WorldWideScience

Sample records for veterinary healthcare management

  1. Pain management in veterinary patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Vedpathak

    Full Text Available The veterinary practitioner has an ethical obligation to help alleviate animal pain. Although most veterinarians accept the fact that animals feel pain, still, postoperative pain relief is not a routine practice in all veterinary hospitals and clinics today. Nociception is a physiological process which involves transduction, transmission, modulation and perception of the noxious stimuli. Chemical mediators are important components of the nociceptive reflex and offer a target of pharmacologic modulation. Assessment of pain in animals is the most important step in the successful management of pain. Choosing appropriate method of pain control would depend upon the type of procedure followed, severity of pain and economic considerations for each individual circumstance. Our understanding of the pain in its manifestation, mechanisms, assessment and alleviation in animals is still although improving, limited. [Vet World 2009; 2(9.000: 360-363

  2. Exploring the Impact of Toxic Attitudes and a Toxic Environment on the Veterinary Healthcare Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Irene C; Coe, Jason B; Adams, Cindy L; Conlon, Peter D; Sargeant, Jan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians' and Registered Veterinary Technicians' (RVT's) perceptions of the veterinary healthcare team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with four veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians) and four Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs). Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with manifestations of toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These manifestations included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the "go to person," avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when "broken communication and tension between staff members" occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands. The presence of people manifesting a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment.

  3. Quality management in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash S Dodwad

    2013-01-01

    Clinical governance and better human resource management practices are important planks in the current health policies emphasizing quality of patient care. There are numerous reasons why it is important to improve quality of healthcare, including enhancing the accountability of health practitioners and managers, resource efficiency, identifying, and minimizing medical errors while maximizing the use of effective care and improving outcomes, and aligning care to what users/patients want in add...

  4. STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Odigie, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect both their mental and physical health, decrease their efficiency at work, for a successful intervention, the causes and management of stress in any healthcare unit or among healthcare professionals must be diligently documented. The aim of this study is to explore issues on specific occupational stress related to job performance, the role of healthcare in stress management and the effects of job resourc...

  5. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Edwards, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...... of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in healthcare...... still is in its infancy and it is just a matter of letting sufficient time pass in order have a successful implementation of lean in all areas of healthcare. The second hypothesis states that a major barrier to lean management in healthcare simply is lacking understanding of the lean concepts leading...

  6. Quality management in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodwad, Subhash S

    2013-01-01

    Clinical governance and better human resource management practices are important planks in the current health policies emphasizing quality of patient care. There are numerous reasons why it is important to improve quality of healthcare, including enhancing the accountability of health practitioners and managers, resource efficiency, identifying, and minimizing medical errors while maximizing the use of effective care and improving outcomes, and aligning care to what users/patients want in addition to what they need. "Quality in health is doing the right things for the right people at the right time, and doing them right first time and every time." Quality can also refer to the technical quality of care, to nontechnical aspects of service delivery such as clients' waiting time and staff's attitudes, and to programmatic elements such as policies, infrastructure, access, and management. In this oration/article quality initiatives like Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) and National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) of Government of India (GOI), which concentrate on improving the quality of infrastructure of vast rural health facilities including sub-center, primary health center, and community health center has been taken into account with focus on improving quality of health services also. United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) in collaboration with the GOI has proposed introducing quality assurance program for accessing and improving the quality of services at public sector health facilities. It is felt that improving the quality of health services in public sector will attract the client belonging to low economic strata, and surely will help in achieving the goal of the NRHM, that is, "Reaching the enriched with quality of health services."

  7. Stress management interventions for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberg, Susan; Gelberg, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Two-hundred-and-eighty-nine veterinary students from all four years of the University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine (UTCVM) were invited to complete the Derogatis Stress Profile (DSP)1 and an original Demographic Data Profile (DDP). The DSP assessed the students' current experiences of perceived stress, and the DDP was designed to gather information about students' academic year, their living situations, their financial situations, their interest area within the veterinary medical profession, and their current methods of coping with stress. These data were gathered as a baseline measure of veterinary medical students' perceived level of stress and quality of life. In an earlier study, data were also collected from faculty and staff about the perceived quality of the climate and culture of the veterinary college. The results of the DSP and DDP suggest that, although veterinary students at UTCVM do not experience significant levels of stress overall, they do report higher levels of subjective stress, time pressure, and depression than the general population. The more companion animals that veterinary students cared for in their personal lives, the more likely they were to report higher levels of perceived stress. Lastly, there were significant differences between genders, with female veterinary students reporting higher levels of perceived stress than their male counterparts. The preliminary results of the climate and culture data suggest that faculty and staff of the veterinary college individually feel that they are cared for in the work environment and collectively believe that the college strives for excellence.

  8. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  9. Healthcare waste management in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, A Prem; Prashanthini, V; Visvanathan, C

    2010-01-01

    The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

  10. Exploring the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment on the veterinary healthcare team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eMoore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians’ and Registered Veterinary Technicians’ (RVT’s perceptions of the veterinary health care team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with 4 veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians and 4 Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs. Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These attitudes included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the go to person, avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when broken communication and tension between staff members occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands.The presence of people with a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment.

  11. Public Healthcare Organizations: Leadership or Management?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maite Martínez-Gonzalez; Pilar Monreal-Bosch; Santiago Perera; Clara Selva Olid

    2016-01-01

    ...) was sent to 120 people occupying management positions in healthcare centers and hospitals as well as 14 others who also hold such positions in these healthcare centers and hospitals, were interviewed...

  12. Knowledge management in Portuguese healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Sofia Gaspar; Ferreira, Maria Manuela Frederico

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge management imposes itself as a pressing need for the organizations of several sectors of the economy, including healthcare. to evaluate the perception of healthcare institution collaborators in relation to knowledge management in the institution where they operate and analyze the existence of differences in this perception, based on the institution's management model. a study conducted in a sample consisting of 671 collaborators from 10 Portuguese healthcare institutions with different models of management. In order to assess the knowledge management perception, we used a score designed from and based on items from the scores available in the literature. the perception of moderate knowledge management on the healthcare institutions and the statistically significant differences in knowledge management perception were evidenced in each management model. management knowledge takes place in healthcare institutions, and the current management model determines the way staff at these institutions manage their knowledge.

  13. Hazardous Waste Management by healthcare Institutions, Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study regarding healthcare institution waste management and practical implementation of laws and regulation was conducted in selected hospitals of Addis Ababa during the period of 2012/13. The entire healthcare system generates non-hazardous and hazardous wastes during healthcare processes. Therefore, this ...

  14. Veterinary Business Management Association presents program to aid future growth and stability of veterinary profession

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Spiraling veterinary student debt and the lack of a sustainable and profitable business model for many private practices in the modern business environment threaten the future growth and stability of the veterinary profession.

  15. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs.

  16. Developing Ethical Competence in Healthcare Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenström, Erica; Ohlsson, Jon; Höglund, Anna T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers' ethical competence. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews…

  17. Group profile management in ubiquitous healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengou, Maria-Anna; Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, ubiquitous healthcare is of utmost importance in the patient-centric model. Furthermore, the personalization of ubiquitous healthcare services plays a very important role to make the patient-centric model a reality. The personalization of the ubiquitous healthcare services is based on the profiles of the entities participating in these services. In this paper, we propose a group profile management system in a ubiquitous healthcare environment. The proposed system is responsible for the dynamic creation of a group profile and its management.

  18. Healthcare hazard control and safety management

    CERN Document Server

    Tweedy, James T

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive in scope, this totally revamped edition of a bestseller is the ideal desk reference for anyone tasked with hazard control and safety management in the healthcare industry. Presented in an easy-to-read format, Healthcare Hazard Control and Safety Management, Third Edition examines hazard control and safety management as proactive functions of an organization. Like its popular predecessors, the book supplies a complete overview of hazard control, safety management, compliance, standards, and accreditation in the healthcare industry. This edition includes new information on leadersh

  19. Business resilience: Reframing healthcare risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    The responsibility of risk management in healthcare is fractured, with multiple stakeholders. Most hospitals and healthcare systems do not have a fully integrated risk management system that spans the entire organizational and operational structure for the delivery of key services. This article provides insight toward utilizing a comprehensive Business Resilience program and associated methodology to understand and manage organizational risk leading to organizational effectiveness and operational efficiencies, with the fringe benefit of realizing sustainable operational capability during adverse conditions. © 2015 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  20. Integrated healthcare resource planning and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluta, Mladen; Nunziata, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    Management information systems (MIS) and decision support systems (DSS), used as part of broader healthcare technology management, are considered to be health technologies. As such, they should meet the criteria of affordability, appropriateness, cost-effectiveness, ease of use and sustainability if they are to be implementable and have a lasting impact on healthcare service delivery. They should also facilitate and support improved quality of healthcare. We have developed a suite of management-support tools around a concept of integrated healthcare resource planning and management (iHRPM). We believe that these tools meet the above-mentioned criteria and therefore lend themselves to widespread applicability in diverse healthcare and socio-economic contexts, not least in supporting performance monitoring and benchmarking.

  1. Managing strategic outsourcing in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, V

    2001-01-01

    Hospitals and healthcare systems are facing increased financial difficulties because of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and managed care. As a result, healthcare executives face the challenge of reducing costs while maintaining quality patient care. One of the strategic tools healthcare executives use to meet this challenge is outsourcing. Even though outsourcing has many benefits, outsourcing will fail if not managed successfully. Senior executives must choose outsourcing managers who have the necessary leadership capabilities. Managing outsourcing requires an understanding of outsourcing strategy, the benefits and risks of outsourcing, the evaluation process, and the methods to managing strategically. With appropriate management, strategic outsourcing should provide healthcare executives with a viable strategy for controlling costs and maintaining quality patient care.

  2. Managing problem wildlife in the 'Old World': a veterinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artois, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on mammalian pest species mainly in Europe and Africa and on implications for animal health, human safety, wildlife management and animal welfare. Three examples of problem species are presented: the wild boar (Sus scrofa), the stray dog (Canis familiaris) and the red fox, (Vulpes vulpes). Several species are reservoirs or vectors of transmissible diseases of man and of economically valuable domestic species. The control of these and other infections and the limitation of the nuisance or damage caused by these pest species involves lethal or non-lethal methods which are briefly reviewed. Some control measures require veterinary expertise, and veterinary involvement in managing problem species is likely to increase. With regard to fertility control, methods are considered which will allow an appropriate choice of the best technique for the management of problem animals in various habitats. For desirable native species, traditional methods of control, especially hunting in the case of game species, is preferable to contraception. For exotic or feral species, control of fertility seems to be a worthwhile option.

  3. Health concerns and management of select veterinary drug residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Ronald E; Dedonder, Keith; Kissell, Lindsey; Mzyk, Danielle; Marmulak, Tara; Smith, Geof; Tell, Lisa; Gehring, Ronette; Davis, Jennifer; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to review the potential adverse health effects in humans if exposed to residues of selected veterinary drugs used in food-producing animals. Our other objectives are to briefly inform the reader of why many of these drugs are or were approved for use in livestock production and how drug residues can be mitigated for these drugs. The selected drugs include several antimicrobials, beta agonists, and phenylbutazone. The antimicrobials continue to be of regulatory concern not only because of their acute adverse effects but also because their use as growth promoters have been linked to antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, nitroimidazoles and arsenicals are no longer approved for use in food animals in most jurisdictions. In recent years, the risk assessment and risk management of beta agonists, have been the focus of national and international agencies and this manuscript attempts to review the pharmacology of these drugs and regulatory challenges. Several of the drugs selected for this review can cause noncancer effects (e.g., penicillins) and others are potential carcinogens (e.g., nitroimidazoles). This review also focuses on how regulatory and independent organizations manage the risk of these veterinary drugs based on data from human health risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-06

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer. British Veterinary Association.

  5. Improving preparation for senior management in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R

    2007-01-01

    Noting the historical and practical relationship of management education in healthcare to business generally, this paper reviews and analyzes four recent criticisms of management education by Pfeffer and Fong, Ghoshal, Mintzberg, and Bennis. It concludes from that analysis that increased effort on assessing and improving healthcare education efforts is essential, and proposes a model for a national program of continuous improvement of educational practice. It reviews existing competency assessment tools in the light of needs, and suggests next steps for educators and practitioners.

  6. Management-By-Objectives in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas

    Concurrent to the hasty development within the medical, technological and organizational areas of healthcare, new initiatives are continuously implemented to improve quality of delivered care. To evaluate the effect of these initiatives, the application of performance measurement has become common...... practice for modern healthcare organizations. During the last decade, vast amounts of quality indicators, accreditation audits, satisfaction surveys etc. have become an integrated part of healthcare professionals' daily work. Most of these measurement structures are well documented and well executed...... the overview and transparency for healthcare decision makers; as a result, well-documented initiatives fail to become integrated support in operational decision-making processes. This research work has thus striven to design a holistic Management-By-Objectives framework that can enable managers and operational...

  7. Process Management Practices In Healthcare Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kılıç

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare institutions differ from other service businesses by their “matrix organizational structure” and “error-free output” requirement. However, the processes stay the same for all organizational activities at different levels. One of the post-modern management approach is to focus on basis of necessary processes and fundamental organizational changes. This case study aims to initially explain the characteristics of healthcare institutions and the basic conceptual properties of process and process management. Then the effect of the “management throughprocesses approach” over organization will be discussed. Finally; process management at healthcare institutions, scope of health care and examples of the other post-modern approaches will be examined with their outputs

  8. Performance management in healthcare: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewko, Sarah J; Cummings, Greta G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying theoretical assumptions and implications of current micro-level performance management and evaluation (PME) practices, specifically within health-care organizations. PME encompasses all activities that are designed and conducted to align employee outputs with organizational goals. Design/methodology/approach - PME, in the context of healthcare, is analyzed through the lens of critical theory. Specifically, Habermas' theory of communicative action is used to highlight some of the questions that arise in looking critically at PME. To provide a richer definition of key theoretical concepts, the authors conducted a preliminary, exploratory hermeneutic semantic analysis of the key words "performance" and "management" and of the term "performance management". Findings - Analysis reveals that existing micro-level PME systems in health-care organizations have the potential to create a workforce that is compliant, dependent, technically oriented and passive, and to support health-care systems in which inequalities and power imbalances are perpetually reinforced. Practical implications - At a time when the health-care system is under increasing pressure to provide high-quality, affordable services with fewer resources, it may be wise to investigate new sector-specific ways of evaluating and managing performance. Originality/value - In this paper, written for health-care leaders and health human resource specialists, the theoretical assumptions and implications of current PME practices within health-care organizations are explored. It is hoped that readers will be inspired to support innovative PME practices within their organizations that encourage peak performance among health-care professionals.

  9. Waste management in healthcare establishments within Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Poor management of healthcare waste exposes health workers and the public to the toxic effects of wastes generated from health establishments. The disposal of these wastes could also lead to environmental problems if not done properly. This study has assessed the waste management practices in hospitals and ...

  10. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare.

  11. Veterinary practice management education in the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges member colleges during 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J W; Covert, B R

    2001-07-15

    Most veterinary students enrolled at AAVMC member institutions take at least 1 VPM course prior to graduation. These courses are characterized by widespread involvement of outside lecturers with business expertise, which likely adds to their strength. However, it remains that wide variation in VPM education exists across the AAVMC with regard to the topics addressed, the specific business expertise of faculty and administrative course specifics. As such, the situation provides several key opportunities. Foremost among these is the immediate need for profession-wide discourse on VPM education to define reasonable expectations with regard to the business skills of veterinary graduates. In addition, outcomes assessment would provide information on which of the widely varying approaches to VPM education is most likely to produce successful graduates. The opportunity also exists for development of academic research programs to support VPM education directly by strengthening the related disciplinary knowledge base. Effective leadership for these efforts will be crucial to their success.

  12. Public Healthcare Organizations: Leadership or Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Martínez-Gonzalez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the type of leadership that managers are currently exercising in the Catalan health system in Catalonia. A questionnaire (MQL-5X was sent to 120 people occupying management positions in healthcare centers and hospitals as well as 14 others who also hold such positions in these healthcare centers and hospitals, were interviewed. The mixed methods research design attests that the Catalan health system is managed through a structure of simultaneous transformational and transactional leadership. However, the efficacy of this system is conditioned purely by the communicative competence that a manager may or may not possess, as the system itself makes no effort to encourage transformational leadership. Transformation leadership inspires positive change, conveys a clear vision and enhances morale, motivation and job performance. It galvanizes a team into changing their expectations and perceptions and motivates them to work towards common goals.

  13. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management: Experiences from the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in healthcare...

  14. Are healthcare middle management jobs extreme jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A; Parry, Emma; Gascoigne, Charlotte; Moore, Cíara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence of "extreme jobs" among middle managers in acute hospitals, and to identify individual and organizational implications. The paper is based on interviews and focus groups with managers at six hospitals, a "proof of concept" pilot with an operations management team, and a survey administered at five hospitals. Six of the original dimensions of extreme jobs, identified in commercial settings, apply to hospital management: long hours, unpredictable work patterns, tight deadlines with fast pace, broad responsibility, "24/7 availability", mentoring and coaching. Six healthcare-specific dimensions were identified: making life or death decisions, conflicting priorities, being required to do more with fewer resources, responding to regulatory bodies, the need to involve many people before introducing improvements, fighting a negative climate. Around 75 per cent of hospital middle managers have extreme jobs. This extreme healthcare management job model was derived inductively from a qualitative study involving a small number of respondents. While the evidence suggests that extreme jobs are common, further research is required to assess the antecedents, incidence, and implications of these working practices. A varied, intense, fast-paced role with responsibility and long hours can be rewarding, for some. However, multi-tasking across complex roles can lead to fatigue, burnout, and mistakes, patient care may be compromised, and family life may be adversely affected. As far as the authors can ascertain, there are no other studies exploring acute sector management roles through an extreme jobs lens.

  15. Veterinary Curricula Today: Curricular Management and Renewal at AAVMC Member Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F; Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M

    2017-01-01

    Renewing a veterinary curriculum is challenging work and its impact is difficult to measure. Academic leaders are charged with regular review and updating of their curricula, but have few resources available to guide their efforts. Due to the paucity of published veterinary reports, most turn to colleagues at other veterinary schools for insider advice, while a few undertake the task of adapting information from the educational literature to suit the needs of the veterinary profession. In response to this paucity, we proposed a theme issue on curricular renewal and surveyed academic leaders regarding curricular challenges and major renewal efforts underway. We compiled the results of this survey (with respondents from 38 veterinary colleges) as well as publicly available information to create a digest of curricular activities at AAVMC member institutions. This introductory article summarizes the key survey findings, describes the methods used to create the curricular digest, and presents information about key aspects of selected programs. Our overarching research questions were as follows: (1) What was the extent and nature of curricular change at AAVMC-accredited veterinary colleges over the past 5 years? and (2) How are curricula and curricular changes managed at AAVMC accredited veterinary colleges? The appended curricular digests provide selected details of current DVM curricula at participating institutions. Additional articles in this issue report on institutional change efforts in more detail. It is our hope that this issue will help to pave the way for future curricular development, research, and peer-to-peer collaboration.

  16. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  17. Uncovering middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birken Sarah A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Middle managers have received little attention in extant health services research, yet they may have a key role in healthcare innovation implementation. The gap between evidence of effective care and practice may be attributed in part to poor healthcare innovation implementation. Investigating middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation may reveal an opportunity for improvement. In this paper, we present a theory of middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation to fill the gap in the literature and to stimulate research that empirically examines middle managers' influence on innovation implementation in healthcare organizations. Discussion Extant healthcare innovation implementation research has primarily focused on the roles of physicians and top managers. Largely overlooked is the role of middle managers. We suggest that middle managers influence healthcare innovation implementation by diffusing information, synthesizing information, mediating between strategy and day-to-day activities, and selling innovation implementation. Summary Teamwork designs have become popular in healthcare organizations. Because middle managers oversee these team initiatives, their potential to influence innovation implementation has grown. Future research should investigate middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation. Findings may aid top managers in leveraging middle managers' influence to improve the effectiveness of healthcare innovation implementation.

  18. Uncovering middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Weiner, Bryan J

    2012-04-03

    Middle managers have received little attention in extant health services research, yet they may have a key role in healthcare innovation implementation. The gap between evidence of effective care and practice may be attributed in part to poor healthcare innovation implementation. Investigating middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation may reveal an opportunity for improvement. In this paper, we present a theory of middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation to fill the gap in the literature and to stimulate research that empirically examines middle managers' influence on innovation implementation in healthcare organizations. Extant healthcare innovation implementation research has primarily focused on the roles of physicians and top managers. Largely overlooked is the role of middle managers. We suggest that middle managers influence healthcare innovation implementation by diffusing information, synthesizing information, mediating between strategy and day-to-day activities, and selling innovation implementation. Teamwork designs have become popular in healthcare organizations. Because middle managers oversee these team initiatives, their potential to influence innovation implementation has grown. Future research should investigate middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation. Findings may aid top managers in leveraging middle managers' influence to improve the effectiveness of healthcare innovation implementation.

  19. Medical management of myxomatous mitral valve disease: An evidence-based veterinary medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Richard K; Schoeman, Johan

    2014-10-22

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common heart disease of dogs. The current management of MMVD in dogs is mostly pharmacological, and the recommendations for treatment are based on a number of veterinary studies. Notwithstanding the current consensus regarding the medical management of MMVD, there remains active debate as to which drugs are the most effective. In order to understand how recommendations are constructed in the pharmacological management of diseases, the veterinarian needs to understand the concept of evidence-based veterinary medicine, and how the findings of these studies can be applied in their own practices. This review summarises the current veterinary literature and explains how the consensus regarding the management of MMVD has been reached. This review highlights the limitations of veterinary studies in order to provide veterinary practitioners with a sense of the difficulty there is in establishing the benefit of one treatment over the other. Veterinarians should therefore apply treatment recommendations based on the best evidence, integrated with a pathomechanistic understanding of the disease process and clinical experience.

  20. Development and pilot of Case Manager: a virtual-patient experience for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Julie K; Johnson, Susan E; Allen, L Clare V; Brilmyer, Cheryl; Griffiths, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in veterinary education to engage students, teach and reinforce clinical reasoning, and provide access anytime/anywhere to quality learning opportunities. In addition, accrediting bodies are asking for more concrete documentation of essential clinical-skills outcomes. Unfortunately, during the clinical year in a referral hospital setting, students are at the mercy of chance regarding the types of cases they will encounter and the opportunities they will have to participate. Patient- and case-simulation technology is becoming more popular as a way to achieve these objectives in human and veterinary medical education. Many of the current options available to the veterinary medical education community to develop virtual-patient cases are too time-consuming, cost prohibitive, or difficult for the instructor or learner to use. In response, we developed a learning tool, Case Manager, which is low-cost and user-friendly. Case Manager was designed to meet the demands of veterinary education by providing students with an opportunity to cultivate clinical reasoning skills and allowing for real-time student feedback. We launched a pilot test with 37 senior veterinary medical students as part of their Small Animal Internal Medicine clinical rotation. Students reported that Case Manager increased their engagement with the material, improved diagnostic and problem-solving skills, and broadened their exposure to a variety of cases. In addition, students felt that Case Manager was superior to a more traditional, less interactive case presentation format.

  1. Analysis of the healthcare waste management status in Tehran hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Malekahmadi, Fariba; Yunesian,Masud; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar; Nadafi, Kazem

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the importance of healthcare waste management, following the ratification of the Waste Management law in 2005 and the subsequent approval of its executive bylaw in 2006 and finally the healthcare waste management criteria passing by the parliament in 2008, a review on the status of healthcare waste management is needed to implement the mentioned law properly. Findings In this retrospective study during six months period all public hospitals in Iran’s capital city, Tehra...

  2. The relationship between farmers’ participation in veterinary herd health management programs and farm performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.; Werven, van T.; Hogeveen, H.; Kremer, W.D.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, farms have increased in size and the focus of management has changed from curative to preventive. To help farmers cope with these changes, veterinarians offer veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programs, whose major objective is to support the farmer in reaching his

  3. Medical Waste Management Training for Healthcare Managers - a Necessity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aclan Ozder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers regarding bio-medical waste management.Methods:The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June – August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions. A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups.Results:67.5% (162 of participants were female. 42.5% (102 are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers.A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test and others who had not (p<0.01. It was observed that information levels of all healthcare managers who had received training on waste management had risen at the completion of that training session.Conclusion:On the subject of waste management, to have trained healthcare employees who are responsible for the safe disposal of wastes in hospitals is both a necessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country.

  4. Teaching methods in the healthcare management major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Gergana G; Popov, Teodor N

    2009-01-01

    Organisation and management are factors of paramount importance in higher education for achieving higher quality of training, better professional adaptation, and more effective career pursuance of the students. The present study analyses the use of various teaching methods for the students in the major of Healthcare Management as they are employed in two medical universities. We conducted a detailed questionnaire survey which included the students in the Healthcare Management major in the Faculty of Public Health (FPH) at Sofia Medical University (SMU) and the Medical Faculty of Plovdiv Medical University (PMU). The students were surveyed for two consecutive academic years (2004/2005 and 2005/2006). The logical units of study were 198 students completing their baccalaureate programs in Healthcare Management: 145 (73.23+/-3.15%) in the FPH, SMU and 53 (26.77+/-3.15%) in the PMU (the greater number of students from the SMU was due to the greater number of students admitted into the Sofia Medical University). The technical units of study were the Faculty of Public Health in the Medical University in Sofia and the Medical faculty in the Medical University in Plovdiv. The survey was carried out using our own questionnaire form comprising 51 questions (open and closed), some of them allowing more than one answer. The collected sociological data were analysed using SPSS v. 13.0, and the diagrams were made using Microsoft Excel' 97. We used the alternative, non-parametric and graphic analyses to illustrate the processes and events at a level of significance P < 0.05. The most frequently used teaching method in both Medical Universities is the lecture (30.43+/-3.63% for PMU and 26.32+/-1.91% for SMU). This format of teaching is also considered to be the easiest with regard to learning the study material by 22.75+/-3.25% of the PMU graduates and 27.56+/-2.38% of the SMU graduates. The PMU students regard seminars, individual work and discussions as the format that afford the

  5. An artificial neural networks approach in managing healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroh, Michael Iheoma; Ilozor, Benedict Dozie; Gombera, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Hospitals as learning organisations have evolved through complex phases of service failures and continuous service improvement to meet the business needs of a varied continuum of care customers. This paper explores the use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) in the development of a decision support system to manage healthcare non-clinical services. The information (postal questionnaires and repertory grid interviews) used to develop the input to the National Healthcare Service Facilities Risk Exposure System (NHSFRES) was articulated from 60 experienced healthcare operators. The system provides a reasonable early warning signal to the healthcare managers, and can be used by decision makers to evaluate the severity of risks on healthcare non clinical business operations. The advantage of using NHSFRES is that healthcare managers can provide their own risk assessment values (point score system) based on their own healthcare management business knowledge/judgement and corporate objectives.

  6. Managing change within the healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipcamon, James D

    2003-01-01

    In the healthcare environment, there are many catalysts for change, including federal and state regulations, increased utilization, patients' expectations, competition, declining reimbursement and the technologist shortage. Regardless of what organization you work in, change creates pressure internally. This is especially true of organizations that have not had to deal with much change. The three most common responses are: 1) senior managers tend to isolate themselves from the effects of change on staff members; 2) middle managers tend to feel squeezed between the need to implement change and the need to support staff members; and 3) employees tend to feel attacked and betrayed by change. The following five steps will help you work with your staff as you introduce and implement change: prepare your employees, plan thoroughly, develop a transitional line of authority, stay flexible during implementation, and encourage self-management, acknowledging those who helped make the change work. When change is implemented, it is important to understand that people will move through four stages of reaction: denial, resistance, exploration and commitment. As a general rule, individuals will go through all four stages, but the speed at which they move through them will be different. Managers need to assist employees who get stuck in certain stages. To implement change as successfully as possible, follow these four steps: communicate about change, deal with resistance, increase team involvement, and use visionary leadership.

  7. Efficiency of dairy farms participating and not participating in veterinary herd health management programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Marjolein; Hogeveen, Henk; Kooistra, Sake R; van Werven, Tine; Tauer, Loren W

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares farm efficiencies between dairies who were participating in a veterinary herd health management (VHHM) program with dairies not participating in such a program, to determine whether participation has an association with farm efficiency. In 2011, 572 dairy farmers received a

  8. Healthcare technology management competency and its impacts on IT-healthcare partnerships development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Her; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Greenes, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    This study presents a conceptual model to investigate the healthcare technology management (HTM) competency required by healthcare IS professionals and the impact of such competency in gaining strategic advantages through information technology (IT) by development of partnerships with people from different divisions of healthcare organizations. First, a scale to measure HTM competency was developed and validated, then it was used to collect the large-scale survey data. Second, the partial least squares (PLS) method was used to empirically test the conceptual model and hypotheses through the large-scale survey data collected. The empirical results support the proposed structure for HTM competency encompassing the four skills/knowledge domains: healthcare organization overview, external knowledge networking, healthcare technology integration, and management and interpersonal. The findings indicate that HTM competency positively influences the attitudes of information system (IS) professionals towards their willingness to develop partnerships with healthcare professionals. The findings improve our understanding of the concept of HTM competency and its influence on IT-healthcare partnerships. The conceptual model of HTM is of particular value to those concerned with skills/knowledge training and competency development for IS professionals in healthcare organizations. Healthcare organizations can develop HTM profiles for individual IS professionals in accordance with their own organization contexts. Executive management can take advantage of such HTM profiles to assist in making succession-planning decisions by evaluating the competency levels and development needs of their employees.

  9. Privatization and management development in the healthcare sector of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel J; Costello, Michael; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare reforms in Georgia parallel some of the major changes made by other Central and Eastern European countries. This is especially true of efforts to privatize the health sector and secure capital investments from Western Europe. Privatization of Georgian healthcare requires an understanding of the Soviet-era healthcare system and ideological orientation. Many of the issues and problems of privatization in Georgia require new knowledge to enhance equity outcomes, improve financial performance, increase access to care and encourage healthcare competition. Training existing and future healthcare leaders in modern management theory and practice is paramount. A university based health-management education partnership model was developed and implemented between several universities in the United States and Europe, along with two Georgian universities, to address workforce demands, changing market conditions, management knowledge and leadership competencies. Health-management education concentrations were developed and implemented along with several short courses to meet market demand for trained leaders and managers.

  10. Regional Stormwater Management Facility System at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Wolter, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    Continuing development of the Virginia Tech campus is increasing downstream flooding and water quality problems. To address these problems, the University has proposed the construction of a stormwater management facility to control the quantity and quality of stormwater releases to Strouble Creek, a tributary of the New River. The overall goal of this project is to design a stormwater management facility proposed for the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech i...

  11. Healthcare operations management through use of simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafee, Navonil; Williams, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades healthcare organisations have grown in size and complexity and healthcare costs have outpaced economic growth. In countries where healthcare is publicly-funded, increasing costs have traditionally meant a rise in the healthcare budgets in real terms; however, the ongoing global financial and economic crisis (2007-present) has had spending implications on governmental budgets for public resources in several countries. This apparent contradiction - "provide better service at a lesser cost" - which may last for years to come therefore necessitates the careful use of the allo

  12. Clinical features and management of equine post operative ileus (POI): Survey of Diplomates of the American Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, D; Hudson, N P H; Elce, Y A; Blikslager, A; Divers, T J; Handel, I G; Tremaine, W H; Pirie, R S

    2016-11-01

    A recent survey of European Colleges (European College of Equine Internal Medicine [ECEIM] and European College of Veterinary Surgeons [ECVS]) revealed the different strategies implemented by, and some of the challenges facing, European clinicians presented with cases of post operative ileus (POI). It was concluded that further comparative analysis of opinions, canvassed from additional colleges of equine veterinary specialism worldwide, would provide valuable additional insight into current POI knowledge on a more global scale. To report and compare the current strategies favoured by American veterinary specialists when managing POI in horses that underwent emergency colic surgery. Cross-sectional survey. Electronic invitations were sent to 814 Large Animal specialists, including 3 colleges: the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC). The response rate was 14% (115/814). The majority of respondents (68%) reported an estimated prevalence range of POI of 0-20%. The presence of reflux on nasogastric intubation was the main criterion used to define POI. A lesion involving the small intestine was considered the main risk factor for POI. Anti-inflammatory drugs, intravenous (i.v.) fluids and antimicrobial drugs were the primary strategies used when managing POI. Flunixin meglumine and i.v. lidocaine were the drugs most commonly used in the treatment of horses with POI. Supplementary management strategies targeted mainly the prevention of post operative adhesions, infection and inflammation. There is a lack of consensus on the clinical definition of POI. Prospective and objective clinical assessment of the effectiveness of the different strategies contained within this and the European survey is necessary in order to identify a standardised approach to the management of equine POI. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Successful healthcare programs and projects: organization portfolio management essentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Scott; Solak, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Many healthcare organization projects take more time and resources than planned and fail to deliver desired business outcomes. Healthcare IT is a major component of many projects and often undeservedly receives the blame for failure. Poor results are often not a result of faulty healthcare IT or poor project management or poor project execution alone. Many projects fail because of poor portfolio management--poor planning and management of the portfolio of initiatives designed to meet an organization's strategic goals. Because resources are limited, portfolio management enables organizations to more strategically allocate and manage their resources so care delivery, service delivery, and initiatives that advance organizations toward their strategic goals, including healthcare IT initiatives, can be accomplished at the levels of quality and service desired by an organization. Proper portfolio management is the essential foundation for program and project success and supports overall organization success. Without portfolio management, even programs and projects that execute flawlessly may not meet desired objectives. This article discusses the essential requirements for porfolio management. These include opportunity identification, return on investment (ROI) forecast, project prioritization, capacity planning (inclusive of human, financial, capital, and facilities resources), work scheduling, program and project management and execution, and project performance and value assessment. Portfolio management is essential to successful healthcare project execution. Theories are drawn from the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) work of the Project Management Institute and other leading strategy, planning, and organization change management research institutes.

  14. Common competencies for all healthcare managers: the Healthcare Leadership Alliance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefl, Mary E

    2008-01-01

    Today's healthcare executives and leaders must have management talent sophisticated enough to match the increased complexity of the healthcare environment. Executives are expected to demonstrate measurable outcomes and effectiveness and to practice evidence-based management. At the same time, academic and professional programs are emphasizing the attainment of competencies related to workplace effectiveness. The shift to evidence-based management has led to numerous efforts to define the competencies most appropriate for healthcare. The Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA), a consortium of six major professional membership organizations, used the research from and experience with their individual credentialing processes to posit five competency domains common among all practicing healthcare managers: (1) communication and relationship management, (2) professionalism, (3) leadership, (4) knowledge of the healthcare system, and (5) business skills and knowledge. The HLA engaged in a formal process to delineate the knowledge, skills, and abilities within each domain and to determine which of these competencies were core or common among the membership of all HLA associations and which were specialty or specific to the members of one or more HLA organizations. This process produced 300 competency statements, which were then organized into the Competency Directory, a unique and interactive database that can be used for assessing individual and organizational competencies. Overall, this work helps to unify the field of healthcare management and provides a lexicon and a basis for collaboration among different types of healthcare executives. This article discusses the steps that the HLA followed. It also presents the HLA Competency Directory; its application and relevance to the practitioner and academic communities; and its strengths, limitations, and potential.

  15. Challenges of Data-driven Healthcare Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Danholt, Peter; Ubbesen, Morten Bonde

    This paper describes the new kind of data-work involved in developing data-driven healthcare based on two cases from Denmark: The first case concerns a governance infrastructure based on Diagnose-Related Groups (DRG), which was introduced in Denmark in the 1990s. The DRG-system links healthcare....... Here, a core challenge is select indicators and actually being able to acquire data upon them. The two cases point out that data-driven healthcare requires more and new kinds of work for which new skills, functions and work roles have to be developed....... activity and financing and relies of extensive data entry, reporting and calculations. This has required the development of new skills, work and work roles. The second case concerns a New Governance project aimed at developing new performance indicators for healthcare delivery as an alternative to DRG...

  16. Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case of health centers in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia. ... Operational guidelines were not found in all assessed health centers. Nine out 70 (13%) interviewed healthcare workers had needle injuries during the last 12 months prior this study.

  17. Strategies for healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James G

    2012-05-01

    Adventist HealthCare offers the following lessons learned in improving the value of healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management: Use an integrated approach. Ensure that the objectives of the approach align the hospital or health system's mission and values. Embrace innovation. Develop a plan that applies to the whole organization, rather than specific business units. Ensure commitment of senior leaders.

  18. A design thinking framework for healthcare management and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jess P; Fisher, Thomas R; Trowbridge, Matthew J; Bent, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The business community has learned the value of design thinking as a way to innovate in addressing people's needs--and health systems could benefit enormously from doing the same. This paper lays out how design thinking applies to healthcare challenges and how systems might utilize this proven and accessible problem-solving process. We show how design thinking can foster new approaches to complex and persistent healthcare problems through human-centered research, collective and diverse teamwork and rapid prototyping. We introduce the core elements of design thinking for a healthcare audience and show how it can supplement current healthcare management, innovation and practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cooperation between veterinary and fisheries authorities in aquatic animal management in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Sri Kamal Ranjith

    2007-01-01

    The need for effective cooperation between the Veterinary and Fisheries Authorities in the field of aquatic animal health is widely accepted in Sri Lanka. International organisations have requested Sri Lanka to develop a model to promote this cooperation. With no tradition of aquaculture, Sri Lanka ventured into commercial aquaculture only a few decades ago. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), monodon baculovirus and white spot syndrome virus are the only OIE recognized diseases reported. Responsibility for disease diagnosis, the implementation of preventive and control measures and certification is held by three institutions: the National Aquaculture Development Authority (NAQDA), the National Aquatic Research and Development Agency (NARA) and the Department of Animal Production and Health (DAPH). The National Centre for Disease Diagnosis and Health Management in Aquaculture is at the University of Peradeniya. The Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act (No.2 of 1996), the Animal Diseases Act (No. 59 of 1992), the Animal Feeds Act of 1986 and the Aquaculture Management (Disease Control) Regulations 2000 provide the legislative framework for aquatic health issues. Coordination among the institutions involved in aquatic health management is inadequate and there is no proper policy and strategy for promoting aquatic health. Surveillance programs and epidemiological studies are also inadequate. A new structure has been proposed for better coordination between Veterinary and Fisheries Authorities in Sri Lanka to encourage all stakeholders in aquatic health control to participate in a coordinated effort. This new initiative will not only promote cooperation between Veterinary and Fisheries authorities but also strengthen the national aquatic animal health network.

  20. HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT IN THE KYRGYZ REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bokushev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the active reformation and informatization of healthcare, healthcare establishments of different levels feature a different degree of access to information resources. The situation is also characterized by parallel development of information collection flows, different level of development of different regions, poorly developed infrastructure. These aspects complicate operative information exchange for the purposes of managerial decision-making. We need to determine the degree of compliance of healthcare information systems and subsystems with user needs, as well as assess the capabilities of information systems to provide timely and quality healthcare information to all users of all levels for the purposes of managerial decision-making. The article presents results of a comprehensive assessment of the current state of healthcare informatization in the Kyrgyz Republic using HMN-developed (Health Metrics Network analytical tools. We demonstrate significant differences in healthcare information system management in the Kyrgyz Republic and note the heterogenous use thereof, especially in regions and districts.

