column HP-5 (5 % diphenyl.

  11. essential oil and its activity against mosquito larvae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a refrigerator (4 °C) pending subsequent experiments. Analysis of the essential oil. Gas chromatographic analysis was performed using Hewlett–Packard 5890 gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector and fused silica capillary column HP-5MS (5 % diphenyl and 95 % dimethylpolysyloxane, 30 m ×.

  12. Essential Oil Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Salvia officinalis samples were collected from northern and southern Albania, respectively. The crushed leaves were subjected to hydro-distillation, and the essential oils analyzed by gas chromatography GC/FID (for quantification of volatiles) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) for identification.

  13. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From our experimental results, the extract of flowers, fruit, stem and leaves of those plants showed highest potential as free radical scavengers. Keywords: Antioxidant, phenolics, flavonoids, essential oil, extracts, gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC–MS). African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(34), pp. 5314-5320 ...

  14. Antimicrobial efficacy of the extract, fractions and essential oils from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eugenia uniflora leaves is employed in Nigerian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of cough, bronchitis, skin and wound infections. In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of the methanolic extract, fractions and essential oils from the leaves of Eugenia uniflora were investigated on some multidrug ...

  15. Antinociceptive And Antiinflammatory Effects Of Essential Oil Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti- inflammatory activities of the essential oil (EO) of the fruits ofDennettia tripetala in rodents. The plant is a tropical African plant and the fruits are commonly eaten as spices and consumed as a stimulant, and its various parts are used in the treatment of fever, cough and as ...

  16. Behavioural effects and mechanisms of essential oils of dennettia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fruits of the plant Dennettia tripetala G.Baker (Annonaceae) are well known in many communities of some southern states of Nigeria and some West African countries. They are commonly eaten as spices. We investigated the acute toxicity and behavioural effects of the essential oils of these fruits in mice and the ...

  17. The Artemisia L. Genus: A Review of Bioactive Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Bermejo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous members of the Anthemideae tribe are important as cut flowers and ornamental crops, as well as being medicinal and aromatic plants, many of which produce essential oils used in folk and modern medicine and in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry. Essential oils generally have a broad spectrum of bioactivity, owing to the presence of several active ingredients that work through various modes of action. Due to their mode of extraction, mostly by distillation from aromatic plants, they contain a variety of volatile molecules such as terpenes, phenol-derived aromatic and aliphatic components. The large genus Artemisia L., from the tribe Anthemideae, comprises important medicinal plants which are currently the subject of phytochemical attention due to their biological and chemical diversity. Artemisia species, widespread throughout the world, are one of the most popular plants in Chinese traditional preparations and are frequently used for the treatment of diseases such as malaria, hepatitis, cancer, inflammation and infections by fungi, bacteria and viruses. Extensive studies of the chemical components of Artemisia have led to the identification of many compounds as well as essentials oils. This review summarizes some of the main reports on the chemistry and anti-infective activities of Artemisia. Li. essential oils from the data in the recent literature (2000–2011.

  18. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the essential oil composition of the flower of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandifloroum L. (Jasminum grandiflorum) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The optimum GC-MS conditions used for the analysis were 250 oC inlet temperature, 150 oC MSD detector temperature, ...

  19. Evaluation Of The Essential Oil Of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill (Fennel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hydrodistillation (HD) and steam-distillation, or solvent extraction methods of essential oils have some disadvantages like thermal decomposition of extracts, its contamination with solvent or solvent residues and the pollution of residual vegetal material with solvent which can be also an environmental problem.

  20. Using essential oils to control moss and liverwort in containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil Khadduri

    2011-01-01

    Liverwort and moss are economically significant weeds across a range of US container production sites, including forest seedling greenhouse culture in the Pacific Northwest. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of essential oils, or distilled plant extracts, in controlling liverwort and moss container weeds over three seasons of trials. When applied at the...

  1. The antimicrobial effect of Origanum compactum essential oil, nisin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... Oregano EO chemical analysis. The essential oil chemical composition was analyzed using a gas chromatograph (GC) fitted to a mass spectrometer (MS). Operating ..... in ground beef treated with nisin, chelators, organic acids and their combinations immobilized in calcium alginate gels. Food Microbiol.

  2. Essential Oil Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Clinopodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    photoperiod for hatching. The newly emerged larvae were then isolated in groups of ten specimens in 100 ml tubes with mineral water and a small amount of dog ..... 21. Vokou D, Kokkini S, Bessiere JM. Geographic variation of. Greek oregano (Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum) essential oils. Biochem Syst Ecol 1993; 21: 287-.

  3. Lemon grass ( Cymbopogon citratus ) essential oil as a potent anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO) was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral antiinflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods:The chemical profile ofLGEOas determined bygas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed ...

  4. Comparative antimicrobial activity of clove and fennel essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antimicrobial activity of clove and fennel essential oils against food borne pathogenic fungi and food spoilage bacteria. ... Bactericidal activity of culinary spices was evaluated against five food spoilage bacteria namely: Pseudomonas syringae, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus sp., and ...

  5. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patrick

    2015-03-25

    Mar 25, 2015 ... fungicides against phytopathogenic fungi. Key words: GC/MS, essential oils , citrus, antifungal activity, phytopathogenic fungi. INTRODUCTION. Fungal diseases are considered as the main enemies of crops. Apart from the fact that they have the potential to cause significant yield losses and deterioration of.

  6. Anticancer Effects of Chenopodium ambrosiodes L. Essential Oil on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    168. 17. Hou J, Sun J, Chen SY, Chen S, Cai X, Zou G.. Chemical composition, cytotoxic and antioxidant activity of the leaf essential oil of Photinia serrulata. Food Chemistry 2007;. 103: 355-358. 18. Bezerra DP, Costa EV, Nogueira PCL.

  7. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LACPREENE

    2012-08-12

    Aug 12, 2012 ... resin used in perfumes especially as a fixative. It is used ... MATERIALS AND METHODS ... (Eastern of Morocco) and they were identified by Dr Haloui of the ... Analysis of essential oils was carried out by GC–MS using a.

  8. Antibacterial activity and composition of the essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... -caryophyllene (11.55%) and carvacrol (9.05%). Eucalyptol (50.13%) was identified as the main constituent of the essential oil of Myrtus communis L. The other important components were linalool (12.65%), -terpineol (7.57%) and limonene (4.26%). M. communis showed some activity on Gram positive and Gram negative ...

  9. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2-ol (19.4%), transp- mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (16.4%) and limonene (13.7%). The major components identified in the oil of Cymbopogon schoenanthus were piperitone (68.4%), and ä-2-carene (11.5%). The antimicrobial activity of the essential ...

  10. Effects of oregano essential oil and attapulgite on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martina

    2016-03-21

    Mar 21, 2016 ... alternative feed additives to promote growth, strengthen the immune system and sustain the health of broiler chickens because of .... Metabolizable energy, MJ/kg. 12.98. 13.31 .... dietary supplements of specific blends of organic acids and essential oils on broiler performance, Bozkurt et al. (2012) found ...

  11. Comparative Study of Root, Stalk and Leaf Essential Oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-03-03

    Mar 3, 2017 ... manufacture of perfumes, coloured soaps and synthesis of Vitamin A, ionones and β- carotene(Shah et al., 2011; Mirghani et al., 2012). Essential oils are characterized by qualitative and quantitative differences depending on the part of the plant. The variability is especially related to the proportions of ...

  12. Composition of the Essential Oil of Clausena Suffruticosa Leaf and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The essential oil of Clausena suffruticosa leaf was extracted by hydrodistillation using a modified Clevenger-type apparatus and was analyzed by GC-MS using electron impact ionization method. Antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic screenings were made by disc diffusion technique, poisoned food technique and ...

  13. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as ... Enzymatic browning in fruits and vegetables tissues can cause undesirable quality changes (Nicoli et al., ..... maillard reaction products on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activity in food. J. Food Biochem.

  14. Phenols, essential oils and carotenoids of Rosa canina from Tunisia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antioxidant activity of leaf extracts of Rosa canina from diverse localities of Tunisia were evaluated by ABTS and DPPH methods, whereas in those of essential oils and carotenoids extracts such activity was determined only by the ABTS method. Total phenols determined by the Folin method revealed that at Aindraham, ...

  15. Research Report: The analysis of the essential oil of Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Report: The analysis of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum L. growing in Kenya. TAR Akeng'a, SC Chhabra. Abstract. Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology Vol.3(1) 2001: 72-75. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  16. Phthalides in the essential oil from roots of Levisticum officinale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, M. J.; Scheffer, J. J.; Baerheim Svendsen, A.

    1982-01-01

    The composition of the phthalide mixture of the essential oil from roots of Levisticum officinale Koch was investigated. The phthalide mixture was analyzed by combining separation methods - GLC, LSC and TLC - and subsequently using spectroscopic methods - IR, MS and NMR. E- and

  17. Fumigant toxicity of essential oils to Reticulitermes flavipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2008-01-01

    Subterranean termite infestations occur in every state in the contiguous United States and are responsible for damage to wooden structures in excess of two billion dollars (U.S.) annually. Essential oils have historically been used to repel insects. They have relatively low toxicity and some of them are exempt from regulation by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and...

  18. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were...

  19. Chemical Composition and Insecticidal Activity of the Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the essential oil of the aerial parts of Ostericum grosseserratum against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamaisD. Methods: Steam distillation of the aerial parts of O. grosseserratum during the flowering stage was carried out using a Clavenger ...

  20. Adsorption of essential oil components of Lavandula angustifolia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis of essential oil has basically one technical goal: to achieve the best possible separation performance by using the most effective, available and current technology of chromatography. The present work aimed to study the formulation created by the adsorption of active components of Lavandula angustifolia ...

  1. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the essential oils and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with the evaluation of the in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activity of phenolic extracts and essential oils of two medicinal and aromatic plants Zygophyllum album and Myrtus communis by using the 2,2- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, total antioxidant power and agar diffusion methods and ...

  2. Biological activities of four essential oils against Anopheles gambiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The control of malaria is still a challenge partly due to mosquito's resistance to current available insecticides. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ovicidal, larvicidal and repellent activities of Lantana camara, Hyptis suaveolens, Hyptis spicigera and Ocimum canum essential oils against Anopheles gambiae s.l. ...

  3. Investigation of effects of essential oils of Origanum minutiflorum O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of essential oils extracted from Origanum minutiflorum and Cyclotrichium niveum (Labiatae) plants to the vascularization systems of the chick embryos in a chorioallantoic membrane model. The aerial parts of O. minutiflorum and C. niveum were subjected to hydrodistillation.

  4. Effect of selected essential oil plants on bacterial wilt disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a major constrain to production of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). Control of bacterial wilt is very difficult as there are no effective curative chemicals. This study was aimed at investigating the potential roles of essential oil plants in control of the disease.

  5. Chemical compositions of seven essential oils from Blighia sapida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Blighia sapida traditionally to treat many ailments, these chemical constituents identified might be useful pharmaceutically and industrially. These results indicate that Blighia sapida essential oils were mostly dominated by terpenoids and esters. Keywords: Hydrodistillation, gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry ...

  6. Blossom thinning in apple and peach with an essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of experiments were conducted with apple (Malus xdomestica) and peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] from 2003-2008 to evaluate the flower thinning efficacy of eugenol and a eugenol-based essential oil. Flower thinning effects by hand defoliation and alternative chemical agents were compared...

  7. Biological activity and phytoconstituents of essential oil from fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-04

    Feb 4, 2009 ... Fresh Leaves (1000 g) were subjected to steam distillation for approximately 6 h using a Clevenger-type apparatus. The yield obtained was 0.28% v/w. The essential oil was ... 0.45 µm membrane filter. Paper disc moistened with aqueous. DMSO was placed on the seeded Petri plate as a vehicle control. A.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... Essential oil distillation. Fresh leaf samples were subjected to hydro-distillation in a modified. Clevenger-type apparatus for a minimum of 4 h in accordance with the British .... ones because they posses outer membrane surrounding the cell membrane (Ratledge and Wilkinson, 1988) which restricts diffusion ...

  9. The chemical composition and biological activities of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the hole-plate diffusion testing method, the essential oil exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsielia pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis with at least 58% inhibition compared to the positive ...

  10. Effect of essential oils extracted from Satureja calamintha, Mentha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... further in vitro and in vivo trials are required to search optimum dose which reduce methane production without adversely changing dietary fermentation and rumen function. Key words: Methane, ammonia, essential oils, Satureja calamintha (Calament), Mentha pulegium (fliou, Menthe pouliot), Juniperus phoenicea (Arar, ...

  11. chemical constituents of essential oils of ocimum gratissimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    2003-01-17

    Université René Descartes, 45 rue des Saints-Pères, 75270 Paris Cedex 06, France. (Received January 17, 2003; revised June 13, 2003). ABSTRACT. The following studies report the inhibitory effect produced by chemical constituents of essential oils of three plants used in traditional medicine as anti-inflammatory and ...

  12. Geographical impact on essential oil composition of endemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Kundmannia anatolica Hub.-Mor. is an endemic specie of Apiaceae diversified in Turkey. Several parts of the plant may contain essential oils in different quantity which can be influenced by environmental factors, mainly altitude. The aim of this study was to test whether there is any altitude effect on volatile ...

  13. Activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum essential oil and ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ICC

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... ESBL-producing. Enterobacteriaceae and other kinds of bacteria have been reported widely. Infections caused by ESBL- producing bacteria have .... Amino acids. -ve. -ve. Flavonoids. +ve. +ve. Phenols. -ve. -ve. Proteins. -ve. -ve. Table 2. MIC (μg/ml) values of essential oil and ethanolic extract of C.

  14. ( Cymbopogon citratus Stapf) powder and essential oil on mould ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After 6 months in farmers' stores, unshelled melon seeds treated with 0.5% (v/w) of essential oil and 10% (w/w) of powdered leaves of C. citratus had significantly lower proportion of visibly diseased seeds and Aspergillus spp infestation levels and significantly higher seed germination compared to the untreated seeds.

  15. Determination of the required HLB values of some essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orafidiya, Lara O; Oladimeji, F A

    2002-04-26

    The required HLB values of eucalyptus, lippia and peppermint essential oils were determined using droplet size analysis and turbidimetric method on emulsions prepared with emulsifier blends of varying HLB values. The percentage increase in mean droplet diameter and the degree of dispersion of droplet sizes were determined before and after centrifugation of the emulsions. The HLB value of the emulsion with the least dispersion ratio or the least percentage increase in mean droplet diameter was taken as the required HLB of the respective essential oil. The turbidimetric method was validated by the existence of correlation (r=-0.958) between the mean droplet diameter and the turbidity of the emulsions. The turbidity curve went through a maximum at the HLB value where the mean droplet diameter was least. Based on these methods, the required HLB values of eucalyptus, lippia and peppermint oils were determined as 9.8, 12.1 and 12.3, respectively (PHLB fell within literature value.

  16. Database of the Amazon aromatic plants and their essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guilherme S. Maia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aromatic flora of the Amazon has been inventoried for 30 years. In this sense, were made over 500 field trips to collect over 2500 plants and to obtain more than 2000 essential oils and aroma concentrates, all of them submitted to GC and GC-MS. This work led to the creation of a database for the aromatic plants of the Amazon, which catalogs general information about 1250 specimens. The database has allowed the publication of the chemical composition of the oils and aromas of more than 350 species, associated with a larger number of chemical types. The essential oils of many species offer optimum conditions for economic exploitation and use in national and international market of fragrances, cosmetics, agricultural and household pesticides.

  17. Efficacy of medicinal essential oils against pathogenic Malassezia sp. isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, A R; Shokri, H; Fahimirad, S

    2016-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the distribution pattern and population size of Malassezia species in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD) and the inhibitory efficacy of Zataria multiflora, Thymus kotschyanus, Mentha spicata, Artemisia sieberi, Rosmarinus officinalis and Heracleum persicum essential oils against pathogenic Malassezia isolates. The samples were collected from 5 different anatomical sites of 33 atopic dogs and cultured onto modified Dixon agar (MDA) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) media. The essential oil extraction was performed by steam distillation using Clevenger system. Anti-Malassezia efficacy of medicinal essential oils and standard drugs was evaluated using broth microdilution method. A total of 103 yeast colonies were isolated from dogs with AD. Eight different Malassezia species were identified as follows: Malassezia pachydermatis (81.4%), M. globosa (7.8%), M. restricta (3.9%), M. sloofiae (2.9%), M. furfur (1%), M. nana (1%), M. obtusa (1%) and M. sympodialis (1%). The most and least infected sites were: anal (21.2%) and ear (10.6%) respectively. M. pachydermatis was the most frequent Malassezia species isolated from both skin and mucosa of dogs with AD. Antifungal susceptibility test revealed the inhibitory efficacy of essential oils on pathogenic Malassezia isolates with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90)) values ranging from 30 to 850 μg/mL. Among the tested oils, Z. multiflora and T. kotschyanus exhibited the highest inhibitory effects (Pessential oils of Z. multiflora and T. kotschyanus showed strong antifungal activity against pathogenic Malassezia species tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Essential oil composition of Eucalyptus microtheca and Eucalyptus viminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoodlou, Malek Taher; Kazemipoor, Nasrin; Valizadeh, Jafar; Falak Nezhad Seifi, Mohsen; Rahneshan, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus (Fam. Myrtaceae) is a medicinal plant and various Eucalyptus species possess potent pharmacological actions against diabetes, hepatotoxicity, and inflammation. This study aims to investigate essential oil composition from leaves and flowers of E. microtheca and E. viminalis leaves growing in the Southeast of Iran. The aerial parts of these plants were collected from Zahedan, Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran in 2013. After drying the plant materials in the shade, the chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by hydro-distillation method using a Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by GC/MS. In the essential oil of E. microtheca leaves, 101 compounds representing 100%, were identified. Among them, α-phellandrene (16.487%), aromadendrene (12.773%), α-pinene (6.752%), globulol (5.997%), ledene (5.665%), P-cymen (5.251%), and β-pinene (5.006%) were the major constituents. In the oil of E. microtheca flowers, 88 compounds representing 100%, were identified in which α-pinene (16.246%), O-cymen (13.522%), β-pinene (11.082%), aromadendrene (7.444%), α-phellandrene (7.006%), globulol (5.419%), and 9-octadecenamide (5.414%) were the major components. Sixty six compounds representing 100% were identified in the oil of E. viminalis leaves. The major compounds were 1, 8-cineole (57.757%), α-pinene (13.379%), limonene (5.443%), and globulol (3.054%). The results showed the essential oils from the aerial parts of Eucalyptus species are a cheap source for the commercial isolation of α-phellandrene, α-pinene, and 1, 8-cineole compounds to be used in medicinal and food products. Furthermore, these plants could be an alternative source of insecticide agents.

