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Sample records for veterinary radiology association

  1. Radiology in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrusovsky, J.; Benes, J.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook is presented for pregraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary medicine, offering an extensive review of all aspects of radiology as applied in veterinary sciences. Based on findings published in the literature and the authors' own research, the textbook familiarizes the reader with the problems of nuclear physics, biological effects of ionizing radiation on animals, the principles of biological cycles of radionuclides in the atmosphere, the fundamentals of radiochemistry, dosimetry, radiometry and nuclear medicine. Radiation protection of animals, raw materials, feeds, foodstuff and water, and the questions of the aplications of ionizing radiation and of radionuclides in veterinary medicine are discussed in great detail. The publication is complemented with numerous photographs, figures and graphs. (L.O.)

  2. Radiological protection in veterinary practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Emiko; Tabara, Takashi; Kusama, Tomoko.

    1990-01-01

    To propose measures for radiological protection of veterinary workers in Japan, X-ray exposure of workers in typical conditions in veterinary clinics was assessed. Dose rates of useful beam and scattered radiation, worker exposure doses at different stations, and effectiveness of protective clothing were determined using TLD and ion chambers. As precausions against radiation, the following practices are important: (1) use of suitable and properly maintained X-ray equipment, (2) proper selection of safe working stations, (3) use of protective clothing. Regulations are necessary to restrict the use of X-rays in the veterinary field. Because the use of X-rays in the veterinary field is not currently controlled by law, the above precautions are essential for minimizing exposure of veterinary staff. (author)

  3. Radiation protection in veterinary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hone, C.P.

    1989-06-01

    This Code of Practice is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons in ensuring that workers and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of x-ray equipment in veterinary practice. (author)

  4. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in veterinary diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Ruiz, L.; Jimenez-Flores, Y.; Rivera-Montalvo, T.; Arias-Cisneros, L.; Méndez-Aguilar, R.E.; Uribe-Izquierdo, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of Environmental and Personnel Dosimetry made in a radiology area of a veterinary hospital. Dosimetry was realized using thermoluminescent (TL) materials. Environmental Dosimetry results show that areas closer to the X-ray equipment are safe. Personnel Dosimetry shows important measurements of daily workday in some persons near to the limit established by ICRP. TL results of radiation measurement suggest TLDs are good candidates as a dosimeter to radiation dosimetry in veterinary radiology. - Highlights: ► Personnel dosimetry in laboratory veterinary diagnostic was determined. ► Student workplaces are safe against radiation. ► Efficiency value of apron lead was determined. ► X-ray beams distribution into veterinarian laboratory was measured.

  5. American Veterinary Medical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free client handout to share with them. Compounding Veterinary Compounding FDA has withdrawn its draft guidance for ... new guidance, the AVMA is working to ensure veterinary access and animal health are protected. NEWS & ALERTS ...

  6. A survey of radiology reporting practices in veterinary teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiologists from 28 veterinary schools and one private teaching hospital responded to a survey questionnaire focused on diagnostic image reporting. Radiologists at 26 hospitals generated a hard copy report on essentially all imaging studies performed. At 25 hospitals, radiologists dictated and transcriptionists typed all or most reports; radiologists at two institutions typed all or some of their reports. At five hospitals, preliminary and/or final handwritten reports were generated. The range of reports generated per day was <10 to 40 per radiologist on duty. Seven respondents generated reports as films came from the processor and another 12 routinely generated reports the day the studies were completed. Clinician access to a processed report averaged 2 to 4 days after study was completed (reported range: several hours to 7 or more days). Fifteen responding radiologists personally mounted films from storage jackets for a majority of their reporting. Fourteen respondents generated reports from films mounted on motorized or stationary viewers. Nineteen respondents generated reports in a busy viewing area where they were frequently interrupted. Radiologists' impression of clinician and resident satisfaction regarding availability of radiology reports was that they were satisfied or very satisfied at 15 of the 29 hospitals. Five respondents reported that clinicians and residents were not concerned about availability of processed radiology reports. Thirteen radiologists were planning to change their reporting method within the next 2 years. The change most frequently sought (12 respondents) was to decrease turn-around time of reports. Ten radiologists indicated an interest in trying a voice recognition dictation system. The most common reasons given for not planning any changes in radiology reporting in the next 2 years were: limited number of radiologists (8) and 1 ''satisfied as is'' (7). Turn-around of radiology reports at these veterinary institutions averaged 2

  7. A study of the arrangements for radiological protection in twenty-three veterinary practices in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheelton, R.

    1977-09-01

    The general standards of radiological protection found in 23 veterinary practices are summarised, with reference to the recommendations of the Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons Exposed to Ionising Radiations from Veterinary Uses. The views expressed by the veterinary surgeons interviewed are included where relevant. It is concluded that the majority of practices do not completely satisfy the present standards for radiological safety but that the radiographic workloads are small and unlikely to give cause for alarm. Of most concern are the doses to the hands and forearms of persons who manually restrain small animals during radiography. Recommendations are made concerning the need for greater management supervision in practices and the training and designation of veterinary workers. The veterinary profession are urged to promote discussion on radiological procedures and techniques which avoid the exposure of the personnel involved. (author)

  8. Factors Associated with Veterinary Clinical Faculty Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Martin

    Faculty attrition and recruitment for veterinary clinical faculty positions have been reported as significant problems in veterinary medical education. To investigate the factors that may be important in veterinary clinical faculty retention, the perceptions and views of veterinary clinical academic faculty were determined using a web-distributed electronic survey. Responses were dichotomized by whether the respondent had or had not left an academic position and were analyzed for their association with faculty attrition. A total of 1,226 responses were recorded, and results demonstrated that factors other than compensation were associated with veterinary clinical faculty attrition, including departmental culture, work-life balance, and recognition and support of clinical medicine by the administration. Forty-four percent of respondents who had held a faculty appointment reported leaving academia either voluntarily or for non-voluntary reasons such as failure to achieve tenure, retirement, or having their position closed. Attention to correcting deficiencies in workplace culture and professional rewards could be a beneficial means by which to decrease the faculty attrition rates currently observed in clinical academic veterinary medicine.

  9. Evaluation of the integrity of radiological protection clothing used in veterinary radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Paola da Costa; Barros, Frieda Saicla; Costa, Douglas Siqueira da, E-mail: paah_dacosta@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Radiologia e Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Biomedica

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integrity of radiological protection clothing used by veterinarians in veterinary radiology facilities, and whether they are available in an adequate quantity for the team. Inspection was performed by palpation, followed by X-ray scanning in 189 clothing from 29 veterinary facilities. The results indicate that 5% of the clothes evaluated in this study were considered inadequate due to the failure of the integrity of the lead, being most lead aprons. All facilities have at least two lead aprons and one Thyroid protectors. 24% of the facilities have lead glasses, pointing to a risk to veterinarians by radiosensitivity of the eyes. Also, 24% of the facilities do not have lead gloves, which also presents a risk due to the hand's exposure to the primary beam. Most lead clothing has shield equivalence of 0.5mmPb. The method used in the study was effective in attesting the adequacy of lead clothing. It is recommended to periodically evaluate clothing to ensure that users are always protected. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the integrity of radiological protection clothing used in veterinary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Paola da Costa; Barros, Frieda Saicla; Costa, Douglas Siqueira da

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integrity of radiological protection clothing used by veterinarians in veterinary radiology facilities, and whether they are available in an adequate quantity for the team. Inspection was performed by palpation, followed by X-ray scanning in 189 clothing from 29 veterinary facilities. The results indicate that 5% of the clothes evaluated in this study were considered inadequate due to the failure of the integrity of the lead, being most lead aprons. All facilities have at least two lead aprons and one Thyroid protectors. 24% of the facilities have lead glasses, pointing to a risk to veterinarians by radiosensitivity of the eyes. Also, 24% of the facilities do not have lead gloves, which also presents a risk due to the hand's exposure to the primary beam. Most lead clothing has shield equivalence of 0.5mmPb. The method used in the study was effective in attesting the adequacy of lead clothing. It is recommended to periodically evaluate clothing to ensure that users are always protected. (author)

  11. Acceptance rate and reasons for rejection of manuscripts submitted to Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound during 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Christopher R; Mai, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of the reasons why manuscripts are rejected, and recognition of the most frequent manuscript flaws identified by reviewers, should help submitting authors to avoid these pitfalls. Of 219 manuscripts submitted to Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound in 2012, none (0%) was accepted without revision, four (2%) were withdrawn by the authors, 99 (45%) were accepted after revision, and 116 (53%) were rejected. All manuscripts for which minor revision was requested, and 73/86 (85%) manuscripts for which major revision was requested, were ultimately accepted. Acceptance rate was greater for retrospective studies and for manuscripts submitted from countries in which English was the primary language. The prevalences of flaws in manuscripts were poor writing (62%), deficiencies in data (60%), logical or methodological errors (28%), content not suitable for Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (26%), and lack of new or useful knowledge (25%). Likelihood of manuscript rejection was greater for lack of new or useful knowledge and content not suitable than for other manuscript flaws. The lower acceptance rate for manuscripts from countries in which English was not the primary language was associated with content not suitable and not poor writing. Submitting authors are encouraged to do more to recognize and address manuscript flaws before submission, for example by internal review. Specifically, submitting authors should express clearly the potential added value of their study in the introduction section of their manuscript, describe completely their methods and results, and consult the Editor-in-Chief if they are uncertain whether their subject matter would be suitable for the journal. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Biological effects and radiation protection in veterinary radiology: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, P.C.; Siqueira, D.; Barros, F.S.

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary radiology is a tool of excellent diagnostic support. Besides X--ray, it counts on technological advances such as computed tomography, nuclear medicine and interventional radiology . It is common during X-ray practice to use exposure parameters with short times to avoid blurring by the movement of the animal, but the fact that the animals need to be immobilized during the exposures contribute significantly with the increase of the dose received by the professionals, whose biological risks are not yet well established as a result of exposure to other factors harmful to health, such as anesthetic gases, insecticides, zoonoses and others. For this reason, we sought to verify the main radiological risks to which veterinarians are exposed and the best means to guarantee radiological protection

  13. Development of interactive patient-based multimedia computer programs in veterinary orthopedic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.L.; Hoskinson, J.J.; Mussman, J.M.; Michaels, W.E.; Mclaughlin, R.; Gaughan, E.M.; Roush, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Three computerized multimedia programs on large and small animal veterinary orthopedic radiology were developed and implemented for the radiology curriculum as an alternative to traditional film-based laboratory learning. Programs utilized ''hot words'' (colored text words that displayed an overlaid image label that highlighted lesions) and interactive quizzes which responded appropriately to selected answers. ''Hot words'' helped students develop confidence in accurate lesion detection and the interactive quizzes transformed learning from a passive to an active process. Multiple examples were provided for reinforcement and concepts were incorporated from other clinical disciplines for curriculum integration. Programs were written using a presentation software program, Toolbook for DOS based platform, and contained radiographic images made by laser-scanning digitization. Multiple students could simultaneously access the programs through a network server. These pilot programs were implemented successfully and computerized multimedia presentation proved to be well suited to teaching radiology. Development of the programs required attention to a number of hardware, software, time and cost factors

  14. South African Association of Veterinary Technologists : congress abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The following are abstracts of papers and posters presented at the 'Back to Basics Congress' of the South African Association of Veterinary Technologists (SAAVT, 15-16 September 2009, Batter Boys, Pretoria, South Africa.

  15. Problems associated with veterinary dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisner, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    Veterinarians have been radiographing animal skulls for many years, but sophisticated dentistry was not widely used until the 1970s. Elevated awareness of veterinary dental techniques has led to the need for producing accurate radiographic images of the teeth and periodontal structures. Many problems arise for the clinician who treats small animals who has, before this time, radiographed the skull of dogs and cats solely for the purpose of assessing neoplastic, infectious, or traumatic disease of the mandible, maxilla, or calvarium and now desires to perform dental radiography. This chapter will describe the advantages and disadvantages of some of the more common types of radiographic equipment and supplies, discuss extraoral and intraoral radiographic positioning and technique, identify anatomic landmarks and diagnostic features of intraoral radiography, and offer suggestions concerning the art of using dental radiography in veterinary practice

  16. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  17. Veterinary Business Management Association presents program to aid future growth and stability of veterinary profession

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Spiraling veterinary student debt and the lack of a sustainable and profitable business model for many private practices in the modern business environment threaten the future growth and stability of the veterinary profession.

  18. Preliminary analysis of doses to evaluate the image quality in radiographic examinations in veterinary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Ana Carolina B.C.F.; Dias, Mayara T.P.; Santos, Andrea C.; Melo, Camila S.; Furquim, Tania A.C.

    2009-01-01

    This work has as objective to promote the analysis of the radiological doses and quality of the image of the technical letter used for the accomplishment of thorax and coxal radiographic examination of animals of canine and feline species. The study was accomplished in the service of Diagnosis for Image in Veterinarian Hospital of Veterinary Medicine and Zootecnia College of University of Sao Paulo, in two conventional equipment. Initially, physical features of the animals and the technique used were collected for each one of the 188 radiographic examinations of thorax and 52 examinations of coxal. The animals were placed in different groups, according to their body weight. For each group, the averages for each feature were calculated: thickness of the radiographed region, tension, electric current, time of exhibition, current product electric-time, size of the used film, presence or absence of bucky and feature of focus (narrow or thick). On the basis of the averages of group M (of lesser weights that 5kg for cats and between 10,1kg and 20kg for dogs), was executed a physical analysis of the current technical letter, using the equipment: ionization chamber (to determinate the value of kerma in air), simulator objects (representative of the thickness of the animal) and three dispositive standards of test that evaluate space resolution, resolution in low contrast and contrast-detail. The obtained images were analyzed and compared for a physicist and a radiologist medical veterinary. The results had shown that the examinations supply dose considered high for techniques used mainly for coxal. The equipment A, although to supply higher doses, presents the better images for the majority of the projections. However, the study indicates that there are not exactly reference levels, but these examinations must pass for improvement of quality of image (author)

  19. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, COPPE (Brazil); Mauricia, C. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Brazil); Barroso, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operatorserefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  20. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R.; Mauricia, C.; Barroso, R.

    2006-01-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operators, therefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  1. Analysis of the costs of veterinary education and factors associated with financial stress among veterinary students in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, K P; Matthew, S M; Baguley, J A

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the course-related and other costs involved in obtaining a veterinary education in Australia and how these costs are met. The study also aimed to identify sociodemographic and course-related factors associated with increased financial stress. Students from seven Australian veterinary schools were surveyed using an online questionnaire. A total of 443 students participated (response rate 17%). Responses to survey items relating to finances, employment and course-related costs were compared with sociodemographic factors and prior research in the area of student financial stress. Respondents reported spending a median of A$300 per week on living costs and a median of A$2,000 per year on course-related expenses. Over half of respondents received the majority of their income from their parents or Youth Allowance (56%). A similar proportion (55%) reported that they needed to work to meet basic living expenses. Circumstances and sociodemographic factors linked to perceived financial stress included requiring additional finances to meet unexpected costs during the course; sourcing additional finances from external loans; an expected tuition debt at graduation over A$40,000; being 22 years or older; working more than 12 hours per week; living costs above A$300 per week; and being female. The costs involved in obtaining a veterinary education in Australia are high and over half of respondents are reliant on parental or Government income support. Respondents with certain sociodemographic profiles are more prone to financial stress. These findings may have implications for the psychological health, diversity and career plans of veterinary students in Australia. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. [The Cheiron emblem and Cheiron medal of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmann, E H

    2001-01-01

    In 1964 the first symposium on history of veterinary medicine was organised in Hanover by the section "History of Veterinary Medicine" of the German Society of Veterinary Medicine. During the 6th symposium in Hanover the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM) was created. In the following years further symposiums, called later on congresses took place almost every year. In 2001 the 32nd congress will be held. The Association gave herself in 1973 a distinguishing mark, the Cheiron Emblem. Sixteen years later, the Cheiron Medal was endowed to allow the World Association to express thanks and acknowledgement for special achievements in the field of history of veterinary medicine. The Cheiron Medal was bestowed for the first time on May 26th, 1989.

  3. Factors associated with simulator-assessed laparoscopic surgical skills of veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Jessica J; Singh, Ameet; Kerr, Carolyn L; Khosa, Deep K; Fransson, Boel A

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether simulator-assessed laparoscopic skills of veterinary students were associated with training level and prior experience performing nonlaparoscopic veterinary surgery and other activities requiring hand-eye coordination and manual dexterity. DESIGN Experiment. SAMPLE 145 students without any prior laparoscopic surgical or fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) simulator experience in years 1 (n = 39), 2 (34), 3 (39), and 4 (33) at a veterinary college. PROCEDURES A questionnaire was used to collect data from participants regarding experience performing veterinary surgery, playing video games, and participating in other activities. Participants performed a peg transfer, pattern cutting, and ligature loop-placement task on an FLS simulator, and FLS scores were assigned by an observer. Scores were compared among academic years, and correlations between amounts of veterinary surgical experience and FLS scores were assessed. A general linear model was used to identify predictors of FLS scores. RESULTS Participants were predominantly female (75%), right-hand dominant (92%), and between 20 and 29 years of age (98%). No significant differences were identified among academic years in FLS scores for individual tasks or total FLS score. Scores were not significantly associated with prior surgical or video game experience. Participants reporting no handicraft experience had significantly lower total FLS scores and FLS scores for task 2 than did participants reporting a lot of handicraft experience. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Prior veterinary surgical and video game experience had no influence on FLS scores in this group of veterinary students, suggesting that proficiency of veterinary students in FLS may require specific training.

  4. Level of and motivation for extracurricular activity are associated with academic performance in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredyth L; Rush, Bonnie R; Elmore, Ronnie G; White, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the number of school-sanctioned extracurricular opportunities available to veterinary students and characterize the policies of school administrations toward extracurricular involvement and academic standing. Further, we sought to describe the level of extracurricular involvement of veterinary students, determine the association between extracurricular activity involvement and academic performance, and determine the motivation for extracurricular involvement of veterinary students. Survey data were obtained from 18 associate deans of colleges of veterinary medicine regarding the number of extracurricular student organizations within their school and administrative recommendations regarding student involvement. Another survey was administered and responded to by 665 veterinary students enrolled in curricular years 1-3 at Kansas State University and Texas A&M University regarding their extracurricular involvement. Associate deans of 11 schools responded that they make formal or informal recommendations to students about extracurricular activities, workload, and academic priority (61.1%). In a multivariate model, students who participated two times per week or more had a significantly higher overall grade point average (GPA) than students participating once per week (pStudents for whom the primary reason for participation was networking or social enhancement had a significantly lower overall GPA than students for whom the primary reason was gaining new knowledge and skills (pstudent extracurricular involvement is a consideration for administrators when counseling students in academic difficulty. Moderate levels of extracurricular involvement can contribute to the academic success of students, but students should temper their level of involvement based upon their own motivations.

  5. Quality control in veterinary radiology: application of X-ray sets in veterinary practices and measurements of radiation exposure at taking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, C.

    1986-10-01

    In a first part a survey was made by questionnaires from veterinary doctors about the existence and use of X-ray sets in their practices. Special attention is given to the quality of X-ray shots. In part two stray radiation measurements under typical conditions were performed and the radiation burden of the personnel estimated. The results is that because of the small number of shots the burden is safely below the legal limits. (G.Q.)

  6. Characterization of veterinary hospital-associated isolates of Enterococcus species in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeon Soo; Kwon, Ka Hee; Shin, Sook; Kim, Jae Hong; Park, Yong Ho; Yoon, Jang Won

    2014-03-28

    Possible cross-transmission of hospital-associated enterococci between human patients, medical staff, and hospital environments has been extensively studied. However, limited information is available for veterinary hospital-associated Enterococcus isolates. This study investigated the possibility of cross-transmission of antibiotic-resistant enterococci between dog patients, their owners, veterinary staff, and hospital environments. Swab samples (n =46 5) were obtained from five veterinary hospitals in Seoul, Korea, during 2011. Forty-three Enterococcus strains were isolated, representing seven enterococcal species. E. faecalis and E. faecium were the most dominant species (16 isolates each, 37.2%). Although slight differences in the antibiotic resistance profiles were observed between the phenotypic and the genotypic data, our antibiogram analysis demonstrated high prevalence of the multiple drug-resistant (MDR) isolates of E. faecalis (10/16 isolates, 62.5%) and E. faecium (12/16 isolates, 75.0%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic comparison of the MDR isolates revealed three different clonal sets of E. faecalis and a single set of E. faecium, which were isolated from different sample groups or dog patients at the same or two separate veterinary hospitals. These results imply a strong possibility of cross-transmission of the antibiotic-resistant enterococcal species between animal patients, owners, veterinary staff, and hospital environments.

  7. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition... for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition (Guidelines). The NIH is seeking input from the public on... updated AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition must be submitted electronically at...

  8. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  9. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  10. Factors associated with Salmonella shedding among equine colic patients at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L M; Morley, P S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Salman, M D; Gentry-Weeks, C

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate factors potentially associated with fecal Salmonella shedding among equine patients hospitalized for colic at a veterinary teaching hospital and to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on fecal Salmonella shedding and clinical signs. Longitudinal study and controlled trial. 246 equine colic patients. History and medical information were obtained from patient records. Fecal and environmental samples were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture for Salmonella enterica. Fifty-one patients were treated with a commercially available probiotic; 46 were treated with a placebo. Logistic regression was used to evaluate data. Salmonella organisms were detected in feces from 23 (9%) patients at least once during hospitalization. Patients were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms if diarrhea was evident equine patients hospitalized at a veterinary teaching hospital because of colic and that pathogen monitoring in patients and the hospital environment and use of barrier nursing precautions for equine colic patients are beneficial.

  11. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  12. External dose estimation of the human associated with companion animals under veterinary nuclear medical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Hanawa, Asumi; Suzuki, Kanan

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed in order to make a safety guideline for veterinary nuclear medicine in Japan. Well often used radionuclides ( 18 F and 99 mTc) were employed for evaluating the external radiation exposures of veterinarians, animal owners, and the public. The human external radiation exposure from radiation sources in phantom likened to animal was considered by comparing the results of computer simulation and the actually measured exposure. The computer simulation was performed by using macro program of Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). In this simulation calculation process, radiation absorption and buildup were taken into consideration with the gamma ray emitted from radioactive materials in the body of the animal. Both corresponded well though the simulation result tended to be overvalued from the actual measurement value. Therefore, it is thought that this system can be applied to the estimation of human's external exposure. When the calculation was done on the condition that the radioactive substance exists only in internal organs (heart, liver, kidneys, and bladder), the unequal distribution of the dose rate was found near the animal body. External radiation exposure estimation to the veterinarian, the animal owner and the public was performed under consideration of the actual working condition, the distance from the source, and the time of exposure. In the calculation, the radiation dose of the animal owner and the public did not exceed the dose limit (5 mSv/yr for the animal owner, and 1 mSv/yr for the general public: International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990) in the release after 24 hours of the radiopharmaceutical administering. The calculation condition used in this study was actually more excessive. So the authors consider these exposures would cause no significant issue by starting the veterinary nuclear medicine in Japan. Moreover, since injected radiopharmaceutical is excreted out of the body actually, the

  13. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  14. A model to determine payments associated with radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Hall, Christopher S; Thomas, Shiby; Wald, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Across the United States, there is a growing number of patients in Accountable Care Organizations and under risk contracts with commercial insurance. This is due to proliferation of new value-based payment models and care delivery reform efforts. In this context, the business model of radiology within a hospital or health system context is shifting from a primary profit-center to a cost-center with a goal of cost savings. Radiology departments need to increasingly understand how the transactional nature of the business relates to financial rewards. The main challenge with current reporting systems is that the information is presented only at an aggregated level, and often not broken down further, for instance, by type of exam. As such, the primary objective of this research is to provide better visibility into payments associated with individual radiology procedures in order to better calibrate expense/capital structure of the imaging enterprise to the actual revenue or value-add to the organization it belongs to. We propose a methodology that can be used to determine technical payments at a procedure level. We use a proportion based model to allocate payments to individual radiology procedures based on total charges (which also includes non-radiology related charges). Using a production dataset containing 424,250 radiology exams we calculated the overall average technical charge for Radiology to be $873.08 per procedure and the corresponding average payment to be $326.43 (range: $48.27 for XR and $2750.11 for PET/CT) resulting in an average payment percentage of 37.39% across all exams. We describe how charges associated with a procedure can be used to approximate technical payments at a more granular level with a focus on Radiology. The methodology is generalizable to approximate payment for other services as well. Understanding payments associated with each procedure can be useful during strategic practice planning. Charge-to-total charge ratio can be used to

  15. Evaluation of entrance surface-skin doses in animals submitted on exams of abdomen in veterinary radiology using Tl dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneziani, G. R.; Matsushima, L. C.; Campos, L. L.; Filho, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    The radiation protection has recently gained considerable attention in human medicine. In veterinary medicine has been some advances in radiodiagnostic and therapy for domestic animal like dogs and cats. It is notable the increase of the costs with domestic animals that are considered, by many people in the whole world, like members of family. However, an important parameter that must be taken into account is the increasing use of computed tomography and other equipment s that uses ionizing radiation, which may lead to comparatively high exposure of critical organs. The radiation dose is determined by the balance between therapeutic benefit and possible damage to surrounding normal tissues. This study aimed the evaluation of entrance surface-skin doses in dogs submitted to radiodiagnostic procedures of abdomen using the technique of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). The radiation doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD 100) and a dog phantom made with a plastic container, proportional to the dog size, fulfilled with water. (Author)

  16. Evaluation of entrance surface-skin doses in animals submitted on exams of abdomen in veterinary radiology using Tl dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneziani, G. R.; Matsushima, L. C.; Campos, L. L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Filho, A. M., E-mail: venezianigr@gmail.com [Centro Universitario de Rio Petro - UNIRP, Rodovia Br 153 (Transbrasiliana), Km. 69 Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The radiation protection has recently gained considerable attention in human medicine. In veterinary medicine has been some advances in radiodiagnostic and therapy for domestic animal like dogs and cats. It is notable the increase of the costs with domestic animals that are considered, by many people in the whole world, like members of family. However, an important parameter that must be taken into account is the increasing use of computed tomography and other equipment s that uses ionizing radiation, which may lead to comparatively high exposure of critical organs. The radiation dose is determined by the balance between therapeutic benefit and possible damage to surrounding normal tissues. This study aimed the evaluation of entrance surface-skin doses in dogs submitted to radiodiagnostic procedures of abdomen using the technique of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). The radiation doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD 100) and a dog phantom made with a plastic container, proportional to the dog size, fulfilled with water. (Author)

  17. Biological effects and radiation protection in veterinary radiology: a literature review; Efeitos biológicos e radioproteção em radiologia veterinária: uma revisão de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, P.C.; Siqueira, D.; Barros, F.S., E-mail: paah_dacosta@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Veterinary radiology is a tool of excellent diagnostic support. Besides X--ray, it counts on technological advances such as computed tomography, nuclear medicine and interventional radiology . It is common during X-ray practice to use exposure parameters with short times to avoid blurring by the movement of the animal, but the fact that the animals need to be immobilized during the exposures contribute significantly with the increase of the dose received by the professionals, whose biological risks are not yet well established as a result of exposure to other factors harmful to health, such as anesthetic gases, insecticides, zoonoses and others. For this reason, we sought to verify the main radiological risks to which veterinarians are exposed and the best means to guarantee radiological protection.

  18. Radiological survey of chest in dogs with mammary tumors assisted at the Hospital of Veterinary Faculty between January 2011 and June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.

    2013-01-01

    At the Veterinary Hospital (UdelaR) radiographic evaluation of the thorax is routinely recommended to all patient with clinical diagnosis of mammary tumors. In this study, we stablished the casuistic of bitches with mammary tumors and the number of radiologic studies performed between January 2011 and June 2013. Each radiograph was evaluated and classified as positive or negative, according to the presence or absence of radiographic signs of pulmonary metastasis. Findings showed that 4,4% of all consultations made by female dogs were due to mammary tumors. The average age among patients with thoracic radiographs was 10,5 years. At the time of initial diagnosis 18% of the bitches were positive to lung metastasis. Only six patients had more than one radiographic study. Radiographic abnormalities included nodular lesions of different sizes, pleural effusion and one sternal lymphadenopathy. Though recommended, thoracic radiographs were not performed in 40% of the patients. Owners need to be educated regarding the importance of this procedure, not only to assess tumor dissemination at the time of diagnosis, but also as a follow-up measure after treatment

  19. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  20. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP): the 50th anniversary in 2013--history, achievements, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, J

    2013-08-01

    In 2013 the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) can celebrate its 50th anniversary. At this occasion in this article selected historical data are updated, and the achievements and future perspectives of the WAAVP are discussed. Although the WAAVP is a small association with only a few hundred members, it has been able to develop remarkable activities. Between 1963 and 2011 the WAAVP has organized 23 international scientific congresses, and the 24th conference will take place in Perth, Western Australia, in 2013. These conferences have achieved a high degree of international recognition as indicated by relatively large numbers of participants (up to ~800). Furthermore, the WAAVP has promoted veterinary parasitology in various ways, such as publishing international guidelines (efficacy evaluation of antiparasitic drugs, parasitological methods, standardized nomenclature of animal parasitic diseases "SNOAPAD"), stimulating international discussions on teaching and continued education ("colleges of veterinary parasitology") and by supporting the high quality journal "Veterinary Parasitology" which is the official organ of the WAAVP. In retrospect, the development of the WAAVP can be classified as very successful. New challenges associated with global changes (growth of the world population, urbanization, climate change, new developments in animal and plant production, etc.) will require new efforts in research in various fields, including veterinary parasitology. Future activities of WAAVP may include inter alia: (a) support of international parasitological networks; (b) stimulation of coordinated research aimed at the solution of defined problems; (c) increasing the exposure of WAAVP to parasitology from hitherto neglected regions of the world; (d) strengthening of official links to international organizations (FAO, WHO, etc.); (e) continuation of guideline preparation; and (d) preparation and international distribution of high

  1. Origin and history to date of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) African Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecek, R C; Penzhorn, B L; de Waal, D T; Peter, R J; Prichard, R; Sumption, D

    2011-03-01

    The origin of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) African Foundation is described. The 16th WAAVP Conference held in South Africa in 1997 generated a surplus of ZAR 430 460 (US$ 70 116). This was invested and a foundation established to manage the fund with the intention of using it to the mutual advantage of the WAAVP and African veterinary parasitologists. To date, more than 110 scholarship applications have been screened, and 51 full and partial scholarships awarded to young African veterinary parasitologists to attend subsequent biennial WAAVP Conferences. This investment has grown into a very successful endowment currently valued at US$ 206 553. This article is written in response to many queries across the globe about the origin of this fund and how it has been invested, managed, sustained and utilised.

  2. Origin and history to date of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP African Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Krecek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP African Foundation is described. The 16th WAAVP Conference held in South Africa in 1997 generated a surplus of ZAR 430 460 (US$ 70 116. This was invested and a foundation established to manage the fund with the intention of using it to the mutual advantage of the WAAVP and African veterinary parasitologists. To date, more than 110 scholarship applications have been screened, and 51 full and partial scholarships awarded to young African veterinary parasitologists to attend subsequent biennial WAAVP Conferences. This investment has grown into a very successful endowment currently valued at US$ 206 553. This article is written in response to many queries across the globe about the origin of this fund and how it has been invested, managed, sustained and utilised.

  3. Radiological diagnosis in AIDS - associated diseases: survey and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademaker, J.; Frahm, C.

    1997-01-01

    Acute manifestations of illnesses in patients with HIV-infection or AIDS will benefit from rapid diagnosis. Radiologic examinations provide substantial information to narrow the differential diagnosis. This article reviews clinically important HIV-associated diseases for the radiologist. The braod spectrum of possible manifestations is illustrated by the accompanying case reports that typify the complexity of diagnoses in this growing problem worldwide. (orig.) [de

  4. Open Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Veterinary Journal is a peer reviewed international open access online and printed journal that publishes high-quality original research articles, reviews, short communications and case reports dedicated to all aspects of veterinary sciences and its related subjects. Other websites associated with this journal: ...

  5. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  6. Veterinary vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoret, P P

    1999-11-01

    Veterinary vaccinology is a very interesting and rapidly developing field. In fact veterinary vaccines are not only used for the prevention of infectious diseases in the animal health sector, but also help to solve problems of public health, to reduce detrimental environmental impact of the use of some veterinary drugs and prevent the emergence of resistance of micro-organisms or parasites. After a short introduction, this paper will deal with the use of vaccines for animal health and welfare, including new developments in the veterinary field such as marker vaccines and vectored vaccines, the special case of equine influenza-inactivated vaccines and the use of veterinary vaccines in public health. The conclusions will analyse the reasons as to why develop veterinary vaccines and the obstacles to their development.

  7. Childhood hydrocephalus – is radiological morphology associated with etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Jon; Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians use a non-standardized, intuitive approach when correlating radiological morphology and etiology of hydrocephalus.......Clinicians use a non-standardized, intuitive approach when correlating radiological morphology and etiology of hydrocephalus....

  8. Current Issues and the Veterinary Medical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary medical libraries and librarians are unique. There are now 33 veterinary colleges in North America, and in accordance with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation, each has a library managed by an accredited librarian. Colleges with veterinary programs often maintain specialized branch libraries to support the degree,…

  9. The musculoskeletal radiologic findings associated with chronic renal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, P.J.; Gomez, I.; Hernandez, L.; Relanzon, S.; Hurtado, M.

    1997-01-01

    The numerous musculoskeletal changes associated with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are detected with increasing frequency since hemodialysis and kidney transplantation have prolonged the survival of these patients. These signs have been divided into two large groups. The first includes secondary hyperparathyroidism (bone resorption, periostitis and brown tumors), osteoporosis, osteosclerosis, osteomalacia and vascular and soft tissue calcification, all of which are grouped under the term renal osteodystrophy. the second group is composed of miscellaneous disorders including aluminum poisoning, amyloid and crystal deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, tendon rupture, infection and avascular necrosis. These changes are less common and occur especially in patients under prolonged hemodialysis or kidney transplant recipients. The detection of musculoskeletal involvement in CRI patients has a considerable impact on their clinical management. The present article reviews the radiological signs of these changes, including representative images that will aid in their recognition. (Author) 33 refs

  10. Pregnancy-associated breast disease: radiologic features and diagnostic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun Ju; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2006-02-28

    In this paper, we evaluate the radiological features of pregnancy-associated breast lesions and discuss the difficulties in diagnosis by imaging. We selected patients who were diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast lesions during the previous 5 years. All patients complained of palpable lesions in the breast and underwent ultrasonographic (US) examination, the first choice for examination of pregnancy-related breast lesions. Any suspicious lesions found by the US were recommended for a US-guided core biopsy, US-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), or surgery. Various breast lesions were detected during pregnancy and lactation, including breast cancer, mastitis and abscesses, lactating adenoma, galactoceles, lobular hyperplasia, and fibroadenomas. The imaging features of pregnancy-associated breast lesions did not differ from the features of non-pregnancy-associated breast lesions; however, some pregnancy-associated benign lesions had suspicious sonographic features. A US-guided core biopsy was necessary for differentiating benign from malignant. In patients with breast cancer, the cancer was often advanced at the time of diagnosis. In conclusion, various pregnancy-related breast lesions were detected and the imaging of these lesions had variable findings. Breast ultrasound could be an excellent imaging modality for diagnosis and differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. However, when the imaging results are suspicious, a biopsy should be performed to obtain a pathologic diagnosis.

  11. An attempt to evaluate the risks associated with radiological terror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Dantas, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of the risk of a terrorist attack has been made frequently by multiplying the probability of occurrence of a terrorist attempt by the probability of its success and a quantity which represents the consequences of a successful attack. In the case of a radiological attack the consequences will vary in case the action will be active or passive. Thirteen radionuclides were examined for their potential uses in credible threats or terrorist attacks based on their availability from laboratories and hospitals. Taking into account the dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, those radionuclides with higher dose effectiveness for ingestion are the following: 210 Po; 226 Ra and 241 Am. Other radionuclides which can be used in threats and terror attacks, like 137 Cs for example have also been examined. The risks associated with the selected radionuclides have been tentatively ranked as high, medium, or low. The probability used to evaluate risks depends on the motivation of the terrorist and the capacity, which implies availability or the actual possibility of obtaining a particular radionuclide. On the other hand, whenever a list of radionuclides to be used in a malevolent action is available to a terrorist, the choice of the most adequate will depend also on the action to be undertaken. This work ranks risks associated with radiological terror based on physical, chemical, radio-toxicological and other relevant data on radionuclides, which were either already used in terror attacks, or were pointed out as adequate to be used in such malevolent actions. (author)

  12. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speksnijder, D C; Jaarsma, A D C; van der Gugten, A C; Verheij, T J M; Wagenaar, J A

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A thorough understanding of veterinarians' current prescribing practices and their reasons to prescribe antimicrobials might offer leads for interventions to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of factors that influence prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Semi-structured interviews with eleven farm animal veterinarians were conducted, which were taped, transcribed and iteratively analysed. This preliminary analysis was further discussed and refined in an expert meeting. A final conceptual model was derived from the analysis and sent to all the respondents for validation. Many conflicting interests are identifiable when it comes to antimicrobial prescribing by farm animal veterinarians. Belief in the professional obligation to alleviate animal suffering, financial dependency on clients, risk avoidance, shortcomings in advisory skills, financial barriers for structural veterinary herd health advisory services, lack of farmers' compliance to veterinary recommendations, public health interests, personal beliefs regarding the veterinary contribution to antimicrobial resistance and major economic powers are all influential determinants in antimicrobial prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Interventions to change prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians could address attitudes and advisory skills of veterinarians, as well as provide tools to deal with (perceived) pressure from farmers and advisors to prescribe antimicrobials. Additional (policy) measures could probably support farm animal veterinarians in acting as a more independent animal health consultant. © 2014 Blackwell

  13. Clinical Research Abstracts of the British Equine Veterinary Association Congress 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, V; Weller, R; Stubbs, N C; Rombach, N; Pfau, T

    2015-09-01

    Training and rehabilitation techniques which improve core muscle strength are beneficial for improvement of dynamic stability of the equine vertebral column. The Equiband™ system, consisting of resistance bands attached to a customised saddle pad, is suggested to provide constant proprioceptive feedback during motion to encourage recruitment of abdominal and hindquarter musculature. To quantify the effect of the Equiband™ system on back kinematics and movement symmetry. Longitudinal intervention study. Quantitative analysis of back movement and gait symmetry before/after a 4-week exercise programme. Inertial sensor data was collected from 7 horses at Weeks 0 and 4 of a fixed exercise protocol. Analysis with and without the Equiband™ system was completed at trot in hand on a hard surface, and for both reins on the lunge on a soft surface. Six back kinematic and 3 movement symmetry parameters were calculated according to published methods. Movement symmetry values were side-corrected to allow comparison between reins on the lunge. A mixed model (Ptime, and trotting direction on back kinematic and movement symmetry parameters. The Equiband™ system significantly reduced (all Pkeeper of each animal. Royal Veterinary College. Competing interests: N.C. Stubbs and N. Rombach developed the Equiband™ system. The remaining authors have no competing interests. © 2015 The Author(s). Equine Veterinary Journal © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Dental Education in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Eubanks

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is among the most prevalent canine dis-eases affecting over 75% of dogs. Strengthening of the human-animal bond and the increasing education of the aver-age pet owner, have fostered a heightened awareness of periodontal care in dogs and cats. Industry support has further assisted the small animal veterinarian in providing quality dental treatments and prevention. As recently as the 1990’s, veterinary curriculums contained little or no dental training. That trend is changing as nearly every one of the 28 US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine offers some level of small animal dentistry during the four-year curriculum. Primary areas of focus are on client education, the treatment of periodontal disease, dental prophylaxis, dental radiology, endodontics, exodontics and pain control. Students receive instruction in dental anatomy during their di-dactic curriculum and later experience clinical cases. Graduate DVMs can attend a variety of continuing education courses and even choose to specialize in veterinary dentistry in both small animals and horses. Through the efforts of organizations such as the American Veterinary Dental So-ciety, The American Veterinary Dental College and The Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, many veterinarians have been able to advance their skills in dentistry and improve animal welfare. Increasing ex-pectations of the pet-owning public coupled with the recent advancements of training opportunities available for vete-rinary students, graduate DVMs and certified veterinary technicians make veterinary dentistry an emerging practice-builder among the most successful small animal hospitals.

  15. Methodology for environmental risk assessment associated with the use of veterinary medicinal products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Valentina Tihulca

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental risk assessment (ERA is mandatory for all new applications for centralized marketing authorization or national regardless of their legal basis. ERA aims to protect the environment. Risk assessment has two phases of veterinary product evaluation possible role of exposure and its effects. Phase I of the ERA isbased on filling a decision tree with 19 questions. If the answers to these questions do not stop the assessment at this stage then is advancing to Phase II. It uses a two stage approach stage A and stage B. The first stage, stage A, studies using simple, less expensive studies. I f the assessment is not complete, then is appealed to Step B to drill ERA. If there is still a risk indicator after filling and assessment in stage B, then, to mitigate risk, is recommended the file discussing and of the proposals for additional data.

  16. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Clinical Research Abstracts of the British Equine Veterinary Association Congress 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, M J; Hewetson, M; Pöytäkangas, M R

    2015-09-01

    Professor Thomas Spillmann and the staff of Equine College Ypäjä and the University of Helsinki Equine Teaching Hospital. The cooperation of horse owners is gratefully acknowledged. Ethical animal research: The study protocol was approved by the National Animal Experiment Board of Finland (Eläinkoelautakunta ELLA, Request for Animal Experiments, ref. no. ESAVI-2010-06567/Ym-23). For client-owned animals, owner informed consent was obtained. This study was funded by the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. Competing interests: None declared. © 2015 The Author(s). Equine Veterinary Journal © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  18. Determination of Radiological Hazard Associated with the use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... calculated to be 17.41nGyhr-1 with mean annual effective dose rate of 0.022mSvyr-1The values of the radiological indicators were found to be within the limits recommended for safety, indicating that the use of the sediment of the river as building material does ...