  1. Profitable marketing: marketing for non marketing managers. Ceuta Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Kilburn, David

    2005-01-01

    This workshop was conducted with 20 Managers from Ceuta Healthcare to raise their awareness of the power of marketing and give them a set of marketing tools to improve the success rate of their business development activities

  2. An Exploration of Healthcare Inventory and Lean Management in Minimizing Medical Supply Waste in Healthcare Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how lean thinking and inventory management technology minimize expired medical supply waste in healthcare organizations. This study was guided by Toyota's theory of lean and Mintzberg's theory of management development to explain why the problem of medical supply waste exists. Government…

  3. Reputation management on facebook: awareness is key to protecting yourself, your practice, and the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2014-01-01

    From the Social media use by health professionals occurs in a digital environment where etiquette has yet to be solidly defined. The objectives of this study were to explore veterinarians' personal use of Facebook, knowledge of privacy settings, and factors related to sharing personal information online. All American Animal Hospital Association member veterinarians with a valid e-mail address (9469) were invited to complete an online survey about Facebook (e.g., time spent on Facebook, awareness of consequences, types of information posted). Questions assessing personality dimensions including trust, popularity, self-esteem and professional identity were included. The response rate was 17% (1594 of 9469); 72% of respondents (1148 of 1594) had a personal Facebook profile. Veterinarians were more likely to share information on Facebook than they would in general. Trust, need for popularity, and more time spent on Facebook predicted more disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Awareness of consequences and increased veterinary experience predicted lesser disclosure. As veterinary practices use Facebook to improve client services, they need also to manage risks associated with online disclosure by staff. Raising awareness of reputation management and consequences of posting certain types of information to Facebook is integral to protecting the individual, the practice, and the veterinary profession.

  4. Recruitment and Hiring Strategies of Private Practitioners and Implications for Practice Management Training of Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R; Hellyer, Peter W; Stewart, Sherry M; Dowers, Kristy L

    2015-01-01

    Hiring new employees is one of the most important and difficult decisions all veterinary practice managers and owners face. In an effort to improve hiring decisions, many employers are choosing to screen potential employees more thoroughly through the use of interviews, background checks, personality assessments, and online research including social and professional networking websites. The current study reports results from an anonymous online survey created to evaluate practicing veterinarians' attitudes and practices related to the use of recruitment and hiring tools. Results suggest that, compared to those in other professions, veterinarians underutilize these evaluative tools. The profession could benefit from more opportunities for both practitioners and veterinary students to learn how to utilize a broader range of hiring and recruitment techniques. One area of particular and growing concern is the use of Internet social media for evaluation of potential employees. Despite the fairly low number of participants who indicated they currently research applicants online, a significant number plan to implement this practice in the future. Many students are unaware of how their online postings can affect their future job possibilities and career. It is therefore important to designate time within continuing education programs and professional veterinary curricula to educate these populations about hiring and recruitment tool options and about how to manage their personal Internet interactions (especially social media) to enhance and maintain their professional image (e-professionalism).

  5. Healthcare professionals' accounts of challenges in managing motor neurone disease in primary healthcare: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerum, Sverre Vigeland; Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Frich, Jan C

    2017-07-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a progressive neurological disease causing muscle wasting, gradual paralysis and respiratory failure, with a life expectancy of 2-4 years. In order to better understand how MND is managed in the community, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the challenges healthcare professionals encounter when managing MND in primary healthcare. Based on data from 15 semi-structured interviews with primary healthcare professionals in Norway, we found that MND is viewed as a condition that requires exceptional effort and detailed planning. Healthcare professionals reported five main challenges in managing MND in primary healthcare: (i) building relationships with those giving and receiving care in the home; (ii) preventing caregiver burnout and breakdown; (iii) providing tailored care; (iv) ensuring good working conditions in patients' homes; and (v) recruiting and retaining qualified nursing assistants. Healthcare professionals reported needing working conditions that allow them to tailor their approach to the personal, emotional and existential nature of care preferences of those living with MND. However, people with MND and their families were sometimes perceived by healthcare professionals to prefer a strictly task-focused relationship with care providers. Such relationships limited the healthcare professionals' control over the MND trajectory and their capacity to prevent family caregiver burnout and breakdown. Adequate resources, along with training and support of nursing assistants, may increase the continuity of nursing assistants. Responsiveness to patient and family needs may enhance collaboration and promote tailored primary care and support for patients with MND and their families. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Types of conflicts and conflict management among Hungarian healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csupor, Éva; Kuna, Ágnes; Pintér, Judit Nóra; Kaló, Zsuzsa; Csabai, Márta

    2017-04-01

    Efficient communication, conflict management and cooperation are the key factors of a successful patient care. This study is part of an international comparative research. The aim of this study is to unfold conflicts among healthcare workers. 73 healthcare workers were interviewed using a standardized interview protocol. The in-person interviews used the critical incident method. 30 interviews (15 doctors, 15 nurses) were analysed with the Atlas.ti 7 content analysis software. The sources, types, effects of conflicts and conflict management strategies were investigated. The content analysis unfolded the specificities of conflicts in healthcare based on personal experiences. Organizational hierarchy was a substantial source of conflict, especially among physicians, which originates from implicit rules. As a result of the avoiding conflict management the conflicts remain partly unresolved which has negative individual and group effect. Our conceptual framework helps to develop a proper intervention specific to healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(16), 625-632.

  7. Routine veterinary anaesthetic management practices in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the routine anaesthetic management of dogs and cats during sterilisation by veterinarians in South Africa was conducted. This report describes the premedication, induction and maintenance agents most commonly used in dogs and cats. Information about monitoring of patients during the procedure and who is responsible for induction of anaesthesia and monitoring was obtained. Questionnaires were analysed with regard to demographic data, practice size, continuing education, the number of surgical procedures and sterilisations performed per week and an estimate of yearly mortality. Acetylpromazine is the most commonly used premedication in dogs and xylazine in cats. Thiopentone in dogs and alphaxalone/alphadolone in cats were the induction agents most commonly used. Alphaxalone/alphadolone in cats and halothane in dogs are the most commonly used maintenance agents. Records of anaesthesia are poorly kept and monitoring of patients is poorly performed. Respiratory rate is the parameter most commonly monitored (90.7 %, and in most cases is the sole parameter. On average 10.34 ± 8.25 cats were operated per week, of which 5.45 ±5.60 were sterilised; 17.79 ±11.61 dogs were operated per week, of which 8.65 ±7.10 were sterilised. In total, 190 patients died under anaesthesia, a mortality rate of 1:1243. Just over 50 % of practitioners had attended continuing education courses during their careers.

  8. Veterinary practice marketeer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Justin

    2015-01-24

    Justin Phillips is marketing manager at White Cross Vets and the Veterinary Marketing Association's (VMA's) Young Veterinary Marketeer of the Year. Here, he describes what he does and why he believes other practices should embrace marketing to improve their quality and client care. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Evidence-based healthcare management competency evaluation: alumni perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Clement, Dolores G; Nayar, Preethy

    2006-01-01

    An ongoing concern of healthcare educators is how well students are prepared for practice after they are graduated. Curriculum design and pedagogical methods are central components for developing healthcare management and leadership competencies. Various stakeholders have identified competency domains and typologies that outline the requisite skills and expertise to manage and lead healthcare organizations. This study analyzes survey data over a ten-year period from alumni one-year post graduation to compare self-reported assessment of competency development. Trends across two graduate professional programs tailored to different students of healthcare administration are compared. A total of 302 alumni responded to the survey. A factor analysis is performed to evaluate how the skills, knowledge, and abilities of graduates fit into identified competency domains. Fourteen competencies on the survey load into four factor domains: leadership, communication, business skills, and technology.

  10. Implementation of Online Veterinary Hospital on Cloud Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Huang, Yao-Min; Chen, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Pet markets involve in great commercial possibilities, which boost thriving development of veterinary hospital businesses. The service tends to intensive competition and diversified channel environment. Information technology is integrated for developing the veterinary hospital cloud service platform. The platform contains not only pet medical services but veterinary hospital management and services. In the study, QR Code andcloud technology are applied to establish the veterinary hospital cloud service platform for pet search by labeling a pet's identification with QR Code. This technology can break the restriction on veterinary hospital inspection in different areas and allows veterinary hospitals receiving the medical records and information through the exclusive QR Code for more effective inspection. As an interactive platform, the veterinary hospital cloud service platform allows pet owners gaining the knowledge of pet diseases and healthcare. Moreover, pet owners can enquire and communicate with veterinarians through the platform. Also, veterinary hospitals can periodically send reminders of relevant points and introduce exclusive marketing information with the platform for promoting the service items and establishing individualized marketing. Consequently, veterinary hospitals can increase the profits by information share and create the best solution in such a competitive veterinary market with industry alliance.

  11. The marketing of herd health and production management services on Dutch dairy farms: perceptions of dairy farmers and their veterinary surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire-based survey on veterinary herd health and production management services was conducted on 194 specialist dairy veterinarians and 466 dairy farmers. The farmers were randomly selected from greater than 6,000 farmer clients of the surveyed veterinarians. This paper reports these survey findings and the findings of an earlier survey conducted among the veterinarians. The survey included questions on the attributes of the service itself, the practitioners delivering the service, reasons for participation and the expected future of herd health and production management services. Reasons farmers participated in herd health and production management programmes included; access to routine screening of their herd; increasing profits; and receiving regular veterinary advice or solutions to remedy existing problems. Advantages of participation named included: good management support; higher profits; structural solutions to problems; and being better informed. Differences between farming styles were observed, pointing to the different needs and goals of farming styles. Farmers cited high costs and the time investment required as major disadvantages. The proportion of farmers citing these reasons was lower than expected by the veterinarians. In the future, preventive healthcare will be the main reason of farmers to participate. Farmers who are not using the service can potentially be encouraged to engage the services after gaining increased insight into the herd health and management service structure, the planning of activities, the cost-benefit of the service, veterinary surgeons being more co-operative with other farm advisors and veterinarians being more willing to pay attention to quality issues on the dairy farm. PMID:21851703

  12. Managing Knowledge across Boundaries in Healthcare when Innovation is Desired

    OpenAIRE

    Mats Edenius; Christina Keller; Staffan Lindblad

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how knowledge can be managed across boundaries when implementing innovations in the healthcare sector is desired, in this specific case a healthcare quality register. The research is based on a qualitative, case study approach and comprises methodologies such as semi-structured interviews and document analysis. The findings of this study describe knowledge transferred across boundaries on a syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic level. On the syntactic leve...

  13. [Methods and tools for risk management in healthcare organisations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P; Guez, P; Moll, M-C

    2008-11-01

    Risk management is a major stake for healthcare organisations. In a systemic approach, the process is based on methods and tools, of which the main ones are mentioned, for general application by clinical or technical teams, for some of them with quality and risk management support.

  14. Healthcare waste management practices and safety indicators in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abayomi Samuel Oyekale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate management of healthcare waste (HCW is a prerequisite for efficient delivery of healthcare services. In Nigeria, there are several constraints militating against proper management of HCW. This is raising some environmental concerns among stakeholders in the health sector. In this study, we analyzed the practices of HCW management and determinants of risky/safe indices of HCW disposal. Methods The study used the 2013/2014 Service Delivery Indicator (SDI data that were collected from 2480 healthcare facilities in Nigeria. Descriptive statistics, Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Ordinary Least Square (OLS regression were used to analyze the data. Results The results showed that 52.20% and 38.21% of the sampled healthcare facilities from Cross River and Bauchi states possessed guidelines for HCW management, respectively. Trainings on management of HCW were attended by 67.18% and 53.19% of the healthcare facilities from Cross River and Imo states, respectively. Also, 32.32% and 29.50% of healthcare facilities from rural and urban areas previously sent some of their staff members for trainings on HCW management, respectively. Sharp and non-sharp HCW were burnt in protected pits in 45.40% and 45.36% of all the sampled healthcare facilities, respectively. Incinerators were reported to be functional in only 2.06% of the total healthcare facilities. In Bauchi and Kebbi states, 23.58% and 21.05% of the healthcare facilities respectively burnt sharp HCW without any protection. Using PCA, computed risky indices for disposal of sharp HCW were highest in Bayelsa state (0.3070 and Kebbi state (0.2172, while indices of risky disposal of non-sharp HCW were highest in Bayelsa state (0.2868 and Osun state (0.2652. The OLS results showed that at 5% level of significance, possession of medical waste disposal guidelines, staff trainings on HCW management, traveling hours from the facilities to local headquarters and being located in

  15. Using hormones to manage dairy cow fertility: the clinical and ethical beliefs of veterinary practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Helen M; Ferguson, Eamonn; Smith, Robert F; Green, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    In the face of a steady decline in dairy cow fertility over several decades, using hormones to assist reproduction has become common. In the European Union, hormones are prescription-only medicines, giving veterinary practitioners a central role in their deployment. This study explored the clinical and ethical beliefs of practitioners, and provides data on their current prescribing practices. During 2011, 93 practitioners working in England completed a questionnaire (95% response rate). Of the 714 non-organic farms they attended, only 4 farms (0.6%) never used hormones to assist the insemination of lactating dairy cows. Practitioners agreed (>80%) that hormones improve fertility and farm businesses profitability. They also agreed (>80%) that if farmers are able to tackle management issues contributing to poor oestrus expression, then over a five year period these outcomes would both improve, relative to using hormones instead. If management issues are addressed instead of prescribing hormones, practitioners envisaged a less favourable outcome for veterinary practices profitability (p<0.01), but an improvement in genetic selection for fertility (p<0.01) and overall cow welfare (p<0.01). On farms making no efforts to address underlying management problems, long-term routine use at the start of breeding for timing artificial insemination or inducing oestrus was judged "unacceptable" by 69% and 48% of practitioners, respectively. In contrast, practitioners agreed (≥ 90%) that both these types of use are acceptable, provided a period of time has been allowed to elapse during which the cow is observed for natural oestrus. Issues discussed include: weighing quality versus length of cow life, fiscal factors, legal obligations, and balancing the interests of all stakeholders, including the increasing societal demand for food. This research fosters debate and critical appraisal, contributes to veterinary ethics, and encourages the pro-active development of professional

  16. The diagnosis and management of age-related veterinary cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Ashley B

    2012-07-01

    The American Veterinary Medical Association reported 81.7 million cats and 72.1 million dogs in the United States, with more than 10% over 11 years of age. Disorders of the cardiovascular system are one of the most commonly encountered disease entities in the aging pet population. This article reviews the diseases affecting older cats and dogs including how to make the diagnosis and when to treat while keeping in mind the unique aspects of comorbid conditions and polypharmacy situations encountered while managing pets with cardiovascular disease.

  17. Healthcare waste management practices and safety indicators in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekale, Abayomi Samuel; Oyekale, Tolulope Olayemi

    2017-09-25

    Adequate management of healthcare waste (HCW) is a prerequisite for efficient delivery of healthcare services. In Nigeria, there are several constraints militating against proper management of HCW. This is raising some environmental concerns among stakeholders in the health sector. In this study, we analyzed the practices of HCW management and determinants of risky/safe indices of HCW disposal. The study used the 2013/2014 Service Delivery Indicator (SDI) data that were collected from 2480 healthcare facilities in Nigeria. Descriptive statistics, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression were used to analyze the data. The results showed that 52.20% and 38.21% of the sampled healthcare facilities from Cross River and Bauchi states possessed guidelines for HCW management, respectively. Trainings on management of HCW were attended by 67.18% and 53.19% of the healthcare facilities from Cross River and Imo states, respectively. Also, 32.32% and 29.50% of healthcare facilities from rural and urban areas previously sent some of their staff members for trainings on HCW management, respectively. Sharp and non-sharp HCW were burnt in protected pits in 45.40% and 45.36% of all the sampled healthcare facilities, respectively. Incinerators were reported to be functional in only 2.06% of the total healthcare facilities. In Bauchi and Kebbi states, 23.58% and 21.05% of the healthcare facilities respectively burnt sharp HCW without any protection. Using PCA, computed risky indices for disposal of sharp HCW were highest in Bayelsa state (0.3070) and Kebbi state (0.2172), while indices of risky disposal of non-sharp HCW were highest in Bayelsa state (0.2868) and Osun state (0.2652). The OLS results showed that at 5% level of significance, possession of medical waste disposal guidelines, staff trainings on HCW management, traveling hours from the facilities to local headquarters and being located in rural areas significantly influenced indices of

  18. Public-private partnerships in healthcare: the managers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J E; Peck, E

    2003-11-01

    The role of the private sector in the provision of publicly funded healthcare services has become the subject of increasing debate and discussion at the heart of the New Labour Government. The present paper reports the findings from an empirical study regarding the attitude of public-sector managers towards public-private partnerships in the healthcare arena. It reveals a growing awareness amongst managers of both the positive and negative consequences of stepping into the market place to purchase services. However, in the context of the ongoing ideological debate within the Government regarding the role of both the private sector and markets within healthcare, public sector managers are unlikely to receive the practical advice that will enable them to reap the benefits of working with the private sector and avoid the pitfalls.

  19. Total quality management practices in Malaysia healthcare industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Md Fauzi; Nee, Phoi Soo; Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Wei, Chan Shiau; Hassan, Mohd Fahrul; Hamid, Nor Aziati Abdul

    2017-10-01

    The aim of total quality management (TQM) is to achieve customer satisfaction. Healthcare industry is very important in Malaysia for providing good healthcare services to public. However, failure to improve quality and efficiency is a big challenge in a healthcare industry in order to increase quality healthcare services. The objectives of this research are to identify the extent level of TQM implementation; and to determine the impact of TQM implementation on business sustainable in healthcare industry. Quantitative approach has been chosen as the methodology of this study. The survey respondents targeted in this research are staffs in Malaysia private clinic. 70 respondents have participated in this research. Data were analysed by Statistical Package Social Science (SPSS). Analysis result showed that there was a positive significant relationship between TQM practices and business sustainable (r=0.774, Pbusiness sustainable factors. The findings of this research will help healthcare industry to understand a better and deeper valuable information on the impact of TQM implementation towards business sustainable in Malaysia healthcare industry.

  20. Knowledge management systems success in healthcare: Leadership matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nor'ashikin; Tretiakov, Alexei; Whiddett, Dick; Hunter, Inga

    2017-01-01

    To deliver high-quality healthcare doctors need to access, interpret, and share appropriate and localised medical knowledge. Information technology is widely used to facilitate the management of this knowledge in healthcare organisations. The purpose of this study is to develop a knowledge management systems success model for healthcare organisations. A model was formulated by extending an existing generic knowledge management systems success model by including organisational and system factors relevant to healthcare. It was tested by using data obtained from 263 doctors working within two district health boards in New Zealand. Of the system factors, knowledge content quality was found to be particularly important for knowledge management systems success. Of the organisational factors, leadership was the most important, and more important than incentives. Leadership promoted knowledge management systems success primarily by positively affecting knowledge content quality. Leadership also promoted knowledge management use for retrieval, which should lead to the use of that better quality knowledge by the doctors, ultimately resulting in better outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinicians' strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Donna; Martin, Elliott B; Mills, Kelsey; Mazzola, Natalia M; Bell, Sigall K; Meyer, Elaine C

    2016-09-01

    To examine strategies employed by clinicians from different disciplines to manage their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. Self-report questionnaires were collected prior to simulation-based Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) workshops for professionals representing a range of experience and specialties at a tertiary pediatric hospital. In response to an open-ended prompt, clinicians qualitatively described their own strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. 126 respondents reported emotion management strategies. Respondents included physicians (42%), nurses (29%), medical interpreters (16%), psychosocial professionals (9%), and other (4%). Respondents identified 1-4 strategies. Five strategy categories were identified: Self-Care (51%), Preparatory and Relational Skills, (29%), Empathic Presence (28%), Team Approach (26%), and Professional Identity (20%). Across disciplines and experience levels, clinicians have developed strategies to manage their emotions when holding difficult healthcare conversations. These strategies support clinicians before, during and after difficult conversations. Understanding what strategies clinicians already employ to manage their emotions when holding difficult conversations has implications for educational planning and implementation. This study has potential to inform the development of education to support clinicians' awareness of their emotions and to enhance the range and effectiveness of emotion management during difficult healthcare conversations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Intelligent Healthcare Data Management System Using Nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulzii-Orshikh Dorj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a design of Intelligent Healthcare Data Management System using nanosensors (IHDMS and composed an application for mobile device. The proposed IHDMS will coordinate the healthcare data of the patients from nanosensors and transforms it into a worldwide consumed standard HL7 (Health Level Seven for conversion of healthcare data. This converted data dispatches to a server of its system. The battery lifetime of the facility is feasible to increase, the memory usage is less than 100 KB, and it operates all data by employing few and far between resources. Moreover, the proposed system decreases the waiting time in the transposing data, and secured channel was used for the server of the healthcare center in the running HL7 format data.

  3. Veterinary herd health management programs on dairy farms in the Netherlands: Use, execution, and relations on farmers characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.; Werven, van T.; Hogeveen, H.; Kremer, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programs are of growing importance to the dairy industry; they support farmers in the shift from curative to preventive health management, caused by increased herd sizes and quality standards in dairy farming. Farmers participating in VHHM are visited every 4

  4. Management Practices of Cats Owned by Faculty, Staff, and Students at Two Midwest Veterinary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith L. Stella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding cat owners’ housing, care, and management practices is important for promoting cat welfare. A survey study was conducted on the housing and management practices used for cats by students, faculty, and staff of The Ohio State University and Purdue University veterinary colleges. Subjects were 138 cat-owner dyads. Most cats (74% were housed strictly indoors in keeping with common US veterinary recommendations. However, many did not implement best practices outlined for behavior and other welfare needs of indoor cats. The percentage of respondents placing resources where cats could be disrupted while using them was 31%, 53%, and 30% for resting areas, food/water dishes, and litter boxes, respectively. Many cats were not provided a litter box in a private area (35%, in multiple areas of the house (51%, or that was regularly washed (73%. Horizontal scratching opportunities were not provided to 38% of cats; 32% were not provided toys that mimic prey and 91% of cats were fed a diet consisting of >75% dry food. These findings suggest a need for more concerted efforts to educate owners about meeting their cats’ welfare needs so as to attenuate risks and improve cat physical and behavioral welfare outcomes.

  5. Survey process quality: a question of healthcare manager approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Petra; Blomqvist, Kerstin

    2017-08-14

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare first-line managers think about and act regarding workplace survey processes. Design/methodology/approach This interview study was performed at a hospital in south Sweden. First-line healthcare managers ( n=24) volunteered. The analysis was inspired by phenomenography, which aims to describe the ways in which different people experience a phenomenon. The phenomenon was a workplace health promotion (WHP) survey processes. Findings Four main WHP survey process approaches were identified among the managers: as a possibility, as a competition, as a work task among others and as an imposition. For each, three common subcategories emerged; how managers: stated challenges and support from hospital management; described their own work group and collaboration with other managers; and expressed themselves and their situation in their roles as first-line managers. Practical implications Insights into how hospital management can understand their first-line managers' motivation for survey processes and practical suggestions and how managers can work proactively at organizational, group and individual level are presented. Originality/value Usually these studies focus on those who should respond to a survey; not those who should run the survey process. Focusing on managers and not co-workers can lead to more committed and empowered managers and thereby success in survey processes.

  6. Experiences of healthcare providers managing sexual assault ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of health care providers managing sexual assault victims in the emergency unit of a community hospital in the Nkangala district in the Mpumalanga Province. A qualitative, phenomenological design was applied. Purposeful sampling was used to select ...

  7. Evolution in clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Nathan C; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs.

  8. Solid healthcare waste management in Anambra State of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: We concluded that the current healthcare waste management practice at the facility level is good but storage and disposal methods are crude. Means of transport may have negative effect on the good habit of waste segregation the facilities have. We recommend the setting up of an agency responsible for ...

  9. Management of occupational dermatitis in healthcare workers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J; Williams, S; Peel, P; Pedersen, K

    2012-04-01

    This systematic review informed evidence-based guidelines for the management of occupational dermatitis, with a particular focus on healthcare workers. A multidisciplinary guideline group formulated questions about the management of healthcare workers with dermatitis. Keywords derived from these questions were used in literature searches. We appraised papers and developed recommendations using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology. Literature searches identified 1677 papers; 11 met the quality standard (SIGN grading ++ or +). A small body of evidence indicated that dermatitis is more likely to be colonised with micro-organisms than normal skin, but there was insufficient evidence about the risk of transmission to patients. There was limited evidence that using alcohol gel for hand decontamination is less damaging to skin than antiseptics or soap. A small body of evidence showed that conditioning creams improve dermatitis, but are not more effective than their inactive vehicle. A small inconsistent body of evidence showed that workplace skin care programmes improve dermatitis. Healthcare workers should seek early treatment for dermatitis and should be advised about the risk of bacterial colonisation. Work adjustments should be considered for those with severe or acute dermatitis who work with patients at high risk of hospital-acquired infection. Healthcare workers with dermatitis should follow skin care programmes, and use alcohol gel where appropriate for hand decontamination. Further research should explore whether healthcare workers with dermatitis are more likely to transmit infection to their patients, and whether health surveillance is effective at reducing dermatitis.

  10. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data.

  11. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  12. Healthcare Services Managers: What Information do They Need and Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Booth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The purpose of this research project was to gain insight into the information behaviour of healthcare services managers as they use information while engaged in decision-making unrelated to individual patient care. Methods – This small-scale, exploratory, multiple case study used the critical incident technique in nineteen semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using ‘Framework,’ a matrix-based content analysis system. Results – This paper presents findings related to the internal information that healthcare services managers need and use. Their decisions are influenced by a wide variety of factors. They must often make decisions without all of the information they would prefer to have. Internal information and practical experience set the context for new research-based information, so they are generally considered first.Conclusions – Healthcare services managers support decisions with both facts and value-based information. These results may inform both delivery of health library services delivery and strategic health information management planning. They may also support librarians who extend their skills beyond managing library collections and teaching published information retrieval skills, to managing internal and external information, teaching information literacy, and supporting information sharing.

  13. Managed behavioral healthcare in the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, M; Riley, J

    2000-09-01

    Employers, in their search for cost containment and quality improvement, have driven the development of the behavioral health managed care vendor. More specifically, the behavioral health carve-out is an innovation that was developed to respond to employer and, more recently, health plan needs. Now that the product has matured, it is increasingly being asked to justify its existence. Costs have certainly been maintained, but improvements in quality have not always been evident. The issues the authors address include, as cost pressures continue, can the industry deliver on its promise to improve care? Will it need to evolve to yet another level, with new or different features?

  14. Do healthcare managers have an ethical duty to admit mistakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, M; Chaku, M

    1998-10-01

    Historically, healthcare organizations have been reluctant to admit mistakes because of potential legal liability. Admitting mistakes and taking corrective and compensatory action may reduce the likelihood of a lawsuit and, if a lawsuit is lost, may reduce the punitive damage award. Financial consequences involve admitting mistakes and incurring the associated compensatory costs or not admitting mistakes and incurring associated compensatory and punitive damages for the mistakes that are discovered later. Ethical consequences revolve around managers' duty to patients, the healthcare organization, and themselves and their families.

  15. Tensions within management roles in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anne; Timmons, Stephen

    2017-03-30

    Aim This article reports the results of a study that gives an insight into ward leaders' perspectives of their leadership role and explores how they deliver leadership at ward level within organisational constraints and processes. Previous studies have been evaluations of clinical leadership in general, or literature reviews of the ward leader role. The aim of this study was to examine the leadership role of ward sisters and to understand how they lead improvements in quality of care on their wards. Methods A qualitative methodology was used, incorporating 19 in-depth interviews with ward leaders and modern matrons. Results Three main themes were identified: empty conformity, authority and autonomy, and visibility and leading by example. Participants aimed to be role models in leading and maintaining standards of care for patients, but this was sometimes constrained by organisational processes, lack of authority and autonomy, and lack of support and preparation. Conclusion Perceived differences between nursing and health service management mean that ward leaders' efforts to lead improvements in quality care are often undermined. Ward leaders must strike a balance between leading high-quality nursing care, in the context of organisational and political performance requirements, and the demands of administrative work, while often lacking autonomy and authority.

  16. Managing Knowledge across Boundaries in Healthcare when Innovation is Desired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Edenius

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore how knowledge can be managed across boundaries when implementing innovations in the healthcare sector is desired, in this specific case a healthcare quality register. The research is based on a qualitative, case study approach and comprises methodologies such as semi-structured interviews and document analysis. The findings of this study describe knowledge transferred across boundaries on a syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic level. On the syntactic level, knowledge of the innovation was transferred by training sessions for healthcare staff and through information to patients. On the semantic level, knowledge was transferred by knowledge brokering in the professional community of rheumatologists, and by creating collective stories and encouraging rheumatologists to “try” the innovation to find added value. On the pragmatic level, there were explicit conflicts of interest between physicians and healthcare authorities, as well as resistance from some rheumatologists to share knowledge of patients and treatment. The paper is concluded with implications for innovation practice in healthcare drawn from the study and ends with remarks about challenges ahead.

  17. Rural healthcare in transition. A time for change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J P

    1988-09-01

    The fundamental challenge for rural healthcare leaders today is to address three key questions: What is the nature of the system that is undergoing change? What are the nature and extent of the changes? What strategies are needed to manage in a climate of change? Healthcare administrators' perspective of rural healthcare systems must take into account the full range of provider organizations, promote the idea of continuum of care, and consider system and environment as mutually dependent parts of a larger whole. The environments that have influenced rural healthcare delivery and organization in the 1980s include demographics, epidemiology, economics, finances, personnel, technology, regulations, and politics. As hospital admissions and patient days declined under the pressures of cost containment, population shifts, and changes in medical practice, rural hospitals sought to maintain viability through a variety of adaptive actions, such as downsizing, forming relationships with other hospitals, and diversifying. These environmental and restructuring trends will require some degree of adaptation by rural healthcare organizations. Leaders will have to shift the organization toward a horizontal orientation, which emphasizes participation by department heads and supervisors in defining and implementing interorganizational relationships; authority for horizontal action taking and seeking out additional connections that will improve continuity and quality of care; and team-building skills to enhance cooperation and effectiveness.

  18. Managing responsible antimicrobial use: perspectives across the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, O J; Tebano, G; Pulcini, C

    2017-07-01

    Healthcare systems consist of building blocks. Shaping how these building blocks function and interact can promote responsible antimicrobial use, and this represents an important opportunity for managers at different points within healthcare systems to act upon. To review real-world examples of how healthcare systems can promote responsible antimicrobial use, focusing on the role of governance and managers. We searched and reviewed existing literature and official documents, which mostly focused on antibiotics. We also drew on the diverse experiences of the ESGAP (the ESCMID (European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Study Group for Antimicrobial stewardshiP) network. First, we explored at the institution level the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the need to embrace multidisciplinary approaches, the benefits of engaging with social sciences experts, and the role of governance and leadership. We look beyond individual institutions and highlight the urgent need for workforce capacity estimates for antimicrobial stewardship activities, how antimicrobial stewardship efforts can connect to form networks, and the importance of governance and regulation at national and international levels. Managers in the healthcare system are in a strong position to look beyond individual prescriptions and to recognize the many ways in which different healthcare system building blocks can contribute to responsible use of antimicrobials. At the institution level this can be achieved by implementing antimicrobial stewardship programmes, ensuring they are adequately resourced, and driving buy-in across clinical leadership. At regional and national levels this includes facilitating the sharing of experiences and resources between institutions, and developing the standards and regulations needed to support responsible antimicrobial use. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier

  19. A systematic approach: optimization of healthcare operations with knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Bali, Rajeev K; Gibbons, M Chris; Choi, J H James; Schaffer, Jonathan L

    2009-01-01

    Effective decision making is vital in all healthcare activities. While this decision making is typically complex and unstructured, it requires the decision maker to gather multispectral data and information in order to make an effective choice when faced with numerous options. Unstructured decision making in dynamic and complex environments is challenging and in almost every situation the decision maker is undoubtedly faced with information inferiority. The need for germane knowledge, pertinent information and relevant data are critical and hence the value of harnessing knowledge and embracing the tools, techniques, technologies and tactics of knowledge management are essential to ensuring efficiency and efficacy in the decision making process. The systematic approach and application of knowledge management (KM) principles and tools can provide the necessary foundation for improving the decision making processes in healthcare. A combination of Boyd's OODA Loop (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act) and the Intelligence Continuum provide an integrated, systematic and dynamic model for ensuring that the healthcare decision maker is always provided with the appropriate and necessary knowledge elements that will help to ensure that healthcare decision making process outcomes are optimized for maximal patient benefit. The example of orthopaedic operating room processes will illustrate the application of the integrated model to support effective decision making in the clinical environment.

  20. The evolving role of supply chain management technology in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The healthcare supply chain is a vast, disintegrated network of products and players, loosely held together by manual and people-intensive processes. Managing the flow of information, supplies, equipment, and services from manufacturers to distributors to providers of care is especially difficult in clinical supply chains, compared with more technology-intense industries like consumer goods or industrial manufacturing. As supplies move downstream towards hospitals and clinics, the quality and robustness of accompanying management and information systems used to manage these products deteriorates significantly. Technology that provides advanced planning, synchronization, and collaboration upstream at the large supply manufacturers and distributors rarely is used at even the world's larger and more sophisticated hospitals. This article outlines the current state of healthcare supply chain management technologies, addresses potential reasons for the lack of adoption of technologies and provides a roadmap for the evolution of technology for the future. This piece is based on both quantitative and qualitative research assessments of the healthcare supply chain conducted during the last two years.

  1. Healthcare managers' construction of the manager role in relation to the medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knorring, Mia; Alexanderson, Kristina; Eliasson, Miriam A

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare managers construct the manager role in relation to the medical profession in their organisations. Design/methodology/approach - In total, 18 of Sweden's 20 healthcare chief executive officers (CEOs) and 20 clinical department managers (CDMs) were interviewed about their views on management of physicians. Interviews were performed in the context of one aspect of healthcare management; i.e., management of physicians' sickness certification practice. A discourse analysis approach was used for data analysis. Findings - Few managers used a management-based discourse to construct the manager role. Instead, a profession-based discourse dominated and managers frequently used the attributes "physician" or "non-physician" to categorise themselves or other managers in their managerial roles. Some managers, both CEOs and CDMs, shifted between the management- and profession-based discourses, resulting in a kind of "yes, but […]" approach to management in the organisations. The dominating profession-based discourse served to reproduce the power and status of physicians within the organisation, thereby rendering the manager role weaker than the medical profession for both physician and non-physician managers. Research limitations/implications - Further studies are needed to explore the impact of gender, managerial level, and basic profession on how managers construct the manager role in relation to physicians. Practical implications - The results suggest that there is a need to address the organisational conditions for managers' role taking in healthcare organisations. Originality/value - Despite the general strengthening of the manager position in healthcare through political reforms during the last decades, this study shows that a profession-based discourse clearly dominated in how the managers constructed the manager role in relation to the medical profession on the workplace level in their organisations.

  2. [Clinical practice guidelines and knowledge management in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are key tools for the translation of scientific evidence into everyday patient care. Therefore guidelines can act as cornerstones of evidence based knowledge management in healthcare, if they are trustworthy, and its recommendations are not biased by authors' conflict of interests. Good medical guidelines should be disseminated by means of virtual (digital/electronic) health libraries - together with implementation tools in context, such as guideline based algorithms, check lists, patient information, a.s.f. The article presents evidence based medical knowledge management using the German experiences as an example. It discusses future steps establishing evidence based health care by means of combining patient data, evidence from medical science and patient care routine, together with feedback systems for healthcare providers.

  3. Development of a Standardized Job Description for Healthcare Managers of Metabolic Syndrome Management Programs in Korean Community Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjin Lee, RN, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs.

  4. Clinicians' recognition and management of emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elliott B; Mazzola, Natalia M; Brandano, Jessica; Luff, Donna; Zurakowski, David; Meyer, Elaine C

    2015-10-01

    To examine the most commonly reported emotions encountered among healthcare practitioners when holding difficult conversations, including frequency and impact on care delivery. Interprofessional learners from a range of experience levels and specialties completed self-report questionnaires prior to simulation-based communication workshops. Clinicians were asked to describe up to three emotions they experienced when having difficult healthcare conversations; subsequent questions used Likert-scales to measure frequency of each emotion, and whether care was affected. 152 participants completed questionnaires, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial professionals. Most commonly reported emotions were anxiety, sadness, empathy, frustration, and insecurity. There were significant differences in how clinicians perceived these different emotions affecting care. Empathy and anxiety were emotions perceived to influence care more than sadness, frustration, and insecurity. Most clinicians, regardless of clinical experience and discipline, find their emotional state influences the quality of their care delivery. Most clinicians rate themselves as somewhat to quite capable of recognizing and managing their emotions, acknowledging significant room to grow. Further education designed to increase clinicians' recognition of, reflection on, and management of emotion would likely prove helpful in improving their ability to navigate difficult healthcare conversations. Interventions aimed at anxiety management are particularly needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcome of 7-S, TQM technique for healthcare waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Junaid Habib; Ahmed, Rashid; Malik, Javed Iqbal; Khan, M Amanullah

    2011-12-01

    To assess the present waste management system of healthcare facilities (HCFs) attached with Shalamar Hospital, Lahore by applying the 7-S technique of Total Quality Management (TQM) and to find out the outcome after imparting training. Interventional quasi-experimental study. The Shalamar Hospital, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan, November, 2009 to November, 2010. Mckinsey's 7-S, technique of TQM was applied to assess the 220 HCFs from Lahore, Gujranwala and Sheikhupura districts for segregation, collection, transportation and disposal (SCTD) of hospital waste. Direct interview method was applied. Trainings were provided in each institution. After one year action period, the status of four areas of concern was compared before and after training. The parameters studied were segregation, collection, transportation and disposal systems in the 220 HCFs. Each of these were further elaborated by strategy, structure, system, staff, skill, style and stakeholder/shared value factors. Standard error of difference of proportion was applied to assess significance using 95% confidence level. There was marked improvement in all these areas ranging from 20% to 77% following a training program of 3 months. In case of disposal of the waste strategy, structure and system an increase of 60%, 65% and 75% was observed after training. The 7-S technique played a vital role in assessing the hospital waste management system. Training for the healthcare workers played a significant role in healthcare facilities.

  6. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  7. Teaching organization theory for healthcare management: three applied learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    Organization theory (OT) provides a way of seeing, describing, analyzing, understanding, and improving organizations based on patterns of organizational design and behavior (Daft 2004). It gives managers models, principles, and methods with which to diagnose and fix organization structure, design, and process problems. Health care organizations (HCOs) face serious problems such as fatal medical errors, harmful treatment delays, misuse of scarce nurses, costly inefficiency, and service failures. Some of health care managers' most critical work involves designing and structuring their organizations so their missions, visions, and goals can be achieved-and in some cases so their organizations can survive. Thus, it is imperative that graduate healthcare management programs develop effective approaches for teaching OT to students who will manage HCOs. Guided by principles of education, three applied teaching/learning activities/assignments were created to teach OT in a graduate healthcare management program. These educationalmethods develop students' competency with OT applied to HCOs. The teaching techniques in this article may be useful to faculty teaching graduate courses in organization theory and related subjects such as leadership, quality, and operation management.

  8. Managing information resources: a study of ten healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, C J; Hornberger, K D; Shmerling, J E

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the results of information technology management audits conducted by senior executives at ten healthcare organizations. The audits evaluated how well the following seven information technology management responsibilities were carried out: (1) strategic information systems planning; (2) employment of a user focus in system development; (3) recruiting of competent personnel; (4) information systems integration; (5) protection of information security and confidentiality; (6) employment of effective project management in system development; and (7) post-implementation evaluation of information systems. The audit results suggest that most of these responsibilities are being met to a considerable extent by a majority of the organizations studied. However, substantial variation across organizations was noted. Executives participating in the study were able to define areas in which the management of information resources in their organizations was in need of attention. The audit process encourages senior management to provide the leadership required to ensure that information technology is used to maximum advantage.

  9. Management of health-care waste in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate health-care waste in the 18 districts of metropolitan municipality of the third biggest city in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 825 health institutions established in the 18 districts of Izmir metropolitan municipality, in 2007. The total amount of health-care waste collected was 4841 tons and 621 kilograms per patient's bed in 2007. Most of the medical wastes were collected from Konak, Karsiyaka and Bornova districts and were 2308, 272 and 1020 tons, respectively. Regarding to overpopulation, the number of health institutions in these districts are more than the number of health institutions in the other administrative districts. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between the amount of health-care waste collected and population of the 18 districts (r = 0.79, p < 0.001, and number of beds/patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. To provide a safe health-care waste management metropolitan municipality must provide hazardous waste separation in health institutions, establish sterilization units for infectious waste, and provide the last storage of medical waste in completely different, safe and special areas apart from the municipal waste storage areas.