  19. Inhibition of cholinesterase by essential oil from food plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyana, Wantida; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2012-06-15

    Inhibition of cholinesterase has attracted much attention recently because of its potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In this work, the anticholinesterase activities of plant oils were investigated using Ellman's colorimetric method. The results indicate that essential oils obtained from Melissa officinalis leaf and Citrus aurantifolia leaf showed high acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase co-inhibitory activities. C. aurantifolia leaf oil revealed in this study has an IC(50) value on acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase of 139 ± 35 and 42 ± 5 μg/ml, respectively. GC/MS analysis revealed that the major constituents of C. aurantifolia leaf oil are monoterpenoids including limonene, l-camphor, citronellol, o-cymene and 1,8-cineole. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening of anticancer activity from agarwood essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun; Phirdaous, Abbas; Azura, Amid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Agarwood is a priceless non-timber forest product from Aquilaria species belonging to the Thymelaeaceae family. As a result of a defence mechanism to fend off pathogens, Aquilaria species develop agarwood or resin which can be used for incense, perfumery, and traditional medicines. Evidences from ethnopharmacological practices showed that Aquilaria spp. have been traditionally used in the Ayurvedic practice and Chinese medicine to treat various diseases particularly the inflammatory-associated diseases. There have been no reports on traditional use of agarwood towards cancer treatment. However, this is most probably due to the fact that cancer nomenclature is used in modern medicine to describe the diseases associated with unregulated cell growth in which inflammation and body pain are involved. Objective: The aim of this current study was therefore to investigate the potential anticancer properties of agarwood essential oil obtained from distillation of agarwood (resin) towards MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The essential oil was subjected to screening assays namely cell viability, cell attachment and sulforhodamine B (SRB)-based cytotoxicity assay to determine the IC50 value. Results: The agarwood essential oil caused reduction of the cell number in both the cell viability and attachment assay suggesting a cumulative effect of the cell killing, inhibition of the cell attachment and or causing cells to detach. The agarwood essential oil showed IC50 value of 900 μg/ml towards the cancer cells. Conclusion: The agarwood essential oil exhibited anticancer activity which supports the traditional use against the inflammatory-associated diseases. This warrants further investigation towards the development of alternative remedy towards cancer. PMID:25002797

  1. Preventive effect of cinnamon essential oil on lipid oxidation of vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahtab; Asgary, Sedigheh; Jafarian-dehkordi, Abbas; Najafi, Somayeh; Ghoreyshi-Yazdi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipid oxidation is the main deterioration process that occurs in vegetable oils. This process was effectively prevented by natural antioxidants. Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon) is rich with antioxidants. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cinnamon on malondialdehyde (MDA) rate production in two high consumption oils in Iranian market. METHODS Chemical composition of cinnamon essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). 200 µl each oil, 50 µl tween 20, and 2 ml of 40 Mm AAPH solutions were mixed and the prepared solution was divided into four glass vials. Respectively, 50 µl of 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm of cinnamon essential oil were added to three glass vials separately and one of the glass vials was used as the control. All of the glass vials were incubated at 37° C water bath. Rate of MDA production was measured by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test at the baseline and after the 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 hours. RESULTS Compounds of cinnamon essential oil by GC-MS analysis such as cinnamaldehyde (96.8%), alpha-capaene (0.2%), alpha-murolene (0.11%), para-methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.6%) and delta-cadinen (0.4%) were found to be the major compounds. For both oils, maximum rate of MDA production was achieved in 5th hours of heating. Every three concentrations of cinnamon essential oil significantly decreased MDA production (P < 0.05) in comparison with the control. CONCLUSION Essential oil of cinnamon considerably inhibited MDA production in studied oils and can be used with fresh and heated oils for reduction of lipid peroxidation and adverse free radicals effects on body. PMID:24302936

  2. Fatty Acid And Essential Oil Compositions Of The Seed Oil Of Five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid and essential oil compositions of the seed oil of Annona cherimola, A. muricata, A. reticulata, A. senegalensis and A. squamosa were investigated by GC and GC/MS spectra. About eleven fatty acids were identified of which oleic, gondoic, palmitic and stearic acids predominated in each sample, and others ...

  3. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Felšöciová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita, L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis.

  4. Essential Oil Composition of Salvia tebesana Bunge (Lamiaceae from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Goldansaz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvia tebesana Bunge (Lamiaceae is an endemic medicinal species which grows wild in center of Iran. In the present study, chemical composition of the essential oil of the plant at two developmental stages (vegetative and full flowering was reported for the first time. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation from air-dried samples and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The yield of oil (w/w % in different stages was in the order: full flowering (0.32 % > vegetative (0.14 %. In total 44 and 61 constituents were identified and quantified in the studied samples representing 99.6 and 99.2 % of the total oil, respectively. The main constituents were 7-epi-α-eudesmol, (E-nerolidol, (E-caryophyllene, α-pinene, caryophyllene oxide, and δ-cadinen. Oxygenated sesquiterpens (43.7% and 48.2% followed by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (30.3% and 32.7% were the main group of compound in the oil of the plant at vegetative and full flowering stages, respectively.

  5. Effect of citronella essential oil fractions as oil phase on emulsion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiyanti, Melati; Meliana, Yenny; Agustian, Egi

    2017-11-01

    The emulsion system consists of water, oil and surfactant. In order to create stable emulsion system, the composition and formulation between water phase, surfactant and oil phase are very important. Essential oil such as citronella oil has been known as active ingredient which has ability as insect repellent. This research studied the effect of citronella oil and its fraction as oil phase on emulsion stability. The cycle stability test was conducted to check the emulsion stability and it was monitored by pH, density, viscosity, particle size, refractive index, zeta potential, physical appearance and FTIR for 4 weeks. Citronellal fraction has better stability compared to citronella oil and rhodinol fraction with slight change of physical and chemical properties before and after the cycle stability test. However, it is need further study to enhance the stability of the emulsion stability for this formulation.

  6. Possibility for use essential oils in veterinary medicine and animal husbandry with special emphasis on oregano oil

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić, Marijana; Nedeljković-Trailović, Jelena; Trailović, Saša; Ivanović, Saša; Milovanović, Mirjana; Krnjaić, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    The paper reviews the latest studies on possible applications of oregano essential oil in veterinary medicine and animal livestock production. The first part of the paper deals with the definition of essential oils, possibilities for their extraction from plants, possibilities for their application in human and veterinary medicine, the interest of a science in essential oils, and, essential oils classification based on their use in human and veterinary medi...

  7. Preventive effect of cinnamon essential oil on lipid oxidation of vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahtab; Asgary, Sedigheh; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Najafi, Somayeh; Ghoreyshi-Yazdi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2013-09-01

    Lipid oxidation is the main deterioration process that occurs in vegetable oils. This process was effectively prevented by natural antioxidants. Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon) is rich with antioxidants. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cinnamon on malondialdehyde (MDA) rate production in two high consumption oils in Iranian market. Chemical composition of cinnamon essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). 200 µl each oil, 50 µl tween 20, and 2 ml of 40 Mm AAPH solutions were mixed and the prepared solution was divided into four glass vials. Respectively, 50 µl of 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm of cinnamon essential oil were added to three glass vials separately and one of the glass vials was used as the control. All of the glass vials were incubated at 37° C water bath. Rate of MDA production was measured by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test at the baseline and after the 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 hours. Compounds of cinnamon essential oil by GC-MS analysis such as cinnamaldehyde (96.8%), alpha-capaene (0.2%), alpha-murolene (0.11%), para-methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.6%) and delta-cadinen (0.4%) were found to be the major compounds. For both oils, maximum rate of MDA production was achieved in 5th hours of heating. Every three concentrations of cinnamon essential oil significantly decreased MDA production (P oil of cinnamon considerably inhibited MDA production in studied oils and can be used with fresh and heated oils for reduction of lipid peroxidation and adverse free radicals effects on body.

  8. Essential oil of Baccharis semiserrata, a source of spathuleno

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Sayonara; Sávio Nunes, Domingos; Marques, Mariza Boscacci; Tardivo, Rosângela Capuano; Cechinel Filho,Valdir; Simionatto, Edesio Luiz; Wisniewski Junior, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The essential oils of the leaves of female (0.13%) and male (0.45%) specimens of Baccharis semiserrata collected in the state of Paraná, Brazil, were analyzed in detail using GC-FID and GC-MS techniques. Both samples have low monoterpene content and present the sesquiterpene spathulenol as their main component, reaching 50.75% in the oil originating from the male specimen and 42.65% in that of the female specimen. Other major sesquiterpenes found were (female-male): aromadendrene (9.6...

  9. Essential oil of three Uvaria species from Ivory Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Koffi A; Félix, Tonzibo Z; Figueredo, Gilles; Chalard, Pierre; N'guessan, Yao T

    2011-11-01

    Different parts of Uvaria ovata (Dunals) A, U. anonoides Baker f. and U. tortilis A. Chev were collected from Ivory Coast, in Toumodi (center), Agboville (south-east) and Sikensi (south), respectively. The essential oils, obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus, were investigated by CG and CG/MS. The proportion of the chromatographed constituents identified varied from 92.5% to 98.5%. For U. ovata, the root bark oil comprised mainly camphene (10.2%), beta-pinene (10.1%), epi-alpha-cadinol (13.2%) and intermedeol (9.7%), while the oil of the stem bark was dominated by epi-alpha-cadinol (27.3%), intermedeol (11.9%) and benzyl benzoate (13.4%). The oil of the leaves showed beta-caryophyllene (15.6%), germacrene D (24.2%) and benzyl benzoate (18.3%) as the most abundant constituents. The leaf oil of U. anonoides was rich in 2,5-dimethoxy-p-cymene (15.5%), bicyclogermacrene (21.3%) and benzyl benzoate (8.7%), while, gamma-terpinene (31.7%), beta-caryophyllene (23.9%) and germacrene D (15.8%) constituted the main components of the stem bark oil of U. tortilis.

  10. The leaf essential oils of five Vietnamese Desmos species (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Do Ngoc; Hoi, Tran Minh; Thang, Tran Dinh; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2012-02-01

    The leaf essential oils of five Desmos species from Vietnam have been extracted by steam distillation and subjected to GC and GC-MS analyses. The plant samples were Desmos cochinchinensis Lour., D. penduculosus (A. DC.) Ban, D. penducolosus var. tonkinensis Ban, D. chinensis Lour., and D. dumosus (Roxb.) Saff. The oils were rich in sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (65.9%-88.9%) and monoterpene hydrocarbons (6.3%-30.9%). The oxygenated counterparts were less common. The quantitatively significant constituents of the oils were alpha-pinene (2.4%-12.1%), beta-elemene (2.2-39.5%), beta-caryophyllene (13.9-26.3%), germacrene D (9.9-15.5%), bicyclogermacrene (2.0-11.4%) and alpha-humulene (3.8-7.5%). The studied oils could be classified into two chemical forms: oils with abundance of beta-caryophyllene, germacrene D and alpha-pinene (D. cochinchinensis, D. penducolosus var. tonkinensis, D. chinensis and D. Dumosus) and oil with high amounts of beta-elemene, beta-caryophyllene and germacrene D (D. penduculosus).

  11. Composition of the Essential oil of Artemisia absinthium from Tajikistan

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    Farukh S. Sharopov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three samples of Artemisia absinthium were collected from two different locations in the central-south of Tajikistan. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. A total of 41 compounds were identified representing 72-94% of total oil compositions. The major components of A. absinthium oil were myrcene (8.6-22.7%, cis-chrysanthenyl acetate (7.7-17.9%, a dihydrochamazulene isomer (5.5-11.6%, germacrene D (2.4-8.0%, β-thujone (0.4-7.3%, linalool acetate (trace-7.0%, α-phellandrene (1.0-5.3%, and linalool (5.3-7.0%. The chemical compositions of A. absinthium from Tajikistan are markedly different from those from European, Middle Eastern, or other Asian locations and likely represent new chemotypes.

  12. Essential oil composition and variability in Hyptis fruticosa

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    Clóvis R. P. Franco

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition of six samples of essential oil (EO extracted from leaves, flowers and seeds of several plants of Hyptis fruticosa Salzm. ex Benth., Lamiaceae, was investigated by GC/MS and GC/FID. 1,8-Cineole, spathulenol, α-pinene, β-pinene were the major constituents. Ten constituents that have not been previously described in the composition of the oil of H. fruticosa were identified. Hydrocarbons sesquiterpenes represented the main group, followed by hydrocarbons monoterpenes. The results were submitted to Cluster Analysis which allowed three groups of EO to be distinguished with respect to the content of α-pinene/β-pinene, 1,8-cineole and spathulenol. Growth stages of the plants and geographical parameters seem to be important factors determining the variability of the oil. Sesquiterpenes were mainly produced in the seeds.

  13. Essential oil composition and variability in Hyptis fruticosa

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    Clóvis R. P. Franco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of six samples of essential oil (EO extracted from leaves, flowers and seeds of several plants of Hyptis fruticosa Salzm. ex Benth., Lamiaceae, was investigated by GC/MS and GC/FID. 1,8-Cineole, spathulenol, α-pinene, β-pinene were the major constituents. Ten constituents that have not been previously described in the composition of the oil of H. fruticosa were identified. Hydrocarbons sesquiterpenes represented the main group, followed by hydrocarbons monoterpenes. The results were submitted to Cluster Analysis which allowed three groups of EO to be distinguished with respect to the content of α-pinene/β-pinene, 1,8-cineole and spathulenol. Growth stages of the plants and geographical parameters seem to be important factors determining the variability of the oil. Sesquiterpenes were mainly produced in the seeds.

  14. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Graciela Rocha; Fernandes, Patrícia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP) is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO). The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%). Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP), with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan. PMID:27547225

  15. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil

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    Graciela Rocha Donald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO. The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%. Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP, with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan.

  16. Polymer nanoparticles containing essential oils: new options for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdin González, Jorge Omar; Jesser, Emiliano Nicolás; Yeguerman, Cristhian Alan; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia; Fernández Band, Beatriz

    2017-07-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are vectors of important parasites and pathogens causing death, poverty and social disability worldwide. The overuse of synthetic insecticides to control mosquito vectors lead to resistance, adverse environmental effects and high operational costs. Therefore, the development of eco-friendly control tools is an important public health challenge. In this study, two different essential oils (EO) (geranium, Geranium maculatum, and bergamot, Citrus bergamia) loaded polymeric nanoparticle (PN) were elaborated using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and chitosan (Qx) as the polymeric matrix/coating. In addition, the mosquito larvicidal acute and residual activity of the PN was evaluated on Culex pipiens pipiens. The physicochemical characterization of PN revealed that PEG-PN had sizes polymer nanoparticles containing essential oil are a promising source of eco-friendly mosquito larvicidal products.

  17. The Essential Oil Secretory Structures of Prostanthera ovalifolia (Lamiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GERSBACH, P. V.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the essential oil secretory tissues of Prostanthera ovalifolia R.Br was investigated using bright‐ and dark‐field optical microscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The leaves of P. ovalifolia have glandular trichomes of the peltate type common to many Lamiaceae species. The trichomes consist of a basal cell embedded in the epidermis, a stalk cell with heavily cutinized walls and a 16‐celled secretory head, but they differ from those of many previously reported Lamiaceae species in their morphological form defined by the elevated cuticle. The sub‐cuticular space contains a mixture of lipid and aqueous phases. Secretory cells have dense cytoplasm with many leucoplasts present. Volatile terpenoids are eliminated from the cytoplasm into the sub‐cuticular space, the site of essential oil accumulation, via granulocrine secretion. PMID:12096737

  18. Essential oil constituents of Piper cubeba L. fils. from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Rein; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Kayser, Oliver; Quax, Wim J.; Ruslan, Komar; Elfami, [No Value

    2007-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of ripe berries (11.8% v/w) and leaves (0.9% v/w) of Piper cubeba L. fils. (Piperaceae) was investigated by GC and GUMS. Sabinene (9.1%), beta-elemene (9.4%), beta-caryophyllene (3.1%), epi-cubebol (4.3%), and cubebol (5.6%) were the main components of

  19. Antitumor Activity of Monoterpenes Found in Essential Oils

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    Marianna Vieira Sobral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex genetic disease that is a major public health problem worldwide, accounting for about 7 million deaths each year. Many anticancer drugs currently used clinically have been isolated from plant species or are based on such substances. Accumulating data has revealed anticancer activity in plant-derived monoterpenes. In this review the antitumor activity of 37 monoterpenes found in essential oils is discussed. Chemical structures, experimental models, and mechanisms of action for bioactive substances are presented.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against multiresistant aeromonads and enterococci

    OpenAIRE

    Quendera, Ana Patrícia Páscoa, 1991-

    2014-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Microbiologia Aplicada). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2014 fections in humans and animals. The emergence of multiresistant strains and biofilm formation in clinical and food industry settings are major problems to public health worldwide. In the present study, in order to contribute to the evaluation of alternatives to antibiotics/disinfectants, eleven commercial essential oils were assessed for their antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity aga...