  19. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Sonographic Measurements of Ocular Biometry of Indigenous Nigerian. Dogs in Zaria ..... between L2 and R) anesthetic risks and additional costs were ... prevalent worldwide problem (Toni et al.,. 2013). Paunknis and ... correlation with refractive error is larger for axial length than .... Veterinary Medical Association. 207:12.

  20. Veterinary radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirshin, V.A.; Belov, A.D.; Budarkov, V.A.; Prochazka, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The monograph summarizes the authors' experience and data from Soviet and foreign scientific literature. It consists of the following chapters: radioactive sources; utilization of ionizing radiation and radioactive isotopes; biological effects of ionizing radiation; radiation sickness in animals; combined post-irradiation syndromes; prophylaxis of radiation injury; therapy of irradiated animals; and veterinary radiation hygiene control of the environment, fodder, animals and animal products. (P.A.)

  1. Preliminary analysis of doses to evaluate the image quality in radiographic examinations in veterinary radiology;Analise preliminar das doses para avaliacao da qualidade da imagem em exames radiograficos na radiologia veterinaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Ana Carolina B.C.F.; Dias, Mayara T.P.; Santos, Andrea C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia; Melo, Camila S.; Furquim, Tania A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2009-07-01

    This work has as objective to promote the analysis of the radiological doses and quality of the image of the technical letter used for the accomplishment of thorax and coxal radiographic examination of animals of canine and feline species. The study was accomplished in the service of Diagnosis for Image in Veterinarian Hospital of Veterinary Medicine and Zootecnia College of University of Sao Paulo, in two conventional equipment. Initially, physical features of the animals and the technique used were collected for each one of the 188 radiographic examinations of thorax and 52 examinations of coxal. The animals were placed in different groups, according to their body weight. For each group, the averages for each feature were calculated: thickness of the radiographed region, tension, electric current, time of exhibition, current product electric-time, size of the used film, presence or absence of bucky and feature of focus (narrow or thick). On the basis of the averages of group M (of lesser weights that 5kg for cats and between 10,1kg and 20kg for dogs), was executed a physical analysis of the current technical letter, using the equipment: ionization chamber (to determinate the value of kerma in air), simulator objects (representative of the thickness of the animal) and three dispositive standards of test that evaluate space resolution, resolution in low contrast and contrast-detail. The obtained images were analyzed and compared for a physicist and a radiologist medical veterinary. The results had shown that the examinations supply dose considered high for techniques used mainly for coxal. The equipment A, although to supply higher doses, presents the better images for the majority of the projections. However, the study indicates that there are not exactly reference levels, but these examinations must pass for improvement of quality of image (author)

  2. Radiation protection in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential part of present-day veterinary practice. The need for radiation protection exists because occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can result in deleterious effects that may manifest themselves not only in exposed individuals but in their descendants as well. These are respectively called somatic and genetic effects. Somatic effects are characterized by observable changes occurring in the body organs of the exposed individual. These changes may appear from within a few hours to many years later, depending on the amount and duration of exposure of the individual. In veterinary medicine, the possibility that anyone may be exposed to enough radiation to create somatic effect is extremely remote. Genetic effects are more a cause for concern at the lower doses used in veterinary radiology. Although the radiation doses may be small and appear to cause no observable damage, the probability of chromosomal damage in the germ cells, with the consequence of mutations, does exist. These mutations may give rise to genetic defects and therefore make these doses significant when applied to a large number of individuals. There are two main aspects of the problem to be considered. First, personnel working with X-ray equipment must be protected from excessive exposure to radiation during their work. Secondly, personnel in the vicinity of veterinary X-ray facilities and the general public require adequate protection

  3. Radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Moua

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. RESULTS: Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1-5.8. After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16-7.12. Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23-12.1. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history.

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    ¹Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, ABU Zaria, Nigeria, ²Department of. Veterinary Physiology ... dogs, AGRs have a highly sensitive sense of smell. The rats ..... Gonadal Axis and thyroid Activity in. Male rats.

  5. Bibliometric Analysis of Manuscript Title Characteristics Associated With Higher Citation Numbers: A Comparison of Three Major Radiology Journals, AJNR, AJR, and Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Falgun H; Kang, Jian; Kundu, Suprateek; Castillo, Mauricio

    Our purpose was to determine if associations exist between titles characteristics and citation numbers in Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), and American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR). This retrospective study is Institutional Review Board exempt. We searched Web of Science for all original research and review articles in Radiology, AJR, and AJNR between 2006 and 2012 and tabulated number of words in the title, presence of a colon symbol, and presence of an acronym. We used a Poisson regression model to evaluate the association between number of citations and title characteristics. We then used the Wald test to detect pairwise differences in the effect of title characteristics on number of citations among the 3 journals. Between 2006 and 2012, Radiology published 2662, AJR 3998, and AJNR 2581 original research and review articles. There was a citation number increase per title word increase of 1.6% for AJNR and 2.6% for AJR and decrease of 0.8% for Radiology. For all, P citation increases for AJNR (16%), Radiology (14%), and AJR (7.4%). Title acronym was associated with citation increases for AJNR (10%), Radiology (14%), and AJR (13.3%). All P citation numbers in Radiology, AJR, and AJNR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Impact Factor of Radiological Journals: Associations with Journal Content and Other Characteristics Over a Recent 12-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ayoola, Abimbola

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends in the impact factor (IF) of radiological journals over a recent 12-year period, including associations between IF and journal topic. Journal Citation Reports (JCR) was used to identify all biomedical journals and all radiological journals (assigned a JCR category of "Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, & Medical Imaging"), along with journal IF, in 2003 and 2014. Radiological journals were manually classified by topic. Trends in median IF (mIF) were assessed. The number of radiological journals increased from 83 (2003) to 125 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 5907 to 8718, respectively). mIF of radiological journals increased from 1.42 (2003) to 1.75 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 0.93 to 1.46, respectively). The most common topic among new radiological journals was general (nonspecialized) radiology (8). Five new radiological journals in 2014 were in topics (cancer imaging and molecular imaging) having no journals in 2003. mIF of general radiological journals was 1.49. Topics having highest mIF were cardiac imaging (2.94), optics (2.86), molecular imaging (2.77), radiation oncology (2.60), and neuroradiology (2.25). Topics with lowest mIF were ultrasound (1.19) and interventional radiology (1.44). Topics with the largest increase in mIF were cardiac imaging (from 1.17 to 2.94) and neuroradiology (from 1.07 to 2.25). Radiological journals exhibited higher mIF than biomedical journals overall. Among radiological journals, subspecialty journals had highest mIF. While a considerable number of new radiological journals since 2003 were general radiology journals having relatively low IF, there were also new journal topics representing emerging areas of subspecialized radiological research. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Canadian Association of Radiologists White Paper on Artificial Intelligence in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tam, Roger; Cadrin-Chênevert, Alexandre; Guest, Will; Chong, Jaron; Barfett, Joseph; Chepelev, Leonid; Cairns, Robyn; Mitchell, J Ross; Cicero, Mark D; Poudrette, Manuel Gaudreau; Jaremko, Jacob L; Reinhold, Caroline; Gallix, Benoit; Gray, Bruce; Geis, Raym

    2018-05-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly moving from an experimental phase to an implementation phase in many fields, including medicine. The combination of improved availability of large datasets, increasing computing power, and advances in learning algorithms has created major performance breakthroughs in the development of AI applications. In the last 5 years, AI techniques known as deep learning have delivered rapidly improving performance in image recognition, caption generation, and speech recognition. Radiology, in particular, is a prime candidate for early adoption of these techniques. It is anticipated that the implementation of AI in radiology over the next decade will significantly improve the quality, value, and depth of radiology's contribution to patient care and population health, and will revolutionize radiologists' workflows. The Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) is the national voice of radiology committed to promoting the highest standards in patient-centered imaging, lifelong learning, and research. The CAR has created an AI working group with the mandate to discuss and deliberate on practice, policy, and patient care issues related to the introduction and implementation of AI in imaging. This white paper provides recommendations for the CAR derived from deliberations between members of the AI working group. This white paper on AI in radiology will inform CAR members and policymakers on key terminology, educational needs of members, research and development, partnerships, potential clinical applications, implementation, structure and governance, role of radiologists, and potential impact of AI on radiology in Canada. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Citizen perceptions of risks associated with moving radiological waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeth, M.K.; Oakes, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Much has been written about public support or opposition to the siting of hazardous waste facilities and more generally about concern for radioactive contamination. Much less has been written about the perceived risks of citizens' specific concerns about the transportation of radiological waste to temporary or permanent sites. This study reviews the existing literature in the area and presents new data on the subject from an Idaho survey. The new data indicates: (1) age, gender, and knowledge are the key variables predicting opposition to the transportation of such waste, (2) the primary concern among the opposing and unsure public is the planned use of trucks to move the TRU waste, and (3) respondents have high degrees of trust in officials who make decisions based on technical knowledge, are charged with the safety of transporting TRU waste, and who respond to mishaps. These attitudes need to be understood by policy makers and administrators when designing and implementing waste-transportation programs. 19 refs., 4 tabs

  9. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences Epiphyseal plate closure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigeria. 2. Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University. Sokoto, Nigeria ... from three different small ruminant farms with birth record within Sokoto metropolis,. Nigeria. They were ... animals, one of which is the use of epiphyseal plate closure (Choi et al., ...

  10. 75 FR 31745 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ...] Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services Laboratories... collection associated with the National Veterinary Services Laboratories animal health diagnostic system...: For information on request forms associated with the National Veterinary Services Laboratories animal...

  11. Making a difference through veterinary public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-11

    More than 100 people gathered in Birmingham on April 23 for the third joint conference of the Veterinary Public Health Association and the Association of Government Vets. With the theme of 'VPH hands on - making a difference together', the meeting considered the role vets play in society through their work on public health and sustainability. Kathryn Clark reports. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Survey of the prevalence and methodology of quality assurance for B-mode ultrasound image quality among veterinary sonographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscheit, Larry P; Heng, Hock Gan; Lim, Chee Kin; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2018-05-01

    Image quality in B-mode ultrasound is important as it reflects the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic information provided during clinical scanning. Quality assurance programs for B-mode ultrasound systems/components are comprised of initial quality acceptance testing and subsequent regularly scheduled quality control testing. The importance of quality assurance programs for B-mode ultrasound image quality using ultrasound phantoms is well documented in the human medical and medical physics literature. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional, survey study was to determine the prevalence and methodology of quality acceptance testing and quality control testing of image quality for ultrasound system/components among veterinary sonographers. An online electronic survey was sent to 1497 members of veterinary imaging organizations: the American College of Veterinary Radiology, the Veterinary Ultrasound Society, and the European Association of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, and a total of 167 responses were received. The results showed that the percentages of veterinary sonographers performing quality acceptance testing and quality control testing are 42% (64/151; 95% confidence interval 34-52%) and 26% (40/156: 95% confidence interval 19-33%) respectively. Of the respondents who claimed to have quality acceptance testing or quality control testing of image quality in place for their ultrasound system/components, 0% have performed quality acceptance testing or quality control testing correctly (quality acceptance testing 95% confidence interval: 0-6%, quality control testing 95% confidence interval: 0-11%). Further education and guidelines are recommended for veterinary sonographers in the area of quality acceptance testing and quality control testing for B-mode ultrasound equipment/components. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Cost-effectiveness and radiological risk associated with mass chest screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents in summary the cost effectiveness and radiological risks associated with mass chest tuberculosis screening in major European countries. The state of tuberculosis in west Europe, the cost effectiveness of mass screening, international standards regarding radiation doses as well as the need for quality control are addressed

  14. Veterinary School Applicants: Financial Literacy and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, McKensie M; Greenhill, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Each year the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) conducts a survey after the close of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS) application. The survey provides a glimpse into applicant behavior surrounding the veterinary school application process. Additional survey questions probe into applicant financial behaviors, use of financial products and services, and pet ownership. This article examines the 2013 survey data from applicants who successfully completed the application, with a focus on applicant financial literacy and behaviors. Data from the study revealed a disconnect between applicants' perception of their ability to deal with day-to-day finances and their actual financial behaviors, particularly for first-generation college student applicants and applicants who are racially/ethnically underrepresented in veterinary medicine (URVM). Many applicants were not able to accurately report the average veterinary school graduate's student debt level, which suggests the potential need for better education about the costs associated with attending veterinary school.

  15. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Code of practice for radiation protection in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, J.; Fenton, D.; McGarry, A.; McAllister, H.; Skelly, C

    2002-11-01

    This Code of Practice updates the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in Veterinary Radiology prepared by the Nuclear Energy Board in June 1989. The Code is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons to ensure that they, their employees and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of X-ray equipment and radioactive substances in the practice of veterinary medicine. It reflects the regulations as specified in the Radiological Protection Act, 1991, (Ionising Radiation) Order, 2000 (S.I. No. 125 of 2000)

  17. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  18. 75 FR 57737 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ...] Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services Laboratories... Service's intention to request approval of an information collection associated with National Veterinary...' Information Collection Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: National Veterinary...

  19. Veterinary and human medicine: learning from each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Laura

    2016-03-26

    A well-attended session at this year's joint SPVS/VPMA congress considered what lessons the medical and veterinary professions might learn from one another. Laura Honey reports. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Assessment of veterinary services in central Ethiopia: A case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    services, and black-market drug dealers were found to be challengers associated .... veterinary service, private veterinarians, traditional healers and NGOs mainly ... timeliness, effectiveness and affordability of the veterinary service providers.

  1. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin ... One of these mutations led to an amino acid exchange at position 544 ... organs such as comb, wattle, brain, heart, .... congestion in various tissues and edema of.

  2. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    and Aji, T. G.. 1. 1Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria. ... limited nervous, muscle and skeletal systems development ... samples. Colloid area/volume and perimeter: This ..... BANKS, W. J., (1993): Applied Veterinary.

  3. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) has been in existence since 1971. ... dogs diagnosed with parvovirus enteritis in some veterinary clinics in Nigeria · EMAIL ... Rabies vaccination status among occupationally exposed humans in Nigeria ...

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 3Veterinary. Teaching ... salivation, cornea opacity, haematuria and convulsion were observed in 20, 8, 2, 4, 1 and 3 of the patients ... intravenous fluid administration either for.

  5. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzeminski, M.; Lass, P.; Teodorczyk, J.; Krajka, J.

    2004-01-01

    The veterinary use of radionuclide techniques dates back to the mid-sixties, but its more extensive use dates back to the past two decades. Veterinary nuclear medicine is focused mainly on four major issues: bone scintigraphy - with the majority of applications in horses, veterinary endocrinology - dealing mainly with the problems of hyperthyreosis in cats and hyperthyreosis in dogs, portosystemic shunts in small animals and veterinary oncology, however, most radionuclide techniques applied to humans can be applied to most animals. (author)

  6. Vaccines for veterinary, made with the help of radiative technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulkhanov, R.U.; Butaev, M.K.; Mirsaev, B.Sh.; Ryasnaynskiy, I.V.; Yuldashev, R.Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In applied radiology scientists usually use stimulating, mutagenic and inactivating effects of gamma-radiation. In this report there are the results of gamma-radiation inactivating effect for radiovaccine making biotechnology development for veterinary. Inactivation with hamma-irradiation gives us opportunity to make highly immunogenic vaccines, which cause minimum damage of antigenic contaminants structure. With the help of radiative biotechnology we can produce highly effective monoassociated and polyvalented radiovaccines against the most wide-spread infections disease in agricultural animals, young animals in particular (calves, lambs, sucking-pigs). These diseases include such infection diseases as colibacterioses, salmonellosis, pasterellosis, which cause much economic damage to stockbreeding i.e. loss of cattle, slow growth of young animal, lack of offsprings, decrease of reproduction properties. Monovaccines are used for these disease prophylaxis as well as associated and polyvalented vaccines. Taking into consideration the necessity of vaccine improvement and great amount of associated vaccines, one of the main problems of veterinary is the development of vaccines of new generation, which can induce immunity against several diseases in agricultural animals. That is why, radiative biotechnology of radiovaccines creation was developed and is used in radiative laboratory of Uzbek Scientific Veterinary Institute (Bulkhanov R.U., 1999, 2001), A ssociated radiovaccine against colibacteriosis, salmonellosis of calves, kids , 'Associated radiovaccine against colibacteriosis and salmonellosis of calves', 'Polyvalented radiovaccine against pasterellosis, salmonellosis and colibacteriosis in agricultural animals' were developed with the help of radiative biotechnology and are successfully used in veterinary practice. The advantage of these radiovaccines is that they produce one year immunity and you need twice less dosage and revaccinations. More than

  7. The radiological impact associated with the recycling of actinides and fission products. A global assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of a literature study performed to identify any significant differences in the public radiological impact associated with existing nuclear fuel cycles and partitioning and transmutation (P and T) based fuel cycles. The study was performed in the framework of ECN Nuclear Energy's RAS (Recyclage van Actiniden en Splijtingsprodukten) research programme. Two reference 'once through' cycles and five 'advanced' fuel cycles were analysed. The five 'advanced' fuel cycles all incorporate technologies for the partitioning and transmutation of the long-lived radionuclides present in high level radioactive waste. Currently, only a limited amount of information on these 'advanced' fuel cycles is available. The assessment of the radiological impact associated with these cycles is therefore by necessity of a general nature. (orig./WL)

  8. The radiological risks associated with the thorium fuelled HTGR fuel cycle. A comparative risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.; Hienen, J.F.A. van.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the results of task B.3 of the 'Technology Assessment of the High Temperature Reactor' project. The objective of task B.3 was to evaluate the radiological risks to the general public associated with the sustainable HTGR cycle. Since the technologies to be used at several stages of this fuel cycle are still in the design phase and since a detailed specification of this fuel cycle has not yet been developed, the emphasis was on obtaining a global impression of the risk associated with a generic thorium-based HTGR fuel cycle. This impression was obtained by performing a comparative risk analysis on the basis of data given in the literature. As reference for the comparison a generic uranium fuelled LWR cycle was used. The major benefit with respect to the radiological rsiks of basing the fuel cycle around modular HTGR technology instead of the LWR technology is the increase in reactor safety. The design of the modular HTGR is expected to prevent the release of a significant amount of radioactive material to the environment, and hence early deaths in the surrounding population, during accident conditions. This implies that there is no group risk as defined in the Dutch risk management policy. The major benefit of thorium based fuel cycles over uranium based fuel cycles is the reduction in the radiological risks from unraium mining and milling. The other stages of the nuclear fuel cycle which make a significant contribution to the radiological risks are electricity generation, reprocessing and final disposal. The risks associated with the electricity generation stage are dominated by the risks from fission products, activated corrosion products and the activation products tritium and carbon-14. The risks associated with the reprocessing stage are determined by fission and activation products (including actinides). (orig./WL)

  9. The radiological risks associated with the thorium fuelled HTGR fuel cycle. A comparative risk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, D.H.; Hienen, J.F.A. van

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the results of task B.3 of the `Technology Assessment of the High Temperature Reactor` project. The objective of task B.3 was to evaluate the radiological risks to the general public associated with the sustainable HTGR cycle. Since the technologies to be used at several stages of this fuel cycle are still in the design phase and since a detailed specification of this fuel cycle has not yet been developed, the emphasis was on obtaining a global impression of the risk associated with a generic thorium-based HTGR fuel cycle. This impression was obtained by performing a comparative risk analysis on the basis of data given in the literature. As reference for the comparison a generic uranium fuelled LWR cycle was used. The major benefit with respect to the radiological rsiks of basing the fuel cycle around modular HTGR technology instead of the LWR technology is the increase in reactor safety. The design of the modular HTGR is expected to prevent the release of a significant amount of radioactive material to the environment, and hence early deaths in the surrounding population, during accident conditions. This implies that there is no group risk as defined in the Dutch risk management policy. The major benefit of thorium based fuel cycles over uranium based fuel cycles is the reduction in the radiological risks from unraium mining and milling. The other stages of the nuclear fuel cycle which make a significant contribution to the radiological risks are electricity generation, reprocessing and final disposal. The risks associated with the electricity generation stage are dominated by the risks from fission products, activated corrosion products and the activation products tritium and carbon-14. The risks associated with the reprocessing stage are determined by fission and activation products (including actinides). (orig./WL).

  10. Domestic violence shelter partnerships and veterinary student attitudes at North American veterinary schools and colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creevy, Kate E; Shaver, Stephanie L; Cornell, Karen K

    2013-01-01

    Animal abuse and domestic violence are linked issues, and pet ownership is reported to play a crucial role in the choice to leave an abusive situation. Although veterinarians witness the effects of abuse and violence over the course of their careers, they have limited training regarding these issues. One mechanism for educating veterinary students while providing a service for victims of domestic violence is the creation of partnerships between domestic violence shelters and veterinary schools. These extracurricular programs can provide both care for pets belonging to victims of domestic violence and an educational platform for student participants. The goals of this study were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of domestic violence shelter partnerships (DVSPs) at North American veterinary teaching hospitals and to determine whether the presence of a DVSP was associated with increased awareness among veterinary students regarding animal abuse and domestic violence. Nine of 33 veterinary schools surveyed described a DVSP program. Students at schools with DVSPs associated with their veterinary teaching hospitals were significantly more likely to indicate that their awareness of the link between animal abuse and domestic violence had increased during veterinary school. Most veterinary students reported that they felt poorly prepared to handle domestic violence and animal abuse issues in the workplace. This study indicates that extracurricular DVSPs are a viable means of educating veterinary students regarding domestic violence and animal abuse. A need for improved education on these topics in veterinary schools across North America is identified.

  11. Chemical toxicity and radiological health detriment associated with the inhalation of various enrichments of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3C Limited, Queen Square House, 18-21 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4NH (United Kingdom))" data-affiliation=" (SR3C Limited, Queen Square House, 18-21 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4NH (United Kingdom))" >Bryant, P A

    2014-01-01

    The occupational risks associated with the chemical toxicity of uranium can be overlooked during the processing, handling and storage of the material, as the radioactivity of the material is often used alone to assess the health consequences of exposure to uranium compounds. This note provides a summary of the current United Kingdom occupational standards for uranium based on radiation dose and/or chemical toxicity with a particular focus on intake via inhalation. A simple model is subsequently presented to allow a comparison to be drawn between the occupational exposure standard for chemical toxicity and radiological dose limit. Using these data a set of suggested limits on occupational exposure to airborne uranium is proposed that indicate where the legal annual radiological dose limit for workers or the Health and Safety Executive occupational exposure standard for chemical toxicity are at risk of being breached. (note)

  12. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  13. Honorary authorship in radiologic research articles: assessment of frequency and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ronald L; Ngo, Long; Boiselle, Philip M; Bankier, Alexander A

    2011-05-01

    To quantify the frequency of perceived honorary authorship in radiologic journals and to identify specific factors that increase its prevalence. This study qualified for exempt status by the institutional review board. An electronic survey was sent to first authors of all original research articles published in Radiology and European Radiology over 3 years. Questions included guidelines used for determining authorship, contributions of coauthors, the perception of honorary authorship, and demographic information. Univariable analysis of sample proportions was performed by using χ(2) tests. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the independent factors that were associated with the probability of perceiving honorary authorship. Of the 392 (29.3%) of 1338 first authors who responded to the survey, 102 (26.0%) perceived that one or more coauthors did not make sufficient contributions to merit being included as an author. Of the 392 respondents, 231 (58.9%) stated that one or more coauthors performed only "nonauthor" tasks according to International Committee of Medical Journal Editors criteria. Factors associated with an increased first-author perception of honorary authorship included lower academic rank (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.66, 5.06), as well as working in an environment in which the section or department head was automatically listed as an author (adjusted OR: 3.80; 95% CI: 2.13, 6.79). The percentage of honorary authorship was significantly higher (P = .019) among respondents who did not follow journal requirements for authorship. The rate of perceived honorary authorship (overall, 26.0%) was substantially more frequent among respondents of lower academic rank and in those working in an environment in which their section or department head was automatically listed as an author. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101500/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  14. Janis Huston Audin, MSc, DVM,1950-2009. Dynamic editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and strong One Health advocate dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Kaplan, DVM

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Dr Janis H. Audin (MSc Illinois 1975, DVM Illinois 1979, a champion of progressive veterinary medical journalism and ‘One Health’ died on 22 April 2009 following a long, courageous and difficult battle with pancreatic cancer. The world has lost a truly significant One Health leader and advocate. Under her guidance, the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA implemented a ‘one-health wonders’ column that recognised and highlighted prominent One Health individuals among the medical and veterinary medical professions in the United States. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA has lost a dedicated and gifted editor-in-chief.Dr Audin joined the editorial staff of the AVMA in 1985, as an assistant editor and was promoted to associate editor in 1989 and editor in 1994. She became the editor-in-chief of both the JAVMA and the American Journal of Veterinary Research in 1995. Prior to that, Dr Audin practised as an associate veterinarian in Calumet City, Illinois, for four years.During her tenure, Dr Audin was noted for implementing procedural and technological changes in the journal to reduce costs, improve timeliness of publications and promote readership interest and awareness. New features in the News section introduced under her leadership have made the journals more practical and public health-relevant. For instance, Dr Audin fostered the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS ‘Inspection Insights’ - a public health-oriented food safety monthly column related to meat, poultry and egg products - from 1996 through 1998. She also increased international manuscript submissions.On 23 March 2009 AVMA Executive Vice President Dr W. Ron DeHaven named Dr Audin as editor-in-chief emeritus of the Publications Division. Wisely, it also meant that Dr Audin could continue contributing to the staff effort to ensure the high quality of the AVMA scientific journals

  15. 35 Years of Experience From the American Association for Women Radiologists: Increasing the Visibility of Women in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Arleo, Elizabeth K; Macura, Katarzyna J; Rumack, Carol M

    2017-03-01

    Women radiologists remain in minority, unchanged for the past several decades. In 1981, the American Association for Women Radiologists (AAWR) was founded to address the problems that women radiologists were experiencing in being subordinate to male radiologists in the workplace and at the national level in organizations with respect to political power and financial compensation, as well as additional issues unique to women in radiology. The AAWR defined goals to meet the needs of women in radiology: improve the visibility of women radiologists, advance the professional and academic standing of women in radiology, and identify and address issues faced by women in radiology. AAWR efforts have included providing opportunities for career development and award recognition, hosting educational programs at national meetings, and publishing numerous manuscripts on issues faced by women in radiology. The AAWR recognizes that although there has been significant progress in the standing of women in radiology over the past 35 years, there is much room for improvement. The AAWR will continue to advocate for the needs of women in radiology. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of h-index of Editorial Board Members and Impact Factor among Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnafi, Solmaz; Gunderson, Tina; McDonald, Robert J; Kallmes, David F

    2017-02-01

    h-Index has been proposed as a useful bibliometric measure for quantifying research productivity. In this current study, we analyzed h-indices of editorial board members of Radiology journals and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of Radiology journals with higher impact factors (IF) have higher h-indices. Sixty-two Radiology journals with IF >1 were included. Editorial board members were identified using the journals' websites. Editors' affiliations and research fields of interest were used to distinguish investigators with similar names. Bibliometric indices including number of publications, total citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each editorial board member were obtained using the Web of Science database. Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to test for differences in bibliographic measures or demographics between groups. Among the editorial boards of 62 journals, the median [interquartile range] board h-index was 26 [18, 31] and had 36 [17, 56] members. The median journal IF was 2.27 [1.74, 3.31]. We identified a total of 2204 distinct editors; they had a median [interquartile range] h-index of 23 [13, 35], 120 [58, 215] total publications, 1938 [682, 4634] total citations, and an average of 15.7 [9.96, 24.8] citations per publication. The boards of journals with IF above the median had significantly higher h-indices (P = .002), total publications (P = .01), and total and average citations (both any [P = .003, .009] and nonself-citations [P = .001, .002]) than journals below the median. Our data indicate that board members of Radiology journals with higher IF have greater h-indices compared to lower IF journals. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Burnout: Job Resources and Job Demands Associated With Low Personal Accomplishment in United States Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenette, Jeffrey P; Smith, Stacy E

    2018-06-01

    We aimed to identify job resources and job demands associated with measures of personal accomplishment (PA) in radiology residents in the United States. A 34-item online survey was administered between May and June 2017 to U.S. radiology residents and included the 8 Likert-type PA questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, 19 visual analog scale job demands-resources questions, and 7 demographic questions. Multiple linear regression was calculated to predict PA based on job demands-resources. Effects of binomial demographic factors on PA scores were compared with independent-samples t tests. Effects of categorical demographic factors on PA scores were compared with one-way between-subjects analysis of variance tests. A linear regression was calculated to evaluate the relationship of age on PA scores. "The skills and knowledge that I am building are important and helpful to society" (P = 2 × 10 -16 ), "I have good social support from my co-residents" (P = 4 × 10 -5 ), and "I regularly receive adequate constructive feedback" (P = 4 × 10 -6 ) all positively correlated with PA. PA scores were significantly lower for individuals who were single vs those married or partnered (P = .01). Radiology residents score higher in the PA domain of burnout when they receive adequate constructive feedback, have good co-resident social support, and feel that the skills and knowledge they are building are important to society. Improving constructive feedback mechanisms, enabling resident-only social time, and supporting opportunities that reinforce the importance of their contributions may therefore improve radiology residents' sense of PA. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Veterinary Services Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Mission:To provide quality veterinary medical care and environmental enrichment programs for all animals, representing nine different species.To provide guidance for...

  19. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Whiting, M; Chambers, D; Toutain, P-L; Whitehead, M L

    2017-08-12

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Post Stroke Fatigue; Point Prevalence, Characterization, Associations and Radiological Correlation in a Rehabilitation Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A

    2017-11-01

    Post stroke fatigue (PSF) is a frequently reported symptom by stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. This cross sectional observational study was undertaken in a rehabilitation facility to look at its prevalence and relationship with various variables like personal factors, type of stroke, social context, hemispheric involvement on CT scan and mobility status. The results showed that PSF was present in 83% (25 out of 30) of the patients included in the study. No clear association could be established between PSF, social, radiological and functional characteristics.

  1. Bone paracoccidioidomycosis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: evaluation by radiological methods - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Lucimara; Hara, Monica Hiromi; Sabedotti, Ismail Fernando; Montandon, Cristiano; Torriani, Martin; Nanni, Livio

    1999-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a chronic granulomatous disease, caused by the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis fungus. This disease involves primarily the lungs, although disseminated forms may occur. Bone involvement is rare, and is associated to systemic disease or may present as a focal lesion. An association between paracoccidioidomycosis and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was first established in 1989. There are only a few reports on this association, and none of them was the fungus isolated from bone lesions. This is the first case report on the paracoccidioidomycosis-AIDS association in which bone lesions demonstrated infection by P. brasiliensis. The authors propose the inclusion of paracoccidioidomycosis in the differential diagnosis of lytic bone lesions in patients with AIDS and discuss the role of radiological diagnostic in this case. (author)

  2. The literature of veterinary imaging: the analysis of a questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raw, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    250 veterinarians, including 143(57.7%) non-radiologists, replied to a questionnaire on current literature of veterinary imaging. Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound was considered the best overall journal, being chosen as first choice by 51.6% respondents. It was also judged to have the best photographic reproduction. No book was chosen as first choice by more than 18.4%. Three, Textbook of Diagnostic Radiology, Thrall; Diagnostic Radiology of the Dog & Cat, Kealy and Thoracic Radiography of the Dog & Cat, Suter & Lord, were chosen by 18.4%, 16.8% and 13.2% respondents respectively. Clinically orientated papers and review articles were the preferred contents of journal's. Experience of colleagues and journals were adjudged the best source of information on diagnostic imaging. Differences in results between radiologists and non-radiologists were not great and geographic differences were few. Of the 112 respondents who had published papers on veterinary imaging, 30 (26.4%) were non-radiologists

  3. Patients' satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and referral hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulisa, Teshome; Tessema, Fasil; Merga, Hailu

    2017-06-26

    Patient satisfaction, one of the main components of quality of care, is a crucial phenomenon for the overall health care delivery system. Even though a number of studies have been conducted about patient satisfaction in different health services, studies in radiology services are flimsy in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing patient satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and Referral hospital. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 321 adult patients presented for radiological service in the study area using stratified sampling technique. Patient satisfaction was measured using SERVQUAL (Service Quality) tool that consisted of seven items: accessibility, quality of radiological service, courtesy of radiology staff, existence of good communication with service provider and desk worker, physical environment and privacy technique. Exit interviews of patients were conducted using a structured and pretested questionnaire. Data was collected by three grade ten completed trained data collectors from May 12 to May 28, 2016. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify independent factors associated with patient satisfaction on radiological services using SPSS version 21. The overall patient satisfaction towards radiological service was 71.6%. Satisfaction to accessibility of the service was 84.5% while it was 80.6% to courtesy of the staff. Similarly, 81.6% reported satisfied with quality of the service and 59.4% and 71% of reported satisfied with physical environment and radiological service provider respectively. On the other hand, 99.7% of the respondents were dissatisfied with privacy of the service. The study revealed that patients who attended primary school (AOR = 0.317, 95% CI: 0.11-0.88), unemployed patients (AOR = 0.067, 95% CI: 0.007-0.622) and patients who had short waiting time to enter into examination room less than one hour (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI: 1.4-11.62) were

  4. The current status of interventional radiology in Canada: results of a survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millward, S.F.; Holley, M.L. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Radiology, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate the current status of interventional radiology in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to 28 Canadian interventional radiologists (defined as a physician who performs any type of interventional procedure, including biopsies, but excluding interventional neuroradiology) practising in both tertiary and community hospitals in the major centres in all provinces except Prince Edward Island. Twenty-two (79%) of 28 surveys were completed and returned, providing data about 86 interventional radiologists (IRs). IRs were performing almost all of the following procedures at their institutions: inferior vena cava filter placement, venous angioplasty, dialysis fistula angioplasty, diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary and bronchial artery procedures, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the lower extremity and renal arteries, percutaneous abscess and biliary drainage procedures, percutaneous nephrostomy, and fibroid embolization. A second group of procedures, performed by both IRs and non-radiologists in most institutions, included: all types of central venous catheter placements, pleural drainage, and gastrostomy tube placement. Procedures not being performed by anyone in a number of institutions included: dialysis graft thrombolysis, varicocele embolization, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, palliative stenting of the gastrointestinal tract, fallopian tube recannalization, and liver and prostate tumour treatments. The factors most often limiting the respondents' ability to provide a comprehensive interventional service were the interventional radiology inventory budget and the availability of interventional radiology rooms; 50% of respondents indicated the number of available nurses, technologists and IRs was also an important limiting factor. IRs in Canada still play a major role in many of the most commonly performed procedures. However, limited availability of resources and personnel in many institutions may be hampering the ability of IRs to

  5. Ketamine-associated lower urinary tract destruction: a new radiological challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, K., E-mail: k.mason@doctors.org.u [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Cottrell, A.M. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Corrigan, A.G. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Gillatt, D.A.; Mitchelmore, A.E. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: Ketamine is a short-acting dissociative anaesthetic whose hallucinogenic side effects have led to an increase in its illicit use amongst club and party goers. There is a general misconception amongst users that it is a safe drug with few long term side effects, however ketamine abuse is associated with severe urinary tract dysfunction. Presenting symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. Materials and methods: We describe the radiological findings found in a series of 23 patients, all with a history of ketamine abuse, who presented with severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Imaging techniques used included ultrasonography (US), intravenous urography (IVU), and computed tomography (CT). These examinations were reviewed to identify common imaging findings. All patients with positive imaging findings had also undergone cystoscopy and bladder wall biopsies, which confirmed the diagnosis. The patients in this series have consented to the use of their data in the ongoing research into ketamine-induced bladder pathology. Results: Ultrasound demonstrated small bladder volume and wall thickening. CT revealed marked, generalized bladder wall thickening, mucosal enhancement, and perivesical inflammation. Ureteric wall thickening and enhancement were also observed. In advanced cases ureteric narrowing and strictures were identified using both CT and IVU. Correlation of clinical history, radiological and pathological findings was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusion: This case series illustrates the harmful effects of ketamine on the urinary tract and the associated radiological findings. Delayed diagnosis can result in irreversible renal tract damage requiring surgical intervention. It is important that radiologists are aware of this emerging clinical entity as early diagnosis and treatment are essential for successful management.

  6. Veterinary medicines in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, A B A; Fogg, L A; Blackwell, P A; Kay, P; Pemberton, E J; Croxford, A

    2004-01-01

    (6000 L kg(-1)). The variation in partitioning for many of the compounds in different soils was significant (up to a factor of 30), but these differences could be not be explained by normalization to the organic carbon content of the soils. Thus, to arrive at a realistic assessment of the availability of veterinary medicines for transport through the soil and uptake into soil organisms, the K(oc) (which is used in many of the exposure models) may not be an appropriate measure. Transport of particle-associated substances from soil to surface waters has also been demonstrated. Veterinary medicines can persist in soils for days to years, and half-lives are influenced by a range of factors including temperature, pH, and the presence of manure. The persistence of major groups of veterinary medicines in soil, manure, slurry, and water varies across and within classes. Ecotoxicity data were available for a wide range of veterinary medicines. The acute and chronic effects of avermectins and sheep dip chemicals on aquatic organisms are well documented, and these substances are known to be toxic to many organisms at low concentrations (ng L(-1) to microg L(-1)). Concerns have also been raised about the possibility of indirect effects of these substances on predatory species (e.g., birds and bats). Data for other groups indicate that toxicity values are generally in the mg L(-1) range. For the antibiotics, toxicity is greater for certain species of algae and marine bacteria. Generally, toxicity values for antibacterial agents were significantly higher than reported environmental concentrations. However, because of a lack of appropriate toxicity data, it is difficult to assess the environmental significance of these observations with regard to subtle long-term effects.

  7. Veterinary education in Africa: current and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, G E; Kriek, N P J

    2009-03-01

    Veterinary education commenced in South Africa in 1920 at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa in association with the Transvaal University College, now the University of Pretoria. Sir Arnold Theiler, Director of Veterinary Research and Education, was the first Dean. Today there are 46 veterinary training institutions in Africa of which 21 are in sub-Saharan Africa. Veterinary services are indispensable to the sustained health and wellbeing of animals and humans, and agricultural economies of countries worldwide. Veterinary education, postgraduate training, and research, and adequate numbers of veterinarians, are essential to satisfy the millennium development goals, the objectives of NEPAD and the African Union, and the agreements regulating international trade. The relevance of the veterinary profession internationally is currently subject to profound scrutiny. Its contributions are assessed against major environmental, demographic, political, disease, technological and economic needs. The scope of veterinary training in future will have to emphasise veterinary public health, food safety, emerging diseases, international trade, bioterrorism, and biomedical research, within the context of a one-health system focusing on the interface between wildlife, domesticated animals, humans, and their environment. Within the context of time available, it would mean reducing the time allocated to training in the field of companion animals. A brief history and scope of veterinary education; current international trends in veterinary education and provisioning; and some perspectives on future veterinary training and initiatives applicable to Africa are provided.

  8. Understanding veterinary leadership in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Caroline Elizabeth; Butler, Allan J; Murray, Yaqub Paul

    2018-04-21

    The Vet Futures Report has identified 'exceptional leadership' as a key ambition for the long-term sustainability of the industry. This research investigates what it is like to be a veterinary surgeon in an in-practice leadership position, applying the qualitative methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Through the researchers' interpretation of the seven participants' stories of their leadership experiences, the study advances understanding of the work environment, underlying motivations and the perceived responsibilities of veterinary leaders. Findings suggest, for many, a struggle in transition to leader positions, improving with time. The increase in pace of work is relayed by participants, with an ongoing, and unchallenged, work-life imbalance. The vets involved are highly motivated, driven by enjoyment of their jobs, a desire for self-determination and a need to make a difference. Relationships form the core of the perceived responsibilities, and yet are identified as the greatest day-to-day challenge of leadership. This study offers a valuable insight for veterinary surgeons, suggesting the industry could benefit from pausing and reflecting on behaviours. With a greater understanding of the complexity of leadership and followership, progress can be made to enact positive changes for the future. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Veterinary microbiology and microbial disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinn, P. J

    2011-01-01

    "Veterinary Microbiology is one of the core subjects for veterinary students. Fully revised and expanded, this new edition covers every aspect of veterinary microbiology for students in both paraclinical and clinical years...

  10. Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences is the official journal of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria. The journal welcomes original research articles, short communications and reviews on all aspects of veterinary sciences and related disciplines.

  11. Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 49 of 49 ... Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 49 of 49 Items ...

  12. Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 16 of 16 ... Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 16 of 16 Items ...

  13. .* Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Central Diagnostic, National Veterinary Research Institute Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria, 'Department of Veterinary Medicine. Ahmadu Bello ..... environment as reported by (Olabode et al., 2009; Okwor and Eze, 2011;Jwander et al., 2013b). Farmers who had the same complaints of. Marek's disease from the same source of.

  14. Association of gender and specialty interest with video-gaming, three-dimensional spatial analysis, and entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Heather R; Towle Millard, Heather A; Millard, Ralph P; Constable, Peter D; Freeman, Lyn J

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether gender or interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery was associated with video-gaming, 3-D spatial analysis, or entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE A convenience sample of 68 (42 female and 26 male) third-year veterinary students. PROCEDURES Participants completed a survey asking about their interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery. Subsequently, participants' entry-level laparoscopic skills were assessed with 3 procedures performed in box trainers, their video-gaming skills were tested with 3 video games, and their 3-D spatial analysis skills were evaluated with the Purdue University Visualization of Rotations Spatial Test. Scores were assigned for laparoscopic, video-gaming, and 3-D spatial analysis skills. RESULTS Significantly more female than male students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine (23/42 vs 7/26), and significantly more male than female students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery (19/26 vs 19/42). Males had significantly higher video-gaming skills scores than did females, but spatial analysis and laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between males and females. Students interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery had higher video-gaming and spatial analysis skills scores than did students interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine, but laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between these 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For this group of students, neither gender nor interest in specialty certification in internal medicine versus surgery was associated with entry-level laparoscopy skills.

  15. Modern nuclear medicine methods as a topic of biophysics in veterinary training at UVM in Kosice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanicova, J.; Lohajova, L.