  10. Mobile healthcare information management utilizing Cloud Computing and Android OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charalampos; Pliakas, Thomas; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Cloud Computing provides functionality for managing information data in a distributed, ubiquitous and pervasive manner supporting several platforms, systems and applications. This work presents the implementation of a mobile system that enables electronic healthcare data storage, update and retrieval using Cloud Computing. The mobile application is developed using Google's Android operating system and provides management of patient health records and medical images (supporting DICOM format and JPEG2000 coding). The developed system has been evaluated using the Amazon's S3 cloud service. This article summarizes the implementation details and presents initial results of the system in practice.

  11. Performance Management in Healthcare Organizations: Concept and Practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Panagiotis E

    2017-01-01

    Organizational performance can create and sustain competitive advantages for corporations and even improve their sustainability and future prospects. Health care organizations present a sector where performance management is structured by multiple dimensions. The scope of this study is to analyze the issue of performance management in healthcare organizations and specifically the implementation of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) methodology on organizations providing health services. The study provides a discussion on the BSC development process, the steps that management has to take in order to prepare the implementation of the BSC and finally discusses a practical example of a scorecard with specific strategic goals and performance indicators. Managers of healthcare organizations and specifically those providing services to the elderly and the general population could use the propositions of the study as a roadmap for processing, analyzing, evaluating and implementing the balanced scorecard approach in their organizations' daily operations. BSC methodology can give an advantage in terms of enhanced stakeholder management and preservation within a highly volatile and competitive economic environment.

  12. Management, Entrepreneurship and Private Service Orientation: A Framework for Undergraduate Veterinary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidhar, P. V. K.; Van Den Ban, Anne W.

    2006-01-01

    The changing nature of livestock outreach service delivery, manpower requirements and opportunities in the private sector provide both push and pull dynamics for veterinary graduates to engage in managerial, entrepreneurial, public and private service activities. The veterinary schools should support this transition by integrating Managerial,…

  13. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Ogunro et al. 187. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): 187-191. CASE REPORT. Management of Epitheliogenesis Imperfecta in a Piglet (Sus Scrofa domesticus) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Ogunro, B. N.. 1. ; Otuh, P. I.. 1.

  14. Managing gender diversity in healthcare: getting it right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbroeck, Paul; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise

    2017-02-06

    Purpose Diversity, notably gender diversity, is growing in health care, both at the level of teams and the level of organizations. This paper aims to describe the challenges for team leaders and leaders of organizations to manage this diversity. The authors believe that more could be done to help leaders master these challenges in a way that makes diverse teams and organizations more productive. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on previously published research, using gender diversity as an example, the paper first describes how diversity can both have a positive and a negative influence on team productivity. Next, it describes the challenge of gender diversity at an organizational level, using Switzerland as an example. Findings The first part of the paper espouses the causes of gender diversity, undoes some of the myths surrounding diversity and presents a model for effective management of diversity in teams. The second part looks at gender diversity at an organizational level. Drawing from sources inside and outside healthcare, the effects of the "leaking pipeline", "glass wall" and "glass ceiling" that prevent health-care organizations from leveraging the potential of female talent are discussed. Practical implications The authors propose a model developed for intercultural teamwork as a framework for leveraging gender diversity for better team productivity. Proposals are offered to health-care organizations on how they can tip the gender balance at senior levels into their favor, so as to get the maximum benefit from the available talent. Originality/value Applying the "how to" ideas and recommendations from this general review will help leaders of health-care organizations gain a better return on investment from their talent development as well as to increase the productivity of their workforce by a better use of diverse talent.

  15. Healthcare logistics in disaster planning and emergency management: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanVactor, Jerry D

    2017-12-01

    This paper discusses the role of healthcare supply chain management in disaster mitigation and management. While there is an abundance of literature examining emergency management and disaster preparedness efforts across an array of industries, little information has been directed specifically toward the emergency interface, interoperability and unconventional relationships among civilian institutions and the US Department of Defense (US DoD) or supply chain operations involved therein. To address this imbalance, this paper provides US DoD healthcare supply chain managers with concepts related to communicating and planning more effectively. It is worth remembering, however, that all disasters are local - under the auspice of tiered response involving federal agencies, the principal responsibility for responding to domestic disasters and emergencies rests with the lowest level of government equipped and able to deal with the incident effectively. As such, the findings are equally applicable to institutions outside the military. It also bears repeating that every crisis is unique: there is no such thing as a uniform response for every incident. The role of the US DoD in emergency preparedness and disaster planning is changing and will continue to do so as the need for roles in support of a larger effort also continues to change.

  16. Development of healthcare waste management in Serbia and challenges in the improvement of the quality of healthcare services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Verica S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper Healthcare Waste Management (HCWM was introduced in the Republic of Serbia in 2007 with the support of the European Union. Since then, the amounts of waste treated, prior to landfill, have steadily increased and more and more healthcare institutions adopted HCWM systems. In parallel large numbers of healthcare workers were trained in proper HCWM. This study quantifies the progress made. The study analyzed the period 2009 to 2012 using three methods of data collection. On basis of data collected, it has been established that with a population of just over seven million, Serbia generates between 4,500 and 5,000 tones of infectious waste on an annual basis of which some 20% originates from the treatment of out-patients, 75% from the treatment of in-patients and 5% from micro-biological laboratory tests. While in 2009 only one third of this waste was treated prior to disposal, this fraction has increased to two thirds in 2011. The data also show that more than 90% of healthcare facilities have developed individual healthcare waste management plans up from less than 20% in 2009. In every healthcare facility there are at least 2 people trained in healthcare waste management, and in total there are approximately 3000 staff members who received formal HCWM training provided through the Institute for Public Health. Healthcare waste management is continuously improving in the Republic of Serbia and is well established in more than 85% of healthcare facilities. There are still issues to be improved especially regarding treatment on healthcare waste other than infectious waste.

  17. The health-care manager's guide to managing change in challenging times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, D N

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Bill Gates was a college dropout working for a four-member, fledgling company in New Mexico. Today, he is the richest man in America and the head of perhaps the most powerful company in recent corporate history. Ten years ago, managed health care was merely a concept discussed in academic and industry observer circles. Now it is a norm in almost every health-care organization nationally. Five years ago, health-care professionals in every discipline believed the maxim that, ¿as long as people get sick, health-care professionals will have jobs.¿ In 1995, health-care executives have alternately referred to the widescale process of laying off employees as reengineering, rightsizing, downsizing, or RIF (reduction in force). With this massive amount of change, both societally and professionally, health-care managers have been contending with the change management process. Although a breadth of concepts borrowed from other industries and a plethora of conceptual practicums have entered the health-care educational realm, a straightforward, immediately useful approach to managing change is probably more beneficial, as the need to manage change quickly and effectively becomes the paramount criterion for health-care management success in the second half of this decade of change. In this article we will explore the four areas where mistakes are made most frequently by leaders in the change process, and we will provide specific strategies to not only avoid these mistakes but moreover reduce resistance to change, activate positive action, and ultimately improve performance through optimum staff contribution. The four critical areas we will explore are the reasons for resistance to change, the management of the proactive phase of change, creating staff interdependence, and key leadership roles for change management.

  18. Healthcare waste management research: A structured analysis and review (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Ramesh, A

    2015-10-01

    The importance of healthcare waste management in preserving the environment and protecting the public cannot be denied. Past research has dealt with various issues in healthcare waste management and disposal, which spreads over various journals, pipeline research disciplines and research communities. Hence, this article analyses this scattered knowledge in a systematic manner, considering the period between January 2005 and July 2014. The purpose of this study is to: (i) identify the trends in healthcare waste management literature regarding journals published; (ii) main topics of research in healthcare waste management; (iii) methodologies used in healthcare waste management research; (iv) areas most frequently researched by researchers; and (v) determine the scope of future research in healthcare waste management. To this end, the authors conducted a systematic review of 176 articles on healthcare waste management taken from the following eight esteemed journals: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, International Journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance, Journal of Environmental Management, Journal of Hazardous Material, Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, Resources, Conservations and Recycling, Waste Management, and Waste Management & Research. The authors have applied both quantitative and qualitative approaches for analysis, and results will be useful in the following ways: (i) results will show importance of healthcare waste management in healthcare operations; (ii) findings will give a comparative view of the various publications; (c) study will shed light on future research areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Healthcare quality management in Switzerland--a survey among providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderli, Reto; Pfortmueller, Carmen A; Businger, Adrian P

    2012-04-27

    In the last decade assessing the quality of healthcare has become increasingly important across the world. Switzerland lacks a detailed overview of how quality management is implemented and of its effects on medical procedures and patients' concerns. This study aimed to examine the systematics of quality management in Switzerland by assessing the providers and collected parameters of current quality initiatives. In summer 2011 we contacted all of the medical societies in Switzerland, the Federal Office of Public Health, the Swiss Medical Association (FMH) and the head of Swiss medical insurance providers, to obtain detailed information on current quality initiatives. All quality initiatives featuring standardised parameter assessment were included. Of the current 45 initiatives, 19 were powered by medical societies, five by hospitals, 11 by non-medical societies, two by the government, two by insurance companies or related institutions and six by unspecified institutions. In all, 24 medical registers, five seals of quality, five circles of quality, two self-assessment tools, seven superior entities, one checklist and one combined project existed. The cost of treatment was evaluated by four initiatives. A data report was released by 24 quality initiatives. The wide variety and the large number of 45 recorded quality initiatives provides a promising basis for effective healthcare quality management in Switzerland. However, an independent national supervisory authority should be appointed to provide an effective review of all quality initiatives and their transparency and coordination.

  20. Healthcare waste management in selected government and private hospitals in Southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Nnamdi Oli

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The availability of material for waste segregation at point of generation, compliance of healthcare workers to healthcare waste management guidelines and the existence of infection control committee in both hospitals is generally low and unsatisfactory.

  1. Mingling of human and veterinary strains of Staphylococcus aureus: An emerging issue in health-care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Giordana Rimoldi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus remains a leading cause of hospital and community infections. We report a retrospective molecular characterization of S. aureus strains from different settings: hospital workers and patients, and veterinarian surgeons and pets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-nine S. aureus isolates obtained from nasal swabs of 10 patients, 17 health-care workers (HCWs, 9 pets, and 53 veterinarians were genotypically characterized by means of repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (Rep PCR and whole-genome sequencing. Results: Thirteen different sequence types (STs were detected: ST398, ST22, ST8, ST30, ST15, ST5, ST121, ST45, ST10, ST6, ST34, ST97, and ST1. Two new STs differing from ST22 and ST5 for a single multilocus sequence typing gene were also identified. Rep PCR documented a genetic relationship among isolates obtained from 5 veterinarians and 10 HCWs. Conclusion: The large diversity of S. aureus strains detected may reflect a larger epidemiology within the hospital and community, in which companion animals likely act as a reservoir. We identified the circulation of ST5, ST8, ST15, ST22, ST30, ST45, and ST121 both in the hospital and veterinarian environment. Starting from the idea of a unique setting where our population lives, we consider the relationship between community- and hospital-acquired S. aureus.

  2. New path for health-care leadership: clinical systems management. CLMA Clinical Systems Management Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, L; Lien, J; Snyder, J R; Teixeira, R; Vernon, M; Pomerantz, P

    1998-01-01

    This article sets forth a concept and an action plan to support the educational needs for the clinical systems manager. This article describes the roles, competencies, and tasks of the clinical systems manager and defines specific intermediate and long-term steps. Clinical systems management is umbrella terminology used to describe an array of related jobs including, but not necessarily limited to, multidepartmental or interdisciplinary management, regional or health system-wide laboratory management, and traditional laboratory management. In general, clinical systems management recognizes the emergence of new jobs, with the primary responsibility of leading the integration of clinical services within health-care systems.

  3. Current Issues and the Veterinary Medical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary medical libraries and librarians are unique. There are now 33 veterinary colleges in North America, and in accordance with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation, each has a library managed by an accredited librarian. Colleges with veterinary programs often maintain specialized branch libraries to support the degree,…

  4. Sustainable use of veterinary pharmaceuticals on the territory (Sust-PHarm): Linking available database of manure management and environmental fate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Andrea; Finizio, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Analogously to the evolution of the EU legislation on pesticides, there is an increasing need of strategies aiming to reach a "sustainable use of veterinary pharmaceuticals". To this end, it is essential to develop tools, such as supporting information systems (SIS), for managing the environmental risks of veterinary pharmaceuticals on a territorial scale. In this context, we propose Sust-PHarm (SUSTainable use of veterinary Pharmaceuticals), a SIS useful to identify groundwater vulnerable areas to veterinary pharmaceuticals at both local and regional scale. As background, Sust-PHarm follows the schemes of SIS for pesticides. The latter are based on the integration of predictive models in GIS. The proposed approach goes a step forward by integrating also data on the typologies of livestock farm, their spatial distribution and manure management techniques. This information allows to identify the potential environmental loads of veterinary pharmaceuticals. In this paper, we discuss the innovative elements characterizing Sust-PHarm through a comparison with the SIS currently used for pesticides. The advantages of Sust-PHarm are discussed using Lombardia Region (Northern Italy) as a case study. Simulations were made on 12 veterinary pharmaceuticals characterized by different physical-chemical properties. Results are compared with the current guidelines for the evaluation of veterinary pharmaceuticals leaching highlighting some substantial differences when realistic data are utilized making our approach more accurate than guidelines one. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a standardized job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs in Korean community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Choo, Jina; Cho, Jeonghyun; Kim, So-Nam; Lee, Hye-Eun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs using task analysis. Exploratory research was performed by using the Developing a Curriculum method, the Intervention Wheel model, and focus group discussions. Subsequently, we conducted a survey of 215 healthcare workers from 25 community health centers to verify that the job description we created was accurate. We defined the role of healthcare managers. Next, we elucidated the tasks of healthcare managers and performed needs analysis to examine the frequency, importance, and difficulty of each of their duties. Finally, we verified that our job description was accurate. Based on the 8 duties, 30 tasks, and 44 task elements assigned to healthcare managers, we found that the healthcare managers functioned both as team coordinators responsible for providing multidisciplinary health services and nurse specialists providing health promotion services. In terms of importance and difficulty of tasks performed by the healthcare managers, which were measured using a determinant coefficient, the highest-ranked task was planning social marketing (15.4), while the lowest-ranked task was managing human resources (9.9). A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Aspects of healthcare computer networks security in the education of students of medicine and healthcare management

    OpenAIRE

    Mircheva, Iskra

    2001-01-01

    Preserving privacy and confidentiality of medical data has always been a fundamental question in medicine and healthcare. Information technologies state even greater requirements to medical data security, especially when, as expected, medical data should be transferred between the different healthcare providers using specialized or public computer networks. The presented paper outlines some basic requirements to healthcare networks security, with which the future medical specialists should ...

  7. Occupational Safety Management Framework for Healthcare and Social Assistance Service Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Edorisiagbon, James

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on improving safety management for healthcare and social assistance service providers who deliver healthcare for patients and client in Healthcare and Social centers and homes. The quality of these provided services is dependent heavily on attitudes and well-being of its care workers and staff. Therefore, healthcare and social assistant workers’ (HCSA) safety is crucial to the quality of patient care, though it remains a challenge in countries of various levels of developm...

  8. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence generation from healthcare databases: recommendations for managing change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Alison; Bate, Andrew; Sauer, Brian C; Brown, Jeffrey S; Hall, Gillian C

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing reliance on databases of healthcare records for pharmacoepidemiology and other medical research, and such resources are often accessed over a long period of time so it is vital to consider the impact of changes in data, access methodology and the environment. The authors discuss change in communication and management, and provide a checklist of issues to consider for both database providers and users. The scope of the paper is database research, and changes are considered in relation to the three main components of database research: the data content itself, how it is accessed, and the support and tools needed to use the database. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Implementation and deployment of healthcare management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelic, I; Bercic, B; Pikec, M; Slavec, S

    2000-01-01

    In the following article we present development of the Management Information System, an implementation of our own Data Warehouse, build on top of the existing Healthcare Information System. We discuss requirements and phases of development of the system, we present the structure of the system, the experiences with end users and obstacles that we met, as well as possible improvements end extensions of the system. The system is designed as a framework that works with workload measurement sub-systems, which are defined as multidimensional arrays, and are observed through different units of time. Each of the axis has several hierarchical structures build on top of it. Setting up the system is a difficult task, because it requires a good knowledge of organisational structure of a particular hospital. We used an incremental approach in defining the organisational structure. On top of the framework we build a user customisable graphical user interface, which enables different types of end users to efficiently use the system.

  11. Knowledge management practices in healthcare settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitri, Ioanna; Talias, Michael A; Bellali, Thalia

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge is an intangible asset in Organizations, and provides a comparative advantage to those who possess it. Hospitals are complex organizations with unique characteristics because of the heterogeneity of health professionals' orientation, the composite networking and the decision-making processes. A deeper understanding of knowledge management (KM) could streamline productivity and coordinate the use of resources more efficient. We conducted a systematic literature search of peer-reviewed papers that described key elements of KM using three databases (Medline, Cinahl and Health Source: nursing/academic edition) for a 10-year period (1/1/2004-25/11/2014). The included articles were subjected to qualitative content analysis. We retrieved 604 articles of which 20 articles were eligible for analysis. Most of the studies (n=13) used a qualitative methodology. The total sample size was 2155 participants. The key elements that arose were as follows: perceptions of KM, synthesis, dissemination, collaboration, means of KM and leadership. Moreover, this study identified barriers for KM implementation, like time restrictions and limited skills. Healthcare managers ought to cultivate a knowledge environment, operate as role models, provide the tools for KM and reward people who act as knowledge brokers. Opportunities for collaboration and knowledge sharing should be encouraged. Successful KM should be patient-centered to gain its maximum value. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Lean management-the journey from toyota to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Sorin T; Faddoul, Fady F

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of production systems is tightly linked to the story of Toyota Motor Company (TMC) that has its roots around 1918. The term "lean" was coined in 1990 following the exploration of the Toyota model that led to the "transference" thesis sustaining the concept that manufacturing problems and technologies are universal problems faced by management and that these concepts can be emulated in non-Japanese enterprises. Lean is a multi-faceted concept and requires organizations to exert effort along several dimensions simultaneously; some consider a successful implementation either achieving major strategic components of lean, implementing practices to support operational aspects, or providing evidence that the improvements are sustainable in the long term. The article explores challenges and opportunities faced by organizations that intend incorporating lean management principles and presents the specific context of the healthcare industry. Finally, the concepts of "essential few" and customer value are illustrated through a simple example of process change following lean principles, which was implemented in a dental school in the United States.

  13. The root causes of ineffective and inefficient healthcare technology management in Benin public health sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houngbo, T.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Bunders- Aelen, J.G.F.; Coleman, H.L.S.; Medenou, D.; Dakpanon, L.Y.; de Cock Buning, Tjard

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the root causes and solutions of main problems facing Healthcare Technology Management in Benin׳s public health sector. Conducted in Benin from 2008 to 2010, two surveys were used with key actors in Healthcare Technology Management. The first survey was based on 377

  14. Investigating the Optimal Management Strategy for a Healthcare Facility Maintenance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaillard, Daria

    2004-01-01

    ...: strategic partnering with an equipment management firm. The objective of this study is to create a decision-model for selecting the optimal management strategy for a healthcare organization's facility maintenance program...

  15. Development of a Standardized Job Description for Healthcare Managers of Metabolic Syndrome Management Programs in Korean Community Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngjin; Choo, Jina; Cho, Jeonghyun; Kim, So-Nam; Lee, Hye-Eun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to develop a job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs using task analysis. Methods: Exploratory research was performed by using the Developing a Curriculum method, the Intervention Wheel model, and focus group discussions. Subsequently, we conducted a survey of 215 healthcare workers from 25 community health centers to verify that the job description we created was accurate. Results: We defined the role of healthcare man...

  16. New directions for veterinary technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Linda M; Lloyd, James W; Pazak, Helene E

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary technology has generally established itself well in companion-animal and mixed-animal veterinary medical practice, but the career's growth trajectory is uncertain. Michigan State University (MSU) convened a national conference, "Creating the Future of Veterinary Technology-A National Dialogue," in November 2011 to explore ways to elevate the veterinary technician/technologist's role in the veterinary medical profession and to identify new directions in which the career could expand. Veterinary technicians/technologists might advance their place in private practice by not only improving their clinical skills, but by also focusing on areas such as practice management, leadership training, business training, conflict resolution, information technology, and marketing/communications. Some new employment settings for veterinary technicians/technologists include more participation within laboratory animal medicine and research, the rural farm industry, regulatory medicine, and shelter medicine. Achieving these ends would call for new training options beyond the current 2-year and 4-year degree programs. Participants suggested specialty training programs, hybrid programs of various types, online programs, veterinary technician residency programs of 12-18 months, and more integration of veterinary technician/technology students and veterinary medicine students at colleges of veterinary medicine.

  17. The impacts of motivation, personal traits of managers and management education on the performances of public healthcare facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karanović Nevena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Exposed to increasing needs of users for better and faster services, more medications and innovative health technologies, managers of healthcare services in the public sector need motivation, permanent updating of information and constant personal development. The aim of this paper was to evaluate, on the basis of experienced healthcare managers, the impact of their motivation, selected character traits, managerial skills and formal education in management on healthcare facilities performances in the public sector. Methods. For the purposes of this study, 97 experienced managers from public hospitals and primary health centers in Serbia answered to 30 questions on the motivation of managers, essential skills for successful management and formal education in management in health facilities. The obtained data about their motivation, governing experience, personal skills and formal education in management were systematized and processed by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Healthcare facilities performances were expressed by the healthcare facilities ranks in the official annual rankings according to the quality improvement, conducted by the Institute of Public Health of Serbia. Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficients were used for proving the potential impact of selected factors on performances of healthcare facilities. Results. This study confirmed the association between the healthcare facilities ranks and managers' abilities to organize the working process (t = -2.453; p = 0.018; expressed high managers’ motivation (ρS = 0.206; p = 0.048 and the length of governing experience (r = -0.198; p = 0.043. Within a 3-year follow-up, this study also confirmed a positive correlation between annual ranks of healthcare facilities and managers quality management courses (ρS = -0.238; p = 0.017 and managers education in human resources management (ρS = -0.234; p = 0.027. Conclusion. In addition to management

  18. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  19. Management of healthcare waste: developments in Southeast Asia in the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühling, Jan-Gerd; Pieper, Ute

    2012-09-01

    In many Southeast Asian countries, significant challenges persist with regard to the proper management and disposal of healthcare waste. The amount of healthcare waste in these countries is continuously increasing as a result of the expansion of healthcare systems and services. In the past, healthcare waste, if it was treated at all, was mainly incinerated. In the last decade more comprehensive waste management systems were developed for Southeast Asian countries and implementation started. This also included the establishment of alternative healthcare waste treatment systems. The developments in the lower-middle-income countries are of special interest, as major investments are planned. Based upon sample projects, a short overview of the current development trends in the healthcare waste sector in Laos, Indonesia and Vietnam is provided. The projects presented include: (i) Lao Peoples Democratic Republic (development of the national environmental health training system to support the introduction of environmental health standards and improvement of healthcare waste treatment in seven main hospitals by introducing steam-based treatment technologies); (ii) Indonesia (development of a provincial-level healthcare waste-management strategy for Province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam (NAD) and introduction of an advanced waste treatment system in a tertiary level hospital in Makassar); and (iii) Vietnam (development of a healthcare waste strategy for five provinces in Vietnam and a World Bank-financed project on healthcare waste in Vietnam).

  20. Managing hospital doctors and their practice: what can we learn about human resource management from non-healthcare organisations?

    OpenAIRE

    Trebble, Timothy M; Heyworth, Nicola; Clarke, Nicholas; Powell, Timothy; Hockey, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Background Improved management of clinicians’ time and practice is advocated to address increasing demands on healthcare provision in the UK National Health Service (NHS). Human resource management (HRM) is associated with improvements in organisational performance and outcomes within and outside of healthcare, but with limited use in managing individual clinicians. This may reflect the absence of effective and transferrable models. Methods The current systems of managing the performance of i...

  1. Access control management for e-Healthcare in cloud environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Data outsourcing is a major component for cloud computing that allows data owners to distribute resources to external services for users and organizations who can apply the resources. A crucial problem for owners is how to make sure their sensitive information accessed by legitimate users only using the trusted services but not authorized to read the actual information. With the increased development of cloud computing, it brings challenges for data security and access control when outsourcing users’ data and sharing sensitive data in cloud environment since it is not within the same trusted domain as data owners’. Access control policies have become an important issue in the security filed in cloud computing. Semantic web technologies represent much richer forms of relationships among users, resources and actions among different web applications such as clouding computing. However, Semantic web applications pose new requirements for security mechanisms especially in the access control models. This paper addresses existing access control methods and presents a semantic based access control model which considers semantic relations among different entities in cloud computing environment. We have enriched the research for semantic web technology with role-based access control that is able to be applied in the field of medical information system or e-Healthcare system. This work shows how the semantic web technology provides efficient solutions for the management of complex and distributed data in heterogeneous systems, and it can be used in the medical information systems as well.

  2. Patient Relationship Management: What the U.S. Healthcare System Can Learn from Other Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poku, Michael K; Behkami, Nima A; Bates, David W

    2017-01-01

    As the U.S. healthcare system moves to value-based care, the importance of engaging patients and families continues to intensify. However, simply engaging patients and families to improve their subjective satisfaction will not be enough for providers who want to maximize value. True optimization entails developing deep and long-term relationships with patients. We suggest that healthcare organizations must build such a discipline of "patient relationship management" (PRM) just as companies in non-healthcare industries have done with the concept of customer relationship management (CRM). Some providers have already made strides in this area, but overall it has been underemphasized or ignored by most healthcare systems to date. As healthcare providers work to develop their dedicated PRM systems, tools, and processes, we suggest they may benefit from emulating companies in other industries who have been able to engage their customers in innovative ways while acknowledging the differences between healthcare and other industries.

  3. A system dynamics approach for healthcare waste management: a case study in Istanbul Metropolitan City, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciplak, Nesli; Barton, John R

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare waste consists of various types of waste materials generated at hospitals, medical research centres, clinics and laboratories. Although 75-90% of this waste is classified as 'domestic' in nature, 20-25% is deemed to be hazardous, which if not disposed of appropriately, poses a risk to healthcare workers, patients, the environment and even the whole community. As long as healthcare waste is mixed with municipal waste and not segregated prior to disposal, costs will increase substantially. In this study, healthcare waste increases along with the potential to decrease the amounts by implementing effective segregation at healthcare facilities are projected to 2040. Our long-term aim is to develop a system to support selection and planning of the future treatment capacity. Istanbul in Turkey was used as the case study area. In order to identify the factors affecting healthcare waste generation in Istanbul, observations were made and interviews conducted in Istanbul over a 3 month period. A system dynamics approach was adopted to build a healthcare waste management model using a software package, Vensim Ple Plus. Based on reported analysis, the non-hazardous municipal fraction co-disposed with healthcare waste is around 65%. Using the projected waste generation flows, reducing a municipal fraction to 30% has the potential to avoid some 8000 t year(-1) of healthcare waste by 2025 and almost 10 000 t year(-1) by 2035. Furthermore, if segregation practices ensured healthcare waste requiring incineration was also selectively managed, 77% of healthcare waste could be diverted to alternative treatment technologies. As the throughput capacity of the only existing healthcare waste treatment facility in Istanbul, Kemerburgaz Incinerator, has already been exceeded, it is evident that improved management could not only reduce overall flows and costs but also permit alternative and cheaper treatment systems (e.g. autoclaving) to be adopted for the healthcare waste.

  4. Medical managers in contemporary healthcare organisations: a consideration of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Alison J

    2010-11-01

    To consider the literature supporting the evolution of the roles of a Medical Manager within contemporary healthcare organisations. Consideration of available literature. Limited dedicated literature available. Consideration of available studies and expert opinion reveals benefit of doctors in management positions within healthcare organisations. The roles of Medical Managers arise from: organisational structure-theory of healthcare's 'professional bureaucracy'; clinical directorate models; clinical governance, legislative and public health requirements; and the duality of combining medical knowledge with business and healthcare management training. Roles identified are: (1) leadership and management of medical staff including appointments and credentialing, and mentoring of medical staff in Clinical Directorate roles; (2) strategy development including Medical Advisory Role to Executive; (3) clinical governance including quality and risk management and legislative requirements; and (4) operational areas that benefit from clinical and management skills. Strengths of this review include considering contexts of Medical Managers in medical and healthcare management literature. Weaknesses include drawing inferences from theory. Future recommendations include formal studies and systematic reviews of available literature of the subject. In light of falling Medical Management trainee numbers, this study highlights the value to the health system of a dwindling Medical Management profession, the urgent need to encourage more medical practitioners into management and for organisations to further embrace Medical Managers in key leadership roles.

  5. Denmark's comparative position regarding health status, healthcare provision, self-management and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Jones, Allan; Zander, Mette

    2015-01-01

    the perspective of people with diabetes, family members of people with diabetes and healthcare professionals. METHODS: A total of 502 Danish people with diabetes (PWD), 122 adult family members of people with diabetes (FM) and 283 healthcare professionals (HCPs) participated in the study. Data on healthcare......, there is room for improvement when it comes to self-management behaviours. Special attention is needed to address this issue without compromising the psychological wellbeing of the PWD....

  6. RFID of next generation network for enhancing customer relationship management in healthcare industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ahmed; Qureshi, Muhammad Shuaib; Thayananthan, Vijey

    2017-10-23

    This paper aims to analyze possible next generation of networked radio frequency identification (NGN-RFID) system for customer relationship management (CRM) in healthcare industries. Customer relationship and its management techniques in a specific healthcare industry are considered in this development. The key objective of using NGN-RFID scheme is to enhance the handling of patients' data to improve the CRM efficiency in healthcare industries. The proposed NGN-RFID system is one of the valid points to improve the ability of CRM by analyzing different prior and current traditional approaches. The legacy of customer relationship management will be improved by using this modern NGN-RFID technology without affecting the novelty.

  7. IoT-based Asset Management System for Healthcare-related Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Carman Ka Man

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare industry has been focusing efforts on optimizing inventory management procedures through the incorporation of Information and Communication Technology, in the form of tracking devices and data mining, to establish ideal inventory models. In this paper, a roadmap is developed towards a technological assessment of the Internet of Things (IoT in the healthcare industry, 2010–2020. According to the roadmap, an IoT-based healthcare asset management system (IoT-HAMS is proposed and developed based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Fuzzy Logic (FL, incorporating IoT technologies for asset management to optimize the supply of resources.

  8. The perception of veterinary herd health management by Dutch dairy farmers and its current status in the Netherlands: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Marjolein; van de Ven, Lindsay M A; van Werven, Tine; Kremer, Wim D J; Hogeveen, Henk

    2012-05-01

    The importance of veterinary herd health management (VHHM) is increasing in both dairy farming and veterinary practice. Little is known, however, about how VHHM is perceived by farmers in terms of structure, content and satisfaction. In 2007 a questionnaire, containing questions about these three items was therefore sent to 800 Dutch dairy farmers. Farmers received two questionnaires, one for participants in VHHM and one for non-participants, allowing them to choose the appropriate one. Results were summarized and statistically analyzed. Farmers who were participating in VHHM had better farm performance. They were satisfied with the way VHHM was executed on their farm. However, there were some pressure points. Goal setting and evaluation was still not a regular part of VHHM, even though it is said to be effective in literature. Time spent on VHHM not visible to the farmer was often not charged or not clearly specified on the bill. The differences in opinions between participants and non-participants of VHHM indicated a lack of communication and/or product differentiation. Satisfaction with the way VHHM was executed on the farm had no significant influence on 305-day production. There was, however, some influence on calving interval and bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An innovative approach to teaching bioethics in management of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova-Yankulovska, Silviya

    2016-03-01

    Bioethical courses were introduced in the curricula in medical universities in Bulgaria in 1990s. In the beginning, the courses were mainly theoretical, and systematic case analyses and discussions of movies were introduced later on. The benefits of using films to teach ethics have been previously analyzed in the literature; however, to our knowledge such studies in Bulgaria are yet lacking. The aim of this study was to survey the opinions of students and analyze the results from the application of movies in bioethics teaching in a medical university in the north of Bulgaria. A survey was carried out among 92 students in the management of healthcare. Two movies were used, and separate protocols for film discussion were developed. The study was conducted anonymously and with students' free informed consent. The students distinguished in total 21 different dilemmas and concepts in the first movie. The ethical dilemmas were classified into five groups: general ethical issues, deontological issues, special ethical issues, principles of bioethics, and theories of ethics. The second movie focused students' attention on the issues of death and dying. In total, 18 elements of palliative care were described by the students. The range of different categories was a positive indicator of an increased ethical sensitivity. The students evaluated the movies' discussions as a generally positive educational approach. They perceived the experience as contributing to their better understanding of bioethical issues. The innovative approach was well accepted by the students. The introduction of movies in the courses of bioethics had the potential to provide vivid illustrations of bioethical issues and to contribute to the exploration of specific theses and arguments. The presentation and discussion should be preceded by accumulation of theoretical knowledge. The future of effective bioethics education lays in the interactive involvement of students. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. A healthcare management system for Turkey based on a service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herand, Deniz; Gürder, Filiz; Taşkin, Harun; Yuksel, Emre Nuri

    2013-09-01

    The current Turkish healthcare management system has a structure that is extremely inordinate, cumbersome and inflexible. Furthermore, this structure has no common point of view and thus has no interoperability and responds slowly to innovations. The purpose of this study is to show that using which methods can the Turkish healthcare management system provide a structure that could be more modern, more flexible and more quick to respond to innovations and changes taking advantage of the benefits given by a service-oriented architecture (SOA). In this paper, the Turkish healthcare management system is chosen to be examined since Turkey is considered as one of the Third World countries and the information architecture of the existing healthcare management system of Turkey has not yet been configured with SOA, which is a contemporary innovative approach and should provide the base architecture of the new solution. The innovation of this study is the symbiosis of two main integration approaches, SOA and Health Level 7 (HL7), for integrating divergent healthcare information systems. A model is developed which is based on SOA and enables obtaining a healthcare management system having the SSF standards (HSSP Service Specification Framework) developed by the framework of the HSSP (Healthcare Services Specification Project) under the leadership of HL7 and the Object Management Group.

  11. Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    The mean healthcare waste generation rate among health centers did not significantly vary. Segregation of wastes .... waste were daily distributed to different section of the health center. ..... Clinical Technology and Department of Protection.

  12. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  13. A Case Study of Implications and Applications of Standardized Nomenclature for Asset Management in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrancesco, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare organizations strive to adapt to the continuous change in what has become a fast-paced, high technology environment. Many organizations are charged to find efficiencies to better manage medical device assets. Increasingly, healthcare leaders opt to adopt a standardized medical device nomenclature under the purview of a set of national…

  14. The convergence of systemic threads shaping a future South African healthcare dispensation: A technology management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weeks

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Underpinning healthcare service delivery are a number of support systems. This paper focuses on the development of a healthcare services framework that reflects the systems that need to be integrated, from a technology healthcare support perspective.Research purpose: The purpose of this paper is gain an understanding of some of the intricacies associated with the management of the transition to a future South African healthcare dispensation, with reference to the convergence of technology, financial healthcare and socio-political systems.Motivation for the study: South Africa is in the process of implementing the National Health Insurance initiative and the approach adopted will have a significant impact on the business model design.Research design, approach and method: A multidisciplinary literature study was undertaken. In addition, a limited narrative enquiry was also conducted. Practitioners interviewed were from the healthcare, informatics and management and technology sectors respectively. The research study constituted an insight study – analytically descriptive and not statistical in nature.Main findings: The literature reflects two very contrasting and different business models of healthcare service provision, namely a primarily curative and preventative stance. Each assumes a very different convergence of technology, healthcare, financial and social systems and consequently gives rise to contrasting business models. The dominant model appears to be based on primary healthcare, with a different technology support infrastructure to the previously-adopted curative approach. It is a model that would also appear to necessitate a complex adaptive management approach, necessitating a bottom-up as opposed to a top-down hierarchal management orientation.Contribution/Value-add: The National Healthcare Insurance initiative entails a very fundamental restructuring of the healthcare infrastructure. The insights gained from this

  15. Dog and cat management through sterilization: Implications for population dynamics and veterinary public policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Augusto; Baquero, Oswaldo Santos; Guilloux, Aline Gil Alves; Moretti, Caio Figueiredo; de Lucca, Tosca; Rodrigues, Ricardo Conde Alves; Castagna, Cláudio Luiz; Presotto, Douglas; Kronitzky, Yury Cezar; Grisi-Filho, José Henrique Hildebrand; Ferreira, Fernando; Amaku, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to compare different sterilization scenarios allowing the adoption of the most adequate strategy to control owned dog and cat population sizes as the official veterinary public policy for animal control in an urban area of Campinas municipality, Brazil. To achieve this goal, the vital parameters of the owned pet population were measured in a neighborhood of Campinas called Jardim Vila Olimpia through questionnaires used in two census studies performed in February 2012 and June 2013. Different hypothetical sterilization scenarios were compared with the scenario of a single sterilization campaign performed in the study area between the census studies. Using a deterministic mathematical model, population dynamics were simulated for these different scenarios. We have observed that for both owned dogs and cats, the impact on the population size achieved by a single sterilization campaign would be diluted over the years, equating to the impact achieved by the usual sterilization rate practiced before the sterilization campaign yearly. Moreover, using local and global sensitivity analyses, we assessed the relative influence on animal population evolution of each vital parameter used in the mathematical models. The more influential parameters for both species were the carrying capacity of the environment and sterilization rates of males and females (for both species). We observed that even with sterilizing 100% of the intact animals annually, it would not be possible to obtain proportions greater than 86% and 88% of sterilized dogs and cats, respectively, after 20 years due to the high introduction of new intact animals. There is no public dog and cat sterilization service in place in the city, and sporadic and local sterilization campaigns are performed with a prior communication to the owners to bring their animals to be sterilized in a selected veterinary facility. If a sterilization campaign was performed annually in the study area, it would

  16. Pursuing enterprise risk management: a local road map for Canadian healthcare leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, James R; Church, John; Cockerill, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of organizational risk management in healthcare, and in particular the concepts of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), has identified a 5-part model that can be used by Canadian healthcare leaders as an evidence-supported approach to successful organizational risk management. The Model for Organizational Risk Management, termed "the Model," has been developed as a basis for linking the components of an ERM Framework into a Canadian health organization to overcome the barriers that commonly disrupt strategic risk management. The Model addresses how an ERM Framework can fit within an existing health organization by building off and enhancing existing processes and resources to ensure familiarity, acceptance, and sustainability of the risk management program. By approaching the Model in a stepwise fashion (based on individual organizational context), healthcare leaders are provided with a road map from which to advance their own organizational risk management program.

  17. Bringing plant-based veterinary vaccines to market: Managing regulatory and commercial hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Doshi, Ketan; Dussault, Marike; Hall, J Christopher; Holbrook, Larry; Jones, Ginny; Kaldis, Angelo; Klima, Cassidy L; Macdonald, Phil; McAllister, Tim; McLean, Michael D; Potter, Andrew; Richman, Alex; Shearer, Heather; Yarosh, Oksana; Yoo, Han Sang; Topp, Edward; Menassa, Rima

    2015-12-01

    The production of recombinant vaccines in plants may help to reduce the burden of veterinary diseases, which cause major economic losses and in some cases can affect human health. While there is abundant research in this area, a knowledge gap exists between the ability to create and evaluate plant-based products in the laboratory, and the ability to take these products on a path to commercialization. The current report, arising from a workshop sponsored by an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme, addresses this gap by providing guidance in planning for the commercialization of plant-made vaccines for animal use. It includes relevant information on developing business plans, assessing market opportunities, manufacturing scale-up, financing, protecting and using intellectual property, and regulatory approval with a focus on Canadian regulations. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation and modeling efforts to support decision making in healthcare supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuKhousa, Eman; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Mohamed, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Recently, most healthcare organizations focus their attention on reducing the cost of their supply chain management (SCM) by improving the decision making pertaining processes' efficiencies. The availability of products through healthcare SCM is often a matter of life or death to the patient; therefore, trial and error approaches are not an option in this environment. Simulation and modeling (SM) has been presented as an alternative approach for supply chain managers in healthcare organizations to test solutions and to support decision making processes associated with various SCM problems. This paper presents and analyzes past SM efforts to support decision making in healthcare SCM and identifies the key challenges associated with healthcare SCM modeling. We also present and discuss emerging technologies to meet these challenges.