  1. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Bixa orellana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzote, Lianet; García, Marley; Scull, Ramón; Cuellar, Armando; Setzer, William N

    2014-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania protozoa. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and chemotherapy remains the only effective control. However, conventional drugs are toxic, expensive, and require long periods of treatment, and resistance to clinical chemotherapeutic agents is emerging. Recent research on plants has shown a successful approach to obtain new antileishmanial alternatives. Herein, the in vitro and in vivo effects of the essential oil from Bixa orellana seeds against Leishmania amazonensis were evaluated. A total of 73 compounds were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, of which ishwarane (18.6%) and geranylgeraniol (9.1%) were the major components. The oil showed activity against intracellular amastigote form (IC50  = 8.5 µg/mL), while the cytotoxic concentration was sevenfold higher for the host cells. The ability of Bixa oil to control disease progression of established cutaneous leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice was demonstrated, after a treatment with 30 mg/kg by intraperitoneal administration over 14 days. The present study reports for the first time the antileishmanial potentialities of the essential oil from B. orellana. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Use of essential oils in poultry nutrition: A new approach

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    Gopal Krishan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria has created the necessity of replacement of antibiotic with other products like prebiotics, probiotics, organic acid botanicals, and herbal essential oils. Essential oils (EOs are important aromatic components of herbs and spices, and are used as natural alternatives for replacing antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs in poultry feed as these have antimicrobial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and antiviral properties. Beside, other beneficial effects of EOs include appetite stimulation, improvement of enzyme secretion related to food digestion, and immune response activation. Recently, use of EOs in broiler chickens has drawn attentions. EOs are generally used as blend with a carrier oil or combination with other plant oils in the feed to enhance the productive performance of birds. Conclusively, EOs can be used in poultry feed, but there are still questions concerning their action, metabolic pathway and optimal dosage in poultry, which are to be explored in detail. This mini-review describes the expanding horizons in the research on EOs in poultry nutrition.

  3. Differential effects of selective frankincense (Ru Xiang) essential oil versus non-selective sandalwood (Tan Xiang) essential oil on cultured bladder cancer cells: a microarray and bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Yang, Qing; Wu, Weijuan; Wren, Jonathan; Suhail, Mahmoud M; Woolley, Cole L; Young, D Gary; Fung, Kar-Ming; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2014-01-01

    Frankincense (Boswellia carterii, known as Ru Xiang in Chinese) and sandalwood (Santalum album, known as Tan Xiang in Chinese) are cancer preventive and therapeutic agents in Chinese medicine. Their biologically active ingredients are usually extracted from frankincense by hydrodistillation and sandalwood by distillation. This study aims to investigate the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils in cultured human bladder cancer cells. The effects of frankincense (1,400-600 dilutions) (v/v) and sandalwood (16,000-7,000 dilutions) (v/v) essential oils on cell viability were studied in established human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal human bladder urothelial UROtsa cells using a colorimetric XTT cell viability assay. Genes that responded to essential oil treatments in human bladder cancer J82 cells were identified using the Illumina Expression BeadChip platform and analyzed for enriched functions and pathways. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Human bladder cancer J82 cells were more sensitive to the pro-apoptotic effects of frankincense essential oil than the immortalized normal bladder UROtsa cells. In contrast, sandalwood essential oil exhibited a similar potency in suppressing the viability of both J82 and UROtsa cells. Although frankincense and sandalwood essential oils activated common pathways such as inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 signaling), each essential oil had a unique molecular action on the bladder cancer cells. Heat shock proteins and histone core proteins were activated by frankincense essential oil, whereas negative regulation of protein kinase activity and G protein-coupled receptors were activated by sandalwood essential oil treatment. The effects of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils on J82 cells and UROtsa cells involved different mechanisms leading to cancer cell death. While frankincense

  4. Repellent activity of herbal essential oils against Aedes aegypti (Linn. and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say.

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    Duangkamon Sritabutra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the mosquito repellent activity of herbal essential oils against female Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods: On a volunteer’s forearm, 0.1 mL of each essential oil was applied to 3 cm伊10 cm of exposed skin. The protection time was recorded for 3 min after every 30 min. Results: Essential oil from clove oil in olive oil and in coconut oil gave the longest lasting period of 76.50 min and 96.00 min respectively against Aedes aegypti. The citronella grass oil in olive oil, citronella grass oil in coconut oil and lemongrass oil in coconut oil exhibited protection against Culex quinquefasciatus at 165.00, 105.00, and 112.50 min respectively. Conclusions: The results clearly indicated that clove, citronella and lemongrass oil were the most promising for repellency against mosquito species. These oils could be used to develop a new formulation to control mosquitoes.

  5. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. essential oil: Chemistry and biological activity

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    Shyamapada Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum is one of the most useful essential oil bearing spices as well as medicinal plants, belonging to the family Umbelliferae/Apiaceae. The leaves and seeds of the plant are widely used in folk medicine in addition to its use as a seasoning in food preparation. The C. sativum essential oil and extracts possess promising antibacterial, antifungal and anti-oxidative activities as various chemical components in different parts of the plant, which thus play a great role in maintaining the shelf-life of foods by preventing their spoilage. This edible plant is non-toxic to humans, and the C. sativum essential oil is thus used in different ways, viz., in foods (like flavouring and preservatives and in pharmaceutical products (therapeutic action as well as in perfumes (fragancias and lotions. The current updates on the usefulness of the plant C. sativum are due to scientific research published in different web-based journals.

  6. Chemotypes of Pistacia atlantica leaf essential oils from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourine, Nadhir; Bombarda, Isabelle; Yousfi, Mohamed; Gaydou, Emile M

    2010-01-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of Pistacia atlantica Desf. leaves collected from different regions of Algeria were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The essential oil was rich in monoterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. The major components were alpha-pinene (0.0-67%), delta-3-carene (0.0-56%), spathulenol (0.5-22%), camphene (0.0-21%), terpinen-4-ol (0.0-16%) and beta-pinene (0.0-13%). Among the various components identified, twenty were used for statistical analyses. The result of principal component analysis (PCA) showed the occurrence of three chemotypes: a delta-3-carene chemotype (16.4-56.2%), a terpinen-4-ol chemotype (10.8-16.0%) and an alpha-pinene/camphene chemotype (10.9-66.6%/3.8-20.9%). It was found that the essential oil from female plants (delta-3-carene chemotype) could be easily differentiated from the two other chemotypes corresponding to male trees.

  7. The influence of essential oils on human vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Eva; Ilmberger, Josef

    2010-09-01

    Olfactory stimuli are used in aromatherapy to enhance mood, well-being and work efficiency. Nevertheless, the impact of fragrances on cognitive performance in humans is not well understood. The present investigation aimed to evaluate the effects of 1,8-cineol, jasmine absolute ether, linalyl acetate and peppermint essential oil on human vigilance performance. The odorants were administered by means of inhalation and, except for peppermint essential oil, were tested at 2 different dosages. Performance in a standard visual vigilance task was measured in terms of speed and accuracy and subjective ratings of the odorants were assessed in terms of pleasantness, intensity, arousal and stress. We hypothesized that 1,8-cineol, jasmine absolute ether and peppermint essential oil would improve vigilance performance, whereas linalyl acetate would impair such performance. Comparison of the performances of the seven independent experimental groups with that of a control group did not show any of the expected effects. In contrast, inhalation of linalyl acetate decreased reaction times. Within-group analyses, however, revealed significant interactions between subjective ratings of the odorants and task performance. The results of the present investigation emphasize the high impact of subjective factors on the modulation of attentional functions by olfactory stimuli in humans.

  8. Antibacterial and Anticandidal Activities of Common Essential Oil Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökalp İşcan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils and some of their oxygenated constituents are known to possess antimicrobial activity. In the last 30 years, there is a dramatic increase in the number of resistant microorganisms against available antimicrobials and a tendency towards natural products; consequently, scientists have been forced to discover new bioactive agents preferably from nature. As a result of this, so many antimicrobial screening works have been published on plant essential oils including miscellaneous screening methods and several microorganism strains. The aim of this study was to determine the MIC values of 65 monoterpenoids and 3 phenyl propanoids commonly found in essential oils, against 24 pathogenic bacteria and Candida strains, by using standard reference broth dilution methods (CLSI M7-A7 and M27-A2. According to broth microdilution test results, when compared with standard agents, monoterpene hydrocarbons generally showed weak antibacterial effects (>16 to 4 mg/mL where the oxygenated monoterpenes inhibited the microbial growth between the concentrations of 16 to 0,03 mg/mL. Generally, tested compounds demonstrated better inhibitory effects on Candida strains then the bacteria panel. The most effective microbial growth inhibitor constituents were determined as carvacrol, thymol, cumin alcohol, terpinen-4-ol, α-terpineol, lavandulol, estragol and thymoquinone.

  9. Essential oil diversity of European Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Brigitte; Schmiderer, Corinna; Novak, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    This investigation focused on the qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oil compounds of European Origanum vulgare. Extracts of 502 individual O. vulgare plants from 17 countries and 51 populations were analyzed via GC. Extracts of 49 plants of 5 populations of Israeli Origanum syriacum and 30 plants from 3 populations of Turkish Origanum onites were included to exemplify essential oil characteristics of 'high-quality' oregano. The content of essential oil compounds of European O. vulgare ranged between 0.03% and 4.6%. The monoterpenes were primarily made up of sabinene, myrcene, p-cymene, 1,8-cineole, β-ocimene, γ-terpinene, sabinene hydrate, linalool, α-terpineol, carvacrol methyl ether, linalyl acetate, thymol and carvacrol. Among the sesquiterpenes β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, germacrene D-4-ol, spathulenol, caryophyllene oxide and oplopanone were often present in higher amounts. According to the proportions of cymyl-compounds, sabinyl-compounds and the acyclic linalool/linalyl acetate three different main monoterpene chemotypes were defined. The cymyl- and the acyclic pathway were usually active in plants from the Mediterranean climate whereas an active sabinyl-pathway was a characteristic of plants from the Continental climate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemicals and lemon essential oil effect on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris viability

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    Maria Cristina Maldonado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is considered to be one of the important target microorganisms in the quality control of acidic canned foods. There is an urgent need to develop a suitable method for inhibiting or controlling the germination and outgrowth of A.acidoterrestris in acidic drinks. The aim of this work was to evaluate the chemicals used in the lemon industry (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and lemon essential oil as a natural compound, against a strain of A.acidoterrestris in MEB medium and in lemon juice concentrate. The results pointed out that sodium benzoate (500-1000-2000 ppm and lemon essential oil (0.08- 0.12- 0.16% completely inhibited the germination of A. acidoterrestris spores in MEB medium and LJC for 11 days. Potassium sorbate (600-1200 ppm was more effective to inhibit the growth of the microbial target in lemon juice than in MEB medium. The effect of sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and essential oil was sporostatic in MEB and LJC as they did not affect spore viability.

  11. Superheated water extraction of essential oils from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Bimali; Smith, Roger M

    2010-01-01

    Superheated water extraction (SHWE) potentially provides an environmentally friendly and clean extraction technique which uses a minimum or no organic solvent. The scope and limitations of the technique have still to be fully explored. To investigate the application of SHWE to cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum L.) bark and leaves as typical plant materials to determine if this extraction method can yield a higher quality oil. Samples of cinnamon bark or leaves were extracted at 200°C with water under pressure. The essential oils were obtained from the aqueous solution using a solid phase extraction cartridge and were then examined by GC-MS. Using superheated water extraction, cinnamon bark oil with over 80% cinnamaldehyde and cinnamon leaf oil containing up to 98% eugenol were obtained. Alternative solvent extraction methods were also studied but led to emulsion formation apparently because of the presence of cellulose breakdown products. Superheated water extraction offers a cheap, environmentally friendly technique with a shorter extraction time than hydrodistillation and yielded a higher quality oil with a higher proportion of eugenol than hydrodistillation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Polylactic Acid—Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L.; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Florin, Iordache; D’Autilia, Francesca; Carzino, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid—lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization. PMID:27399724

  13. Polylactic Acid—Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties

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    Ioannis L. Liakos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs. The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid—lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization.

  14. Polylactic Acid-Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Florin, Iordache; D'Autilia, Francesca; Carzino, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-07-07

    Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid-lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization.

  15. Artemisia spicigera Essential Oil: Assessment of Phytochemical and Antioxidant Properties

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    Ghajarbeygi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Essential oils (EO, also called volatile odoriferous oil, are aromatic oily liquids extracted from different parts of plants. In general, the constituents in EOs are terpenes, aromatic compounds (aldehyde, alcohol, phenol, methoxy derivatives, and so on, and terpenoids (isoprenoids. Essential Oils have been known to possess antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, thereby serving as natural additives in foods and food products. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the quantity and quality of compounds, with active chemical and antioxidant properties, of Artemisia spicigera essential oil (EO due to the effect of geographic location and season of harvest on the phenolic compounds of the plant. The plant was collected from east Azarbayjan province, Iran (both before and after the flowering stage. Materials and Methods A. spicigera EO was analyzed by gas chromatogram/mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The antioxidant activity and total phenolic content before and after flowering were evaluated by the Folin Ciocalteu method. Also, the yields of essential oil as a percentage based on the level of dry plant and the volume of extracted oil was determined. Results Analysis of A. spicigera EO by gas chromatogram-mass spectrometry showed that spachulenol 1 H cycloprop (18.39% and bicyclo hexan-3-en, 4-met (26.16%, were the prominent EOs of Artemisia before and after the flowering stage; the total phenolic EO before and after the flowering stage was 23.61 ± 1.08 µg/mL and 17.71 ± 0.9 µg/mL, respectively. Also level of flavonoid content before and after the flowering stage was 37.27 ± 1.70 µg/mL and 29.04 ± 1.30 µg/mL, respectively. This EO was able to reduce the stable free radical 2, 2-diphenol,1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH with an IC50 of 86.14 ± 2.23 and 96.18 ± 2.61 µg/mL, before and after flowering, respectively. Yield of EO before and after flowering was 0.5% and 0.6%, respectively. Conclusions Results have shown that A. spicigera EO

  16. Rhanterium epapposum Oliv. essential oil: Chemical composition and antimicrobial,insect-repellent and anticholinesterase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essential oils from Rhanterium epapposum Oliv. (Asteraceae) was investigated for its repellent, antimicrobial and acetyl- and butyrylcholine esterase inhibitory activities. The oil showed good repellent activity while oils demonstrated weak in antimicrobial and cholinesterase inhibitions. Terpenoids...

  17. Essential oil composition, antioxidant assay and antifungal activity of essential oil and various extracts of Alpinia allughas (Retz. Roscoe leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Sethi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes chemical composition, antifungal activities, antioxidant assays and total phenolic content of essential oil and different extracts from leaves of Alpinia allughas. Fifty-seven components were identified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with eucalyptol (17.4% and humulene epoxide II (14.1% as the main component. The essential oil was found to be remarkable fungicide according to its inhibition action against tested pathogens like Colletotricum falcatum, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotium and Sclerotium rolfsii followed by different extracts obtained in hexane, dichloromethane and methanol, respectively, with their minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 31.25 to 500 µg/ml. The essential oil showed higher phenolic contents (82.36 µg/ml than the extracts. The antioxidant assay evaluated in essential oil and extracts by different methods revealed good-to-moderate antioxidant potential with different IC50 values viz. (174.72–244.04 µg/ml in Fe3+ reducing power, (124.63–135.41 µg/ml in Fe2+ metal-chelating ability, (84.60–138.72 µg/ml in DPPH, (87.06–187.44 µg/ml in OH radical, (78.90–171.65 µg/ml, in NO radical and (97.31–143.24 µg/ml in superoxide anion scavenging activities, respectively, in comparison to the standard antioxidants. Based on obtained results, the herb A. allughas can be a good source to develop a safe and sustainable natural antioxidant.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Felšöciová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. [i]Lavandula angustifolia[/i], [i]Carum carvi[/i], [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Mentha piperita[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.,[i] Pinus sylvestris[/i], [i]Satureia hortensis[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L., [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinali[/i]s L., [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L. [i]Rausch[/i], [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. for antifungal activity against five [i]Penicillium[/i] species: [i]Penicillium brevicompactum[/i], [i]Penicillium citrinum[/i], [i]Penicillium crustosum[/i], [i]Penicillium expansum[/i] and [i]Penicillium griseofulvum[/i]. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against [i]Penicillium[/i] fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L., [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i], [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. and [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i]. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.[i] Rausch[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinalis[/i].

  19. Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L. peel essential oil compositions obtained with different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem GÖLÜKCÜ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus essential oils are one of the most widely used essential oils in the world. They could be obtained by cold press, hydro-distillation etc. In this study, the effects of cold press and hydro‑distillation applications on essential composition of bitter orange peel oil were investigated. Additionally changes in essential oil compositions by drying were presented. Essential oil composition was affected from extraction techniques and drying process. Limonene was determined as the main component of bitter orange essential oil (94.00-94.65%. The other highest components were β-myrcene (1.77-1.90%, linalool (0.53-0.81%, β-pinene (0.29-0.72% and α‑pinene (0.45-0.51% in descending order. As a result, the essential oil compositions of oil obtained by cold-press were more similar to fresh peel oil than the oils obtained by hydro distillation. On the other hand, the essential oil content of fresh sample significantly decreased during drying process. While essential oil content was 3.00% for the fresh peel, it was 2.50% for dried one. These results showed that drying process only affected essential oil content not its oil composition.

  20. Use of oregano (Origanum onites L.) essential oil as hatching egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... These results imply that oregano essential oil had great potential for hatching egg disinfectant and it .... The essential oils obtained from extraction were dried over anhydrous ..... some Greek aromatic plants for antioxidant activity. Phytother. .... vulgare L.) essential oil as alternative hatching egg disinfectant.

  1. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural...

  2. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 582.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural...

  3. Antifungal Activity of Clove Essential Oil and its Volatile Vapour Against Dermatophytic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Chee, Hee Youn; Lee, Min Hee

    2007-01-01

    Antifungal activities of clove essential oil and its volatile vapour against dermatophytic fungi including Candida albicans, Epidermophyton floccosum. Microsporum audouinii, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum were investigated. Both clove essential oil and its volatile vapour strongly inhibit spore germination and mycelial growth of the dermatophytic fungi tested. The volatile vapour of clove essential oil showed fungistatic activity whereas direct application of clove essen...

  4. Study of the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aimed to study the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon ... essential oil production. Within an international project designed to promote the production of essential oils in Senegal, several endemic plants among which C. citratus ..... the article; MBD participated on the writing of.