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic application of ionising radiation is very important in all of branches of medicine including veterinary medicine. In veterinary training at University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice (UVM), biophysics is a basic subject and it grants physical basis necessary for understanding subsequent subjects such as veterinary surgery, roentgenology, orthopedics. In view of this, traditional methods of radiology such as fluoroscopy, skiagraphy and tomography are explaining. The appearance and application of the theory so called reconstruction of image and also computers led to qualitatively new solutions via the development of modern methods in radiology. Explaining of physical principles, advantages or disadvantages of these new methods is also important in veterinary training although some of them do not use in veterinary practice yet. Two modern methods of nuclear medicine using in diagnostic (SPECT and PET) are discussed bellow. (authors)

  16. Statistical associations between radiation exposure and the clinical examination data of Japanese radiology technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka; Aoyama, Takashi; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki; Yamamoto, Yoichi.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between occupational irradiation, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and clinical examination data were investigated in Japanese male radiology technicians. The number of investigated examination items was 35, including 29 biochemical serum test, four hematological tests and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The associations with each factor were evaluated using the multiple linear regression model. As single factors, radiation associated with urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase, monoamine oxidase and leukocyte count (four items), smoking associated with albumin-globulin index, zinc sulfate turbidity test, urea nitrogen, creatinine, neutral fat, amylase, serum iron, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit (10 items), and drinking associated with creatinine, uric acid, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, leucine aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and erythrocyte count (six items). As synergistic factors, the combination of radiation and smoking associated with nine items, radiation and drinking 10 items, smoking and drinking four items, and radiation, smoking and drinking two items. These results suggested that the number of items which radiation associated as single-factor were less than that of smoking and of drinking, however suggested that associations between radiation and examination data was synergistic when combined with smoking or drinking. (author)

  17. Statistical associations between radiation exposure and the clinical examination data of Japanese radiology technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Aoyama, Takashi; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki; Yamamoto, Yoichi

    1995-06-01

    The associations between occupational irradiation, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and clinical examination data were investigated in Japanese male radiology technicians. The number of investigated examination items was 35, including 29 biochemical serum test, four hematological tests and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The associations with each factor were evaluated using the multiple linear regression model. As single factors, radiation associated with urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase, monoamine oxidase and leukocyte count (four items), smoking associated with albumin-globulin index, zinc sulfate turbidity test, urea nitrogen, creatinine, neutral fat, amylase, serum iron, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit (10 items), and drinking associated with creatinine, uric acid, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, leucine aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and erythrocyte count (six items). As synergistic factors, the combination of radiation and smoking associated with nine items, radiation and drinking 10 items, smoking and drinking four items, and radiation, smoking and drinking two items. These results suggested that the number of items which radiation associated as single-factor were less than that of smoking and of drinking, however suggested that associations between radiation and examination data was synergistic when combined with smoking or drinking. (author).

  18. Relationships between young stallions' temperament and their behavioral reactions during standardized veterinary examinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Marie; Verwilghen, Denis; Serteyn, Didier

    2012-01-01

    radiological examination. During the years 2008 and 2009, 93 stallions were evaluated. Stallions were observed from the moment they were unloaded from the trailer at the clinic until the end of veterinary examinations. In addition to the behavioral observations made by the experimenter, each staff member......," and " learning level" temperament traits were the most consistent, as shown by the significant Spearman correlations between judges' assessments. Undesirable behaviors during veterinary examinations leading to handling difficulties were associated with a low " easiness of manipulation" score assessed...... by the clinical staff. These low " easiness of manipulation" scores were positively correlated to temperament traits such as " anxiousness" and " aggressiveness" and negatively correlated to others such as " sociability" or " learning level." Temperament assessment and behavioral observations can therefore...

  19. Radiological management of multiple hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms associated with cholangitic abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Ankur; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Baruah, Bhaskar; Shalimar; Sharma, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are uncommon, occurring mostly as a complication of trauma (accidental or iatrogenic). Liver abscess rarely causes HAP and multiple HAP associated with cholangitic abscesses have not been reported in the literature. We present a patient of acute necrotizing pancreatitis with stent block cholangitis and multiple cholangitic abscesses who developed hemorrhagic output through drainage catheter in the liver abscess. A multiphasic CT angiography demonstrated three HAP, which were treated with a combination of endovascular coil embolization and percutaneous thrombin injection. The fact that cholangitic abscesses may be associated with pseudoaneurysms should not be neglected, considering the potentially catastrophic complication and relatively easy radiological management. CT angiography permits accurate diagnosis and lays down the roadmap for endovascular procedures

  20. Association between nasopharyngeal load of Streptococcus pneumoniae, viral coinfection, and radiologically confirmed pneumonia in Vietnamese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Huong Thi Thu; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Suzuki, Motoi; Nguyen, Hien Anh Thi; Nguyen, Cat Dinh Lien; Nguyen, Ai Thi Thuy; Oishi, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kiwao; Vu, Thiem Dinh

    2011-01-01

    The interplay between nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage, viral coinfection, and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) is poorly understood. We explored this association in Vietnamese children aged less than 5 years. A hospital-based case-control study of pediatric LRTIs was conducted in Nha Trang, Vietnam. A total of 550 hospitalized children (274 radiologically confirmed pneumonia [RCP] and 276 other LRTIs) were enrolled and 350 healthy controls were randomly selected from the community. Polymerase chain reaction-based methods were used to measure bacterial loads of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis and to detect 13 respiratory viruses and bacterial serotypes in nasopharyngeal samples of study participants. The median nasopharyngeal bacterial load of SP was substantially higher in children with RCP compared with healthy controls or children with other LRTIs (P RCP or other LRTIs groups. An increased load of SP in the nasopharynx was associated with RCP, viral coinfection, and presence of pneumococcal capsule.

  1. Radiological management of multiple hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms associated with cholangitic abscesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP are uncommon, occurring mostly as a complication of trauma (accidental or iatrogenic. Liver abscess rarely causes HAP and multiple HAP associated with cholangitic abscesses have not been reported in the literature. We present a patient of acute necrotizing pancreatitis with stent block cholangitis and multiple cholangitic abscesses who developed hemorrhagic output through drainage catheter in the liver abscess. A multiphasic CT angiography demonstrated three HAP, which were treated with a combination of endovascular coil embolization and percutaneous thrombin injection. The fact that cholangitic abscesses may be associated with pseudoaneurysms should not be neglected, considering the potentially catastrophic complication and relatively easy radiological management. CT angiography permits accurate diagnosis and lays down the roadmap for endovascular procedures.

  2. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting

  3. Radiological consequences associated with human intrusion into radioactive waste repositories in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-01-01

    The assessment of the radiological impact of human intrusion scenarios is extremely important in the case of repositories located in salt formations, since salt is obviously a valuable economic resource. Salt formations also represent a suitable medium for mining storage caverns for oil and gas. The scenario considered in this report is that of solution mining in salt formations to produce salt for human consumption. It is postulated that the salt is extracted by excavating a cavern through solution-mining and that, in the course of cavern enlargement, the waste is intercepted and drops to the bottom of the cavern. We have assumed that the intrusion takes place 500 or even 2 500 years after the repository has been sealed. The cases considered involve high-level vitrified waste or cemented alpha waste. The paper describes the assumptions on which the scenario is based and uses a simplified model to assess the radiological consequences associated with the ingestion of contaminated salt. The paper also provides details of a sensitivity/uncertainty analysis which identified several areas in which experimental studies should be either initiated or continued [fr

  4. Radiological environmental risk associated with different water management systems in amang processing in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, B.; Yasir, M.S.; Redzuwan, Y.; Amran, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The processing of amang (tin-tailing) for its valuable minerals have shown that it technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials, and has a potential of impacting the environment. Large volume of water is used to extract these valuable minerals from amang. Three types of water management systems are used by amang plants, i.e. Open Water System (OWS), Close Water System Man-made (CWS mm) and Close Water System Natural (CWSn). A study was carried out to determine the radiological environmental risk associated with these different water management systems in amang processing in Malaysia. The parameters studied were pH of water, Water Quality Indices, and uranium ad thorium concentrations in water and sediments. Three different sampling locations were selected for each water management system, i.e. the source, the receiver and related reference water bodies. Results obtained showed that amang reduces the pH and contaminates the water. However, OWS appears have the least radiological environmental impact. On the contrary both CWS (man-made and natural) pose a potential environmental risk if great care are not given to the treatment of accumulated sediment and contaminated water before discharge into the environment

  5. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecker, A.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Haage, P.; Huppert, P.; Landwehr, P.; Loose, R.; Reimer, P.; Tacke, J.; Vorwerk, D.; Fischer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  6. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula: clinical and radiologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Shin, Su-Mi; Kim, In-One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, So-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) can be associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). Because there are a variety of degrees of obstruction and symptoms of CES, it is frequently difficult to make a pre- and post-operative diagnosis of the distal CES associated with EA/TEF. To evaluate the clinical and radiologic features of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula. We retrospectively reviewed postoperative esophagograms and medical records of 187 children (107 boys, 80 girls) who had primary repair of EA/TEF from 1992 to 2009 at our institution. We evaluated the incidence of CES, clinical findings, radiologic features and management of CES in these children. CES was diagnosed in 22 of 187 EA/TEF children (12%); one child had double CES lesions, for a total of 23 lesions. Ten of those 22 children (45%) had presented with significant symptoms of esophageal obstruction. The diagnosis of CES was delayed in 10 children (45%) until 1-10 years of age. On esophagogram, CES (n = 23) was located in the distal esophagus (n = 20, 87%) or mid-esophagus (n = 3, 13%). The degree of stenosis was severe (n = 6, 26%), moderate (n = 10, 43%), or mild (n = 7, 30%). Eight children, including two with unsuccessful esophageal balloon dilatation of CES, were treated surgically. Histologic examination revealed tracheobronchial remnant (n = 7) or fibromuscular hyperplasia (n = 1). One child with surgically treated CES developed achalasia at the age of 3 years 9 months. Esophagography after EA/TEF repair should be performed with a high index of suspicion for the presence of distal CES, because the diagnosis and adequate management of CES can often be delayed. (orig.)

  7. Radiological risk associated with a fire scenario in a radioactive waste deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, E.N.; Lima, Z.R. de, E-mail: erica.ndomingos@gmail.com, E-mail: zelmolima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (PPGIEN/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Aguiar, L.A., E-mail: aguiar.lais@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A fire at the disposal of radioactive waste can result in significant damage, as well as serious risks to the environment and the health of the general public. The norms of CNEN (Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear), CNEN 2.03; CNEN 2.04 and CNEN 8.02 include fire protection regulations and have criteria and requirements that aim to prevent the occurrence, neutralize the action and minimize the effects of the fire on the radioactive and/or toxic mate-rial present in the installations. For decision making due to a fire scenario containing radioactive material, it is fundamental to have information that can allow the estimate of the dose to which the population will be submitted. This work proposes to identify the radiological risk of cancer in the respiratory system using the BEIR V model, associated with a fire scenario containing radioactive material generated in the Hotspot code. (author)

  8. Radiologic features of a pyrophosphate-like arthropathy associated with long-term dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Martel, W.; Menerey, K.; Fox, I.H.; Swartz, R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 28 long-term dialysis patients with musculoskeletal complaints, the radiologic findings in six cases resembled those occurring in the arthropathy of idiopathic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease. These findings included osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and cartilage loss in the metacarpophalangeal joints, patellofemoral joints, wrists, and shoulders. Chondrocalcinosis was present in three of the six cases. There were no significant differences in renal function or levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, iron, ferritin, aluminum, or parathormone between these patients and a control group matched for sex and age. Long-term dialysis may be associated with a metabolic arthritis similar to the arthritis which occurs in CPPD deposition disease. The etiology may include deposition of CPPD crystals, hydroxyapatite, or other calcium-containing substances in joints, or it may be related to a number of dialysis-induced metabolic abnormalities. (orig.)

  9. Radiological consequences associated with a human intrusion into a saliferous formation containing a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.; Raimbault, P.

    1990-01-01

    Assessment of the consequences of human intrusion scenarios for a repository in salt formations is very important, since this material has an undeniable economic value: it is also a propitious medium for the storage of hydrocarbons, gases, etc. In this work the scenario considers solution mining of salt for human consumption: salt is extracted from a cavern by leaching, and this enlarges the cavern and uncovers the waste, which then falls down into the sump. It was assumed that the intrusion would take place at 500 or even 2500 years after closing of the repository. High activity vitrified waste or cement enrobed alpha waste was considered. This paper sets out the assumptions made and, using simplified modelling of the phenomena, makes an estimation of the radiological consequences associated with ingestion of contaminated salt. A sensitivity/uncertainty analysis which is presented emphasises several fields in which experimental studies should be launched or pursued. (author)

  10. Radiologic features of a pyrophosphate-like arthropathy associated with long-term dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Martel, W.; Menerey, K.; Fox, I.H.; Swartz, R.

    1987-08-01

    In a series of 28 long-term dialysis patients with musculoskeletal complaints, the radiologic findings in six cases resembled those occurring in the arthropathy of idiopathic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease. These findings included osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and cartilage loss in the metacarpophalangeal joints, patellofemoral joints, wrists, and shoulders. Chondrocalcinosis was present in three of the six cases. There were no significant differences in renal function or levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, iron, ferritin, aluminum, or parathormone between these patients and a control group matched for sex and age. Long-term dialysis may be associated with a metabolic arthritis similar to the arthritis which occurs in CPPD deposition disease. The etiology may include deposition of CPPD crystals, hydroxyapatite, or other calcium-containing substances in joints, or it may be related to a number of dialysis-induced metabolic abnormalities.

  11. Radiological issues associated with the recent boom in oil and gas hydraulic fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Alejandro [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, 800 North Bell Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15106 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    As the worldwide hydraulic fracturing 'fracking' market continued to grow to an estimated $37 Billion in 2012, the need to understand and manage radiological issues associated with fracking is becoming imperative. Fracking is a technique that injects pressurized fluid into rock layer to propagate fractures that allows natural gas and other petroleum products to be more easily extracted. Radioactivity is associated with fracking in two ways. Radioactive tracers are frequently a component of the injection fluid used to determine the injection profile and locations of fractures. Second, because there are naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the media surrounding and containing oil and gas deposits, the process of fracking can dislodge radioactive materials and transport them to the surface in the wastewater and gases. Treatment of the wastewater to remove heavy metals and other contaminates can concentrate the NORM into technologically-enhanced NORM (TENORM). Regulations to classify, transport, and dispose of the TENORM and other radioactive waste can be complicated and cumbersome and vary widely in the international community and even between states/provinces. In many cases, regulations on NORM and TENORM do not even exist. Public scrutiny and regulator pressure will only continue to increase as the world demands on oil and gas continue to rise and greater quantities of TENORM materials are produced. Industry experts, health physicists, regulators, and public communities must work together to understand and manage radiological issues to ensure reasonable and effective regulations protective of the public, environment, and worker safety and health are implemented. (authors)

  12. Radiological issues associated with the recent boom in oil and gas hydraulic fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    As the worldwide hydraulic fracturing 'fracking' market continued to grow to an estimated $37 Billion in 2012, the need to understand and manage radiological issues associated with fracking is becoming imperative. Fracking is a technique that injects pressurized fluid into rock layer to propagate fractures that allows natural gas and other petroleum products to be more easily extracted. Radioactivity is associated with fracking in two ways. Radioactive tracers are frequently a component of the injection fluid used to determine the injection profile and locations of fractures. Second, because there are naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the media surrounding and containing oil and gas deposits, the process of fracking can dislodge radioactive materials and transport them to the surface in the wastewater and gases. Treatment of the wastewater to remove heavy metals and other contaminates can concentrate the NORM into technologically-enhanced NORM (TENORM). Regulations to classify, transport, and dispose of the TENORM and other radioactive waste can be complicated and cumbersome and vary widely in the international community and even between states/provinces. In many cases, regulations on NORM and TENORM do not even exist. Public scrutiny and regulator pressure will only continue to increase as the world demands on oil and gas continue to rise and greater quantities of TENORM materials are produced. Industry experts, health physicists, regulators, and public communities must work together to understand and manage radiological issues to ensure reasonable and effective regulations protective of the public, environment, and worker safety and health are implemented. (authors)

  13. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Corresponding author: Email: yahidauad@gmail.com; Tel No:+2348037811882 ... and veterinary medicine as potent anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and .... steroid skeleton, similar to hydrocortisone. ... for pregnant women at risk of preterm birth.

  14. Tanzania Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Journal are the Research Workers, Veterinary Clinicians, Animal Scientists, Field Officers ... Prevalence and risk factors for Ascaris and Cryptosporidium infestations in ... Mastitis pathogens prevalent in dairy cattle at Magadu farm, Morogoro- ...

  15. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Also, the advantage of ... antibodies. The major disadvantage of the polyclonal ... advantage of a monoclonal antibody over .... department in the veterinary school was obtained from the ..... methodology for both routine diagnostic and research ...

  16. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Control Services, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Abuja; 9National Veterinary Research Institute, P.M.B 01 Vom,. Nigeria. *Corresponding ... because the poultry industry contributes ..... holidays have been identified as source of transmission ...

  17. Ethiopian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Results of a survey to determine demographic and business management factors associated with size and growth rate of rural mixed-animal veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusk, Amy M; White, Brad J; Goehl, Dan R; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C

    2010-12-15

    To determine potential associations between demographic and business management factors and practice size and growth rate in rural mixed-animal veterinary practices. Cross-sectional survey. 54 mixed-animal practitioners. A cross-sectional survey (96 questions) was electronically disseminated. Responses were collected, and outcomes (number of veterinarians [NV], growth in number of veterinarians [NVG], gross practice income [GPI], growth in gross practice income [GPIG], gross practice income per veterinarian [GPIV], and growth in gross practice income per veterinarian [GPIVG]) were calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed and multivariable models created to determine associations between survey responses and outcomes of interest. Survey respondents were from mixed-animal practices, and most (46/54 [85.2%]) practiced in small communities (business manager. Typically, practices had positive mean growth in NVG (4.4%), GPIG (8.5%), and GPIVG (8.1%), but growth rate was highly variable among practices. Factors associated with growth rate included main species interest, frequency for adjusting prices, use of a marketing plan, service fee structure, and sending a client newsletter. Mixed-animal practices had a large range in size and growth rate. Economic indices were impacted by common business management practices.

  19. Abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: Radiological findings and changes after therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jeong-Hee [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Yoon, Seong Eon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eugene K. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Park, Seong Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate imaging findings of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and changes after steroid therapy. Methods and materials: This study included nine AIP patients with abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, which were determined by retrospective radiological review. CT (initial and follow-up, n = 9) and MR imaging (initial, n = 5) were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to determine imaging characteristics (i.e., size, number, attenuation or signal intensity, and contrast enhancement of the lesions, and the presence of overlying capsule retraction) and evaluate changes with steroid therapy of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP. Results: The most common abdominal extrapancreatic lesion associated with AIP was retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) in six patients. In five patients, CT and MR imaging revealed single or multiple, round- or wedge-shaped, hypoattenuating or hypointense, enhancing lesions in the renal cortex or pelvis. Other lesions included a geographic, ill-defined, hypoattenuating lesion with or without overlying capsule retraction in the liver in two and bile duct dilatation with or without bile duct wall thickening in four. Over a follow-up period of 6-81 months, CT exams of eight patients demonstrated partial or complete improvement of the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, albeit their improvement in general lagged behind that of the pancreatic lesion. Conclusion: On CT or MR imaging, the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP are various in the retroperitoneum, liver, kidneys and bile ducts, and are reversible with steroid therapy.

  20. Teaching veterinary parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verster, A

    1994-08-01

    The history of parasitology and the teaching of veterinary parasitology in South Africa are reviewed briefly. Courses in veterinary parasitology are presented at the faculties of veterinary science at the University of Pretoria and the Medical University of South Africa as well as at the Pretoria Technicon. At the University of Pretoria, the three disciplines of veterinary parasitology, entomology, helminthology and protozoology, are covered in 330 core lectures; from 13 to 40% of the contact time is devoted to practical classes. Teaching veterinary parasitology is both labour intensive and costly, viz. R1700 (US$570) per student per annum. Such costs are justified by the R148.8 million (US$49.6 million) spent every year in South Africa on anthelmintics, ectoparasiticides and vaccines to control parasites. Veterinary parasitology is a dynamic subject and the curriculum must be revised regularly to incorporate new information. Because the parasite faunas are so diverse no single textbook can satisfy the requirements of the various institutions worldwide which teach the subject, with the result that extensive use is made of notes. In Australia and in Europe, ticks and tick-borne diseases are less important than they are in Africa; consequently insufficient space is devoted to them in textbooks to satisfy the requirements of the subject in African countries. Parasite control under extensive and intensive conditions is dealt with adequately at the University of Pretoria, but increasing emphasis will be given to small-scale farming systems, particularly if alternative food animals are to be kept.

  1. Pathological and radiological investigations on osteochondrosis in pigs, associated with leg weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jørgensen, B.; Arnbjerg, J.; Aaslyng, M.

    1995-01-01

    Two-hundred and seventy-eight Danish Landrace boars were examined radiologically and pathologically for osteochondrosis and other joint lesions on the left legs at slaughter (95 kg). The joint changes were scored on a scale from 1 (normal) to 5 (very severe changes/osteochondritis dissecans). The correlations between radiological and pathological scores were highly significant in the humeral condyles (r = 0.66, P lt 0.001), the distal ulna growth plate (r = 0.51, P lt 0.001), the femoral condyles (r = 0.33, P lt 0.001) and hock (distal tibia (r = 0.17, P lt 0.01) and the medial trochlear ridge of the talus (r = 0.17, P lt 0.01), indicating that radiographical examination is a useful method for diagnosing osteochondrosis in live pigs. Thickening of cartilage was strongly associated with subchondral lesions in the three predilection sites: the humeral condyle, the femoral condyles and the distal ulna growth plate. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the humeral condyles was significantly associated with subchondral lesions (OR= 1.86; P lt 0.001), but not with cartilage thickness when analysed simultaneously. There were no associations between lesions in the distal ulna growth place, the humeral condyles, the femoral condyles or the anconeal process. There was no significant correlation' between OCD in the humeral condyles and the anconeal process. Osteochondrosis could therefore not be stated to be a generalized disorder. Regression coefficients between joint changes and leg weakness symptoms judged before slaughter were very small and showed no clear trends. OCD in the humeral condyles was, however, significantly associated with 'legs turned out on fore (OR = 2.48; P lt 0.001) and hind (OR = 1.62; P lt 0.05) legs', and OCD in the anconeal process with 'stiff movement in front' (OH+OR = 2.01; P lt 0.05). Osteochondrosis is thus comparable with a threshold trait, where the threshold is the development of an OCD in an osteochondrosis injured joint

  2. The significance of reduced respiratory chain enzyme activities: clinical, biochemical and radiological associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordekar, S R; Guthrie, P; Bonham, J R; Olpin, S E; Hargreaves, I; Baxter, P S

    2006-03-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an important group of neurometabolic disorders in children with varied clinical presentations and diagnosis that can be difficult to confirm. To report the significance of reduced respiratory chain enzyme (RCE) activity in muscle biopsy samples from children. Retrospective odds ratio was used to compare clinical and biochemical features, DNA studies, neuroimaging, and muscle biopsies in 18 children with and 48 without reduced RCE activity. Children with reduced RCE activity were significantly more likely to have consanguineous parents, to present with acute encephalopathy and lactic acidaemia and/or within the first year of life; to have an axonal neuropathy, CSF lactate >4 mmol/l; and/or to have signal change in the basal ganglia. There were positive associations with a maternal family history of possible mitochondrial cytopathy; a presentation with failure to thrive and lactic acidaemia, ragged red fibres, reduced fibroblast fatty acid oxidation and with an abnormal allopurinol loading test. There was no association with ophthalmic abnormalities, deafness, epilepsy or myopathy. The association of these clinical, biochemical and radiological features with reduced RCE activity suggests a possible causative link.

  3. The Application of Strength of Association Statistics to the Item Analysis of an In-Training Examination in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, James J.; McCormick, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Using item responses from an in-training examination in diagnostic radiology, the application of a strength of association statistic to the general problem of item analysis is illustrated. Criteria for item selection, general issues of reliability, and error of measurement are discussed. (Author/LMO)

  4. Radiological Findings in a Case of Multiple Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Associated with Portal Vein Atresia and Portopulmonary Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Joon; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Choi, Jin Woo; Park, Hee Sun; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Hae Ryoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    We present here the radiological findings of a rare case of multiple focal nodular hyperplasia that was associated with portal vein atresia and portopulmonary hypertension in a young woman. This case illustrates and supports the pathophysiological hypotheses that were previously proposed for the coexistence of these three abnormalities

  5. The role of veterinary team effectiveness in job satisfaction and burnout in companion animal veterinary clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Irene C; Coe, Jason B; Adams, Cindy L; Conlon, Peter D; Sargeant, Jan M

    2014-09-01

    To determine the role of veterinary team effectiveness regarding job satisfaction and burnout in companion animal veterinary practice. Cross-sectional observational study. 48 companion animal veterinary health-care teams. 274 team members participated in an online survey. Overall job satisfaction was evaluated with a 1-item measure, and the 3 dimensions of burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy) were measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey. Team effectiveness was assessed with a survey developed for this study. Demographic and team effectiveness factors (coordinated team environment, toxic team environment, team engagement, and individual engagement) associated with job satisfaction and burnout were evaluated. Overall mean job satisfaction score was 5.46 of 7 (median, 6.00); veterinary technicians and kennel attendants had the lowest scores. According to the Maslach survey results, 22.4% of participants were in the high-risk category for exhaustion, 23.2% were in the high-risk category for cynicism, and 9.3% were in the high-risk category for professional efficacy. A coordinated team environment was associated with increased professional efficacy and decreased cynicism. A toxic team environment was negatively associated with job satisfaction and positively associated with exhaustion and cynicism. Individual engagement was positively associated with job satisfaction and professional efficacy and negatively associated with exhaustion and cynicism. Results suggested the effectiveness of a veterinary team can significantly influence individual team members' job satisfaction and burnout. Practices should pay specific attention to the effectiveness with which their veterinary team operates.

  6. Dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accident by numerical simulations by means associating an anthropomorphic model and a Monte Carlo computation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courageot, Estelle

    2010-01-01

    After a description of the context of radiological accidents (definition, history, context, exposure types, associated clinic symptoms of irradiation and contamination, medical treatment, return on experience) and a presentation of dose assessment in the case of external exposure (clinic, biological and physical dosimetry), this research thesis describes the principles of numerical reconstruction of a radiological accident, presents some computation codes (Monte Carlo code, MCNPX code) and the SESAME tool, and reports an application to an actual case (an accident which occurred in Equator in April 2009). The next part reports the developments performed to modify the posture of voxelized phantoms and the experimental and numerical validations. The last part reports a feasibility study for the reconstruction of radiological accidents occurring in external radiotherapy. This work is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a linear accelerator, with the aim of identifying the most relevant parameters to be implemented in SESAME in the case of external radiotherapy

  7. Bone tumors with an associated pathologic fracture: Differentiation between benign and malignant status using radiologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Ji Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Song, You Seon; Kim, Jeung Il; Lee, Moon Sung; Lee, Young Hwan; Song, Jong Woon

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether benign and malignant bone tumors with associated pathologic fractures can be differentiated using radiologic findings. Seventy-eight patients (47 men and 31 women, age range: 1-93 years) with a bone tumor and an associated pathologic fracture from 2004 to 2013 constituted the retrospective study cohort. The tumor size, margin, and enhancement patterns; the presence of sclerotic margin, the peritumoral bone marrow, soft tissue edema, extra-osseous soft tissue mass, intratumoral cystic/hemorrhagic/necrotic regions, mineralization/sclerotic regions, periosteal reaction and its appearance; and cortical change and its appearance were evaluated on all images. Differences between the imaging characteristics of malignant and benign pathologic fractures were compared using Pearson's chi-square test and the 2-sample t-test. There were 22 benign and 56 malignant bone tumors. Some factors were found to significantly differentiate between benign and malignant tumors; specifically, ill-defined tumor margin, the presence of sclerotic tumor margin and an extra-osseous soft tissue mass, the absence of cystic/necrotic/hemorrhagic portions in a mass, the homogeneous enhancement pattern, and the presence of a displaced fracture and of underlying cortical change were suggestive of malignant pathologic fractures. Some imaging findings were helpful for differentiating between benign and malignant pathologic fractures

  8. Bone tumors with an associated pathologic fracture: Differentiation between benign and malignant status using radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ji Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Song, You Seon [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeung Il [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic University of Daegu College of Medicine, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jong Woon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To determine whether benign and malignant bone tumors with associated pathologic fractures can be differentiated using radiologic findings. Seventy-eight patients (47 men and 31 women, age range: 1-93 years) with a bone tumor and an associated pathologic fracture from 2004 to 2013 constituted the retrospective study cohort. The tumor size, margin, and enhancement patterns; the presence of sclerotic margin, the peritumoral bone marrow, soft tissue edema, extra-osseous soft tissue mass, intratumoral cystic/hemorrhagic/necrotic regions, mineralization/sclerotic regions, periosteal reaction and its appearance; and cortical change and its appearance were evaluated on all images. Differences between the imaging characteristics of malignant and benign pathologic fractures were compared using Pearson's chi-square test and the 2-sample t-test. There were 22 benign and 56 malignant bone tumors. Some factors were found to significantly differentiate between benign and malignant tumors; specifically, ill-defined tumor margin, the presence of sclerotic tumor margin and an extra-osseous soft tissue mass, the absence of cystic/necrotic/hemorrhagic portions in a mass, the homogeneous enhancement pattern, and the presence of a displaced fracture and of underlying cortical change were suggestive of malignant pathologic fractures. Some imaging findings were helpful for differentiating between benign and malignant pathologic fractures.

  9. The association between submission counts to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the economic and disease challenges of the Ontario swine industry from 1998 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, T; Friendship, R; Pearl, D L; McEwen, B; Ker, A; Dewey, C

    2012-10-01

    An intuitive assumption is to believe that the number of submissions made to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory is dictated by the financial state of the industries using the laboratory. However, no research is available to document how the economics of a food animal industry affects laboratory submissions and therefore disease monitoring and surveillance efforts. The objective of this study was to determine if economic indices associated with the Ontario swine industry can account for the variability seen in these submissions. Retrospective swine submissions made to the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario from January 1998 to July 2009 were compiled. The following economic, demographic, and health variables impacting Ontario swine production were selected for analysis: auction price, lean-hog futures, currency exchange rate, price of corn, an outbreak of porcine circovirus type-2 associated diseases (PCVAD), government incentive program, number of farms in province, and average farm size. All independent variables identified by unconditional associations to have a significance of P≤0.2 with the outcome of monthly submission count were included in a multivariable negative binomial model. A final model was identified by a backwards elimination procedure. A total of 30,432 swine submissions were recorded. The mean frequency of monthly submissions over 139 months was 212.9 (SD=56.0). After controlling for farm size, the number of pigs in Ontario, higher submission counts were associated with a weaker CAD$ versus US$, higher auction prices, and a PCVAD outbreak (Pvolatility and disease outbreaks in the Ontario swine industry drive submissions to the laboratory. In conclusion, lab submissions are a useful source of animal health data for disease surveillance; however, surveillance activities should also monitor the economics of the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The risk of some veterinary antimicrobial agents on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance and their molecular basis

    OpenAIRE

    Haihong Hao; Zahid Iqbal; Yulian Wang; Guyue Cheng; Zong-Hui Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data and risk assessment result of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in human. From the selected examples, it was obvious...

  11. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  12. Veterinary Forensic Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney-Brant, S M

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists working in diagnostic laboratories are sometimes presented with cases involving animal poisonings that become the object of criminal or civil litigation. Forensic veterinary toxicology cases can include cases involving animal cruelty (malicious poisoning), regulatory issues (eg, contamination of the food supply), insurance litigation, or poisoning of wildlife. An understanding of the appropriate approach to these types of cases, including proper sample collection, handling, and transport, is essential so that chain of custody rules are followed and proper samples are obtained for toxicological analysis. Consultation with veterinary toxicologists at the diagnostic laboratory that will be processing the samples before, during, and after the forensic necropsy can help to ensure that the analytical tests performed are appropriate for the circumstances and findings surrounding the individual case. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Ethical principles for novel therapies in veterinary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, J W

    2016-02-01

    To present insights to aid decision-making about novel veterinary treatments from regulations concerning animal experimentation and human clinical medical trials. EU Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes and EU Regulation 536/2014 on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use were analysed, evaluated and "translated" into relevant principles for veterinary surgeons. A number of principles are relevant, relating to treatment expectations, thresholds and objectives; client consent; minimising harms; personnel; review committees; assessment and publication. These principles should assist veterinary surgeons to make good ethical decisions about novel treatments. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Comar, C.L.; Wentworth, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  15. Radiological features of Paget disease of bone associated with VCP myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farpour, Farzin [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Queens Hospital Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Donkervoort, Sandra; Vanjara, Pari [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Charles [University of Kentucky, Department of Neurology and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Lexington, KY (United States); Martin, Barbara [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Osann, Kathryn [University of California, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimonis, Virginia E. [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene cause a unique disorder characterized by classic Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy, and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Our objective was to analyze the radiographic features of PDB associated with VCP mutations since there is a dearth of literature on the PDB component of VCP disease. Radiographic bone surveys were examined in 23 individuals with VCP mutation and compared with their unaffected relatives. Laboratory testing relevant for VCP disease was performed in all individuals. Of the 17 affected individuals with clinical manifestations of VCP disease, 16 of whom had myopathy, radiographic analysis revealed classic PDB in 11 individuals (65%). The mean age of diagnosis for myopathy was 43.8 years and for PDB was 38.1 years of age. Radiological evidence of PDB was seen in one individual (16%) amongst six clinically asymptomatic VCP mutation carriers. Alkaline phosphatase was a useful marker for diagnosing PDB in VCP disease. Radiographic findings of classic PDB are seen in 52% of individuals carrying VCP mutations at a significantly younger age than conventional PDB. Screening for PDB is warranted in at-risk individuals because of the benefit of early treatment with the new powerful bisphosphonates that hold the potential for prevention of disease. (orig.)

  16. Association of Lifestyle with Physical and Mental Health in Japanese Radiological Technologists

    OpenAIRE

    Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ueya, Etsuo

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of low-dose radiation exposure and lifestyle on physical health and mental health, we evaluated the relationship of age, cumulative radiation dose, and lifestyle (cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and physical exercise) to physical and mental health in Japanese radiological technologists. The study subjects were 932 Japanese radiological technologists who participated in a health study from 1981 to 1985. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to each subject t...

  17. Infrared thermography in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, R.; Zivcak, J.; Sevcik, A.; Danko, J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of infrared thermography in veterinary medicine has been practiced since at least the 1960's, but it is only now, in approximately the last 5 years, that it has been viewed with a reasonably open mind in the veterinary community at large. One of the reasons is progress in sensors technology, which contributed for an outstanding improvement of the thermal imager parameters. Paper deals with veterinary thermography and with description of applications at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice. (authors)

  18. Clinical and radiological outcome of craniocervical osteo-dural decompression for Chiari I-associated syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Giannantonio; Bernucci, Claudio; Garbossa, Diego; Valfrè, Walter; Versari, Pietro

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of craniocervical decompression for patients affected by Chiari I-related syringomyelia. We performed a retrospective analysis of a group of patients affected by Chiari I-associated syringomyelia treated by craniocervical decompression (CCD). Surgical and technical aspects and preoperative factors predicting outcome were discussed. A total of 36 patients were reviewed. There were 17 men and 19 women (female/male ratio 1.11), and the mean age was 40.4 (range 18-68). The most important preoperative symptoms were related to myelopathy (pain, weakness, atrophy, spasticity, sensory loss, and dysesthesias). Most syrinxes were in the cervico-thoracic region (61.1%), and the majority of patients had tonsillar descent between the foramen magnum and C1. All patients underwent a craniectomy less than 3 cm in diameter followed by a duroplasty with dura substitute. No arachnoid manipulation was necessary. Three patients (8.1%) experienced cerebrospinal fluid leaks that resolved without complications. At a mean follow up of 40 months (range 16-72) 80.5% of patients exhibited improvement over their preoperative neurological examination while 11.1% stabilized. The syrinx shrank in 80.5% of patients. Chi-square test showed that preoperative syrinx extension and degree of tonsillar descent did not correlate with clinical and neuroradiological postoperative evolution. Treating syringomyelia associated in Chiari I malformation with CCD leads to a large percentage of patients with satisfying results and no irreversible complications.

  19. Tanzania Veterinary Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Tanzania Veterinary Journal (The Tropical Veterinarian) is a biannual Journal, which publishes original contribution to knowledge on Veterinary Science, Animal Science and Production, and allied sciences including new techniques and developments in Veterinary Medicine. The target readers of the ...

  20. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Fowlpox Virus from Backyard Poultry in Plateau State Nigeria: Isolation and Phylogeny of the P4b Gene Compared to a Vaccine Strain. Meseko, C. A.. 1. ; Shittu, I. 1. ; Bwala, D. G.. 2. ; Joannis, T. M.. 1 and Nwosuh, C. I.. 2. 1Regional Laboratory For Animal Influenza and Transboundary Animal Diseases, National Veterinary ...

  1. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. This journal did not publish any issues between 2002 and 2015 but has been revived and and it actively accepting papers ...

  2. Veterinary Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, H.I.J.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Weesendorp, E.; Bossers, A.; Elbers, A.R.W.

    2017-01-01

    In veterinary molecular diagnostics, samples originating from animals are tested. Developments in the farm animals sector and in our societal attitude towards pet animals have resulted in an increased demand for fast and reliable diagnostic techniques. Molecular diagnostics perfectly matches this

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, ... momohasabeh@gmail.com; Tel No:+2348038352906. ... in-contact humans from pig farms and abattoir. ... Momoh et al. 141 and may enhance the distribution of resistance genes into ... treating clinical infections in both man and.

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    xyphoid cartilage to the pelvic area and aquasonic gel applied. The uterus was ... is used in both veterinary and human medicine ... Idris et al. 135 the pelvic region was gently made wet, with ... showing multiple fetuses (blue arrow). Plate IV: ... The beginning of bone formation which appears as hyperechoic structures ...

  5. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  6. Cost-effectiveness and risk associated with infants' hip radiological screening in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pini, M.; Perale, R.

    1987-01-01

    Despite the obvious limits in this study and the scarce information regarding the incidence and distribution of CDH in Italy, we believe that the considerations that led us to restrict the use of radiology in the early diagnosis of this disease are valid. A mass radiologic screening program for the detection of CDH in Italy, even in high incidence zones, does not appear appropriate despite the favorable cost/effectiveness ratio reported for Italy and elsewhere for the x-ray exam of the hip. In the opinion of the authors this low cost is in any case superfluous in view of the excellent results achieved with a clinical screening program like the one we propose. In our opinion, therefore, in Italy instead of mass radiological screening programmes, it would be more appropriate to regulate clinical diagnostic examination of the 1st level (obstetrician, pediatrician) as well as the 2nd (pediatric orthopedist) and the radiological service from both a qualitative and quantitative point of view over the entire national territory. This program for improving medical services, expensive and not easily organized, should be ushered in gradually, involving first the areas of highest disease incidence. The objection may be raised that diagnostic accuracy is sufficiently high in these areas, but nonetheless, we believe that these rates are achieved by resorting to radiological examinations, which can be reduced in number

  7. Lessons of history in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    The future of veterinary medicine is best understood in the context of history. What began as a profession rooted in urban centers in proximity to horses, physicians, and medical schools, was transformed into a land grant-based agricultural profession with the arrival of the internal combustion engine in the early twentieth century. Most of the United States' current veterinary colleges are still located in towns or small cities in the middle section of the country, outside the largest metropolitan areas where most veterinarians practice companion-animal medicine. Throughout veterinarian history, substantial numbers of US students have been educated in foreign colleges and this continues today, creating an even greater geographic imbalance between the veterinary educational process and US population centers and major medical schools. Three themes deserve special attention as we celebrate the profession's 150th anniversary. We must first move beyond the land-grant culture and develop a more geographically balanced approach to establishing new veterinary colleges that are also in closer association with schools of medicine and public health. We must also facilitate more opportunities for women leadership in organized veterinary medicine, in practice ownership, in academia, and in the corporate structures that educate, hire, and interface with veterinarians. Finally, we need to expand our understanding of One Health to include the concept of zooeyia (the role of animals in promoting human health), as well as continue to emphasize veterinarians' special roles in the control and management of zoonotic diseases and in advancing comparative medicine in the age of the genome.

  8. Career identity in the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Jones, S; Abbey, G

    2015-04-25

    This research investigates vet and vet nurse career identity through the qualitative methodology of narrative enquiry. It derives learning and understanding from these empirical data to assist the veterinary profession to adjust to the changing industry landscape. Through a case series of 20 vets and vet nurses' career stories, this paper seeks understanding about career identity and its impact on individuals and organisations in the light of industry consolidation. Findings suggest that career is central to identity for many veterinary professionals who tend to have a strong sense of self; this is particularly evident around self as learner and technically competent, teacher and educator, ethical and moral and dedicated and resilient. Consequently, mismatches between 'who I am' and 'what I do' tend not to lead to identity customisation (to fit self into role or organisation) but to the search for alternative, more identity-compatible employment. This study offers a valuable insight for employers, veterinary professionals and universities. It suggests that businesses can gain competitive advantage and employees achieve validation and enrichment by working towards organisational and individual identity congruence and that teaching veterinary professionals with contemporary business in mind may develop graduates with a more sustainable identity. British Veterinary Association.

  9. World association for the advancement of veterinary parasitology (WAAVP): Second edition of guidelines for evaluating the efficacy of anthelmintics in swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, D.R.; Bauer, C.; Boray, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for evaluating the efficacy of anthelmintics in swine which, in conjunction with other sets of guidance such as those of the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH GL7 and VICH GL16), sho...