  19. [The use of benchmarking to manage the healthcare supply chain: effects on purchasing cost and quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Ruiz-Muñoz, David

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare supply expenses consume a large part of the financial resources allocated to public health. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of a benchmarking process in the management of hospital purchases, as well as its effect on product cost reduction and quality improvement. Data were collected through a survey conducted in 29 primary healthcare districts from 2010 to 2011, and through a healthcare database on the prices, quality, delivery time and supplier characteristics of 5373 products. The use of benchmarking processes reduced or eliminated products with a low quality and high price. These processes increased the quality of products by 10.57% and reduced their purchase price by 28.97%. The use of benchmarking by healthcare centers can reduce expenditure and allow more efficient management of the healthcare supply chain. It also facilitated the acquisition of products at lower prices and higher quality. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulation and Modeling Efforts to Support Decision Making in Healthcare Supply Chain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman AbuKhousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, most healthcare organizations focus their attention on reducing the cost of their supply chain management (SCM by improving the decision making pertaining processes’ efficiencies. The availability of products through healthcare SCM is often a matter of life or death to the patient; therefore, trial and error approaches are not an option in this environment. Simulation and modeling (SM has been presented as an alternative approach for supply chain managers in healthcare organizations to test solutions and to support decision making processes associated with various SCM problems. This paper presents and analyzes past SM efforts to support decision making in healthcare SCM and identifies the key challenges associated with healthcare SCM modeling. We also present and discuss emerging technologies to meet these challenges.

  1. Goals of telephone nursing work--the managers' perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish Healthcare Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Elenor; Carlsson, Marianne; Holmström, Inger K; Larsson, Jan; Fredriksson, Mio

    2014-04-24

    Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD. The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis. The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: 'create feelings of trust', 'achieve patient safety', 'assess, refer and give advice', and 'teach the caller'. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given. The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers' expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems.

  2. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients \\'at risk\\' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored.

  3. Safe injections and waste management among healthcare workers at a regional hospital in northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Josefine; Pembe, Andrea B; Urasa, Miriam; Darj, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Unsafe injections and substandard waste management are public health issues exposing healthcare workers and the community to the risk of infections. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of safe injections and health care waste management among healthcare workers at a regional hospital in northern Tanzania. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in a regional hospital in northern Tanzania. Data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire with additional observations of the incinerator, injections, waste practices, and the availability of medical supplies. Data was analysed in SPSS descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were performed. A total of 223 of 305 (73%) healthcare workers from different cadres were included in the study. The majority of healthcare workers had adequate knowledge and practice of safe injections, but inadequate knowledge about waste management. The majority of the staff reported knowledge of HIV as a risk factor, however, had less knowledge about other blood-borne infections. Guidelines and posters on post exposure prophylaxes and waste management -were present at the hospital, however, the incinerator had no fence or temperature gauge. In conclusion, healthcare workers reported good knowledge and practice of injections, and high knowledge of HIV transmission routes. However, the hospital is in need of a well functioning incinerator and healthcare workers require sufficient medical supplies. There was a need for continual training about health care waste management and avoidance of blood-borne pathogens that may be transmitted through unsafe injections or poor health care waste management.

  4. Self-management: challenges for allied healthcare professionals in stroke rehabilitation--a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satink, T.J.; Cup, E.H.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Self-management has become an important concept in stroke rehabilitation. This study explored allied healthcare professionals' (AHPs) perceptions and beliefs regarding the self-management of stroke survivors and their knowledge and skills regarding stroke self-management interventions.

  5. The impacts of motivation, personal traits of managers and management education on the performances of public healthcare facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karanovic, Nevena; Stosic, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Exposed to increasing needs of users for better and faster services, more medications and innovative health technologies, managers of healthcare services in the public sector need motivation...

  6. Performance based design and management of healthcare facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durmisevic, S; van der Voordt, Theo; Wagenaar, C.

    2009-01-01

    Subject/Research problem
    Healthcare is in need of methods and sound research data to provide a better fit between supply and demand with regard to functionality, serviceability, architectural and perceptual qualities, technical aspects, economical issues and sustainability. This paper presents a

  7. Ending the technology paradox: healthcare management technologies for clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karys, A

    1998-01-01

    As this article has shown, advances are beginning to put an end to the technology paradox that has hindered the industry's efforts to manage care better. Whereas in the past the management side of the healthcare industry has been slow to adopt new technologies, recent years have seen an explosion in the development and use of new tools for managing care. Most of these tools have traditionally focused on managing the administrative and financial aspects of providing care; however, that has also begun to change. Software systems incorporating clinical decision support criteria permit healthcare professionals to make clinical decision-making part of the care management process conveniently and efficiently. Clinical decision support criteria are also helping to change the focus of managed care. At the beginning of the managed care era, insurers and managed care companies concentrated primarily on reigning in costs, in many cases by restricting the types and duration of care provided to their members. Although these restrictions succeeded in conserving resources, they also helped foster an uneasy atmosphere between payers and providers, many of whom felt that their clinical judgment was too often overruled by the "bean counters." At the same time, many healthcare consumers grew to distrust both managed care professionals and providers, feeling that medical decisions were often made for the wrong reasons. However, as managed care companies have acknowledged that the most efficient way to provide care is to provide appropriate care, the focus has begun to move toward the clinical side of healthcare. Although healthcare organizations are still relying on financial management tools, they are also looking for systems that can make the clinical decision-making process more efficient and effective. The end result is that the healthcare industry is able to assure the best, most appropriate treatment while conserving resources. With the constant stream of new technologies into

  8. Perspectives on academic veterinary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberg, H B; Gelberg, S

    2001-09-15

    It is important for veterinary administrators to apply knowledge bases from other fields to their own unique administrative needs. For example, although some resources are written for business managers, the discussions of four key management competency areas, guidelines for mastering these skills, organizational assessment tools, and other self-help tools may provide interesting food-for-thought for veterinary administrators.(76) In developing their own administrative styles, administrators should seek to apply those principles that seem to intuitively fit with their personal research styles, work situations, managerial styles, administrative preferences, and unique organizational culture. Through strengthening their liaisons with community and university business programs, counseling agencies, employee assistance programs, and psychology researchers, administrators can continue to be exposed to and benefit from new paradigms for consideration in veterinary medical environments. Through these liaisons, the unique needs of veterinary medical environments are also communicated to individuals within the fields of psychology and business, thus stimulating new research that specifically targets veterinary medical environment leadership issues. Each field has unique contributions to help veterinary administrators work toward creating veterinary medical environments that are creative, energetic, visionary, pragmatic, and highly marketable in order to help administrators recruit and nurture the best and brightest veterinary researchers, teachers, and clinicians.

  9. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradel, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician’s role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project.Project description: In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich.During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts.In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital’s executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc..A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the

  10. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Maximilian; Moder, Stefan; Nicolai, Leo; Pander, Tanja; Hoppe, Boj; Pinilla, Severin; Von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician's role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project. In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor) at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich. During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts. In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital's executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc.). A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the hospital is selected in advance by the course organizers

  11. Effective design, implementation and management of change in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda

    2016-09-14

    Changes in healthcare organisations are common, and their implementation is often complex and challenging. Change is often implemented suboptimally, and can have several negative effects on staff turnover, patient care and budget targets. To minimise and avoid negative outcomes, a systematic three-stage change process that comprises preparing for change, implementing change, and evaluating and sustaining change can be followed. In the first stage, before commencing any change activities, time and attention should be given to conducting detailed analyses and preparatory work to establish the foundation for the implementation phase. In the second stage, a clear set of multiple implementation tactics are used to ensure the change process is effective. In the final stage, an evaluation of the success of the change is undertaken and measures are put in place to ensure it is sustained over time. It is only by following a methodical change process such as this that changes can be implemented effectively in healthcare organisations.

  12. Petri net methodology for solving healthcare management issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushk Abdul Rauf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Various approaches of Petri nets can be achieved as system security and information flow in the healthcare recording system inside any medical or health-related business. Petri net system formal modeling is essential as well as important to track down the records and secure information inside a preformed health organization. In this paper, we mainly focused on the formal model Petri net which security mechanism is controlled by public key encryption where PN based modeling is preferred. This Petri net is a mathematical modeling to solve graphical notation for step by step processes that include choice, repetition, and circumstantial execution. Petri nets offer widely mathematical applications of discrete and continuous event execution semiotics, with an efficient mathematical analysis processing theory. We sure that our formal model will lay a solid foundation to minimize the risks and overcome the security risks in the healthcare industry.

  13. Managing resources and reducing waste in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; Wells, Bill

    2016-05-18

    The NHS is under pressure to increase its effectiveness and productivity. Nurses are tasked with delivering effective and efficient care, as well as improving patient safety, experiences and results. The reduction of waste in service delivery, care and treatment can release time and resources for nurses to engage in direct patient care. Nurses have an important role in reducing waste and influencing other professionals in the healthcare environment to increase their efficiency and productivity.

  14. Management system aided design: healthcare R&D center application

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, Aude; Bocquet, Jean-Claude; Dudezert, Aurélie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The very changing economic environment imposes on the organizations to be flexible. New design methods have to be carried out to create such agile organizations. The systemic approach can be used to contribute to the design of systems such as organizational or decision systems. This paper presents a method based on systemics and an exploratory study case relative to the design of a healthcare research center called MIRCen, especially its decision system. Organizational...

  15. Commercial Smartphone-Based Devices and Smart Applications for Personalized Healthcare Monitoring and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Vashist

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone-based devices and applications (SBDAs with cost effectiveness and remote sensing are the most promising and effective means of delivering mobile healthcare (mHealthcare. Several SBDAs have been commercialized for the personalized monitoring and/or management of basic physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, weight, body analysis, pulse rate, electrocardiograph, blood glucose, blood glucose saturation, sleeping and physical activity. With advances in Bluetooth technology, software, cloud computing and remote sensing, SBDAs provide real-time on-site analysis and telemedicine opportunities in remote areas. This scenario is of utmost importance for developing countries, where the number of smartphone users is about 70% of 6.8 billion cell phone subscribers worldwide with limited access to basic healthcare service. The technology platform facilitates patient-doctor communication and the patients to effectively manage and keep track of their medical conditions. Besides tremendous healthcare cost savings, SBDAs are very critical for the monitoring and effective management of emerging epidemics and food contamination outbreaks. The next decade will witness pioneering advances and increasing applications of SBDAs in this exponentially growing field of mHealthcare. This article provides a critical review of commercial SBDAs that are being widely used for personalized healthcare monitoring and management.

  16. Commercial Smartphone-Based Devices and Smart Applications for Personalized Healthcare Monitoring and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Schneider, E Marion; Luong, John H T

    2014-08-18

    Smartphone-based devices and applications (SBDAs) with cost effectiveness and remote sensing are the most promising and effective means of delivering mobile healthcare (mHealthcare). Several SBDAs have been commercialized for the personalized monitoring and/or management of basic physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, weight, body analysis, pulse rate, electrocardiograph, blood glucose, blood glucose saturation, sleeping and physical activity. With advances in Bluetooth technology, software, cloud computing and remote sensing, SBDAs provide real-time on-site analysis and telemedicine opportunities in remote areas. This scenario is of utmost importance for developing countries, where the number of smartphone users is about 70% of 6.8 billion cell phone subscribers worldwide with limited access to basic healthcare service. The technology platform facilitates patient-doctor communication and the patients to effectively manage and keep track of their medical conditions. Besides tremendous healthcare cost savings, SBDAs are very critical for the monitoring and effective management of emerging epidemics and food contamination outbreaks. The next decade will witness pioneering advances and increasing applications of SBDAs in this exponentially growing field of mHealthcare. This article provides a critical review of commercial SBDAs that are being widely used for personalized healthcare monitoring and management.

  17. Performance management of the public healthcare services in Ireland: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesabbah, Mohammed; Arisha, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Performance Management (PM) processes have become a potent part of strategic and service quality decisions in healthcare organisations. In 2005, the management of public healthcare in Ireland was amalgamated into a single integrated management body, named the Health Service Executive (HSE). Since then, the HSE has come up with a range of strategies for healthcare developments and reforms, and has developed a PM system as part of its strategic planning. The purpose of this paper is to review the application of PM in the Irish Healthcare system, with a particular focus on Irish Hospitals and Emergency Services. An extensive review of relevant HSE's publications from 2005 to 2013 is conducted. Studies of the relevant literature related to the application of PM and of international best practices in healthcare performance systems are also presented. PM and performance measurement systems used by the HSE include many performance reports designed to monitor performance trends and strategic goals. Issues in the current PM system include inconsistency of measures and performance reporting, unclear strategy alignment, and deficiencies in reporting (e.g. feedback and corrective actions). Furthermore, PM processes have not been linked adequately into Irish public hospitals' management systems. The HSE delivers several services such as mental health, social inclusion, etc. This study focuses on the HSE's PM framework, with a particular interest in acute hospitals and emergency services. This is the first comprehensive review of Irish healthcare PM since the introduction of the HSE. A critical analysis of the HSE reports identifies the shortcomings in its current PM system.

  18. Developing an information resources management strategy for regulatory veterinary medicine: a national imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L E; Honeycutt, T L; Cowen, P; Morrow, W E; Hueston, W D

    1994-10-15

    Lack of a standardized information technology management strategy has resulted in state and federal information systems evolving separately, rather than in tandem. Absence of an information management strategy will eventually affect regulatory program management, epidemiologic research, and domestic and international livestock trade. Producers will ultimately pay the price for the lack of regulatory coordination of US animal health and disease information. The longer the development of state and federal information technology management strategies is postponed, the more cost-, labor-, and time-intensive correcting the deficiency will be. Development of a national information resources management environment is the first step in constructing state and federal information technology strategies.

  19. A Healthcare Project: Managing Knowledge through Electronic Medical Record -Empirical Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco Reina; Teresa Cetani; Assunta Lacroce; Marzia Ventura

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims at analysing the complex relations between knowledge management and project management on an empirical case in healthcare system represented by Electronic Medical Record (EMR); the effective goal is to underline the approach and the practical methods used by the project teams to maximize the level of knowledge plugged in EMR in two selected Italian hospitals. First, the research analyzes the main references about knowledge management and project management; then, it shows the j...

  20. How can we synthesize qualitative and quantitative evidence for healthcare policy-makers and managers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Catherine; Mays, Nicholas; Popay, Jennie

    2006-01-01

    Interest in synthesizing the findings of qualitative and quantitative evidence is increasing in response to the complex questions being asked by healthcare managers and policy-makers. There is a wealth of evidence available from many sources--both formal research and non-research based (e.g., expert opinion, stakeholder, and user views). Synthesis offers the opportunity to integrate diverse forms of evidence into a whole. We categorize the current approaches to the synthesis of qualitative and quantitative evidence into four broad groups: narrative, qualitative, quantitative, and Bayesian. Many of the methods for synthesis are emergent; some have been used to integrate primary data; few have a long history of application to healthcare. In the healthcare context, synthesis methods are less well developed than methods such as systematic review. Nonetheless, synthesis has the potential to provide knowledge and decision support to healthcare policy-makers and managers.

  1. Use of evidence-based management in healthcare administration decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruiling; Berkshire, Steven D; Fulton, Lawrence V; Hermanson, Patrick M

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine whether healthcare leaders use evidence-based management (EBMgt) when facing major decisions and what types of evidence healthcare administrators consult during their decision-making. This study also intends to identify any relationship that might exist among adoption of EBMgt in healthcare management, attitudes towards EBMgt, demographic characteristics and organizational characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional study was conducted among US healthcare leaders. Spearman's correlation and logistic regression were performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 23.0. Findings One hundred and fifty-four healthcare leaders completed the survey. The study results indicated that 90 per cent of the participants self-reported having used an EBMgt approach for decision-making. Professional experiences (87 per cent), organizational data (84 per cent) and stakeholders' values (63 per cent) were the top three types of evidence consulted daily and weekly for decision-making. Case study (75 per cent) and scientific research findings (75 per cent) were the top two types of evidence consulted monthly or less than once a month. An exploratory, stepwise logistic regression model correctly classified 75.3 per cent of all observations for a dichotomous "use of EBMgt" response variable using three independent variables: attitude towards EBMgt, number of employees in the organization and the job position. Spearman's correlation indicated statistically significant relationships between healthcare leaders' use of EBMgt and healthcare organization bed size ( rs = 0.217, n = 152, p making.

  2. Knowledge management in the NHS: positioning the healthcare librarian at the knowledge intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, C; Lambert, S

    2000-09-01

    This paper defines what is meant by Knowledge Management, investigates how it interlinks with new ways of delivering health care and gives a synopsis of a study that investigated issues around implementation of Knowledge Management across a sample of healthcare librarians. Areas of investigation that are related to Knowledge Management include: HSG(97)47, evidence-based medicine, clinical governance, information and communication technologies, and the changing role of the healthcare librarian. A diagram is included in this paper which illustrates how the healthcare librarian interacts with resources, staff and practices, so contributing to the knowledge base of health care. The paper concludes that Government policy, new technologies and the push towards the practice of information age medicine are forcing changes throughout the NHS. Recognition of Knowledge Management is still in its infancy in the NHS--it calls for major change in organizational thinking and acceptance by the librarian that their service must also be subject to continuous improvement.

  3. Keeping Up with Healthcare Trends: IcHeart as a Medication Management Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Azah Samsudin, Noor

    2016-11-01

    According to the US governments, more than 125,000 people die each year due to failure to manage their medications, leading to approximately USD100 billion in preventable costs to healthcare systems. The core failure in medication management is attributed by patients failing to adhere their medication regimens, whether by accident, negligence, or intentional. Recognizing the importants of vigilant monitoring in medication management, this paper is set to review the latest android-based healthcare trends and propose a new mobile medication reminder application called IcHeart.

  4. A methodology and supply chain management inspired reference ontology for modeling healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig E; Yazdi, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies and strategic plans are advocating more team based healthcare delivery that is facilitated by information and communication technologies (ICTs). However before we can design ICTs to support teams we need a solid conceptual model of team processes and a methodology for using such a model in healthcare settings. This paper draws upon success in the supply chain management domain to develop a reference ontology of healthcare teams and a methodology for modeling teams to instantiate the ontology in specific settings. This research can help us understand how teams function and how we can design ICTs to support teams.

  5. Swiss-model of managerial culture as the basis for forming the competence model of a modern manager in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aleksandrovna Strakhova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to research the practice of Swissmanagement of healthcare organizations. Methods abstractlogic comparative management benchmarking. Results elaboration o f the mechanism and tools of forming the competence model of the modern manager in healthcare. Scientific novelty the conceptual approach is elaborated to build the system of human resources management in healthcare organization basing on the Swissmodel of managerial culture the innovative model of healthcare managers training in the system of continuous professional education is elaborated the problemoriented approach to training the medical personnel is used with the possibility to correct the curriculum during its implementation. Practical value the issue of efficient resource management in healthcare are discussed at the level of the Russian Ministry of Healthcare Russian Agency for Monitoring in Healthcare Federal Fund for compulsory medical insurance. The existing contradictions in the management and regulatory system of healthcare as a sector of economy the protracted reforms the unbalanced model of healthcare system lead to the search of new managerial mechanisms. Thus the introduction of the Swissmodel of human resources management and the new type of managerial culture in healthcare organizations can be viewed as the mechanism of increasing the efficiency of the Russian healthcare organizationsrsquo functioning. nbsp

  6. Developing entrepreneurial competencies in the healthcare management undergraduate classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Louis; Freshman, Brenda

    2005-01-01

    Recently, entrepreneurial behavior is becoming more accepted in the healthcare field. This article describes an attempt to foster development of positive entrepreneurial competencies in the undergraduate health administration classroom. Through a literature review on entrepreneurs, eight competency clusters are identified; decision making, strategic thinking, risk taking, confidence building, communicating ideas, motivating team members, tolerance of ambiguity, and internal locus of control. These clusters are used to promote entrepreneurial skills for students though identified learning-centered activities and supplement an instructional style that facilitates thoughtful reflection.

  7. Implementing chronic disease management in the public healthcare sector in Singapore: the role of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, J; Heng, B H

    2001-01-01

    The public health care delivery system in Singapore faces the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, an increasing chronic disease burden, increasing healthcare cost, rising expectations and demand for better health services, and shortage of resources. It is also fragmented, resulting in duplication and lack of coordination between institutions. A disease management approach has been adopted by the National Healthcare Group (NHG) as a critical strategy to provide holistic, cost-effective, seamless and well-coordinated care across the continuum. The framework in the development of the disease management plan included identifying the diseases and defining the target population, organizing a multi-disciplinary team lead by a clinician champion, defining the core components, treatment protocols and evaluation methods, defining the goals, and measuring and managing the outcomes. As disease management and case management for chronic diseases are new approaches adopted in the healthcare delivery system, there is a lack of understanding by healthcare professionals. The leadership and participation of hospital physicians was sought in the planning, design and outcomes monitoring to ensure their 'buy-in' and the successful implementation and effectiveness of the program. The episodic diagnosis related group (DRG)-based framework of funding and subvention for healthcare, and the shortage of step-care care facilities, have been recognized by the Ministry of Health as an impediments to the implementation, and these are currently being addressed.

  8. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance.

  9. Influence of healthcare institution managers' proactive approach to communication activities on patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Vinka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Over the recent years customer satisfaction program as a tool for patient satisfaction has been recognized as an important issue in healthcare services. The aim of this preliminary study was to explore an influence of healthcare institution managers' approach and attitudes to marketing and public relations activities (communication activities, in the context of implementation of customer satisfaction programs, on patient satisfaction. Methods. The study was conducted among managers from different state-owned healthcare institutions (healthcare centers, clinics, hospitals in Serbia. The structured questionnaire form, comprising both open and closed questions, was used as a main research tool. The total number of sent questionnaires was 120; 56 questionnaires were sent back, while 49 of them were valid. Results. It was shown that 42.9% of healthcare institutions apply proactive media approach, and that 35.7% of the organizations have a person who, besides his/her basic engagements, performs activities connected with marketing and public relations. Using Chi-square likelihood ratio test it is confirmed that these activities have a significant role in supporting customer satisfaction program implementation (p < 0.05. The results showed that in 69.4% cases, positive attitude of healthcare institutions managers toward marketing and public relations activities had positive influence on patient satisfaction (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Managers in healthcare sector in Serbia who used proactive approach toward media and who had already institutionalized communication activities with external stakeholders have a positive attitude to implementation of customer satisfaction program. Furthermore, managers' attitude toward communication activities has influence on patient satisfaction.

  10. Knowledge Management Implementation and the Tools Utilized in Healthcare for Evidence-Based Decision Making: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Leila; Safadari, Reza; Jimma, Worku

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare is a knowledge driven process and thus knowledge management and the tools to manage knowledge in healthcare sector are gaining attention. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate knowledge management implementation and knowledge management tools used in healthcare for informed decision making. Three databases, two journals websites and Google Scholar were used as sources for the review. The key terms used to search relevant articles include: "Healthcare and Knowledge Management"; "Knowledge Management Tools in Healthcare" and "Community of Practices in healthcare". It was found that utilization of knowledge management in healthcare is encouraging. There exist numbers of opportunities for knowledge management implementation, though there are some barriers as well. Some of the opportunities that can transform healthcare are advances in health information and communication technology, clinical decision support systems, electronic health record systems, communities of practice and advanced care planning. Providing the right knowledge at the right time, i.e., at the point of decision making by implementing knowledge management in healthcare is paramount. To do so, it is very important to use appropriate tools for knowledge management and user-friendly system because it can significantly improve the quality and safety of care provided for patients both at hospital and home settings.

  11. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  12. Veterinary Parasitology

    OpenAIRE

    Rondon, F. C. M.; Bevilaqua, C.M.L.; Franke,C.R.; Barros, R. S.; Oliveira,F.R.; Alcântara, Adriano Costa de; Diniz, A. T.

    2008-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 24-31 Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the most important reemerging parasitic disease in the world. The domestic dog is the main reservoir in urban environments. The aim of this work was to extend the knowledge on canine Leishmania infection in the city of Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil, identifying the risk factors inherent in dog susceptibility to the infection. Two populations were analyzed, domestic dogs from clinics and the Veterinary ...

  13. Developing a ubiquitous health management system with healthy diet control for metabolic syndrome healthcare in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yao-Chiang; Chen, Kai-Hong; Lin, Hsueh-Chun

    2017-06-01

    Self-management in healthcare can allow patients managing their health data anytime and everywhere for prevention of chronic diseases. This study established a prototype of ubiquitous health management system (UHMS) with healthy diet control (HDC) for people who need services of metabolic syndrome healthcare in Taiwan. System infrastructure comprises of three portals and a database tier with mutually supportive components to achieve functionality of diet diaries, nutrition guides, and health risk assessments for self-health management. With the diet, nutrition, and personal health database, the design enables the analytical diagrams on the interactive interface to support a mobile application for diet diary, a Web-based platform for health management, and the modules of research and development for medical care. For database integrity, dietary data can be stored at offline mode prior to transformation between mobile device and server site at online mode. The UHMS-HDC was developed by open source technology for ubiquitous health management with personalized dietary criteria. The system integrates mobile, internet, and electronic healthcare services with the diet diary functions to manage healthy diet behaviors of users. The virtual patients were involved to simulate the self-health management procedure. The assessment functions were approved by capturing the screen snapshots in the procedure. The proposed system development was capable for practical intervention. This approach details the expandable framework with collaborative components regarding the self-developed UHMS-HDC. The multi-disciplinary applications for self-health management can support the healthcare professionals to reduce medical resources and improve healthcare effects for the patient who requires monitoring personal health condition with diet control. The proposed system can be practiced for intervention in the hospital. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Strategic information technology alliances for effective health-care supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Stephen C; Rivers, Patrick A; Hsu, H Y Sonya

    2009-08-01

    To gain and sustain competitive advantage, health-care providers have to continuously review and renovate their operational and information technology (IT) strategies through collaborative and cooperative endeavour with their supply chain channel members. This paper explores new ways of enhancing a health-care organization's responsiveness to changes and increasing its competitiveness through implementing strategic information technology alliances among channel members in a health-care supply chain network. An overview of issues and problems (e.g. bullwhip effect, negative externalities and free-riding phenomenon in multichannel supply chains) presented in the health-care supply chains is first delineated. This paper further goes over the issues of health-care supply chain coordination and integration for strategic IT alliances, followed by the discussion of the spillover effect of IT investments. A number of viable IT practices (such as information sharing and Internet-enabled supply chain portal) for effective health-care supply chain collaboration and coordination are then examined in this research. Finally, the paper discusses how strategic IT alliances can help improve the effectiveness of health-care supply chain management.

  15. The Future of Management Training in Canadian Healthcare Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A case study of a Canadian health care organization and a Delphi study with a sample of subject-matter experts identified five themes for management training and development: continued tight financial constraints; greater accountability; need for better staff development and evaluation; cooperative resource sharing for management training; and…

  16. The Implications of Healthcare Utilization of Diabetes Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, colorectal screening, depression, diabetes, hypertension, Chronic Obstructive Coronary Disease ...the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes and to prevent the development of microvascular and Utilization Implications of Diabetes Disease Management...of Diabetes Disease Management 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Webb. Jonathan R., MAJ. MS. USA 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  17. Exploring the awareness level of biomedical waste management: Case of Indian healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul S. Mor; Sarbjit Singh; Arvind Bhardwaj; Mohammad Osama

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the awareness level of Biomedical waste managements in healthcare facilities, and their perception among hospital waste management team, doctors, nurses, lab techni-cians and waste handlers in Northwest Delhi region in India. The study has been conducted through a questionnaire survey followed by the descriptive statistical analysis method. Question-naire contains of 38 questions, where the first section deals with the hospital waste management team, the second ...

  18. Teaching and learning teamwork: competency requirements for healthcare managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses an essential element of postgraduate health service management education - development of individual competencies to enhance teamwork among health service managers. A survey of qualified health service managers in the state of Victoria, Australia revealed a set of individual competencies that the managers felt made a positive contribution to the success of workplace teams. The identified competencies included skills in leadership and communication; clinical knowledge and knowledge of organizational goals and strategies; motives such as commitment to the organization, to quality, to working collaboratively and to a consumer focus; and respect for others as a trait. Building on acknowledged teaching and learning theories, a teamwork teaching and learning model was successfully introduced into the postgraduate health services management curriculum at La Trobe University in Melbourne.

  19. The growing need for resources to help older adults manage their financial and healthcare choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Stephanie; Musich, Shirley; Hawkins, Kevin; Armstrong, Douglas G

    2017-04-11

    Both financial literacy (managing personal finances) and health literacy (managing personal health) become increasingly important for older adults, potentially impacting their quality of life. Resources in these constructs of literacy tend to be distinct, although the skills and decision-making involved overlap as financial issues impact healthcare choices. Thus the primary purpose of this commentary is to propose a new area of research focus that defines the intersection of financial and health literacy (i.e., financial health literacy). We conducted a limited literature review related to financial, health, and health insurance literacy to demonstrate gaps in the literature and support our position. Online search engines were utilized to identify research in our primary areas of interest. We define the intersection of financial and health literacy as an area of need labeled financial health literacy, with a focus on four domains. These include: 1) the ability to manage healthcare expenses; 2) pay medical bills; 3) determine health needs and understand treatment options; and 4) make sound healthcare decisions with financial resources available. Despite some overlap with health insurance literacy, financial health literacy would define an area of need encompassing health management choices and health plan selections integrated with other financial management issues including living arrangements, financial planning, and retirement planning. Potential initiatives should be considered to help at-risk older adults find resources to improve their financial health literacy, which in turn will enhance their abilities to manage medical choices in the environment of an increasingly complex healthcare system.

  20. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses. During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership. The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group. A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders. The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups. Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students' and faculty members' attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-10-01

    While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS), a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012) and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students' and faculty members' ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  2. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEDROWICZ, APRIL A.; ROYAL, KENNETH; FLAMMER, KEVEN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS), a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012) and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students’ and faculty members’ ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. Conclusion: These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere. PMID:27795965

  3. Social media and impression management: Veterinary medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APRIL A. KEDROWICZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS, a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012 and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students’ and faculty members’ ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. Conclusion: These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  4. Systematic meta-review of supported self-management for asthma: a healthcare perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Hilary; Parke, Hannah L; Panagioti, Maria; Daines, Luke; Pearce, Gemma; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Bower, Peter; Sheikh, Aziz; Griffiths, Chris J; Taylor, Stephanie J C

    2017-03-17

    Supported self-management has been recommended by asthma guidelines for three decades; improving current suboptimal implementation will require commitment from professionals, patients and healthcare organisations. The Practical Systematic Review of Self-Management Support (PRISMS) meta-review and Reducing Care Utilisation through Self-management Interventions (RECURSIVE) health economic review were commissioned to provide a systematic overview of supported self-management to inform implementation. We sought to investigate if supported asthma self-management reduces use of healthcare resources and improves asthma control; for which target groups it works; and which components and contextual factors contribute to effectiveness. Finally, we investigated the costs to healthcare services of providing supported self-management. We undertook a meta-review (systematic overview) of systematic reviews updated with randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published since the review search dates, and health economic meta-analysis of RCTs. Twelve electronic databases were searched in 2012 (updated in 2015; pre-publication update January 2017) for systematic reviews reporting RCTs (and update RCTs) evaluating supported asthma self-management. We assessed the quality of included studies and undertook a meta-analysis and narrative synthesis. A total of 27 systematic reviews (n = 244 RCTs) and 13 update RCTs revealed that supported self-management can reduce hospitalisations, accident and emergency attendances and unscheduled consultations, and improve markers of control and quality of life for people with asthma across a range of cultural, demographic and healthcare settings. Core components are patient education, provision of an action plan and regular professional review. Self-management is most effective when delivered in the context of proactive long-term condition management. The total cost (n = 24 RCTs) of providing self-management support is offset by a reduction in

  5. Healthcare Managers' Perceptions of Patient Perpetrated Aggression and Prevention Strategies: A Cross Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Maria; Swain, Nicola; Gale, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Patient or client aggression towards staff is a risk in healthcare. Healthcare takes place in a variety of settings, including hospitals, community, and Aged Care facilities. A minimal amount is known regarding the existence of safety and training measures available throughout the broad range of hospital and community healthcare services. A web-based survey of the type and frequency of violence experienced by healthcare staff was sent to unit managers working in mental health and older peoples' services of District Health Boards, Non-Governmental Organisations, and Aged Care facilities across New Zealand. One hundred and forty-one managers responded to the survey with a response rate of 79.21%. Managers reported high rates of verbal aggression and assaults against staff within their services. A total of 60% of respondents stated that an increase in assaults against staff was due to an increase in violent events and 43.1% related this to increased staff awareness and reporting of violent events to management. Communication skills and de-escalation training were provided across approximately 95% of organisations. The availability of safety measures including panic buttons, personal alarms, use of security personnel, and police assistance were more widely available and accessible within hospital settings and the community sector was found to mostly rely on police for assistance when violence occurs. The perception of violence is high in healthcare. Prevention and management training is provided in public hospital and aged care setting but not so much in NGOs. All areas of healthcare provision could benefit from increased evidence based aggression prevention programmes.

  6. The ambiguous role of healthcare providers: a new perspective in Human Resources Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panari, Chiara; Levati, W; Bonini, A; Tonelli, M; Alfieri, E; Artioli, Giovanna

    2016-05-26

    A strategic Human Resources Management approach, that overcomes anadministrative Personnel Management, is becoming crucial for hospital organizations. In this sense, the aimof this work was to examine the figure of healthcare provider using the concept of role, as expected behaviourin term of integration in the organizational culture. The instrument used to analyse the healthcareprovider figure was "role mapping". Particularly, semistructured interviews were conducted and involved to36 health professionals of four units in order to examine the behaviour expectations system towards thehealthcare providers. The analysis revealed that the expectations of different professionals relatedto the healthcare provider were dissimilar. Physicians' expectations referred to technical preparation and efficiency,while nurses and nurse coordinators required collaboration in equip work and emotional support forpatients. In all Operating Units, directors were perceived as missing persons with vague expectations of efficiency.Differences concerned also the four Units. For example, in intensive care Unit, the role of healthcareprovider was clearer and this figure was perceived as essential for patients' care and for the equip teamwork.On the contrary, in Recovery Unit the healthcare provider was underestimated, the role was ambiguous andnot integrated in the equip even if there was a clear division of tasks between nurses and healthcare providers. The "role mapping" instrument allows to identify healthcare provider profile and find possible roleambiguity and conflicts in order to plan adequate human resources management interventions.

  7. Veterinary critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Kevin T T; Mathews, Karol; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Bain, Fairfield T; Hughes, Dez

    2003-04-01

    Veterinary species experience similar perturbations of their health to those of human patients. When the long-term prognosis is good and providing suffering can be minimized, animals stand to benefit greatly from recent advances in the field of emergency and critical care. Outcomes in many conditions in small and large animals have improved markedly in the last 15 years, as management has improved, making the financial and emotional investment in critical care worthwhile for many owners.

  8. BIOTEX--biosensing textiles for personalised healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Shirley; Lau, King-Tong; Moyna, Niall; O'Gorman, Donal; Diamond, Dermot; Di Francesco, Fabio; Costanzo, Daniele; Salvo, Pietro; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; De Rossi, Danilo Emilio; Taccini, Nicola; Paradiso, Rita; Porchet, Jacque-André; Ridolfi, Andrea; Luprano, Jean; Chuzel, Cyril; Lanier, Thierry; Revol-Cavalier, Frdéric; Schoumacker, Sébastien; Mourier, Véronique; Chartier, Isabelle; Convert, Reynald; De-Moncuit, Henri; Bini, Christina

    2010-03-01

    Textile-based sensors offer an unobtrusive method of continually monitoring physiological parameters during daily activities. Chemical analysis of body fluids, noninvasively, is a novel and exciting area of personalized wearable healthcare systems. BIOTEX was an EU-funded project that aimed to develop textile sensors to measure physiological parameters and the chemical composition of body fluids, with a particular interest in sweat. A wearable sensing system has been developed that integrates a textile-based fluid handling system for sample collection and transport with a number of sensors including sodium, conductivity, and pH sensors. Sensors for sweat rate, ECG, respiration, and blood oxygenation were also developed. For the first time, it has been possible to monitor a number of physiological parameters together with sweat composition in real time. This has been carried out via a network of wearable sensors distributed around the body of a subject user. This has huge implications for the field of sports and human performance and opens a whole new field of research in the clinical setting.

  9. Management practices in Australian healthcare: can NSW public hospitals do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy; Agarwal, Neeru; Randhawa, Krithika

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and studies the impact of a range of hospital factors in driving best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach - This study adapts a unique survey instrument globally tested to quantify the multi-dimensional nature of hospital management practices in 42 acute care public hospitals of NSW. The authors then analysed the role of hospital-specific characteristics in driving best management practices, namely hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds, employees and doctors), level of skill and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. Findings - The findings of this study show the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in NSW hospitals. The authors find a positive association between the adoption of better management practices and hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds and employees), level of skills and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. However, hospital size as measured by the number of doctors did not have a statistically significant relationship. Practical implications - This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators, clinical doctors and healthcare policy-makers who want to improve and develop strategies for better management in the healthcare sector. Originality/value - This study provides an internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in public hospitals, and contributes to the evidence-base of management practices and performance in hospitals.

  10. Managing hospital doctors and their practice: what can we learn about human resource management from non-healthcare organisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebble, Timothy M; Heyworth, Nicola; Clarke, Nicholas; Powell, Timothy; Hockey, Peter M

    2014-11-21

    Improved management of clinicians' time and practice is advocated to address increasing demands on healthcare provision in the UK National Health Service (NHS). Human resource management (HRM) is associated with improvements in organisational performance and outcomes within and outside of healthcare, but with limited use in managing individual clinicians. This may reflect the absence of effective and transferrable models. The current systems of managing the performance of individual clinicians in a secondary healthcare organisation were reviewed through the study of practice in 10 successful partnership organisations, including knowledge worker predominant, within commercial, public and voluntary sector operating environments. Reciprocal visits to the secondary healthcare environment were undertaken. Six themes in performance related HRM were identified across the external organisations representing best practice and considered transferrable to managing clinicians in secondary care organisations. These included: performance measurement through defined outcomes at the team level with decision making through local data interpretation; performance improvement through empowered formal leadership with organisational support; individual performance review (IPR); and reward, recognition and talent management. The role of the executive was considered essential to support and implement effective HRM, with management of staff performance, behaviour and development integrated into organisational strategy, including through the use of universally applied values and effective communication. These approaches reflected many of the key aspects of high performance work systems and strategic HRM. There is the potential to develop systems of HRM of individual clinicians in secondary healthcare to improve practice. This should include both performance measurement and performance improvement but also engagement at an organisational level. This suggests that effective HRM and

  11. A randomised study of leadership interventions for healthcare managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lornudd, Caroline; Bergman, David; Sandahl, Christer; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica

    2016-10-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to assess two different leader development interventions by comparing their effects on leadership behaviour and evaluating their combined impact after two years, from the viewpoints of both the participating managers and external raters. Design/methodology/approach The study was a longitudinal randomised controlled trial with a cross-over design. Health care managers ( n = 177) were first randomised to either of two 10-month interventions and a year later were switched to the other intervention. Leadership behaviour was rated at pre-test and 12 and 24 months by participating managers and their superiors, colleagues and subordinates using a 360-degree instrument. Analysis of variance and multilevel regression analysis was performed. Findings No difference in effect on leadership behaviour was found between the two interventions. The evaluation of the combined effect of the interventions on leadership behaviour showed inconsistent (i.e. both increased and decreased) ratings by the various rater sources. Practical implications This study provides some evidence that participation in leadership development programmes can improve managers' leadership behaviours, but the results also highlight the interpretive challenges connected with using a 360-degree instrument to evaluate such development. Originality/value The longitudinal randomised controlled design and the large sample comprising both managers and external raters make this study unusually rigorous in the field of leadership development evaluations.