  5. Supercritical fractional extraction of fennel seed oil and essential oil: Experiments and mathematical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverchon, E.; Marrone, C.; Poletto, M. [Univ. di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Chimica a Alimentare; Daghero, J.; Mattea, M. [Univ. Nacional de Rio Cuarto (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria

    1999-08-01

    Supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction of fennel seeds has been performed in two steps; the first step was performed at 90 bar and 50 C to obtain the selective extraction of essential oil. The second one was performed at 200 bar and 40 C and allowed the extraction of vegetable oil. The experiments were performed using the fractional separation of the extracts using three different CO{sub 2} flow rates (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 kg/h). On the basis of the extraction results and of the analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the vegetable matter, mathematical models of the two extraction processes have been proposed. The extraction of fennel vegetable oil has been modeled using a model based on differential mass balances and on the concept of broken and intact cells as evidenced by SEM. Only one adjustable parameter has been used: the internal mass-transfer coefficient k{sub t}. A fairly good fitting of the experimental data was obtained by setting k{sub t} = 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s. The fennel essential oil extraction process was modeled as desorption from the vegetable matter plus a small mass-transfer resistance. The same internal mass-transfer coefficient value used for vegetable oil extraction allowed a fairly good fitting of the essential oil extraction data.

  6. Supercritical extraction of carqueja essential oil: experiments and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. F. Vargas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Baccharis trimera is a native Brazilian plant which has medicinal properties. In this work a method of supercritical extraction was studied to obtain the popularly essential oil from Baccharis trimera, known as carqueja. The aim was to obtain experimental data and to compare two mathematical models used in the simulation of carqueja (Baccharis trimera oil extraction by supercritical CO2. The two mathematical models are based on mass transfer. One of the models, proposed by Reverchon, is solved numerically and requires two adjustable parameters from the experimental data. The other model chosen is the one proposed by Sovová. This model is solved analytically and requires four adjustable parameters. Numerical results are presented and discussed for the adjusted parameters. The experimental results are obtained in a temperature range of 313.15 K to 343.15 K at 90 bar. The extraction yield of carqueja essential oil using supercritical carbon dioxide ranged between 1.72 % (w/w at 323.15 K and 2.34 % (w/w at 343.15 K, 90 bar with a CO2 flow rate of 3.34.10-8 m³/s for a 0.0015 kg sample of Baccharis trimera.

  7. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SENSITIVITY OF MOLDS ISOLATED FROM WAREHOUSES OF FOOD PRODUCTION FACILITY ON SELECTED ESSENTIAL OILS

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    Łukasz Kręcidło

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of raw materials is one of steps in food production chain. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of selected essential oils on the growth of four fungal strains: Trichoderma viride, Rhizomucor miehei, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium janthinellum. Strains were isolated from warehouses of the food production facility. Selected essential oils: thyme oil, rosewood oil and rosemary oil were used to assess antifungal activity. Chemical composition of essential oils was determined by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS. Antifungal activity of essential oils was estimated in relative to peracetic acid (PAA and sterile water with Tween 80 (0,5%. The influence of essential oils on fungal growth was carried by medium poisoning method. Increment of fungal mycelium was measured every day by 10 days. The thyme essential oils totally inhibited fungal growth in the lowest concentration of 1 mm3·cm-3. The most resistant strain was Penicillium janthinellum.

  9. Luminescence and fluorescence of essential oils. Fluorescence imaging in vivo of wild chamomile oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, F; Fontanella, M; Calderan, L; Sbarbati, A

    2011-06-16

    Essential oils are currently of great importance to pharmaceutical companies, cosmetics producers and manufacturers of veterinary products. They are found in perfumes, creams, bath products, and household cleaning substances, and are used for flavouring food and drinks. It is well known that some of them act on the respiratory apparatus. The increasing interest in optical imaging techniques and the development of related technologies have made possible the investigation of the optical properties of several compounds. Luminescent properties of essential oils have not been extensively investigated. We evaluated the luminescent and fluorescent emissions of several essential oils, in order to detect them in living organisms by exploiting their optical properties. Some fluorescent emission data were high enough to be detected in dermal treatments. Consequently, we demonstrated how the fluorescent signal can be monitored for at least three hours on the skin of living mice treated with wild chamomile oil. The results encourage development of this technique to investigate the properties of drugs and cosmetics containing essential oils.

  10. Essential oils of Mentha pulegium and Mentha rotundifolia from Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lorenzo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from leaves of Mentha pulegium L. and Mentha rotundifolia (L. Huds. from Uruguay were analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Oxygen-containing monoterpenes were the main group of constituents in both oils. Pulegone, isomenthone and menthone were the major components in the oil of M. pulegium, whereas piperitenone oxide and (Z-sabinene hydrate were the major ones in M. rotundifolia. Enantiomerically pure (--menthone, (+-isomenthone, (+-isomenthol, (--menthol and (+-pulegone were detected by multidimensional gas chromatography in the case of M. pulegium oil.Óleos essenciais obtidos por hidrodestilação das folhas de Mentha pulegium L. e Mentha rotundifolia (L. Huds. do Uruguay foram analisados por GC-FID e GC-MS. O grupo de monoterpenes oxigenados foi o mais importante em ambos os óleos, sendo que a pulegona, isomenthona e menthona foram os constituintes maioritarios no óleo de Mentha pulegium, no entanto, o ôxido de piperitenona e (Z-hidrato de sabineno foram os maioritarios na Mentha rotundifolia. (--mentone, (+-isomentone, (+-isomenthol, (--menthol e (+-pulegone enantioméricamente puras foram detectadas por cromatografía gasosa multidimensional no caso do óleo de Mentha pulegium.

  11. Natural (Mineral, Vegetable, Coconut, Essential) Oils and Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verallo-Rowell, Vermén M; Katalbas, Stephanie S; Pangasinan, Julia P

    2016-07-01

    Natural oils include mineral oil with emollient, occlusive, and humectant properties and the plant-derived essential, coconut, and other vegetable oils, composed of triglycerides that microbiota lipases hydrolyze into glycerin, a potent humectant, and fatty acids (FAs) with varying physico-chemical properties. Unsaturated FAs have high linoleic acid used for synthesis of ceramide-I linoleate, a barrier lipid, but more pro-inflammatory omega-6:-3 ratios above 10:1, and their double bonds form less occlusive palisades. VCO FAs have a low linoleic acid content but shorter and saturated FAs that form a more compact palisade, more anti-inflammatory omega-6:-3 ratio of 2:1, close to 7:1 of olive oil, which disrupts the skin barrier, otherwise useful as a penetration enhancer. Updates on the stratum corneum illustrate how this review on the contrasting actions of NOs provide information on which to avoid and which to select for barrier repair and to lower inflammation in contact dermatitis genesis.

  12. Essential oil composition and antioxidant activity of Pterocarya fraxinifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, M A; Nabavi, S F; Nabavi, S M

    2009-07-01

    Current research into free radicals has confirmed that plants rich in antioxidants play an essential role in the prevention of many diseases. The potential antioxidant activities of Pterocarya fraxinifolia bark and leaves investigated employing six in vitro assay systems. IC50 for DPPH radical-scavenging activities were 3.89 +/- 0.09 for leaves and 41.57 +/- 1.30 microg mL(-1) for bark, respectively. The leaf extract exhibited a good reducing power at 2.5 and 80 microg mL(-1) that was comparable with Vit C (p > 0.05). The extracts also showed weak nitric oxide-scavenging activity and Fe2+ chelating ability. The peroxidation inhibition of extracts exhibited values from 92 to 93% at 72nd h, almost at the same pattern of Vitamin C activity (p > 0.05). Based on higher total phenol and flavonoid contents in leaves, higher antioxidant activities were observed in leaf extract. In addition, chemical composition of leaf essential oil was determined. The major compound was bisabolol oxide A (23.6%). Sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes are the major compounds in leaves essential oil. Presence of these compounds may be a reason for the good antioxidant activity of leaf extract.

  13. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  14. Disinfection of vegetable seed by treatment with essential oils, organic acids and plant extract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Birnbaum, Y.E.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Groot, S.P.C.

    2008-01-01

    Various essential oils, organic acids, Biosept, (grapefruit extract), Tillecur and extracts of stinging nettle and golden rod were tested for their antimicrobial properties in order to disinfect vegetable seed. In in vitro assays, thyme oil, oregano oil, cinnamon oil, clove oil and Biosept had the

  15. Menthol differs from other terpenic essential oil constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolassa, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    The European Medicines Agency concluded that there is a risk of suppositories containing terpenic derivatives, which are used to treat coughs and colds, inducing neurological disorders, especially convulsions, in infants and small children. Terpenic derivatives are found in essential oils obtained from plants and include camphor, eucalyptol (syn. 1,8-cineol), thujone, and menthol. Chemistry, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of these compounds are clearly different and explain the appearance of convulsions following camphor, thujone, and eucalyptus oil overdose/poisoning, whereas no convulsions have been reported in cases of menthol overdose/poisoning in accordance with the pharmacological properties of menthol. Thus, a general verdict on all terpenic derivatives without differentiation appears inappropriate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Volatile essential oil constituents of Alpinia smithiae (Zingiberaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Joseph

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of leaf and rhizome essential oils of Alpinia smithiae that grow wild in the Western Ghats of Kerala (South India was analysed by gas chromatography. The major components were -caryophyllene, sabinene, myrcene and 1,8-cineole in both samples, but variation in the yield of oil as well as the major components between the two plant parts was observed.La composición de los aceites escenciales de hojas y rizomas de Alpinia smithiae, que crece silvestre en Ghats Occidental de Kerala (sur de India, fue analizada por cromatografía de gases. Los principales componentes en ambas muestras fueron -cariofileno, sabinero, mirceno y 1,8-cinole, pero fue observada la existencia de variación entre las dos partes de la planta en la capa de aceite así como en los princiapales componentes.

  17. Essential oils from aromatic herbs as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Miranda-Novales, Maria Guadalupe

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics is a health problem. Essential oils (EOs) possess antibacterial properties and have been screened as potential sources of novel antimicrobial compounds. Terpenes and terpenoids are components derived from EOs. Some of these EOs show inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Carvacrol has specific effects on S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Perilla oil suppresses expression of α-toxin, Staphylococcus enterotoxin A and B and toxic shock syndrome toxin. Geraniol shows good activity in modulating drug resistance in several gram-negative species. EOs could act as biopreservatives, reducing or eliminating pathogenic bacteria and increasing the overall quality of animal and vegetable food products. Although clinical studies are scarce, the uses of EOs for topical administration and as penetration enhancers for antiseptics are promising. Little information exists for oral administration. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Repellent Activity of Eight Essential Oils of Chinese Medicinal Herbs t oBlattella germanica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Long Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Eight e ssential oil s of Chinese medicinal herbs ( Angelica sinensis , Curuma aeruginosa , Cyperus rotundus , Eucalyptus robusta , Illicium verum , Lindera aggregate , Ocimum basilicum , and Zanthoxylum bungeanum w ere obtained by hydrodistillation and the essential oil of Eucalyptus robusta leaves was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. A total of 22 components of the essential oil of E. robusta were identified. The principal compounds in E . robusta essential oil were α- p inene (28.74% and 1,8- c ineole (27.18%, spathulenol (6.63%, globulol (6.53% and ρ - m enth-1-en-8-ol (5.20%. The 8 essential oil s and two main components, α -pinene and 1, 8-cineole of the essential oil of E. robusta were evaluated repellency against nymphs of the German cockroaches . Strong repellency (Class V was obtained for Cyperus rotundus and Eucalyptus robusta essential oils and α- p inene and 1, 8- c ineole . However, Illicium verum essential oil possessed weak (Class I repellency. At a concentration of 5 ppm, all the 8 essential oils and the two compounds showed repellent activity after one hour exposure. At 1 ppm concentration, essential oil of Cyperus rotundus showed strong repellency and Class IV repellency was obtained for essential oil of E. robusta and the two compounds after one hour exposure. However, essential oils of I . verum and Lindera aggregata showed strong attractiveness to the German cockroaches at a concentration of 1 ppm .

  19. Combined Toxicity of Three Essential Oils Against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Ramirez, Jose L; Doll, Kenneth M; Bowman, Michael J

    2017-11-07

    Essential oils are potential alternatives to synthetic insecticides because they have low mammalian toxicity, degrade rapidly in the environment, and possess complex mixtures of bioactive constituents with multi-modal activity against the target insect populations. Twenty-one essential oils were initially screened for their toxicity against Aedes aegypti (L.) larvae and three out of the seven most toxic essential oils (Manuka, oregano, and clove bud essential oils) were examined for their chemical composition and combined toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae. Manuka essential oil interacted synergistically with oregano essential oil and antagonistically with clove bud essential oil. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 21 components in Manuka essential oil and three components each in oregano and clove bud essential oils. Eugenol (84.9%) and eugenol acetate (9.6%) were the principal constituents in clove bud essential oil while carvacrol (75.8%) and m-isopropyltoluene (15.5%) were the major constituents in oregano essential oil. The major constituents in Manuka essential oil were calamenene (20%) and 3-dodecyl-furandione (11.4%). Manuka essential oil interacted synergistically with eugenol acetate and antagonistically with eugenol, suggesting that eugenol was a major contributor to the antagonistic interaction between Manuka and clove bud essential oils. In addition, Manuka interacted synergistically with carvacrol suggesting its contribution to the synergistic interaction between Manuka and oregano essential oils. These findings provide novel insights that can be used to develop new and safer alternatives to synthetic insecticides. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 2-undecanone rich leaf essential oil from Zanthoxylum armatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Deepa; Chanotiya, Chandan S

    2011-01-01

    The leaf essential oils of Zanthoxylum armatum DC (Rutaceae) from Kumaon, India, extracted by hydrodistillation, were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major classes of compounds found in the leaf oils were acyclic and menthane monoterpenoids as well as simple alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. The high proportion of non-terpenic acyclic ketones, notably 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, and the low abundance of undec-10-en-1-al and p-phellandren-8-ol make the composition entirely new. Other constituents present in significant amounts were oxygenated monoterpenes, which include 1,8-cineole, linalool, terpinen-4-ol, and alpha-terpineol, and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons represented mainly by trans-caryophyllene, a-humulene and germacrene D. On the contrary, the oil distilled from the leaves on the second day of distillation was characterized by a high content of 2-tridecanone (27.1%) and trans-caryophyllene (7.4%), as compared with 3.5% and 4.6%, respectively, for the fresh leaves; a slight decrease in pH of the distillate was also significant. Moreover, the presence of a high 2-undecanone content followed by 2-tridecanone is being reported for the first time for Z. armatum from this region. In terms of molecular diversity, the simple acyclic ketones dominate the essential oils as compared with linalool that was reported in several previous studies on Z. armatum. Therefore, the two acyclic ketones may be utilized to establish the origin and authenticity of the material.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of a traditionally used complex essential oil distillate (Olbas(®) Tropfen) in comparison to its individual essential oil ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoud, Razan; Sporer, Frank; Reichling, Jürgen; Wink, Michael

    2012-08-15

    Plant extracts and essential oils have been widely studied and used as antimicrobial agents in the last decades. In our study we investigated the antimicrobial activities of Olbas(®) Tropfen (in the following named Olbas), a traditionally used complex essential oil distillate, in comparison to its individual essential oil ingredients. Olbas (10 g) consists of three major components such as peppermint oil (5.3 g), eucalyptus oil (2.1 g), and cajuput oil (2.1 g) and of two minor constituents like juniper berry oil (0.3 g) and wintergreen oil (0.2 g). The composition of Olbas and the five individual essential oils were characterized by GLC-MS. According to GLC-MS analysis 1,8-cineol is the main component of the complex essential oil distillate followed by menthol and menthone. The minimum inhibitory and minimum microbicidal concentrations of Olbas and each of the single essential oils were evaluated in 17 species/strains of bacteria and fungi. Time-kill assay was performed to compare the microbicidal activity of Olbas and peppermint oil during several time intervals. Olbas displayed a high antimicrobial activity against all test strains used in this study, among them antibiotic resistant MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and VRE (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus). Its antimicrobial activity was comparable to that of peppermint oil which was the most potent one of all individual essential oils tested. In the time kill assay Olbas as well as peppermint oil demonstrated similar microbicidal activities. Based on its wide antimicrobial properties Olbas can be a useful agent for the treatment of uncomplicated infections of skin and respiratory tract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Essential oils as natural medicinal substances: review article

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    Ehsan Aali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Herbal essential oils are volatile, natural, complex compounds formed by medicinal plants as secondary metabolites. As reported by international organization for standardization (ISO, the term "essential oils" (EOs is defined for a product obtained from vegetable raw materials or fruit using distillation with water or steam. The EOs are generally complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds include hydrocarbons (terpenes and sesquiterpenes and oxygenated compounds (alcohols, esters, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, lactones, phenols, and phenol ethers compounds. In medicinal plants, the EOs chemical profile usually very varies because of both intrinsic (sexual, seasonal, ontogenetic, and genetic variations and extrinsic (ecological and environmental aspects factors, also the EOs composition differs not only in the number and type of molecules but also in their stereochemical structures, and can be very different according to the extraction method. EOs represents a “green” alternative in the nutritional and pharmaceutical fields due to reported antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties thus, in recent times; EOs has gained great popularity as consumers have developed a particular ever-growing awareness toward the use of natural ingredients, especially in food and household. Therefore, the present review provides a comprehensive summary on the method of preparation of EOs from medicinal plants, chemical composition analysis, their biological and pharmacological effects and their potential benefits on health level. Present information was compiled using keywords “Essential oil, Medicinal Plants and Natural additive in scientific database as Science Direct, Elsevier, PubMed, Google scholar and SID, until 2005 to 2015. EOs have great antimicrobial activity and mostly destroy bacteria, fungi and viruses without harmful effects on consumer’s health. Finding of this study showed that the Thymol, α-Pinene,

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Basil, Oregano, and Thyme Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Hercules; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2017-03-28

    For centuries, plants have been used for a wide variety of purposes, from treating infectious diseases to food preservation and perfume production. Presently, the increasing resistance of microorganisms to currently used antimicrobials in combination with the appearance of emerging diseases requires the urgent development of new, more effective drugs. Plants, due to the large biological and structural diversity of their components, constitute a unique and renewable source for the discovery of new antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic compounds. In the present paper, the history, composition, and antimicrobial activities of the basil, oregano, and thyme essential oils are reviewed.