  10. The association of departmental leadership gender with that of faculty and residents in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anand; Braga, Larissa; Braga-Baiak, Andresa; Jacobs, Danny O; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2007-08-01

    Although the number of women graduating from medical school continues to increase, their representation in radiology residency programs has not increased over the past 10 years. We examined whether the gender of radiology faculty and residents differed according to the gender of the departmental leadership. We issued an anonymous Web-based survey via e-mail to all 188 radiology residency program directors listed in the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA Online). Data regarding the gender of the department chairperson, residency program director, faculty, and residents were collected. The institutional review board granted a waiver for this study, and all subjects provided informed consent. Of the 84 program directors who responded, 9 (10.7%) were chaired by females and 75 (89.3%) by males; residency program director positions were held by 36 (42.9%) females and 48 (57.1%) males. More programs were located in the northeastern United States (n = 31, 36.9%) than in any other region, and more were self-described as academic (n = 36, 42.9%) than any other practice type. Programs that were led by a male chairperson had a similar proportion of female faculty (25.2% versus 27.3%; P = .322) and residents (26.2% versus 27.4%; P = .065) compared with those led by a female. Similarly, radiology departments with a male residency program director had a similar proportion of female residents (24.8% versus 28.7%; P = .055) compared with programs with a female residency program director. The gender composition of radiology faculty and residents does not differ significantly according to the gender of the departmental chairperson or residency program director. Nevertheless, there continues to be a disparity in the representation of women among radiology faculty and residents.

  11. New directions for veterinary technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Linda M; Lloyd, James W; Pazak, Helene E

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary technology has generally established itself well in companion-animal and mixed-animal veterinary medical practice, but the career's growth trajectory is uncertain. Michigan State University (MSU) convened a national conference, "Creating the Future of Veterinary Technology-A National Dialogue," in November 2011 to explore ways to elevate the veterinary technician/technologist's role in the veterinary medical profession and to identify new directions in which the career could expand. Veterinary technicians/technologists might advance their place in private practice by not only improving their clinical skills, but by also focusing on areas such as practice management, leadership training, business training, conflict resolution, information technology, and marketing/communications. Some new employment settings for veterinary technicians/technologists include more participation within laboratory animal medicine and research, the rural farm industry, regulatory medicine, and shelter medicine. Achieving these ends would call for new training options beyond the current 2-year and 4-year degree programs. Participants suggested specialty training programs, hybrid programs of various types, online programs, veterinary technician residency programs of 12-18 months, and more integration of veterinary technician/technology students and veterinary medicine students at colleges of veterinary medicine.

  12. Annotations on cost-effectiveness and risk associated with infants' hip radiological screening in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, P.

    1987-01-01

    In the Netherlands there is a never made a good cost-benefit analysis of the radiological screening of the infants' hip abnormalities, (= congenital dislocation of the hip). The time between the invitation to join the Technical Workshop on Practices and Regulations in Field of Radiological Mass Screening within the Member States of the European Community and the planned meeting was too short to collect all the data necessary for such an analysis. In this paper we will present as much data as possible so that we can participate in the discussion about the workshop's subject. In the forthcoming months we will continue to collect data for a real cost-effectiveness analysis

  13. Assessing radiological impacts (exposures and doses) associated with the mining and milling of radioactive ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The basic units and concepts applicable to radiological assessment are presented. Data relevant to the assessment of radiological exposures from the mining and milling phases of uranium and thorium ores are discussed. As a guide to the assessment of environmental exposures to members of the public, concepts such as the critical group are defined. Environmental transport and exposure pathways are presented in general terms, together with a discussion of the use of mathematical models. The dose assessment procedures defined in the 1987 Code of Practice are described. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  14. Microscope use in clinical veterinary practice and potential implications for veterinary school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherry M; Dowers, Kristy L; Cerda, Jacey R; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy (skill of using a microscope) and the concepts of cytology (study of cells) and histology (study of tissues) are most often taught in professional veterinary medicine programs through the traditional method of glass slides and light microscopes. Several limiting factors in veterinary training programs are encouraging educators to explore innovative options for teaching microscopy skills and the concepts of cytology and histology. An anonymous online survey was administered through the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association to Colorado veterinarians working in private practice. It was designed to assess their current usage of microscopes for cytological and histological evaluation of specimens and their perceptions of microscope use in their veterinary education. The first part of the survey was answered by 183 veterinarians, with 104 indicating they had an onsite diagnostic lab. Analysis pertaining to the use of the microscope in practice and in veterinary programs was conducted on this subset. Most respondents felt the amount of time spent in the curriculum using a microscope was just right for basic microscope use and using the microscope for viewing and learning about normal and abnormal histological sections and clinical cytology. Participants felt more emphasis could be placed on clinical and diagnostic cytology. Study results suggest that practicing veterinarians frequently use microscopes for a wide variety of cytological diagnostics. However, only two respondents indicated they prepared samples for histological evaluation. Veterinary schools should consider these results against the backdrop of pressure to implement innovative teaching techniques to meet the changing needs of the profession.

  15. Errors in veterinary practice: preliminary lessons for building better veterinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, T; Guile, D; May, S A

    2015-11-14

    Case studies in two typical UK veterinary practices were undertaken to explore teamwork, including interprofessional working. Each study involved one week of whole team observation based on practice locations (reception, operating theatre), one week of shadowing six focus individuals (veterinary surgeons, veterinary nurses and administrators) and a final week consisting of semistructured interviews regarding teamwork. Errors emerged as a finding of the study. The definition of errors was inclusive, pertaining to inputs or omitted actions with potential adverse outcomes for patients, clients or the practice. The 40 identified instances could be grouped into clinical errors (dosing/drugs, surgical preparation, lack of follow-up), lost item errors, and most frequently, communication errors (records, procedures, missing face-to-face communication, mistakes within face-to-face communication). The qualitative nature of the study allowed the underlying cause of the errors to be explored. In addition to some individual mistakes, system faults were identified as a major cause of errors. Observed examples and interviews demonstrated several challenges to interprofessional teamworking which may cause errors, including: lack of time, part-time staff leading to frequent handovers, branch differences and individual veterinary surgeon work preferences. Lessons are drawn for building better veterinary teams and implications for Disciplinary Proceedings considered. British Veterinary Association.

  16. A contribution to quality control in veterinary radiology. Development and calibration of a test-phantom for the control of the picture quality of radiographs of the abdomen of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Wabro, A.

    1996-10-01

    The theme of this thesis was the extension of the application of a test phantom developed at the institute of medical physics (University of Veterinary Medicine/Vienna) and the calibration for the abdomen of the cat. The test phantom is a stepped test body consisting of a material, which absorbs and scatters X-rays similar to bony tissue. On the baseplate of the staircase there are holes 0.5 and 0.7 mm in diameter. Objective parameters of a radiograph - radiographic density latitude, contrast and detail visibility - can be examined with the phantom. By using subjective 'good' rated radiographs it was possible to establish an indirect relation between the soft tissue of the abdomen and the phantom by comparing the optical density. Thus the practicability of the application for abdominal radiographs could be demonstrated. The recognizability of the holes means a measure of detail visibility. For the represented parameters of an X-ray picture are connected, one can conclude radiograph quality from detail visibility. On the basis of the results of a judgement by test-persons a nomogram was designed, which is of use in quick classifying and controlling X-ray pictures. (author)

  17. 78 FR 1824 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...; National Veterinary Services Laboratories; Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Surveillance Program Documents... associated with National Veterinary Services Laboratories diagnostic support for the bovine spongiform..., Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 43, Riverdale, MD 20737; (301) 851-3511. For copies of more...

  18. European veterinary specialists denounce alternative medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Venker-van Haagen, Anjop

    On November 19, the Federation of Veterinarians in Europe (FVE) issued a policy statement urging its 200,000 members "to work only on the basis of scientifically proven and evidence-based methods and to stay away from non-evidence-based methods." The Swedish Veterinary Association banned its members

  19. Derivation of the source term, dose results and associated radiological consequences for the Greek Research Reactor – 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, Charalampos, E-mail: chpappas@ipta.demokritos.gr; Ikonomopoulos, Andreas; Sfetsos, Athanasios; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Varvayanni, Melpomeni; Catsaros, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Source term derivation of postulated accident sequences in a research reactor. • Various containment ventilation scenarios considered for source term calculations. • Source term parametric analysis performed in case of lack of ventilation. • JRODOS employed for dose calculations under eighteen modeled scenarios. • Estimation of radiological consequences during typical and adverse weather scenarios. - Abstract: The estimated source term, dose results and radiological consequences of selected accident sequences in the Greek Research Reactor – 1 are presented and discussed. A systematic approach has been adopted to perform the necessary calculations in accordance with the latest computational developments and IAEA recommendations. Loss-of-coolant, reactivity insertion and fuel channel blockage accident sequences have been selected to derive the associated source terms under three distinct containment ventilation scenarios. Core damage has been conservatively assessed for each accident sequence while the ventilation has been assumed to function within the efficiency limits defined at the Safety Analysis Report. In case of lack of ventilation a parametric analysis is also performed to examine the dependency of the source term on the containment leakage rate. A typical as well as an adverse meteorological scenario have been defined in the JRODOS computational platform in order to predict the effective, lung and thyroid doses within a region defined by a 15 km radius downwind from the reactor building. The radiological consequences of the eighteen scenarios associated with the accident sequences are presented and discussed.

  20. Fluid retention associated with imatinib treatment in patients with gastroenterol stromal: Quantitative radiologic assessment and implications for management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikihil H. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Pyo, Jun Hee [The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We aimed to describe radiologic signs and time-course of imatinib-associated fluid retention (FR) in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and its implications for management. In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study of 403 patients with GIST treated with imatinib, 15 patients with imaging findings of FR were identified by screening radiology reports, followed by manual confirmation. Subcutaneous edema, ascites, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion were graded on a four-point scale on CT scans; total score was the sum of these four scores. The most common radiologic sign of FR was subcutaneous edema (15/15, 100%), followed by ascites (12/15, 80%), pleural effusion (11/15, 73%), and pericardial effusion (6/15, 40%) at the time of maximum FR. Two distinct types of FR were observed: 1) acute/progressive FR, characterized by acute aggravation of FR and rapid improvement after management, 2) intermittent/steady FR, characterized by occasional or persistent mild FR. Acute/progressive FR always occurred early after drug initiation/dose escalation (median 1.9 month, range 0.3-4.0 months), while intermittent/steady FR occurred at any time. Compared to intermittent/steady FR, acute/progressive FR was severe (median score, 5 vs. 2.5, p = 0.002), and often required drug-cessation/dose-reduction. Two distinct types (acute/progressive and intermittent/steady FR) of imatinib-associated FR are observed and each type requires different management.

  1. Assessment of natural radioactivity and associated radiological risks from tiles used in Kajang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, S.; Ismail, A. F.; Samat, S. B.; Yasir, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    The activity concentration and radiological risk of commonly used flooring materials (tiles) in Malaysia were studied. The natural radionuclide concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured using high-purity germanium detector. The average concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the samples were 65.75±1.1 Bq kg-1, 61.92±1.43 Bq kg-1 and 617.77±6.72 Bq kg-1 respectively. The mean concentration of radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate, external and internal hazard indices and annual effective dose equivalent were 195.21±2.88 Bq kg-1, 92.75±1.27 nGy h-1, 0.53±0.01, 0.7±0.01 and 0.44±0.0 mSv y-1 respectively. The aim was to assess the possible radiological risks attributed from the tile materials. Even though, the activity concentrations were higher than worldwide average values, but none of the radiological impact parameters exceeded the maximum recommended values. Hence, it was concluded that, contribution of tiles to radiation exposure is negligible and therefore, radiologically safe to use as building materials.

  2. Veterinary homeopathy: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Vockeroth, W G

    1999-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies, including homeopathy, have a definite place in veterinary medicine today. The public is demanding access to a full range of conventional and complementary therapies, and the best scenario is to have all therapies available, for there is a place and a need for all of them in the right situation. In my own practice, I use both alternative and conventional therapies, as well as referring patients to specialists, for services such as ultrasound and surgery...

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. 3Department of ... This was evident of the textural difference of the colonic flap compared with the thicker urinary bladder. ... procedure is adequate in regional urinary bladder geometry like ...

  4. Survey of rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, D; Foyle, L; Cobbold, R; Speare, R

    2018-05-01

    To determine the rabies vaccination status of Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students and their perception of zoonotic risk from Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV). Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys. Questionnaires were sent by post in 2011 to veterinary surgeons registered in Queensland, to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University via SurveyMonkey® in 2013 and to final-year veterinary students at James Cook University and University of Queensland via SurveyMonkey® in 2014. The response rate for registered veterinarians was 33.5% and for veterinary students 33.3% and 30% in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Of the 466 registered veterinary surgeons, 147 (31.5%) had been vaccinated, with 72 (15.5%) currently vaccinated. For veterinary students the rabies vaccination rate was 20.0% (4/20) and 13.0% (6/46) in the 2013 and 2014 surveys, respectively. More than 95% of veterinary students had received the mandatory Q fever vaccine. Both veterinarians and students regarded bats and horses as high-risk species for zoonoses. Queensland veterinarians and veterinary students have low levels of protection against ABLV. Although incidents of ABLV spilling over from a bat to a domestic mammal are likely to remain rare, they pose a significant human health and occupational risk given the outcome of infection in humans is high consequence. Principals of veterinary practices and veterinary authorities in Australia should implement a policy of rabies vaccination for clinical staff and veterinary students. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Comparison of Performance Characteristics of American College of Radiology TI-RADS, Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology TIRADS, and American Thyroid Association Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, William D; Teefey, Sharlene A; Reading, Carl C; Langer, Jill E; Beland, Michael D; Szabunio, Margaret M; Desser, Terry S

    2018-05-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS) provides guidelines to practitioners who interpret sonographic examinations of thyroid nodules. The purpose of this study is to compare the ACR TI-RADS system with two other well-established guidelines. The ACR TI-RADS, the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology (KSThR) Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TIRADS), and the American Thyroid Association guidelines were compared using 3422 thyroid nodules for which pathologic findings were available. The composition, echogenicity, margins, echogenic foci, and size of the nodules were assessed to determine whether a recommendation would be made for fine-needle aspiration or follow-up sonography when each system was used. The biopsy yield of malignant findings, the yield of follow-up, and the percentage of malignant and benign nodules that would be biopsied were determined for all nodules and for nodules 1 cm or larger. The percentage of nodules that could not be classified was 0%, 3.9%, and 13.9% for the ACR TI-RADS, KSThR TIRADS, and ATA guidelines, respectively. The biopsy yield of malignancy was 14.2%, 10.2%, and 10.0% for nodules assessed by the ACR TI-RADS, KSThR TIRADS, and ATA guidelines, respectively. The percentage of malignant nodules that were biopsied was 68.2%, 78.7%, and 75.9% for the ACR TI-RADS, the KSThR TIRADS, and the ATA guidelines, respectively, whereas the percentage of malignant nodules that would be either biopsied or followed was 89.2% for the ACR TI-RADS. The percentage of benign nodules that would be biopsied was 47.1%, 79.7%, and 78.1% for the ACR TI-RADS, the KSThR TIRADS, and the ATA guidelines, respectively. The percentage of benign nodules that would be either biopsied or followed was 65.2% for the ACR TI-RADS. The ACR TI-RADS performs well when compared with other well-established guidelines.

  6. Evaluating veterinary practitioner perceptions of communication skills and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M P; Cobb, M A; Tischler, V A; Robbé, I J; Dean, R S

    2017-03-25

    A survey was conducted among veterinary practitioners in the UK and the USA in 2012/2013. Thematic analysis was used to identify underlying reasons behind answers to questions about the importance of communication skills and the desire to participate in postgraduate communication skills training. Lack of training among more experienced veterinary surgeons, incomplete preparation of younger practitioners and differences in ability to communicate all contribute to gaps in communication competency. Barriers to participating in further communication training include time, cost and doubts in the ability of training to provide value. To help enhance communication ability, communication skills should be assessed in veterinary school applicants, and communication skills training should be more thoroughly integrated into veterinary curricula. Continuing education/professional development in communication should be part of all postgraduate education and should be targeted to learning style preferences and communication needs and challenges through an entire career in practice. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Investigation of whether various types of radioactive waste are equivalent in terms of the radiological impact associated with their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearn, H.S.; Smith, G.M.; Davis, J.P.; Hill, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility that various types of waste are equivalent in terms of the risks associated with their disposal in so far as they are viewed by different sections of society. If such a framework can be established it could be used as an aid to decisions as to whether central disposal facilities, to accept waste from several countries, should be constructed. Details are presented of assumed radionuclide inventories for a representative range of radioactive wastes, calculations and results of the radiological impacts of their disposal, and illustrative methods for weighting the various components of impact which when summed provide an overall measure of impact. Five sets of weighting factors have been devised which are intended to represent the views of a) the radiological protection community, b) those with a pro-nuclear industry view, c) those who oppose nuclear power on safety grounds, d) the inhabitants of the country receiving wastes for disposal, and e) the inhabitants of the country dispatching wastes. On the basis of the calculated weighted radiological impacts it is demonstrated how conclusions can be drawn about general views on the disposal of each waste, about likely attitudes to the export of wastes from one country for disposal in another, and attitudes to exchanging wastes between countries. The study is preliminary and of limited scope. However, the results show that the general methodology is practicable and could be applied in a wider ranging investigation

  8. Radiology for veterinarians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, K.

    1983-01-01

    The author has made an attempt to comprise the extensive and heterogenic area of radiological topics in the sense of a studying support for the second part of the veterinary examination and as an introduction to the entire area. Numerous details, exact physical derivations and more extensive radiological tables and graphs had to be left out to achieve the brief and understandable form. On the other hand, in addition to the test subjects, at least a few of the particularly up-to-date problems of this branch had to be emphasized and the data necessary to assess them had to be given. This explains the extensive form of the manuscript and the frequent occurrence of numbers, especially in the chapters radioecology, radiobiology and radiotoxicology. (orig./MG) With 65 figs., 76 tabs [de

  9. Proceedings of the 15th nuclear safety research association symposium ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This is the document of the Symposium in the title, held in Tokyo, 2003. The document contains the greeting by chairperson (Toshiso Kosako, International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) member, Tokyo University): lecture 1; for the title subject presented as ''ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on Radiological Protection'' with its slides entitled ''The Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection-The Justification for ICRP's 2005 Recommendations'' by L.-E. Holm (ICRP Vice-Chairman, Swedish Radiation Protection Authority): lecture 2; ''Protection of the Environment: from Ethics to Genetics''' with slides, ''Ionising Radiation and the Environment'', by R. J. Pentreath (ICRP member, The University of Reading, the United Kingdom (UK)): respectively followed by discussion with 3 Japanese panelists for each lecture: and chairperson's summary. The chair's greeting is about the rise of interest in environmental radiation protection, its background, and related trends in The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). L-EH's presentation involves sections of the background of the recommendations and protection of the environment, mentioning some of the proposed changes in the Commission's recommendations for its 2005 Recommendations. RJP's presentation involves sections of a philosophical platform, environmental management, relevance to radiation and its effects, points of reference and discussion where the impact of radionuclides and radiation in environment on various biological systems is mentioned in view for future. (R.T.)

  10. Radiological abnormalities associated with Aspergillus colonization in a cystic fibrosis population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Michelle A.; Chotirmall, Sanjay Haresh; McCullagh, Brian; Branagan, Peter; McElvaney, N.G.; Logan, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine if sputum colonization with Aspergillus species in patients with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) correlates with radiological abnormalities and/or a reduction in pulmonary function (FEV1). Methods: We prospectively evaluated 32 PWCF utilizing high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the thorax and pulmonary function testing (PFT). The cohort was assessed as two groups: Aspergillus positive (n = 16) and Aspergillus negative (n = 16) based on sputum culture for Aspergillus species. A modified Bhalla scoring system was applied to each HRCT scan by two blinded radiologists. Results: Aspergillus positive patients had more severe and significant bronchiectasis compared to those Aspergillus negative (p < 0.05). This was most marked in the right upper and lower lobes (RUL, RLL). Total Bhalla score was clinically significant in both groups and approached statistical significance between groups (p = 0.063). No difference in pulmonary function between the groups was detected. Conclusion: PWCF colonized by Aspergillus species have greater radiological abnormalities undetectable by PFTs. Early radiological evaluation of Aspergillus colonized PWCF is therefore warranted.

  11. Radiation protection for veterinary practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheelton, R.; McCaffery, A.

    1993-01-01

    This brief article discusses radiation protection for diagnostic radiography in veterinary practices. It includes aspects such as a radiation protection adviser, personal dosimetry but in particular a Veterinary Monitoring Service, developed by the NRPB, which offers veterinary practitioners the convenience of making simple but essential measurements for themselves using photographic films contained in a 'vet pack' to determine the operating condition of their X-ray machine. (U.K.)

  12. Guidance notes for the protection of persons against ionising radiations arising from veterinary use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These notes are not intended to provide detailed guidance on all the conditions that apply to veterinary practice but rather to indicate the types of arrangements which should be employed in order to comply with the main requirements of the Regulations. They also aim to establish a pattern by which good radiological practice can be achieved and radiation doses to veterinary surgeons, radiographic staff, and anyone else involved, minimised. (author)

  13. What is the veterinary professional identity? Preliminary findings from web-based continuing professional development in veterinary professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage-Chan, E; Maddison, J; May, S A

    2016-03-26

    Professionalism and professional skills are increasingly being incorporated into veterinary curricula; however, lack of clarity in defining veterinary professionalism presents a potential challenge for directing course outcomes that are of benefit to the veterinary professional. An online continuing education course in veterinary professionalism was designed to address a deficit in postgraduate support in this area; as part of this course, delegates of varying practice backgrounds participated in online discussions reflecting on the implications of professional skills for their clinical practice. The discussions surrounding the role of the veterinary professional and reflecting on strengths and weaknesses in professional skills were analysed using narrative methodology, which provided an understanding of the defining skills and attributes of the veterinary professional, from the perspectives of those involved (i.e. how vets understood their own career identity). The veterinary surgeon was understood to be an interprofessional team member, who makes clinical decisions in the face of competing stakeholder needs and works in a complex environment comprising multiple and diverse challenges (stress, high emotions, financial issues, work-life balance). It was identified that strategies for accepting fallibility, and those necessary for establishing reasonable expectations of professional behaviour and clinical ability, are poorly developed. British Veterinary Association.

  14. About veterinary education in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathalla, M

    2003-01-01

    The cons and pros of veterinary education in Iraq are described. Started as a small institution, with few students and with foreign staffs, then expanded to enroll more than hundred students each year, with all Iraqi staff. The graduates of the Veterinary College played an important role in monitoring animal health, supervising research projects involving animal welfare, some served as educators of various veterinary science specializations, others worked as private practitioners or recruited in the army. Veterinary education was very vital, as other sciences for progress of the country.

  15. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Veterinary Oncology Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2018-03-01

    The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells, be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells, and be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor. Tumor immunology and immunotherapy are among the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields; cancer immunotherapy is now recognized as a pillar of treatment alongside traditional modalities. This article highlights approaches that seem to hold particular promise in human clinical trials and many that have been tested in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Holistic pediatric veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Holistic veterinary medicine treats the whole patient including all physical and behavioral signs. The root cause of disease is treated at the same time as accompanying clinical signs. Herbal and nutritional supplements can help support tissue healing and proper organ functioning, thereby reducing the tendency of disease progression over time. Proper selection of homeopathic remedies is based on detailed evaluation of clinical signs. Herbal medicines are selected based on organ(s) affected and the physiologic nature of the imbalance. Many herbal and nutraceutical companies provide support for veterinarians, assisting with proper formula selection, dosing, drug interactions, and contraindications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Veterinary medical education in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamas, Wael A; Nour, Abdelfattah

    2004-01-01

    Iraq is an agricultural country with a large population of animals: sheep, goats, cattle, water buffaloes, horses, donkeys, mules, and camels. In the 1980s, the successful poultry industry managed to produce enough table eggs and meat to satisfy the needs of the entire population; at one time, the thriving fish industry produced different types of fish for Iraqis' yearly fish consumption. There are four veterinary colleges in Iraq, which have been destroyed along with the veterinary services infrastructure. Understandably, improvements to the quality of veterinary education and services in Iraq will be reflected in a healthy and productive animal industry, better food quality and quantity, fewer zoonotic diseases, and more income-generating activities in rural areas. Thus, if undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs are improved, the veterinary medical profession will attract more competent students. This will satisfy the country's increased demand for competent veterinarians in both public and private sectors. Although Iraq has an estimated 5,000-7,000 veterinarians, there is a need for quality veterinary services and for more veterinarians. In addition, there is a need for the improvement of veterinary diagnostic facilities, as zoonotic diseases are always highly probable in this region. This article provides insight into the status of veterinary medical education and veterinary services in Iraq before and after the 1991 Gulf War and gives suggestions for improvement and implementation of new programs. Suggestions are also offered for improving veterinary diagnostic facilities and the quality of veterinary services. Improving diagnostic facilities and the quality of veterinary services will enhance animal health and production in Iraq and will also decrease the likelihood of disease transmission to and from Iraq. Threats of disease transmission and introduction into the country have been observed and reported by several international

  20. Veterinary Fusarioses within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan; Robert, Vincent A R G; Crous, Pedro W; Geiser, David M

    2016-11-01

    Multilocus DNA sequence data were used to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships of 67 Fusarium strains from veterinary sources, most of which were from the United States. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that the strains comprised 23 phylogenetically distinct species, all but two of which were previously known to infect humans, distributed among eight species complexes. The majority of the veterinary isolates (47/67 = 70.1%) were nested within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), and these included 8 phylospecies and 33 unique 3-locus sequence types (STs). Three of the FSSC species (Fusarium falciforme, Fusarium keratoplasticum, and Fusarium sp. FSSC 12) accounted for four-fifths of the veterinary strains (38/47) and STs (27/33) within this clade. Most of the F. falciforme strains (12/15) were recovered from equine keratitis infections; however, strains of F. keratoplasticum and Fusarium sp. FSSC 12 were mostly (25/27) isolated from marine vertebrates and invertebrates. Our sampling suggests that the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex (FIESC), with eight mycoses-associated species, may represent the second most important clade of veterinary relevance within Fusarium Six of the multilocus STs within the FSSC (3+4-eee, 1-b, 12-a, 12-b, 12-f, and 12-h) and one each within the FIESC (1-a) and the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (ST-33) were widespread geographically, including three STs with transoceanic disjunctions. In conclusion, fusaria associated with veterinary mycoses are phylogenetically diverse and typically can only be identified to the species level using DNA sequence data from portions of one or more informative genes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 8. Cost and radiological impact associated with near-surface disposal of reactor waste (Spanish concept)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo Berna, S.; Sanchez Delgado, N.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the determination of the cost and the radiological impact associated with a near-surface disposal site (Spanish concept) for low and medium-level radioactive waste generated during operation of a 20 GWe nuclear park composed of LWRs for 30 years. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  2. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 7. Cost and radiological impact associated with near-surface disposal of reactor waste (French concept)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the determination of the cost and the radiological impact associated with a near-surface disposal site (French concept) for low and medium-level radioactive waste generated during operation of a 20 GWe nuclear park composed of LWRs for 30 years. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  3. Piloting interprofessional education interventions with veterinary and veterinary nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Tierney; Lumbis, Rachel; Orpet, Hilary; Welsh, Perdi; Gregory, Sue; Baillie, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has received little attention in veterinary education even though members of the veterinary and nursing professions work closely together. The present study investigates veterinary and veterinary nursing students' and practitioners' experiences with interprofessional issues and the potential benefits of IPE. Based on stakeholder consultations, two teaching interventions were modified or developed for use with veterinary and veterinary nursing students: Talking Walls, which aimed to increase individuals' understanding of each other's roles, and an Emergency-Case Role-Play Scenario, which aimed to improve teamwork. These interventions were piloted with volunteer veterinary and veterinary nursing students who were recruited through convenience sampling. A questionnaire (the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale [RIPLS]) was modified for use in veterinary education and used to investigate changes in attitudes toward IPE over time (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and four to five months afterward). The results showed an immediate and significant positive change in attitude after the intervention, highlighting the students' willingness to learn collaboratively, their ability to recognize the benefits of IPE, a decreased sense of professional isolation, and reduced hierarchical views. Although nearly half of the students felt concerned about learning with students from another profession before the intervention, the majority (97%) enjoyed learning together. However, the positive change in attitude was not evident four to five months after the intervention, though attitudes remained above pre-intervention levels. The results of the pilot study were encouraging and emphasize the relevance and importance of veterinary IPE as well as the need for further investigation to explore methods of sustaining a change in attitude over time.

  4. Computer applications in veterinary medicine | Hassan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... become essential tools in almost every field of research and applied technology. ... Computers in veterinary medicine have been used for veterinary education; ... agro-veterinary project design, monitoring and implementation; preparation of ...

  5. Radiological Approach to Forefoot Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Chung Ho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forefoot pain is a common clinical complaint in orthopaedic practice. In this article, we discuss the anatomy of the forefoot, clinical and radiological approaches to forefoot pain, and common painful forefoot disorders and their associated radiological features.

  6. Perspectives on academic veterinary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberg, H B; Gelberg, S

    2001-09-15

    It is important for veterinary administrators to apply knowledge bases from other fields to their own unique administrative needs. For example, although some resources are written for business managers, the discussions of four key management competency areas, guidelines for mastering these skills, organizational assessment tools, and other self-help tools may provide interesting food-for-thought for veterinary administrators.(76) In developing their own administrative styles, administrators should seek to apply those principles that seem to intuitively fit with their personal research styles, work situations, managerial styles, administrative preferences, and unique organizational culture. Through strengthening their liaisons with community and university business programs, counseling agencies, employee assistance programs, and psychology researchers, administrators can continue to be exposed to and benefit from new paradigms for consideration in veterinary medical environments. Through these liaisons, the unique needs of veterinary medical environments are also communicated to individuals within the fields of psychology and business, thus stimulating new research that specifically targets veterinary medical environment leadership issues. Each field has unique contributions to help veterinary administrators work toward creating veterinary medical environments that are creative, energetic, visionary, pragmatic, and highly marketable in order to help administrators recruit and nurture the best and brightest veterinary researchers, teachers, and clinicians.

  7. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. The Journal publishes original research articles related to veterinary sciences, including livestock health and production, diseases of wild life and fish, preventive veterinary medicine and zoonoses among others. Case reports, review articles and editorials are also accepted. Other sites related to ...

  8. A review of radiological hazards associated with tin by-product mineral processing industry in the SEATRAD centre member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udompornwirat, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radiological hazards associated with the tin by-product mineral processing industry has recently become an issue of concern in the SEATRAD Centre member countries namely, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. The SEATRAD Centre, with the assistance of a United Nations Development Program consultant, carried out an investigation on radioactivity problems at twelve tin by-product mineral processing plants in Malaysia and Thailand. The investigation included a survey of external gamma radiation levels and dust sampling for internal dose estimation as well as characterising the potential sources of radiation exposure in the plants. This paper reviews the nature of the tin by-product mineral processing industry and the general levels of associated radiological hazards. In addition, data provided by the government organisations in the member countries are reviewed. Typical annual effective doses experienced by the industry's workers are estimated on the basis of existing information, and possible measures to reduce exposure are discussed. It is concluded that the estimated median effective dose experienced by the workers is about 18 to 19 mSv per annum. Maximum exposures may exceed 200 mSv per annum. The important exposure pathways are external gamma radiation and internal radiation arising through intake of radioactive dust. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  9. Association between l-thyroxine treatment, GH deficiency, and radiological vertebral fractures in patients with adult-onset hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, G; Mormando, M; Cristiano, A; Bianchi, A; Porcelli, T; Giampietro, A; Maffezzoni, F; Serra, V; De Marinis, L; Giustina, A

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we aimed at evaluating the association between radiological vertebral fractures and levo-thyroxine (l-T4) replacement doses in adult patients with hypopituitarism. Cross-sectional study. We studied 74 adult hypopituitary patients (males, 43; females, 31; mean age, 57 years; and range, 23-79) with central hypothyroidism treated with l-T4 (median daily dose: 1.1  μg/kg). All patients also had severe GH deficiency (GHD) and 38 of them were replaced with recombinant GH. Vertebral fractures were assessed by a quantitative morphometric analysis performed on thoracic and lumbar spine lateral X-ray. Radiological vertebral fractures were found in 23 patients (31.1%) in association with untreated GHD (P=0.02), higher serum free T4 levels (P=0.03), a higher daily dose of l-T4 (P=0.005), and a longer duration of hypopituitarism (P=0.05). When GHD was treated, the prevalence of vertebral fractures was more frequent (P=0.03) in patients receiving high l-T4 doses (third tertile: >1.35  μg/kg per day) as compared with patients who were treated with lower drug doses (first tertile: hypopituitarism. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. Analysis of radiological parameters associated with decreased fractional anisotropy values on diffusion tensor imaging in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiandi; Wang, Hongli; Sun, Chi; Zhou, Shuyi; Meng, Tao; Lv, Feizhou; Ma, Xiaosheng; Xia, Xinlei; Jiang, Jianyuan

    2018-04-26

    Previous studies have indicated that decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are well correlated with the symptoms of nerve root compression. The aim of our study is to determine primary radiological parameters associated with decreased FA values in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis involving single L5 nerve root. Patients confirmed with single L5 nerve root compression by transforaminal nerve root blocks were included in this study. FA values of L5 nerve roots on both symptomatic and asymptomatic side were obtained. Conventional radiological parameters, such as disc height, degenerative scoliosis, dural sac cross-sectional area (DSCSA), foraminal height (FH), hypertrophic facet joint degeneration (HFJD), sagittal rotation (SR), sedimentation sign, sagittal translation and traction spur were measured. Correlation and regression analyses were performed between the radiological parameters and FA values of the symptomatic L5 nerve roots. A predictive regression equation was established. Twenty-one patients were included in this study. FA values were significantly lower at the symptomatic side comparing to the asymptomatic side (0.263 ± 0.069 vs. 0.334 ± 0.080, P = 0.038). DSCSA, FH, HFJD, and SR were significantly correlated with the decreased FA values, with r = 0.518, 0.443, 0.472 and - 0.910, respectively (P values, and the regression equation is FA = - 0.012 × SR + 0.002 × DSCSA. DSCSA and SR were primary contributors to decreased FA values in LSS patients involving single L5 nerve root, indicating that central canal decompression and segmental stability should be the first considerations in preoperative planning of these patients. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  11. White paper of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) on multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Carrio, Ignasi; Cuocolo, Alberto; Knapp, Wolfram; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; McCall, Iain; Reiser, Maximilian; Silberman, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    New multimodality imaging systems bring together anatomical and molecular information and require the competency and accreditation of individuals from both nuclear medicine and radiology. This paper sets out the positions and aspirations of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) working together on an equal and constructive basis for the future benefit of both specialties. EANM and ESR recognise the importance of coordinating working practices for multimodality imaging systems and that undertaking the nuclear medicine and radiology components of imaging with hybrid systems requires different skills. It is important to provide adequate and appropriate training in the two disciplines in order to offer a proper service to the patient using hybrid systems. Training models are proposed with the overall objective of providing opportunities for acquisition of special competency certification in multimodality imaging. Both organisations plan to develop common procedural guidelines and recognise the importance of coordinating the purchasing and management of hybrid systems to maximise the benefits to both specialties and to ensure appropriate reimbursement of these examinations. European multimodality imaging research is operating in a highly competitive environment. The coming years will decide whether European research in this area manages to defend its leading position or whether it falls behind research in other leading economies. Since research teams in the Member States are not always sufficiently interconnected, more European input is necessary to create interdisciplinary bridges between research institutions in Europe and to stimulate excellence. EANM and ESR will work with the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) to develop further research opportunities across Europe. European Union grant-funding bodies should allocate funds to joint research initiatives that encompass clinical research

  12. White paper of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; McCall, Iain; Reiser, Maximilian; Silberman, Bruno; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Carrio, Ignacio; Cuocolo, Alberto; Knapp, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    New multimodality imaging systems bring together anatomical and molecular information and require the competency and accreditation of individuals from both radiology and nuclear medicine. This paper sets out the positions and aspirations of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) working together on an equal and constructive basis for the future benefit of both specialties. ESR and EANM recognise the importance of coordinating working practices for multimodality imaging systems and that undertaking the radiology and nuclear medicine components of imaging with hybrid systems requires different skills. It is important to provide adequate and appropriate training in the two disciplines in order to offer a proper service to the patient using hybrid systems. Training models are proposed with the overall objective of providing opportunities for acquisition of special competency certification in multimodality imaging. Both organisations plan to develop common procedural guidelines and recognise the importance of coordinating the purchasing and management of hybrid systems to maximise the benefits to both specialties and to ensure appropriate reimbursement of these examinations. European multimodality imaging research is operating in a highly competitive environment. The coming years will decide whether European research in this area manages to defend its leading position or whether it falls behind research in other leading economies. Since research teams in the member states are not always sufficiently interconnected, more European input is necessary to create interdisciplinary bridges between research institutions in Europe and to stimulate excellence. ESR and EANM will work with the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) to develop further research opportunities across Europe. European Union grant-funding bodies should allocate funds to joint research initiatives that encompass clinical research

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by Australian veterinary diagnostic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardefeldt, L Y; Marenda, M; Crabb, H; Stevenson, M A; Gilkerson, J R; Billman-Jacobe, H; Browning, G F

    2018-04-01

    The national strategy for tackling antimicrobial resistance highlights the need for antimicrobial stewardship in veterinary practice and for surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility in veterinary pathogens. Diagnostic laboratories have an important role in facilitating both of these processes, but it is unclear whether data from veterinary diagnostic laboratories are similar enough to allow for compilation and if there is consistent promotion of appropriate antimicrobial use embedded in the approaches of different laboratories to susceptibility testing. A cross-sectional study of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and reporting procedures by Australian veterinary diagnostic laboratories was conducted in 2017 using an online questionnaire. All 18 veterinary diagnostic laboratories in Australia completed the questionnaire. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion was the method predominantly used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and was used to evaluate 86% of all isolates, although two different protocols were used across the 18 laboratories (CLSI 15/18, CDS 3/18). Minimum inhibitory concentrations were never reported by 61% of laboratories. Common isolates were consistently reported on across all species, except for gram-negative isolates in pigs, for which there was some variation in the approach to reporting. There was considerable diversity in the panels of antimicrobials used for susceptibility testing on common isolates and no consistency was apparent between laboratories for any bacterial species. We recommend that nationally agreed and consistent antimicrobial panels for routine susceptibility testing should be developed and a uniform set of guidelines should be adopted by veterinary diagnostic laboratories in Australia. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Syntactic and semantic errors in radiology reports associated with speech recognition software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Michael D; Goss, Brian C; Bartholmai, Brian J

    2017-03-01

    Speech recognition software can increase the frequency of errors in radiology reports, which may affect patient care. We retrieved 213,977 speech recognition software-generated reports from 147 different radiologists and proofread them for errors. Errors were classified as "material" if they were believed to alter interpretation of the report. "Immaterial" errors were subclassified as intrusion/omission or spelling errors. The proportion of errors and error type were compared among individual radiologists, imaging subspecialty, and time periods. In all, 20,759 reports (9.7%) contained errors, of which 3992 (1.9%) were material errors. Among immaterial errors, spelling errors were more common than intrusion/omission errors ( p reports, reports reinterpreting results of outside examinations, and procedural studies (all p < .001). Error rate decreased over time ( p < .001), which suggests that a quality control program with regular feedback may reduce errors.

  15. The lost history of American veterinary medicine: the need for preservation*†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, C. Trenton

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to survey holdings of ephemeral veterinary literature. Methods: WorldCat OCLC catalog, the Library of Congress online catalog, the US National Agricultural Library online catalog, and the Dictionary Catalog of the National Agricultural Library, 1862–1965, were used to determine current library holdings of materials published by veterinary schools that are no longer in existence and veterinary associations that are defunct, veterinary supply catalogs, veterinary house organs, patent medicine publications, and veterinary advertisements. Individual library catalogs were also consulted. In addition, the practice of removing advertisements from bound volumes was examined. Results: There are many gaps in the cataloged library holdings of primary source materials relating to the history of the education of veterinarians in the United States. Conclusions: A proactive action plan needs to be designed and activated to locate, catalog, and preserve this primary source material of veterinary medicine for posterity. PMID:21243050

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among veterinary staff and dogs in private veterinary clinics in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kanako; Saito, Mieko; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Muramatsu, Yasukazu; Maetani, Shigeki; Tamura, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    To explore the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary medical practices, MRSA carriage was tested among 96 veterinarians (Vets), 70 veterinary technicians (VTs) and 292 dogs with which they had contact at 71 private veterinary clinics (VCs) in Hokkaido, Japan. MRSA isolates were obtained from 22 Vets [22.9%] and 7 VTs [10%]. The prevalence of MRSA among Vets was as high as that found in an academic veterinary hospital in our previous study. In contrast, only two blood donor dogs and one dog with liver disease (1.0%, 3/292) yielded MRSA. All MRSA-positive dogs were reared or treated in different VCs, in each of which at least one veterinary staff member carrying MRSA worked. Sequence types (ST) identified by multilocus sequence typing, spa types, and SCCmec types for canine MRSA isolates (ST5-spa t002-SCCmec II [from two dogs] or ST30-spa t021-SCCmec IV [from a dog]) were concordant with those from veterinary staff members in the same clinics as the MRSA-positive dogs, with which they had potentially had contact. Most MRSA isolates from veterinary staff were the same genotype (SCCmec type II and spa type t002) as a major hospital-acquired MRSA clone in Japan. The remaining MRSA was the same genotypes as domestic and foreign community-associated MRSA. Measures against MRSA infection should be provided in private VCs. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  18. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  19. Computer automation in veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H

    1996-05-01

    Computers have been used to automate complex and repetitive tasks in veterinary hospitals since the 1960s. Early systems were expensive, but their use was justified because they performed jobs which would have been impossible or which would have required greater resources in terms of time and personnel had they been performed by other methods. Systems found in most veterinary hospitals today are less costly, magnitudes more capable, and often underused. Modern multitasking operating systems and graphical interfaces bring many opportunities for automation. Commercial and custom programs developed and used in a typical multidoctor mixed species veterinary practice are described.