  12. Investments in information systems and technology in the healthcare: Project management mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare organisations must improve their business practices and internal procedures in order to answer the increasing demand of health professionals and the general public for more and better information. Hospitals invest massively in information systems and technology (IS/IT in the hope that these investments will improve healthcare and meet patients’ demands. The main objective of our research is to study how organisational maturity, enhanced by investments in IS/IT, project management and best practices, leads to successful projects in public healthcare organisations. The rational of our model is that organisational maturity has a positive effect on IS/IT project success, and that this success is also positively enhanced by the use of project management practices. We emphasise that this combination of approaches can increase the effectiveness of projects. Furthermore, it can also improve the confidence that the results of investments will meet stakeholders’ expectations.

  13. The Role of Healthcare Technology Management in Facilitating Medical Device Cybersecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busdicker, Mike; Upendra, Priyanka

    2017-09-02

    This article discusses the role of healthcare technology management (HTM) in medical device cybersecurity and outlines concepts that are applicable to HTM professionals at a healthcare delivery organization or at an integrated delivery network, regardless of size. It provides direction for HTM professionals who are unfamiliar with the security aspects of managing healthcare technologies but are familiar with standards from The Joint Commission (TJC). It provides a useful set of recommendations, including relevant references for incorporating good security practices into HTM practice. Recommendations for policies, procedures, and processes referencing TJC standards are easily applicable to HTM departments with limited resources and to those with no resource concerns. The authors outline processes from their organization as well as best practices learned through information sharing at AAMI, National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (NH-ISAC), and Medical Device Innovation, Safety, and Security Consortium (MDISS) conferences and workshops.

  14. Knowledge Management in healthcare libraries: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge management has seen something of a resurgence in attention amongst health librarians recently. Of course it has never ceased to exist, but now many library staff are becoming more involved in organisational knowledge management, and positioning themselves as key players in the sphere. No single model of knowledge management is proliferating, but approaches that best fit the organisation's size, structure and culture, and a blending of evidence based practice and knowledge sharing. Whatever it is called and whatever models are used, it's clear that for librarians and information professionals, the importance of putting knowledge and evidence into practice, sharing knowledge well and capturing it effectively, are still what we will continue to do. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  15. Session management for web-based healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L; Sengupta, S

    1999-01-01

    In health care systems, users may access multiple applications during one session of interaction with the system. However, users must sign on to each application individually, and it is difficult to maintain a common context among these applications. We are developing a session management system for web-based applications using LDAP directory service, which will allow single sign-on to multiple web-based applications, and maintain a common context among those applications for the user. This paper discusses the motivations for building this system, the system architecture, and the challenges of our approach, such as the session objects management for the user, and session security.

  16. Safety culture: the Nottingham Veterinary Safety Culture Survey (NVSCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, C; Mossop, L; White, K; Ferguson, E

    2017-05-13

    Safety culture is a vital concept in human healthcare because of its influence on staff behaviours in relation to patient safety. Understanding safety culture is essential to ensure the acceptance and sustainability of changes, such as the introduction of safe surgery checklists. While widely studied and assessed in human medicine, there is no tool for its assessment in veterinary medicine. This paper therefore presents initial data on such an assessment: the Nottingham Veterinary Safety Culture Survey (NVSCS). 350 pilot surveys were distributed to practising vets and nurses. The survey was also available online. 229 surveys were returned (65 per cent response rate) and 183 completed online, resulting in 412 surveys for analysis. Four domains were identified: (1) organisational safety systems and behaviours, (2) staff perceptions of management, (3) risk perceptions and (4) teamwork and communication. Initial indications of the reliability and the validity of the final survey are presented. Although early in development, the resulting 29-item NVSCS is presented as a tool for measuring safety culture in veterinary practices with implications for benchmarking, safety culture assessment and teamwork training. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Risk-Based Models for Managing Data Privacy in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL Faresi, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Current research in health care lacks a systematic investigation to identify and classify various sources of threats to information privacy when sharing health data. Identifying and classifying such threats would enable the development of effective information security risk monitoring and management policies. In this research I put the first step…

  18. [Lean logistics management in healthcare: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Escobar, V G; Garrido-Vega, P

    2013-01-01

    To study the applicability of the principles of Lean Production to manage the supply chain of a hospital. In particular, to determine which Lean practices and principles are applicable, the benefits obtained and the main barriers for its implementation. Managing the hospital supply chain is an important issue, both for its effect on the quality of care and its impact on costs. This study is based on a case study. 2005-10. Hospital Virgen Macarena in Seville. Process of implementing a comprehensive logistics management plan based on Lean principles and technological investments. The implementation of the comprehensive plan has reduced inventory, decreased lead times and improved service quality. Also, there have been other important improvements: enhanced employee satisfaction and increased staff productivity, both dedicated to health and the logistics. The experience analysed has shown the applicability and appropriateness of Lean principles and some of its techniques in managing the logistics of hospitals. It also identifies some of the main difficulties that may arise. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. hospital waste management as primary healthcare ce ste

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... Harmful chemicals present in these wastes such as heavy metals can also cause water pollution. Landfill technology can also cause water pollution in the form of leachates. The illegal dumping of medical .... training on hospital waste management and 32% practice hand washing with soap and water as a ...

  20. Human resource capacity for information management in selected public healthcare facilities in Meru County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilu, Elizabeth Mueke; Okero, Dominic Charles; Muiruri, Lillian; Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    Reliable health information is essential for decision making in the healthcare system. Information management in Kenya was considered the weakest area under the Health Information System pillar mainly due to inadequate health workers capacity. The study therefore aimed at assessing health workers skills and current training needs for information management in the selected healthcare facilities. Cross-section research design was adopted and both purposive sampling technique and censuses were used to establish the study participants. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and results were presented in tables, charts and graphs. It was established that capacity building was usually undertaken through on-job trainings i.e. 85.1% (103) health workers had on-job training on filling of data collection tools and only 10% (13) had received formal classroom training on the same. Further, only 9.1% (11) health workers had received information management training while 90.9% (110) had not received such training. Health workers demonstrated below average skills on information management i.e. only 17.4% (21) could check for data accuracy, only 16.5% (20) could compute trends from bar charts and only 16.5% (20) could transform the data they collected into meaningful information for use. The researcher recommended that healthcare facilities management teams develop a competency based framework for defining the desired skill mix for information management and have a yearly Training Needs Assessment for assessing training needs for information management among the health workers.

  1. Reflections on 'medical tourism' from the 2016 Global Healthcare Policy and Management Forum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crooks, V.A.; Ormond, M.E.; Jin, Ki Nam

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016, the Global Healthcare Policy and Management Forum was held at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. The goal of the forum was to discuss the role of the state in regulating and supporting the development of medical tourism. Forum attendees came from 10 countries. In this short

  2. Design and implementation of monitoring and evaluation of healthcare organization management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampos, Platis; Emmanouil, Zoulias; Dimitrios, Iracleous; Lappa, Evaggelia

    2017-09-01

    The management of a healthcare organization is monitored using a suitably designed questionnaire to 271 nurses operating in Greek hospital. The data are fed to an automatic data mining system to obtain a suitable series of models to analyse, visualise and study the obtained information. Hidden patterns, correlations and interdependencies are investigated and the results are analytically presented.

  3. Realising the knowledge spiral in healthcare: the role of data mining and knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Bali, Rajeev K; Gibbons, M Chris; Schaffer, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) is an emerging business approach aimed at solving current problems such as competitiveness and the need to innovate which are faced by businesses today. The premise for the need for KM is based on a paradigm shift in the business environment where knowledge is central to organizational performance . Organizations trying to embrace KM have many tools, techniques and strategies at their disposal. A vital technique in KM is data mining which enables critical knowledge to be gained from the analysis of large amounts of data and information. The healthcare industry is a very information rich industry. The collecting of data and information permeate most, if not all areas of this industry; however, the healthcare industry has yet to fully embrace KM, let alone the new evolving techniques of data mining. In this paper, we demonstrate the ubiquitous benefits of data mining and KM to healthcare by highlighting their potential to enable and facilitate superior clinical practice and administrative management to ensue. Specifically, we show how data mining can realize the knowledge spiral by effecting the four key transformations identified by Nonaka of turning: (1) existing explicit knowledge to new explicit knowledge, (2) existing explicit knowledge to new tacit knowledge, (3) existing tacit knowledge to new explicit knowledge and (4) existing tacit knowledge to new tacit knowledge. This is done through the establishment of theoretical models that respectively identify the function of the knowledge spiral and the powers of data mining, both exploratory and predictive, in the knowledge discovery process. Our models are then applied to a healthcare data set to demonstrate the potential of this approach as well as the implications of such an approach to the clinical and administrative aspects of healthcare. Further, we demonstrate how these techniques can facilitate hospitals to address the six healthcare quality dimensions identified by the Committee

  4. Partnering with universities and colleges to facilitate the PCMH process. An innovative plan to place healthcare management students into practices to promote healthcare transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, R W

    2012-01-01

    Practices contemplating the Patient-Centered Medical Home recognition process are confronted with an arduous task. Perhaps the most palpable constraints are time management combined with staff allocation decisions. Outside consultants can be expensive and disruptive to practice flow. Collaborating with a local college or university's healthcare management or other health career students might be one answer. This article will explore that option.

  5. Healthcare Technology Management (HTM) of mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Jun; Nakane, Masaki; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilator failures expose patients to unacceptable risks, and maintaining mechanical ventilator safety is an important issue. We examined the usefulness of maintaining mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers (CEs) using a specialized calibrator. These evaluations and the ability to make in-house repairs proved useful for obviating the need to rent ventilators which, in turn, might prove faulty themselves. The CEs' involvement in maintaining mechanical ventilators is desirable, ensures prompt service, and, most importantly, enhances safe management of mechanical ventilators.

  6. The growing need for resources to help older adults manage their financial and healthcare choices

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Stephanie; Musich, Shirley; Hawkins, Kevin; Armstrong, Douglas G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Both financial literacy (managing personal finances) and health literacy (managing personal health) become increasingly important for older adults, potentially impacting their quality of life. Resources in these constructs of literacy tend to be distinct, although the skills and decision-making involved overlap as financial issues impact healthcare choices. Thus the primary purpose of this commentary is to propose a new area of research focus that defines the intersection of financ...

  7. Why (just) information is not enough: The contributions of information services in the management of healthcare information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostagiolas, P.; Lappa, E.

    2015-02-01

    Information is at the centre of every hospital activity including clinical decisions and healthcare service delivery systems. Although information is an important hospital asset, several issues related to its management and organization needs to be addressed within the hospitals. The management of healthcare information is a strategic goal related to the reduction of healthcare service provision costs, and to the improvement of quality and safety of healthcare services. By discussing the rather obvious necessity for information organization and management in the healthcare domain, this work aims at the role of healthcare information services, i.e. hospital libraries and patient medical records. Finally, a typology of information services' contributions to hospital environment is presented.

  8. Why (just) information is not enough: The contributions of information services in the management of healthcare information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostagiolas, P., E-mail: pkostagiolas@ionio.gr [Assistant Professor Department of Archives, Library Science and Museology, Ionian University, CORFU 49100 (Greece); Lappa, E., E-mail: evlappa@med.uoa.gr [Director of Medical Library of General Hospital Attikis KAT, Nikis 2 str, 14564 KIFFISIA-ATHENS (Greece)

    2015-02-09

    Information is at the centre of every hospital activity including clinical decisions and healthcare service delivery systems. Although information is an important hospital asset, several issues related to its management and organization needs to be addressed within the hospitals. The management of healthcare information is a strategic goal related to the reduction of healthcare service provision costs, and to the improvement of quality and safety of healthcare services. By discussing the rather obvious necessity for information organization and management in the healthcare domain, this work aims at the role of healthcare information services, i.e. hospital libraries and patient medical records. Finally, a typology of information services’ contributions to hospital environment is presented.

  9. Category Captain Management: a new approach for healthcare suppliers to partner with their hospital customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Hospitals represent a substantial market for pharmaceutical and medical device companies. The typical approach by healthcare manufacturers and suppliers to hospitals is to send representatives or detailers to hospitals and meet with representatives of hospital formularies and purchasing officials. Classic channels systems, and specifically, Category Captain Management ("CCM") may provide more of a sustainable competitive advantage than traditional hospital detailing. The purpose of this article is to discuss how CCM might apply as an approach for healthcare suppliers to truly partner with their hospital customers.

  10. Healthcare waste generation and management practice in government health centers of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Menelik Legesse; Kumie, Abera

    2014-11-25

    Healthcare wastes are hazardous organic and inorganic wastes. The waste disposal management in Addis Ababa city is seen unscientific manner. The waste management practice in the health facilities are poor and need improvement. This study will help different organizations, stakeholders and policy makers to correct and improve the existing situation of healthcare waste legislation and enforcement and training of staff in the healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa. The study aimed to assess the existing generation and management practice of healthcare waste in selected government health centers of Addis Ababa. The cross-sectional study was conducted to quantify waste generation rate and evaluate its management system. The study area was Addis Ababa. The sample size was determined by simple random sampling technique, the sampling procedure involved 10 sub-cities of Addis Ababa. Data were collected using both waste collecting and measuring equipment and check list. The Data was entered by EPI INFO version 6.04d and analyzed by and SPSS for WINDOW version15. The mean (±SD) healthcare waste generation rate was 9.61 ± 3.28 kg/day of which (38%) 3.64 ± 1.45 kg/day was general or non-hazardous waste and (62%) 5.97 ± 2.31 kg/day was hazardous. The mean healthcare waste generation rate between health centers was a significant different with Kurskal-Wallis test (χ2 = 21.83, p-value = 0.009). All health centers used safety boxes for collection of sharp wastes and all health centers used plastic buckets without lid for collection and transportation of healthcare waste. Pre treatment of infectious wastes was not practiced by any of the health centers. All health centers used incinerators and had placenta pit for disposal of pathological waste however only seven out of ten pits had proper covering material. Segregation of wastes at point of generation with appropriate collection materials and pre- treatment of infectious waste before disposal should be practiced

  11. Controlling healthcare professionals: how human resource management influences job attitudes and operational efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogin, Julie Ann; Ng, Ju Li; Lee, Ilro

    2016-09-20

    We assess how human resource management (HRM) is implemented in Australian hospitals. Drawing on role theory, we consider the influence HRM has on job attitudes of healthcare staff and hospital operational efficiency. We adopt a qualitative research design across professional groups (physicians, nurses, and allied health staff) at multiple levels (executive, healthcare managers, and employee). A total of 34 interviews were carried out and analyzed using NVivo. Findings revealed a predominance of a control-based approach to people management. Using Snell's control framework (AMJ 35:292-327, 1992), we found that behavioral control was the principal form of control used to manage nurses, allied health workers, and junior doctors. We found a mix between behavior, output, and input controls as well as elements of commitment-based HRM to manage senior physicians. We observed low levels of investment in people and a concentration on transactional human resource (HR) activities which led to negative job attitudes such as low morale and frustration among healthcare professionals. While hospitals used rules to promote conformity with established procedures, the overuse and at times inappropriate use of behavior controls restricted healthcare managers' ability to motivate and engage their staff. Excessive use of behavior control helped to realize short-term cost-cutting goals; however, this often led to operational inefficiencies. We suggest that hospitals reduce the profusion of behavior control and increase levels of input and output controls in the management of people. Poor perceptions of HR specialists and HR activities have resulted in HR being overlooked as a vehicle to address the strategic challenges required of health reform and to build an engaged workforce.

  12. 'Perimeteritis' and rural health in Manitoba, Canada: perspectives from rural healthcare managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, D; Beesley, K B

    2007-01-01

    Rural areas in many parts of the world are facing issues such as economic restructuring, environmental degradation, aging, and depopulation. These issues impact the health and wellbeing of the people living in rural communities. The purpose of this study was to assess rural healthcare managers' understanding of rural community wellbeing. Specifically, definitions were sought for rural, community, health, wellbeing, and healthy rural community. The research reported in this article is based on a set of interviews with each of the 20 healthcare professionals who either managed healthcare centres or administered specialized programs in the rural health care centres in the Assiniboine Regional Health Authority in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Capitalizing on the open-ended structure of the interviews, respondents were thoughtful and philosophical in their responses. This produced a rich array of definitions of rural, community, health, wellbeing, and healthy rural community. In doing so, the struggles for rural communities in southwestern Manitoba were highlighted. The findings also illustrated that definitions of health and wellbeing do not fit standard biomedical or health determinant models alone. This study was a follow up to another study that employed focus groups to obtain rural resident perceptions of rural, community, wellbeing, and health in southwestern Manitoba. The study reported on here argued that the specific views of healthcare managers were necessary to further illustrate the complexities in understanding definitions of community and condition. The results are consistent with previous research on this topic in southern Manitoba and the recent literature in that there are no universally accepted definitions of rural, community, wellbeing, or health. Further, the study illustrated that professionals charged with managing healthcare services in rural Manitoba maintain very broad definitions of health and wellbeing. Most significantly, the determinants

  13. Globalization of healthcare: case management in a 21st-century world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Kathy; Beichl, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This article explains the current state of the global healthcare market with respect to international medical travel (medical tourism) and worldwide provider sourcing. Emphasis is placed on the traditional twin pillars of oversight: program accreditation and branding affiliation. These are discussed for their main strength, which is their ability to operate at a system-strata level. This strength also represents a primary weakness from the international patient's perspective, which is the functional gap between systemic oversight and bedside surveillance. International case management (ICM) is identified as the right conduit of patient-level service delivery that fills the gap between system and bedside. The ICM professional is introduced and defined as the provider of patient-centered quality and safety improvements, who coordinates and collaborates using international network connections and culture-sensitive in-country communication skills. The article's information is useful for healthcare practitioners who want to learn about the global medical marketplace. Practitioners who are preparing to or who already have business enterprises associated with the global healthcare market will also find the information helpful. Explanations and content are useful to case management generalists, specialists, and business developers. The content is intended for uptake by interested parties within and outside the healthcare practice arena. All research and syntheses were executed by the authors. Sources included business correspondences, medical tourism literature, corporate Internet profiles, news releases, and healthcare industry investigative and monitoring agencies. Clinical competencies stem from the international practice experiences of one author (K. Craig). International health insurance, economics, and financing expertise stems from other author (L. Beichl). This article launches the platform for development of checklists, tools, and guidelines for international case

  14. Problems experienced by role players within the managed healthcare context in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mahlo

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Role players within the context of managed healthcare in Gauteng experience problems in the delivery of healthcare, which negatively affect their working relationships. This in turn, affects the quality of care provided to patients. The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the problem experienced by different role players within the context of managed healthcare in Gauteng, as well as the suggested solutions to counteract these problems. These results will be utilised as the basis of a conceptual framework to formulate a strategy to enhance the working relationships amongst these role players. The strategy will not be discussed in this article as the focus is on the problems experienced by the role players in the delivery of healthcare, as well as suggested solutions in the counteraction thereof. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual study was followed to explore and describe the problems, as well as the suggested solutions to counteract these problems. Focus group interviews were conducted to collect data from three private hospitals, three managed care organisations and four general medical practitioners in Gauteng. The participants were purposively and conveniently selected. Content analysis as described by Tesch (1990 was followed to analyse the data. The main problems experienced were related to inadequate communication, inadequate staff competence, cost saving versus quality care, procedural complexity, perceived loss of power by doctors and patients and the system of accounts payment. The suggested solutions focused mainly on empowerment and standardisation of procedures. It is recommended that replication studies of this nature be conducted in other provinces and that ethical standards are formulated within the managed healthcare context.

  15. The relationship of health-care managers' spirituality to their self-perceived leadership practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, James Gary; Fottler, Myron D; Kilpatrick, Ann Osbourne

    2008-11-01

    This exploratory survey examines the relationship between selected dimensions of spirituality and self-perceived effective leadership practices of health-care managers. Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practices Inventory and Beazley's Spiritual Assessment Scale were administered to a sample of health-care managers. Significant statistical relationships were found between and among the dimensions of both subscales. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant difference in three effective leadership practices by 'more spiritual than non-spiritual' managers. The confirmatory factor analysis of our theory-based model revealed a moderately positive correlation between spirituality and leadership (r = 0.50). The paper concludes with a conceptual theory postulating a rationale for the relationship between spirituality and effective leadership.

  16. Structuring agency: examining healthcare management in the USA and Australia using organizational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Leiter, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the healthcare industry has undergone significant changes. Using neo-institutional and resource dependency theories, the purpose of this paper is to explore how managers perceive constraint and enact agency amidst these historic challenges--perhaps most significantly, declining funding and increasing regulation. The data come from ten interviews with healthcare managers, spanning for-profit, non-profit, and government legal forms and hospital and nursing home sub-industries in both Queensland, Australia and North Carolina, USA. The authors look for patterns across the interviews. The paper shows that governments and umbrella "parent" organizations force managers to adhere to institutional expectations in exchange for resource investment. Managers navigate these environmental obstacles using a shared business-minded approach and competitive differentiation. Yet various interest groups--including front-line workers, physicians, and patients--challenge this paradigm, as they demand a focus on quality of care. Managers' efforts are likewise curbed by the very resource and institutional pressures they resist. The authors understand changes in the healthcare industry as resulting from an increasingly powerful managerial logic, at odds with traditional professional and societal values. Interest groups are best positioned to challenge this logic.

  17. Managing healthcare waste in Ghana: a comparative study of public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abor, Patience Aseweh

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims to examine the healthcare waste management practices of selected hospitals in Ghana. The study adopted a multiple case approach, using two public and two private hospitals. Findings indicate that both public hospitals and one private hospital have a waste management policy. Public and private hospitals have waste management plans and waste management teams. Public hospitals were found to generate more waste than the private hospitals. One private hospital and the public hospitals segregate their waste into different categories. This is done by first identifying the waste type and then separating non-infectious or general waste from infectious waste. Both public and private hospitals have internal storage facilities for temporarily storing the waste before they are finally disposed off-site. On-site transportation in the public hospitals is done by using wheelbarrows, while covered bins with wheels are used to transport waste on-site in the private hospitals. In public and private hospitals, off-site transportation of the hospital waste is undertaken by Municipal Assemblies with the use of trucks. Both public and private hospitals employ standard methods for disposing of healthcare waste. The article provides insights into healthcare waste management from a Ghanaian perspective.

  18. Clinically led performance management in secondary healthcare: evaluating the attitudes of medical and non-clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebble, Timothy M; Paul, Maureen; Hockey, Peter M; Heyworth, Nicola; Humphrey, Rachael; Powell, Timothy; Clarke, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Improving the quality and activity of clinicians' practice improves patient care. Performance-related human resource management (HRM) is an established approach to improving individual practice but with limited use among clinicians. A framework for performance-related HRM was developed from successful practice in non-healthcare organisations centred on distributive leadership and locally provided, validated and interpreted performance measurement. This study evaluated the response of medical and non-clinical managers to its implementation into a large secondary healthcare organisation. A semistructured qualitative questionnaire was developed from themes identified during framework implementation and included attitudes to previous approaches to measuring doctors' performance, and the structure and response to implementation of the performance-related HRM framework. Responses were analysed through a process of data summarising and categorising. A total of 29, from an invited cohort of 31, medical and non-clinical managers from departmental to executive level were interviewed. Three themes were identified: (1) previous systems of managing clinical performance were considered to be ineffective due to insufficient empowerment of medical managers and poor quality of available performance data; (2) the implemented framework was considered to address these needs and was positively received by medical and non-clinical managers; (3) introduction of performance-related HRM required the involvement of the whole organisation to executive level and inclusion within organisational strategy, structure and training. This study suggests that a performance-related HRM framework may facilitate the management of clinical performance in secondary healthcare, but is dependent on the design and methods of application used. Such approaches contrast with those currently proposed for clinicians in secondary healthcare in the UK and suggest that alternative strategies should be considered

  19. Evaluation of a welfare assessment tool to examine practices for preventing, recognizing, and managing pain at companion-animal veterinary clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Lauren C; Dewey, Cate E; Stone, Elizabeth A; Mosley, Cornelia I; Guerin, Michele T; Niel, Lee

    2017-10-01

    Successful prevention, recognition, and treatment of pain are integral to ensuring veterinary patient welfare. A canine and feline welfare assessment tool, incorporating verbal interviews with veterinarians using open-ended questions, was developed to assess pain management practices that safeguard and improve patient welfare. The tool was evaluated in 30 companion- and mixed-animal veterinary clinics in Ontario in order to assess its reliability, feasibility, and validity, while also benchmarking current practices. Responses were analyzed according to a scoring scheme developed based on published literature and expert opinion. Based on weighted kappa statistics, interview scoring had substantial inter-observer (Kw = 0.83, 0.73) and near-perfect intra-observer (Kw = 0.92) agreement, which suggests that the tool reliably collects information about pain management practices. Interviews were completed at all recruited clinics, which indicates high feasibility for the methods. Validity could not be assessed, as participants were reluctant to share information about analgesic administration from their clinical records. Descriptive results indicated areas for which many veterinarians are acting in accordance with best practices for pain management, such as pre-emptive and post-surgical analgesia for ovariohysterectomy patients, and post-surgical care instructions. Areas that offer opportunity for enhancement were also highlighted, e.g., training veterinary staff to recognize signs of pain and duration of analgesia in ovariohysterectomy patients after discharge. Overall, based on this limited sample, most veterinarians appear to be effectively managing their patients' pain, although areas with opportunity for enhancement were also identified. Further research is needed to assess trends in a broader sample of participants.

  20. iLead-a transformational leadership intervention to train healthcare managers' implementation leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Anne; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Lornudd, Caroline; Lundmark, Robert; Mosson, Rebecca; Hasson, Henna

    2016-07-29

    Leadership is a key feature in implementation efforts, which is highlighted in most implementation frameworks. However, in studying leadership and implementation, only few studies rely on established leadership theory, which makes it difficult to draw conclusions regarding what kinds of leadership managers should perform and under what circumstances. In industrial and organizational psychology, transformational leadership and contingent reward have been identified as effective leadership styles for facilitating change processes, and these styles map well onto the behaviors identified in implementation research. However, it has been questioned whether these general leadership styles are sufficient to foster specific results; it has therefore been suggested that the leadership should be specific to the domain of interest, e.g., implementation. To this end, an intervention specifically involving leadership, which we call implementation leadership, is developed and tested in this project. The aim of the intervention is to increase healthcare managers' generic implementation leadership skills, which they can use for any implementation efforts in the future. The intervention is conducted in healthcare in Stockholm County, Sweden, where first- and second-line managers were invited to participate. Two intervention groups are included, including 52 managers. Intervention group 1 consists of individual managers, and group 2 of managers from one division. A control group of 39 managers is additionally included. The intervention consists of five half-day workshops aiming at increasing the managers' implementation leadership, which is the primary outcome of this intervention. The intervention will be evaluated through a mixed-methods approach. A pre- and post-design applying questionnaires at three time points (pre-, directly after the intervention, and 6 months post-intervention) will be used, in addition to process evaluation questionnaires related to each workshop. In

  1. How Dutch medical specialists perceive the competencies and training needs of medical residents in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenbosch, L; Bax, M; Scherpbier, A; Heyligers, I; Muijtjens, A M M; Busari, J O

    2013-04-01

    The Dutch postgraduate medical training has been revised to focus on seven competencies. The role as manager is one of these competencies. Recent studies show that this competency receives little attention during the residency training. In an earlier study, we discovered that residents perceived their competency as managers to be moderate. In this study, we investigated how medical specialists perceived the managerial competencies of medical residents and their need for management education. In September 2010, a 46-item questionnaire was designed which examined medical specialists' perceptions of the competency and needs of residents in the field of medical management. Two hundred ninety-eight specialists were invited via email to participate. Hundred twenty-nine specialists (43.3%) responded to our survey. They rated the residents' competencies in contract negotiating skills, knowledge of the healthcare system, and specialist department poorly. They felt that residents were competent in updating their medical knowledge. Ninety-four percent reported a need for training in management among residents. Preferred topics were time management and healthcare organization. The preferred training method was a workshop given during residency by an extramural expert. Dutch medical specialists perceive the management competencies of residents in some areas to be inadequate. They feel that training in medical management during residency is necessary.

  2. The changing healthcare landscape: physicians embrace disease management and improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selecky, Christobel; Peck, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The troubled economy and a new administration in Washington have reinvigorated the debate over the merits of disease management programs and the savings they bring to healthcare. At the forefront of the discussion are physicians who are discovering disease management's innovative approach to treating the chronically ill. Across the country, physicians are responding to evidence-based programs designed to improve patient outcomes that, at the same time, assist them in reaching pay-for-performance goals. New research shows that when disease management professionals provide physicians with credible information, course corrections are made more than 85% of the time.

  3. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Okorie-Kanu et al. 160. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): ... Nigeria; 3Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu state,. Nigeria. ...... (ASVCP), International Veterinary.

  5. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.. 2Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Abeokuta, Ogun State,. Nigeria. *Corresponding Authors: .... medial and lateral canthi of each eye. Philtrum Height (PH). Measured ...

  6. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2000-07-02

    Jul 2, 2000 ... Nigerian Veterinary Journal 36(4). 2015. Owoyemi et al. 1341. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., December 2015 ... medicine, 3Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. .... in wound or burn healing, internal intake of.

  7. "Delivering knowledge and advice": Healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients' management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, Ulrika; Bergman, Stefan; Fridlund, Bengt; Arvidsson, Barbro

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers' perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers' attitudes and patients' responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers' experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients' expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  8. Managing in the context of healthcare's escalating technology and evolving culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Dawn E; Smits, Stanley J

    2012-01-01

    As healthcare has become more scientifically based and far more sophisticated in terms of technology, it has become more fragmented in terms of care-giving, and less personal. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenging task of leading and managing in the gap between the existing and emerging cultures of healthcare. This paper considers the literature on culture, how it exists at many levels and in multiple forms, and the impacts it has on the US healthcare system. Further, the paper explores foundations of the current healthcare culture and attempts to forecast features of the emerging culture, incorporating examples of advances in scientific knowledge and technology. System change will continue to be problematic until leaders and change agents find ways to operate effectively in the gap between the existing cultural tenets and those emerging as the result of scientific and technological advancements. Punctuated equilibrium theory serves as a main tenet for describing how changes will continue to push the USA towards a cultural tipping point. This paper contends that leaders and managers can succeed only by understanding and respecting both cultures and calls for improved theory development and research to help find creative ways to advance the new culture without trampling the old.

  9. Veterinary clinical pathologists in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, A Eric; Bounous, Denise I; Bolliger, Anne Provencher

    2008-06-01

    There is an international shortage of veterinary clinical pathologists in the workplace. Current trainees in veterinary clinical pathology may choose to pursue careers in academe, diagnostic laboratories, government health services, biopharmaceutical companies, or private practice. Academic training programs attempt to provide trainees with an exposure to several career choices. However, due to the proprietary nature of much of the work in the biopharmaceutical industry, trainees may not be fully informed regarding the nature of work for veterinary clinical pathologists and the myriad opportunities that await employment in the biopharmaceutical industry. The goals of this report are to provide trainees in veterinary clinical pathology and other laboratory personnel with an overview of the work-life of veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry, and to raise the profile of this career choice for those seeking to enter the workforce. Biographical sketches, job descriptions, and motivation for 3 successful veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry are provided. Current and past statistics for veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry are reviewed. An overview of the drug development process and involvement of veterinary clinical pathologists in the areas of discovery, lead optimization, and candidate evaluation are discussed. Additional duties for veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry include development of biomarkers and new technologies, service as scientific resources, diagnostic support services, and laboratory management responsibilities. There are numerous opportunities available for trainees in veterinary clinical pathology to pursue employment in the biopharmaceutical industry and enjoy challenging and rewarding careers.

  10. The role of regional planning and management strategies in the transformation of the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Denis, Jean-Louis; Sicotte, Claude

    2003-02-01

    Drawing on a case study, this article questions the role of planning and management strategies in the process of transforming a regional public healthcare system that involves a number of organizations and is characterized by fluidity in its functions and division of power. It examines the efficacy of the Regional Plan for the Organization of Health Services (PROS) in reforming the mental health sector in a health and social service district in Quebec, in terms of integrated regional management of mental healthcare and activities at the local level. The regional planning procedure involves a major transformation in management of the mental health system, organizational roles and clinical and professional practices. Our assessment of PROS highlights the importance of taking into account the context of implementation and the instrumental value of planning, before judging its efficacy. To transform a complex healthcare system at the regional and local level, the study suggests a revised conception of the main roles played by planning and of the process shaping its implementation. Our study concludes in favour of developing management strategies at the operational, clinical and professional levels, and integrating them as a planning aid that allows a more corporate and matrix-based system to be set up.

  11. Solid waste management in primary healthcare centers: application of a facilitation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Maniero Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to propose a tool to facilitate diagnosis, formulation and evaluation of the Waste Management Plan in Primary Healthcare Centers and to present the results of the application in four selected units. Method: descriptive research, covering the stages of formulation /application of the proposed instrument and the evaluation of waste management performance at the units. Results: the tool consists in five forms; specific indicators of waste generation for outpatients healthcare units were proposed, and performance indicators that give scores for compliance with current legislation. In the studied units it is generated common waste (52-60%, infectious-sharps (31-42% and recyclable (5-17%. The average rates of generation are: 0,09kg of total waste/outpatient assistance and 0,09kg of infectious-sharps waste/outpatient procedure. The compliance with regulations, initially 26-30%, then reached 30-38% a year later. Conclusion: the tool showed to be easy to use, bypassing the existence of a complex range of existing regulatory requirements, allowed to identify non-conformities, pointed out corrective measures and evaluated the performance of waste management. In this sense, it contributes to decision making and management practices relating to waste, tasks usually assigned to nurses. It is recommended that the tool be applied in similar healthcare units for comparative studies, and implementation of necessary adaptations for other medical services.

  12. Healthcare managers' leadership profiles in relation to perceptions of work stressors and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lornudd, Caroline; Bergman, David; Sandahl, Christer; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica

    2016-05-03

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between leadership profiles and differences in managers' own levels of work stress symptoms and perceptions of work stressors causing stress. Design/methodology/approach Cross-sectional data were used. Healthcare managers ( n = 188) rated three dimensions of their leadership behavior and levels of work stressors and stress. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to identify leadership profiles based on leadership behaviors. Differences in stress-related outcomes between profiles were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Findings Four distinct clusters of leadership profiles were found. They discriminated in perception of work stressors and stress: the profile distinguished by the lowest mean in all behavior dimensions, exhibited a pattern with significantly more negative ratings compared to the other profiles. Practical implications This paper proposes that leadership profile is an individual factor involved in the stress process, including work stressors and stress, which may inform targeted health promoting interventions for healthcare managers. Originality/value This is the first study to investigate the relationship between leadership profiles and work stressors and stress in healthcare managers.

  13. Implementing organisation and management innovations in Swedish healthcare: lessons from a comparison of 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John; Andreen-Sachs, Magna; Carlsson, Jan; Gustafsson, Helena; Hansson, Johan; Keller, Christina; Lofgren, Susana; Mazzocato, Pamela; Tolf, Sara; Brommels, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the implementation of 12 different organisation and management innovations (OMIs) in Swedish healthcare, to discover the generic and specific factors important for successful healthcare improvement change in a public health system. Longitudinal cross-case comparison of 12 case studies was employed, where each case study used a common framework for collecting data about the process of change, the content of the change, the context, and the intermediate and final outcomes. Clinical leaders played a more important part in the development of these successful service innovations than managers. Strategies for and patterns of change implementation were found to differ according to the type of innovation. Internal organisational context factors played a significant role in the development of nearly all, but external factors did not. "Developmental evolution" better described the change process than "implementation". The 12 cases were all of relatively successful change processes: some unsuccessful examples would have provided additional testing of the hypotheses about what would predict successful innovation which were used in the case comparison. The cross-case comparative hypothesis testing method allows systematic comparison if the case data are collected using similar frameworks, but this approach to management research requires considerable resources and coordination. Management innovations that improve patient care can be carried out successfully by senior clinicians, under certain circumstances. A systematic approach is important both for developing and adapting an innovation to a changing situation. A significant amount of time was required for all involved, which could be reduced by "fast-tracking" approval for some types of change. This is the first empirical report comparing longitudinal and contextualised findings from a number of case studies of different organisational and management healthcare innovations. The findings

  14. Exploring the awareness level of biomedical waste management: Case of Indian healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S. Mor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the awareness level of Biomedical waste managements in healthcare facilities, and their perception among hospital waste management team, doctors, nurses, lab techni-cians and waste handlers in Northwest Delhi region in India. The study has been conducted through a questionnaire survey followed by the descriptive statistical analysis method. Question-naire contains of 38 questions, where the first section deals with the hospital waste management team, the second section is for doctors, nurses and lab technicians, and the third section is for the waste handlers. Out of 311 respondents, there were 16 hospital waste management teams, 81 doc-tors, 92 nurses, 49 lab technicians and 73 waste handlers. It was surprising that only 40% (n=10 hospitals had any kind of waste treatment & disposal facility onsite, only 10% hospitals were using the latest technology and 60% hospitals shred the Biomedical waste before disposal. It was good to see that none of the hospital waste managements disposed the waste with general waste, and 40% of them were exhausting through government agencies and the remaining 60% were using private agencies to dispose the waste. Finally, all the hospitals maintained the record of waste generated. It is concluded that there was a lack of awareness about the biomedical waste generation, legislation and management among healthcare personnel, and they all needed regular audits and training pro-grams at all levels, and a proper management starting from waste generation to its disposal at sites.

  15. [Features of interpersonal behavior among executives of healthcare institutions with different styles of resolving management decisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezhnovets', T A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the type of interpersonal relationships between executives and subordinates in healthcare institutions on their style of resolving management decision. It was established that indulgent and autonomous style are formed against background of liberal interpersonal relationship by the following criteria, as the absence of dominant traits, expressed benevolence among executives with autonomous style, uncertainty and inexperience among executives with indulgent style. Authoritarian and marginal styles are formed against empowerment and dominance in relationship with subordinates by expressed dominance criteria, as leadership qualities among executives with authoritarian style or as a manifestation of social maladjustment among executives with marginal style. Type of interpersonal relationships determines the style of resolving management decisions, that should be considered at conducting professional selection of candidates for senior positions in healthcare institutions.

  16. Setting the scene: Mobile and wearable technology for managing healthcare and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, James D; James, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The growing proliferation of mobile and wearable technology (MWT) offers interesting use cases when applied to health and wellness management. Current trends towards more longer term health and wellness management coupled with global challenges around the provision of healthcare to aging populations with tighter budget constraints, create rich opportunities to exploit this new technology to maintain health and wellness. This paper provides an overview of commonly available MWT and examines how it can be used in health and wellness systems. Case studies are given from two recent research projects and the issues and challenges that arise in the use of MWT are discussed. We conclude that MWT offers some key advantages in some healthcare situations, but that care must be taken to select appropriate technology for each use.

  17. Team innovation climate and knowledge sharing among healthcare managers: mediating effects of altruistic intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Chao, Minston; Tseng, Hsu-Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide empirical evidence concerning the impact of team climate on knowledge sharing behavior and the mediating effects of individuals' altruistic intentions in the context of healthcare settings. Questionnaire data were collected from 212 administrators employed at a medical center in Taiwan. Team climate was assessed by the Team Climate Inventory composed of four factors, participative safety, support for innovation, vision, and task orientation. The proposed hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. The influence of the team innovation climate on knowledge sharing behavior was evident. Furthermore, individuals' altruistic intentions played a full mediating role in the relationship between team innovation climate and knowledge sharing behavior. These results contribute to the field of the people-orientated perspective in knowledge management. The full mediating effect of employees' altruistic intentions provides healthcare team managers the direction to accelerate knowledge sharing behavior.