  5. Plant regeneration from callus culture of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides Nash

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    Somporn Prasertsongskun

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to establish cell suspension culture of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides Nash from Surat Thani germplasm source and efficient plant regeneration from callus derived from such cultures. Cell suspension cultures were established from calli derived from inflorescence of vetiver. Optimum cell proliferation occurred in liquid N6 medium supplemented with 10 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and 10 mM proline. The cell suspension formed the highest small colonies when plated on solid MS medium containing 0.45 μM 2,4-D. After subsequent transfer to regeneration medium (MS free medium 65% of plantlets were obtained.

  6. Sensory attribute preservation in extra virgin olive oil with addition of oregano essential oil as natural antioxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Claudia M; Nepote, Valeria; Grosso, Nelson R

    2012-09-01

    Four commercial varieties of oregano are farmed in Argentina: "Compacto,"Cordobes,"Criollo," y "Mendocino." Oregano essential oil is known for antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the intensities of positive and negative attributes in extra virgin olive oil with addition of essential oil obtained from the 4 Argentinean oregano types. Oregano essential oil was added into olive oil at 0.05% w/w. The samples were stored in darkness and light exposure during 126 d at room temperature. The intensity ratings of fruity, pungency, bitterness, oregano flavor, and rancid flavor were evaluated every 21 d by a trained sensory panel. In general, samples with addition of oregano essential oil in olive oil exhibited higher and lower intensity ratings of positive and negative attributes, respectively, during storage compared with the control samples. The first 2 principal components explained 72.3% of the variability in the olive oil samples. In general, positive attributes of olive oil were highly associated with the addition of oregano essential oil in darkness, whereas rancid flavor was negatively associated with them. Olive oil with oregano "Cordobes" essential oil was oppositely associated with light exposure treatments and negative attribute (rancid flavor) suggesting better performance as natural antioxidant of this essential oil in olive oil. The result of this study showed that the presence of oregano essential oil, specially "Cordobes" type, preserve sensory quality of extra virgin olive oil prolonging the shelf life of this product. Extra virgin olive oil is highly appreciated for its health benefits, taste, and aroma. These properties are an important aspect in this product quality and need to be preserved. The addition of natural additives instead of synthetic ones covers the present trend in food technology. This research showed that the addition of oregano essential oil preserved the intensity ratings of positive attributes

  7. Potential of eleven Eucalyptus species for the production of essential oils

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Paulo Henrique Müller da; Brito,José Otávio; Silva Junior,Francides Gomes da

    2006-01-01

    Most Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil aim the production of paper and charcoal, but the use of the species for lumbering, construction and extraction of essential oil has increased. Eleven species of Eucalyptus were assessed in regard to their essential oil production potential, nine never used before for commercial, essential oil extraction. Assessements were compared with Eucalyptus citriodora and Eucalyptus globulus, already explored in oil production for perfume and medical purposes, aimi...

  8. Performance of Vetiver Grass (Vetiveria zizanioides for Phytoremediation of Contaminated Water

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    Syed Hasan Sharifah Nur Munirah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In tolerance towards metal uptake, there is a need to evaluate the performance of vetiver grass for metal removal to reduce water impurity. This study was aimed to evaluate contaminant removal by vetiver grass at varying root length and plant density and determine the metal uptake in vetiver plant biomass. Pollutant uptake of vetiver grass was conducted in laboratory experiment and heavy metal analysis was done using acid digestion and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Findings indicated that the removal of heavy metal was decreased in seven days of the experiment where iron shows the highest percentage (96%; 0.42 ppm of removal due to iron is highly required for growth of vetiver grass. Removal rate of heavy metals in water by vetiver grass is ranked in the order of Fe>Zn>Pb>Mn>Cu. Results also demonstrated greater removal of heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn at greater root length and higher density of vetiver grass because it increased the surface area for metal absorption by plant root into vetiver plant from contaminated water. However, findings indicated that accumulation of heavy metals in plant biomass was higher in vetiver shoot than in root due to metal translocation from root to the shoot. Therefore, the findings have shown effective performance of vetiver grass for metal removal in the phytoremediation of contaminated water.

  9. Essential oil and other constituents from Magnolia ovata fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Letícia F L; Ehrenfried, Carlos Augusto; Riva, Dilamara; Barison, Andersson; de Mello-Silva, Renato; Stefanello, Maria Elida A

    2012-10-01

    The volatile and non-volatile constituents of the unripe fruits of Magnolia ovata (A. St.-Hil.) Spreng. (Magnoliaceae) were studied. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the fruit of two plant populations (A and B) and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS. The oil of sample A was rich in sesquiterpenes, mainly spathulenol (19.3%), while the oil of sample B showed a predominance of aliphatic compounds, mainly hexadecanoic acid (52.0%). Extracts of the dried fruit contained fourteen known compounds including nine lignoids (magnovatin A, magnovatin B, acuminatin, licarin A, oleiferin A, oleiferin C, kadsurenin M, 4-O-demethylkadsurenim M and 7-epi-virolin), two sesquiterpene lactones (parthenolide and michelenolide) and three alkaloids (lysicamine, lanuginosine and O-methylmoschatoline). Michelenolide, 7-epi-virolin and lisycamine are reported for the first time in the species, while the remaining compounds have already been reported in the leaves and/or trunk bark o f Magnolia ovata. Acetylation o f oleiferin A yielded a ne wcompound, acetyl oleiferin A, whose NMR data and that of michelenolide are furnished.

  10. Essential oils from five species of Annonaceae from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Tran D; Dai, Do N; Hoi, Tran M; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2013-02-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the leaves of five species of Annonaceace grown in Vietnam were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The main constituents of Artabotrys hongkongensis Hance were the sesquiterpenes spathulenol (13.1%), beta-caryophyllene (6.6%), gamma-elemene (6.3%) and delta-cadinene (6.3%). beta-Caryophyllene (12.1%), bicycloelemene (11.2%) and bicyclogermacrene (11.6%) were the predominant components of the oil of Melodorum fruticosum Lour, whereas the oil of Polyalthia longifolia var. pendula Hort was comprised mainly of beta-caryophyllene (30.0%), alpha-zingiberene (21.7%), aromadendrene (15.2%) and beta-selinene (9.1%). The main constituents of Fissistigma maclurei Merr. were germacrene D (26.1%), alpha-terpinene (8.2%), spathulenol (10.0%), and bicyclogermacrene (6.6%), while alpha-santalene (14.3%), beta-caryophyllene (6.3%), terpinen-4-ol (6.3%), caryophyllene oxide (5.7%), trans-alpha-bergamotene (5.3%) and allo-ocimene (5.3%) were identified in significant quantity from Fissistigma rufinerve (Hook.f. & Thomson) Merr.

  11. Essential oil from Eupatorium buniifolium leaves as potential varroacide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpiérrez, María Laura; Santos, Estela; Mendoza, Yamandú; Altesor, Paula; Rossini, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    Beekeeping has experienced a great expansion worldwide. Nowadays, several conventional pesticides, some organic acids, and essential oil components are the main means of chemical control used against Varroa destructor, an ectoparasite that may contribute to the colony collapse disorders. Varroa resistance against conventional pesticides has already been reported; therefore it is imperative to look for alternative control agents to be included in integrated pest management programs. A good alternative seems to be the use of plant essential oils (EOs) which, as natural products, are less toxic and leave fewer residues. Within this context, a bioprospecting program of the local flora searching for botanical pesticides to be used as varroacides was launched. A primary screening (driven by laboratory assays testing for anti-Varroa activity, and safety to bees) led us to select the EOs from Eupatorium buniifolium (Asteraceae) for follow up studies. We have chemical characterized EOs from twigs and leaves collected at different times. The three E. buniifolium EOs tested were active against Varroa in laboratory assays; however, there are differences that might be attributable to chemical differences also found. The foliage EO was selected for a preliminary field trial (on an experimental apiary with 40 hives) that demonstrated acaricidal activity when applied to the hives. Although activity was less than that for oxalic acid (the positive control), this EO was less toxic to bees than the control, encouraging further studies.

  12. Antimicrobial effects of spices and herbs essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemet Nevena T.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spices and herbs have been used as food additives since ancient times, as flavouring agents but also as natural food preservatives. A number of spices shows antimicrobial activity against different types of microorganisms. This article gives a literature review of recent investigations considering antimicrobial activity of essential oils widely used spices and herbs, such as garlic, mustard, cinnamon, cumin, clove, bay, thyme, basil, oregano, pepper, ginger, sage, rosemary etc., against most common bacteria and fungi that contaminate food (Listeria spp., Staphylococcus spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia spp., Pseudomonas spp., Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp. and many others. Antimicrobial activity depends on the type of spice or herb, type of food and microorganism, as well as on the chemical composition and content of extracts and essential oils. Summarizing results of different investigations, relative antimicrobial effectiveness can be made, and it shows that cinnamon, cloves and mustrad have very strong antimicrobial potential, cumin, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary show medium inhibitory effect, and spices such as pepper and ginger have weak inhibitory effect.

  13. Invited review: Essential oils as modifiers of rumen microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calsamiglia, S; Busquet, M; Cardozo, P W; Castillejos, L; Ferret, A

    2007-06-01

    Microorganisms in the rumen degrade nutrients to produce volatile fatty acids and synthesize microbial protein as an energy and protein supply for the ruminant, respectively. However, this fermentation process has energy (losses of methane) and protein (losses of ammonia N) inefficiencies that may limit production performance and contribute to the release of pollutants to the environment. Antibiotic ionophores have been very successful in reducing these energy and protein losses in the rumen, but the use of antibiotics in animal feeds is facing reduced social acceptance, and their use has been banned in the European Union since January 2006. For this reason, scientists have become interested in evaluating other alternatives to control specific microbial populations to modulate rumen fermentation. Essential oils can interact with microbial cell membranes and inhibit the growth of some gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. As a result of such inhibition, the addition of some plant extracts to the rumen results in an inhibition of deamination and methanogenesis, resulting in lower ammonia N, methane, and acetate, and in higher propionate and butyrate concentrations. Results have indicated that garlic oil, cinnamaldehyde (the main active component of cinnamon oil), eugenol (the main active component of the clove bud), capsaicin (the active component of hot peppers), and anise oil, among others, may increase propionate production, reduce acetate or methane production, and modify proteolysis, peptidolysis, or deamination in the rumen. However, the effects of some of these essential oils are pH and diet dependent, and their use may be beneficial only under specific conditions and production systems. For example, capsaicin appears to have small effects in high-forage diets, whereas the changes observed in high-concentrate diets (increases in dry matter intake and total VFA, and reduction in the acetateto-propionate ratio and ammonia N concentration) may be beneficial

  14. Mass propagation and essential oil analysis of Artemisia vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Sujatha; Kumari, Bollipo Diana Ranjitha; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Flamini, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Artemisia vulgaris L. (Mugwort) is a threatened and valuable medicinal plant. Attempts have been made in this research to mass propagate its plantlets through in vitro liquid culture technology using Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 6-benzyl adenine (BA) (0.44-8.88 microM). Initially, 22.6 shoots (99.9% shooting frequency) developed from shoot tip explants cultured in MS with 4.44 microM BA at 100 ml flask capacity. This was further subcultured at increasing flask capacity (150, 250, and 500 ml) for shoot proliferation. Of the different concentrations of BA and flask capacities tested, 4.44 microM BA and 500 ml flask capacity were found to produce a maximum of 85.5 shoots after 30 d of culture. Shoot proliferation was found to increase with increasing flask capacity whereas shoot number decreased with increasing BA concentration (>4.44 microM). Individual shoots were isolated and rooted on MS medium containing 8.56 microM indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Then the plantlets were acclimatized under standard laboratory conditions and later under greenhouse conditions. Fresh leaves were collected from greenhouse-grown plants and subjected to essential oil analysis by the simultaneous distillation and extraction method. GC-MS results revealed the presence of 88 components and the extracted oil was rich in camphor (16.8%), alpha-thujone (11.3%), germacrene D (7.2%), camphene (6.5%), 1,8-cineole (5.8%) and beta-caryophyllene (5.4%). This in vitro strategy can be a reliable method for the steady production of a large number of plants for essential oil production, which is reported for the first time for A. vulgaris.

  15. Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of Mentha longifolia (L. Huds. essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Nikšić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Present study describes the antimicrobial activity and free radical scavenging capacity (RSC of essential oil from Mentha longifolia (L. Huds. Aim of this study to investigate the quality, antimicrobial andantioxidant activity of wild species Mentha longifolia essential oil from Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: The chemical profi le of essential oil was evaluated by the means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and thin-layer chromatography (TLC. Antimicrobial activity was tested against 6bacterial strains. RSC was assessed by measuring the scavenging activity of essential oils on 2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH.Results: The main constituents of the essential oil of M. longifoliae folium were oxygenated monoterpenes,piperitone oxide (63.58% and 1,8-cineole (12.03%. Essential oil exhibited very strong antibacterial activity.The most important antibacterial activity essential oil was expressed on Gram negative strains: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aerginosa and Salmonella enterica. subsp.enterica serotype ABONY. Antioxidant activity was evaluated as a RSC. Investigated essential oil was able to reduce DPPH radicals into the neutral DPPHH form (IC50=10.5 μg/ml and this activity was dose –dependent.Conclusion: The study revealed signifi cant antimicrobial activity of the investigated essential oil. The examined oil exhibited high RSC, which was found to be in correlation to the content of mainly monoterpeneketones and aldehydes. These results indicate that essential oils could serve as safe antioxidant and antiseptic supplements in pharmaceuticals.

  16. Seasonal variation in the essential oil of Pilocarpus microphyllus Stapf.

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    FRANCISCA S. N. TAVEIRA

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of the leaves and fine stems of Pilocarpus microphyllus, collected on iron mineralized soil of the Serra de Carajás, Southeast of Pará State, Brazil, during the rainy and dry seasons, were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. The main identified compounds were 2-tridecanone, beta-caryophyllene, 2-pentadecanone, caryophyllene oxide and germacrene D. Their percentage contents varied with the season, the greater values having been detected mainly in the rainy season. For 2-tridecanone and beta-caryophyllene the higher values were observed in the fine stem oils for the former, and in the leaf oils for the latter. For 2-pentadecanone, caryophyllene oxide and germacrene D they were also in the leaf oils. In general, the leaf oils were very distinguishable from those of fine stem oils, even in the same specimen.Os óleos essenciais das folhas e galhos finos de Pilocarpus microphyllus, coletado em solo mineralizado com ferro, na Serra de Carajás, Sudeste do Pará, Brasil, durante as estações chuvosa e seca, foram obtidos por hidrodestilação e analisados por GC-MS. Os principais compostos identificados foram 2-tridecanona, beta-cariofileno, 2-pentadecanona, óxido de cariofileno e germacreno D. Seus teores percentuais variam com a estação, embora os maiores valores tenham sido detectados principalmente na estação chuvosa. Para 2-tridecanona e beta-cariofileno os valores mais expressivos foram observados nos óleos de galhos finos, para o primeiro, e nos óleos das folhas, para o útimo. Para 2-pentadecanona, óxido de cariofileno e germacreno D, os valores mais altos foram, também, nos óleos das folhas. Em geral, os óleos das folhas se apresentaram muito distintos em relação aos galhos finos, assim como também no mesmo espécime.

  17. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  18. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils. PMID:26424908

  19. Bioefficacy of essential and vegetable oils of Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides seeds against Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogang, Hervet Paulain Dongmo; Womeni, Hilaire Macaire; Piombo, Georges; Barouh, Nathalie; Tapondjou, Léon Azefack

    2012-03-01

    Experiments were conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the bioefficacy of essential and vegetable oils of Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides (Rutaceae) against Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). The chemical composition of the essential oil and the fatty acid composition of the vegetable oil extracted from the seeds of Z. xanthoxyloides were determined. The insecticidal activities of these oils and the associated aromatized clay powder were evaluated against A. obtectus. Both oils were strongly repellent (100% repellency at 0.501 μl/cm² essential oil and 3.144 μl/cm² vegetable oil) and highly toxic (LC₅₀ = 0.118 μl/cm² for essential oil) to this beetle after contact on filter paper. The vapors of the essential oil were highly toxic to adult insects (LC₅₀ = 0.044 μl/cm³), and the aromatized powder made from clay and essential oil was more toxic (LD₅₀ = 0.137 μl/g) than the essential oil alone (LD₅₀ = 0.193 μl/g) after 2 days of exposure on a common bean. Both oils greatly reduced the F₁ insect production and bean weight loss and did not adversely affect the bean seed viability. In general, the results obtained indicate that these plant oils can be used for control of A. obtectus in stored beans.

  20. GC-MS Analysis of Insecticidal Essential Oil of Aerial Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Steam distillation of the aerial parts of P. scandens was carried out using Clavenger apparatus in order to obtain the volatile oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analyses (HP-5MS column) of the essential oil were performed and its composition determined. Insecticidal activity of the essential oil ...

  1. Chemical composition, in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and insecticidal activities of essential oil from Cladanthus arabicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of Cladanthus arabicus (L.) Cass was studied for its chemical composition, antioxidant, antimicrobial and insecticidal activities. The essential oil (EO) was analyzed by GC-MS. Sixty seven compounds representing 94.2% of the oil were identified. The m...