  20. Association of Veterinary Third-Generation Cephalosporin Use with the Risk of Emergence of Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin Resistance in Escherichia coli from Dairy Cattle in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toyotaka; Okubo, Torahiko; Usui, Masaru; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Izumiyama, Satoshi; Tamura, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The use of extended-spectrum cephalosporins in food animals has been suggested to increase the risk of spread of Enterobacteriaceae carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamases to humans. However, evidence that selection of extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant bacteria owing to the actual veterinary use of these drugs according to criteria established in cattle has not been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the natural occurrence of cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli in dairy cattle following clinical application of ceftiofur. E. coli isolates were obtained from rectal samples of treated and untreated cattle (n = 20/group) cultured on deoxycholate-hydrogen sulfide-lactose agar in the presence or absence of ceftiofur. Eleven cefazoline-resistant isolates were obtained from two of the ceftiofur-treated cattle; no cefazoline-resistant isolates were found in untreated cattle. The cefazoline-resistant isolates had mutations in the chromosomal ampC promoter region and remained susceptible to ceftiofur. Eighteen extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant isolates from two ceftiofur-treated cows were obtained on ceftiofur-supplemented agar; no extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant isolates were obtained from untreated cattle. These extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant isolates possessed plasmid-mediated β-lactamase genes, including bla CTX-M-2 (9 isolates), bla CTX-M-14 (8 isolates), or bla CMY-2 (1 isolate); isolates possessing bla CTX-M-2 and bla CTX-M-14 were clonally related. These genes were located on self-transmissible plasmids. Our results suggest that appropriate veterinary use of ceftiofur did not trigger growth extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant E. coli in the bovine rectal flora; however, ceftiofur selection in vitro suggested that additional ceftiofur exposure enhanced selection for specific extended-spectrum cephalosporin–resistant β-lactamase-expressing E. coli clones PMID:24755996

  1. Tubercular meningitis in children: Clinical, pathological, and radiological profile and factors associated with mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil V Israni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Childhood tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries with tubercular meningitis being a serious complication with high mortality and morbidity. Aim: To study the clinicopathological as well as radiological profile of childhood tuberculous meningitis (TBM cases. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study including children <14 years of age with TBM admitted in a tertiary care hospital from Western India. Subjects and Methods: TBM was diagnosed based on predefined criteria. Glassgow coma scale (GCS and intracranial pressure (ICP was recorded. Staging was done as per British Medical Council Staging System. Mantoux test, chest X-ray, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination, neuroimaging, and other investigations were done to confirm TB. Statistical Analysis Used: STATA software (version 9.0 was used for data analysis. Various risk factors were determined using Chi-square tests, and a P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Forty-seven children were included, of which 11 (24.3% died. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and meningismus was the most common sign. Twenty-nine (62% children presented with Stage III disease. Stage III disease, low GCS, and raised ICP were predictors of mortality. Findings on neuroimaging or CSF examination did not predict mortality. Conclusions: Childhood TBM presents with nonspecific clinical features. Stage III disease, low GCS, lack of Bacillus Calmette–Gu͹rin vaccination at birth and raised ICP seem to the most important adverse prognostic factors.

  2. Risk of bleeding associated with interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. A comprehensive review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foremny, Gregory B.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery-Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This review compiles the current literature on the bleeding risks in common musculoskeletal interventional procedures and attempts to provide guidance for practicing radiologists in making decisions regarding the periprocedural management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The practitioner must weigh the risk of bleeding if therapy is continued against the possibility a thromboembolic occurring if anticoagulation therapy is withheld or reversed. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data to guide evidence-based decisions for many musculoskeletal interventions. However, a review of the literature shows that for low-risk procedures, such as arthrograms/arthrocenteses or muscle/tendon sheath injections, bleeding risks are sufficiently small that anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapies need not be withheld. Additionally, relatively higher-risk procedures, such as needle biopsies of bone and soft tissue, may be safely performed without holding antithrombotic therapy, provided pre-procedural INR is within therapeutic range. Thus, while a patient's particular clinical circumstances should dictate optimal individualized management, anticoagulation alone is not a general contraindication to most interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. (orig.)

  3. Shielding Studies for Reducing the associated Radiological Risks Due To Irradiated Low Enriched Uranium Foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present work estimates the radiation dose rates corresponding to irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (20 wt % 235 U) foil as part of shielding studies for radiological risks reduction after irradiation inside TRIGA 14 MW Research Reactor in an investigation on 99 Mo production possibility. Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory's cell shielding calculations have been performed; radiation source was obtained by using ORIGEN-S code with specific cross-sections libraries. Different post-irradiation cooling times have been considered, gamma dose rates being estimated by using MAVRIC module from Scale 6 programs package, for following exposure situations (relative to Pie cell): i) front side, ii) lateral side and iii) back side. Three different calculations were performed: a) without any protection shield between operator and cell, except for the cell stainless steel wall; b) with a Lead protection shield between operator and cell and c) with a depleted Uranium shield, located inside the cell in between the radiation source and cell window. Radiation dose rates to cell external wall surface and for other eight fixed distances from cell wall were estimated. To obtain a consistent set of solutions, the study was done for various Uranium foil weights and different Lead and depleted Uranium shields thicknesses. Calculations were focused to assure that the dose rate to an operator positioned at 60 cm working distance from the cell will not exceed 0.02 mSv/h, maximum allowed dose rate for professionally exposed personnel according to Romanian regulations.

  4. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  5. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  6. Quality systems in veterinary diagnostics laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Branco, Freitas Maia L M

    2007-01-01

    Quality assurance of services provided by veterinary diagnostics laboratories is a fundamental element promoted by international animal health organizations to establish trust, confidence and transparency needed for the trade of animals and their products at domestic and international levels. It requires, among other things, trained personnel, consistent and rigorous methodology, choice of suitable methods as well as appropriate calibration and traceability procedures. An important part of laboratory quality management is addressed by ISO/IEC 17025, which aims to facilitate cooperation among laboratories and their associated parties by assuring the generation of credible and consistent information derived from analytical results. Currently, according to OIE recommendation, veterinary diagnostics laboratories are only subject to voluntary compliance with standard ISO/IEC 17025; however, it is proposed here that OIE reference laboratories and collaboration centres strongly consider its adoption.

  7. Needlestick injuries in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J Scott; Jack, Douglas C

    2008-08-01

    Needlestick injuries are an inherent risk of handling needles during the course of veterinary practice. While significant effort has been expended to reduce needlestick injuries in human medicine, a relatively lax approach seems to be prevalent in veterinary medicine. It appears that needlestick injuries are very common among veterinary personnel and that serious adverse effects, while uncommon, do occur. Clients may also receive injuries in clinics during the course of animal restraint, and at home following prescription of injectable medications or fluids. Because of occupational health, personal health, and liability concerns, veterinary practices should review the measures they are taking to reduce the likelihood of needlestick injuries and develop written needlestick injury avoidance protocols.

  8. Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As seen on the center's logo, the mission statement for FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) reads: "Protecting Human and Animal Health." To achieve this broad...

  9. Simulation of fire in a deposit of radioactive waste and the radiological risk associated to this scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, Érica Nascimento; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Aguiar, Laís Alencar de

    2017-01-01

    A fire at radioactive waste deposit can result in significant damage as well as serious risks to the environment and the health of the general public. The CNEN (National Commission of Nuclear Energy) norms have fire protection regulations criteria and requirements to prevent the occurrence, neutralize the action and minimize the effects of the fire on the radioactive material present on the plant. These norms it is for to avoid or limit to the lowest possible levels the effects of ionizing radiation or toxic substances on humans and the environment. Before a possible fire containing radioactive material is necessary information that can estimate the dose in which the population will be submitted. In this work the proposal is to simulate a fire scenario containing radioactive material using Hotspot Health Physics simulation code and to identify the radiological risk of cancer in the respiratory system associated with this scenario using the BEIR V model. (author)

  10. Simulation of fire in a deposit of radioactive waste and the radiological risk associated to this scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Érica Nascimento; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de, E-mail: erica.ndomingos@gmail.com, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Aguiar, Laís Alencar de, E-mail: laguiars@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A fire at radioactive waste deposit can result in significant damage as well as serious risks to the environment and the health of the general public. The CNEN (National Commission of Nuclear Energy) norms have fire protection regulations criteria and requirements to prevent the occurrence, neutralize the action and minimize the effects of the fire on the radioactive material present on the plant. These norms it is for to avoid or limit to the lowest possible levels the effects of ionizing radiation or toxic substances on humans and the environment. Before a possible fire containing radioactive material is necessary information that can estimate the dose in which the population will be submitted. In this work the proposal is to simulate a fire scenario containing radioactive material using Hotspot Health Physics simulation code and to identify the radiological risk of cancer in the respiratory system associated with this scenario using the BEIR V model. (author)

  11. The musculoskeletal radiologic findings associated with chronic renal insufficiency; Manifestaciones radiologicas musculoesqueleticas de la insuficiencia renal cronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, P J; Gomez, I; Hernandez, L; Relanzon, S; Hurtado, M [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-10-01

    The numerous musculoskeletal changes associated with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are detected with increasing frequency since hemodialysis and kidney transplantation have prolonged the survival of these patients. These signs have been divided into two large groups. The first includes secondary hyperparathyroidism (bone resorption, periostitis and brown tumors), osteoporosis, osteosclerosis, osteomalacia and vascular and soft tissue calcification, all of which are grouped under the term renal osteodystrophy. the second group is composed of miscellaneous disorders including aluminum poisoning, amyloid and crystal deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, tendon rupture, infection and avascular necrosis. These changes are less common and occur especially in patients under prolonged hemodialysis or kidney transplant recipients. The detection of musculoskeletal involvement in CRI patients has a considerable impact on their clinical management. The present article reviews the radiological signs of these changes, including representative images that will aid in their recognition. (Author) 33 refs.

  12. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  13. Radiological protection problems associated with parasitic X-ray emission from electronic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amlinger, G.; Anger, K.; Billaudelle, H.; Ehlers, J.; Fendt, H.W.; Festag, J.G.; Haug, R.; Herrmann, K.H.; Klein, H.; Kossel, F.; Krebs, A.; Lauterbach, U.; Leibssle, H. Fa.; Lustig, H.; Maushart, R.; Milde, K.G.; Peter, F.; Ritter, J.; Riecke, W.D.; Rosenbaum, O.; Schiekel, M. Fa.; Schleich, F.; Schmidt, Th.; Speyer, K.; Teschke, L.; Tzschaschel, R.; Wagner, H.; Wehner, G.; Wendel, W.; Zehender, E.; Aiginoer, H.; Zakovsky, J.; Blom, G.; De backer, J.; Delhove, J.; Hublet, P.; Lejeune, P.; Misslin, A.; Nuyts, R.; Popovitch, I.; Hjardemaal, O.; Oehlenschlaeger, N.; Gonzalez Del Campo, R.; Becker, S.; Elder, R.L.; Matthews, J.D.; Sheldon, J.L.; Viitaniemi, T.J.; Aouizerate, H.; Aymeric, H.; Barthe, J.; Bermann, F.; Berthaud, Madeleine; Blanc, D.; Bory, P.; Bourrieau, J.; Bouville, A.; Bovagne, H.; Bresson, G.; Casanovas, J.; Cassanhiol, E.; Cassanhiol, E.; Chambragne, J.; Chanteur, J.; Choquet, R.; Cluchet, J.; Commanay, L.; Commanay, P.; Cros, J.L.; Dana, M.; Danna, J.; Decossas, J.L.; Delpla, M.; Destame, D.; Dieval, M.; Drouet, J.; Dubec, A.; Galy, J.; Garnier, A.; Gouerne, R.; Gras, M.; Grob, R.; Guelfucci, J.P.; Guevenoux, J.; Guichardiere, R.; Hamard, J.; Hardy, J.; Haym, J.P.; Hionette, J.; Jacob, G.; Lavie, J.M.; Levy, L.; Logre, P.; Manquene, J.; Martin, H.; Mathieu, J.; Odievre, Monique; Oustrin, J.; Palluel, P.; Patau, J.P.; Penotet, H.; Perrot, A.; Petel, M.; Peyrelavigne, A.; Peyrelavigne, Monique; Provincial, M.; Raedersdorff, J.; Renard, Cl.; Roche, L.; Roche, R.; Schaeffer, R.; Soubiran, J.; Soudain, G.; Stern, J.C.; Terrissol, M.; Tixier, M.; Vialettes, H.; Wauquier, J.M.; Casbolt, P.N.; Ciuciura, A.; Goodhew, E.G.; Jones, I.S.; O'riordan, M.C.; Speight, D.L.; Ward, P.R.; Williams, K.F.; Biro, T.; Vago, G.; Rosental, N.; Argiero, L.; Belli, M.; Boggio, M.; Carfi, N.; Garretti, S.; Loppa, A.; Parisi, A.; Susanna, A.; Ogawa, I.; Koren, K.; Aten, J.B.Th.; Barendsen, G.W.; Den Boer, A.M.; De Pijper, M.A.; Hekman, H.; Julius, H.W.; Strackee, L.; Van daatselaar, G.; Lorentzon, L.; Hadzi-Pealo, M.; Jeremio, M.; Stevanovio, Marija; Oosterkamp, W.J.; Shalmon, E.; Doyen, Diana; Goetschalkx, J.; Puel, R.

    1971-03-01

    During the past few decades there has been an increase in the production of many types of electronic devices such as rectifying tubes, thyratrons, klystrons, magnetrons, etc., containing elements capable of emitting undesirable X-radiation. These components are not only found in equipment used in industry and research laboratories, but also in devices of a more domestic nature, such as colour television sets, usually low in energy, this radiation may nevertheless constitute a health hazard for many users of such devices and may affect not only workers but even the population as a whole. The Commission of the European Communities (Euratom) felt it was desirable to review the state of the art with regard to problems of radiological protection arising in the manufacture, repair and use of such electronic equipment and to seek suitable technical and administrative solutions. In conjunction with the Centre Physique Atomique et Nucleaire of the Paul Sabatier University, the Commission held an International Symposium in Toulouse on 3-6 November 1970, which was attended by manufacturers of electronic equipment, officials of technical inspection bodies and representatives of public health and occupational safety authorities. The following items were discussed: classification and identification of sources of parasitic X-rays, methods of measuring soft X-rays, biological aspects of exposure to soft X-rays, performance standards and methods for testing and inspecting electronic equipment. The Symposium was followed attentively by 180 delegates from 21 countries and international organizations, and was concluded by a round table discussion at which the chairmen of the different sessions, assisted by experts, drew conclusions from their sessions and from the discussions, pointing up the problems which needed most urgently to be studied. This document contains the texts, in their original versions, of the papers presented at the meetings, together with the minutes of the

  14. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  15. Brazilian regulation of radiation protection in veterinary medical radiodiagnosis; Regulamentação brasileira da proteção radiológica em radiodiagnóstico médico veterinário

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, E.T.; Pelegrineli, S.Q.; Gomes, A.S., E-mail: etxsaude@gmail.com, E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: alexandregomes.rad@gmail.com [Faculdade Casa Branca (FACAP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Pós-graduação em Proteção Radiológica em Aplicações Médicas

    2017-07-01

    Introduction: Veterinary Radiology is defined as the part of the science that studies the organs and internal structures of the body of veterinary patients with the aid of equipment that emits ionizing radiation to form images. Different techniques are employed, more current and more specific for each situation. Objective: To present the regulatory framework of radiological protection focused on veterinary medicine in Brazil. Methodology: We searched for the public documents for the regulation of radiological protection in veterinary radiology through digital search tools on the Internet and in physical literature that could be used or collaborated for such a search. Results: It was detected the lack of a regulation of radiological protection aimed at the area of veterinary radiology. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate a specific standard that meets, supply and supports the professionals who work with ionizing radiation in the area of veterinary medicine. The professions of veterinarian radiologist and technologist in veterinary radiology are of such complexity that they require higher level for proper exercise. Given the peculiarity of the activities, where there is a need for physical restraint of the patient and other artifices to perform the exam, the professionals are, in the examination room, less than one meter from the primary and secondary beam of radiation. It is hoped that the work will contribute to document the dangerous scenario described and encourage the search for this necessary improvement in such a specialized area.

  16. Radiological risks associated with the various uses of radiation in medicine within the context of their associated benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Medical procedures represent the largest source of human-made radiation exposure. Most radiation sources expose populations to a risk and these persons may receive no benefit or only an indirect benefit. There are some specific features of medical exposure that make the benefit/risk assessment different from that for other sources of radiation exposure. In medical exposure the exposed person is the direct recipient of an intended benefit that can be compared with the potential risk to that same individual, and the exposure is voluntary. Most radiation exposures should be limited to doses that are as low as reasonably achievable, but in medicine the doses must be at least high enough to obtain an image of diagnostic quality or to eradicate a tumour. The use of very high doses in radiation therapy makes it impossible to make comparisons using effective dose. The paper addresses the radiation risks from diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; discusses the determinants of radiation risk, the measures of benefit and the factors affecting the balance between benefit and risk; and reviews the application of the radiation protection philosophy to medical exposure. (author)

  17. Radiological impact associated to the use of phosphogypsum in crops cultivated at the Cerrado region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Kerley A.P.; Menezes, Maria A.B.C.; Taddei, Maria H.T.; Mello, Jaime W.V.; Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of the 'wet process', whereby sulfuric acid is reacted with phosphate rock to produce phosphoric acid. The Brazilian production of this material is around 12 million of tons per year which is stacked in piles at the same place where it is produced. Researches accomplished in several countries worldwide have demonstrated the potential use of PG in agriculture not only as a source for calcium and sulfur, but also as a conditioner for soils that contain high levels of aluminum. In Brazil, these studies are mainly focused on the application of phosphogypsum to the Cerrado region, the main agriculture region of the country. Taking into account the presence of natural radionuclides in this material and the fact that the mobility and bioaccumulation of these elements can vary significantly with changes in climate, a research project has been conducted in a partnership with the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Soil Department of Vicosa Federal University in order to investigate the radiological impact of using phosphogypsum in crops cultivated in Cerrado soils. For this purpose a set of greenhouse experiments have been conducted in two types of soil (one clayey and other sandy loam textured) to determine the transfer factor of natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb) from soil to crops (lettuce, corn and soybean) and drainage waters. This paper aims to report preliminary results of the study, including the chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization of the soil samples, and radioactivity concentration in both the applied PG and soil samples. The measurement of 232 Th concentration has been carried out by neutron activation analysis, 238 U by delayed neutron counting technique, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb by the method of radiochemical separation. The mean activity concentrations of 226 Ra (240 Bq.kg -1 ) and 228 Ra (224 Bq.kg -1 ) in PG were below the maximum level recommended by CNEN

  18. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  19. [Research reveals a market for a veterinary behaviour clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheer-Sheehy, Valerie; Endenburg, Nienke

    2009-11-01

    An enquiry into the requirement of a university veterinary behaviour clinic in The Netherlands revealed that there is a clear call for such a service. The specific demands and wishes of first line practicing veterinarians and companion animal owners were investigated. The research revealed that veterinarians are regular confronted with behaviour problems in companion animals and that they are willing to refer these cases to the University. They also expressed their need for access to continuing professional development opportunities in the field of veterinary behavioural medicine (which is something that most veterinary behaviour clinics associated with veterinary faculties provide). The demand from companion animal owners was also examined. It can be concluded that a large number of them had animals with behaviour problems and that they were willing to seek veterinary advice on these matters. In response to the above mentioned demands the University of Utrecht will open a veterinary behaviour clinic, providing high quality service for animals, their owners and the referring veterinarians. This service will be based on sound scientific practice and delivered by both veterinarians specialised in this field and recognised animal behaviour therapists.

  20. The Association of the Heads of European Radiological Protection Competent Authorities (HERCA); La Asociacion de Autoridades Competentes en Proteccion Radiologica (HERCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, R.; RodrigueZ, M.; Amor, I.; Villanueva, I.; Martin Calvarro, J. M.; Aguado, M. D.; Sanchez, M.

    2012-07-01

    In 2007 a European association of regulatory authorities working in the field of radiological protection, known as HERCA, was set up with a view to harmonising the regulatory practices of the different countries, identifying new problems and providing agreed-to solutions. (Author)

  1. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  2. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  3. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P.; Pelligand, L.; Whiting, M.; Chambers, D.; Toutain, P-L.; Whitehead, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. PMID:28801498

  4. Radiological findings of male urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae

    2004-01-01

    Urethral duplication or accessory urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. Even rarer, is its association with bladder duplication. We report a case of urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication in a seven-year-old boy who underwent retrograde urethrography, sonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. WhiIe retrograde urethrography can demonstrate the extent of the duplicated urethra, MR imaging and sonography can provide detailed information on the anatomy of the adjacent tissues as well as urethral duplication

  5. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  6. Radiological experience on decontamination of moderator and associated system at NAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, C.L.R.; Mitra, S.R.; Pawar, S.K.; Lal Chand

    2000-01-01

    Narora Atomic Power Station, the first of Indian standardized Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor, is faced with a problem of 60 Co contamination in moderator and its associated system. This contamination has resulted in increase of collective dose contribution. As a part of ALARA campaign in NAPS it was decided to decontaminate the moderator and associated systems and also incorporate modification which will further control the 60 Co contamination. As a part of decontamination program several experiments to determine the effectiveness of the chemical formulation on SS and cupro-nickel surfaces were carried out on various moderator system equipment before finalizing the formulation for full scale decontamination of moderator system. This paper gives an overview of various modifications in system and decontamination efficiency of various chemical formulation which were used for decontamination of moderator system (excluding calandria) and associated equipment. (author)

  7. Veterinary education in Africa : current and future perspectives : animal health management in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E. Swan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary education commenced in South Africa in 1920 at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa in association with the Transvaal University College, now the University of Pretoria. Sir Arnold Theiler, Director of Veterinary Research and Education, was the first Dean. Today there are 46 veterinary training institutions in Africa of which 21 are in sub-Saharan Africa.Veterinary services are indispensable to the sustained health and wellbeing of animals and humans, and agricultural economies of countries worldwide. Veterinary education, postgraduate training, and research, and adequate numbers of veterinarians, are essential to satisfy the millennium development goals, the objectives of NEPAD and the African Union, and the agreements regulating international trade.

  8. Principles of veterinary radiography. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.W.; Herrtage, M.E.; Williamson, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book by Douglas and Williamson about the physical-technical fundamentals of radiology in veterinary medicine was first published in 1977 and the second edition now available has been revised and enlarged. Part 1 gives coverage of the basic physical and technical requirements of the necessary equipment and installations as well as the laws governing radiation protection. In Part 2, exposure techniques and special examinations procedures are described in detail. Contrast-enhanced examinations are dealt with exhaustively. (orig./MG) With 166 figs., 10 tabs [de

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Beijing genotype strains not associated with radiological presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, Martien W.; van Deutekom, Henk; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Kremer, Kristin; van Soolingen, Dick

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing genotype have been involved in various outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Some studies suggest that the infection with the Beijing genotype is associated with a different host immune response. Since this might also lead to a different

  10. Anxiety in veterinary surgical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Eika, Berit; Jensen, Asger Lundorff

    2012-01-01

    The surgical educational environment is potentially stressful and this can negatively affect students' learning. The aim of this study was to investigate whether veterinary students' level of anxiety is higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course and if pre-surgical training...... in a Surgical Skills Lab (SSL) has an anxiety reducing effect. Investigations were carried out as a comparative study and a parallel group study. Potential participants were fourth-year veterinary students who attended a surgical course (Basic Surgical Skills) and a non-surgical course (Clinical Examination...... and 28 students from 2010). Our results show that anxiety levels in veterinary students are significantly higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course (p...

  11. Investigating laparoscopic psychomotor skills in veterinarians and veterinary technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Jessica; Santarossa, Amanda; Mrotz, Victoria; Walker, Meagan; Monaghan, Dominique; Singh, Ameet

    2017-04-01

    To determine the influence of age, year of graduation, and video game experience on baseline laparoscopic psychomotor skills. Cross-sectional. Licensed veterinarians (n = 38) and registered veterinary technicians (VTs) (n = 49). A laparoscopic box trainer was set up at the 2016 Ontario Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA) and the 2016 Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians (OAVT) conferences held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants volunteered to perform a single repetition of a peg transfer (PT) exercise. Participants were given a short demonstration of the PT task prior to testing. A Spearman's rank correlation (r s ) was used to identify associations between baseline psychomotor skills and self-reported surgical and non-surgical experiences collected via survey. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare PT scores in veterinarians and VTs. A P-value of  .05). Veterinary technicians that frequently used chopsticks scored higher than those without chopstick experience (P = .04). Age and year of graduation correlated inversely, while self-reported VG experience correlated positively with laparoscopic psychomotor skills of veterinarians, when assessed on a simulator. The use of chopsticks may contribute to the acquisition of psychomotor skills in VTs. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Association of Haematological and Radiological Findings with Clinical Outcome in Hospitalized Children 2-36 Months Old with Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, R.; Bhatti, N.; Nisar, Y. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite reduction in ld mortality during last decade, lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) remained number one killer of under-five. The current study aimed to assess the association of haematological and radiological findings with clinical outcome in hospitalized children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. Methods: In the current cross sectional study, 581 children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI were enrolled and followed at the Children Hospital, Islamabad, between 2011 and 2014. At the time of enrolment, complete history of present illness, anthropometric measurements, blood sample and chest radiograph were obtained. The primary outcome was either early clinical response (within 72 hours) or delayed clinical response (>72 hours). Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between haematological and radiological findings with clinical outcome, adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results: Of 581 enrolled children, 292 (50.3 percent) children had early, and 289 (49.7 percent) had delayed clinical response. The multivariable logistic regression showed that leucocytosis (OR 1.79, 95 percent CI 1.15-2.79), neutrophilia (OR 1.91, 95 percent CI 1.29-2.84), radiological interstitial pneumonia (OR 2.49, 95 percent CI 1.70-3.64), and lobar consolidation (OR 6.00, 95 percent CI 2.41-14.96) were significantly associated with delayed clinical response, after adjusted for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: Delayed clinical response was significantly associated with abnormal haematological and radiological findings at the time of admission in children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. Haematological and radiological findings at the time of presentation are useful for predicting delayed clinical response in children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. (author)

  13. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  15. Gamma rays application in veterinary immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulkhanov, R.U.; Butaev, M.K.; Mirzaev, B.Sh.; Ryasnyanskiy, I.V.; Yuldashev, R.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The process based on stimulated action of ionized radiation, change of quality of agricultural goods and row materials, biocides including bactericide action of ionized radiation are among the methods of radiation biotechnology, which can be applied in agriculture. We used the bactericide action of ionized radiation in technological process for creation of fundamentally new preparation possessed by by immunogenic properties and named as 'radio vaccine'. This term is well known and frequently used in scientific papers in the field of applied radiobiology. It is well known that physical (thermal) and chemical actions are used for preparation of vaccine for veterinary. It was noted that this process resulted in destruction of antigenic structure of bacteria cells, with are responsible for immunity creation. The possibility of virulence reduction at constant immunogenic properties of microorganism and keeping its antigenic structure can be achieved by using ionized radiation as one of the factor, which influences on bacteria. Taking into account the necessity of vaccine improvement and increase of quantity of associated vaccine one of the most important problems of veterinary science and particle is creation of vaccines of new generation which are characterized by the ability to form immunity against several diseases of agricultural animals. As a result of many-years investigations using gamma rays radiations in UzSRIV (laboratory of radiobiology) the radiation biotechnology of vaccine preparation was developed. These vaccines are necessary for practical application. Radiation biotechnology allows to prepare high-effective mono-, associated and polyvalent radio vaccines against widespread infection diseases of agricultural animals especially cubs (calves, lambs, young pigs). On the basis of developed radiation biotechnology there were prepared the following vaccines: 'Associated radio vaccine against colibacteriosis and salmonellosis of small horned cattle

  16. Emotions in veterinary surgical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Eika, Berit; Pedersen, Lene Tanggaard

    2012-01-01

    A surgical educational environment is potentially stressful and can negatively affect students' learning. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emotions experienced by veterinary students in relation to their first encounter with live-animal surgery and to identify possible sources...... of positive and negative emotions, respectively. During a Basic Surgical Skills course, 155 veterinary fourth-year students completed a survey. Of these, 26 students additionally participated in individual semi-structured interviews. The results of the study show that students often experienced a combination...

  17. Results of the radiological survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company facility, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed under government contract from February to September, 1956. The survey included gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around and outside of the building, and gamma scanning over most accessible indoor floor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Roof trusses were beta-gamma scanned in locations where floor contamination was found. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and overhead surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in the areas that had been used in the early government work

  18. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  19. Veterinary Compounding: Regulation, Challenges, and Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Gigi

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of therapeutic need in veterinary medicine is large, and the availability of approved drug products for all veterinary species and indications is relatively small. For this reason, extemporaneous preparation, or compounding, of drugs is commonly employed to provide veterinary medical therapies. The scope of veterinary compounding is broad and focused primarily on meeting the therapeutic needs of companion animals and not food-producing animals in order to avoid human exposure to ...

  20. Radiological pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis associated to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, D; Dirou, S; Arrigoni, P P; Durant, C; Hamidou, M; Néel, A; Agard, C

    2018-05-18

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a very rare interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by progressive fibrotic lesions of the visceral pleura and the sub-pleural parenchyma, affecting predominantly the upper lobes. PPFE may occur in different contextes like bone marrow or lung transplantations, but also in the context of telomeropathy with mutations of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), telomerase RNA component (TERC) or regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) genes. PPFE-like lesions have recently been described in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-related ILD. We report here the first detailed case of PPFE associated to systemic sclerosis (SSc) in a woman free of telomeropathy mutations. A caucasian 46 year old woman was followed for SSc in a limited form with anti-centromere Ab since 1998, and seen in 2008 for a routine visit. Her SSc was stable, and she had no respiratory signs. Pulmonary function tests showed an isolated decreased cTLCO at 55.9% (of predicted value). Cardiac ultrasonography was normal. Thoracic CT-scan showed upper lobes predominant mild and focal pleural and subpleural thickenings, suggestive of PPFE, with a slight worsening at 8 years of follow-up. She remained clinically stable. Biology only found a moderate and stable peripheral thrombocytopenia, and sequencing analysis did not find any mutations in TERT and TERC genes. ILD is frequent in SSc but isolated PPFE has never been described so far. In our case, PPFE is not related to telomeropathy, has indolent outcome and seems to have good prognosis. PPFE might be an extremely rare form of SSc-related ILD, although a fortuitous association remains possible.

  1. Survey results of output measurements in diagnostic X ray equipments using glass dosimeter and the questionnaire. Aichi association of radiological technologists 50 year anniversary memorial work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yuji; Hirofuji, Yoshiaki; Saiga, Osamu; Ishibashi, Kazuto

    2003-01-01

    The Aichi Association of Radiological Technologists executed the survey according to the task of radiation control in Aichi prefecture. The survey investigated the number of clinics/hospitals who own radiation dosimeters. The association also measured outputs using glass dosimeter (GD-450) manufactured by Chiyoda Technical in diagnostic X ray. The purpose and significance of the survey are: to illustrate that the radiation control task is not involved as routine maintenance work, to examine why the task is not routinely performed, to investigate the number of clinics/hospitals who own diagnostic X ray radiation dosimeters, to inform that the use of dosimeter is essential to achieve accurate measurement for exposed dose, and to motivate the significance of radiation control in routine work. The result of the survey clearly indicated the necessity of radiation control, and suggested the information needed for the Aichi Association of Radiological Technologists to determine the guideline for the medical radiation exposed dose. (author)

  2. Reflections on the future of veterinary medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Keith W

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Keith Prasse is a very distinguished leader in veterinary education. He started his career achieving his BS and DVM degrees from Iowa State University (ISU). He returned to ISU after a brief period in private practice in Illinois. His well-recognized career in veterinary pathology began with his MS and PhD degrees, followed by a five-year period of teaching at ISU. Dr. Prasse joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1972, and thus began a long-term partnership with Dr. Bob Duncan that is arguably the foundation of veterinary clinical pathology. The textbook they authored, Veterinary Laboratory Medicine: Clinical Pathology, or "Duncan and Prasse" as it is known, remains the standard today, with later participation from Dr. Ed Mahaffey and most recently Dr. Ken Latimer. Dr. Prasse has mentored numerous graduate students and received many awards over his 23-year career in teaching, including the Norden Distinguished Teaching award twice, once at ISU and once at Georgia. His leadership as President of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists was greatly acknowledged and appreciated. Dr. Prasse's administrative service at the University of Georgia spanned 14 years, first as Associate Dean for Public Service and Outreach and later as Dean for eight years, during which time he served as President of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). The growth of the College of Veterinary Medicine under Dean Prasse's visionary leadership was extraordinary. He led through difficult economic and political times, yet the college and its community continued to prosper. His legacy at the University of Georgia is indelible and perpetual. His outstanding leadership of the college was recognized by the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association in 2004, when he was given the Georgia Veterinarian of the Year award. Since his retirement from Georgia, Dr. Prasse has contributed greatly to the profession and to the AAVMC by leading the Foresight project

  3. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Shivley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge

  4. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivley, Jacob M; Brookshire, Wilson C; Bushby, Philip A; Woodruff, Kimberly A

    2018-01-01

    Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine) of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge of biosecurity at a

  5. A Clinical Pharmacology Course for Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Lynn Mulcahy

    1983-01-01

    A one-semester, two-credit course is described that was developed cooperatively by the colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine at Washington State University to help resolve an acute shortage of clinical pharmacologists in veterinary medicine and veterinary medical education. Course procedures, content, and evaluation are outlined (MSE)

  6. 7 CFR 371.4 - Veterinary Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary Services. 371.4 Section 371.4 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 371.4 Veterinary Services. (a) General statement. Veterinary Services (VS) protects and safeguards the Nation's livestock and...

  7. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  8. African Journals Online: Veterinary Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... African Journals Online: Veterinary Science ... Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ... Life Sciences, Chemistry, Mathematics & Physics, Earth Sciences ... The Nigerian Journal of Animal Science (NJAS) is an official ...

  9. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. Section Policies. Articles. Checked Open Submissions, Checked Indexed, Checked Peer Reviewed. Publication Frequency.

  10. Probabilistic risk assessment of veterinary medicines applied to four major aquaculture species produced in ASIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary medicines into the environment. About 90% of the global aquaculture production is produced in Asia and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of veterinary medicines in Asian aquaculture have

  11. Radiation physics in medicine and veterinary medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.

    2000-01-01

    Medical and veterinary medicine staff and specialists represent an important decision making group in national administration and institutions dealing with radiation protection and environmental protection matters in general. Still, their education in physics, especially in radiation physics is fragmentary and loose, both from technical and theoretical point of view. Within medicine and veterinary medicine studies as well as within other biomedical sciences (biology, pharmacology, biotechnology) radiation physics is usually incorporated in the first year curricula as a part of general physics or biophysics course. Some segments of radiation physics mainly as a technical base for different instrumentation methods and techniques could be also found within different graduate and post-graduate courses of radiology, physical therapy, radiation hygiene, environmental protection, etc. But the traditional approach in presenting the matter and inflexibility of the educational system strongly confront the growing public concern for the environmental problems dealing with radiation and demands for better informing and technical education for those involved in informing and administration. This paper considers some of these problems presenting a new approach in education in radiation physics for medical and veterinary medicine students based on education through student projects and work in the field, as well as on the strong collaboration among administration, universities and professional societies on the national and international level. (author)

  12. Technology assessment HTR. Part 6. The radiological risks associated with the thorium-fuelled High Temperature Reactor. A comparative risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.; Van Hienen, J.F.A.

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results of task B.3 of the 'Technology Assessment of the High Temperature Reactor' project. The objective of task B.3 was to evaluate the radiological risks to the general public associated with the sustainable HTGR cycle. Since the technologies to be used at several stages of this fuel cycle are still in the design phase and since a detailed specification of this fuel cycle has not yet been developed, the emphasis was on obtaining a global impression of the risk associated with a generic thorium-based HTGR fuel cycle. This impression was obtained by performing a comparative risk analysis on the basis of data given in the literature. As reference for the comparison a generic uranium fuel led LWR cycle was used. The structure of the report is as follows. In Chapter 2 the general methodology for assessing the radiological risks associated with nuclear installations is described. An overview is given of the measures commonly used to quantify these risks. In Chapter 3 an overview is given of the different stages of the reference uranium fuel led LWR cycle and the thorium fuel led HTGR cycle. In Chapter 4 a stage-by-stage analysis is given of the radiological risks associated with the two fuel cycles. Finally, in Chapter 5 an evaluation is made of the radiological risks associated with the LWR and HTGR cycles and with thorium and uranium fuels. In Appendix A the production and releases of 14 C for LWR and HTGR fuel cycle facilities is considered in detail. 11 figs., 10 tabs., 10 refs

  13. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  14. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  15. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  16. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  17. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    compared using univariate and logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with vaccination ... reverse transcriptase- Polymerase chain ... Individuals at risk of rabies virus infection ..... vaccine supply in Nigerian hospitals might.

  18. Veterinary Homeopathy: The Implications of Its History for Unorthodox Veterinary Concepts and Veterinary Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Dwight B.

    1979-01-01

    The history of veterinary homeopathy, its future and implications are discussed. The need for investigation into the validity of both allopathic and homeopathic claims is stressed and it is suggested that maintenance of quality is the key factor in any approach. (BH)

  19. Veterinary surgeons' attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide: an empirical study of Swedish experts on euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Henrik; Lindblad, Anna; Algers, Bo; Lynöe, Niels

    2011-05-01

    To examine the hypothesis that knowledge about physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and euthanasia is associated with a more restrictive attitude towards PAS. A questionnaire about attitudes towards PAS, including prioritization of arguments pro and contra, was sent to Swedish veterinary surgeons. The results were compared with those from similar surveys of attitudes among the general public and physicians. All veterinary surgeons who were members of the Swedish Veterinary Association and had provided an email address (n=2421). Similarities or differences in response pattern between veterinary surgeons, physicians and the general public. The response pattern among veterinary surgeons and the general public was almost similar in all relevant aspects. Of the veterinarians 75% (95% CI 72% to 78%) were in favour of PAS, compared with 73% (95% CI 69% to 77%) among the general public. Only 10% (95% CI 5% to 15%) of the veterinary surgeons were against PAS, compared with 12% (95% CI 5% to 19%) among the general public. Finally, 15% (95% CI 10% to 21%) of veterinarians were undecided, compared with 15% (95% CI 8% to 22%) among the general public. Physicians had a more restrictive attitude to PAS than the general public. Since veterinary surgeons have frequent practical experience of euthanasia in animals, they do have knowledge about what euthanasia really is. Veterinary surgeons and the general public had an almost similar response pattern. Accordingly it seems difficult to maintain that knowledge about euthanasia is unambiguously associated with a restrictive attitude towards PAS.

  20. NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY IN SEDIMENTS AND RIVER BANK SOIL OF KALLADA RIVER OF KERALA, SOUTH INDIA AND ASSOCIATED RADIOLOGICAL RISK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venunathan, N; Kaliprasad, C S; Narayana, Y

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the activity concentrations of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in the sediments and river bank soil samples collected from the Kallada river environs of coastal Kerala. The radiological risks associated with these radionuclides were calculated. The samples were processed following standard procedure, and activity was counted using a high-efficiency 5″ × 5″ NaI (Tl) detector coupled to GSPEC gamma spectroscopy system. The mean values of measured activities of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in soil samples were found to be 98.1 ± 0.4, 60.3 ± 1.1 and 343.4 ± 1.8 Bq kg -1 , respectively, which results in an average absorbed dose rate of 103 nGy h -1 The corresponding values for sediment samples were found to be 88.0 ± 0.4, 48.6 ± 0.9 and 423.2 ± 2.0 Bq kg -1 , respectively, with a resulting absorbed dose rate of 95 nGy h -1 Radium equivalent activity, annual effective dose equivalent, the external and internal hazard indices were determined and compared with recommended limits. The results of the work provide background data on natural radioactive isotopes, which are useful in the assessment of human radiation exposure from natural environment. The accumulation of information on natural radiation is of great value for radiation protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. An aerial radiological survey of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The first of a three-phase effort to radiologically monitor the lowering of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways was conducted over three areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The areas surveyed during this first phase included Par Pond, the Savannah River swamp from Steel Creek to Little Hell Landing, and Lower Three Runs Creek from the mouth of Lower Three Runs to the Highway 301 Bridge. The first phase was conducted to coincide with the lowering of the water level of Par Pond to an elevation of 190 feet above sea level. Additional surveys were conducted when the water level was at an elevation of 180 feet and prior to refill. The first survey began August 19, 1991, and was completed September 11, 1991. The second survey was conducted in October/November, 1991, during the SRS site-wide survey, and the third survey was conducted in August/September, 1992. Only the Par Pond area itself was surveyed during the third and final phase. The radiation detected over the Creek Plantation portion of the Savannah River swamp and Lower Three Runs areas during the August 1991 survey was consistent with the spatial distribution, quantity, and kinds of radionuclides detected during the 1983 and 1986 surveys. No migration of man-made gamma emitting materials was detected when compared to the prior surveys. The major differences occurred along the Par Pond shoreline where lowered water levels exposed the contaminated pond bed. The activity in the pond bed was attenuated by the water cover prior to the start of the lowering of Par Pond in June 1991. The data collected during each survey were processed in the field and were presented to SRS. A comparison report is being generated after the completion of each survey. A final report will be generated for the three surveys and will include a quantitative comparison of the three surveys in the Par Pond area only

  2. An anatomy precourse enhances student learning in veterinary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Margaret A; Stevens-Sparks, Cathryn; Taboada, Joseph; Daniel, Annie; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2016-07-08

    Veterinary anatomy is often a source of trepidation for many students. Currently professional veterinary programs, similar to medical curricula, within the United States have no admission requirements for anatomy as a prerequisite course. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of a week-long precourse in veterinary anatomy on both objective student performance and subjective student perceptions of the precourse educational methods. Incoming first year veterinary students in the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine professional curriculum were asked to participate in a free precourse before the start of the semester, covering the musculoskeletal structures of the canine thoracic limb. Students learned the material either via dissection only, instructor-led demonstrations only, or a combination of both techniques. Outcome measures included student performance on examinations throughout the first anatomy course of the professional curriculum as compared with those who did not participate in the precourse. This study found that those who participated in the precourse did significantly better on examinations within the professional anatomy course compared with those who did not participate. Notably, this significant improvement was also identified on the examination where both groups were exposed to the material for the first time together, indicating that exposure to a small portion of veterinary anatomy can impact learning of anatomical structures beyond the immediate scope of the material previously learned. Subjective data evaluation indicated that the precourse was well received and students preferred guided learning via demonstrations in addition to dissection as opposed to either method alone. Anat Sci Educ 9: 344-356. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Milestone Educational Planning Initiatives in Veterinary Medical Education: Progress and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth A; Reimann, Jessica; Greenhill, Lisa M; Dewey, Cate E

    2017-11-29

    Three milestone educational planning initiatives engaged the veterinary medical profession in the United States and Canada between 1987 and 2011, namely the Pew National Veterinary Education Program, the Foresight Project, and the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. In a quantitative study, we investigated the impact of these initiatives on veterinary medical education through a survey of academic leaders (deans, previous deans, and associate deans for academics from veterinary medical schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges) to assess their perspectives on the initiatives and eight recommendations that were common to all three initiatives. Two of the recommendations have in effect been implemented: enable students to elect in-depth instruction and experience within a practice theme or discipline area (tracking), and increase the number of graduating veterinarians. For three of the recommendations, awareness of the issues has increased but substantial progress has not been made: promote diversity in the veterinary profession, develop a plan to reduce student debt, and develop a North American strategic plan. Lastly, three recommendations have not been accomplished: emphasize use of information more than fact recall, share educational resources to enable a cost-effective education, and standardize core admissions requirements. The educational planning initiatives did provide collaborative opportunities to discuss and determine what needs to change within veterinary medical education. Future initiatives should explore how to avoid and overcome obstacles to successful implementation.