  18. Black carbon emission reduction strategies in healthcare industry for effective global climate change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raila, Emilia Mmbando; Anderson, David O

    2017-04-01

    Climate change remains one of the biggest threats to life on earth to date with black carbon (BC) emissions or smoke being the strongest cause after carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Surprisingly, scientific evidence about black carbon emissions reduction in healthcare settings is sparse. This paper presents new research findings on the reduction of black carbon emissions from an observational study conducted at the UN Peacekeeping Operations (MINUSTAH) in Haiti in 2014. Researchers observed 20 incineration cycles, 30 minutes for each cycle of plastic and cardboard sharps healthcare waste (HCW) containers ranged from 3 to 14.6 kg. The primary aim was to determine if black carbon emissions from healthcare waste incineration can be lowered by mainstreaming the use of cardboard sharps healthcare waste containers instead of plastic sharps healthcare waste containers. Similarly, the study looks into whether burning temperature was associated with the smoke levels for each case or not. Independent samples t-tests demonstrated significantly lower black carbon emissions during the incineration of cardboard sharps containers (6.81 ± 4.79% smoke) than in plastic containers (17.77 ± 8.38% smoke); a statistically significant increase of 10.96% smoke (95% Confidence Interval ( CI) [4.4 to 17.5% smoke], p = 0.003). Correspondingly, lower bottom burner temperatures occurred during the incineration of cardboard sharps containers than in plastic (95% Cl [16 to 126°C], p = 0.014). Finally, we expect the application of the new quantitative evidence to form the basis for policy formulation, mainstream the use of cardboard sharps containers and opt for non-incineration disposal technologies as urgent steps for going green in healthcare waste management.

  19. Human resource capacity for information management in selected public healthcare facilities in Meru County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilu, Elizabeth Mueke; Okero, Dominic Charles; Muiruri, Lillian; Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reliable health information is essential for decision making in the healthcare system. Information management in Kenya was considered the weakest area under the Health Information System pillar mainly due to inadequate health workers capacity. The study therefore aimed at assessing health workers skills and current training needs for information management in the selected healthcare facilities. Methods Cross-section research design was adopted and both purposive sampling technique and censuses were used to establish the study participants. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and results were presented in tables, charts and graphs. Results It was established that capacity building was usually undertaken through on-job trainings i.e. 85.1% (103) health workers had on-job training on filling of data collection tools and only 10% (13) had received formal classroom training on the same. Further, only 9.1% (11) health workers had received information management training while 90.9% (110) had not received such training. Health workers demonstrated below average skills on information management i.e. only 17.4% (21) could check for data accuracy, only 16.5% (20) could compute trends from bar charts and only 16.5% (20) could transform the data they collected into meaningful information for use. Conclusion The researcher recommended that healthcare facilities management teams develop a competency based framework for defining the desired skill mix for information management and have a yearly Training Needs Assessment for assessing training needs for information management among the health workers. PMID:26175824

  20. Interdisciplinary Research in Operations Management: Applications in Healthcare, Retailing and On-demand Service Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Jiaru

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on applications of interdisciplinary research in operations management. The first essay addresses issues in healthcare. Our goal is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab compared to the baseline treatment with only chemotherapy in recurrent/persistent and metastatic cervical cancer using recently reported updated survival and toxicology data. We developed a Markov model with 5 patient health states for both treatments. With data based on ...

  1. Identity Management in the Internet of Things: the Role of MANETs for Healthcare Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chibelushi, Caroline; EARDLEY, Alan; Arabo, Abdullahi

    2013-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare and medical applications promises to solve many problems which are currently challenging the sector, ranging from remotely caring for our aging population to medical discoveries on incurable diseases. However, the challenges and risks of having 50 billion Things and users connected together are complex and may be detrimental to control. Concerns have been raised in relation to the IoT Identification Management (IDM) issues, in which each Thing (user ...

  2. Staying current by searching the veterinary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2011-01-01

    The body of knowledge in veterinary medicine and the biomedical sciences continues to grow logarithmically, and learning about new developments in veterinary medicine requires successful navigation of recently published literature worldwide. This article examines how veterinarians can use different types of automated services from databases and publishers to search the current and past literature, access articles, and manage references that are found.

  3. [Implementation of a diabetes disease management program in Switzerland: patients' and healthcare professionals' point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvergeon, S; Burnand, B; Peytremann-Bridevaux, I

    2013-10-01

    A reorganization of healthcare systems is required to meet the challenge of the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, e.g. diabetes. In North-America and Europe, several countries have thus developed national or regional chronic disease management programs. In Switzerland, such initiatives have only emerged recently. In 2010, the canton of Vaud set up the "Diabetes Cantonal Program", within the framework of which we conducted a study designed to ascertain the opinions of both diabetic patients and healthcare professionals on the elements that could be integrated into this program, the barriers and facilitators to its development, and the incentives that could motivate these actors to participate. We organized eight focus-groups: one with diabetic patients and one with healthcare professionals in the four sanitary areas of the canton of Vaud. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. Patients and healthcare professionals were rather in favour of the implementation of a cantonal program, although patients were more cautious concerning its necessity. All participants envisioned a set of elements that could be integrated to this program. They also considered that the program could be developed more easily if it were adapted to patients' and professionals' needs and if it used existing structures and professionals. The difficulty to motivate both patients and professionals to participate was mentioned as a barrier to the development of this program however. Quality or financial incentives could therefore be created to overcome this potential problem. The identification of the elements to consider, barriers, facilitators and incentives to participate to a chronic disease management program, obtained by exploring the opinions of patients and healthcare professionals, should favour its further development and implementation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Fever and Pain Management in Childhood: Healthcare Providers’ and Parents’ Adherence to Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genny Raffaeli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the adherence of healthcare providers and parents to the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management, randomized samples of 500 healthcare providers caring for children and 500 families were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The 378 health care providers (HCPs responding to the survey (75.6% included 144 primary care pediatricians (38.1%, 98 hospital pediatricians (25.9%, 62 pediatric residents (16.4%, and 71 pediatric nurses (19.6%; the 464 responding parents (92.8% included 175 whose youngest (or only child was ≤5 years old (37.7%, 175 whose youngest (or only child was aged 6–10 years (37.7%, and 114 whose youngest (or only child was aged 11–14 years (24.6%. There were gaps in the knowledge of both healthcare providers and parents. Global adherence to the guidelines was lower among the pediatric nurses than the other healthcare providers (odds ratio 0.875; 95% confidence interval 0.795–0.964. Among the parents, those of children aged 6–10 and 11–14 years old, those who were older, and those without a degree answered the questions correctly significantly less frequently than the others. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the dissemination of the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management among healthcare providers and parents in order to avoid mistaken and sometimes risky attitudes, common therapeutic errors, and the unnecessary overloading of emergency department resources. Pediatric nurses and parents with older children, those who are older, and those with a lower educational level should be the priority targets of educational programmes.

  5. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Rughoobur, G F; Slattery, C G; Sugrue, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored. An education programme, incorporating 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST)' training, was implemented in eight of 10 eligible primary care practices (14 general practitioners and nine practice nurses attended), in seven private nursing homes (20 staff nurses attended) and two health centres (53 community nurses attended) in conjunction with a community dietetics service for patients at risk of malnutrition. Nutritional knowledge was assessed before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention using self-administered, multiple-choice questionnaires. Reported changes in practice and the acceptability of the education programme were considered using self-administered questionnaires 6 months after the intervention. A significant increase in nutritional knowledge 6 months after the intervention was observed (P dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition increased the nutritional knowledge and improved the reported management of malnourished patients in the community by healthcare professionals. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. [Follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Coordinated management and criteria for referral between healthcare levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The correct management of osteoarthritis requires an accurate diagnosis, evaluation of its spread and functional repercussions, and the application of comprehensive and effective individually-tailored treatment aimed at relieving pain and improving physical function with a consequent improvement in quality of life; treatment should also aim to prevent or delay disease progression and its effects. In the National Health Service, primary care is the basic level and the first point of access to healthcare; this level guarantees the continuity of care, coordinates patients, and regulates clinical workflow. Family physicians coordinate the healthcare processes related to chronic diseases and are responsible for the management, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The clinical practice guidelines internationally accepted as the standard of care for the management of osteoarthritis should be adapted by both Spanish health planning strategies and clinical practice guidelines to the Spanish healthcare setting. The comprehensive assessment of osteoarthritis includes evaluation of its effects on the patient's physical function and quality of life; formulating a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and adapted to his or her comorbidities; providing advice on basic treatments and their risks and benefits; and carrying out an individually-tailored periodic review. Referral criteria are based on diagnostic confirmation, poor treatment response, and surgical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Is variation management included in regional healthcare governance systems? Some proposals from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Sabina; Seghieri, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The Italian National Health System, which follows a Beveridge model, provides universal healthcare coverage through general taxation. Universal coverage provides uniform healthcare access to citizens and is the characteristic usually considered the added value of a welfare system financed by tax revenues. Nonetheless, wide differences in practice patterns, health outcomes and regional usages of resources that cannot be justified by differences in patient needs have been demonstrated to exist. Beginning with the experience of the health care system of the Tuscany region (Italy), this study describes the first steps of a long-term approach to proactively address the issue of geographic variation in healthcare. In particular, the study highlights how the unwarranted variation management has been addressed in a region with a high degree of managerial control over the delivery of health care and a consolidated performance evaluation system, by first, considering it a high priority objective and then by actively integrating it into the regional planning and control mechanism. The implications of this study can be useful to policy makers, professionals and managers, and will contribute to the understanding of how the management of variation can be implemented with performance measurements and financial incentives. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Profile of medical waste management in two healthcare facilities in Lagos, Nigeria: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, Ibijoke; Alo, Babajide; Atherton, William; Al Khaddar, Rafid

    2013-05-01

    Proper management and safe disposal of medical waste (MW) is vital in the reduction of infection or illness through contact with discarded material and in the prevention of environmental contamination in hospital facilities. The management practices for MW in selected healthcare facilities in Lagos, Nigeria were assessed. The cross-sectional study involved the use of questionnaires, in-depth interviews, focused group discussions and participant observation strategies. It also involved the collection, segregation, identification and weighing of waste types from wards and units in the representative facilities in Lagos, Nigeria, for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the MW streams. The findings indicated that the selected Nigerian healthcare facilities were lacking in the adoption of sound MW management (MWM) practices. The average MW ranged from 0.01 kg/bed/day to 3.98 kg/bed/day. Moreover, about 30% of the domestic waste from the healthcare facilities consisted of MW due to inappropriate co-disposal practices. Multiple linear regression was applied to predict the volume of waste generated giving a correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.99 confirming a good fit of the data. This study revealed that the current MWM practices and strategies in Lagos are weak, and suggests an urgent need for review to achieve vital reversals in the current trends.

  9. Geographic information system-based healthcare waste management planning for treatment site location and optimal transportation routeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Soulalay, Vongdeuane; Chettiyappan, Visvanathan

    2012-06-01

    In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a growth of healthcare centres, and the environmental hazards and public health risks typically accompanying them, increased the need for healthcare waste (HCW) management planning. An effective planning of an HCW management system including components such as the treatment plant siting and an optimized routeing system for collection and transportation of waste is deemed important. National government offices at developing countries often lack the proper tools and methodologies because of the high costs usually associated with them. However, this study attempts to demonstrate the use of an inexpensive GIS modelling tool for healthcare waste management in the country. Two areas were designed for this study on HCW management, including: (a) locating centralized treatment plants and designing optimum travel routes for waste collection from nearby healthcare facilities; and (b) utilizing existing hospital incinerators and designing optimum routes for collecting waste from nearby healthcare facilities. Spatial analysis paved the way to understand the spatial distribution of healthcare wastes and to identify hotspots of higher waste generating locations. Optimal route models were designed for collecting and transporting HCW to treatment plants, which also highlights constraints in collecting and transporting waste for treatment and disposal. The proposed model can be used as a decision support tool for the efficient management of hospital wastes by government healthcare waste management authorities and hospitals.

  10. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-06-01

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Equine Medical Center Appoints Veterinary Advisory Board Members

    OpenAIRE

    Nadjar, Ann

    2003-01-01

    A Veterinary Advisory Board, comprised of Virginia- and Maryland-based equine practitioners, has been established to help the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center continue its quest to provide excellence in equine healthcare for the region.

  12. Compilation and adoption of ethno-veterinary medicine, traditional and other management practices by small ruminant farmers in Edo State Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamikole, M A; Ikhatua, U J

    2009-10-01

    An inventory study into the ethno-veterinary medicine and traditional management practices and the extent of their adoption in the management of small ruminants by farmers in Edo State, Nigeria was carried out. Three hundred and fifty (350) small ruminant farmers randomly chosen from the seven (7) randomly selected local government areas in the state were used for the study. Data pertaining to farmers' background information, small ruminant acquisition and rearing as well as the ethno-veterinary medicines (EVMs) adopted were collected through a scheduled interview where structured questionnaires were administered. Data collected were used in the computation of ethno-veterinary medicine use indices (EVMUIs) and were subjected to simple statistical analysis. Results showed that 60.5% of the farmers interviewed were male while 39.4% were females and 56.9% of them were above 40 years old. About 60% of the farmers had between primary and secondary education, while 33.1% have no formal education and about 86% had little or no exposure to mass media. Thirty-seven (37) different EVMs/Traditional practices were identified. Based on their EVMUIs, 11 or 29.73% were highly used, 9 or 24.32% were moderately used while 17 or 45.95% were poorly used by farmers. Materials identified were noted to be locally available and were fully discussed. It is concluded that EVMs practices are actually adapted to the culture and socio-economic realities of resource poor farmers and means of spreading the knowledge among small scale farmers should be encouraged.

  13. An exploratory study of safety culture, biological risk management and hand hygiene of healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Laurence; Biron, Alain; Lavigne, Geneviève; Frechette, Julie; Bernard, Agnès; Mitchell, Jonathan; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie

    2017-11-08

    The objectives of the study were to: (1) examine the relationships between three different qualitative perceptions of safety culture and the Canadian Patient Safety Climate Survey factors; (2) determine whether these perceptions are associated with different hand hygiene practices. Healthcare-associated infections and safety cultures are a worldwide issue. During the A/H1N1 Influenza pandemic, Europe and North America did not have the same responses. Importantly, healthcare professionals' perceptions can influence patient safety through infection prevention practices like hand hygiene. A cross-sectional design was used with data collected in 2015. The Canadian Patient Safety Culture Survey and hand hygiene observations were gathered from three healthcare centres (two Canadian and one European). Descriptive analyses and ANOVAs were conducted to explore healthcare professionals' safety perceptions and practices. The rates of hand hygiene practices varied widely between the three sites, ranging from 35-77%. One site (Site 3) was found to have the highest scores of management follow-up, feedback about incidents, supervisory leadership for safety, unit learning culture and senior leadership support for safety, and the highest levels of overall patient safety grades for the unit and organization. The quantitative results of this study support the previously described model based on qualitative results: individual culture, blaming culture and collaborative culture. Differences between continents emerged regarding infection prevention practices and the way we qualify infections. The results raise concerns about infection practices and about safety cultures and challenges worldwide. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The emerging role of veterinary orthotics and prosthetics (V-OP) in small animal rehabilitation and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mich, Patrice M

    2014-03-01

    In veterinary school, we learn much about how to repair bone fractures, ligament injuries, and neuropathies. The idea, of course, is to return some level of function to a damaged appendage and decrease pain. When a limb cannot be salvaged for medical or financial reasons, we are taught that dogs and cats do "great" on 3 legs. Three legs may mean a less functional limb or outright total amputation. We espouse this doctrine to our clients. Indeed, most of us have countless stories of triped patients acclimating to their disability with aplomb. Although it is true that many patients adapt, learning to ambulate and negotiate their environment, this is functional adaptation-not necessarily the highest quality of life. As a profession, we have come to expect-even accept-that limited mobility, limb breakdown, and chronic neck or back pain are unavoidable consequences. The short- and long-term consequences of limb loss or altered limb function are not benign as once thought. Furthermore, the quality of care demanded by clients is rising and the breadth of knowledge afforded by technology and global communication spawns innovative therapies readily accessible to the computer-savvy pet owner. Recent examples of therapeutic innovations include the following: dentistry, acupuncture, chiropractic, and rehabilitation. Often there is no precedent for these new therapies in animals, and the onus rests with the veterinary community to educate itself to provide best care for patients and clients and to establish evidence-informed best practice. The newest emerging therapeutic modality is veterinary orthotics and prosthetics. Like the previously mentioned modalities, the origin lies in human health care and subsequently leaps to veterinary health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing complex medication regimens: perspectives of consumers with osteoarthritis and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth; Claydon-Platt, Kate; McColl, Geoffrey J; Bucknall, Tracey K; Brand, Caroline A

    2007-05-01

    Managing medications is complex, particularly for consumers with multiple coexisting conditions for whom benefits and adverse effects are unpredictable and health priorities may be variable. To investigate perceptions of and experiences with managing drug regimens from the perspectives of consumers with osteoarthritis and coexisting chronic conditions and of healthcare professionals from diverse backgrounds. Using an exploratory research design, focus groups were formed with 34 consumers and 19 healthcare professionals. Individual interviews were undertaken with 3 community medical practitioners. Consumers' management of medications was explored in terms of 3 themes: administration of medications, provision of information, and the perceived role of healthcare professionals. In general, consumers lacked understanding regarding the reason that they were prescribed certain medications. Since all consumer participants had at least 2 chronic conditions, they were taking many drugs to relieve undesirable symptoms. Some consumers were unable to achieve improved pain relief and were reluctant to take analgesics prescribed on an as-needed basis. Healthcare professionals discussed the importance of using non-pharmacologic measures to improve symptoms; however, consumers stated that physicians encourage them to continue using medications, often for prolonged periods, even when these agents are not helpful. Consumers were dissatisfied about the complexity of their medication regimens and also lacked understanding as to how to take their drugs effectively. Dedicated time should be devoted during medical consultations to facilitate verbal exchange of information about medications. Pharmacists must communicate regularly with physicians about consumers' medication needs to help preempt any problems that may arise. Instructions need to be revised through collaboration between physicians and pharmacists so that "as needed" directions provide more explicit advice about when and how

  16. Healthcare managers in negative media focus: a qualitative study of personification processes and their personal consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wramsten Wilmar, Maria; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Jacobsson, Christian; Dellve, Lotta

    2014-01-07

    Over the last decade healthcare management and managers have increasingly been in focus in public debate. The purpose of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of how prolonged, unfavorable media focus can influence both the individual as a person and his or her managerial practice in the healthcare organization. In-depth interviews (n = 49) with 24 managers and their superiors, or subordinate human resources/information professionals, and partners were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. The conceptual model explains how perceived uncertainties related to the managerial role influence personification and its negative consequences. The role ambiguities comprised challenges regarding the separation of individual identity from the professional function, the interaction with intra-organizational support and political play, and the understanding and acceptance of roles in society. A higher degree of uncertainty in role ambiguity increased both personification and the personal reaction to intense media pressure. Three types of reactions were related to the feeling of being infringed: avoidance and narrow-mindedness; being hard on self, on subordinates, and/or family members; and resignation and dejection. The results are discussed so as to elucidate the importance of support from others within the organization when under media scrutiny. The degree of personification seems to determine the personal consequences as well as the consequences for their managerial practice. Organizational support for managers appearing in the media would probably be beneficial for both the manager and the organization.

  17. Healthcare managers in negative media focus: a qualitative study of personification processes and their personal consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last decade healthcare management and managers have increasingly been in focus in public debate. The purpose of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of how prolonged, unfavorable media focus can influence both the individual as a person and his or her managerial practice in the healthcare organization. Methods In-depth interviews (n = 49) with 24 managers and their superiors, or subordinate human resources/information professionals, and partners were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results The conceptual model explains how perceived uncertainties related to the managerial role influence personification and its negative consequences. The role ambiguities comprised challenges regarding the separation of individual identity from the professional function, the interaction with intra-organizational support and political play, and the understanding and acceptance of roles in society. A higher degree of uncertainty in role ambiguity increased both personification and the personal reaction to intense media pressure. Three types of reactions were related to the feeling of being infringed: avoidance and narrow-mindedness; being hard on self, on subordinates, and/or family members; and resignation and dejection. The results are discussed so as to elucidate the importance of support from others within the organization when under media scrutiny. Conclusions The degree of personification seems to determine the personal consequences as well as the consequences for their managerial practice. Organizational support for managers appearing in the media would probably be beneficial for both the manager and the organization. PMID:24397306

  18. Regulating time commitments in healthcare organizations: managers' boundary approaches at work and in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengelin, Ellinor; Arman, Rebecka; Wikström, Ewa; Dellve, Lotta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore managers' boundary setting in order to better understand their handling of time commitment to work activities, stress, and recovery during everyday work and at home. The paper has qualitatively-driven, mixed method design including observational data, individual interviews, and focus group discussions. Data were analyzed according to Charmaz' view on constructivist grounded theory. A first step in boundary setting was to recognize areas with conflicting expectations and inexhaustible needs. Second, strategies were formed through negotiating the handling of managerial time commitment, resulting in boundary-setting, but also boundary-dissolving, approaches. The continuous process of individual recognition and negotiation could work as a form of proactive coping, provided that it was acknowledged and questioned. These findings suggest that recognition of perceived boundary challenges can affect stress and coping. It would therefore be interesting to more accurately assess stress, coping, and health status among managers by means of other methodologies (e.g. physiological assessments). In regulating managers' work assignments, work-related stress and recovery, it seems important to: acknowledge boundary work as an ever-present dilemma requiring continuous negotiation; and encourage individuals and organizations to recognize conflicting perspectives inherent in the leadership assignment, in order to decrease harmful negotiations between them. Such awareness would benefit more sustainable management of healthcare practice. This paper highlights how managers can handle ever-present boundary dilemmas in the healthcare sector by regulating their time commitments in various ways.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and practices about biomedical waste management among healthcare personnel: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesh Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The waste produced in the course of healthcare activities carries a higher potential for infection and injury than any other type of waste. Inadequate and inappropriate knowledge of handling of healthcare waste may have serious health consequences and a significant impact on the environment as well. Objective: The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians, and sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted among hospitals (bed capacity >100 of Allahabad city. Participants: Medical personnel included were doctors (75, nurses (60, laboratory technicians (78, and sanitary staff (70. Results: Doctors, nurses, and laboratory technicians have better knowledge than sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Knowledge regarding the color coding and waste segregation at source was found to be better among nurses and laboratory staff as compared to doctors. Regarding practices related to biomedical waste management, sanitary staff were ignorant on all the counts. However, injury reporting was low across all the groups of health professionals. Conclusion: The importance of training regarding biomedical waste management needs emphasis; lack of proper and complete knowledge about biomedical waste management impacts practices of appropriate waste disposal.

  20. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  1. Impact of intervention on healthcare waste management practices in a tertiary care governmental hospital of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Binaya; Gupta, Gopal Kumar; Mainali, Dhiraj

    2014-09-26

    Healthcare waste is produced from various therapeutic procedures performed in hospitals, such as chemotherapy, dialysis, surgery, delivery, resection of gangrenous organs, autopsy, biopsy, injections, etc. These result in the production of non-hazardous waste (75-95%) and hazardous waste (10-25%), such as sharps, infectious, chemical, pharmaceutical, radioactive waste, and pressurized containers (e.g., inhaler cans). Improper healthcare waste management may lead to the transmission of hepatitis B, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This evaluation of waste management practices was carried out at gynaecology, obstetrics, paediatrics, medicine and orthopaedics wards at Government of Nepal Civil Service Hospital, Kathmandu from February 12 to October 15, 2013, with the permission from healthcare waste management committee at the hospital. The Individualized Rapid Assessment tool (IRAT), developed by the United Nations Development Program Global Environment Facility project, was used to collect pre-interventional and post-interventional performance scores concerning waste management. The healthcare waste management committee was formed of representing various departments. The study included responses from focal nurses and physicians from the gynaecology, obstetrics, paediatrics, medicine and orthopaedics wards, and waste handlers during the study period. Data included average scores from 40 responders. Scores were based on compliance with the IRAT. The waste management policy and standard operating procedure were developed after interventions, and they were consistent with the national and international laws and regulations. The committee developed a plan for recycling or waste minimization. Health professionals, such as doctors, nurses and waste handlers, were trained on waste management practices. The programs included segregation, collection, handling, transportation, treatment and disposal of waste, as well as occupational health and safety issues

  2. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  3. Texas Assoc. of Healthcare Facilities Management Competes in EPAs Sixth Annual Energy Star Battle of the Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS - (July 22, 2015) Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the 2015 Energy Star Battle of the Buildings. With dozens of buildings across the state, the Texas Association of Healthcare Facilities Management is among 125 teams

  4. [Workforce management in Emergency Care Units: government strategies and profile of healthcare professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Cristiani Vieira; de Lima, Luciana Dias; O'Dwyer, Gisele; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria; Pitthan, Rachel Guimarães Vieira; Ibañez, Nelson

    2016-02-01

    In the late 2000s, the expansion of Emergency Care Units (UPAs) in Brazil's policy for provision of urgent healthcare included hiring a large contingent of health professionals. This article analyzes government strategies for workforce management and the profile of these professionals in the UPAs in the State of Rio de Janeiro, which has the largest number of such units in the country. The methods included document analysis, interviews with managers, and visits to the UPAs and interviews with coordinators, physicians, and nurses. The results showed that the workforce management strategies varied over time and according to administrative sphere (state versus municipal). The so-called Social Organizations became the main hirers of health professionals in the UPAs, since they allowed management flexibility. However, there were problems with selection and stability, with a predominance of young professionals with limited experience and high physician turnover. Instability associated with outsourced hiring reinforced the view of work at the UPA as a temporary job.

  5. [Critical research issues in nursing policy and management: a healthcare system perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jwo-Leun; Chen, Wen-Yi; Hung, Chin-Tun; Hsu, Ming-Yi

    2011-06-01

    This study explores critical research issues in nursing policy and management in Taiwan from a healthcare system perspective that considers resources, programmes and organisations, service delivery, policy and management, and economic support. Findings suggest the following: In terms of resources, priority issues include quantity planning, active surveillance, planning methodology, and estimation of work life expectancies for nursing manpower. In terms of programmes ÷ organisations and delivery, priority issues include skill mix, task shifting, nationwide nursing work surveys, and nursing manpower structure and utilization. In terms of policy/management and economic support, priority issues included minimum nursing manpower requirements by law or medical institution standards and the relationship between the social insurance payment system and development of the nursing profession. The last section of this paper makes suggestions on practical ways to improve nursing policy and management research in Taiwan.

  6. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  7. Policy-Based Approach to Emergency Bio-Data Management for Mobile Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Man Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In m-healthcare service, accurate detection and notification of emergency situation are critical to chronic patients' life. Since they are usually performed by a limited number of medical staff, it is difficult to simultaneously support many patients in real-time. This article presents an architecture to support the emergency bio-data management for m-healthcare service using personalized emergency policy. The salient feature of the proposed architecture is that the decision on emergency is made using personalized emergency policy. Specifically, the structure of the detailed system components has also been designed. The emergency condition of the individual bio-data collected from wireless body area network is detected automatically using personalized emergency policy. The message flow diagram based on the personalized emergency policy is described. This enables quick emergency rescue service provided to the patient both accurately and immediately. The prototype of proposed system has been built to demonstrate the design concept.

  8. Enhancing the nurses' role in healthcare delivery through strategic management: recognizing its importance or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Marie

    2009-09-01

    To determine the importance of strategy in nursing management and to establish if strategic management has entered the lexicon of nurses' vocabulary. Developing and managing strategy is a critical success factor for health care managers. It remains unclear if nurse managers view strategy development as their role. A review of scholarly International nursing and management literature, available through CINAHL and PUBMED Data Bases was undertaken. The titles of 1063 articles, published between 1997 and 2007 were examined in order to determine the profile of strategy in those titles. Documentary analysis was undertaken on a random sample of 250 of those articles and on the full text of a further 100. Less than 10% of journal titles contained the word strategy. What was presented as strategy was in the majority of cases describing policy, administration or management. Little formal strategy theory was evident. The nursing profession does not appear to have adopted the terms strategy or strategic management to any great extent. Nurse Managers could play a greater role in enhancing healthcare delivery if an understanding of, and acceptance of the importance of strategy in health care delivery was promoted.

  9. Enterprise project management is key to success: addressing the people, process and technology dimensions of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, JoAnn; Rhodes, Harry

    2007-01-01

    The world of healthcare professionals is in a constant state of transition, requiring different processes for the organization, and for completing projects and programs. Projects that manage transition are complex undertakings prone to cost and time overruns. An enterprise project management model is proposed to address the people, process and technology dimensions. It includes the five-step PMI project process, vocabulary, processes, soft skills, stakeholder expectation management, portfolio management and talent diversity. Differences in project deliverables and organizational results are discussed, along with a technique to analyze gaps from the current to the new state, which then defines the projects and programs for an organizational initiative. The role and responsibilities of an executive decision team are defined. Learning the model is needed by all members of the organization, regardless of their role or level, for successfully adapting to future changes. Finally, a case is made for healthcare organizations to implement these competencies if they are to be well-performing organizations in this continuous world of change.

  10. First-line nurse leaders' health-care change management initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, Maura; Suryaprakash, Nitya

    2012-03-01

    To examine nurse leaders' change management projects within British Columbia, Canada. British Columbia Nursing Leadership Institute 2007-10 attendees worked on year-long change management initiatives/projects of importance to their respective health-care institutions. Most leaders were in first-line positions with leaders' project reports (N = 133) were content analysed for specific themes: types of projects; scope of projects (e.g. unit or local level, departmental, institutional); influence targets or key stakeholder groups targeted by the projects; leadership successes and challenges. Of study participants, 77% successfully completed their projects. Staff tool and resource development and existing services improvement were major project types. Care delivery teams were the major influence targets. Only 25% of projects were at the unit level. Many projects had broader scopes, such as institutional levels. Participants cited multiple leadership successes, including enhanced leadership styles and organizational skills. First-line nurse leaders were able to successfully manage projects beyond their traditional scope of responsibilities. The majority of projects dealt with staff needs and healthcare restructuring initiatives. Constant change is a global reality. Change management, a universal competency, must be included in leadership development programmes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for veterinary technologists and technicians. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of veterinary technologists and ...

  12. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology; Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, ... Parasitic diseases have a debilitating impact on human and animal health worldwide particularly in developing countries. Haemoparasitism have largely been ..... exerts a major health concern in domestic.

  13. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  14. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  15. Self-management: challenges for allied healthcare professionals in stroke rehabilitation--a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satink, Ton; Cup, Edith H C; de Swart, Bert J M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2015-01-01

    Self-management has become an important concept in stroke rehabilitation. This study explored allied healthcare professionals' (AHPs) perceptions and beliefs regarding the self-management of stroke survivors and their knowledge and skills regarding stroke self-management interventions. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 27 professionals. Verbal questions and mind mapping were used to collect data. A constant comparative framework was used for analysis. The AHPs discussed different levels of post-stroke self-management, depending on factors such as pre-stroke skills, recovery-phases post-stroke and cognitive abilities of the stroke patients. They hesitated about stroke clients' capacities to self-manage. AHPs questioned whether their own attitudes and skills were really supportive for stroke clients' self-management and criticised stroke services as being too medically oriented. They recommended that self-management programmes should focus both on clients and caregivers and be delivered at peoples' homes. Professional perceptions and beliefs are important factors to take into account when implementing stroke self-management programmes. Before professionals can enable stroke survivors to self-manage, they first need support in acquiring knowledge and skills regarding post-stroke self-management. Moreover, professionals could benefit from behavioural change models, and professionals recognised that stroke self-management interventions would be most beneficial when delivered post-discharge at people's homes. Post-stroke self-management is a learning process with different levels dependent on pre-stroke lifestyle and self-management skills, the post-stroke phase of recovery, the cognitive abilities of stroke survivors and the support of caregivers (co-management). Persons with cognitive impairments are not persons who cannot learn to self-manage; rather, they need more specific self-management support. Case studies describing the abilities of stroke

  16. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) has been in existence since 1971. The NVJ is published by the Nigerian Veterinary Medical Association (NVMA) as part of the association's commitment to the advancement of Veterinary Medicine in Nigeria and other parts of the world, with a general view of enhancing the livestock ...

  17. Tanzania Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanzania Veterinary Journal (The Tropical Veterinarian) is a biannual Journal, which publishes original contribution to knowledge on Veterinary Science, Animal Science and Production, and allied sciences including new techniques and developments in Veterinary Medicine. The target readers of the Journal are the ...

  18. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(3). 2017. Gberindyer et al. 250. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2017. Vol 38 (3): 250-259. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Drugs Prescription Pattern in Dogs Diagnosed with Parvovirus Enteritis in Some Veterinary Clinics in Nigeria. Gberindyer, F. A.. 1.

  19. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria, 2Department of. Veterinary Anatomy ... laboratory technologists and academic staff of the departments of veterinary anatomy, pathology and public health. Design of the ... Early histology and histopathology based research was ...

  20. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(2). 2017. Mustapha et al. 129 ... 1 Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta,. Abeokuta, Ogun State; 2 ..... lamina 9; IB: Internal basilar nucleus; ICI: Intercalated nucleus; ICo9: Intercostal muscle motor neurons of lamina 9; ...

  1. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Thomas et al. 123 .... Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of. Agriculture Abeokuta and were ..... immunogenic Salmonella ghost confers protection against internal organ colonization and egg contamination. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology,. 162(1-2): 41–50. JOSHI ...

  2. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1288. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., December 2015. Vol. 36 (4): 1288-1298. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Anatomical Studies of ... 1Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria; 2 Department of .... back, the internal organs were measured in.

  3. Understanding requirements of novel healthcare information systems for management of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagholikar, Amol S; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases is a global health priority. A healthcare information system offers opportunities to address challenges of chronic disease management. However, the requirements of health information systems are often not well understood. The accuracy of requirements has a direct impact on the successful design and implementation of a health information system. Our research describes methods used to understand the requirements of health information systems for advanced prostate cancer management. The research conducted a survey to identify heterogeneous sources of clinical records. Our research showed that the General Practitioner was the common source of patient's clinical records (41%) followed by the Urologist (14%) and other clinicians (14%). Our research describes a method to identify diverse data sources and proposes a novel patient journey browser prototype that integrates disparate data sources.

  4. A curriculum for training healthcare workers in the management of highly infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, A; Fusco, F M; Puro, V; Vetter, N; Skinhoj, P; Ott, K; Siikamaki, H; Brodt, H R; Gottschalk, R; Follin, P; Bannister, B; De Carli, G; Nisii, C; Heptonstall, J; Ippolito, G

    2007-06-01

    The SARS epidemic, the threat of bioterrorism, and recent examples of imported highly infectious diseases (HID) in Europe have all highlighted the importance of competent clinical and public health management of infectious disease emergencies. Although the European Union of Medical Specialists in Europe and the Infectious Diseases Society of America have developed curricula for training in infectious disease medicine, neither of those mentions training in the management of HIDs. The European Network for Infectious Diseases (EUNID, http://www.eunid.com) is a European Commission co-funded network of experts in HID management, created to help improve the preparedness for HID emergencies within Europe. One of EUNID's agreed tasks is the development of a curriculum for such a training. Between April 2005 and September 2006, EUNID developed a curriculum and accompanying training course on the basis of a questionnaire that was sent to all country representatives and discussion, followed by amendment of drafts shared through the project website, and a final consensus meeting. The resulting curriculum consists of a two-module course covering the core knowledge and skills that healthcare workers need to safely treat a patient who has, or who may have, an HID. The first module introduces theoretical aspects of HID management, including disease-specific knowledge, infection control, and the public health response, through didactic teaching and class-based discussion. The second module involves a "skill station" and a clinical scenario, and equips trainees with relevant practical skills, including the use of specialised equipment and teamwork practice in patient management. Together, the curriculum and course contribute to the creation of a common framework for training healthcare professionals in Europe, and although they are designed primarily for clinicians that are directly involved in patient care, they are relevant also to public health professionals and others who may be

  5. Using Ontologies for the E-learning System in Healthcare Human Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia BAJENARU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a model for the use of ontology in e-learning systems for structuring educational content in the domain of healthcare human resources management (HHRM in Romania. In this respect we propose an effective method to improve the learning system by providing personalized learning paths created using ontology and advanced educational strategies to provide a personalized learning content for the medical staff. Personalization of e-learning process for the chosen target group will be achieved by setting up learning path for each user according to his profile. This will become possible using: domain ontology, learning objects, modeling student knowledge. Developing an ontology-based system for competence management allows complex interactions, providing intelligent interfacing. This is a new approach for the healthcare system managers in permanent training based on e-learning technologies and specific ontologies in a complex area that needs urgent modernization and efficiency to meet the public health economic, social and political context of Romania.

  6. Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare: a critical review of health sector and generic management literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlie, Ewan; Crilly, Tessa; Jashapara, Ashok; Peckham, Anna

    2012-04-01

    The health policy domain has displayed increasing interest in questions of knowledge management and knowledge mobilisation within healthcare organisations. We analyse here the findings of a critical review of generic management and health-related literatures, covering the period 2000-2008. Using 29 pre-selected journals, supplemented by a search of selected electronic databases, we map twelve substantive domains classified into four broad groups: taxonomic and philosophical (e.g. different types of knowledge); theoretical discourse (e.g. critical organisational studies); disciplinary fields (e.g. organisational learning and Information Systems/Information Technology); and organisational processes and structures (e.g. organisational form). We explore cross-overs and gaps between these traditionally separate literature streams. We found that health sector literature has absorbed some generic concepts, notably Communities of Practice, but has not yet deployed the performance-oriented perspective of the Resource Based View (RBV) of the Firm. The generic literature uses healthcare sites to develop critical analyses of power and control in knowledge management, rooted in neo-Marxist/labour process and Foucauldian approaches. The review generates three theoretically grounded statements to inform future enquiry, by: (a) importing the RBV stream; (b) developing the critical organisational studies perspective further; and (c) exploring the theoretical argument that networks and other alternative organisational forms facilitate knowledge sharing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The benefits of using a heart failure management programme in Swedish primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agvall, Björn; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition with which high mortality, morbidity, and poor quality of life are associated. It has previously been shown that use of HF management programmes (HFMPs) in HF clinics can be beneficial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the use of HFMPs also has beneficial effects on HF patients in primary healthcare (PHC). This is a randomized, prospective, open-label study including 160 patients from five PHC centres with systolic HF and a mean age of 75 years (standard deviation 7.8). In the intervention group, an intensive follow-up was performed by HF nurses and physicians providing information and education about HF and the optimization of HF treatment according to recognized guidelines. There was a significant improvement of composite endpoints in the intervention group. Significantly more patients with reduced N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (P = 0.012), improved cardiac function (P = 0.03), fewer healthcare contacts (P = 0.04), and fewer emergency room visits and admittances (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.03, respectively) could be seen in the intervention group when compared with the control group. The use of a HFMP in a PHC setting was found to have beneficial effects in terms of reducing the number of healthcare contacts and hospital admissions, and improving cardiac function in patients with systolic HF, even if the result should be interpreted with caution. It can therefore be recommended that HFMPs should be used in PHC.

  8. Veterinary orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, J M; Kraut, I

    1990-07-01

    Orthodontic correction for dogs in both practical and beneficial. We have treated several dogs in our practice and have developed a manageable, fully fixed technique for solving various malocclusions. The case presented herein was a pseudo Class III malocclusion with all incisors in crossbite and an anterior open bite.

  9. The Development of a Quality Management Framework for Evaluating Medical Device Reprocessing Practice in Healthcare Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Bailey; Horodyski, Robin; Welton, Cynthia; Vail, John; Simonetto, Luca; Jokanovic, Danilo; Sharma, Richa; Mahoney, Angela Rea; Savoy-Bird, Shay; Bains, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of medical device reprocessing (MDR) for the provision of safe patient care. Although industry service standards are available to guide MDR practices, there remains a lack of published key performance indicators (KPIs) and targets that are necessary to evaluate MDR quality for feedback and improvement. This article outlines the development of an initial framework that builds on established guidelines and includes service standards, KPIs and targets for evaluating MDR operations. This framework can support healthcare facilities in strengthening existing practices and enables a platform for collaboration towards better MDR performance management.

  10. A Novel Fractional-Discrete-Cosine-Transform-Based Reversible Watermarking for Healthcare Information Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Ting Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital watermarking is a good tool for healthcare information management systems. The well-known quantization-index-modulation- (QIM- based watermarking has its limitations as the host image will be destroyed; however, the recovery of medical image is essential to avoid misdiagnosis. A transparent yet reversible watermarking algorithm is required for medical image applications. In this paper, we propose a fractional-discrete-cosine-transform- (FDCT- based watermarking to exactly reconstruct the host image. Experimental results show that the FDCT-based watermarking is preferable to the QIM-based watermarking for the medical image applications.