  2. Pharmacological activity of the essential oil of Satureja viminea (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Suárez

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract and the essential oil of Satureja viminea (Lamiaceae were tested. General physiologic effects were assessed through the Hippocratic screening test. Non fasted female Sprague Dawley rats were utilized and 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg doses were used. Two animals were used for each dosage level and for the vehicle alone. Exploratory behavior and curiosity were measured using a hole board apparatus and placing non-trained mice on the board and recording the number of holes explored in a 5 minute period. The Boissier chimney test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Muscle strength was assessed through a grasping test where mice were hung by their fore-limbs 40 cm above the base on a horizontal metal stainless bar. In all these tests, 3 groups of 6 albino mice, were treated with 1000 mg/kg of each the essential oil of S. viminea, the vehicle and diazepan (1 mg/kg as a positive control. Analgesic activity was explored in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tail flick method described by D`Amour and Smith (1941 modified by CYTED was implemented on three groups (6 rats each of animals treated with, each the essential oil of S. viminea (1000 mg/kg, the vehicle and indomethacine. The test was carried out just before and 30, 60 and 120 min after oral treatment. Peristaltic activity was measured in albino mice, three groups of 6 animals each, treated orally with each the essential oil of S. viminea (1000 mg/kg, the aqueous extract (1000 mg/kg, and the vehicle. The marker used was activated carbon. Animals were sacrificed 30 min after the marker was given and the percent of total small intestine traversed by it was calculated. Also a lethal dose 50 (LD 50 was determined with the Spearman-Karber method. A dose-related spontaneous motor activity reduction was observed. Exploratory behavior and curiosity were diminished. The grasping strength of mice was reduced. A very clear and significant analgesic effect was observed with the oral

  3. Phytoremediation potential of vetiver grass [Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.)] for tetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rupali; Das, Padmini; Smith, Stephanie; Punamiya, Pravin; Ramanathan, Dil M; Reddy, Ramana; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    The presence of veterinary and human antibiotics in soil and surface water is an emerging environmental concern. The current study was aimed at evaluating the potential of using vetiver grass as a phytoremediation agent in removing Tetracycline (TC) from aqueous media. The study determined uptake, translocation, and transformation of TC in vetiver grass as function of initial antibiotic concentrations and exposure time. Vetiver plants were grown for 60 days in a greenhouse in TC contaminated hydroponic system. Preliminary results show that complete removal of tetracycline occurred within 40 days in all TC treatments. Initial concentrations of TC had significant effect (p < 0.0001) on the kinetics of removaL Tetracycline was detected in the root as well as shoot tissues, confirming uptake and root-to-shoot translocation. Liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry analysis of plant tissue samples suggest presence of metabolites of TC in both root and shoot tissues of vetiver grass. The current data is encouraging and is expected to aid in developing a cost-effective, in-situ phytoremediation technique to remove TC group of antibiotics from wastewater.

  4. Phytoextraction of lead from firing range soils with Vetiver grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. W. Wilde; R. L. Brigmon; D. L. Dunn; M. A. Heitkamp; D. C. Dagnan

    2007-01-01

    Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanoides) along with soil amendments were evaluated for phytoextraction of lead and other metals (zinc, copper, and iron) from the soil of an active firing range at the Savannah River Site, SC. Lead-contaminated soil (300-4,500 ppm/kg) was collected, dried, placed in pots, fertilized, and used as a medium for growing...

  5. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils

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    Stephanie de Rapper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with other oils, synergistic (26.7%, additive (48.9%, non-interactive (23.7%, and antagonistic (0.7% interactions were observed. When investigating different ratios of the two oils in combination, the most favourable interactions were when L. angustifolia was combined with Cinnamomum zeylanicum or with Citrus sinensis, against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively. In 1 : 1 ratios, 75.6% of the essential oils investigated showed either synergistic or additive results, lending in vitro credibility to the use of essential oil blends in aroma-therapeutic practices. Within the field of aromatherapy, essential oils are commonly employed in mixtures for the treatment of infectious diseases; however, very little evidence exists to support the use in combination. This study lends some credence to the concomitant use of essential oils blended with lavender.

  6. Differential effects of selective frankincense (Ru Xiang) essential oil versus non-selective sandalwood (Tan Xiang) essential oil on cultured bladder cancer cells: a microarray and bioinformatics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Frankincense (Boswellia carterii, known as Ru Xiang in Chinese) and sandalwood (Santalum album, known as Tan Xiang in Chinese) are cancer preventive and therapeutic agents in Chinese medicine. Their biologically active ingredients are usually extracted from frankincense by hydrodistillation and sandalwood by distillation. This study aims to investigate the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils in cultured human bladder cancer cells. Methods The effects of frankincense (1,400–600 dilutions) (v/v) and sandalwood (16,000–7,000 dilutions) (v/v) essential oils on cell viability were studied in established human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal human bladder urothelial UROtsa cells using a colorimetric XTT cell viability assay. Genes that responded to essential oil treatments in human bladder cancer J82 cells were identified using the Illumina Expression BeadChip platform and analyzed for enriched functions and pathways. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Human bladder cancer J82 cells were more sensitive to the pro-apoptotic effects of frankincense essential oil than the immortalized normal bladder UROtsa cells. In contrast, sandalwood essential oil exhibited a similar potency in suppressing the viability of both J82 and UROtsa cells. Although frankincense and sandalwood essential oils activated common pathways such as inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 signaling), each essential oil had a unique molecular action on the bladder cancer cells. Heat shock proteins and histone core proteins were activated by frankincense essential oil, whereas negative regulation of protein kinase activity and G protein-coupled receptors were activated by sandalwood essential oil treatment. Conclusion The effects of frankincense and sandalwood essential oils on J82 cells and UROtsa cells involved different mechanisms leading to

  7. Nematicidal activity of plant essential oils and components from coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Oriental sweetgum (Liquidambar orientalis), and valerian (Valeriana wallichii) essential oils against pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junheon; Seo, Sun-Mi; Lee, Sang-Gil; Shin, Sang-Chul; Park, Il-Kwon

    2008-08-27

    Commercial essential oils from 28 plant species were tested for their nematicidal activities against the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Good nematicidal activity against B. xylophilus was achieved with essential oils of coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Oriental sweetgum (Liquidambar orientalis), and valerian (Valeriana wallichii). Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of 26, 11, and 4 major compounds from coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Oriental sweetgum (Liquidambar orientalis), and valerian (Valeriana wallichii) oils, respectively. Compounds from each plant essential oil were tested individually for their nematicidal activities against the pine wood nematode. Among the compounds, benzaldehyde, trans-cinnamyl alcohol, cis-asarone, octanal, nonanal, decanal, trans-2-decenal, undecanal, dodecanal, decanol, and trans-2-decen-1-ol showed strong nematicidal activity. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential nematicides against the pine wood nematode.

  8. The Leaf Essential Oil of Eugenia reinwardtiana Growing in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Joseph J; Clarkson, John R; Deseo, Myrna A; Ford, Andrew J; Lawes, Douglas J; Leach, David N

    2015-09-01

    The leaf essential oils of the two chemotypes of Eugenia reinwardtiana (Blume) DC growing in Australia have been investigated. Chemotype 1, isolated in 0.2% yield, w/w, dry weight, contained major amounts of α-pinene (10-26%), limonene (1-15%), β-caryophyllene (0.7-11%), α-humulene (0.9-16%) and bicyclogermacrene (1-23%). The second chemotype, found only on coastal dunes SW of Lockerbie Qld, and isolated in 0.4-0.6% (w/w, dry weight), contained α-pinene (tr-8.5%) β-caryophyllene (12-27%) and α-humulene (1-17%) as the major terpenes. This chemotype also contained the novel aliphatic diketone, 2-butyl-2,4,4-trimethyl-5-methoxycyclohex-5-en-1,3-dione (18-33%), whose structure determination is reported herein.

  9. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Pham; Chi, Pham Thi Lan; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2013-03-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was investigated. The EOs of the citrus peels were obtained by cold-pressing method and the antifungal activity of EOs was evaluated using the agar dilution method. The results show that the EOs had significant antifungal activity. Lime EO was the best inhibitor of M. hiemalis and F. proliferatum while pomelo EO was the most effective against P. expansum. These results indicate that citrus EOs can be used as antifungal natural products in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  10. Antibacterial activity of Ocimum gratissimum L. essential oil

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    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil (EO of Ocimum gratissimum inhibited Staphylococcus aureus at a concentration of 0.75 mg/ml. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for Shigella flexineri, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., and Proteus mirabilis were at concentrations ranging from 3 to 12 mg/ml. The endpoint was not reached for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (>=24 mg/ml. The MICs of the reference drugs used in this study were similar to those presented in other reports. The minimum bactericidal concentration of EO was within a twofold dilution of the MIC for this organism. The compound that showed antibacterial activity in the EO of O. gratissimum was identified as eugenol and structural findings were further supported by gas chromatography/mass spectra retention time data. The structure was supported by spectroscopic methods.

  11. Tolerance and accumulation of lead in Vetiveria zizanioides and its effect on oil production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotkittikhun, P; Kruatrachue, M; Pokethitiyook, P; Baker, A J M

    2010-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate lead tolerance and accumulation in vetiver grass Vetiveria zizanioides (L.), grown in hydroponics and a pot study and to examine the effect of lead on vetiver oil production. Elevated concentrations of lead decreased the length of shoots and roots of plants. However, vetiver grown in highly contaminated soils showed no apparent phytotoxicity symptoms. Lead concentrations in the shoots and roots of vetiver plants grown in hydroponics were up to 144 and 19530 mg kg(-1) and those grown in soil were 38 and 629 mg kg(-1), respectively. Lead had an effect on vetiver oil production and composition by stimulating oil yield and the number of its constituents. Oil yield ranged from 0.4-1.3%; the highest yields were found in plants grown in nutrient solution with 100 mg Pb l(-1) for 5 weeks (1.29%) and 7 weeks (1.22%). The number of total constituents of vetiver oil also varied between 47-143 compounds when lead was presentin the growth medium. The highest number (143) was found in plants grown in soil spiked with 1000 mg Pb kg(-1). The predominant compound was khusimol (10.7-18.1%) followed by (E)-isovalencenol (10.3-15.6%). Our results indicated that lead could increase the oil production of vetiver.

  12. Toxicity of selected essential oils, silicone oils, and paraffino oil against the common bed bug, cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) resurged in the U.S. and many other countries over the past decade. The need for safe and effective bed bug control products propelled the development of numerous “green pesticides”, mostly with essential oils listed as active ingredients. Various inorganic ...

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

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    Shanayda M.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial properties of essential oils of Lamiaceae Family representatives. Material and methods.The antimicrobial activity of essential oils of investigated plants was studied with using in vitro condition. The essential oils derived from the aerial parts of cultivated plants of Ocimum, Hyssopus, Dracocephalum, Lophanthus, Monarda and Satureja genus harvested during flowering period (in terms of Ternopil region. The antimicrobial activity of essential oils studied plants was studied by serial dilution method and disk diffusion assay. It has been applied on standard microorganism test strains: Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 and Candida albicans ATCC 885-653. Results and discussion. It was conducted a comparative study of the influence of some essential oils of cultivated plants belonging to Lamiaceae family on microorganisms in conditions in vitro. It was found that essential oils of the studied plants were most effective in the maximum concentration (1:10. Gram-positive cocci S. aureus and yeast C. albicans were the most sensitive to influence of investigated essential oils. It was analyzed the relationship of the biological activity with the component composition of essential oils of plants. Essential oils of L. anisatus, M. fistulosa and S. hortensis characterized by the dominance of aromatic compounds and had shown stronger antimicrobial activity than essential oils of

  14. Essential Oils Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Three Thymus Species

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    Hamzeh Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of three wild-growing Thymus species, collected from west of Iran during the flowering stage, were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Under the optimum extraction and analysis conditions, 44, 38, and 38 constituents (mainly monoterpenes compounds were identified in T. kotschyanus Boiss. and Hohen, T. eriocalyx (Ronniger Jalas, and T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak Jalas which represented 89.9%, 99.7%, and 95.8% of the oils, respectively. The main constituents were thymol (16.4–42.6%, carvacrol (7.6–52.3%, and γ-terpinene (3–11.4%. Antioxidant activity was employed by two complementary test systems, namely, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free-radical scavenging and β-carotene/linoleic acid systems. Antioxidant activity of polar subfraction of T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak Jalas was found to be higher than those of the others in DPPH assay, while nonpolar subfraction of T. eriocalyx (Ronniger Jalas has most antioxidant activity in β-carotene/linoleic acid test (19.1±0.1 μg/mL and 96.1±0.8% inhibition rate, resp..

  15. Essential Oil Bioactive Fibrous Membranes Prepared via Coaxial Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Cheng; Chen, Si-Cong; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Huang, Jie; Chang, Ming-Wei; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-06-01

    A novel antimicrobial composite material was prepared by encapsulating orange essential oil (OEO) in zein prolamine (ZP) via the coaxial electrospinning (ES) technique. By manipulating process parameters, the morphological features of ZP/OEO fibers were modulated. Fine fibers with diameters ranging from 0.7 to 2.3 μm were obtained by regulating ZP solution concentration and process parameters during the ES process. Optimal loading capacity (LC) and encapsulation efficiency (EE) of OEO in fibrous ZP mats were determined to be 22.28% and 53.68%, respectively, and were achieved using a 35 w/v% ZP ES solution. The encapsulation of OEO was found to be reliant on ZP solution concentration (the enveloping medium). SEM analysis indicates the surface morphology of ZP/OEO electrospun fibers is dependent on ZP solution loading volume, with lower ZP concentrations yielding defective fibrous structures (for example, beaded and spindled-string like morphologies). Furthermore, this loading volume also influences OEO LC, EE, mat water contact angle and oil retention. CCK-8 assay and cell morphology assessment (HEK293T cells) indicate no significant change with electrospun ZP and ZP/OEO fibrous membranes over an 8 h period. Antimicrobial activity assessment using Escherichia coli, suggests composite nonwovens possess sterilization properties; elucidating potential application in active food packaging, food preservation and therefore sustainability. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. Essential oil of Lepechinia schiedeana (Lamiaceae from Costa Rica

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    José F. Cicció

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the essential oil isolated by steam distillation from aerial parts of the Costa Rican herb Lepechinia schiedeana (Schlecht Vatke (Lamiaceae collected in El Empalme, Costa Rica, was determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC and coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses. Fifty-one components were identified corresponding ca. 93% of the oil. The major components were -pinene (26.6%, cis -pinocamphone (25.1%, -3-carene (6.1%, trans -pinocamphone (4.0%, camphor (3.8% and -caryophyllene (3.7%.Se estudiaron los constituyentes del aceite esencial de las partes aéreas de Lepechinia schiedeana (Lamiaceae mediante el uso de cromatografía de gases (GC y cromatografía de gases acoplada a espectrometría de masas (GC-MS. Se caracterizaron 51 compuestos (que representan ca. del 93% del aceite. El aceite se caracteriza por la presencia de gran cantidad de hidrocarburos monoterpénicos (45.9% y de monoterpenos oxigenados (39.7%. Los componentes mayoritarios fueron -pineno (26.6%, cis -pinocanfona (25.1%, -3-careno (6.1%, trans -pinocanfona (4.0%, alcanfor (3.8% y -cariofileno (3.7%.

  17. Chemotaxonomical markers in essential oil of Murraya koenigii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappan, Thilahgavani; Ramasamy, Perumal; Vairappan, Charles Santhanaraju

    2012-10-01

    The composition of the essential oils of Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng, cultivated at six locations in Peninsula Malaysia and Borneo are presented. The oils were obtained from fresh leaves by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS); 61 compounds were identified, of which eleven were present in all the specimens analyzed. The two major volatile metabolites were identified as beta-caryophyllene (16.6-26.6%) and alpha-humulene (15.2-26.7%) along with nine minor compounds identified as beta-elemene (0.3-1.3%), aromadendrene (0.5-1.5%), beta-selinene (3.8-6.5%), spathulenol (0.6-2.7%), caryophyllene oxide (0.7-3.6%), viridiflorol (1.5-5.5%), 2-naphthalenemethanol (0.7-4.8%), trivertal (0.1-1.0%) and juniper camphor (2.6-8.3%). The results suggest that beta-caryophyllene and alpha-humulene could be used as chemotaxonomical markers for Malaysian M. koenigii, hence these specimens could be of the same stock and different from the ones in India, Thailand and China.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Essential Oils-Present Status and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Sonam; Sharma, Kanika; Guleria, Sanjay

    2017-08-08

    Extensive documentation on the antimicrobial properties of essential oils and their constituents has been carried out by several workers. Although the mechanism of action of a few essential oil components has been elucidated in many pioneering works in the past, detailed knowledge of most of the compounds and their mechanism of action is still lacking. This knowledge is particularly important for the determination of the effect of essential oils on different microorganisms, how they work in combination with other antimicrobial compounds, and their interaction with food matrix components. Also, recent studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with essential oils have significant antimicrobial potential against multidrug- resistant pathogens due to an increase in chemical stability and solubility, decreased rapid evaporation and minimized degradation of active essential oil components. The application of encapsulated essential oils also supports their controlled and sustained release, which enhances their bioavailability and efficacy against multidrug-resistant pathogens. In the recent years, due to increasingly negative consumer perceptions of synthetic preservatives, interest in essential oils and their application in food preservation has been amplified. Moreover, the development of resistance to different antimicrobial agents by bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites, etc. is a great challenge to the medical field for treating the infections caused by them, and hence, there is a pressing need to look for new and novel antimicrobials. To overcome these problems, nano-encapsulation of essential oils and exploiting the synergies between essential oils, constituents of essential oils, and antibiotics along with essential oils have been recommended as an answer to this problem. However, less is known about the interactions that lead to additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. A contributing role of this knowledge could be the design of new

  19. [Gas chromatography for analysis of essential oils. Characteristics of essential oil of Dracocephalum species and the influence of extraction method on its composition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberkovics, Eva; Kakasy, András Zoltán; Héthelyi, B Eva; Simándi, Béla; Böszörményi, Andrea; Balázs, Andrea; Szoke, Eva

    2007-01-01

    In this work the essential oil composition of some less known Dracocephalum species was studied and compared the effectiveness, selectivity and influence of different extraction methods (hydrodistillation, Soxhlet extraction with organic solvents and supercritical fluid extraction) on essential oils. For investigations in Hungary and Transylvania cultivated plant material was used. The analysis of essential oils was carried out by GC and GC-MS methods. The components were identified by standard addition, retention factors and mass spectra. The percentile evaluation of each volatile constituents was made on basis of GC-FID chromatograms. The accuracy of measurements was characterized by relative standard deviation. In the essential oil of D. renati Emb. (studied firstly by us) 18.3% of limonene was measured and carvone, citrals and linalyl acetate monoterpenes, methyl chavicol and some sesquiterpene (e.g. bicyclovetivenol) determined in lower quantities. We established that more than 50% of essential oil of D. grandiflorum L. was formed by sesquiterpenes (beta-caryophyllene and- oxide, beta-bourbonene, beta-cubebene, aromadendrene) and the essential oil of D. ruyschiana L. contained pinocamphone isomers in more than 60%. The oxygenated acyclic monoterpenes, the characteristic constituents of Moldavian dragonhead were present in some tenth percent only in D. renati oil. We found significant differences in the composition of the SFE extract and traditional essential oil of D. moldavica L. The supercritical fractions collected at the beginning of the extraction process were richer in valuable ester component (geranyl acetate) than the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation. The fractions collected at the end of supercritical were poor in oxygenated monoterpenes but rich in minor compounds of traditional oil, e.g. palmitic acid.