  4. Veterinary vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A Innes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii has a very wide intermediate host range and is thought to be able to infect all warm blooded animals. The parasite causes a spectrum of different diseases and clinical symptoms within the intermediate hosts and following infection most animals develop adaptive humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The development of protective immunity to T. gondii following natural infection in many host species has led researchers to look at vaccination as a strategy to control disease, parasite multiplication and establishment in animal hosts. A range of different veterinary vaccines are required to help control T. gondii infection which include vaccines to prevent congenital toxoplasmosis, reduce or eliminate tissue cysts in meat producing animals and to prevent oocyst shedding in cats. In this paper we will discuss some of the history, challenges and progress in the development of veterinary vaccines against T. gondii.

  5. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) associated with Staphylococcus spp. bacteremia, responsive to potassium arsenite 0.5% in a veterinary surgeon and his coworking wife, handling with CFS animal cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, W

    2001-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in human patients remain a controversial and perplexing condition with emerging zoonotic aspects. Recent advances in human medicine seem to indicate a bacterial etiology and the condition has already been described in horses, dogs, cats and birds of prey in association with micrococci-like organisms in the blood. To evaluate the possibility of a chronic bacteremia, a veterinary surgeon (the author) and his coworking wife, both diagnosed with CFS and meeting the CDC working case definition, were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Blood cultures proved Staph-positive and micrococci-like organisms in the blood were repeatedly observed in the 3-year period preceding the arsenical therapy, during which several medicaments, including antibiotics, proved unsuccessful. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (potassium arsenite 0.5%, im., 1 ml/12 h, for 10 days) both patients experienced complete remission. At the post-treatment control made 1 month later, micrococci had disappeared from the blood, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was raising.

  6. Occurrence of undesirable tissue reaction in interventional vascular radiology; La radiologie interventionnelle et les risques associes: etude d'un cas clinique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thouveny, Francine [Service de radiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-15

    After lengthy technological development, the constantly evolving diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiology procedures have become vital factors in patient care. X-rays remain the key tool for these techniques in a large number of cases, including certain complex vascular pathologies for which endovascular treatment is associated with prolonged irradiation. The risk they represent are however outweighed by the underlying therapeutic stakes and remains of secondary medical concern. In these difficult cases, which require maximum concentration on the intervention, the practitioner will need to be aided by tools that strictly limit and monitor the dose. The manufacturers and radiological physicists must be involved in configuring the facilities used and the health professionals in determining reference levels and professional recommendations that take account of the dose optimisation tools. (authors)

  7. Review of hazards to female reproductive health in veterinary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheftel, Joni M; Elchos, Brigid L; Rubin, Carol S; Decker, John A

    2017-04-15

    OBJECTIVE To review publications that address female reproductive health hazards in veterinary practice, summarize best practices to mitigate reproductive risks, and identify current knowledge gaps. DESIGN Systematized review. SAMPLE English-language articles describing chemical, biological, and physical hazards present in the veterinary workplace and associations with adverse reproductive outcomes or recommendations for minimizing risks to female reproductive health. PROCEDURES Searches of the CAB abstracts database were performed in July 2012 and in May 2015 with the following search terms: veterinarians AND occupational hazards and vets.id AND occupational hazards.sh. Searches of the PubMed database were conducted in November 2012 and in May 2015 with the following medical subject heading terms: occupational exposure AND veterinarians; anesthetics, inhalation/adverse effects AND veterinarians; risk factors AND pregnancy AND veterinarians; pregnancy outcome AND veterinarians; and animal technicians AND occupational exposure. Two additional PubMed searches were completed in January 2016 with the terms disinfectants/toxicity AND female AND fertility/drug effects and veterinarians/psychology AND stress, psychological. No date limits were applied to searches. RESULTS 4 sources supporting demographic trends in veterinary medicine and 118 resources reporting potential hazards to female reproductive health were identified. Reported hazards included exposure to anesthetic gases, radiation, antineoplastic drugs, and reproductive hormones; physically demanding work; prolonged standing; and zoonoses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Demographic information suggested that an increasing number of women of reproductive age will be exposed to chemical, biological, and physical hazards in veterinary practice. Information on reproductive health hazards and minimizing risk, with emphasis on developing a safety-focused work culture for all personnel, should be discussed starting

  8. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  9. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  10. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  11. Mapping discussion of canine obesity between veterinary surgeons and dog owners: a provisional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns-Haylor, Theodora; Fordyce, Peter

    2017-02-11

    This study maps communication between veterinary surgeons and dog owners on obesity management in four first-opinion practices in the UK. A total of 74 dog owners who met the study's inclusion criteria and 24 veterinary surgeons were interviewed using oral questionnaires between November 2013 and May 2014. The dog owner questionnaire was based on potential discussion areas that could influence an owner's intention to act (initiate a weight loss regime) based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour. The veterinary surgeons' questionnaires assessed perception of canine obesity, their personal communication strategies and current practice-level interventions. The findings identify opportunities for more proactive approaches to obesity management by veterinary surgeons and their practices. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Towards the development of day one competences in veterinary behaviour medicine: survey of veterinary professionals experience in companion animal practice in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Olwen; Hanlon, Alison J

    2018-01-01

    Veterinary behaviour medicine should be a foundation subject of the veterinary curriculum because of its wide scope of applications to veterinary practice. Private practitioners are likely to be the primary source of information on animal behaviour for most pet owners, however studies indicate that behavioural issues are not frequently discussed during companion animal consultations and many practitioners lack confidence in dealing with behavioural problems, likely due to poor coverage of this subject in veterinary education.There is a need to identify learning outcomes to support day one competences in veterinary behaviour medicine and these should be informed by practice-based evidence. This study aimed to investigate the nature and frequency of behavioural queries experienced by veterinary professionals in Ireland, the provision of behavioural services at companion animal practices, behaviour referral practices and challenges associated with providing a behaviour service. Two online surveys were developed, one for private veterinary practitioners (PVP) and one for veterinary nurses (VN). Invitations to participate were distributed using contact details from the Premises Accreditation Scheme database on the Veterinary Council of Ireland website. Thirty-eight PVPs and 69 VNs completed the survey. Results indicated that less than half of companion animal practices offer behavioural consults and under a third of practices provide training and socialization events. Over half of the practices surveyed have referred cases to a behavioural specialist.The majority of respondents encountered behavioural queries weekly. Ninety-eight percent reported receiving queries regarding dog behaviour. Toilet training and unruly behaviour were two issues encountered frequently. Behavioural issues in cats were also common. House soiling and destructive behaviour were the problems most frequently encountered by respondents.The two most commonly cited barriers to providing behavioural

  13. Natural radioactivity in sediments and river bank soil of Kallada river of Kerala, South India and associated radiological risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venunathan, N.; Kaliprasad, C.S.; Narayana, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the activity concentrations of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in the sediments and river bank soil samples collected from the Kallada river environs of coastal Kerala. The radiological risks associated with these radionuclides were calculated. The samples were processed following standard procedure and activity were counted using a high efficiency 5 inch x 5 inch NaI(Tl) detector coupled to GSPEC gamma spectroscopy system. The mean values of measured activities of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in soil samples were found to be 98.1±04, 60.3±1.1 and 343.4 ± 1.8 Bq.kg -1 respectively, which results in an average absorbed dose rate of 103 nGyh -1 . The corresponding values for sediment samples were found to be 88.0±04, 48.6±0.9 and 423.2±2.03 Bq.kg -1 respectively, with a resulting absorbed dose rate of 95 nGyh -1 . The mean value of radium equivalent activity in soil and sediments were found to be 227.1 Bq.kg -1 and 207.1 Bq.kg -1 respectively, which are within the recommended limit. External and internal hazard indices were also calculated and were found to be 0.61 and 0.78 respectively for soil, and 0.56 and 0.69 respectively for sediments. The Annual Effective Dose equivalents from the soil and sediment matrices in the Kallada river environment were estimated to be 0.13 mSv y -1 and 0.12 mSv y -1 respectively. The measured radioactivity, hazard indices and effective dose received by population were found to be within the recommended limits. The results of the work provide background data on natural radioactive isotopes which are useful in the assessment of human radiation exposure from natural environment. The accumulation of information on natural radiation is of great value for radiation protection. (author)

  14. Faculty perspectives regarding the importance and place of nontechnical competencies in veterinary medical education at five North American colleges of veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F; Bogue, E Grady

    2010-07-01

    To explore perceptions of faculty educators regarding the importance of nontechnical competencies in veterinary graduates and the placement of nontechnical competency development in veterinary education. Survey. All faculty members at 5 North American veterinary medical institutions. Participants rated the importance of 14 nontechnical competencies and indicated in which phase or phases of veterinary education such competencies should be developed (ie, curriculum placement). Differences in mean ratings were statistically evaluated, as were associations between ratings or curriculum placement and respondent institution, gender, experience, and discipline. Mean ratings of importance were above neutral for all competencies and were highest for ethical, critical thinking, and interpersonal and intrapersonal competencies; development of these competencies was favored in preveterinary and veterinary training. Ratings were lower for management and business competencies; development of these and other competencies was placed primarily in the clinical phase of the veterinary curriculum. Basic science, nonveterinarian, and junior faculty appeared to more strongly appreciate the importance of nontechnical skills, whereas large animal and midcareer faculty reported a more reserved degree of support. Female faculty were more likely to place nontechnical competency development throughout the educational process. Participants agreed nontechnical competencies are important for veterinary graduates; however, faculty perceptions differed from previously published findings regarding the relative importance of business and management skills. Those involved in faculty hiring, faculty development, and curricular planning should also be aware of disciplinary and career stage differences affecting faculty perspectives.

  15. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P.; Pelligand, L.; Whiting, M.; Chambers, D.; Toutain, P-L.; Whitehead, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Part 2 of this narrative review outlines the theoretical and practical bases for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of conventional medicines and homeopathic products. Known and postulated mechanisms of action are critically reviewed. The evidence for clinical efficacy of products in both categories, in the form of practitioner experience, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of clinical trial results, is discussed. The review also addresses problems and pitfalls in assessing data, and the ethical and negative aspects of pharmacology and homeopathy in veterinary medicine. PMID:28821700

  16. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  17. Is the timing of radiological intervention and treatment day associated with economic outcomes in DRG-financed health care systems: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierala, Christoph; Boes, Stefan

    2017-02-28

    In 2012, Switzerland has introduced a diagnosis related group (DRG) system for hospital financing to increase the efficiency and transparency of hospital services and to reduce costs. However, little is known about the efficiency of specific processes within hospitals. The objective of this study is to describe the relationship between timing of radiological interventions, in particular scan and treatment day, and the length of stay (LOS) compliance in a hospital. This is a cross-sectional observational study based on administrative records of all DRG cases in a Swiss university hospital in 2013, enriched by data from the radiology information system and accounting details. The data are analysed using descriptive statistics and regression methods. Radiology and related treatment on a weekend is associated with a higher LOS compliance of approximately 22.12% (pDRG and attempts to explain how this is linked to standardised operating procedures. Our results have implications regarding potential cost savings in hospital care through alignment of care processes, infrastructure planning and guidance of patient flows.

  18. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  19. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  20. Education in nuclear physics, medical physics and radiation protection in medicine and veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.; Andric, S.

    2001-01-01

    Education in Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics and Radiation Protection in medicine and veterinary medicine studies on Belgrade University is an integral part of the curriculum, incorporated in different courses of graduate and post-graduate studies. During graduate studies students get basic elements of Nuclear Physics through Physics and/or Biophysics courses in the 1 st year, while basic knowledge in Medical Physics and Radiation Protection is implemented in the courses of Radiology, Physical Therapy, Radiation Hygiene, Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Therapy in the 4 th or 5 th year. Postgraduate studies offer MSc degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy, while courses in Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Instrumentation, Radiation Protection and Radiology are core or optional. On the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine graduated students may continue their professional education and obtain specialization degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy or Radiation Protection. On the Faculty of Medicine there are specialization degrees in Medical Nuclear Physics. Still, a closer analysis reveals a number of problems both from methodological and cognitive point of view. They are related mostly to graduate students ability to apply their knowledge in practise and with the qualifications of the educators, as those engaged in graduate studies lack basic knowledge in biological and medical sciences, while those engaged in post graduate studies mostly lack basic education in physics. Therefore, a reformed curricula resulting from much closer collaboration among educators, universities and professional societies at the national level should be considered. (author)

  1. Privatizing community animal health worker based veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privatizing community animal health worker based veterinary services delivery system in West Kordofan, Southern Sudan; The needed roles of community animal health assistant (CAHA) and Pastoral unions.

  2. MARKETING STUDIES OF VETERINARY PHARMACY ORGANIZATIONS ASSORTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Deltsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is an active growth of veterinary pharmacy organizations and consumed medicinal drugs for veterinary use. Content-analysis showed that there was an insufficient number of studies devoted to the activity of veterinary pharmacies. The purpose of our work was the analysis of correspondence of range fullness of veterinary pharmacies to the contemporary state of pharmaceutical market of drugs for veterinary use. Veterinary clinics and pharmacies of Moscow and Moscow oblast were the object of our study. We have applied sociological methods (questionnaire, interview, marketing and statistic analysis methods. We have established that liquid dosage forms (53% occupy the biggest part of drugs in the State Registry of Veterinary Drugs. Solutions occupy 68% of this amount. Antimicrobial drugs for systematic use (40% are the most numerous drugs from pharmacotheraperutic group represented in the State Registry. Assortment of veterinary drugs is targeted mainly on a farm livestock (more than 50%. 58% of the market share is domestic drugs. Principal commodity groups which are released by veterinary pharmacies are feed-stuff (31% and drugs (30%. Pharmacy organizations does not have sufficient number of drugs in their assortment (fullness coefficient 7.9% which speaks about nonconformity of the assortment fullness.

  3. Arterial Injury Associated with Tension-Free Vaginal Tapes-SECUR Procedure Successfully Treated by Radiological Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seok Jung

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various postoperative complications have been reported after the use of tension-free vaginal tapes (TVT. The transobturator approach was introduced to minimize the potential complications. The next generation of recently introduced TVT-SECUR is intended to minimize the incidence of complications. Herein we report a case of internal pudendal artery injury sustained during this procedure that was successfully treated by radiological embolization. Angiography with vessel embolization, when available, should be considered when the arterial injury is suspected.

  4. 78 FR 23742 - Nomination Form of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE National Institute of Food and Agriculture Nomination Form of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP) AGENCY: National Institute... information collection for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP). This notice initiates a 30...

  5. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Ethical dilemmas in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Carol A; McDonald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Veterinarians frequently encounter situations that are morally charged and potentially difficult to manage. Situation involving euthanasia, end-of-life care, economics, and inadequate provision of care create practical and moral dilemmas. Ethical tension may be attributable to differences in beliefs regarding the moral value of animals, client and veterinary responsibilities, and deciding what is best for an animal. Veterinarians can employ communication skills used in medical situations to explore the reasons underpinning ethical dilemmas and to search for solutions with clients, staff, and colleagues.

  7. Veterinary clinical nutrition: success stories: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mike

    2016-08-01

    In this overview of success stories in veterinary clinical nutrition topics in cats and dogs reviewed include the dietary management of chronic kidney disease, dissolution of urinary tract uroliths by dietary modification, the recognition that taurine and L-carnitine deficiencies can cause dilated cardiomyopathy; that clinical signs associated with feline hyperthyroidism (caused by a benign adenoma) can be controlled by a low-iodine diet alone; that dietary management of canine osteoarthritis can also reduce non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug doses; and that disease-free intervals and survival times can be statistically longer in dogs with Stage III lymphoma managed with diet. As we discover more about nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, and as we expand our basic understanding of idiopathic diseases we are bound to identify more nutritionally related causes, and be able to develop novel dietary strategies to manage disease processes, including the formulation of diets designed to alter gene expression to obtain beneficial clinical outcomes.

  8. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U{sup 238} and/or Th{sup 232} associated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare, E-mail: rexnazare@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J., E-mail: nruperti@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIREJ/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2011-07-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U{sup 238} and Th{sup 232} with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software {sup M}athematica{sup ,} to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U{sup 238} and / or Th{sup 232} in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  9. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U238 and/or Th232 associated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare; Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U 238 and Th 232 with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software M athematica , to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U 238 and / or Th 232 in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  10. Dose reduction in diagnostic radiology. Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association meeting on 8th December 1983 at Birbeck College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, S.E.; Putney, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nine chapters review the Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association Meeting held in London in 1983 on 'Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology'. Among the topics discussed were the balance between dose reduction and image quality, various procedures and techniques for keeping the dose to the patient to a minimum including the use of K-edge filtration and rare-earth intensifying screens, equipment for assessing the area exposure product in patients and the balance between radiation risk and benefit from radiographic examinations. All nine chapters are indexed separately. (U.K.)

  11. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanel, Maïa, E-mail: maiavanel@yahoo.fr [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Blond, Laurent [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Vanel, Daniel [The Rizzoli Institute, Via del Barbiano 1-10, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  12. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all

  13. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  14. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  15. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to the...

  16. A new era in veterinary immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliwell, R.E.W.; Goudswaard, J.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of the creation of a new international journal of “Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology” is apparent following the emergence of veterinary immunology as an identifiable discipline and the vital part played by investigations of animal models of immunological diseases of

  17. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  18. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Veterinary Safety's Conflicts in the EAEU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalymbek, Bakytzhan; Shulanbekova, Gulmira K.; Madiyarova, Ainur S.; Mirambaeva, Gulnaz Zh.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of veterinary safety of the countries under the Eurasian Economic Union. Animal health's measures are provided in order to prevent the entry and spread of infectious animal diseases, including common to humans and animals, as well as goods not conforming to the common veterinary and sanitary requirements.…

  20. 21 CFR 530.5 - Veterinary records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary records. 530.5 Section 530.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS General Provisions § 530.5 Veterinary records...

  1. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.110 Veterinary care. (a) Newly acquired marine mammals...

  2. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, ...

  3. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm 2 , varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  4. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site is located at 3550 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, Ohio. Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company produced hollow uranium slugs in a machine shop at the site in 1956. The work was performed for National Lead of Ohio in a contract with the Atomic Energy Commission to augment the capacity of the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The current occupant of the building, Force Control, operates a multipurpose machine shop. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed from February to May of 1995. The purpose of the survey was to verify that radioactivity from residues of 238 U was remediated to a level below acceptable DOE guidelines levels

  5. Potential radiological doses associated with the disposal of petroleum industry NORM via landspreading. Final report, September 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Arnish, J.J.

    1998-12-01

    As a result of oil and gas production and processing operations, naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) sometimes accumulate at elevated concentrations in by-product waste streams. The primary radionuclides of concern in NORM wastes are radium-226 of the uranium-238 decay series, and radium-228, of the thorium-232 decay series. The production waste streams most likely to be contaminated by elevated radium concentrations include produced water, scale, and sludge. Scales and sludges removed from production equipment often are disposed of by landspreading, a method in which wastes are spread over the soil surface to allow the hydrocarbon component of the wastes to degrade. In this study, the disposal of NORM-contaminated wastes by landspreading was modeled to evaluate potential radiological doses and resultant health risks to workers and the general public. A variety of future land use scenarios--including residential, industrial, recreational, and agricultural scenarios--were considered. The waste streams considered included scales and sludges containing NORM above background levels. The objectives of this study were to (1) estimate potential radiological doses to workers and the general public resulting from the disposal of NORM wastes by noncommercial landspreading activities and (2) analyze the effect of different land use scenarios on potential doses

  6. The application of nuclear-medicine methods in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpraga, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Dodig, D.

    1996-01-01

    X-radiography and ultrasound imaging are well established and widely used in veterinary practice, but it is not the same situation with radioisotope imaging. In veterinary practice the above mentioned methods of nuclear medicine are developed only in two countries in Europe. That is not doubt due, so bar, to the difficulties in obtaining satisfactory supply of radioisotopes and to the relatively high cost of scanning equipment. However, in collaboration with the Department of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Medicine of the Medical Faculty in Zagreb, Croatia, we have chance to develop the use of those methods in clinical veterinary practice in Zagreb. That is way in this paper an overview of the application of radioisotopes imaging in veterinary medicine is given. In small animals skeletal changes, lung perusions, brain lesions, space occupying lesions in the liver and its function and hearth function can be usefully searched by a gamma camera and its associated computer. In equine practice scintigraphy of bones, liver, hearth, pulmonary circulation and ventilation is described. The largest amount of radioactive material is used during gamma camera scanning of the skeletons of horses. In this cases the radiation dose 1-2 m from the animal is approximately 3 μSv/h. That is why the protection of personal involved in radioisotope scanning in veterinary medicine must be also regulated by low of radiation protection. Also, the animals should be confined to a controlled area for 2-3 days after scanning before being returned to their owners. After this period the area must be cleaned. (author)

  7. Improving visual observation skills through the arts to aid radiographic interpretation in veterinary practice: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cathy; Gaunt, Heather; Chiavaroli, Neville

    2017-09-01

    Radiographic interpretation is a perceptual and cognitive skill. Recently core veterinary radiology textbooks have focused on the cognitive (i.e., the clinical aspects of radiographic interpretation) rather than the features of visual observation that improve identification of abnormalities. As a result, the skill of visual observation is underemphasized and thus often underdeveloped by trainees. The study of the arts in medical education has been used to train and improve visual observation and empathy. The use of the arts to improve visual observation skills in Veterinary Science has not been previously described. Objectives of this pilot study were to adapt the existing Visual Arts in Health Education Program for medical and dental students at the University of Melbourne, Australia to third year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students and evaluate their perceptions regarding the program's effects on visual observation skills and confidence with respect to radiographic interpretation. This adaptation took the form of a single seminar given to third year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students. Following the seminar, students reported an improved approach to radiographic interpretation and felt they had gained skills which would assist them throughout their career. In the year following the seminar, written reports of the students who attended the seminar were compared with reports from a matched cohort of students who did not attend the seminar. This demonstrated increased identification of abnormalities and greater description of the abnormalities identified. Findings indicated that explicit training in visual observation may be a valuable adjunct to the radiology training of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Preliminary mortality survey from 1973 to 1977 of Japanese radiological technologists and analyses of the association of mortality with cumulative doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Ishizaka, Masatsuna; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Kano, Eiichi; Nikaido, Osamu.

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Association of Radiologic Technologists reported that, from 1941 to 1978, 395 deaths occurred among Japanese radiological technologists who belong to the association. Using these data, Sakka, Kitabatake and colleagues, and the present authors studied mortality and cause of death among these technologists for 11 years from 1955 to 1965, for 7 years from 1966 to 1972, and for 5 years from 1973 to 1977, respectively. In general, the number of cancer deaths in the three studies was less than expected. However, Kitabatake et al. and the present authors found that deaths from skin cancer were significantly more frequent than expected. The present authors recently estimated the cumulative doses of radiation exposure for the majority of deaths (268 out of 395). The mean dose of radiation related to cancer deaths was then compared with that for non-cancer deaths. Also the proportional mortality ratios for cancers were observed in relation to the estimated dose level. In the present study, however, statistical tests to assess for the relationship between mortality and dose of radiation exposure showed no correlation, for the majority of deaths from cancer. (author)

  9. The global public good concept: a means of promoting good veterinary governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloit, M

    2012-08-01

    At the outset, the concept of a 'public good' was associated with economic policies. However, it has now evolved not only from a national to a global concept (global public good), but also from a concept applying solely to the production of goods to one encompassing societal issues (education, environment, etc.) and fundamental rights, including the right to health and food. Through their actions, Veterinary Services, as defined by the Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code) of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), help to improve animal health and reduce production losses. In this way they contribute directly and indirectly to food security and to safeguarding human health and economic resources. The organisation and operating procedures of Veterinary Services are therefore key to the efficient governance required to achieve these objectives. The OIE is a major player in global cooperation and governance in the fields of animal and public health through the implementation of its strategic standardisation mission and other programmes for the benefit of Veterinary Services and OIE Member Countries. Thus, the actions of Veterinary Services and the OIE deserve to be recognised as a global public good, backed by public investment to ensure that all Veterinary Services are in a position to apply the principles of good governance and to comply with the international standards for the quality of Veterinary Services set out in the OIE Terrestrial Code (Section 3 on Quality of Veterinary Services) and Aquatic Animal Health Code (Section 3 on Quality of Aquatic Animal Health Services).

  10. Understanding the primary care paradigm: an experiential learning focus of the early veterinary graduate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William H R; Kinnison, Tierney; May, Stephen A

    2017-11-01

    At a time where high levels of stress are reported in the veterinary profession, this study explores the challenges that veterinary graduates encounter when they enter general (first opinion) practice. Participants had written reflective accounts of their 'Most Puzzling Cases' for the postgraduate Professional Key Skills module of the Certificate in Advanced Veterinary Practice, offered by the Royal Veterinary College. Reasons that a case was puzzling, or became challenging, were thematically analysed. Fifteen summaries were analysed. Three core themes were identified: 'clinical reasoning', centred on the limitations of pattern recognition and the methods used to overcome this; the 'veterinary healthcare system', focusing on the need for continuity of care, time pressure and support in the transition to practice; and the 'owner', looking at the broader clinical skills needed to succeed in general practice. Clinical reasoning was raised as an issue; discussion of when pattern recognition is not appropriate and what to do in these cases was common. A lack of experience in general practice case types, and how to best operate in the resource-constrained environment in which they present, is the likely cause of this, suggesting that a greater focus on the primary care paradigm is needed within veterinary education. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Expert consensus regarding drivers of antimicrobial stewardship in companion animal veterinary practice: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Kay; King, Caroline; Nuttall, Tim; Smith, Matt; Flowers, Paul

    2018-03-23

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global challenge facing both human and animal healthcare professionals; an effective response to this threat requires a 'One-Health' approach to antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) to preserve important antibiotics for urgent clinical need. However, understanding of barriers and enablers to effective AMS behaviour in companion animal veterinary practice is currently limited. We conducted a Delphi study of 16 nationally recognised experts from UK-based veterinary policymakers, university academics and leaders of professional bodies. This Delphi study sought to identify veterinary behaviours which experts believe contribute to AMR and form vital aspects of AMS. Analysis of Delphi findings indicated a perceived hierarchy of behaviours, the most influential being antibiotic prescribing behaviours and interactions with clients. Other veterinary behaviours perceived as being important related to interactions with veterinary colleagues; infection control practices; and the use of diagnostic tests to confirm infection. Key barriers and enablers to AMS within each of these behavioural domains were identified. Specific interventions to address important barriers and enablers are recommended. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to establish expert consensus at a national level about which 'behaviours' (aspects of veterinarian practice) should be targeted in relation to AMR and AMS in companion animal veterinary practice. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  13. Multidrug-resistant opportunistic pathogens challenging veterinary infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birgit; Tedin, Karsten; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    2017-02-01

    Although the problems associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the emergence of zoonotic and multidrug-resistant pathogens in companion animal (dogs, cats and horses) medicine have been well-known for decades, current progress with respect to practical implementation of infection control programs in veterinary clinics has been limited. Clinical outbreak events reported for methicillin-resistant Staphylooccus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Serovars indicate the necessity of infection control strategies for protecting animal patients at risk as well as veterinary personnel. The close bond between humans and their companion animals provides opportunities for exchange of microorganisms, including MDR pathogens. This particular aspect of the "One Health" idea requires more representative surveillance efforts and infection control strategies with respect to animal-species specific characters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  15. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  16. A Decade of Counseling Services in One College of Veterinary Medicine: Veterinary Medical Students' Psychological Distress and Help-Seeking Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adryanna A S; Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R

    Much has been discussed about the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary medical students. Studies investigating general samples of veterinary medical students indicate that, on average, depression and anxiety symptoms are present at higher rates than in comparison samples. However, little is known about veterinary medical students who seek counseling. This study intends to expand the literature on veterinary student well-being, as the first to examine a sample of veterinary medical students seeking counseling services. It offers an overview of student distress and help-seeking trends from a decade of counseling services provided in one College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) in the US. The sample includes data from 279 participants. Results indicate a steady increase in students seeking counseling over the last decade. First-year students sought services at higher rates but second-year students experienced the greatest distress when compared to other cohorts. Students seeking counseling services experienced levels of overall distress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and social role concerns that were, on average, above cut-off scores. Physical health was significantly associated with student distress, suggesting opportunities for intervention.

  17. Qualitative evaluation of environmental radiological impact in a phosphate associated uranium conventional mine: Santa Quiteria Project, CE, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Rocio G. dos; Santo, Aline Sa E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate qualitatively the main potential sources of mineral and installation terms of Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil, evaluating their possible impacts on the environment. The key terms sources in the production of phosphoric acid are usually: the dig of the mines, tailings dams and phospho plaster stack. Thus, this work intends to inform the academic community about this issue, as well as the population in general and also, acting proactively in order to warn about the possible environmental impacts, so that actions to compensate, minimize or avoid these radiological impacts on the environment, can be included in the planning of the industrial mineral project of Santa Quiteria (author)

  18. The European system of veterinary specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary specialist diplomas were available in many European countries during the second half of the 20th century. However, such an early recognition of the importance of veterinary specialization actually delayed the concept of the European veterinary specialist in Europe, compared with the United States, where the first specialist colleges were established in the 1960s, because it was felt that the national system was functioning properly and there was therefore no need for a new structure in the European countries. The European Board of Veterinary Specialisation (EBVS) was established in 1996, and currently there are 23 specialist colleges with more than 2,600 veterinarians officially listed in the EBVS register as European specialists. The Advisory Committee on Veterinary Training (ACVT) approved the establishment of EBVS but never implemented a supervising body (with ACVT representation). Such a body, the European Coordinating Committee on Veterinary Training, was later implemented by the profession itself, although it still lacked a political component. Each college depends on the EBVS, which has the function to define standards and criteria for monitoring the quality of college diplomates. To become a European Diplomate, veterinarians must have gone through an intensive period of training supervised by a diplomate, after which candidates must pass an examination. Although the term European veterinary specialist still does not have any legal recognition, national specialist qualifications are being phased out in many countries because of the inherent higher quality of EBVS specialist qualifications.

  19. The need for veterinary nursing in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmilayo A. Okanlawon, RN, PhD, FWACN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, nursing care has been identified as an integral part of human medicine but is not well recognised in veterinary medicine as practised in Nigeria. In caring for human beings, a nurse is expected to have the fundamental understanding of disease aetiology, manifestations, diagnosis, manage-ment, rehabilitation, prevention and control. This is equally applicable to the care of animals. The role of veterinary nursing in veterinary medicine is significant considering the multitude of issues involved in the care of animals. The keeping of domestic animals is becoming popular and consequently the spread of infectious diseases from animals to human beings is on the increase. It is vital for human beings and animals to coexist in a healthy environment. The authors examine the importance of nursing care in veterinary medicine, the current situation in Nigeria, the role of veterinary nurses, the inter-professional approach to veterinary medicine, preparedness for the emergence of infectious diseases and career opportunities for veterinary nurses. This premise falls within the context of the ‘One Health’ concept.

  20. Veterinary and human vaccine evaluation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Jones, T. J. D.; Edmond, K.; Gubbins, S.; Paton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the universal importance of vaccines, approaches to human and veterinary vaccine evaluation differ markedly. For human vaccines, vaccine efficacy is the proportion of vaccinated individuals protected by the vaccine against a defined outcome under ideal conditions, whereas for veterinary vaccines the term is used for a range of measures of vaccine protection. The evaluation of vaccine effectiveness, vaccine protection assessed under routine programme conditions, is largely limited to human vaccines. Challenge studies under controlled conditions and sero-conversion studies are widely used when evaluating veterinary vaccines, whereas human vaccines are generally evaluated in terms of protection against natural challenge assessed in trials or post-marketing observational studies. Although challenge studies provide a standardized platform on which to compare different vaccines, they do not capture the variation that occurs under field conditions. Field studies of vaccine effectiveness are needed to assess the performance of a vaccination programme. However, if vaccination is performed without central co-ordination, as is often the case for veterinary vaccines, evaluation will be limited. This paper reviews approaches to veterinary vaccine evaluation in comparison to evaluation methods used for human vaccines. Foot-and-mouth disease has been used to illustrate the veterinary approach. Recommendations are made for standardization of terminology and for rigorous evaluation of veterinary vaccines. PMID:24741009

  1. Radiology and Ethics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Aline; Liu, Li; Yousem, David M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess medical ethics knowledge among trainees and practicing radiologists through an online survey that included questions about the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics. Most survey respondents reported that they had never read the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics or the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics (77.2% and 67.4% of respondents, respectively). With regard to ethics education during medical school and residency, 57.3% and 70.0% of respondents, respectively, found such education to be insufficient. Medical ethics training should be highlighted during residency, at specialty society meetings, and in journals and online resources for radiologists.

  2. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J. [University of California - Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M. [University of California - Davis, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  3. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  4. Ten years of CLIVE (Computer-Aided Learning in Veterinary Education) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Vicki H M; McConnell, Gill; Short, Andrew; Sullivan, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the work of the CLIVE (Computer-Aided Learning in Veterinary Education) project over a 10-year period, set against the backdrop of changes in education policy and learning technology developments. The consortium of six UK veterinary schools and 14 international Associate Member Schools has been very successful. Sustaining these partnerships requires that the project redefine itself and adapt to cater to the diverse learning needs of today's students and to changing professional and societal needs on an international scale.

  5. Radiological anatomy - evaluation of integrative education in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, S; Schmiedl, A; Meyer, S; Giesemann, A; Pabst, R; Weidemann, J; Wacker, F K; Kirchhoff, T

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation and analysis of the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" established since 2007 at the Medical School Hannover (MHH) in comparison with conventional education. Anatomy and radiology are usually taught separately with a considerable time lag. Interdisciplinary teaching of these associated subjects seems logical for several reasons. Therefore, the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" was established in the second year of medical education, combining these two closely related subjects. This interdisciplinary course was retrospectively evaluated by consideration of a student questionnaire and staff observations. The advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching in medical education are discussed. The course ratings were excellent (median 1; mean 1.3 on a scale of 1 to 6). This is significantly (p radiology increased during the course (88 %). According to the students' suggestions the course was enhanced by a visitation in the Department of Radiology and the additional topic central nervous system. Integrative teaching of anatomy and radiology was well received by the students. Both, anatomical and radiological comprehension and the motivation to learn were improved. However, it should be considered, that the amount of work and time required by the teaching staff is considerably increased compared to traditional teaching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  7. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  8. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  10. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  11. Risks arising during manipulation with radiologically specific products of biotechnical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrovic, R.; Vukovic, D.; Vicentijevic, M.; Kljajic, R.

    1998-01-01

    Objective of this study was to review the risk of exposure to radiocaesium (134+137Cs), which biologically presents the most toxic radionuclide, of people engaged in the process of supervision, transport and storage of the radiologically specific products, like concentrated protein feedstuff (fish meal, powdered milk), wool, cow hide and chamois. The discussion is based on the results of a radiological-hygienic analysis of these products in the context of veterinary-sanitary control, performed in the authorized referent Laboratory for Radiation Hygiene (LABRAH) at the Scientific Institute for Veterinary Medicine of Serbia in Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

  12. Customer service in equine veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blach, Edward L

    2009-12-01

    This article explores customer service in equine veterinary medicine. It begins with a discussion about the differences between customers and clients in veterinary medicine. An overview of the nature of the veterinary-client-patient relationship and its effects on the veterinarian's services sheds light on how to evaluate your customer service. The author reviews a study performed in 2007 that evaluated 24 attributes of customer service and their importance to clients of equine veterinarians in their decision to select a specific veterinarian or hospital. The article concludes with an overview of how to evaluate your customer service in an effort to optimize your service to achieve customer loyalty.

  13. Inspections in veterinary medicine 2005; Veterinaerinspektioner 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Helene

    2006-11-15

    In Sweden 300 veterinary clinics have a license for x-ray diagnostics. Six of them also have a license for nuclear medicine. During 2005 eight clinics were inspected and the results show that the radiation protection in veterinary medicine can be improved. No clinic fulfilled the regulations of categorization of workplaces and workers (SSI FS 1998:3). Half of the clinics had no Swedish manual to the x-ray equipment and just as many had not performed the annual function check. Obviously, there is a need for more information to staff in veterinary medicine.

  14. Veterinary medicine books recommended for academic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley-Low, Jill

    2004-10-01

    This bibliography of in-print veterinary medical books published in English may be used as an acquisitions or evaluation tool for developing the monograph component of new veterinary medicine collections or existing science, technology, and medicine collections where veterinary medicine is in the scope of the collection. The bibliography is divided into 34 categories and consists of bibliographic information for 419 titles. The appendix contains an author/editor index. Prices for all entries are in US dollars, except where another currency is noted. The total cost of all books in the bibliography is $43,602.13 (US).

  15. Risk versus benefit in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The risks of radiology may be grouped into a) those inherent in the use of ionizing radiation which today are well known and b) those associated with the use of any scientific method in medicine. Inherent risks of scientific methods like inadequate examination and the interpretation of results are discussed. Radiology brought major benefits in medical care and some of the newer methods are considered

  16. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  17. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Mohacsy, A.; Connell, D.A.; Schneider, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Methods: Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). Results: A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. Conclusion: This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. - Highlights: • Patients' awareness regarding

  18. Development of a New Scale to Measure Ambiguity Tolerance in Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jennifer A; Hancock, Jason; Martin, Margaret S; Jamieson, Susan; Mellor, Dominic J

    The ability to cope with ambiguity and feelings of uncertainty is an essential part of professional practice. Research with physicians has identified that intolerance of ambiguity or uncertainty is linked to stress, and some authors have hypothesized that there could be an association between intolerance of ambiguity and burnout. We describe the adaptation of the TAMSAD (Tolerance of Ambiguity in Medical Students and Doctors) scale for use with veterinary students. Exploratory factor analysis supports a uni-dimensional structure for the Ambiguity tolerance construct. Although internal reliability of the 29-item TAMSAD scale is reasonable (α=.50), an alternative 27-item scale (drawn from the original 41 items used to develop TAMSAD) shows higher internal reliability for veterinary students (α=.67). We conclude that there is good evidence to support the validity of this latter TAVS (Tolerance of Ambiguity in Veterinary Students) scale to study ambiguity tolerance in veterinary students.

  19. Small prey species' behaviour and welfare: implications for veterinary professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E Anne

    2017-08-01

    People have obligations to ensure the welfare of animals under their care. Offences under the UK Animal Welfare Act are acts, or failures of action, causing unnecessary suffering. Veterinary professionals need to be able to provide current, scientifically based prophylactic advice, and respect the limits of their expertise. The ethical concept of a life worth living and the Five Freedoms are core to welfare. Behaviour is a central component, both influencing and influenced by physical health. Owners frequently misunderstand the behaviour of small prey mammals and how to meet their needs. This review provides insight into the physical-social (external) and the cognitive-emotional (internal) environments of small prey mammals, contextualised within an evolutionary perspective. This is extrapolated to captivity and practical suggestions given for meeting behavioural freedoms and enhancing client understanding and enjoyment of their animals, thereby improving welfare. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  1. Radiological Worker II Training, Course 20301 (Live), Course 12909 (Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Radiological worker training is the basic building block for any additional radiological training you may receive. Upon completing radiological worker training, you will have the basic knowledge needed to work safely, using proper radiological practices, in areas where radiological hazards exist. You will also have a better understanding of the hazards and responsibilities associated with radiological work to help prevent the carelessness that can occur when working continually with or around radioactive material. This course does not qualify you for any specific radiological work. You may be required to take additional training at individual facilities to address facility- and job-specific hazards and procedures.

  2. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements...

  3. Sleep hygiene among veterinary medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D; Hunt, Suzanne A; Borst, Luke B; Gerard, Mathew

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand veterinary medical students' sleep hygiene and identify the extent to which sleep hygiene behaviors may result in consequences (either positive or negative) for students. A total of 187 doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM) program students at a large College of Veterinary Medicine in the United States. The Epworth Sleep Scale and Daytime Sleepiness Scale were administered to 393 students enrolled in the DVM program. About 55.1% of students reported sleep per night, 28.9% reported having trouble sleeping, and 50.3% reported feeling sleepy all day. With respect to sleep quality, 5.3% described it as excellent, 52.4% as good, 34.2% as fair, and 8.0% as poor. A significant percentage of veterinary medical students exhibit poor sleep hygiene habits that may be detrimental to both their health and academic endeavors.