  11. Healthcare utilization and cost of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis management in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilokthornsakul, P; Sawangjit, R; Inprasong, C; Chunhasewee, S; Rattanapan, P; Thoopputra, T; Chaiyakunapruk, N

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening dermatologic conditions. Although, the incidence of SJS/TEN in Thailand is high, information on cost of care for SJS/TEN is limited. This study aims to estimate healthcare resource utilization and cost of SJS/TEN in Thailand, using hospital perspective. A retrospective study using an electronic health database from a university-affiliated hospital in Thailand was undertaken. Patients admitted with SJS/TEN from 2002 to 2007 were included. Direct medical cost was estimated by the cost-to-charge ratio. Cost was converted to 2013 value by consumer price index, and converted to $US using 31 Baht/ 1 $US. The healthcare resource utilization was also estimated. A total of 157 patients were included with average age of 45.3±23.0 years. About 146 patients (93.0%) were diagnosed as SJS and the remaining (7.0%) were diagnosed as TEN. Most of the patients (83.4%) were treated with systemic corticosteroids. Overall, mortality rate was 8.3%, while the average length of stay (LOS) was 10.1±13.2 days. The average cost of managing SJS/TEN for all patients was $1,064±$2,558. The average cost for SJS patients was $1,019±$2,601 while that for TEN patients was $1,660±$1,887. Healthcare resource utilization and cost of care for SJS/TEN in Thailand were tremendous. The findings are important for policy makers to allocate healthcare resources and develop strategies to prevent SJS/TEN which could decrease length of stay and cost of care.

  12. Technology governance strategies for maximizing healthcare economic value. Developing management systems for IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James; Delgado, Rigoberto; Mikhail, Osama

    2007-01-01

    Based on industry averages, healthcare providers spend from 1.5 percent to 3 percent of their revenues on information technology. That can equate to a million dollars a year for even the smallest hospitals and as much as $50 million or $60 million a year for large health systems. That significant amount of capital must be wisely managed because these investments are long-term assets that can help transform the enterprise and contribute to the organization's strategic goals. Unfortunately, in many hospitals these investments are often made without regard for the actual return on investment that the systems will generate. ROI, or economic value, is difficult to quantify in healthcare because of the complex multi-dimensional processes and perspectives that exist. Administrators and providers often question how a clinical system can be quantified and compared with an ERP, research technology or any other information system. When value can be defined in so many ways - such as improvements in clinical outcomes, improvements in system uptime or reliability, or enhancements in productivity and operational business processes-quantification of economic value becomes much more ambiguous and therefore easy to neglect. However, business value can be created by any combination of shifts in performance. Reductions in waiting lines, improvements in imaging capabilities, increased procedures per labor hour, extensions of system life and higher transaction processing all have potential value. However, ROI cannot be calculated or maximized if underlying key performance indicators are not defined and measured, both pre- and post-implementation. This article will build on solid governance strategies for IT that will help to ensure positive economics and improved productivity in healthcare. It also will discuss specific strategies and methods for extracting the most value out of IT in healthcare.

  13. Patients’ and Healthcare Personnel’s Experiences of Health Coaching with Online Self-Management in the Renewing Health Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Lindberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telehealth applications have shown positive effects for people with chronic conditions and their awareness of health. Objective. To describe patients’ and healthcare personnel’s experiences of using health coaching with online self-management in primary health care. Method. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial was conducted. Patients in the intervention group measured and reported medical parameters such as blood pressure, blood glucose, prothrombin complex (PK values, and 2-channel ECG. Data were collected through a questionnaire, individual interviews with patients, and focus group discussions with healthcare personnel. The questionnaire was analysed using statistics; texts from interviews and focus groups were analysed using content analysis. Findings. Patients were satisfied and believed that the intervention had enhanced their care and increased accessibility without causing concerns about privacy. Although being positive, patients commented the lack of support and feedback from healthcare personnel. Healthcare personnel regarded the intervention valuable for the patients’ abilities to perform self-management healthcare tasks but preferred that patients did so without them supporting the patients. Conclusion. Patients expressed satisfaction and acceptance regarding the use of the application. It seems that healthcare personnel are convinced about the benefits for patients and the potential for the intervention but are not convinced about its benefits for healthcare organisations.

  14. Economic crisis and challenges for the Greek healthcare system: the emergent role of nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notara, Venetia; Koupidis, Sotirios A; Vaga, Elissavet; Grammatikopoulos, Ilias A

    2010-07-01

    Despite several reform efforts, the Greek health care system still faces problems related to misdistribution of trained health staff and finance between geographical areas. The objectives of the present study were to describe the current situation of the delivery of the healthcare service in Greece, to explore the basic implications of the economic crisis from a nursing management perspective and to examine future practices opening a debate in policy developments. The principal finding of this study was the serious shortage of trained nurses, the imbalances in nursing personnel, an excess of doctors and the complete absence of a Primary Healthcare System in civil areas provided by general doctors. It is important that health care policy makers become aware and seriously consider rearranging the Health Care System to become more effective and efficient for the population (client). Special attention should be paid to strengthening areas such as primary health care, public health and health promotion in the direction of minimizing the demand of hospital services. Any implementation of major health care reforms should consider seriously the role of the nursing management which formulates the substantial link between the health services and the patient.

  15. Analysis of the effect of conflict-management and resolution training on employee stress at a healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraway, Dana L; Haraway, William M

    2005-01-01

    Conflict is inevitable and can be both positive and negative. Although it is impossible, and probably not wise, to eliminate conflict, it is prudent for healthcare organizations to provide direct instruction in conflict-management training. In this study, 23 supervisors and managers in a local healthcare organization participated in two 3-hour sessions designed to teach practical conflict-management strategies immediately applicable to their workplace duties and responsibilities. A comparison of pretest and posttest measures indicates statistically significant differences in four areas and suggests a positive influence of the brief intervention.

  16. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-04-24

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  17. Cross-layer fault tolerant data aggregation for improved network delay in healthcare management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Liu, Haoying

    2009-01-01

    The escalation of American health care costs compels a new approach to manage chronic diseases. Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been applied successfully in remote monitoring in military, aerospace, civil structure, and healthcare. However, existing wireless network framework cannot provide required quality of service (QoS) due to communication device failure, message loss caused by link error, collision, and hidden terminal for personalized disease management applications. In this paper, we present scalable network architecture and an operating mechanism that tolerates network structure changes caused by failure, with the application level data aggregation algorithm able to heal from the failure. We provide close form solutions that can achieve optimized network delay. Performance analysis was done to evaluate the significance of different nodes' failure in both homogeneous and heterogeneous sensor network and the effects of sensing and communication speed on failure impact in heterogeneous sensor networks.

  18. The perspective of USDA APHIS Veterinary Services Emergency Management and Diagnostics in preparing and responding to Foreign Animal Diseases - plans, strategies, and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, J R; Styles, D K

    2013-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services (VS) is charged with monitoring, controlling, and responding to select reportable diseases and all foreign animal diseases. Emergency Management and Diagnostics (EM&D) oversees Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) preparedness and response. In order to effectively prepare for and respond to FADs, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease, VS develops plans, strategies, and policies to effectively combat an intrusion. USDA APHIS VS has made significant gains in preparedness and response planning. However, much remains to be done especially in surveillance, diagnostic tools, and vaccines. There are significant needs for novel medical technologies to improve diagnostic capabilities and offer additional approaches for FAD response.

  19. Information-theoretic and stochastic methods for managing the quality of service and satisfaction in healthcare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Komashie, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This research investigates and develops a new approach to the management of service quality with the emphasis on patient and staff satisfaction in the healthcare sector. The challenge of measuring the quality of service in healthcare requires us to view the problem from multiple perspectives. At the philosophical level, the true nature of quality is still debated; at the psychological level, ...

  20. Using key performance indicators as knowledge-management tools at a regional health-care authority level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berler, Alexander; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2005-06-01

    The advantages of the introduction of information and communication technologies in the complex health-care sector are already well-known and well-stated in the past. It is, nevertheless, paradoxical that although the medical community has embraced with satisfaction most of the technological discoveries allowing the improvement in patient care, this has not happened when talking about health-care informatics. Taking the above issue of concern, our work proposes an information model for knowledge management (KM) based upon the use of key performance indicators (KPIs) in health-care systems. Based upon the use of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework (Kaplan/Norton) and quality assurance techniques in health care (Donabedian), this paper is proposing a patient journey centered approach that drives information flow at all levels of the day-to-day process of delivering effective and managed care, toward information assessment and knowledge discovery. In order to persuade health-care decision-makers to assess the added value of KM tools, those should be used to propose new performance measurement and performance management techniques at all levels of a health-care system. The proposed KPIs are forming a complete set of metrics that enable the performance management of a regional health-care system. In addition, the performance framework established is technically applied by the use of state-of-the-art KM tools such as data warehouses and business intelligence information systems. In that sense, the proposed infrastructure is, technologically speaking, an important KM tool that enables knowledge sharing amongst various health-care stakeholders and between different health-care groups. The use of BSC is an enabling framework toward a KM strategy in health care.

  1. Essays on the Effect of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) on the Management of Healthcare Supply Chain Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, Ozden Engin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines three issues on the effect of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) on the management of healthcare supply chain performance within the context of inventory management. Motivated by a case study conducted in a radiology practice, the second chapter analyzes the incremental benefits of RFID over barcodes for managing…

  2. A poster and a mobile healthcare application as information tools for dental trauma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Marian; Lou, Jennifer; Wells, Martha; Scarbecz, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Prompt management of dental trauma in children affects outcomes, and multiple educational resources are available. The aim of this study was to compare subjects' accuracy in answering a survey about dental trauma management utilizing a poster and a mobile healthcare application and to determine user preference for mode of delivery of information. A survey was administered to parents of patients in two pediatric dental practices. Questions collected demographic information, frequency of internet use, and responses to questions regarding dental trauma management for two separate scenarios. Participants used both a poster and a mobile application, but were randomly assigned as to which tool was utilized first. Eighty-nine surveys were usable. The majority of respondents were aged 36-45 years (50.6%), had education beyond high school (64%), and had private insurance (52.8%). Less-educated individuals were more likely to report searching the Internet (74%) compared to individuals with a graduate degree (57%) (P = 0.017). The majority of subjects answered trauma management questions correctly with both tools. However, for an avulsed permanent tooth, individuals receiving the mobile application were more likely to select: 'put the tooth back in place' (71.1%) compared to those utilizing the poster, who chose 'put the tooth in milk' (56.8%) (P = 0.004). Less-educated individuals were willing to pay more for the application (P = 0.015) and were more likely to report being interested in receiving dental information through mobile technology in the future (P = 0.006). Both a poster and a mobile healthcare application are effective in delivering dental trauma information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Healthcare costs among men with favorable risk prostate cancer managed with observation strategies versus immediate treatment in an integrated healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariburyo, Furaha; Wang, Yuexi; Cheng, I-Ning Elaine; Wang, Lisa; Morgenstern, David; Asner, Igor; Xie, Lin; Meadows, Eric; Danella, John

    2017-08-01

    This study explored short-term healthcare costs of men managed with observation strategies (OBS) vs immediate treatment (IMT) for favorable risk prostate cancer (PCa) from the Geisinger Health System, a single integrated health system in Pennsylvania, as evidence from the community setting is limited. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using electronic health records from men aged ≥40 years diagnosed with favorable risk PCa (T1 or 2, PSA ≤15 ng/mL, Gleason ≤7 [3 + 4]) between January 2005 and October 2013. Prostate-specific healthcare costs were compared between the OBS and IMT cohorts in men with ≥3 years of follow-up and available linked claims data. Sub-group analyses focused on those men with low-risk PCa (T1-2a, PSA ≤10 ng/mL, Gleason ≤6). Sensitivity analysis stratified the study sample in three cohorts: OBS, switched from OBS to definitive treatment (OBS switch), and IMT. A total of 352 patients were included (OBS = 70 and IMT = 282). Compared with IMT, OBS resulted in significantly lower cumulative PCa-related healthcare costs for the first 3 years ($15,785 vs $23,177; p-value management costs compared with IMT.

  4. The need for veterinary nursing in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmilayo A. Okanlawon, RN, PhD, FWACN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, nursing care has been identified as an integral part of human medicine but is not well recognised in veterinary medicine as practised in Nigeria. In caring for human beings, a nurse is expected to have the fundamental understanding of disease aetiology, manifestations, diagnosis, manage-ment, rehabilitation, prevention and control. This is equally applicable to the care of animals. The role of veterinary nursing in veterinary medicine is significant considering the multitude of issues involved in the care of animals. The keeping of domestic animals is becoming popular and consequently the spread of infectious diseases from animals to human beings is on the increase. It is vital for human beings and animals to coexist in a healthy environment. The authors examine the importance of nursing care in veterinary medicine, the current situation in Nigeria, the role of veterinary nurses, the inter-professional approach to veterinary medicine, preparedness for the emergence of infectious diseases and career opportunities for veterinary nurses. This premise falls within the context of the ‘One Health’ concept.

  5. Views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katie; Harte, Emma; Martin, Adam; MacLure, Calum; Griffin, Simon J; Mant, Jonathan; Meads, Catherine; Saunders, Catherine L; Walter, Fiona M; Usher-Smith, Juliet A

    2017-11-15

    To synthesise data concerning the views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals towards the National Health Service (NHS) Health Check programme in general and the challenges faced when implementing it in practice. A systematic review of surveys and interview studies with a descriptive analysis of quantitative data and thematic synthesis of qualitative data. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Health Management Information Consortium, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, PsycInfo, Web of Science, OpenGrey, the Cochrane Library, NHS Evidence, Google Scholar, Google, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry from 1 January 1996 to 9 November 2016 with no language restriction and manual screening of reference lists of all included papers. Primary research reporting views of commissioners, managers or healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme and its implementation in practice. Of 18 524 citations, 15 articles met the inclusion criteria. There was evidence from both quantitative and qualitative studies that some commissioners and general practice (GP) healthcare professionals were enthusiastic about the programme, whereas others raised concerns around inequality of uptake, the evidence base and cost-effectiveness. In contrast, those working in pharmacies were all positive about programme benefits, citing opportunities for their business and staff. The main challenges to implementation were: difficulties with information technology and computer software, resistance to the programme from some GPs, the impact on workload and staffing, funding and training needs. Inadequate privacy was also a challenge in pharmacy and community settings, along with difficulty recruiting people eligible for Health Checks and poor public access to some venues. The success of the NHS Health Check Programme relies on engagement by those responsible for its

  6. Pediatric Exposures to Veterinary Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Suzanne; Roberts, Kristin J; Stull, Jason; Spiller, Henry A; McKenzie, Lara B

    2017-03-01

    To describe the epidemiology of veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures to children based on calls to a regional poison control center. A retrospective analysis of pediatric (≤19 years of age) exposures to pharmaceutical products intended for animal use, managed by a regional poison control center from 1999 through 2013, was conducted. Case narratives were reviewed and coded for exposure-related circumstances and intended species. Descriptive statistics were generated. From 1999 through 2013, the Central Ohio Poison Center received 1431 calls that related to a veterinary pharmaceutical exposure for children ≤19 years of age. Most of the pediatric calls (87.6%) involved children ≤5 years of age. Exploratory behavior was the most common exposure-related circumstance (61.4%) and ingestion accounted for the exposure route in 93% of cases. Substances commonly associated with exposures included: veterinary drugs without human equivalent (17.3%), antimicrobial agents (14.8%), and antiparasitics (14.6%). Based on substance and quantity, the majority of exposures (96.9%) were not expected to result in long-term or lasting health effects and were managed at home (94.1%). A total of 80 cases (5.6%) were referred to a health care facility, and 2 cases resulted in a moderate health effect. Children ≤5 years of age are most at risk for veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures. Although most exposures do not result in a serious medical outcome, efforts to increase public awareness, appropriate product dispensing procedures, and attention to home storage practices may reduce the risk of veterinary pharmaceutical exposures to young children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Chemotherapy safety in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahn, Shawna

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to chemotherapy is a health hazard for all personnel in facilities that store, prepare, or administer antineoplastic agents. Contamination levels have been measured as much as 15 times higher in the veterinary medicine sector than in human facilities. Recent publications in human and veterinary medicine indicate that exposure extends beyond the clinic walls to affect the patient's home and family. This article provides an update on the advances in chemotherapy safety, the current issues, and the impact on cancer management in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Managing processes of inpatient care and treatment: Swedish healthcare process managers' descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a knowledge bank for the development of overall hospital processes. Description and analysis are used to show how process managers experience their situation and the various possibilities it offers for active management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals. A qualitative and explorative design with open-ended interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals was used. Transcribed interviews were analysed by means of latent content analysis. The two main categories emerging from the analysis were characteristics of process leadership and prerequisites of process management. Quality, relational and knowledge dimensions, and structure, time and information dimensions emerged as their respective sub-categories. The overall theme describes the interdependence between leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for effective process management. No generalizations could be made from the results of the qualitative interview studies but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which in turn can be transferred to similar settings. This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for active process management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.

  9. Managers' perceptions of the manager role in relation to physicians: a qualitative interview study of the top managers in Swedish healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This study focused on the manager role in the manager-physician relationship, considered from the manager perspective. The aim was to understand how top executives in Swedish healthcare regard management of physicians in their organisations, and what this implies for the manager role in relation to the medical profession. Abbott's theory of professional jurisdiction was used to inform thinking about managerial control and legitimacy in relation to physicians. Methods Data from semi-structured individual interviews with 18 of the 20 county council chief executive officers (CEOs) in Sweden were subjected to qualitative analysis. Results The results show that, when asked about their views on management of physicians, the CEOs talked about "how physicians are" rather than describing their own or their subordinate managers' managerial behaviour or strategies. Three types of descriptions of physicians were identified: 1) they have high status and expertise; 2) they lack knowledge of the system; 3) they do what they want in the organisation. The CEOs seldom reported that general management strategies were used to manage physicians. Instead, they described four types of physician-specific management strategies that were used in their organisations: organisational separation of physicians; "nagging and arguing"; compensations; relying on the physician role. These strategies seemed to reflect pragmatic behaviour on behalf of the managers that helped them to maintain control over physicians in daily work. However, in a longer perspective, they seemed to decrease the legitimacy of the manager role and also contribute to weakening of that role in the organisation. Conclusions Many CEOs seemed to regard the manager role in their organisations as weak and described difficulties in both taking and defining that role (for themselves or others) in relation to the physician role. Further research is needed to elucidate how managers in healthcare organisations assume the

  10. Managers' perceptions of the manager role in relation to physicians: a qualitative interview study of the top managers in Swedish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knorring, Mia; de Rijk, Angelique; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2010-09-17

    This study focused on the manager role in the manager-physician relationship, considered from the manager perspective. The aim was to understand how top executives in Swedish healthcare regard management of physicians in their organisations, and what this implies for the manager role in relation to the medical profession. Abbott's theory of professional jurisdiction was used to inform thinking about managerial control and legitimacy in relation to physicians. Data from semi-structured individual interviews with 18 of the 20 county council chief executive officers (CEOs) in Sweden were subjected to qualitative analysis. The results show that, when asked about their views on management of physicians, the CEOs talked about "how physicians are" rather than describing their own or their subordinate managers' managerial behaviour or strategies. Three types of descriptions of physicians were identified: 1) they have high status and expertise; 2) they lack knowledge of the system; 3) they do what they want in the organisation. The CEOs seldom reported that general management strategies were used to manage physicians. Instead, they described four types of physician-specific management strategies that were used in their organisations: organisational separation of physicians; "nagging and arguing"; compensations; relying on the physician role. These strategies seemed to reflect pragmatic behaviour on behalf of the managers that helped them to maintain control over physicians in daily work. However, in a longer perspective, they seemed to decrease the legitimacy of the manager role and also contribute to weakening of that role in the organisation. Many CEOs seemed to regard the manager role in their organisations as weak and described difficulties in both taking and defining that role (for themselves or others) in relation to the physician role. Further research is needed to elucidate how managers in healthcare organisations assume the manager role in relation to the medical

  11. Healthcare waste management during disasters and its effects on climate change: Lessons from 2010 earthquake and cholera tragedies in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raila, Emilia M; Anderson, David O

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing effects of human activities on climate change throughout the world, and global South in particular, scientists are yet to understand how poor healthcare waste management practices in an emergency influences the climate change. This article presents new findings on climate change risks of healthcare waste disposal during and after the 2010 earthquake and cholera disasters in Haiti. The researchers analysed quantities of healthcare waste incinerated by the United Nations Mission in Haiti for 60 months (2009 to 2013). The aim was to determine the relationship between healthcare waste incinerated weights and the time of occurrence of the two disasters, and associated climate change effects, if any. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient indicated a weak correlation between the quantities of healthcare waste disposed of and the time of occurrence of the actual emergencies (r (58) = 0.406, p = 0.001). Correspondingly, linear regression analysis indicated a relatively linear data trend (R 2 = 0.16, F (1, 58) = 11.42, P = 0.001) with fluctuating scenarios that depicted a sharp rise in 2012, and time series model showed monthly and yearly variations within 60 months. Given that the peak healthcare waste incineration occurred 2 years after the 2010 disasters, points at the need to minimise wastage on pharmaceuticals by improving logistics management. The Government of Haiti had no data on healthcare waste disposal and practised smoky open burning, thus a need for capacity building on green healthcare waste management technologies for effective climate change mitigation.

  12. The future of veterinary parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, G C

    2001-07-12

    Current evidence suggests research in veterinary parasitology is in decline despite its importance. This is particularly true in the UK where research funds have been diverted into BSE. Decline in interest in veterinary parasitology is at least in part due to the success of major pharmaceutical companies in producing a range of effective and safe anti-parasitic drugs. Research is needed because of the effects of parasites on animal welfare and the economic costs of parasites. However, there is little information on the actual costs of animal parasites. Another major reason for research is the development of drug resistance in protozoa, helminths and arthropods of veterinary importance. This is a serious problem particularly for sheep and goats in the southern hemisphere. A prioritised list of research requirements is suggested: (i) new drugs; (ii) resistance management; (iii) vaccines; (iv) breeding for resistance; (v) improved diagnostics; (vi) zoonoses; (vii) global warming and parasites. There is a major political challenge to raise the profile of veterinary parasitology and thus the funding essential for its advancement and the continued welfare and productivity of animals.

  13. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  14. Costs associated with the management of waste from healthcare facilities: An analysis at national and site level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Mentore; Tudor, Terry; Perteghella, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Given rising spend on the provision of healthcare services, the sustainable management of waste from healthcare facilities is increasingly becoming a focus as a means of reducing public health risks and financial costs. Using data on per capita healthcare spend at the national level, as well as a case study of a hospital in Italy, this study examined the relationship between trends in waste generation and the associated costs of managing the waste. At the national level, healthcare spend as a percentage of gross domestic product positively correlated with waste arisings. At the site level, waste generation and type were linked to department type and clinical performance, with the top three highest generating departments of hazardous healthcare waste being anaesthetics (5.96 kg day -1 bed -1 ), paediatric and intensive care (3.37 kg day -1 bed -1 ) and gastroenterology-digestive endoscopy (3.09 kg day -1 bed -1 ). Annual overall waste management costs were $US5,079,191, or approximately $US2.36 kg -1 , with the management of the hazardous fraction of the waste being highest at $US3,707,939. In Italy, reduction in both waste arisings and the associated costs could be realised through various means, including improved waste segregation, and linking the TARI tax to waste generation.

  15. Graph Databases for Large-Scale Healthcare Systems: A Framework for Efficient Data Management and Data Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yubin [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Park, Byung H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ghosh, Dr. Joydeep [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Designing a database system for both efficient data management and data services has been one of the enduring challenges in the healthcare domain. In many healthcare systems, data services and data management are often viewed as two orthogonal tasks; data services refer to retrieval and analytic queries such as search, joins, statistical data extraction, and simple data mining algorithms, while data management refers to building error-tolerant and non-redundant database systems. The gap between service and management has resulted in rigid database systems and schemas that do not support effective analytics. We compose a rich graph structure from an abstracted healthcare RDBMS to illustrate how we can fill this gap in practice. We show how a healthcare graph can be automatically constructed from a normalized relational database using the proposed 3NF Equivalent Graph (3EG) transformation.We discuss a set of real world graph queries such as finding self-referrals, shared providers, and collaborative filtering, and evaluate their performance over a relational database and its 3EG-transformed graph. Experimental results show that the graph representation serves as multiple de-normalized tables, thus reducing complexity in a database and enhancing data accessibility of users. Based on this finding, we propose an ensemble framework of databases for healthcare applications.

  16. Role of external management consultants in health-care organizations implementing TQM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrick, Tony C; Preston, Arthur P

    2002-01-01

    The reliance of organizations on consultants generally is increasing. Although the efficacy of the use of consultants in implementing change programs has been questioned, there have been limited attempts to systematically analyze the contribution of consultants. This article reports observations on the use of consultants in health-care organizations implementing total quality management (TQM). The relationship between the use of external management consultants and successful TQM implementation is not simple. There appears to be a difference in the way consultants are used by the public and private sectors, with the private organizations forming long-term relationships with their consultants. The perceived value of consultants to the private organizations was higher. Consultants are not a substitute for leadership, and the success of outside consultants probably depends on the commitment of senior management. External management consultants appeared to be linked to the successful implementation of TQM. Further, despite the conventional wisdom to the contrary, some prepackaged programs may be beneficial for the introduction of TQM into an organization.

  17. Advanced nurse practitioners in municipal healthcare as a way to meet the growing healthcare needs of the frail elderly: a qualitative interview study with managers, doctors and specialist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungbeck, Birgitta; Sjögren Forss, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    The number of frail elderly people with complex nursing and medical care needs is increasing, and consequently, the healthcare burden. The implementation of Advanced Nurse Practitioners globally has been shown to make healthcare more effective and increase patient safety, continuity of care and access to care. In Sweden, research about Advanced Nurse Practitioners is limited. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the opinions of managers, doctors and nurses in primary care and municipal healthcare about the role of ANPs in municipal healthcare as a way to meet the increasing healthcare needs of the frail elderly. Managers, doctors and specialist nurses in primary care and municipal healthcare adopted a qualitative, descriptive design through 12 semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using content analysis. The participants expressed both opportunities as well as challenges with Advanced Nurse Practitioners in municipal healthcare. This role considered to satisfy frail elderly people's healthcare needs and making the healthcare more effective as the doctors would have more time for other patients. The challenges mainly consist of doubts from the managers whether the nurses would be motivated to pursue further education to become an Advanced Nurse Practitioner if the role becomes a reality. The doctors were unsure if the nurses would consider taking the responsibility the role would imply. Advanced Nurse Practitioner is considered to be a valuable resource not only for the frail elderly but also for the nurses in the municipal healthcare and for the doctors in primary care as they probably would make healthcare more effective. They might be a way to meet the increasing healthcare needs of frail elderly, however there are also challenges to overcome before they can become a reality in a Swedish healthcare context. Consequently, this role deserves further investigation.

  18. Connectivity for Healthcare and Well-Being Management: Examples from Six European Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N.; Lou, Ricardo Castellot; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Nugent, Chris D.; Alexandersson, Jan; Zimmermann, Gottfried; Cortes, Ulises; Casas, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances and societal changes in recent years have contributed to a shift in traditional care models and in the relationship between patients and their doctors/carers, with (in general) an increase in the patient-carer physical distance and corresponding changes in the modes of access to relevant care information by all groups. The objective of this paper is to showcase the research efforts of six projects (that the authors are currently, or have recently been, involved in), CAALYX, eCAALYX, COGKNOW, EasyLine+, I2HOME, and SHARE-it, all funded by the European Commission towards a future where citizens can take an active role into managing their own healthcare. Most importantly, sensitive groups of citizens, such as the elderly, chronically ill and those suffering from various physical and cognitive disabilities, will be able to maintain vital and feature-rich connections with their families, friends and healthcare providers, who can then respond to, and prevent, the development of adverse health conditions in those they care for in a timely manner, wherever the carers and the people cared for happen to be. PMID:19742164

  19. Connectivity for Healthcare and Well-Being Management: Examples from Six European Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Cortes

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances and societal changes in recent years have contributed to a shift in traditional care models and in the relationship between patients and their doctors/carers, with (in general an increase in the patient-carer physical distance and corresponding changes in the modes of access to relevant care information by all groups. The objective of this paper is to showcase the research efforts of six projects (that the authors are currently, or have recently been, involved in, CAALYX, eCAALYX, COGKNOW, EasyLine+, I2HOME, and SHARE-it, all funded by the European Commission towards a future where citizens can take an active role into managing their own healthcare. Most importantly, sensitive groups of citizens, such as the elderly, chronically ill and those suffering from various physical and cognitive disabilities, will be able to maintain vital and feature-rich connections with their families, friends and healthcare providers, who can then respond to, and prevent, the development of adverse health conditions in those they care for in a timely manner, wherever the carers and the people cared for happen to be.

  20. Pharmacy Benefit Management Companies: Do They Create Value in the US Healthcare System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Alan

    2017-05-01

    Pharmacy benefit management companies (PBMs) perform functions in the US market-based healthcare system that may be performed by public agencies or quasi-public institutions in other nations. By aggregating lives covered under their many individual contracts with payers, PBMs have formidable negotiating power. They influence pharmaceutical insurance coverage, design the terms of coverage in a plan's drug benefit, and create competition among providers for inclusion in a plan's network. PBMs have, through intermediation, the potential to secure lower drug prices and to improve rational prescribing. Whether these potential outcomes are realized within the relevant budget is a function of the healthcare system and the interaction of benefit design and clinical processes-not just individually vetted components. Efficiencies and values achieved in price discounts and cost sharing can be nullified if there is irrational prescribing (over-utilization, under-utilization and mis-utilization), variable patient adherence to medication regimens, ineffective formulary processes, or fraud, waste and abuse. Rising prescription drug costs and the increasing prevalence of 'high deductible health plans', which require much greater patient out-of-pocket costs, is creating a crisis for PBM efforts towards an affordable pharmacy benefit. Since PBM rebate and incentive contracts are opaque to the public, whether they add value by restraining higher drug prices or benefit from them is debatable.

  1. Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Catarina Fischer; Dahlqvist, Vera; Zingmark, Karin; Sandlund, Mikael; Söderberg, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support (CES) inspired by Habermas' theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this study was to describe the communication of value conflicts during a series of inter-professional CES sessions. Ten audio- and video-recorded CES sessions were conducted over eight months and were analyzed by using the video analysis tool Transana and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that during the CES sessions the professionals as a group moved through the following five phases: a value conflict expressed as feelings of frustration, sharing disempowerment and helplessness, the revelation of the value conflict, enhancing realistic expectations, seeing opportunities to change the situation instead of obstacles. In the course of CES, the professionals moved from an individual interpretation of the situation to a common, new understanding and then to a change in approach. An open and permissive communication climate meant that the professionals dared to expose themselves, share their feelings, face their own emotions, and eventually arrive at a mutual shared reality. The value conflict was not only revealed but also resolved.

  2. Molecular epidemiology tools in the management of healthcare-associated infections: towards the definition of recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Stefania; Pasquarella, Cesira; Colotto, Marco; Barchitta, Martina; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Agodi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and have a significant economic impact for health systems. Molecular epidemiology tools have a central role in HAI prevention programs. In order to give an overview of their specific advantages and disadvantages we reported current and new molecular typing methods for HAI outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance. The current review was drafted as a short version of a longer document written by the Public Health Genomics (GSP) working group, and the Italian Study Group of Hospital Hygiene (GISIO), entitled Molecular epidemiology of Healthcare Associated Infections: recommendations from the Italian Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health (SItI). This text considers various aspects related to HAIs: the role of genotyping and bioinformatics, the organizational levels of laboratories, as well as ethical and economic aspects. The use of molecular epidemiology represents a key tool in the management of HAIs, to be used as a complement to conventional control measures. The present contribution aims to increase knowledge on the proper use of such methods, given the major challenge HAI represents for National Health systems.

  3. Building for a better hospital. Value-adding management & design of healthcare real estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan van der Zwart

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent deregulation of laws on hospital real estate in the Netherlands implies that healthcare institutions have more opportunities to make independent accommodation choices, but at the same time have themselves become responsible for the risks associated with the investment. In addition, accommodation costs have become an integral part of the costs of healthcare. This sheds new light on the alignment between the organisation of healthcare and accommodation: care institutions themselves bear the risk of recouping their investment in real estate and high accommodation costs lead to higher rates for healthcare compared to competing institutions. In this thesis, the ideas and concepts of Corporate Real Estate Management 
(CREM are examined in terms of the contribution they could make to the process
of accommodation decision by using recent cases in Dutch hospitals. CREM can be defined as the management of the real estate portfolio of a corporation by aligning the portfolio and services with the needs of the core business in order to obtain maximum added value for the business and an optimal contribution to the overall performance of the organisation. This definition assumes that accommodation can add value to the organisation and contribute to its overall achievement. Elaborating on the added value of real estate in addition to quantifying these added values and making them applicable to hospital real estate management is therefore central to this study. The added values determine the transition between the different phases in the cycle of the initiation, design, construction and occupancy of the accommodation. In addition, the added value of real estate functions as a common language between the disciplines involved in the design and construction of hospital accommodation, such as the healthcare institution, healthcare manager, real estate manager and architect. In four sub-studies (1 Context, (2 Management, (3 Value and, (4 Design several

  4. Building for a better hospital. Value-adding management & design of healthcare real estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan van der Zwart

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent deregulation of laws on hospital real estate in the Netherlands implies that healthcare institutions have more opportunities to make independent accommodation choices, but at the same time have themselves become responsible for the risks associated with the investment. In addition, accommodation costs have become an integral part of the costs of healthcare. This sheds new light on the alignment between the organisation of healthcare and accommodation: care institutions themselves bear the risk of recouping their investment in real estate and high accommodation costs lead to higher rates for healthcare compared to competing institutions.In this thesis, the ideas and concepts of Corporate Real Estate Management 
(CREM are examined in terms of the contribution they could make to the process
of accommodation decision by using recent cases in Dutch hospitals. CREM can be defined as the management of the real estate portfolio of a corporation by aligning the portfolio and services with the needs of the core business in order to obtain maximum added value for the business and an optimal contribution to the overall performance of the organisation. This definition assumes that accommodation can add value to the organisation and contribute to its overall achievement. Elaborating on the added value of real estate in addition to quantifying these added values and making them applicable to hospital real estate management is therefore central to this study. The added values determine the transition between the different phases in the cycle of the initiation, design, construction and occupancy of the accommodation. In addition, the added value of real estate functions as a common language between the disciplines involved in the design and construction of hospital accommodation, such as the healthcare institution, healthcare manager, real estate manager and architect.In four sub-studies (1 Context, (2 Management, (3 Value and, (4 Design several

  5. Flexible working arrangements in healthcare: a comparison between managers of shift workers and 9-to-5 employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Danielle; Russell, Elizabeth; Arnold, Kara A

    2014-01-01

    This study examined healthcare managers' perceptions of flexible working arrangements and implementation barriers. Work-life conflict can lead to negative health implications, but flexible working arrangements can help manage this conflict. Little research has examined its implementation in 24/7/365 healthcare organizations or within groups of employees working 9 AM to 5 PM (9-5) versus shift-work hours. Questionnaires regarding perceptions to, benefits of, and barriers against flexible working arrangements were administered to managers of 9-5 workers and shift workers in an Atlantic Canadian healthcare organization. Few differences in perceptions and benefits of flexible working arrangements were found between management groups. However, results indicate that the interaction with patients and/or the immediacy of tasks being performed are barriers for shift-work managers. The nature of healthcare presents barriers for managers implementing flexible working arrangements, which differ only based on whether the job is physical (shift work) versus desk related (9-5 work).

  6. Veterinary Services Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Mission:To provide quality veterinary medical care and environmental enrichment programs for all animals, representing nine different species.To provide guidance for...

  7. Clinical features and management of equine post operative ileus: Survey of diplomates of the European Colleges of Equine Internal Medicine (ECEIM) and Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, D; Pirie, R S; Handel, I G; Tremaine, W H; Hudson, N P H

    2016-03-01

    There is a need for an improved understanding of equine post operative ileus (POI), in terms of both clinical definition and optimal management. Although the pharmacological strategies that are used to treat POI continue to evolve, little is known about the supplementary strategies used to prevent and manage this condition. To report the current strategies used to diagnose, prevent and manage POI following emergency abdominal surgeries. Cross-sectional survey. An electronic survey invitation was sent by email to 306 European college diplomates (European Colleges of Equine Internal Medicine, ECEIM n = 120, and Veterinary Surgeons, ECVS n = 186). The response rate was 33% (100 of 306). The median reported estimated incidence of POI was 10-20%. The presence of reflux on nasogastric intubation was the main criterion used to define POI. Lesions involving the small intestine were thought to be the leading risk factors for developing POI. Anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobial drugs and i.v. fluids were the primary preventative strategies when managing cases at high risk for POI. Flunixin meglumine and lidocaine were the drugs most commonly used to treat horses with POI. Supplementary preventative and treatment strategies for POI included control of endotoxaemia, fluid therapy, early ambulation and judicious timing of post operative feeding. Appreciation of the potential risk factors associated with the development of POI appeared to have an impact on the choice of management strategies that are implemented. The majority of ECEIM and ECVS Diplomates in the survey used flunixin meglumine and lidocaine, often in combination, to treat horses with POI, which is likely to reflect the contributory role of inflammation in its pathophysiology. Various supplementary strategies were used to prevent and manage POI risk factors intraoperatively and post operatively. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Managing expectations: cognitive authority and experienced control in complex healthcare processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Katherine J; May, Carl R

    2017-07-05

    Balancing the normative expectations of others (accountabilities) against the personal and distributed resources available to meet them (capacity) is a ubiquitous feature of social relations in many settings. This is an important problem in the management of long-term conditions, because of widespread problems of non-adherence to treatment regimens. Using long-term conditions as an example, we set out middle range theory of this balancing work. A middle-range theory was constructed four stages. First, a qualitative elicitation study of men with heart failure was used to develop general propositions about patient and care giver experience, and about the ways that the organisation and delivery of care affected this. Second, these propositions were developed and confirmed through a systematic review of qualitative research literature. Third, theoretical propositions and constructs were built, refined and presented as a logic model associated with two main theoretical propositions. Finally, a construct validation exercise was undertaken, in which construct definitions informed reanalysis of a set of systematic reviews of studies of patient and caregiver experiences of heart failure that had been included in an earlier meta-review. Cognitive Authority Theory identifies, characterises and explains negotiation processes in in which people manage their relations with the expectations of normative systems - like those encountered in the management of long-term conditions. Here, their cognitive authority is the product of an assessment of competence, trustworthiness and credibility made about a person by other participants in a healthcare process; and their experienced control is a function of the degree to which they successfully manage the external process-specific limiting factors that make it difficult to otherwise perform in their role. Cognitive Authority Theory assists in explaining how participants in complex social processes manage important relational aspects of

  9. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions.

  10. Promoting quality: the health-care organization from a management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Baggett, Kelvin A; Krubert, Christopher G; Peterson, Eric D; Schulman, Kevin A

    2007-12-01

    Although agreement about the need for quality improvement in health care is almost universal, the means of achieving effective improvement in overall care is not well understood. Avedis Donabedian developed the structure-process-outcome framework in which to think about quality-improvement efforts. There is now a robust evidence-base in the quality-improvement literature on process and outcomes, but structure has received considerably less attention. The health-care field would benefit from expanding the current interpretation of structure to include broader perspectives on organizational attributes as primary determinants of process change and quality improvement. We highlight and discuss the following key elements of organizational attributes from a management perspective: (i) executive management, including senior leadership and board responsibilities (ii) culture, (iii) organizational design, (iv) incentive structures and (v) information management and technology. We discuss the relevant contributions from the business and medical literature for each element, and provide this framework as a roadmap for future research in an effort to develop the optimal definition of 'structure' for transforming quality-improvement initiatives.