  20. Insecticidal action of synthetic girgensohnine analogues and essential oils on Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

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    Juliana Cuadros

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Synthetic girgensohnine analogues, and C. flexuosus and C. sinensis essential oils showed insecticidal activity in R. prolixus. Analogue 3 showed the greatest insecticidal activity among all molecules and oils evaluated under our laboratory conditions.

  1. Investigation on antibacterial synergism of Origanum vulgare and Thymus vulgaris essential oils

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    Stojković D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are well known as strong antimicrobial agents of plant origin. In spite of this, the antimicrobial synergism of essential oils isolated from different plant species is poorly investigated. The following study examines the synergism of the essential oils of Origanum vulgare L. and Thymus vulgaris L against pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium. First, the antibacterial effect of the oils was tested, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC of both oils were determined using the microdilution method. To test whether the oils act synergistically, every possible combination of essential oil concentrations was used in a dynamic checkerboard method. The results indicated that the oils indeed acted synergistically with fractional inhibitory concentration indexes of 0.45 and 0.50. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173032

  2. Evaluation of anxiolytic and sedative effect of essential oil and hydroalcoholic extract of Ocimum basilicum L. and chemical composition of its essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Sajjadi, Seyed Ebrahim; Vaezi, Arefeh

    2015-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum belongs to Lamiaceae family and has been used for the treatment of wide range of diseases in traditional medicine in Iranian folk medicine. Due to the progressive need to anti-anxiety medications and because of the similarity between O. basilicum and Salvia officinalis, which has anti-anxiety effects, we decided to investigate the anxiolytic and sedative activity of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of O. basilicum in mice by utilizing an elevated plus maze and locomotor activity meter. The chemical composition of the plant essential oil was also determined. The essential oil and hydroalcoholic extract of this plant were administered intraperitoneally to male Syrian mice at various doses (100, 150 and 200 mg/kg of hydroalcoholic extract and 200 mg/kg of essential oil) 30 min before starting the experiment. The amount of hydroalcoholic extract was 18.6% w/w and the essential oil was 0.34% v/w. The major components of the essential oil were methyl chavicol (42.8%), geranial (13.0%), neral (12.2%) and β-caryophyllene (7.2%). HE at 150 and 200 mg/kg and EO at 200 mg/kg significantly increased the time passed in open arms in comparison to control group. This finding was not significant for the dose of 100 mg/kg of the extract. None of the dosages had significant effect on the number of entrance to the open arms. Moreover, both the hydroalcoholic extract and the essential oil decreased the locomotion of mice in comparison to the control group. This study shows the anxiolytic and sedative effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of O. basilicum. The anti-anxiety and sedative effect of essential oil was higher than the hydroalcoholic extract with the same doses. These effects could be due to the phenol components of O. basilicum.

  3. Influence of the harvesting time, temperature and drying period on basil (Ocimum basilicum L. essential oil

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    José Luiz S. Carvalho Filho

    Full Text Available Ocimum basilicum L. essential oil with high concentration of linalool is valuable in international business. O. basilicum essential oil is widely used as seasoning and in cosmetic industry. To assure proper essential oil yield and quality, it is crucial to determine which environmental and processing factors are affecting its composition. The goal of our work is to evaluate the effects of harvesting time, temperature, and drying period on the yield and chemical composition of O. basilicum essential oil. Harvestings were performed 40 and 93 days after seedling transplantation. Harvesting performed at 8:00 h and 12:00 h provided higher essential oil yield. After five days drying, the concentration of linalool raised from 45.18% to 86.80%. O. basilicum should be harvested during morning and the biomass dried at 40ºC for five days to obtain linalool rich essential oil.

  4. Plant essential oils potency as natural antibiotic in Indonesian medicinal herb of “jamu”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetjipto, H.; Martono, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The main purposes of this study are to compile antibacterial activity data of essential oils from Indonesian’s plants in order which can be used as a natural antibiotic in “jamu” to increase potential Indonesian medicinal herb. By using Agar Diffusing method, Bioautography and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrum, respectively, antibacterial activity and chemical compounds of 12 plants essential oils were studied in the Natural Product Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Satya Wacana Christian University, Salatiga since 2007 until 2015. The results of this studies showed that all of the essential oils have a medium to a strong antibacterial activity which are in the range of 30 - 2,500 μg and 80-5,000 μg. Further on, the essential oils analyzed by GCMS showed that each essential oils have different dominant compounds. These data can be used as basic doses in the usage of essential oils as natural antibiotics.

  5. Antimicrobial activity and chemical constituents of essential oils and oleoresins extracted from eight pepper species

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    Laira Martinelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Essential oils are the most important compounds produced during secondary metabolism in aromatic plants. Essential oils are volatile, have characteristic odor and are used as defensive agents by plants. In pepper, it is possible to say that essential oils are the “flavor fingerprint” of each species. In the present article, eight species of pepper were studied in order to extract their essential oils and oleoresins, test their antibacterial and antifungal activities and also to identify the compounds present in the most bioactive samples. Results demonstrated that two essential oils [Pimenta dioica (L. Merr. and Schinus terebinthifolius] and three oleoresins (Schinus terebinthifolius and Piper nigrum white and black recorded significant antimicrobial activity. These active essential oils and oleoresins are interesting for use in biotechnological processes employed in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  6. Micromorphology of trichomes and composition of essential oil of Teucrium capitatum

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Teresa; Sevinate-Pinto, Isabel; Barroso, José G.; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Lígia R.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of the glandular trichomes of Teucrium capitatum L., as well as the chemical composition of the essential oils, were studied. Important differences were found with regard to the major constituents of the essential oils of five populations of T. capitatum grown in Portugal. The oil isolated from one population was characterized by a high content of oxygenated monoterpenes (33.0%), isomenthone (7.7%) being the major constituent. Another oil from a population coll...

  7. Distillation Parameters for Pilot Plant Production of Laurus nobilis Essential oil

    OpenAIRE

    Temel Özek

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils have increasing importance in flavour and fragrance industries. They are obtained by distillation techniques. In order to produce an oil with market potential its optimum production parameters have to be well known prior to its commercial production. Determination of the steam distillation parameters of commercially available Laurel leaves oil in pilot plant scale is described. The effect of steam rate and processing time play a major role in distillation of essential oils. Dis...

  8. Cytotoxicity screening of essential oils in cancer cell lines

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    Pollyanna Francielli de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the cytotoxicity activity of the essential oils of Tagetes erecta L., Asteraceae (TE-OE, Tetradenia riparia (Hochst. Codd, Lamiaceae (TR-OE, Bidens sulphurea (Cav. Sch. Bip., Asteraceae (BS-OE, and Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae (FV-OE, traditionally used in folk medicine, against the tumor cell lines murine melanoma (B16F10, human colon carcinoma (HT29, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7, human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa, human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2, and human glioblastoma (MO59J, U343, and U251. Normal hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells were included as control. The cells were treated with essential oil concentrations ranging from 3.12 to 400 µg/ml for 24 h. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using the XTT assay; results were expressed as IC50, and the selectivity index was calculated. The results were compared with those achieved for classic chemotherapeutic agents. TE-OE was the most promising among the evaluated oils: it afforded the lowest IC50 values for B16F10 cells (7.47 ± 1.08 µg/ml and HT29 cells (6.93 ± 0.77 µg/ml, as well as selectivity indices of 2.61 and 2.81, respectively. The major BS-EO, FV-EO and TE-EO chemical constituents were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry as being (E-caryophyllene (10.5%, germacrene D (35.0% and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (43.0% (BS-EO; limonene (21.3% and (E-anethole (70.2% (FV-EO; limonene (10.4%, dihydrotagetone (11.8%, α-terpinolene (18.1% and (E-ocimenone (13.0% (TE-EO; and fenchone (6.1%, dronabinol (11.0%, aromadendrene oxide (14.7% and (E,E–farnesol (15.0% (TR-EO. 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (43.0%, (E-anethole (70.2% and α-terpinolene (18.1%, respectively. These results suggest that TE-OE may be used to treat cancer without affecting normal cells.

  9. Steam distillation extraction kinetics regression models to predict essential oil yield, composition, and bioactivity of chamomile oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is one of the most widely spread and used medicinal and essential oil crop in the world. Chamomile essential oil is extracted via steam distillation of the inflorescences (flowers). In this study, distillation time (DT) was found to be a crucial determinant of yi...

  10. Contribuição para o estudo da destilação do vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides Nash A contribution of the study of vetiver roots distillation

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    Cyro Côrte Brilho

    1961-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram executadas experiências preliminares de destilação das raízes do vetiver, abrangendo alguns tratamentos prévios do material e, por outro lado, ensaiando-se processos para se melhorar a separação do seu óleo essencial. Usou-se, por exemplo, material seco e, também, raízes submetidas a uma maceração prévia em água; empregou-se, nos dois sistemas, o material inteiro e o picado, adotando-se a picagem grossa, a média e a fina. Os resultados obtidos não proporcionam conclusões definitivas e devem ser interpretados, simplesmente, como uma contribuição para que sejam oferecidas melhores condições no desenvolvimento dos futuros trabalhos experimentais nesse setor. A primeira indicação é aquela que aponta a picagem fina das raizes e a sua maceração em água, como o preparo mais adequado. Tal medida traz maior facilidade na liberação da essência e, como fator de importância, um acréscimo na capacidade de carga do alambique, de até 37 por cento. Quanto à destilação, os estudos subseqüentes deverão abranger as questões relativas à duração do processo e à pressão e temperatura do vapor, buscando-se a solução dos problemas que dependem dêsses fatôres. O aquecimento externo, ou indireto, não apresentou diferenças sensíveis. O estudo da condensação patenteou a conveniência, para melhorar a separação, da manutenção da temperatura do condensado, entre 50 e 65ºC. No que diz respeito à decantação do óleo, no vaso separador, bons resultados foram obtidos com a instalação de um filtro retentor, de tecido fino.Because of the high boiling point of its chief volatile constituents, and their high viscosity, the distillation of vetiver roots is beset with considerable difficulties, particularly in regard to the separation of the oil from the distillation water. Its high peculiar viscosity ant the troublesome emoulsion which may occur make oil separation rather complex. Distillation is usually carried out

  11. Chemodiversity of the Essential Oil from Leaves of Abies nebrodensis (Lojac.) Mattei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicchi, Rosario; Geraci, Anna; Rosselli, Sergio; Maggio, Antonella; Bruno, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    Abies nebrodensis (Lojac.) Mattei (Pinaceae) is a species occurring in a very small population only in a restricted area of Sicily. Its taxonomic classification as different species has been object of discussion. In this work the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves is presented for the first time and compared to the essential oils from other euroasiatic species reported in literature. Peculiar characteristics of the essential oil of A. nebrodensis are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  12. Insecticidal activity of some essential oils against larvae of Spodoptera littoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, Roman

    2005-12-01

    Thirty-four essential oils were tested for insecticidal activity (fumigation or topical application) against larvae Spodoptera littoralis. Twenty essential oils applied by fumigation were highly toxic to the third instar of S. littoralis larvae. Two essential oils Nepeta cataria and Thuja occidentalis were highly toxic, with LC50cataria, S. sclarea, O. vulgare, O. compactum, Melissa officinalis, T. mastichina, and Lavandula angustifolia were highly toxic with LD50 < or =0.05 microl/larvae.

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Shanayda M.I.; Pokryshko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial ...

  14. Contact Toxicity and Chemical Composition of Essential Oil of Acantholimon scorpius

    OpenAIRE

    Ardalan Pasdaran Lashgari, Abbas Delazar, Farriba Hesmati Afshar, Dena Parsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plumbaginaceae plants family is a valuable natural insecticidal compound. This research focused on contact toxicity and chemical composition of essential oil obtained from Acantholimon scorpus. Methods: The essential oil from the aerial parts of A. scorpius was extracted by hydrodistillation method and tested for their toxicity against Oryzeaphilus mercator (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenerbrionidae). Chemical compounds of the essential oil was an...

  15. In Vitro Cytotoxic Activity of the Essential Oil Extracted from Artemisia Absinthium

    OpenAIRE

    Mahboubeh Taherkhani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Essential oils are found to have multiple active components which can show in vitro cytotoxic action against various cancerous cell lines. This study reports the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the essential oil from Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae) growing wild in Iran. Methods: Water-distilled essential oil of A. absinthium collected from Ardabil, north-western Iran, was examined for its cytotoxic effects using a modified MTT assay. Air-dried aerial parts of A. absinthium w...

  16. QUALI-QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF EIGHT ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS ESSENTIAL OILS OF DIFFERENT ORIGIN. FIRST REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Miraldi, E; Giachetti, D; MAZZONI, G.; Biagi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim. It is well known that the pharmacological activity of essential oils depends on their major components, which may vary enormously. The aim of the present study was to determine the chemical composition of samples of essential oil of rosemary of different origins, in order to identify the main therapeutic constituents, according to European Pharmacopoeian (EP). Material and Methods. Analytical GC/MS was carried out on a total of eight samples of essential oil of rosemary: seven samples we...

  17. Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of the Essential Oil of Aguaribay (Schinus molle L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Lúcia A. Silva; Maria Silvia Guala; Heriberto Elder; David Díez; Jesus M. Rodilla; Pedro M. de Mendonça Rocha; Eunice Baltazar Pombo

    2012-01-01

    Schinus molle L. (aguaribay, aroeira-falsa, “molle”, family Anacardiaceae), a native of South America, produces an active antibacterial essential oil extracted from the leaves and fruits. This work reports a complete study of its chemical composition and determines the antibacterial activity of Schinus molle L. essential oil and its main components. The results showed that the crude extract essential oil has a potent antibacterial effect on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923...

  18. Antibacterial activity of essential oils of edible spices, Ocimum canum and Xylopia aethiopica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyry Wouatsa, N A; Misra, Laxminarain; Venkatesh Kumar, R

    2014-05-01

    The essential oils of 2 Cameroonian spices, namely, Xylopia aethiopica and Ocimum canum, were chemically investigated and screened for their antibacterial activity. The essential oils were analyzed by means of GC, GC/MS, and NMR. X. aethiopica oil contained myrtenol (12%), a monoterpenoid in highest concentration. The essential oil of O. canum belonged to the known linalool (44%) rich chemotype. The results of the antibacterial screening against the food spoiling bacteria revealed a significant and broad spectrum of activity for these essential oils. The present material of X. aethiopica, which is having myrtenol in relatively higher concentration, has shown moderate antibacterial activity. The bioassay-guided fractionation of Ocimum canum oil through flash chromatography showed that minor compounds, namely, α-terpineol, chavicol, chavibetol, and trans-p-mentha-2,8-dien-ol, significantly contributed for the overall activity observed. Hence, these results evidenced the possible potential of the essential oil of O. canum as a suitable antibacterial for controlling food-borne pathogens whereas the X. aethiopica oil has moderate possibility. There is a strong global demand for the microbe-free, safe, and healthy foods. In this study, we showed that the essential oil of O. canum (wild basil) can be used as antibacterial for food items. Also, we showed that a value addition in the antibacterial potential of O. canum oil can be done by processing the essential oil through flash chromatographic separations. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Effect of Satureja khuzestanica essential oil on oxidative stability of sunflower oil during accelerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mohammad Bagher; Niakousari, Mehrdad; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the application of various concentrations (0.02%, 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%) of Satureja khuzestanica essential oil (EO) was examined on the oxidative stability of sunflower oil and compared to butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) during storage at 60°C. Gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry analyses of the oils revealed that carvacrol (87.7%) was the major component of EO. Peroxide value and anisidine value measurements in sunflower oil showed that all concentrations of EO had antioxidant effects in comparison to BHA. Oil samples supplemented with EO concentration of 0.08% were the most stable during storage (p < 0.05). EO also was able to reduce the stable free radical 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl with a 50% inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of 31.5 ± 0.6 µg mL⁻¹. Therefore, the results indicate that EO could be used as a natural antioxidant in food lipids.

  20. Influence of Teucrium polium L. essential oil on the oxidative stability of canola oil during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad, Ruhollah; Farahmandfar, Reza

    2017-09-01

    The susceptibility of Teucrium polium essential oil (EO) as an antioxidant for canola oil was studied. Major compounds of the EO were 11-acetoxyeudesman-4-α-ol (26.3%) and α-bisabolol (24.6%). Different concentrations (200, 600 and 1200 ppm) of EO and synthetic antioxidant BHA (200 ppm) were added to canola oil and incubated for 60 days at room temperature. Acid value (AV), peroxide value (PV), carbonyl value (CV), iodine value (IV), total phenolics (TP), total polar compounds (TPC) and oxidative stability index (OSI) of canola oil were determined. Antioxidant capacity of the EO was measured by DPPH and β-carotene-linoleic acid assays. Results exhibited that DPPH and β-carotene-linoleic acid experiment detections on the EO were analogous in high concentrations to those detected on BHA. Moreover, incorporated EO samples had better AV, PV, CV, IV, TP and TPC than control. EO at concentration of 600 ppm indicated higher antioxidant activity in canola oil compared with BHA.

  1. Static and dynamic superheated water extraction of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota

    2009-09-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) performed in both static and dynamic condition (S-SWE and D-SWE, respectively) was applied for the extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris L. The influence of extraction pressure, temperature, time, and flow rate on the total yield of essential oil and the influence of extraction temperature on the extraction of some chosen components are discussed in the paper. The SWE extracts are related to PLE extracts with n-hexane and essential oil obtained by steam distillation. The superheated water extraction in dynamic condition seems to be a feasible option for the extraction of essential oil components from T. vulgaris L.