  4. Good veterinary governance: definition, measurement and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msellati, L; Commault, J; Dehove, A

    2012-08-01

    Good veterinary governance assumes the provision of veterinary services that are sustainably financed, universally available, and provided efficiently without waste or duplication, in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. Good veterinary governance is a necessary condition for sustainable economic development insomuch as it promotes the effective delivery of services and improves the overall performance of animal health systems. This article defines governance in Veterinary Services and proposes a framework for its measurement. It also discusses the role of Veterinary Services and analyses the governance dimensions of the performance-assessment tools developed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). These tools (OIE PVS Tool and PVS Gap Analysis) track the performance of Veterinary Services across countries (a harmonised tool) and over time (the PVS Pathway). The article shows the usefulness of the OIE PVS Tool for measuring governance, but also points to two shortcomings, namely (i) the lack of clear outcome indicators, which is an impediment to a comprehensive assessment of the performance of Veterinary Services, and (ii) the lack of specific measures for assessing the extent of corruption within Veterinary Services and the extent to which demand for better governance is being strengthened within the animal health system. A discussion follows on the drivers of corruption and instruments for perception-based assessments of country governance and corruption. Similarly, the article introduces the concept of social accountability, which is an approach to enhancing government transparency and accountability, and shows how supply-side and demand-side mechanisms complement each other in improving the governance of service delivery. It further elaborates on two instruments--citizen report card surveys and grievance redress mechanisms--because of their wider relevance and their possible applications in many settings, including Veterinary

  5. Radiological safety aspects associated with the handling, storage and disposal of self power neutron detectors in TAPS - 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, B.K.; Mudgal, B.; Ghadigoankar, V.R.; Niraj; Ashok; Pati, C.K.; Patil, P.M.; Pawar, S.K.; Varadhan, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    At Tarapur Atomic Power Station 3 and 4, 540 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors, core being large in size requires a continuous in core monitoring for local flux disturbances. Nearly 200 Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) of the Straight Individually Replaceable (SIR) type are distributed in the reactor core. For purpose of reactor regulation and protection, cobalt SPNDs that have a prompt response for changes in power is used for in-core flux mapping, vanadium SPNDs that provide accurate measure of neutron flux, even though having slow response is used In core SPNDs are placed in Vertical Flux Units (VFU) and Horizontal Flux Units (HFUs). These SPNDs were to be replaced at regular intervals to meet the design intent. Cobalt SPNDs have dose rates of the order of 1000 Gy/h and the Mineral Insulated (MI) cables of Vanadium SPNDs have dose rates of the order of 100 Gy/h. So far 3 Cobalt SPNDs were removed from HFUs and are being stored in lead shielding inside spent fuel storage facility. These high active components were handled with meticulous planning with lowest exposures to the maintainers. Radiological safety aspects of handling and storage of SPNDs are discussed in this report. (author)

  6. Potential off-normal events and associated radiological source terms for the compact ignition tokamak: Fusion Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Lyon, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the latest step in the United States program to develop the commercial application of fusion power, is designed as the first fusion device to achieve ignition conditions. It is to be constructed near Princeton, New Jersey on the site of the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). To address the environmental impact and public safety concerns, a preliminary analysis was performed of potential off-normal radiological releases. Operational occurrences, natural phenomena, accidents with external origins, and accidents external to the PPPL site were considered as potential sources for off-normal events. Based on an initial screening, events were selected for preliminary analysis. Included in these events were tritium releases from the tritium delivery and recovery system, tritium releases from the torus, releases of activated nitrogen from the test cell or cryostat, seismic events, and shipping accidents. In each case, the design considerations related to the event were reviewed and the release scenarios discussed. Because of the complexity of some of the proposed safety systems, in some cases event trees were used to describe the accident scenarios. For each scenario, the probability was estimated as well as the release magnitude, isotope, chemical form, and release mode. 10 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  7. The assessment of the safety and the radiological risks associated with the transport of radioactive wastes in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    2000-01-01

    Problems related to the handling, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive wastes (radwastes) are very important and the responsibility for the safe management of radioactive wastes for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. Safety and public welfare are to be considered within the radioactive waste management, particularly in the field of transportation because of the potential risk that it could pose to the public and to the environment. The IAEA regulations ensure safety in the transport of Radioactive Materials (RAM) by laying down detailed requirements, appropriate to the degree of hazard represented by the respective material, taking into account its form and quantity. Risk assessment provides a basis for routing radwastes and developing mitigation plans, prioritizing initiatives and enacting legislation to protect human beings and the environment. Factors such as shipment cost, distance, population exposed, environmental impacts or sensitivity, time in transit and infrastructure related issues, could be included in the terms of safety and risk. The paper presents risk assessment activities aimed to evaluate risk categories and the radiological consequences that may arise during normal (accident free) transport and those resulting from transport accidents involving waste shipments in Romania. (author)

  8. INVITED REVIEW--IMAGE REGISTRATION IN VETERINARY RADIATION ONCOLOGY: INDICATIONS, IMPLICATIONS, AND FUTURE ADVANCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yang; Lawrence, Jessica; Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Forrest, Lisa; Mclaren, Duncan B; McLaughlin, Stephen; Argyle, David J; Nailon, William H

    2016-01-01

    The field of veterinary radiation therapy (RT) has gained substantial momentum in recent decades with significant advances in conformal treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and intensity-modulated (IMRT) techniques. At the root of these advancements lie improvements in tumor imaging, image alignment (registration), target volume delineation, and identification of critical structures. Image registration has been widely used to combine information from multimodality images such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve the accuracy of radiation delivery and reliably identify tumor-bearing areas. Many different techniques have been applied in image registration. This review provides an overview of medical image registration in RT and its applications in veterinary oncology. A summary of the most commonly used approaches in human and veterinary medicine is presented along with their current use in IGRT and adaptive radiation therapy (ART). It is important to realize that registration does not guarantee that target volumes, such as the gross tumor volume (GTV), are correctly identified on the image being registered, as limitations unique to registration algorithms exist. Research involving novel registration frameworks for automatic segmentation of tumor volumes is ongoing and comparative oncology programs offer a unique opportunity to test the efficacy of proposed algorithms. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Clinical decision making in veterinary practice

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the factors which influence veterinary surgeons’ clinical decision making during routine consultations. Methods The research takes a qualitative approach using video-cued interviews, in which one of the veterinary surgeon’s own consultations is used as the basis of a semi-structured interview exploring decision making in real cases. The research focuses primarily on small animal consultations in first opinion practice, how...

  10. Deep Learning in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Morgan P; Awan, Omer A; Colucci, Andrew T; Ghobadi, Comeron W; Kadom, Nadja; Kansagra, Akash P; Tridandapani, Srini; Auffermann, William F

    2018-03-29

    As radiology is inherently a data-driven specialty, it is especially conducive to utilizing data processing techniques. One such technique, deep learning (DL), has become a remarkably powerful tool for image processing in recent years. In this work, the Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Deep Learning provides an overview of DL for the radiologist. This article aims to present an overview of DL in a manner that is understandable to radiologists; to examine past, present, and future applications; as well as to evaluate how radiologists may benefit from this remarkable new tool. We describe several areas within radiology in which DL techniques are having the most significant impact: lesion or disease detection, classification, quantification, and segmentation. The legal and ethical hurdles to implementation are also discussed. By taking advantage of this powerful tool, radiologists can become increasingly more accurate in their interpretations with fewer errors and spend more time to focus on patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Data mining in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining

  12. Breast cancer screening: updated recommendations of the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linei Augusta Brolini Dellê Urban

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To present the current recommendations for breast cancer screening in Brazil, as devised by the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, the Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and the Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations. Materials and methods: We analyzed scientific studies available in the Medline and Lilacs databases. In the absence of evidence, the recommendations reflected the consensus of a panel of experts. Recommendations: Annual mammography screening is recommended for women 40-74 years of age. Among women ≥ 75 years of age, annual mammography screening should be reserved for those with an expected survival > 7 years. Complementary ultrasound should be considered for women with dense breasts. Complementary magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for women at high risk. When available, an advanced form of mammography known as tomosynthesis can be considered as a means of screening for breast cancer.

  13. Research data services in veterinary medicine libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Erin E

    2016-10-01

    The study investigated veterinary medicine librarians' experience with and perceptions of research data services. Many academic libraries have begun to offer research data services in response to researchers' increased need for data management support. To date, such services have typically been generic, rather than discipline-specific, to appeal to a wide variety of researchers. An online survey was deployed to identify trends regarding research data services in veterinary medicine libraries. Participants were identified from a list of contacts from the MLA Veterinary Medical Libraries Section. Although many respondents indicated that they have a professional interest in research data services, the majority of veterinary medicine librarians only rarely or occasionally provide data management support as part of their regular job responsibilities. There was little consensus as to whether research data services should be core to a library's mission despite their perceived importance to the advancement of veterinary research. Furthermore, most respondents stated that research data services are just as or somewhat less important than the other services that they provide and feel only slightly or somewhat prepared to offer such services. Lacking a standard definition of "research data" and a common understanding of precisely what research data services encompass, it is difficult for veterinary medicine librarians and libraries to define and understand their roles in research data services. Nonetheless, they appear to have an interest in learning more about and providing research data services.

  14. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  15. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H. [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted.

  16. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted

  17. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in serum and DNA load in saliva are not associated with radiological or clinical disease activity in patients with early multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René M Gieß

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 and viral capsid antigen (VCA immunoglobulin (IgG antibodies in serum as well as EBV DNA load in saliva with radiological and clinical disease activity in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS and early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS.EBNA-1 and VCA immunoglobulin (IgG antibodies were determined in serum of 100 patients with CIS/early RRMS and 60 healthy controls. EBV DNA load was measured in saliva of 48 patients and 50 controls. Patients underwent clinical assessment with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and after a median of 20 months of follow-up (n = 63 for MRI, n = 71 for EDSS. The association of EBV parameters with occurrence of a second relapse, indicating conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS, was evaluated over a median of 35 months of follow-up after the first clinical event (n = 89.EBNA-1 IgG antibody frequency (p = 0.00005 and EBNA-1 and VCA IgG antibody levels (p<0.0001 for both were higher in patients than in controls. EBV DNA load in saliva did not differ between groups. Neither EBV antibody levels nor DNA load in saliva were associated with baseline or follow-up number or volume of T2-weighted (T2w or contrast enhancing lesions, number of Barkhof criteria or the EDSS, or with the number of new T2w lesions, T2w lesion volume change or EDSS change on follow-up. Likewise, levels of EBV IgG antibodies in serum and DNA load in saliva were not associated with conversion to CDMS.While these findings confirm the association of EBV infection with early MS, neither EBNA-1 nor VCA IgG antibodies in serum nor EBV DNA load in saliva were associated with radiological or clinical disease activity in patients with CIS/early RRMS. These data are compatible with the concept that EBV may be a trigger for MS acting very early during the development of the disease.

  18. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins; Qualifizierungsleitlinie der Deutschen Roentgengesellschaft (DRG) und der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Interventionelle Radiologie und minimalinvasive Therapie (DeGIR) zur Durchfuehrung interventionell-radiologischer minimalinvasiver Verfahren an Arterien und Venen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecker, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Gross-Fengels, W. [Asklepiosklinik, Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Haage, P. [Helios-Kliniken, Wuppertal (Germany); Huppert, P. [Klinikum Darmstadt (Germany); Landwehr, P. [Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany); Reimer, P. [Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany); Tacke, J. [Klinikum Passau (Germany); Vorwerk, D. [Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany); Fischer, J.

    2012-06-15

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  19. Calculation of the uncertainty associated to the result of entrance surface air kerma for conventional radiology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, D.; Mora, P.; Khoury, H.; Fabri, D.; Leyton, F.; Cardenas, J.; Blanco, S.; Kodlulovich, S.; Roas, N.; Benavente, T.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Ramirez, R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation doses from diagnostic radiology are the largest contribution to the collective dose and the use of guidance (reference levels) has proven to be a tool for optimization of protection. Recently, with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), eight countries of the Latin-American region have been working together on a programme to test methodologies for determining preliminary values of guidance levels for X-ray chest, lumbar spine and breast examinations. The approach used was to obtain entrance surface air kerma from measurements of X-ray tube outputs, corrected for distance and backscatter and later for real exposure parameters used with patients. For quality control, some of these values for a reduced number of patients were compared with direct TLD measurements directly placed on the patient during exposure. Given the number of parameters involved in the two methods, relatively large differences are deemed to be found in the comparison. The only way of deciding if measurements and calculations are outliers, for example, due to a systematic error or a mistake, is to compare these differences with the combined uncertainty. The aim of this paper is to present (in a detailed way) the methodology used in the pilot program ARCAL LXXV, the analyses of data performed within the survey and the estimated uncertainty. The parameters analyzed were: precision of the readings, positioning of the detector, reproducibility of the mAs and kV, long term stability of the instrument, radiation quality, kerma rate, radiation incidence, field size and field homogeneity, calibration factor of the equipment, temperature and pressure measurement, X-ray tube output curve adjustment, backscatter factor and focus-patient distance. The combined standard uncertainty for Ke in chest radiography in adult patients of standard complexion, was 12%, and the expanded uncertainty (k=2) was 24%. (author)

  20. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  1. History of veterinary public health in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K L

    1991-12-01

    The geographic isolation of Australasia has played a significant role in preventing the introduction of exotic diseases or in limiting the spread of many diseases which entered after settlement. Some infections such as psoroptic mange, tuberculosis and brucellosis became widely dispersed and some were ultimately to require novel methods to curtail them, e.g. greater use of rail and road transportation to convey stock, improved methods to locate and muster livestock in bush terrain (helicopters), improved diagnostic tests and the introduction of effective methods for tracing diseases found at abattoirs to the farms of origin. From the 1860s to the 1880s, there were such high mortalities from anthrax in Australia that a business syndicate associated with the Pasteur Institute established a laboratory in Sydney to produce anthrax vaccine from 1890 to 1898. The two-dose vaccine developed by Pasteur was unable to compete with a single dose spore vaccine later pioneered locally by Gunn and McGarvie-Smith. The most important achievements in veterinary public health in Australasia have been the successful eradication of brucellosis, the virtual eradication of hydatid disease in New Zealand and Tasmania, the substantial progress made in the eradication of tuberculosis from all but small regions of Australasia, and the development of a commercial vaccine to prevent Q fever in humans.

  2. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  3. Maternal veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes in Washington State, 1992-2014: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Julianne; Vora, Manali V; Fuller, Mackenzie S; Phipps, Amanda I; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2018-05-01

    Women in veterinary occupations are routinely exposed to potential reproductive hazards, yet research into their birth outcomes is limited. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of the association between maternal veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes. Using Washington State birth certificate, fetal death certificate and hospital discharge data from 1992 to 2014, we compared birth outcomes of mothers in veterinary professions (n=2662) with those in mothers in dental professions (n=10 653) and other employed mothers (n=8082). Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using log binomial regression. Outcomes studied were premature birth (veterinary support staff separately. While no statistically significant associations were found, we noted a trend for SGA births in all veterinary mothers compared with dental mothers (RR=1.16, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.36) and in veterinarians compared with other employed mothers (RR=1.37, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.96). Positive but non-significant association was found for malformations among children of veterinary support staff. These results support the need for further study of the association between veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. SPECIAL ISSUE VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY IMMUNOPATHOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS 8TH INTERNATIONAL VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the Special Issue of Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol. that summarizes the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto, Brazil. The 8 th IVIS highlighted the importance of veterinary immunology for animal health, vaccinology, reproducti...

  5. Peer-Reviewed Veterinary Journals From Arabic-Speaking Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kristen M; Bowser, Jacquelyn E; Bernstein, Joshua; Aboul-Enein, Basil H

    The prevalence of diseases of foodborne and zoonotic origin in Arabic-speaking countries highlights the importance of collaboration between human and animal health professionals. However, accessibility of research and evidence-based practices in these countries is not well characterized. This brief report determines the availability of professional veterinary journals within the Arabic-speaking region. An electronic search using 6 databases assessed for publication period, activity status, and available languages incorporated all aspects of veterinary medicine and specialties. Among 29 veterinary journals identified, the oldest current publication originated 63 years ago, with 10 journals currently interrupted or ceased. All 19 currently active journals are available electronically as open access, with 8 also offered in paper format. Veterinary journals published within Arabic-speaking countries are predominantly produced in Egypt, Iraq, and Sudan. Electronic access is lacking compared with English-speaking countries, and there is a lack of journals with an Arabic-language option. The reasons associated with language options in veterinary publications are not immediately apparent, yet may highlight differences among public health, health education, and zoonotic professionals and the populations they serve. Veterinary journals in Arabic-speaking countries do not adequately represent the overall region and are limited in access. Further evaluation of regional culture and publisher preferences is indicated to identify new collaboration opportunities among health professionals and local stakeholders. Copyright © 2017 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Agreement between veterinary students and anesthesiologists regarding postoperative pain assessment in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Michele; Young, Courtni N; Quandt, Jane E; Hofmeister, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    To determine the levels of agreement among first- and second-year veterinary students and experienced anesthesiologists in assessing postoperative pain in dogs from video-recordings. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-seven veterinary students, five anesthesiologists and 13 canine clinical patients. Prior to their enrolment in a core anesthesia course, veterinary students volunteered to watch 13 90 second videos of dogs. Dogs were hospitalized in an intensive care unit after a variety of surgical procedures. Students were asked to score the level of the dogs' pain using the Dynamic Interactive Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form of the Glasgow Composite-Measure Pain Scale. The same videotapes were scored by five board-certified anesthesiologists. The differences and agreement between the ratings of anesthesiologists and students, and first- and second-year students were determined with Mann-Whitney U-tests and Fleiss' or Cohen's kappa, respectively. Pain scores assigned by students and anesthesiologists differed significantly (p Veterinary students early in their training assigned pain scores to dogs that differed from scores assigned by experienced anesthesiologists. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  7. Clinical Trials in Veterinary Medicine: A New Era Brings New Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, M A; Ellenberg, S S; Shaw, P A

    2017-07-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are among the most rigorous ways to determine the causal relationship between an intervention and important clinical outcome. Their use in veterinary medicine has become increasingly common, and as is often the case, with progress comes new challenges. Randomized clinical trials yield important answers, but results from these studies can be unhelpful or even misleading unless the study design and reporting are carried out with care. Herein, we offer some perspective on several emerging challenges associated with RCTs, including use of composite endpoints, the reporting of different forms of risk, analysis in the presence of missing data, and issues of reporting and safety assessment. These topics are explored in the context of previously reported veterinary internal medicine studies as well as through illustrative examples with hypothetical data sets. Moreover, many insights germane to RCTs in veterinary internal medicine can be drawn from the wealth of experience with RCTs in the human medical field. A better understanding of the issues presented here can help improve the design, interpretation, and reporting of veterinary RCTs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. [Links between non-professional agents and the official Veterinary Services in sub-Saharan Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, B A; Bessin, R

    2004-04-01

    Para-professional agents known as auxiliaries, or community animal health workers, provide low-cost basic veterinary services to communities of livestock producers. A 2003 survey of 16 Sub-Saharan African countries, carried out as part of the Pan-African Programme for the Control of Epizootics, showed that in the majority of cases, the official Veterinary Services have no (or very few) links with the auxiliaries, although they are well aware of their existence and in some cases the auxiliaries have been trained by officials of the Veterinary Services. However, there are isolated cases of countries establishing more formal links, for example, recognising the status of an auxiliary, recognising auxiliaries with no definition of a status, attaching auxiliaries to Veterinary Service staff, establishing agreements for the provision of auxiliary services through livestock producer associations, harmonising auxiliary training programmes, issuing professional auxiliary cards, and setting up a consultation framework on the issue of auxiliaries. Unlike private veterinarians, agents of the official services do not generally perceive auxiliaries as competitors, and sometimes collaboration develops at this level. The authors propose several measures to improve links between the official Veterinary Services and auxiliaries, as follows: the fields of competence of auxiliaries should be defined and their curriculum harmonised, the status of auxiliaries should be recognised, a monitoring and assessment mechanism should be established at senior level in the Veterinary Services, training for livestock producers should be improved.

  9. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  10. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  11. Radiological manifestations of melioidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K.S.; Chong, V.H.

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infection that is associated with high mortality. It is due to a Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei which is an environmental saprophyte found in wet soils. Melioidosis is endemic to northern Australia and the Southeast Asia. However, there is now increasing number of reports of imported cases to regions where this infection has not been previously encountered. Almost any organ can be affected. Like many other conditions, radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of melioidosis. Awareness of the various radiological manifestations can help direct appropriate investigations to achieve early diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Generally, there are no known characteristic features on imaging that can specifically differentiate melioidosis from other infections. However, the 'honeycomb' appearance has been described to be characteristic for large melioidosis liver abscesses. Simultaneous involvement of various organs is also characteristics. To date, there are few data available on the radiological manifestations of melioidosis. The present pictorial essay describes melioidosis affecting the various organs.

  12. Radiological field survey problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, E.J.; Boerner, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Situations often arise during radiological field surveys which require the health physicist to improvise and/or make spot decisions. At times these situations can be humorous, but they can also present hazards more serious than normal radiological considerations. This presentation will depict various problematic situations encountered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Radiological Site Assessment Program in the course of performing field environmental surveys. Detailing these potential hazards can alert other field survey groups to problems they may encounter

  13. Physical correlates of radiologic heart volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.

    1978-01-01

    Radiologic heart volume was calculated on a 10 per cent random sample of subjects examined in the London Civil Service Health Survey. Data were available for 1 188 men over the age of 40, and the importance of correcting radiologic heart volume for body size, age and heart rate was demonstrated. After these variables were taken into account, the most important association found was with blood pressure. Radiologic heart volume has potential value in cardiovascular screening programmes. (Auth.)

  14. Ethnography in the Danish Veterinary Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Kirketerp Nielsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this project is research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based learning concept to be used in the veterinary education. Herd visits and animal contact are essential for the development of veterinary competences and skills during education. Yet veterinary students have little occasion to reach/attain a proper level of confidence in their own skills/abilities, as they have limited “training-facilities” (Kneebone & Baillie, 2008. One possible solution mightbe to provide a safe, virtual environment (game-based where students could practise interdisciplinary clinical skills in an easily-accessible, interactive setting. A playable demo using Classical Swine Fever in a pig herd as an example has been produced for this purpose. In order totailor the game concept to the specific veterinary learning environment and to ensure compliance with both learning objectives and the actual learning processes/procedures of the veterinary students, the project contains both a developmental aspect (game development and an exploration of the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context. The initial phase of the project was a preliminary exploration of the actual learning context, providing an important starting point for the upcoming phase in which I will concentrate on research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based virtual environment in this course context. In the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context of a veterinary course in Herd Health Management (Pig module,ethnographic studies have been conducted by using multiple data collection methods; participant observation, spontaneous dialogues and interviews (Borgnakke, 1996; Hammersley & Atkinson, 2007. All courserelated activities in the different learning spaces (commercial pig herds, auditoriums, post-mortem examinations, independent group work were followed.This paper will

  15. Clinical features and radiological findings of adenovirus pneumonia associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome: A single center study in 19 adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min Jae; Chong, Semin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; KIm, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Jung Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To describe radiologic findings of adenovirus pneumonia and to understand clinico-radiological features associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with adenovirus pneumonia. This study included 19 patients diagnosed with adenovirus pneumonia at a tertiary referral center, in the period between March 2003 and April 2015. Clinical findings were reviewed, and two radiologists assessed imaging findings by consensus. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Student's t tests were used for comparing patients with and without subsequent development of ARDS. Of 19 patients, nine were immunocompromised, and 10 were immunocompetent. Twelve patients (63%) progressed to ARDS, six of whom (32%) eventually died from the disease. The average time for progression to ARDS from symptom onset was 9.6 days. Initial chest radiographic findings were normal (n = 2), focal opacity (n = 9), or multifocal or diffuse opacity (n = 8). Computed tomography (CT) findings included bilateral (n = 17) or unilateral (n = 2) ground-glass opacity with consolidation (n = 14) or pleural effusion (n = 11). Patients having subsequent ARDS had a higher probability of pleural effusion and a higher total CT extent compared with the non-ARDS group (p = 0.010 and 0.007, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in clinical variables such as patient age and premorbid condition. Adenovirus pneumonia demonstrates high rates of ARDS and mortality, regardless of patient age and premorbid conditions, in the tertiary care setting. Large disease extent and presence of pleural effusion on CT are factors suggestive of progression to ARDS.

  16. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  17. Use of veterinary services by Latino dog and cat owners with various degrees of English-language proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    To characterize patterns of dog and cat ownership and veterinary service use among Latino dog and cat owners with various degrees of English-language proficiency. DESIGN :Cross-sectional telephone survey. Data from 393 Latino pet owners. Telephone surveys were conducted with Latino dog and cat owners from a random sample of US households to determine the number of dogs and cats owned, factors associated with veterinary service use, and satisfaction with veterinary care. 393 of 1,026 (38.3%) respondents were pet owners. Two hundred fifty-nine of 330 (78.5%) dog owners and 70 of 115 (60.9%) cat owners reported taking their pet to the veterinarian in the past 12 months, most commonly for vaccination or examination or because of illness. Respondents were most satisfied with veterinary care provided, least satisfied with cost, and moderately satisfied with quality of communication. English-language proficiency was not significantly associated with whether owners sought veterinary care. A large proportion of respondents who wanted to receive pet health information in Spanish described themselves as speaking English well or very well. Although having limited proficiency in English was not associated with Latino pet owners seeking veterinary care, opportunities exist for veterinary personnel to improve communications with these clients. Personnel can assess their clients' language needs by asking each about the language in which they would prefer to receive their pet's health information.

  18. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Infantile abuse: Radiological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Araujo Reyes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Infantile abuse is a frequent problem, that must be suspected to bediagnosed, the children victims of infantile abuse can present anytype of injury, nevertheless there are associated injuries common toan inferred trauma that constitute radiological patterns highly specific for abuse, among them are the metafisial injuries, posterior costal fractures and first costal arc fractures, fractures of the toracolumbar region, fractures without apparent explanation, fractures in different stage of evolution, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraparenquimatose contusion and diffuse axonal injury, which combined with the history of the trauma, the age, the development of mental abilities, as well as the mechanism guides the injury diagnose.

  20. Radiological aspects of Arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Sara Eugenia; Barragan, John Henry; Narvaez, Jorge Andres

    2008-01-01

    The development of new surgical techniques, of new prosthetic materials, and the increase in life expectancy with greater coverage of health services has ugmented the performance of hip replacements in our country. The radiologist should be familiar with the different surgical techniques and prosthetic devices, the evaluation of its components and associated complications. The most frequently performed arthroplasties are: shoulder, elbow, hip and knee replacement. This article reviews the most frequent prosthetic devices used, the radiological aspects of arthroplasties and their most common complications.

  1. Veterinary Students' Recollection Methods for Surgical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebaek, Rikke; Tanggaard, Lene; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    When veterinary students face their first live animal surgeries, their level of anxiety is generally high and this can affect their ability to recall the procedure they are about to undertake. Multimodal teaching methods have previously been shown to enhance learning and facilitate recall; however......, student preferences for recollection methods when translating theory into practice have not been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate veterinary students' experience with recollection of a surgical procedure they were about to perform after using multiple methods for preparation. From...... a group of 171 veterinary students enrolled in a basic surgery course, 26 students were randomly selected to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results showed that 58% of the students used a visual, dynamic method of recollection, mentally visualizing the video they had watched as part...

  2. Database on veterinary clinical research in homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Jürgen; Albrecht, Henning

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of the first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy. Detailed searches in the database 'Veterinary Clinical Research-Database in Homeopathy' (http://www.carstens-stiftung.de/clinresvet/index.php). The database contains about 200 entries of randomised clinical trials, non-randomised clinical trials, observational studies, drug provings, case reports and case series. Twenty-two clinical fields are covered and eight different groups of species are included. The database is free of charge and open to all interested veterinarians and researchers. The database enables researchers and veterinarians, sceptics and supporters to get a quick overview of the status of veterinary clinical research in homeopathy and alleviates the preparation of systematical reviews or may stimulate reproductions or even new studies. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Drugs in veterinary medicine. The role of the veterinary drug industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, J C

    1984-02-01

    Veterinary medicines constitute an unescapable element in the scheme of animal health and welfare. Nowadays, they are used more and more to improve health and productivity in farm animals. When a veterinary medicine is prescribed it must not only be effective but must also be safe for both animals and humans. Due to ever changing regulations and constant improvements in residue detection techniques it is necessary to conduct new investigations with existing products. It therefore costs a great deal of time and money to introduce, and maintain, a product in the market. In future, therefore, fewer medicines with more limited indications will be introduced and these will be to combat important production disorders in the more significant species only. In view of the above, research and production will be restricted to large, international, concerns. Due to our well structured agricultural industry and the existence of well organized and equipped veterinary research institutions, and practitioners, Holland is able to play an important role in the development of veterinary medicines. Close co-operation between all involved parties coupled with an efficient registration procedure is not ony of benefit to the veterinary pharmaceutical industry but also for international recognition of our national animal husbandry industry, ancillary industries and veterinary and other consultants. In this scheme of things the accent is not upon qualifications but upon the skills of veterinarians - wherever placed - who are involved in the administration of veterinary medicines.

  4. The veterinary profession and one medicine: some considerations, with particular reference to Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Battelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of ‘one medicine’ and its evolution are discussed and some considerations on the relationship between ‘one medicine’ and veterinary profession are made, with particular reference to Italy. The concept of ‘one medicine’ is mainly associated with public health and has its roots in the Italian tradition and health organisation. In a future which is already with us, the veterinary profession will be called upon to deal with many problems at worldwide level (e.g. the emergence/re-emergence of new/old zoonotic pathogens, biological and chemical contaminants in food, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, non-epidemic emergencies associated with natural or man-made disasters, animal well-being, etc., integrating with other professions. In Italy, most of these problems find the Veterinary Services prepared, but not homogeneously throughout the country. At the present time, doubts are expressed on maintaining and improving these services, mainly due to the lack of students interested in veterinary public health (VPH training. The globalisation of the veterinary profession imposes changes, in both culture and training. The expertise required for ‘one medicine’ must be considered and aspects of veterinary training should be changed to promote sharing expertise with other professionals, mainly within the Italian Health Service. The public should be informed about professional competence and activities of veterinarians, in both the private and public sectors, in order to offer a true picture of the profession, one that is not limited to the conventional model which the public generally has of veterinary medicine.

  5. The use of intravenous lipid emulsion as an antidote in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alberto L; Lee, Justine A; Rahilly, Louisa; Hovda, Lynn; Brutlag, Ahna G; Engebretsen, Kristin

    2011-08-01

    To review the use of IV lipid emulsion (ILE) for the treatment of toxicities related to fat-soluble agents; evaluate current human and veterinary literature; and to provide proposed guidelines for the use of this emerging therapy in veterinary medicine and toxicology. Human and veterinary medical literature. Human data are composed mostly of case reports describing the response to treatment with ILE as variant from mild improvement to complete resolution of clinical signs, which is suspected to be due to the variability of lipid solubility of the drugs. The use of ILE therapy has been advocated as an antidote in cases of local anesthetic and other lipophilic drug toxicoses, particularly in the face of cardiopulmonary arrest and unsuccessful cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation. The use of ILE therapy in veterinary medicine has recently been advocated by animal poison control centers for toxicoses associated with fat-soluble agents, but there are only few clinical reports documenting successful use of this therapy. Evidence for the use of ILE in both human and veterinary medicine is composed primarily from experimental animal data. The use of ILE appears to be a safe therapy for the poisoned animal patient, but is warranted only with certain toxicoses. Adverse events associated with ILE in veterinary medicine are rare and anecdotal. Standard resuscitation protocols should be exhausted before considering this therapy and the potential side effects should be evaluated before administration of ILE as a potential antidote in cases of lipophilic drug toxicoses. Further research is waranted. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  6. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  7. West African Journal of Radiology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The West African Journal of Radiology (WAJR) is a publication and the official organ of the Association of Radiologists of West Africa. It is enlisted on AJOL (African Journals on-line). The Journal accepts for publication, original work in the science and technology of radiology, radiotherapy allied subjects, ...

  8. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus...

  9. Chemotherapy drug handling in first opinion small animal veterinary practices in the United Kingdom: results of a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, E G

    2017-05-27

    To investigate how first opinion small animal veterinary surgeons in the UK handled chemotherapeutic agents, a questionnaire was distributed at the 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association congress and by internet. Chemotherapy was regularly offered by 70.4 per cent of the respondents. Gold standards defined according to available guidelines for safe handling of antineoplastic drugs were poorly followed by general practitioners with only 2 per cent of respondents complying with all of them. Dedicated facilities for preparation and administration of cytotoxic drugs were variably available among participants. The level of training of staff indirectly involved in handling chemotherapy was appropriate in less than 50 per cent of practices. No association was found between demographic characteristics of the sampled population and the decision to perform chemotherapy. The results of this study raise concerns about the safety of the veterinary staff in first opinion practices involved in handling chemotherapy. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Balancing knowledge and basic principles in veterinary parasitology - Competencies for future Danish veterinary graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Johansen, Maria Vang; Nejsum, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Veterinary parasitology has always been considered to be relevant and interesting by the Danish veterinary students. Students have to acquaint themselves with many new, small creatures with complicated and varied life cycles and with intricate Latin names that are difficult to pronounce, as only...... clinician should know a range of parasites by heart as an active resource for their work. The dilemma has been tackled (partly) by introducing a veterinary paraclinical refresher course of 18 h (half practicals and half lectures) in the fourth study year. The focus here is on host(herd)-oriented clinical...

  11. Principles to establish a culture of the radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar M, V. M.

    2013-10-01

    The term of Culture of the Radiological Protection means the way in which the radiological protection is founded, regulated, managed, preserved and perceived in the job places, with the use of the ionizing radiations, in the industry, in medicine and in any daily activity that reflects the activities, beliefs, perceptions, goals and values that all the involved parts concern in relation to the radiological protection. The principles to establish a culture of the radiological protection that should be established by the professionals of the radiological protection, following the recommendations of the International Radiological Protection Association (IRPA) are presented. (author)

  12. Veterinary herd health management-Experience among farmers and farm managers in Swedish dairy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, C; Alvåsen, K; Eldh, A C; Frössling, J; Lomander, H

    2018-07-01

    , staff, and veterinarian was considered crucial for veterinary HHM, but such trust takes a long time to build and can easily be disrupted by, for example, a veterinarian's poor communication skills or lack of time. Our findings suggest that Swedish dairy farmers and herd managers find disease prevention important and that they perform a wide range of tasks to prevent disease in their animals. However, they do not see what role the veterinarian can play, and veterinarians were mainly associated with treating unhealthy cows. In order to increase the use of veterinary HHM programs the services and potential benefits of such programs need to be communicated more proactively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Critique of the use of ICRP-29's 'Robustness Index' in evaluating uncertainties associated with radiological assessment models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, F O; Schwarz, G; Killough, G G [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1980-08-01

    Concern is expressed regarding the use of the robustness index, as proposed in ICRP 29, to characterise the uncertainties associated with a model's predictions. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation employing a model of the grass-cow-milk-infant pathway for /sup 131/I are used to elucidate the author's criticisms. It is recommended that the robustness index should be carefully examined to appraise its possible usefulness and potential dangers. Alternate methods for analysis of uncertainty are proposed.

  14. Competency-based veterinary education - An integrative approach to learning and assessment in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    When graduating from veterinary school, veterinary professionals must be ready to enter the complex veterinary profession. Therefore, one of the major responsibilities of any veterinary school is to develop training programmes that support students’ competency development on the trajectory from

  15. Thirtieth Annual Congress on Veterinary Acupuncture: IVAS Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kaphle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 155 participants from 25 countries attended the 30th Annual IVAS Congress, September 8–11, 2004 in Oostende, Belgium. The focus was on veterinary acupuncture (AP and immunology, and the event was sponsored by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS. IVAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary AP as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary AP through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary AP and the practice of Western veterinary science, while also noting that the science of veterinary AP does not overlook allied health systems, such as homeopathy, herbology, nutrition, chiropractic, kinesiology, etc. (www.ivas.org.

  16. Chapter 5. Assessing the Aquatic Hazards of Veterinary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the widespread distribution of low concentrations of veterinary medicine products and other pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. While aquatic hazard for a select group of veterinary medicines has received previous s...

  17. Toward harmonization of the European food hygiene/veterinary public health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulders, Frans J M; Buncic, Sava; Fehlhaber, Karsten; Huey, Robert J; Korkeala, Hannu; Prieto, Miguel; Steinhauserova, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Prompted by developments in the agri-food industry and associated recent changes in European legislation, the responsibilities of veterinarians professionally active in veterinary public health (VPH), and particularly in food hygiene (FH), have increasingly shifted from the traditional end-product control toward longitudinally integrated safety assurance. This necessitates the restructuring of university training programs to provide starting competence in this area for veterinary graduates or a sub-population of them. To date, there are substantial differences in Europe in the way in which graduate programs in FH/VPH are structured and in the time allocated to this important curricular group of subjects. Having recognized this, the European Association of Establishments for Veterinary Education (EAEVE) recently instituted a working group to analyze the current situation, with a view to produce standard operating procedures allowing fair and transparent evaluations of universities/faculties constituting its membership and in concurrence with explicit European legislation on the professional qualifications deemed necessary for this veterinary discipline. This article summarizes the main conclusions and recommendations of the working group and seeks to contribute to the international efforts to optimize veterinary training in FH/VPH.

  18. Collation of data on applicants, offers, acceptances, students and graduates in veterinary science in Australia 2001-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, G B

    2016-01-01

    To collate data on the numbers of applications, offers, acceptances, students and graduates at Australian veterinary schools between 2001 and 2013. Data were obtained from the Australian Department of Education, the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Graduate Careers Australia and the Australian Veterinary Association Ltd. The number of eligible applicants for veterinary science courses increased from 1540 in 2001 to 2243 in 2013 (46% increase). Offers for places ranged from 400 in 2001 to 643 in 2013 (61% increase) and acceptances ranged from 254 in 2001 to 457 in 2013 (80% increase).The total number of students enrolled ranged from 1641 in 2001 to 3036 in 2013 (85% increase). Female students increased from 1195 in 2001 to 2340 in 2013 (96% increase) and male students increased from 446 to 696 (56%) over this time period. Domestic students numbered 1411 in 2001 and 2391 in 2013 (69% increase). International students increased from 230 in 2001 to 643 in 2013 (180% increase). Students entering veterinary courses numbered 389 in 2001 and increased to 688 in 2013 (77% increase). Graduates increased from 312 in 2001 to 561 in 2013 (80% increase). Percent of recent veterinary graduates seeking full-time employment was 7.6% in 2001 and increased to 21.2% in 2013. Median starting salaries for veterinary graduates in Australia were A$34,000 in 2001 and A$46,000 in 2013 (35% increase). These data provide additional information about the ongoing increase in the numbers of domestic and international students studying veterinary science at Australian universities. Between 2001 and 2013 the numbers of Australian veterinary students and graduates increased at a greater rate than the Australian population. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  19. Is quality and completeness of reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in high impact radiology journals associated with citation rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Christian B; McInnes, Matthew D F; Petrcich, William; Tunis, Adam S; Hanna, Ramez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether study quality and completeness of reporting of systematic reviews (SR) and meta-analyses (MA) published in high impact factor (IF) radiology journals is associated with citation rates. All SR and MA published in English between Jan 2007-Dec 2011, in radiology journals with an IF >2.75, were identified on Ovid MEDLINE. The Assessing the Methodologic Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) checklist for study quality, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for study completeness, was applied to each SR & MA. Each SR & MA was then searched in Google Scholar to yield a citation rate. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between AMSTAR and PRISMA results with citation rate. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for the effect of journal IF and journal 5-year IF on correlation with citation rate. Values were reported as medians with interquartile range (IQR) provided. 129 studies from 11 journals were included (50 SR and 79 MA). Median AMSTAR result was 8.0/11 (IQR: 5-9) and median PRISMA result was 23.0/27 (IQR: 21-25). The median citation rate for SR & MA was 0.73 citations/month post-publication (IQR: 0.40-1.17). There was a positive correlation between both AMSTAR and PRISMA results and SR & MA citation rate; ρ=0.323 (P=0.0002) and ρ=0.327 (P=0.0002) respectively. Positive correlation persisted for AMSTAR and PRISMA results after journal IF was partialed out; ρ=0.243 (P=0.006) and ρ=0.256 (P=0.004), and after journal 5-year IF was partialed out; ρ=0.235 (P=0.008) and ρ=0.243 (P=0.006) respectively. There is a positive correlation between the quality and the completeness of a reported SR or MA with citation rate which persists when adjusted for journal IF and journal 5-year IF.

  20. Assessment of radiological risk parameters associated with some selected rivers around oil mineral producing sites in Abia State, Nigeria due to gross alpha and beta radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enyinna, Paschal Ikenna; Uzochukwu, Francis C.

    2016-01-01

    The study of gross alpha and beta radiation in environmental components and water bodies in particular is very crucial to the environmental, radiation and medical Physicist as this helps to promote good water quality and environmental hygiene. This research work understudied the radiological risk parameters due to gross alpha and beta radiations associated with three selected rivers around crude oil production sites in Abia State, Nigeria. Gross alpha and beta activities were computed for the three rivers based on analytical measurements carried out using a well-calibrated IN-20 model gas-flow proportional counter. Radiological risk parameters were computed from the activity concentrations which included; annual effective dose equivalent of radiation from ingested water (AEDE), annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE), and excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR). The mean of the total AEDE due to the sum of alpha and beta radiations for the three rivers are 0.868 ± 0.221 mSv/y, 1.008 ± 0.156 mSv/y, and 0.917 ± 0.214 mSv/y; and are above the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limit of 0.1 mSv/y. The mean of the total AGDE are 4.048 ± 1.063 mSv/y, 4.756 ± 0.739 mSv/y, and 4.295 ± 1.026 mSv/y; and are above the world average limit of 0.3 mSv/y. The mean of the total ELCR are (3.038 ± 0.774) X 10"-"3, (3.529 ± 0.547) X 10"-"3, and (3.210 ± 0.748) X 10"-"3; and are above the world average limit of 0.29 X 10"-"3. Most values of ELCR computed in this work are >6.0 X 10"-"4 estimated to be the risk of fatal and weighted nonfatal health conditions over a lifetime (70 years) derived from the radiation dose of 0.1 mSv/y (WHO permissible limit for drinking water). Drinking water from these surveyed sources could impact negatively on the end users. (author)

  1. Mobile technology in radiology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbage, Aiham C; Bedi, Harprit S

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents' studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study. A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources. Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices. There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Undergraduates\\' view of the veterinary profession: A study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the veterinary profession: A study of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria – Nigeria. ... the university, however only 33.7% believed that they obtain veterinary services ... of the opinion that both veterinary and medical students study similar courses. ... that veterinarians, pharmacists and physicians can work together in the Food ...

  3. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  4. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    .... FDA-2013-N-1380] Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination AGENCY: Food... announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. This document removes the Veterinary Advisory Committee from the Agency's list of standing advisory committees. DATES: This rule is...