  2. Chemical composition and biological activities of the essential oils from Duguetia lanceolata St. Hil. barks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Orlando V; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; Alves, Maria S; Araújo, Aílson A L; Pinto, Míriam A O; Amaral, Maria P H; Rodarte, Mírian P; Kaplan, Maria A C

    2012-09-13

    Essential oils of Duguetia lanceolata barks, obtained at 2 (T2) and 4 h (T4), were identified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. β-elemene (12.7 and 14.9%), caryophyllene oxide (12.4 and 10.7%) and β-selinene (8.4 and 10.4%) were the most abundant components in T2 and T4, respectively. The essential oils inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The essential oils were cytotoxic against brine shrimp. The extraction time influenced the chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils obtained from the barks of D. lanceolata.

  3. [Determination of chemical constituents of the essential oil from Cnidium monnieri by GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qin; Cui, Zhaojie; Liu, Tingli; Dong, Yan

    2002-08-01

    The chemical components of the essential oil from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson were analyzed by GC-MS. The essential oil was extracted from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson by steam distillation, the components analyzed with the different kinds of capillary columns, the optimum separated and analytical conditions were researched, the amount of the components from the essential oil were determinated by normalization method. The separated components were identified by GC-MS. 50 components composed of about 86% of the total essential oil were separated and identified. The method is reliable and stable.

  4. Anthelmintic activity of essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum Linn. and eugenol against Haemonchus contortus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pessoa, L.M; Morais, S.M; Bevilaqua, C.M.L; Luciano, J.H.S

    2002-01-01

    The ovicidal activity of the essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum Linn. (Labideae) and its main component eugenol was evaluated against Haemonchus contortus, gastrointestinal parasite of small ruminants...

  5. Composition and antifungal activity of essential oils from Piper aduncum, Piper arboreum and Piper tuberculatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickiene Hosana M. Debonsi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of essential oils from leaves, stems and fruits of Piper aduncum, P. arboreum and P. tuberculatum was examined by means of GC-MS and antifungal assay. There was a predominance of monoterpenes in P. aduncum and P. tuberculatum and of sesquiterpenes in P. arboreum. P. aduncum showed the richest essential oil composition, including linalool. The essential oils from fruits of P. aduncum and P. tuberculatum showed the highest antifungal activity with the MIC of 10 µg as determined against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum, respectively. This is the first report of the composition of essential oils from P. tuberculatum.

  6. Allelopathic activity of medicinal plant essential oils on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cíntia Alvarenga Santos Fraga de Miranda; Maria das Graças Cardoso; Maria Laene Moreira de Carvalho; Samisia Maria Fernandes Machado; Marcos de Souza Gomes; Juliana de Andrade; Maria Luisa Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, essential oils have gained commercial interest in the agricultural area, mainly for their allelopathic, insecticidal, antifungal, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and, also...

  7. The effect of environmental factors on growth characteristics, seed germination and essential oils of Ziziphora clinopodioides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Younes Asri; Maryam Firozi Ardestani; Mina Rabie; Gholamreza Bakhshi Khaniki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between altitude, climate and soil characteristics as important and effective factors on the growth characteristics, seed germination and essential oils of Ziziphora...

  8. Study on the Antimicrobial activity and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Essential Oils of Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V.N.Srujan and M.Sravanthi

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of essential oils of garlic, clove and cinnamon were estimated by using various bacterial pathogens. Among the bacterial pathogens tested against essential oil of garlic, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be highly sensitive followed by E.coli. L.monocytogenes and S.pyogenes were found to be less sensitive. The essential oil of clove was found to be most active against S.aureus followed by E.coli. B.cereus and C. jejuni. The essential oil of cinnamon was also most active against S.aureus followed by E.coli and C.jejuni. Essential oil of cinnamon was found to be active against all the bacterial pathogens tested, when compared to garlic and clove oils. However Staph. aureus, E. coli and C.jejuni were found to be most sensitive to the action of essential oils of garlic, clove and cinnamon. Among the bacterial pathogens tested against essential oils of spices to know the MIC by agar diffusion method, C.jejuni was found to be most sensitive to the essential oil of garlic followed by E.coli, S. typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus. L. monocytogenes and Methicillin resistant Staph. aureus were found to be comparatively less sensitive. Essential oil of clove was also found to be highly effective against C.jejuni followed by E.coli, S.typhimurium and S.aureus. Again L.monocytogenes and Methicillin resistant S.aureus were comparatively less sensitive to the action of essential oil of clove. All most all the bacterial pathogens tested were found to be sensitive to the essential oil of cinnamon. However C.jejuni and E.coli were found to be most sensitive followed by S.typhimurium, Staph. aureus and Methicillin resistant Staph. aureus . [Vet. World 2011; 4(7.000: 311-316

  9. Chemical Composition, Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Essential Oils from Organically Cultivated Fennel Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Saleh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of the fruits of three organically grown cultivars of Egyptian fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. azoricum, Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce and Foeniculum vulgare var. vulgare were examined for their chemical constituents, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oils revealed the presence of 18 major monoterpenoids in all three cultivars but their percentage in each oil were greatly different. trans-Anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene were highly abundant in all of the examined oils. Antioxidant activities of the essential oils were evaluated using the DPPH radical scavenging, lipid peroxidation and metal chelating assays. Essential oils from the azoricum and dulce cultivars were more effective antioxidants than that from the vulgare cultivar. Antimicrobial activities of each oil were measured against two species of fungi, two species of Gram negative and two species of Gram positive bacteria. All three cultivars showed similar antimicrobial activity.

  10. Composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oils from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Gonzaga, Wellington; Weber, Andréia Denise; Giacomelli, Sandro Rogério; Simionatto, Euclésio; Dalcol, Ionara Irion; Dessoy, Emilia Carolina Machado; Morel, Ademir Farias

    2003-08-01

    The essential oils from the aerial parts of leaves, fruits and flowers of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium of Southern Brazil (Rio Grande do Sul), were analysed by GC, GC/MS, and chiral phase gas chromatography (CPGC). Forty-eight compounds were identified from the essential oils. The major constituents of the essential oil of the leaves were germacrene D (34 %) and bicyclogermacrene (23 %) and of the fruits, menth-2-en-1-ol (46.2 %), beta-myrcene (30.2 %), (-)-linalool (15 %) and (-)-alpha-terpineol (8.45 %). beta-Myrcene (65 %) and menth-2-en-1-ol (5.4 %) dominate the essential oil of the flowers. The oils of the leaves and fruits were bioactive with antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive), and Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella setubal bacteria (Gram negative) microorganisms, while the essential oil of the flowers was inactive.

  11. Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejonklev, Johan; Kidmose, U.; Jensen, S.

    2016-01-01

    of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0 g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24 d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content....... Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels...... of the essential oils used, with the total amount of terpenes increasing when essential oils were added to the diet. Sensory properties of the produced milk were altered as well, and milk samples from animals receiving essential oil treatment were perceived as having a fresher aroma and lower stored aroma...

  12. A Systematic Review of the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Essential Oils in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damião Pergentino de Sousa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of standardized essential oils (such as Lavender officinalis, in treating anxiety disorders strongly suggests that these natural products are an important candidate source for new anxiolytic drugs. A systematic review of essential oils, their bioactive constituents, and anxiolytic-like activity is conducted. The essential oil with the best profile is Lavendula angustifolia, which has already been tested in controlled clinical trials with positive results. Citrus aurantium using different routes of administration also showed significant effects in several animal models, and was corroborated by different research groups. Other promising essential oils are Citrus sinensis and bergamot oil, which showed certain clinical anxiolytic actions; along with Achillea wilhemsii, Alpinia zerumbet, Citrus aurantium, and Spiranthera odoratissima, which, like Lavendula angustifolia, appear to exert anxiolytic-like effects without GABA/benzodiazepine activity, thus differing in their mechanisms of action from the benzodiazepines. The anxiolytic activity of 25 compounds commonly found in essential oils is also discussed.

  13. Chemical composition and some biological activities of the essential oils from basil Ocimum different cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, Arpi; Markosian, Anahit; Petrosyan, Margarit; Sahakyan, Naira; Babayan, Anush; Aloyan, Samvel; Trchounian, Armen

    2017-01-19

    The plants belonging to the Ocimum genus of the Lamiaceae family are considered to be a rich source of essential oils which have expressed biological activity and use in different area of human activity. There is a great variety of chemotypes within the same basil species. Essential oils from three different cultivars of basil, O. basilicum var. purpureum, O. basilicum var. thyrsiflora, and O. citriodorum Vis. were the subjects of our investigations. The oils were obtained by steam distillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus. The gas chromatography mass selective analysis was used to determine their chemical composition. The antioxidant activities of these essential oils were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assays; the tyrosinase inhibition abilities of the given group of oils were also assessed spectophotometrically, and the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was determined by the agar diffusion method, minimal inhibitory concentrations were expressed. According to the results, the qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oils was quite different: O. basilicum var. purpureum essential oil contained 57.3% methyl-chavicol (estragol); O. basilicum var. thyrsiflora oil had 68.0% linalool. The main constituents of O. citriodorum oil were nerol (23.0%) and citral (20.7%). The highest antioxidant activity was demonstrated by O. basilicum var. thyrsiflora essential oil. This oil has also exhibited the highest tyrosinase inhibition level, whereas the oil from O. citriodorum cultivar demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity. The results obtained indicate that these essential oils have antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activity and can be used as natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agents in medicine, food industry and cosmetics.

  14. Lippia origanoides essential oil: an efficient and safe alternative to preserve food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, C; Pina, E S; Taleb-Contini, S H; Bertoni, B W; Cestari, I M; Espanha, L G; Varanda, E A; Camilo, K F B; Martinez, E Z; França, S C; Pereira, A M S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Lippia origanoides essential oil as a preservative in industrial products. The composition, antimicrobial activity, mutagenic and toxic potential of L. origanoides were determined. Then, the effect of essential oil as a preservative in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products was evaluated. The essential oil of L. origanoides consisted mainly of oxygenated monoterpenes (38·13%); 26·28% corresponded to the compound carvacrol. At concentrations ranging from 0·312 to 1·25 μl ml-1 and in association with polysorbate 80, the essential oil of L. origanoides inhibited the growth of all the tested micro-organisms. The medium lethal dose in mice was 3·5 g kg-1 , which categorizes it as nontoxic according to the European Union criteria, and negative results in the Ames test indicated that this oil was not mutagenic. In combination with polysorbate 80, the essential oil exerted preservative action on orange juice, cosmetic and pharmaceutical compositions, especially in the case of aqueous-based products. Lippia origanoides essential oil is an effective and safe preservative for orange juice, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. This study allowed for the complete understanding of the antimicrobial action and toxicological potential of L. origanoides essential oil. These results facilitate the development of a preservative system based on L. origanoides essential oil. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. FUNGITOXICITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON PLASMOPARA VITICOLA,CAUSAL AGENT OF GRAPEVINE DOWNY MILDEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RÉGIS DE OLIVEIRA FIALHO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the fungitoxic (antifungal effect of seven essential oils on Plasmopara viticola, the causal agent of grapevine downy mildew. The cinnamon, eucalyptus globulus, marjoram, melaleuca, peppermint, oregano and white thyme essential oils were compared with the mancozeb + metalaxyl-M fungicide. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of essential oils on spore germination. The first experiment evaluated the effect of direct contact of essential oils on the pathogen; the second evaluated the effect of volatile compounds on the pathogen and the third assessed the behavior of essential oils, when applied to vine leaves in field conditions, on the pathogen. All essential oils inhibited the spores’ germination, but in varying degrees, in addition, presenting fungistatic activity. All the essential oils showed chemical instability when the incubation time or the interval between products application where increased, all oils decrease antifungal activity percentage. Noteworthy, the cinnamon and the eucalyptus globulus essential oils were the most fungitoxic (antifungal on P. viticola.

  16. Chemical Composition and Biological Investigations of Eryngium triquetrum Essential Oil from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medbouhi, Ali; Merad, Nadjiya; Khadir, Abdelmounaim; Bendahou, Mourad; Djabou, Nassim; Costa, Jean; Muselli, Alain

    2017-10-30

    The chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil obtained from Eryngium triquetrum from Algeria were studied. The chemical composition of sample oils from 25 locations was investigated using GC-FID and GC/MS. Twenty-four components representing always more than 87% were identified in essential oils from total aerial parts of plants, stems, flowers and roots. Falcarinol is highly dominant in the essential oil from the roots (95.5%). The relative abundance of falcarinol in the aerial parts correlates with the phenological stages of the plant. Aerial parts of E. triquetrum produce an essential oil dominated by falcarinol during the early flowering stage, and then there is a decrease in falcarinol and rebalancing of octanal during the flowering stage. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of the chemical composition of E. triquetrum essential oil. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity by means of the paper disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays, showed a moderate efficiency of E. triquetrum essential oil. Using the DPPH method, the interesting antioxidant activity of E. triquetrum essential oil was established. These activities could be attributed to the dominance of falcarinol. The outcome of our literature search on the occurrence of falcarinol in essential oils suggests that E. triquetrum from Algeria could be considered as a possible source of natural falcarinol. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Composition and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Vietnamese Citrus Peels Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hai Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inhibition of α-glucosidase is an important factor to control postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Citrus essential oils (CEO are among the most widely used essential oils, and some of them exhibited promising antidiabetic effect. However, the α-glucosidase inhibition of CEO has not been investigated so far. The present work aims to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibition of essential oils from six Vietnamese Citrus peels. Methods. The chemical composition of essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from six Citrus peels was analyzed by GC-MS. All essential oils were tested for their inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase using p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Results. In Buddha’s hand and lime peels, the major components were limonene (59.0–61.31% and γ-terpinene (13.98–23.84% while limonene (90.95–95.74% was most abundant in pomelo, orange, tangerine, and calamondin peels. Among the essential oils, the Buddha’s hand oil showed the most significant α-glucosidase inhibitory effect with the IC50 value of 412.2 μg/mL. The combination of the Buddha’s hand essential oil and the antidiabetic drug acarbose increased the inhibitory effect. Conclusions. The results suggested the potential use of Buddha’s hand essential oil as an alternative in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Sensitivity of Candida albicans to essential oils: are they an alternative to antifungal agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, E; Cantamessa, S; Pavan, M; Novello, G; Massa, N; Rocchetti, A; Berta, G; Gamalero, E

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, responsible for the majority of yeast infections in humans. Essential oils, extracted from aromatic plants, are well-known antimicrobial agents, characterized by a broad spectrum of activities, including antifungal properties. The aim of this work was to assess the sensitivity of 30 different vaginal isolated strains of C. albicans to 12 essential oils, compared to the three main used drugs (clotrimazole, fluconazole and itraconazole). Thirty strains of C. albicans were isolated from vaginal swab on CHROMagar™ Candida. The agar disc diffusion method was employed to determine the sensitivity to the essential oils. The antifungal activity of the essential oils and antifungal drugs (clotrimazole, itraconazole and fluconazole) were investigated using a microdilution method. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed to get a deep inside on cellular damages. Mint, basil, lavender, tea tree oil, winter savory and oregano essential oils inhibited both the growth and the activity of C. albicans more efficiently than clotrimazole. Damages induced by essential oils at the cellular level were stronger than those caused by clotrimazole. Candida albicans is more sensitive to different essential oils compared to the main used drugs. Moreover, the essential oil affected mainly the cell wall and the membranes of the yeast. The results of this work support the research for new alternatives or complementary therapies against vaginal candidiasis. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Possibility for use essential oils in veterinary medicine and animal husbandry with special emphasis on oregano oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the latest studies on possible applications of oregano essential oil in veterinary medicine and animal livestock production. The first part of the paper deals with the definition of essential oils, possibilities for their extraction from plants, possibilities for their application in human and veterinary medicine, the interest of a science in essential oils, and, essential oils classification based on their use in human and veterinary medicine. The second part of the review deals with the properties of oregano essential oil, its main active principles, carvacrol and thymol and its application in veterinary medicine and animal livestock production. Oregano essential oil may be applied in animal feed, in the treatment of coccidiosis of domestic animals and candidiasis. It can be applied as a larvicide, repellent, insecticide and acaricide. It is used in aquaculture to treat fish diseases caused by bacteria and parasites or in the hatchery industry as a disinfectant for eggs or for disinfection of manure. The greatest potential of oregano essential oil is the possibility of its application in organic agriculture and organic animal husbandry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31087

  20. Antimicrobial, antioxidative, and insect repellent effects of Artemisia absinthium essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana; Jovanović, Boris; Jović, Jovana; Ilić, Budimir; Miladinović, Dragoljub; Matejić, Jelena; Rajković, Jelena; Dorđević, Ljubiša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Zlatković, Bojan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil of Artemisia absinthium was studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of ethnopharmacological uses of this plant species in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases and wounds, and as an insect repellent. The aerial part of the plant was hydrodistilled, and the chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Forty-seven compounds, corresponding to 94.65 % of the total oil, were identified, with the main constituents being sabinene (24.49 %), sabinyl acetate (13.64 %), and α-phellandrene (10.29 %). The oil yield was 0.23 % (v/w). The antimicrobial activity of the oil was investigated against ten bacterial isolates (from patients wounds and stools) and seven American Type Culture Collection strains using a microwell dilution assay. The minimal inhibitory/bactericidal concentration of the oil ranged from absinthium essential oil. Acute oral exposure to the essential oil did not cause mortality in the treated mice, but it did cause neurological, muscle, and gastrointestinal problems. A subchronic toxicity test on Drosophila melanogaster showed that the essential oil of A. absinthium is toxic for developing insect larvae. Starting with the concentration of 0.38 % of essential oil in medium, significant mortality of larvae exposed to the oil was noted when compared to the control. Probit analysis revealed that the LC50 value of A. absinthium essential oil for D. melanogaster larvae after 15 days of exposure was 6.31 % (49 mg/mL). The essential oil also affected the development of D. melanogaster larvae and significantly delayed achievement of the pupa stadium. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.