  5. 75 FR 36588 - Veterinary Feed Directive; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... 558 [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0155] Veterinary Feed Directive; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food... veterinary feed directive (VFD) regulation. The agency is taking this action in response to requests for an... CONTACT: Neal Bataller, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-230), Food and Drug Administration, 7500...

  6. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... [Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093] RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment..., Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093), and effective on February 1, 2010, we amended the National Veterinary... Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 200, Riverdale, MD 20737; (301) 851-3401...

  7. 75 FR 4576 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ...] Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory... Sindelar, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-3), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl...

  8. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal... FROM PREPARATION PURSUANT TO AN UNSUSPENDED AND UNREVOKED LICENSE § 107.1 Veterinary practitioners and...)(1) Products prepared by a veterinary practitioner (veterinarian) solely for administration to...

  9. 75 FR 52605 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ...] Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory..., Rockville, MD 20852, 301-468-1100. Contact Person: Aleta Sindelar, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-3...

  10. Entrepreneurship Education and Veterinary Medicine: Enhancing Employable Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Colette; Treanor, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper has the purpose of exploring the potential for entrepreneurship education within veterinary medicine. It aims to examine some of the key themes in the entrepreneurship education literature, discuss the make-up of the UK veterinary sector, consider veterinary curricula requirements and illustrate how entrepreneurship education…

  11. Allergy among veterinary medicine students in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Sadegh; Spithoven, Jack; Jamshidifard, Ali-Reza; Berends, Boyd R; Lipman, Len; Heederik, Dick J J; Wouters, Inge M

    2012-01-01

    Veterinary medicine students who practice with animals are potentially exposed to many occupational agents, yet sensitisation and allergic symptoms among this group have not been studied extensively. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of sensitisation and allergic symptoms in veterinary medicine students in association with study specialisation over time. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted. Blood was collected and tested for total and specific serum IgE for 16 different common and study-specific allergens using enzyme immunoassay. New development of self-reported allergic symptoms to various allergens occurred in 8.7%, of which 44% was deducted against animals. Handling farm animals was strongly associated with self-reported allergies to various allergens (OR=6.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 25) and animal allergens (OR=12, 95% CI 1.4 to 103). Sensitisation to at least one allergen occurred in 33.1%. Sensitisation prevalence tended to be elevated in later years of the equine study program. In contrast to self-reported allergies, the prevalence of sensitisation to any allergen decreased with prolonged study duration for those specialising in farm animal health (years 3-5: OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.3 to 1.1; year 6: OR=0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5). This was independent of whether people were raised on a farm, which is in itself a protective factor for allergy and sensitisation. This study provides evidence of an elevated prevalence of allergic symptoms with increasing years of veterinary study, suggesting that contact with animals, more specifically contact to farm animals, is a risk factor for the development of symptoms.

  12. Approach to complexity in veterinary epidemology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrot, C.; Calavas, D.; Legay, J.-M.

    1996-01-01

    One of the main goals of veterinary epidemiology is to analyse the determinants of disease, commonly called risk factors. The analysis of such systems is usually based on a pluridisciplinary approach, a planned observation of the natural state, and a judicious use of various methods to analyse...

  13. Improving Student Engagement in Veterinary Business Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth; Jackson, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Improving Student Engagement in Veterinary Business StudiesIn a densely packed veterinary curriculum, students may find it particularly challenging to engage in the less overtly clinical subjects, yet pressure from industry and an increasingly competitive employment market necessitate improved veterinary student education in business and management skills. We describe a curriculum intervention (formative reflective assignment) that optimizes workplace learning opportunities and aims to provide better student scaffolding for their in-context business learning. Students were asked to analyze a business practice they experienced during a period of extra-mural studies (external work placement). Following return to the college, they were then instructed to discuss their findings in their study group, and produce a group reflection on their learning. To better understand student engagement in this area, we analyzed individual and group components of the assignment. Thematic analysis revealed evidence of various depths of student engagement, and provided indications of the behaviors they used when engaging at different levels. Interactive and social practices (discussing business strategies with veterinary employees and student peers) appeared to facilitate student engagement, assist the perception of relevance of these skills, and encourage integration with other curriculum elements such as communication skills and clinical problem solving.

  14. Mergers and acquisitions involving equine veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Brad R; McCafferty, Owen E

    2009-12-01

    This article discusses mergers and acquisitions involving equine veterinary practices. Combining practices can be professionally and economically advantageous but requires a great deal of thought, planning, and implementation. If due diligence is performed and true business teamwork is undertaken, the benefits can be enormous and rewarding.

  15. Prose Learning for Veterinary Educators: Facilitating Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A prose text in veterinary medicine can be arranged and supplemented to facilitate efficient and effective acquisition into short-term memory. Methods include: variation in textual format; relating new information to previous knowledge and future goals; providing specific, test-relevant objectives or introductions, describing mnemonic devices; and…

  16. Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health Technology Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern professional veterinary medicine and animal health technology practice in the state are presented. Licensure requirements are described, and complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a licensed veterinarian and…

  17. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Editorial Board of the Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences (SJVS) wishes to invite research articles, case reports and review articles for ... be accompanied by a cover letter verifying that the final manuscript has been seen and approved by all authors and transferring copyright ownership to SJVS.

  18. Research data services in veterinary medicine libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. Kerby, MSI

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Lacking a standard definition of ‘‘research data’’ and a common understanding of precisely what research data services encompass, it is difficult for veterinary medicine librarians and libraries to define and understand their roles in research data services. Nonetheless, they appear to have an interest in learning more about and providing research data services.

  19. Veterinary Fusarioses within the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multilocus DNA sequence data was used to retrospectively assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships of 67 Fusarium strains from veterinary sources, most of which were from the United States. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that the strains comprised 23 phylogenetically dist...

  20. Enhancing cognitive learning in Veterinary Osteology through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    at Veterinary anatomy education. The objective was to assess the importance of student participation in skeletal preparation. The hypothesis that the students would be more interested in the discipline if the teaching methodology used is based on creative and constructivist methods. Thirteen animal skeletons were ...

  1. Comparative oncology: Integrating human and veterinary medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer constitutes the major health problem both in human and veterinary medicine. Comparative oncology as an integrative approach offers to learn more about naturally occurring cancers across different species. Canine models have many advantages as they experience spontaneous disease, have many genes similar ...

  2. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, ...

  3. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  4. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  5. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  6. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials...... sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification...... of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can...

  7. Guidelines for zoo and aquarium veterinary medical programs and veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backues, Kay; Clyde, Vickie; Denver, Mary; Fiorello, Christine; Hilsenroth, Rob; Lamberski, Nadine; Larson, Scott; Meehan, Tom; Murray, Mike; Ramer, Jan; Ramsay, Ed; Suedmeyer, Kirk; Whiteside, Doug

    2011-03-01

    These guidelines for veterinary medical care and veterinary hospitals are written to conform with the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act, which states that programs of disease prevention and parasite control, euthanasia, and adequate veterinary care shall be established and maintained under the supervision of a veterinarian. Ideally the zoo and aquarium should be providing the best possible veterinary medical care for the animals in their collections. Many of these animals are rare and endangered and the institutions should endeavor both to provide for the long term health and well being of these animals and to advance the field of non-domestic animal medicine. It is hoped that this publication will aid in this process.

  8. 77 FR 77008 - Solicitation of Veterinary Shortage Situation Nominations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... clients can reasonably be expected to pay for professional veterinary services and where food animal... the event of a discrepancy between the primary reviewer's scoring and the panel poll results, the...

  9. Serological Evidence of Exposure to Leptospira spp. in Veterinary Students and Other University Students in Trinidad and Tobago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose James

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the serological evidence of leptospirosis in 212 students in four schools (veterinary, dental, advanced nursing education and pharmacy of the University of the West Indies (UWI, by testing for IgG immunoglobulins to Leptospira spp. using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the microscopic agglutination test (MAT. Overall, of 212 students tested by the ELISA, 12 (5.7% and 31 (14.6% were positive and borderline, respectively. Amongst the 113 veterinary students 11 (9.7% and 19 (16.8% were seropositive and borderline respectively compared with nonveterinary students with corresponding values of 1 (1.0% and 12 (12.1%. The frequency of serological evidence of leptospirosis by the ELISA was statistically significantly (; higher in veterinary students, 26.5% (30 of 113 than in nonveterinary students, 13.1% (13 of 99. By the MAT, the seropositivity for leptospirosis was similar for veterinary students, 7.1% (8 of 113 and nonveterinary students, 7.1% (7 of 99. For veterinary students, the prevalent infecting serovar was Icterohaemorrhagiae Copenhageni while amongst nonveterinary students, the prevalent serovar was Australis Rachmati. Being a veterinary student was the only risk factor that was significantly associated with Leptospira infection indicating that veterinary students need to be cognizant and to practise preventive measures for leptospirosis.

  10. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned.

  11. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  12. The Veterinary Clinical Trials Network - a Pragmatic Approach to Filling the Evidence Gaps for Veterinary Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Doit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Including current published evidence is vital as part of evidence-based decision making in veterinary practice. Sometimes there is no published evidence which is relevant or applicable to the clinical situation.This can be either because it refers to patients with experimentally induced conditions, from a referral population or who lack the co-morbities often seen outside of the experimental context. The Veterinary Clinical Trials Network is unique. It is a rapidly expanding network of veterinary practices, with whom we are working to establish methods for running prospective, pragmatic, practical clinical trials in veterinary practice.Data is extracted from the patient record using an XML Schema. The data extracted is already captured by the Practice Management Software (PMS system as part of the consultation, no extra information is required, and the extraction method is automated. This improves participation as it minimises the time input required from vets and vet nurses. Other data is obtained directly from owners of the animals involved.By working with a large number of first opinion veterinary practices we are able to include enough patients to ensure that our trials are suitably powered, and the participants will be representative of the wider vet-visiting pet population. The research generated from this clinical trials network will help strengthen the evidence base to aid decision making by veterinary practitioners.

  13. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students: a qualitative study of veterinary educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate M; Sandøe, Peter; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010-2011). The content of the interview transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing values and ethical viewpoints, identifying norms and regulations, developing skills of communication and decision making, and contributing to a professional identity. Whereas many of the objectives complement each other, there is tension between the view that ethics teaching should promote knowledge of professional rules and the view that ethics teaching should emphasize critical reasoning skills. The wide range of objectives and the possible tensions between them highlight the challenges faced by educators as they attempt to prioritize among these goals of ethics teaching within a crowded veterinary curriculum.

  14. Novel Card Games for Learning Radiographic Image Quality and Urologic Imaging in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Christopher P

    Second-year veterinary students are often challenged by concepts in veterinary radiology, including the fundamentals of image quality and generation of differential lists. Four card games were developed to provide veterinary students with a supplemental means of learning about radiographic image quality and differential diagnoses in urogenital imaging. Students played these games and completed assessments of their subject knowledge before and after playing. The hypothesis was that playing each game would improve students' understanding of the topic area. For each game, students who played the game performed better on the post-test than students who did not play that game (all pgames, students who played each respective game demonstrated significant improvement in scores between the pre-test and the post-test (pgames were both helpful and enjoyable. Educationally focused games can help students learn classroom and laboratory material. However, game design is important, as the game using the most passive learning process also demonstrated the weakest results. In addition, based on participants' comments, the games were very useful in improving student engagement in the learning process. Thus, use of games in the classroom and laboratory setting seems to benefit the learning process.

  15. Occupational exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergel, E.; Feige, S.; Haeusler, U.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of the Council directive 96/29 EURATOM and the corresponding national Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Protection Ordinance coming subsequently into effect led to a changed situation regarding the occupational radiation protection in the medical sector. To reduce the occupational exposure of veterinarians and assisting staff in veterinary radiography is particularly challenging as, in opposite to human radiological examination, the presence of staff is indispensable to restrain the patient. Beyond that the relevant literature reports about too high and/or about unnecessary radiation exposures. To gain a comprehensive knowledge upon the possible exposure of involved staff, the variety of typical examination methods in veterinary clinics and at practitioners had been investigated during the daily routine. Dose measurements were performed for different employees during the examinations taking into account several places of exposure (lens, thyroid, chest, hand, gonad, and feet). Veterinary X-ray diagnostic examinations for pets as well as in equine radiography had been accounted for this study. In total, 101 examination methods, 4.484 accompanied examinations and 53.892 single dose readings resulted in a reliable statistical base to set up a 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' allowing the dose assessment for a variable number and kind of examinations. The 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' is believed to be a useful tool for optimization of occupational radiation exposure of veterinarians by appraising the height of a possible dose, forcing a review of the status quo and triggering the improvement of personal protection by establishing adequate measures. (orig.)

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of zoonotic and commensal bacteria in Europe: The missing link between consumption and resistance in veterinary medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Fraile, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance in food animals has been associated to the consumption of antimicrobials in veterinary medicine. Consequently, monitoring programs have been designed to monitor the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria. This study analyses the amount of antimicrobial agents...... antimicrobial classes. Substantial differences between countries were observed in the amount of antimicrobials used to produce 1kg of meat. Moreover, large variations in proportions of resistant bacteria were reported by the different countries, suggesting differences in veterinary practice. Despite...

  17. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  18. Effectiveness of a steam cleaning unit for disinfection in a veterinary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Cheryl L; Tanner, Benjamin D; Higgins, Laura A; Dennis, Jeffrey S; Luempert, Louis G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate whether the application of steam to a variety of surface types in a veterinary hospital would effectively reduce the number of bacteria. 5 surface types. Steam was applied as a surface treatment for disinfection to 18 test sites of 5 surface types in a veterinary hospital. A pretreatment sample was obtained by collection of a swab specimen from the left side of each defined test surface. Steam disinfection was performed on the right side of each test surface, and a posttreatment sample was then collected in the same manner from the treated (right) side of each test surface. Total bacteria for pretreatment and posttreatment samples were quantified by heterotrophic plate counts and for Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas spp, and total coliforms by counts on selective media. Significant reductions were observed in heterotrophic plate counts after steam application to dog runs and dog kennel floors. A significant reduction in counts of Pseudomonas spp was observed after steam application to tub sinks. Bacterial counts were reduced, but not significantly, on most other test surfaces that had adequate pretreatment counts for quantification. Development of health-care-associated infections is of increasing concern in human and veterinary medicine. The application of steam significantly reduced bacterial numbers on a variety of surfaces within a veterinary facility. Steam disinfection may prove to be an alternative or adjunct to chemical disinfection within veterinary practices.

  19. Characterisation of antimicrobial usage in cats and dogs attending UK primary care companion animal veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, E L; O'Neill, D; Summers, J; Mateus, A; Church, D; Redmond, L; Brodbelt, D

    2016-11-12

    There is scant evidence describing antimicrobial (AM) usage in companion animal primary care veterinary practices in the UK. The use of AMs in dogs and cats was quantified using data extracted from 374 veterinary practices participating in VetCompass. The frequency and quantity of systemic antibiotic usage was described.Overall, 25 per cent of 963,463 dogs and 21 per cent of 594,812 cats seen at veterinary practices received at least one AM over a two-year period (2012-2014) and 42 per cent of these animals were given repeated AMs. The main agents used were aminopenicillin types and cephalosporins. Of the AM events, 60 per cent in dogs and 81 per cent in cats were AMs classified as critically important (CIAs) to human health by the World Health Organisation. CIAs of highest importance (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, third-generation cephalosporins) accounted for just over 6 per cent and 34 per cent of AMs in dogs and cats, respectively. The total quantity of AMs used within the study population was estimated to be 1473 kg for dogs and 58 kg for cats.This study has identified a high frequency of AM usage in companion animal practice and for certain agents classified as of critical importance in human medicine. The study highlights the usefulness of veterinary practice electronic health records for studying AM usage. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  1. Publication rate of studies presented at veterinary anaesthesia specialty meetings during the years 2003-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Marilies; Braun, Christina; Moens, Yves

    2016-03-01

    To assess publication rates, factors predicting publication, and discrepancies between conference abstracts and subsequent full-text publications of abstracts from the veterinary meetings of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists and the Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists from 2003 to 2008. Retrospective cohort study. A total of 607 abstracts were identified and a database search (Scopus, PubMed, CAB) was conducted to identify matching publications. Authors of nonmatching abstracts were contacted to participate in a confidential online survey. Risk ratios were used to assess factors predicting publication and these were tested for significance (p publication rate was 63.3% and the mean (± SD) time to publication was 25 ± 19 months. Factors significantly associated with subsequent full publication (i.e. publication of a full manuscript in a peer-reviewed journal) were continent of origin (North America), study design (experimental studies), specialty (analgesia) and the presence of a source of funding. The principal reasons why studies remained unpublished were lack of time and responsibility lying with co-authors. Minor changes compared with the original abstract were found in 71.6% of all publications. Major changes were noted in 34.6% and the outcome of the study changed in 7.6%. These data suggest that some of the abstracts reported preliminary findings. Therefore, caution is warranted when quoting abstracts as references in scientific publications. To date, major veterinary journals have not issued recommendations in their author guidelines addressing the use of abstracts as a reference. The authors propose the inclusion of such a statement in author guidelines. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  2. Evaluating the economic and noneconomic impacts of the veterinary medical profession in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J W; Dartt, B A

    2000-01-01

    This study reaffirms the diversity and breadth of the veterinary profession. As it turns out, some of the furthest-reaching impacts of the veterinary medical profession were largely non-quantifiable. The veterinary medical profession had a substantial direct economic impact in Michigan during 1995. The total economic contribution of the veterinary medical profession to Michigan during 1995 that was attributable to expenditures on salaries, supplies, services, and their multiplier effect was approximately $500 million. In addition, the profession was associated with nearly 8,500 jobs (combined professional and lay positions). The veterinary medical profession was also considered to have an impact on the prosperity of the live-stock, equine, and pet food industries in Michigan, even though the economic contribution in these areas could not be directly quantified. Economic well-being of the individual businesses in these industries is directly related to the health and productivity of the associated animals, and improvements in output or productivity that accompany improved animal health likely carry substantial economic benefits in these sectors. In addition, progressive animal health management provides a crucial method of managing risk in the animal industries. Similarly, although the economic contribution could not be quantified, the veterinary medical profession enhances the safety and quality of human food through research, regulation, and quality assurance programs in livestock production, minimizing the risk of drug residues and microbial contamination. During 1995, approximately 5.3 million Michigan residents benefitted from the physical, psychological, and emotional well-being that accompanies companion animal ownership. By preserving the health and longevity of companion animals, veterinarians sustain and enhance these aspects of the human-animal bond. As Michigan enters a new century, it is likely that the state's veterinary medical profession will

  3. Bookshelf on radiological health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, H.G.; Moss, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    This bookshelf is an attempt to list, categorize, and present details on the many varied sources of information available to personnel working in the field of radiological health. This particular bookshelf will not cover those sources listed in a previous publication (Bureau of Radiological Health Training Publication TP-198), but will concentrate on those sources published or revised after 1965. It is hoped that this bookshelf will help schools, public health officials, teachers, students, and others in updating their existing sources of information. It is obvious that any such attempt at developing a master list of this type has to contain only representative sources of information. The authors invite readers to inform them of any omissions or errors. Finally, this bookshelf attempts, where applicable, to restrict the number of sources to those more associated with public health aspects. The bookshelf is divided into four main sections. They are textbooks, current literature, training and educational materials, and other sources. Each one of these sections is further stratified into additional details

  4. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  5. Teaching veterinary professionalism in the Face(book) of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jason B; Weijs, Cynthia A; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Facebook has been identified as the preferred social networking site among postsecondary students. Repeated findings in the social networking literature have suggested that postsecondary students practice high personal self-disclosure on Facebook and tend not to use privacy settings that would limit public access. This study identified and reviewed Facebook profiles for 805 veterinarians-in-training enrolled at four veterinary colleges across Canada. Of these, 265 (32.9%) were categorized as having low exposure, 286 (35.5%) were categorized as having medium exposure, and 254 (31.6%) were categorized as having high exposure of information. Content analysis on a sub-sample (n=80) of the high-exposure profiles revealed publicly available unprofessional content, including indications of substance use and abuse, obscene comments, and breaches of client confidentiality. Regression analysis revealed that an increasing number of years to graduation and having a publicly visible wall were both positively associated with having a high-exposure profile. Given the rapid uptake of social media in recent years, veterinary educators should be aware of and begin to educate students on the associated risks and repercussions of blurring one's private life and one's emerging professional identity through personal online disclosures.

  6. Radiological case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo Estrada, Horacio

    2001-01-01

    The paper analyze the case of a patient (65 year-old) masculine, who consults for precordial pain associated to dyspnoea, left scapular pain and in the shoulder of the same side, of 3 days of evolution that it has been permanent and progressive. He also refers, loss of weight the last 6 months and dyspnoea of effort of 1 month of evolution. He denies chill, fever, cough or expectoration. The patient presents gastric ulcer tried for 1 year, smoker of 2 packages of daily cigarettes of the 15 to the 40 years; all its life worked in masonry. X-rays of the thorax and Tac, among other analyses were done and the case is discusses

  7. Influence of a veterinary curriculum on the approaches and study skills of veterinary medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Ilkiw, Jan E; Boudreaux, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate first-, second-, third-, and fourth-year veterinary medical students' approaches to studying and learning as well as the factors within the curriculum that may influence these approaches. A questionnaire consisting of the short version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) was completed by 405 students, and it included questions relating to conceptions about learning, approaches to studying, and preferences for different types of courses and teaching. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha analysis, and log-linear analysis were performed on the data. Deep, strategic, and surface learning approaches emerged. There were a few differences between our findings and those presented in previous studies in terms of the correlation of the subscale monitoring effectiveness, which showed loading with both the deep and strategic learning approaches. In addition, the subscale alertness to assessment demands showed correlation with the surface learning approach. The perception of high workloads, the use of previous test files as a method for studying, and examinations that are based only on material provided in lecture notes were positively associated with the surface learning approach. Focusing on improving specific teaching and assessment methods that enhance deep learning is anticipated to enhance students' positive learning experience. These teaching methods include instructors who encourage students to be critical thinkers, the integration of course material in other disciplines, courses that encourage thinking and reading about the learning material, and books and articles that challenge students while providing explanations beyond lecture material.

  8. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  9. Patients Without Borders: Using Telehealth to Provide an International Experience in Veterinary Global Health for Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazan, Melissa R; Kay, Gigi; Souhail, Mohammed Larbi; Bubeck, Kirstin; Jenei, Thomas; Merriam, Jay

    There is an increasing need to produce veterinarians with knowledge and critical thinking skills that will allow them to participate in veterinary global health equity delivery, particularly in the developing world, where many people remain dependent on animal-based agriculture for a living. This need for veterinarians trained in global health is reflected by the demand among students for greater exposure and education. At the same time, many students are held back from on-site training in global health due to constraints of cost, time, or family obligations. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of a telemedicine approach to educating veterinary students at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. This approach simultaneously provides expert consultation and support for a pro bono hospital in the developing world. The development of a telemedicine teaching service is discussed, from initial ad hoc email consultation among friends and associates to a more formal use of store-and-forward delivery of data along with real-time videoconferencing on a regular basis, termed tele-rounds. The practicalities of data delivery and exchange and best use of available bandwidth are also discussed, as this very mundane information is critical to efficient and useful tele-rounds. Students are able to participate in discussion of cases that they would never see in their usual clinical sphere and to become familiar with diagnostic and treatment approaches to these cases. By having the patient "virtually" brought to us, tele-rounds also decrease the usual carbon footprint of global health delivery.

  10. Multimodality imaging in Europe: a survey by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, Alberto; Breatnach, Eamann

    2010-01-01

    Multimodality imaging represents an area of rapid growth with important professional implication for both nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists throughout Europe. As a preliminary step for future action aimed at improving the quality and accessibility of PET/SPECT/CT multimodality imaging practice in Europe, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) performed a survey among the individual membership of both societies to obtain information on the status of multimodality imaging in their facilities and their future visions on training for combined modalities. A questionnaire was forwarded to all individual members of the EANM and ESR. The main subject matter of the questionnaire related to: (1) study performance, current procedures, current equipment including its supervisory personnel at respondents' individual facilities and (2) vision of future practice, performance and the potential for combined interdisciplinary viewing and training for future professionals. The reporting and the billing procedures of multimodality imaging studies are very heterogeneous in European countries. The majority of the members of both societies believe that the proportion of PET/CT conducted as a full diagnostic CT with contrast enhancement will increase over time. As expected, 18 F-FDG is the most commonly used PET tracer for clinical applications. The large majority of respondents were in favour of an interdisciplinary training programme being developed on a European level together by the EANM and the ESR and the respective sections of the European Union of Medical Specialists. The results of this survey show that there is wide heterogeneity in the current practice of multimodality imaging in Europe. This situation may limit the full potential and integration of multimodality imaging within the clinical arena. There is a strong desire within both specialties for the development of interdisciplinary training to address some

  11. Risk Factors of Coxiella burnetii (Q Fever) Seropositivity in Veterinary Medicine Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Myrna M. T.; Schimmer, Barbara; Versteeg, Bart; Schneeberger, Peter; Berends, Boyd R.; Heederik, Dick; van der Hoek, Wim; Wouters, Inge M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Q fever is an occupational risk for veterinarians, however little is known about the risk for veterinary medicine students. This study aimed to assess the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii among veterinary medicine students and to identify associated risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study with questionnaire and blood sample collection was performed among all veterinary medicine students studying in the Netherlands in 2006. Serum samples (n = 674), representative of all study years and study directions, were analyzed for C. burnetii IgG and IgM phase I and II antibodies with an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Seropositivity was defined as IgG phase I and/or II titer of 1∶32 and above. Results Of the veterinary medicine students 126 (18.7%) had IgG antibodies against C. burnetii. Seropositivity associated risk factors identified were the study direction ‘farm animals’ (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.27 [95% CI 2.14–5.02]), advanced year of study (OR year 6: 2.31 [1.22–4.39] OR year 3–5 1.83 [1.07–3.10]) having had a zoonosis during the study (OR 1.74 [1.07–2.82]) and ever lived on a ruminant farm (OR 2.73 [1.59–4.67]). Stratified analysis revealed study direction ‘farm animals’ to be a study-related risk factor apart from ever living on a farm. In addition we identified a clear dose-response relation for the number of years lived on a farm with C. burnetii seropositivity. Conclusions C. burnetii seroprevalence is considerable among veterinary medicine students and study related risk factors were identified. This indicates Q fever as an occupational risk for veterinary medicine students. PMID:22363803

  12. Risk factors of Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) seropositivity in veterinary medicine students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Myrna M T; Schimmer, Barbara; Versteeg, Bart; Schneeberger, Peter; Berends, Boyd R; Heederik, Dick; van der Hoek, Wim; Wouters, Inge M

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is an occupational risk for veterinarians, however little is known about the risk for veterinary medicine students. This study aimed to assess the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii among veterinary medicine students and to identify associated risk factors. A cross-sectional study with questionnaire and blood sample collection was performed among all veterinary medicine students studying in The Netherlands in 2006. Serum samples (n = 674), representative of all study years and study directions, were analyzed for C. burnetii IgG and IgM phase I and II antibodies with an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Seropositivity was defined as IgG phase I and/or II titer of 1:32 and above. Of the veterinary medicine students 126 (18.7%) had IgG antibodies against C. burnetii. Seropositivity associated risk factors identified were the study direction 'farm animals' (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.27 [95% CI 2.14-5.02]), advanced year of study (OR year 6: 2.31 [1.22-4.39] OR year 3-5 1.83 [1.07-3.10]) having had a zoonosis during the study (OR 1.74 [1.07-2.82]) and ever lived on a ruminant farm (OR 2.73 [1.59-4.67]). Stratified analysis revealed study direction 'farm animals' to be a study-related risk factor apart from ever living on a farm. In addition we identified a clear dose-response relation for the number of years lived on a farm with C. burnetii seropositivity. C. burnetii seroprevalence is considerable among veterinary medicine students and study related risk factors were identified. This indicates Q fever as an occupational risk for veterinary medicine students.

  13. Canine neuroanatomy: Development of a 3D reconstruction and interactive application for undergraduate veterinary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffan, Hazel; Guevar, Julien; Poyade, Matthieu; Rea, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Current methods used to communicate and present the complex arrangement of vasculature related to the brain and spinal cord is limited in undergraduate veterinary neuroanatomy training. Traditionally it is taught with 2-dimensional (2D) diagrams, photographs and medical imaging scans which show a fixed viewpoint. 2D representations of 3-dimensional (3D) objects however lead to loss of spatial information, which can present problems when translating this to the patient. Computer-assisted learning packages with interactive 3D anatomical models have become established in medical training, yet equivalent resources are scarce in veterinary education. For this reason, we set out to develop a workflow methodology creating an interactive model depicting the vasculature of the canine brain that could be used in undergraduate education. Using MR images of a dog and several commonly available software programs, we set out to show how combining image editing, segmentation and surface generation, 3D modeling and texturing can result in the creation of a fully interactive application for veterinary training. In addition to clearly identifying a workflow methodology for the creation of this dataset, we have also demonstrated how an interactive tutorial and self-assessment tool can be incorporated into this. In conclusion, we present a workflow which has been successful in developing a 3D reconstruction of the canine brain and associated vasculature through segmentation, surface generation and post-processing of readily available medical imaging data. The reconstructed model was implemented into an interactive application for veterinary education that has been designed to target the problems associated with learning neuroanatomy, primarily the inability to visualise complex spatial arrangements from 2D resources. The lack of similar resources in this field suggests this workflow is original within a veterinary context. There is great potential to explore this method, and introduce

  14. USE OF A NOVEL BOARD GAME IN A CLINICAL ROTATION FOR LEARNING THORACIC DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSES IN VETERINARY MEDICAL IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Christopher P

    2017-03-01

    When confronted with various findings on thoracic radiographs, fourth-year veterinary students often have difficulty generating appropriate lists of differential diagnoses. The purpose of this one-group, pretest, posttest experimental study was to determine if a game could be used as an adjunct teaching method to improve students' understanding of connections between imaging findings and differential diagnoses. A novel board game focusing on differential diagnoses in thoracic radiography was developed. One hundred fourth-year veterinary students took a brief pretest, played the board game, and took a brief posttest as a part of their respective clinical radiology rotations. Pretest results were compared to posttest results using a paired t-test to determine if playing the game impacted student understanding. Students' mean scores on the posttest were significantly higher than mean pretest scores (P game resulted in improved short-term understanding of thoracic differential diagnoses by fourth-year students, and use of the board game on a clinical rotation seems to be a beneficial part of the learning process. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. A Collaborative Bovine Artificial Insemination Short Course for Students Attending a Caribbean Veterinary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Joseph C.; Robinson, James Q.; DeJarnette, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) of cattle is a critical career skill for veterinarians interested in food animal practice. Consequently, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Student Chapter of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Select Sires, and University of Idaho Extension have partnered to offer an intensive 2-day course to…

  16. Nigerian Veterinary Journal The record of J 14small animal trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rapidly organize definitive therapy,. Traumas from various causes are recognized as frequent causes of injury to pet animals. However, there is paucity of information concerning the patterns of injuries associated with various causes of trauma in referral Veterinary centers in. Nigeria. This article presents the results of a.

  17. Information prescriptions: A tool for veterinary practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Kogan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has become a major source of health information and has the potential to offer many benefits for both human and animal health. In order for impact to be positive, however, it is critical that users be able to access reliable, trustworthy information. Although more pet owners are using the Internet to research animal health information than ever before, there remains limited research surrounding their online activities or the ability to influence owners’ online search behaviors. The current study was designed to assess the online behaviors and perceptions of pet owners after receiving either general or topic-specific information prescriptions as part of their veterinary appointment. Results indicate that nearly 60% of clients accessed the suggested websites and nearly all of these clients reported positive feelings about this addition to their veterinary services. These results suggest that offering information prescriptions to clients can facilitate better online searches by clients and positively impact both animal health and client satisfaction.

  18. Financing and organisation of veterinary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallacher, M; Barcos, L

    2012-08-01

    This paper analyses the different ways of financing official Veterinary Services (VS) and the effects of these choices on the performance of such Services. The links between governance, organisational effectiveness and financing arrangements are seen as particularly important. The paper comments on some of the advantages and disadvantages of financing VS with service fees, as compared to budget transfers from general government revenues. Evidence is presented on the considerable heterogeneity in the size of VS and on the impact of this heterogeneity on organisation and financing. The paper concludes with a stylised case study, which emphasises the importance of collaboration and the division of labour between the official and the private sector of the veterinary profession.

  19. Planning new basic guideline to the radiological risk. Content, radiological criteria and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin Cuartero, M.; Vega Riber, R. de la; Martin Calvarro, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The most important aspects of the Basic Guideline focus on their area of planning, groups of potential radiological emergencies in the type of activity associated with the levels of response planning and responsible organizations, structure and functions for each level, radiological criteria, implementation and maintenance of the effectiveness of the level of response plans abroad.

  20. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection; 3. Congreso Regional sobre Seguridad Radiologica y Nuclear, Congreso Regional IRPA y 3. Congreso Peruano de Proteccion Radiologica. Libro de Resumenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting.

  1. Radiotherapy in veterinary medicine: beginnings and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R.; Andrade, Alexandre L.; Luvizoto, Maria C.R.; Piero, Juliana R.; Ciarlini, Luciana D.R.P.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a brief historical about the use of ionizing radiations in Veterinary Medicine, instructing the physical beginnings and techniques wrapped in the realization of the proceedings of radiotherapy in animals, illustrating some treated cases, highlighting the difficulties and pointing to the perspectives and importance of the acting of the medical physics in this kind of therapeutic still little used in the national scenery. (author)

  2. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis TOUTAIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given that: (1 the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2 the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR of animal origin; (3 alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed green antibiotics, having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes.We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a turnstile exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s. For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  3. Trochanteric bursitis: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla, T.Y.; Manjon, P.; Lozaono, C.

    1997-01-01

    To describe the radiological findings associated with trochanteric bursitis. Six patients studied by means of plain radiography (n=6), CT(n=4) and MR(n=2). The conventional radiography study was normal in two patients and disclosed bone abnormalities in four. US showed a hypoechoic or anechoic collection in all the patients. Two patients presented areas suggestive of calcification, and septa were observed in one. CT disclosed the presence of well defined, low-attenuation, unenhanced collections. MR images identified collections with a signal intensity similar to that of water. Trochanteric bursitis is a relatively common cause of hip pain, and can involve any one of a number of etiologies. US is a good imaging technique for diagnosing this pathology. (Author) 10 refs

  4. The responsibilities of veterinary educators in responding to emerging needs in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, R E W

    2009-08-01

    It is an unfortunate fact that not only has veterinary education failed to adapt in the face of likely future needs, but it has also failed to respond to societal changes that have already taken place and that have affected the requirements for veterinary services and veterinary capability. The responsibility is primarily that of educators, although vision and foresight require a co-ordinated approach involving national and international veterinary organisations. Once it is accepted by all parties that change is essential, the implementation will fail unless there is a unified programme involving the schools and colleges, the accrediting agencies, the licensing authorities, governments, the professional organisations and corporate veterinary medicine. All have a role to play, and any one can readily block progress. A unified approach is an absolute requirement. The developed countries must take a leading role, but the issues are global, and ways must be found to facilitate change in all parts of the world. Disease knows no boundaries, and any strategy is only as strong as its weakest link.

  5. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  6. Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, P.; Schenker, M.B.; Green, R.; Samuels, S.

    1989-01-01

    All female graduates of a major U.S. veterinary school were surveyed by mailed questionnaire to obtain details of work practice and hazard exposure during the most recent year worked and during all pregnancies. Exposure questions were based on previously implicated occupational hazards which included anesthetic gases, radiation, zoonoses, prostaglandins, vaccines, physical trauma, and pesticides. The response rate was 86% (462/537). We found that practice type and pregnancy status were major determinants of hazard exposure within the veterinary profession. Small-animal practitioners reported the highest rates of exposure to anesthetic gas (94%), X-ray (90%), and pesticides (57%). Large-animal practitioners reported greater rates of trauma (64%) and potential exposure to prostaglandins (92%), Brucella abortus vaccine (23%), and carbon monoxide (18%). Potentially hazardous workplace practices or equipment were common. Forty-one percent of respondents who reported taking X-rays did not wear film badges, and 76% reported physically restraining animals for X-ray procedures. Twenty-seven percent of the respondents exposed to anesthetic gases worked at facilities which did not have waste anesthetic gas scavenging systems. Women who worked as veterinarians during a pregnancy attempted to reduce exposures to X-rays, insecticides, and other potentially hazardous exposures. Some potentially hazardous workplace exposures are common in veterinary practice, and measures to educate workers and to reduce these exposures should not await demonstration of adverse health effects.

  7. Use of adenoviral vectors as veterinary vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, T B; Alves, P M; Aunins, J G; Carrondo, M J T

    2005-10-01

    Vaccines are the most effective and inexpensive prophylactic tool in veterinary medicine. Ideally, vaccines should induce a lifelong protective immunity against the target pathogen while not causing clinical or pathological signs of diseases in the vaccinated animals. However, such ideal vaccines are rare in the veterinary field. Many vaccines are either of limited effectiveness or have harmful side effects. In addition, there are still severe diseases with no effective vaccines. A very important criterion for an ideal vaccine in veterinary medicine is low cost; this is especially important in developing countries and even more so for poultry vaccination, where vaccines must sell for a few cents a dose. Traditional approaches include inactivated vaccines, attenuated live vaccines and subunit vaccines. Recently, genetic engineering has been applied to design new, improved vaccines. Adenovirus vectors are highly efficient for gene transfer in a broad spectrum of cell types and species. Moreover, adenoviruses often induce humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted foreign genes. Thus, adenoviruses have become a vector of choice for delivery and expression of foreign proteins for vaccination. Consequently, the market requirements for adenovirus vaccines are increasing, creating a need for production methodologies of concentrated vectors with warranted purity and efficacy. This review summarizes recent developments and approaches of adenovirus production and purification as the application of these vectors, including successes and failures in clinical applications to date.

  8. Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, P.; Schenker, M.B.; Green, R.; Samuels, S.

    1989-01-01

    All female graduates of a major U.S. veterinary school were surveyed by mailed questionnaire to obtain details of work practice and hazard exposure during the most recent year worked and during all pregnancies. Exposure questions were based on previously implicated occupational hazards which included anesthetic gases, radiation, zoonoses, prostaglandins, vaccines, physical trauma, and pesticides. The response rate was 86% (462/537). We found that practice type and pregnancy status were major determinants of hazard exposure within the veterinary profession. Small-animal practitioners reported the highest rates of exposure to anesthetic gas (94%), X-ray (90%), and pesticides (57%). Large-animal practitioners reported greater rates of trauma (64%) and potential exposure to prostaglandins (92%), Brucella abortus vaccine (23%), and carbon monoxide (18%). Potentially hazardous workplace practices or equipment were common. Forty-one percent of respondents who reported taking X-rays did not wear film badges, and 76% reported physically restraining animals for X-ray procedures. Twenty-seven percent of the respondents exposed to anesthetic gases worked at facilities which did not have waste anesthetic gas scavenging systems. Women who worked as veterinarians during a pregnancy attempted to reduce exposures to X-rays, insecticides, and other potentially hazardous exposures. Some potentially hazardous workplace exposures are common in veterinary practice, and measures to educate workers and to reduce these exposures should not await demonstration of adverse health effects

  9. [Marketing in veterinary practice; a theoretical framework].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, A J; Smidts, A

    1990-03-15

    An increase in the number of veterinarians, while at the same time the number of animals has remained constant, has resulted in growing competition. By extending the range of products and by enlarging the veterinarians' scope of activities this competition can be decreased. A marketing-orientation will be helpful in this respect. This article indicates in which way marketing concepts can be used in a veterinary practice. The services of the veterinarian will be looked at by means of the Abell approach. This focuses on the functions performed by the services and examines, per function performed, for whom this might be interesting and which alternatives there might be. Next the concept of market segmentation is filled in for a veterinary practice by means of a hypothetical example. The marketing mix (product, place, price, promotion and personnel) is given considerable attention. The last element of marketing in a veterinary practice that is discussed here is the marketing information system. In a next article the question will be answered how marketing-directed the Dutch veterinarian works nowadays. To find this out research has been done; 166 vets were interviewed by telephone for approximately 40 minutes each.

  10. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  11. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-06

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  13. Implementation of Online Veterinary Hospital on Cloud Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Huang, Yao-Min; Chen, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Pet markets involve in great commercial possibilities, which boost thriving development of veterinary hospital businesses. The service tends to intensive competition and diversified channel environment. Information technology is integrated for developing the veterinary hospital cloud service platform. The platform contains not only pet medical services but veterinary hospital management and services. In the study, QR Code andcloud technology are applied to establish the veterinary hospital cloud service platform for pet search by labeling a pet's identification with QR Code. This technology can break the restriction on veterinary hospital inspection in different areas and allows veterinary hospitals receiving the medical records and information through the exclusive QR Code for more effective inspection. As an interactive platform, the veterinary hospital cloud service platform allows pet owners gaining the knowledge of pet diseases and healthcare. Moreover, pet owners can enquire and communicate with veterinarians through the platform. Also, veterinary hospitals can periodically send reminders of relevant points and introduce exclusive marketing information with the platform for promoting the service items and establishing individualized marketing. Consequently, veterinary hospitals can increase the profits by information share and create the best solution in such a competitive veterinary market with industry alliance.

  14. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  15. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  16. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  17. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  18. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  19. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Antibiotic prophylaxis in veterinary cancer chemotherapy: A review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, J L; Argyle, D J; Argyle, S A

    2018-06-12

    Bacterial infection following cancer chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in human and veterinary patients. Antimicrobial prophylaxis is controversial in the human oncology field, as any decreased incidence in bacterial infections is countered by patient adverse effects and increased antimicrobial resistance. Comprehensive guidelines exist to aid human oncologists in prescribing antimicrobial prophylaxis but similar recommendations are not available in veterinary literature. As the veterinarian's role in antimicrobial stewardship is increasingly emphasized, it is vital that veterinary oncologists implement appropriate antimicrobial use. By considering the available human and veterinary literature we present an overview of current clinical practices and are able to suggest recommendations for prophylactic antimicrobial use in veterinary cancer chemotherapy patients. © 2018 The Authors. Veterinary and Comparative Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.