  11. HACCP and the management of healthcare associated infections: are there lessons to be learnt from other industries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Hospital cleaning and healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) continue to attract adverse media attention and consumer concern. Parallels exist with similar publicity relating to cleaning and food safety in the food industry almost 13 years earlier. This paper examines some of the management solutions developed in the food industry, and discusses their application to healthcare delivery. The food industry is managing food safety by adopting a dual approach based on pre-requisite programmes and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP). How these differ is described and how the approaches and terminology can be adapted for use in healthcare is discussed. The food industry is moving towards external certification of safety using national and international standards. The HACCP approach, a management tool and a central requirement of these standards, is evolving and there is interest worldwide from the healthcare community. Its application to the decontamination of endoscopes, using conventional HACCP, is presented, as well as suggestions for a simplified format for managing patient-related procedures. Taking this type of approach to the management of HCAIs could provide greater transparency, reduce infection rates and increase consumer confidence. Potential problems in adopting HACCP, including cost and human resource, are discussed. The HACCP method/approach has previously been mentioned in the medical literature but this paper is one of the few to examine, from basic principles, its infection control application within a broader approach to quality assurance.

  12. Food-supply veterinary medicine and veterinary medical education: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Reuben

    2006-01-01

    Food-supply veterinary medicine has been an essential part of veterinary degree programs in Australia since the first veterinary school opened in the late nineteenth century. Australian veterinary schools, like others internationally, are being challenged by the relevance of material in current curricula for modern food-supply veterinary medicine. Additionally, student aspirations are a major issue, as curriculum designers balance companion-animal training with the herd/flock-based issues that focus on productivity and profitability. One of the challenges is to examine the relative balance of education in generic skills (self-knowledge, change management, teamwork, leadership, negotiation) with more technically or scientifically based education. An ongoing process of curriculum review and renewal, which involves input from both external and internal stakeholders and allows regular review and assessment, is needed to ensure continuing curriculum relevance.

  13. Veterinary microbiology and microbial disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinn, P. J

    2011-01-01

    "Veterinary Microbiology is one of the core subjects for veterinary students. Fully revised and expanded, this new edition covers every aspect of veterinary microbiology for students in both paraclinical and clinical years...

  14. Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences is the official journal of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria. The journal welcomes original research articles, short communications and reviews on all aspects of veterinary sciences and related disciplines.

  15. Leading processes of patient care and treatment in hierarchical healthcare organizations in Sweden--process managers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers' experiences of leading processes involving patient care and treatment when working in a hierarchical health-care organization. This study is based on an explorative design. The data were gathered from interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals. These data underwent qualitative and interpretative analysis with a modified editing style. The process managers' experiences of leading processes in a hierarchical health-care organization are described under three themes: having or not having a mandate, exposure to conflict situations and leading process development. The results indicate a need for clarity regarding process manager's responsibility and work content, which need to be communicated to all managers and staff involved in the patient care and treatment process, irrespective of department. There also needs to be an emphasis on realistic expectations and orientation of the goals that are an intrinsic part of the task of being a process manager. Generalizations from the results of the qualitative interview studies are limited, but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which, in turn, can be transferred to similar settings. This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leading care and treatment processes in a functional, hierarchical health-care organization from process managers' experiences, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.

  16. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture,. Umudike, P.M.B 7267 Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria. *Corresponding author: Email: docoleji@yahoo.com; Tel. No:+234 8034509991. SUMMARY. This study investigated comparatively the genetic influence on the ...

  17. Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 49 of 49 ... Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 49 of 49 Items ...

  18. Nigerian Veterinary Journal (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of computers in all works of life need not to be overemphasized. However, in. Nigeria, the application of computers in veterinary medicine has not been fully utilized. Computer aided diagnosis is a process that has significantly improved the practice of veterinary medicine in other parts of the world. This paper ...

  19. Nigerian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCOPE The Editorial Board of the Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) welcomes contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, clinical case reports, and short communications on all aspects of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Animal Production. Submissions are accepted on the understanding that ...

  20. Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 16 of 16 ... Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 16 of 16 Items ...

  1. Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 15 of 15 Items ...

  2. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Meseko et al. 155. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): 155-159. SHORT COMMUNICATION. Detection of Haemagglutination inhibition antibody to Pandemic and. Classical Swine Influenza Virus in Commercial Piggery in ...

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(1). 2016. Igado et al. 54. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 54-63. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Cranio-facial and Ocular Morphometrics of the Male Greater Cane Rat. (Thryonomys swinderianus). Igado, O. O.. 1. *; Adebayo, A. O.. 2.

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(2). 2017. Meseko et al. 124. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., June 2017. Vol 38 (2): 124-128. SHORT COMMUNICATION. Fowlpox Virus from Backyard Poultry in Plateau State Nigeria: Isolation and Phylogeny of the P4b Gene Compared to a Vaccine Strain.

  5. Open Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Veterinary Journal is a peer reviewed international open access online and printed journal that publishes high-quality original research articles, reviews, short communications and case reports dedicated to all aspects of veterinary sciences and its related subjects. Other websites associated with this journal: ...

  6. Open Veterinary Journal: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Dr. Ibrahim Eldaghayes Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P. O. Box 13662, Tripoli, Libya Phone: +218 21 462 8422. Fax: +218 21 462 8421. Email: ibrahim.eldaghayes@vetmed.edu.ly ...

  7. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    variegatum (Acari: Ixodidae) Ticks from Nigeria. Ogo, N. I.. 1. ; Okubanjo, O. O.. 2. ; Inuwa, H. M.. 3 and Agbede, R. I. S.. 4. 1National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom, Plateau State. 2Department of Veterinary Parasitology and. Entomology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. 3Department of Biochemistry, Ahmadu ...

  8. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., December 2015. Vol. 36 (4): 1272-1282. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Gross and Morphometric Anatomical Changes of the Thyroid Gland in the West African Dwarf ... Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. .... common carotid artery, internal jugular vein,.

  9. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 45-53. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. A Retrospective Evaluation of Intravenous Fluid Usage in Animal. Patients Treated at Veterinary Teaching Hospital Nsukka, 2005-2015 ... 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. ... they carried with them their own internal sea.

  10. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    SUMMARY. The prevalence and morphological pathology of renal failure in exotic breeds of dog in Lagos and Ogun States, within Southwestern Nigeria were determined from postmortem records of the. Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of. Agriculture, Abeokuta ...

  11. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    at the Maiduguri municipal abattoir and were used for this study. Thyroid glands collected were transported in ice packs to the Department of Veterinary Pathology laboratory, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria for gross examination and thereafter, fixed and sent to Department of Veterinary. Anatomy, University of Abuja, were it ...

  12. Enabling Healthcare IT Governance: Human Task Management Service for Administering Emergency Department's Resources for Efficient Patient Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The use of Health Information Technology (HIT) to improve healthcare service delivery is constantly increasing due to research advances in medical science and information systems. Having a fully automated process solution for a Healthcare Organization (HCO) requires a combination of organizational strategies along with a selection of technologies that facilitate the goal of improving clinical outcomes. HCOs, requires dynamic management of care capability to realize the full potential of HIT. Business Process Management (BPM) is being increasingly adopted to streamline the healthcare service delivery and management processes. Emergency Departments (EDs) provide a case in point, which require multidisciplinary resources and services to deliver effective clinical outcomes. Managed care involves the coordination of a range of services in an ED. Although fully automated processes in emergency care provide a cutting edge example of service delivery, there are many situations that require human interactions with the computerized systems; e.g. Medication Approvals, care transfer, acute patient care. This requires a coordination mechanism for all the resources, computer and human, to work side by side to provide the best care. To ensure evidence-based medical practice in ED, we have designed a Human Task Management service to model the process of coordination of ED resources based on the UK's NICE Clinical guideline for managing the care of acutely ill patients. This functionality is implemented using Java Business process Management (jBPM).

  13. [Privatization in healthcare management: an adverse effect of the economic crisis and a symptom of bad governance. SESPAS report 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, Fernando I; Abellán-Perpiñán, José María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2014-06-01

    It is often asserted that public management of healthcare facilities is inefficient. On the basis of that unproven claim, it is argued that privatization schemes are needed. In this article we review the available evidence, in Spain and other countries, on the application of private management mechanisms to publicly funded systems similar to the Spanish national health system. The evidence suggests that private management of healthcare services is not necessarily better than public management, nor vice versa. Ownership-whether public or private-of health care centers does not determine their performance which, on the contrary, depends on other factors, such as the workplace culture or the practice of suitable monitoring by the public payer. Promoting competition among centers (irrespective of the specific legal form of the management arrangements), however, could indeed lead to improvements under some circumstances. Therefore, it is advisable to cease the narrow-minded debate on the superiority of one or other model in order to focus on improving healthcare services management per se. Understanding that good governance affects health policies, the management of health care organizations, and clinical practice is, undoubtedly, an essential requirement but may not necessarily lead to policies that stimulate the solvency of the system. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Research data services in veterinary medicine libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Erin E

    2016-10-01

    The study investigated veterinary medicine librarians' experience with and perceptions of research data services. Many academic libraries have begun to offer research data services in response to researchers' increased need for data management support. To date, such services have typically been generic, rather than discipline-specific, to appeal to a wide variety of researchers. An online survey was deployed to identify trends regarding research data services in veterinary medicine libraries. Participants were identified from a list of contacts from the MLA Veterinary Medical Libraries Section. Although many respondents indicated that they have a professional interest in research data services, the majority of veterinary medicine librarians only rarely or occasionally provide data management support as part of their regular job responsibilities. There was little consensus as to whether research data services should be core to a library's mission despite their perceived importance to the advancement of veterinary research. Furthermore, most respondents stated that research data services are just as or somewhat less important than the other services that they provide and feel only slightly or somewhat prepared to offer such services. Lacking a standard definition of "research data" and a common understanding of precisely what research data services encompass, it is difficult for veterinary medicine librarians and libraries to define and understand their roles in research data services. Nonetheless, they appear to have an interest in learning more about and providing research data services.

  15. Development of a trusted healthcare service to support self-management and a physically active lifestyle in COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Monique; Flierman, I.; van Schooten, B.W.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In chronic disease management, such as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), technology can play an important role to increase the quality and efficiency of care. In the THeCS project, which is part of the large Dutch COMMIT programme, we aim to develop a trusted healthcare

  16. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Workplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the

  17. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWorkplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the internal

  18. Healthcare reimbursement models and orthopaedic trauma: will there be change in patient management? A survey of orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihejirika, Rivka C; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Thakore, Rachel V; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Obremskey, William T; Mir, Hassan R; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-02-01

    Healthcare reimbursement models are changing. Fee-for-service may be replaced by pay-for-performance or capitated care. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential changes in orthopaedic trauma surgery patient management based on potential shifts in policy surrounding readmission and reimbursement. An e-mail survey consisting of 3 case-based scenarios was delivered to 375 orthopaedic surgeons. Five options for management of each case were provided. Each of the 3 cases was presented in 3 different healthcare settings: scenario A, our current healthcare setting; scenario B, in which 90-day reoperation or readmission would not be reimbursed; and scenario C, in which a capitated healthcare structure paid a fixed amount per patient. The response rate was 40.3% with 151 surgeons completing the survey. A 71.1% of the respondents were in private practice settings, whereas 28.3% were in academic centers. In each case, there was significant increase in the respondents' choice to transfer patients to tertiary care centers under both the capitated and penalization systems as compared with the current fee-for-service model. This survey is the first of its kind to demonstrate through case-based scenarios that a healthcare system with readmission penalties and capitated reimbursement models may lead to a significant increase in transfer of complex orthopaedic trauma patients to tertiary care centers. Physicians should be encouraged to continue evidence-based medicine instead of making decisions due to finances, and other avenues of healthcare savings should be explored to decrease patient transfer rates with healthcare changes.

  19. Clinical management of parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE concurrent with moderate pneumonia in a goat: a clinical veterinary case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faez Firdaus Abdullah Jesse

    2017-09-01

    Materials and methods: The Jamnapari cross goat aged two years and weighing 40 Kg was presented to the Universiti Veterinary Hospital, Universiti Putra Malaysia with the history of diarrhea and depression. The goat was examined physically. Blood and fecal samples were collected for complete blood count, serum biochemistry analysis and parasitological examination. Standard treatment plan was applied for the correction of the the problem. Results: Physical examination findings revealed the goat was in poor body condition, dull and depressed. Wet and dry fecal traces were observed around the groin region. The temperature was slightly elevated (39.5°C, the heart rate was increased (160 b/min while other parameters were within normal range. Upon auscultation of the thoracic region, moderate crackle lung sound was determined. Visual observation of the nasal cavity indicated a bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge. The hemogram result revealed evidence of a normocytic normochromic anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia with left shift and monocytosis. Serum biochemistry revealed increases in gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, sodium, chloride, creatine kinase (CK, and hyperglobulinemia. Fecal examination revealed increased in Strongyle egg count of about 2,700 eggs per gram of feces using the Modified Mcmaster technique. From the history, physical examination and laboratory findings the goat was diagnosed with clinical parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE concurrent with moderate pneumonia infection. The therapeutic plan for this case were 45 mL of kaolin-pectin (30 mL/Kg body weight orally SID for 3 days as anti-diarrhea, 12 mL Levamisole (12 mg/Kg bwt was administered orally once as anthelminthic, fluid therapy was instituted using 1.5 L of Lactated Ringers’ solution once via intravenously. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (1 mL/16 Kg bwt was administered intramuscularly SID for 3 days. Conclusion: Follow up examination of the goat a week post treatment indicated a good prognosis

  20. A system for the management, display and integration of pre-hospital healthcare activity in the deployed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Simon; Wheatley, R J

    2014-12-01

    To create and implement a system through which pre-hospital healthcare activity across an entire operational theatre could be made available in real-time to support healthcare delivery, governance and assurance activity. An IT-based system was created that could display, manage and integrate the pre-hospital healthcare activity on Op HERRICK 18. The system was based on the Defence Medical Services Common Assurance Framework and run through Microsoft Office SharePoint. Pre-hospital healthcare activity was made available and visible across an operational theatre. This supported delivery, assurance and governance at any time. Activity from each medical facility could be integrated and display automatically improving theatre wide situational awareness. The availability of information resulted in a shift towards a more continuous process of assurance and governance rather than reliance on inherently threatening and increasingly intermittent inspection regimes. The ability to review healthcare activity remotely at anytime significantly improves the validity of assurance possible for a deployed force. Governance activity can be more responsive and less reliant on the fixed timescale and datasets of reports from outlying medical facilities. However, assurance and governance authorities must not allow such a wealth of information to impact local leadership and innovation through a perception of, or actual, micro-management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS. A New Healthcare Paradigm Using the 5Rs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Tehrani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS is a new paradigm comprised of the 5Rs which define a comprehensive patient healthcare system in the digital health age. This service uses a health monitoring system with sensors and a patient application portal that can Read data and securely send it to the cloud with amended data from Electronic Health Records (EHR. The read data is Restructured by analytics software for evaluation and personalization in an aggregated form represented by an individualized health scoring and demographic grading system. The Results are previously restructured data that must become actionable to lead to an escalation path to the Communication Center for a Response. On a periodic basis, Repeat of the cycle will improve patient health outcomes through an interconnected link of services for optimal continuous health relationship management. Providers can leverage the HRMS platform to generate data-driven approaches fostering a positive and lasting impact on their patient's health. Payers can track data to ensure a more healthy patient population and review meaningful outcomes.

  2. Symptomatic Management of Fever in Children: A National Survey of Healthcare Professionals' Practices in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertille, Nathalie; Pons, Gerard; Khoshnood, Babak; Fournier-Charrière, Elisabeth; Chalumeau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the production and dissemination of recommendations related to managing fever in children, this symptom saturates the practices of primary healthcare professionals (HPs). Data on parent practices related to fever are available, but data on HPs' practices are limited. We studied HPs' practices, determinants of practices and concordance with recommendations in France. We conducted a national cross-sectional observational study between 2007 and 2008 among French general practitioners, primary care pediatricians and pharmacists. HPs were asked to include 5 consecutive patients aged 1 month to 12 years with acute fever. HPs completed a questionnaire about their practices for the current fever episode. We used a multilevel logistic regression model to assess the joint effects of patient- and HP-level variables associated with this behavior. In all, 1,534 HPs (participation rate 13%) included 6,596 children (mean age 3.7 ± 2.7 years). Physicians measured the temperature of 40% of children. Primary HPs recommended drug treatment for 84% of children (including monotherapy for 92%) and physical treatment for 62% (including all recommended physical treatments for 7%). HPs gave written advice or a pamphlet for 13% of children. Significant practice variations were associated with characteristics of the child (age, fever level and diagnosis) and HP (profession and experience). In France, despite the production and dissemination of national recommendations for managing fever in children, primary HPs' observed practices differed greatly from current recommendations, which suggests potential targets for continuing medical education.

  3. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Quality of child healthcare at primary healthcare facilities: a national assessment of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Ghulam Farooq; Chikvaidze, Paata; Varkey, Sherin; Higgins-Steele, Ariel; Safi, Najibullah; Mubasher, Adela; Yusufi, Khaksar; Alawi, Sayed Alisha

    2017-02-01

    To assess quality of the national Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) program services provided for sick children at primary health facilities in Afghanistan. Mixed methods including cross-sectional study. Thirteen (of thirty-four) provinces in Afghanistan. Observation of case management and re-examination of 177 sick children, exit interviews with caretakers and review of equipment/supplies at 44 health facilities. Introduction and scale up of Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses at primary health care facilities. Care of sick children according to IMCI guidelines, health worker skills and essential health system elements. Thirty-two (71%) of the health workers were trained in IMCI and five (11%) received supervision in clinical case management during the past 6 months. On average, 5.4 out of 10 main assessment tasks were performed during cases observed, the index being higher in children seen by trained providers than untrained (6.3 vs 3.5, 95% CI 5.8-6.8 vs 2.9-4.1). In all, 74% of the 104 children who needed oral antibiotics received prescriptions, while 30% received complete and correct advice and 30% were overprescribed, and more so by untrained providers. Home care counseling was associated with provider training status (41.3% by trained and 24.5% by untrained). Essential oral and pre-referral injectable medicine and equipment/supplies were available in 66%, 23%, and 45% of health facilities, respectively. IMCI training improved assessment, rational use of antibiotics and counseling; further investment in IMCI in Afghanistan, continuing provider capacity building and supportive supervision for improved quality of care and counseling for sick children is needed, especially given high burden treatable childhood illness.

  5. [Healthcare manager and project management of quality improvement : analysis of managerial action using a professional hands-on training in project management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Pierre-Philippe; Reverdy, Thomas; Valette, Annick; François, Patrice

    2016-07-01

    Introduction : project management is on the expected proficiencies for head nurses. Context : The work on the organizations’ improvement carried out by head nurses, is rarely covered in the literature. Objectives : to follow the implementation of actions from projects led by head nurses and to analyze the parameters of success. Method : for a year, an intervention study has followed 17 projects initiating improvement measures. Semistructured interviews were conducted with health-care teams and managers. All of them reported the results of the implementation of each measure as an operational improvement. A mixed analysis containing a logistic regression investigated associations between the result of the action and the various contextual characteristics. Results : this study involved 111 actions. 71 % of them concluded an operational improvement. The organizational and supporting actions had a high success rate, which decreased when hazards were not managed by healthcare managers. Discussion : this study highlights the place of strategies through the implementing methods and the chosen actions. Recommendations are made in order to promote a collective assessment. Conclusion : scientific approaches are proposed to discuss the organizational work.

  6. Biomedical waste management: Study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  7. Factors Associated with Women’s Chronic Disease Management: Associations of Healthcare Frustrations, Physician Support, and Self-Care Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lee Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research emphasizes the importance of reducing healthcare frustrations and enhancing physician supports to help patients engage in recommended healthcare regimens. However, less is known about how these factors are associated with aging women’s knowledge about self-care behavior. This study examined the sociodemographics, health indicators, healthcare-related frustrations, and perceptions of physician support associated with middle-aged and older adult females’ self-reported need for help to learn how to take better care of their health. Data were analyzed from 287 females with one or more chronic conditions who completed The National Council on Aging (NCOA Chronic Care Survey. A logistic regression model was developed. Women who were non-White (OR=2.26, P=0.049 were more likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Those who had some college education or more (OR=0.55, P=0.044 and lower healthcare-related frustrations (OR=0.44, P=0.017 and perceived to have more physician support (OR=0.49, P=0.033 were less likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Findings can inform the planning, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of evidence-based self-management programs for middle-aged and older women within and outside of clinical settings.

  8. In the mind of the beholder : perspectives on healthcare managers' leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Lornudd, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    The managerial mission in healthcare services today entails challenging conditions that have implications for healthcare managers’ leadership. These circumstances, in combination with reports in the literature describing a consistent association between leadership and employee outcomes, have heightened the need for research on how healthcare manager’s leadership relates to psychosocial aspects in the workplace and how leadership can be supported. The present studies aimed to ad...

  9. [Healthcare delivery to patients with heart failure: from healthcare networks to management of end-stage disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cester, Alberto; Scevola, Moreno; Buoso, Sandro

    2013-03-01

    In geriatrics, end-stage chronic heart failure, old age and death are often an almost obliged clinical and existential continuum. Accompanying these patients to death with dignity and relief is an issue deserving a high degree of cultural attention not only by our discipline, but also by all other specialties and scientific societies that are devoted to the management of terminal illness. Involved professionals are too often in troubles in identifying the conditions that mark the boundary between continuing or stopping the specific treatments. Management of terminal illness requires the ability to identify and treat the complexity of patient's frailty; to discern when continuing therapy is still appropriate; to prepare young physicians in the soft communicative modalities needed to cope with such delicate problems; to face with patient's family expectations in front of death. It is also necessary to distinguish technocratic medicine from humanistic medicine, including human, cultural and overall coordinating capabilities and sharing these capabilities with all actors involved, focusing attention mainly on patient's dignity. Advanced or end-stage chronic heart failure is a peculiar clinical arena that requires close interaction among hospitals, outpatient health district services, and families' needs, expectations and support. Multidimensional assessment teams, firstly introduced into daily clinical practice by geriatricians, address individualized choices and share part of knowledge with cardiology teams. Dichotomy and cultural and scientific debate between aggressive treatment and euthanasia should not prevent from discussing crucial issues such as therapy withdrawal.

  10. Migration of the Japanese healthcare enterprise from a financial to integrated management: strategy and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M

    2001-01-01

    The Hospital Information System (HIS) has been positioned as the hub of the healthcare information management architecture. In Japan, the billing system assigns an "insurance disease names" to performed exams based on the diagnosis type. Departmental systems provide localized, departmental services, such as order receipt and diagnostic reporting, but do not provide patient demographic information. The system above has many problems. The departmental system's terminals and the HIS's terminals are not integrated. Duplicate data entry introduces errors and increases workloads. Order and exam data managed by the HIS can be sent to the billing system, but departmental data cannot usually be entered. Additionally, billing systems usually keep departmental data for only a short time before it is deleted. The billing system provides payment based on what is entered. The billing system is oriented towards diagnoses. Most importantly, the system is geared towards generating billing reports rather than at providing high-quality patient care. The role of the application server is that of a mediator between system components. Data and events generated by system components are sent to the application server that routes them to appropriate destinations. It also records all system events, including state changes to clinical data, access of clinical data and so on. Finally, the Resource Management System identifies all system resources available to the enterprise. The departmental systems are responsible for managing data and clinical processes at a departmental level. The client interacts with the system via the application server, which provides a general set of system-level functions. The system is implemented using current technologies CORBA and HTTP. System data is collected by the application server and assembled into XML documents for delivery to clients. Clients can access these URLs using standard HTTP clients, since each department provides an HTTP compliant web

  11. Challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland: 2. On-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; More, Simon J; Morton, David B; Hanlon, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in recent years as a significant public health threat, which requires both an ethical and a scientific approach. In a recent Policy Delphi study, on-farm use of antimicrobials was a key concern identified by veterinary professionals in Ireland. In this case study (the second in a series of three resulting from a research workshop exploring the challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland; the other two case studies investigate clinical veterinary services and emergency/casualty slaughter certification) we aim to provide a value-based reflection on the constraints and possible opportunities for responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials in Ireland. Using a qualitative focus group approach, this study gathered evidence from relevant stakeholders, namely veterinarians working in public and private organisations, a representative from the veterinary regulatory body, a dairy farmer and a general medical practitioner. Three overarching constraints to prudent on-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials emerged from the thematic analysis: 'Defective regulations', 'Lack of knowledge and values' regarding farmers and vets and 'Farm-centred concerns', including economic and husbandry concerns. Conversely, three main themes which reflect possible opportunities to the barriers were identified: 'Improved regulations', 'Education' and 'Herd health management'. Five main recommendations arose from this study based on the perspectives of the study participants including: a) the potential for regulatory change to facilitate an increase in the number of yearly visits of veterinarians to farms and to implement electronic prescribing and shorter validity of prescriptions; b) a 'One Health' education plan; c) improved professional guidance on responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials; d) improved on-farm herd health management practices; and e) the promotion of a 'One Farm-One Vet' policy. These findings may assist Veterinary Council of

  12. Automated telephone communication systems for preventive healthcare and management of long-term conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Pawel; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Ryan, Rebecca; Gunn, Laura H; Felix, Lambert M; Pappas, Yannis; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Julious, Steven A; Xiang, Liming; Oldenburg, Brian; Car, Josip

    2016-12-14

    Automated telephone communication systems (ATCS) can deliver voice messages and collect health-related information from patients using either their telephone's touch-tone keypad or voice recognition software. ATCS can supplement or replace telephone contact between health professionals and patients. There are four different types of ATCS: unidirectional (one-way, non-interactive voice communication), interactive voice response (IVR) systems, ATCS with additional functions such as access to an expert to request advice (ATCS Plus) and multimodal ATCS, where the calls are delivered as part of a multicomponent intervention. To assess the effects of ATCS for preventing disease and managing long-term conditions on behavioural change, clinical, process, cognitive, patient-centred and adverse outcomes. We searched 10 electronic databases (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; MEDLINE; Embase; PsycINFO; CINAHL; Global Health; WHOLIS; LILACS; Web of Science; and ASSIA); three grey literature sources (Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Theses, Australasian Digital Theses); and two trial registries (www.controlled-trials.com; www.clinicaltrials.gov) for papers published between 1980 and June 2015. Randomised, cluster- and quasi-randomised trials, interrupted time series and controlled before-and-after studies comparing ATCS interventions, with any control or another ATCS type were eligible for inclusion. Studies in all settings, for all consumers/carers, in any preventive healthcare or long term condition management role were eligible. We used standard Cochrane methods to select and extract data and to appraise eligible studies. We included 132 trials (N = 4,669,689). Studies spanned across several clinical areas, assessing many comparisons based on evaluation of different ATCS types and variable comparison groups. Forty-one studies evaluated ATCS for delivering preventive healthcare, 84 for managing long-term conditions, and seven studies for appointment reminders

  13. Adopting best practices: "Agility" moves from software development to healthcare project management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca; Hunt, Eleanor; Sproat, Sara Breckenridge

    2006-01-01

    It is time for a change in mindset in how nurses operationalize system implementations and manage projects. Computers and systems have evolved over time from unwieldy mysterious machines of the past to ubiquitous computer use in every aspect of daily lives and work sites. Yet, disconcertingly, the process used to implement these systems has not evolved. Technology implementation does not need to be a struggle. It is time to adapt traditional plan-driven implementation methods to incorporate agile techniques. Agility is a concept borrowed from software development and is presented here because it encourages flexibility, adaptation, and continuous learning as part of the implementation process. Agility values communication and harnesses change to an advantage, which facilitates the natural evolution of an adaptable implementation process. Specific examples of agility in an implementation are described, and plan-driven implementation stages are adapted to incorporate relevant agile techniques. This comparison demonstrates how an agile approach enhances traditional implementation techniques to meet the demands of today's complex healthcare environments.

  14. E-procurement and automatic identification: enhancing supply chain management in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D; Flanegin, Frank R

    2004-01-01

    The concepts of automated e-procurement, or electronic B2B (business-to-business) trade, are grounded in the strategic leveraging of both tangible/intangible assets for successful implementation and execution of electronic trade, resulting in significant financial benefits for firms. Some of the major reasons for this growth include significant process savings from automation, compliance, and purchasing advantage; and reduced costs that organisations can experience by conducting transactions electronically. Although these are the basic benefits associated with generic e-commerce strategies, a majority of these B2B transactions have focused on the purchase of indirect materials (especially office products and travel services). In fact, more than 93% of medical supplies on hospital shelves appear to have universal product numbers on them--at least while still in their boxes and there is a great potential for huge savings in e-procurement in the healthcare field. However, other types of supply chain-related purchases, including maintenance, repair, and operating and replacement parts, and direct material purchases, are becoming more important operational management considerations. In addition, several other key considerations are: existing procurement strategy, the vendor, technology, suppliers, and total costs of ownership. Companies need to analyse their current procurement strategy before developing an e-procurement plan.

  15. VIKOR method with enhanced accuracy for multiple criteria decision making in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang-Lin; Li, Dan-Dan; Yang, Yi-Bin

    2013-04-01

    Višekriterijumsko kompromisno rangiranje (VIKOR) method is one of the commonly used multi criteria decision making (MCDM) methods for improving the quality of decision making. VIKOR has an advantage in providing a ranking procedure for positive attributes and negative attributes when it is used and examined in decision support. However, we noticed that this method may failed to support an objective result in medical field because most medical data have normal reference ranges (e.g., for normally distributed data: NRR ∈ [μ ± 1.96σ], this limitation shows a negative effect on the acceptance of it as an effective decision supporting method in medical decision making. This paper proposes an improved VIKOR method with enhanced accuracy (ea-VIKOR) to make it suitable for such data in medical field by introducing a new data normalization method taking the original distance to the normal reference range (ODNRR) into account. In addition, an experimental example was presented to demonstrate efficiency and feasibility of the ea-VIKOR method, the results demonstrate the ability of ea-VIKOR to deal with moderate data and support the decision making in healthcare care management. For this reason, the ea-VIKOR should be considered for use as a decision support tool for future study.

  16. Reflections on 'medical tourism' from the 2016 Global Healthcare Policy and Management Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Ormond, Meghann; Jin, Ki Nam

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016, the Global Healthcare Policy and Management Forum was held at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. The goal of the forum was to discuss the role of the state in regulating and supporting the development of medical tourism. Forum attendees came from 10 countries. In this short report article, we identify key lessons from the forum that can inform the direction of future scholarly engagement with medical tourism. In so doing, we reference on-going scholarly debates about this global health services practice that have appeared in multiple venues, including this very journal. Key questions for future research emerging from the forum include: who should be meaningfully involved in identifying and defining categories of those travelling across borders for health services and what risks exist if certain voices are underrepresented in such a process; who does and does not 'count' as a medical tourist and what are the implications of such quantitative assessments; why have researchers not been able to address pressing knowledge gaps regarding the health equity impacts of medical tourism; and how do national-level polices and initiatives shape the ways in which medical tourism is unfolding in specific local centres and clinics? This short report as an important time capsule that summarises the current state of medical tourism research knowledge as articulated by the thought leaders in attendance at the forum while also pushing for research growth.

  17. The electronic health record as a healthcare management strategy and implications for obstetrics and gynecologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Matthew; Hom, Jason; Sharp, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    To review the current trends, utilities, impacts and strategy for electronic health records (EHRs) as related to obstetrics and gynecology. Adoption and utilization of EHRs are increasing rapidly but variably, given pressures of financial incentives, policy and technological advancement. Adoption is outpacing published evidence, but there is a growing body of descriptive literature regarding incentives, benefits, risks and costs of adoption and utilization. Further, there is a rising body of evidence that EHRs can bring benefits to processes and outcomes, and that their implementation can be considered as a healthcare management strategy. Obstetrics and gynecology practices have specific needs, which must be addressed in the adoption of such technology. Specialty specific literature is sparse but should be considered as part of any strategy aimed at achieving quality improvement and practice behavior change. Obstetrics and gynecologic practice presents unique challenges to the effective adoption and use of EHR technologies, but there is promise as the technologies, integration and usability are rapidly improving. This technology will have an increasing impact on the practice of obstetrics and gynecology in the coming years.

  18. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective: the role of leadership and workforce flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, L.; Aij, K.H.; Simons, F.; van der Eng, N.; ten Have, W.D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change

  19. Predicting Personal Healthcare Management: Impact of Individual Characteristics on Patient Use of Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan Heath

    2017-01-01

    The use of health information and health information technology by consumers is a major factor in the current healthcare systems' effort to address issues related to quality, cost, and access. Patient engagement in the healthcare process through access to information related to diagnoses, procedures, and treatment has the potential to improve…

  20. Managing multiple projects: a literature review of setting priorities and a pilot survey of healthcare researchers in an academic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robert Borden; Campbell, Kaitryn; O'Reilly, Daria; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Bowen, Jim; Blackhouse, Gord; Goerre, Ron

    2007-05-16

    To summarize and then assess with a pilot study the use of published best practice recommendations for priority setting during management of multiple healthcare research projects, in a resource-constrained environment. Medical, economic, business, and operations literature was reviewed to summarize and develop a survey to assess best practices for managing multiple projects. Fifteen senior healthcare research project managers, directors, and faculty at an urban academic institution were surveyed to determine most commonly used priority rules, ranking of rules, characteristics of their projects, and availability of resources. Survey results were compared to literature recommendations to determine use of best practices. Seven priority-setting rules were identified for managing multiple projects. Recommendations on assigning priorities by project characteristics are presented. In the pilot study, a large majority of survey respondents follow best practice recommendations identified in the research literature. However, priority rules such as Most Total Successors (MTS) and Resource Scheduling Method (RSM) were used "very often" by half of the respondents when better performing priority rules were available. Through experience, project managers learn to manage multiple projects under resource constraints. Best practice literature can assist project managers in priority setting by recommending the most appropriate priority given resource constraints and project characteristics. There is room for improvement in managing multiple projects.

  1. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  2. [Primary Healthcare Reform in Portugal on two fronts: autonomous family healthcare units and management of groupings of Health Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisco, Luis

    2011-06-01

    In 2005, Portugal began a reform of Primary Health Care. This reform process through to April 2010 is described and analyzed. During this period the Mission for Primary Health Care was responsible for conducting a profound reconfiguration. The main objectives for this reform were to improve accessibility, efficiency, quality and continuity of care and increase the satisfaction of professionals and citizens. The main features are voluntary adhesion, teamwork, mandatory information system, performance-sensitive payment, contracting and evaluation. The reconfiguration of health centers was two pronged. First, there was the formation of small autonomous functional units, known as Family Health Units (USF) providing services with proximity and quality. The second measure involved the aggregation of resources and management structures, groups of health centers (ACES), seeking to achieve efficiency and economies of scale. The FHU proved to offer simultaneously more efficiency, accessibility, better working environment, greater citizen satisfaction, namely better quality. The importance of strong political support, the creation of a structure responsible for the design and implementation of reform and good liaison with the media are stressed.

  3. Healthcare professionals and managers' participation in developing an intervention: A pre-intervention study in the elderly care context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Howard

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to increase the chances of success in new interventions in healthcare, it is generally recommended to tailor the intervention to the target setting and the target professionals. Nonetheless, pre-intervention studies are rarely conducted or are very limited in scope. Moreover, little is known about how to integrate the results of a pre-intervention study into an intervention. As part of a project to develop an intervention aimed at improving care for the elderly in France, a pre-intervention study was conducted to systematically gather data on the current practices, issues, and expectations of healthcare professionals and managers in order to determine the defining features of a successful intervention. Methods A qualitative study was carried out from 2004 to 2006 using a grounded theory approach and involving a purposeful sample of 56 healthcare professionals and managers in Paris, France. Four sources of evidence were used: interviews, focus groups, observation, and documentation. Results The stepwise approach comprised three phases, and each provided specific results. In the first step of the pre-intervention study, we gathered data on practices, perceived issues, and expectations of healthcare professionals and managers. The second step involved holding focus groups in order to define the characteristics of a tailor-made intervention. The third step allowed validation of the findings. Using this approach, we were able to design and develop an intervention in elderly care that met the professionals' and managers' expectations. Conclusion This article reports on an in-depth pre-intervention study that led to the design and development of an intervention in partnership with local healthcare professionals and managers. The stepwise approach represents an innovative strategy for developing tailored interventions, particularly in complex domains such as chronic care. It highlights the usefulness of seeking out the

  4. Telemedicine in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mars

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary surgeons have a long tradition of consulting one another about problem cases and many have unwittingly practised telemedicine when discussing cases by telephone or by sending laboratory reports by telefax. Specific veterinary telemedicine applications have been in use since the early 1980s, but little research has been undertaken in this field. The Pubmed and CAB International databases were searched for the following Boolean logic-linked keywords; veterinary AND telemedicine, veterinary AND telecare, animal AND telemedicine, animal AND telecare and veterinary AND e-mail and an additional search was made of the worldwide web, using Google Scholar. This returned 25 papers which were reviewed. Of these only 2 report research. Sixteen papers had no references and 1 author was associated with 13 papers. Several themes emerge in the papers reviewed. These include remarks about the use of telemedicine, the benefits that can and are derived from the use of telemedicine, areas of practice in which telemedicine is being used, ethical and legal issues around the practice of telemedicine, image standards required for telemedicine, the equipment that is required for the practice of telemedicine, advice on ways in which digital images can be obtained and educational aspects of telemedicine. These are discussed. Veterinary practice has lagged behind its human counterpart in producing research on the validity and efficacy of telemedicine. This is an important field which requires further research.

  5. An intelligent healthcare management system: a new approach in work-order prioritization for medical equipment maintenance requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Naser; Oweis, Rami; Abu Zraiq, Hamzeh; Abu Sammour, Denis

    2012-04-01

    The effective maintenance management of medical technology influences the quality of care delivered and the profitability of healthcare facilities. Medical equipment maintenance in Jordan lacks an objective prioritization system; consequently, the system is not sensitive to the impact of equipment downtime on patient morbidity and mortality. The current work presents a novel software system (EQUIMEDCOMP) that is designed to achieve valuable improvements in the maintenance management of medical technology. This work-order prioritization model sorts medical maintenance requests by calculating a priority index for each request. Model performance was assessed by utilizing maintenance requests from several Jordanian hospitals. The system proved highly efficient in minimizing equipment downtime based on healthcare delivery capacity, and, consequently, patient outcome. Additionally, a preventive maintenance optimization module and an equipment quality control system are incorporated. The system is, therefore, expected to improve the reliability of medical equipment and significantly improve safety and cost-efficiency.

  6. A management information system to plan and monitor the delivery of health-care services in government hospitals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, K V

    2004-01-01

    Governments all over the world are getting increasingly concerned about their ability to meet their social obligations in the health sector. In this paper, we discuss the design and development of a management information system (MIS) to plan and monitor the delivery of healthcare services in government hospitals in India. Our MIS design is based on an understanding of the working of several municipal, district, and state government hospitals. In order to understand the magnitude and complexity of various issues faced by the government hospitals, we analyze the working of three large tertiary care hospitals administered by the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation. The hospital managers are very concerned about the lack of hospital infrastructure and resources to provide a satisfactory level of service. Equally concerned are the government administrators who have limited financial resources to offer healthcare services at subsidized rates. A comprehensive hospital MIS is thus necessary to plan and monitor the delivery of hospital services efficiently and effectively.

  7. [The influence of leadership experience on the style of resolving management decisions by executives of healthcare institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezhnovets', T A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the influence of age and management experience of executives in healthcare institutions at the style of decision-making. The psychological study of 144 executives was conducted. We found out that the age of executives in healthcare institutions does not affect the style of managerial decision making, while experience in leadership position does. Also it was established that the more experienced leader is, the more often he will make decision in authoritative, autonomous, marginal style and the less management experience is, the more likely is the usage of indulgent and situational style. Moreover, the authoritarian style is typical for younger executives, marginal and autonomous is typical for elder executives.

  8. Solid waste management in primary healthcare centers: application of a facilitation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana Maria Maniero; Günther, Wanda Maria Risso

    2016-08-18

    to propose a tool to facilitate diagnosis, formulation and evaluation of the Waste Management Plan in Primary Healthcare Centers and to present the results of the application in four selected units. descriptive research, covering the stages of formulation /application of the proposed instrument and the evaluation of waste management performance at the units. the tool consists in five forms; specific indicators of waste generation for outpatients healthcare units were proposed, and performance indicators that give scores for compliance with current legislation. In the studied units it is generated common waste (52-60%), infectious-sharps (31-42%) and recyclable (5-17%). The average rates of generation are: 0,09kg of total waste/outpatient assistance and 0,09kg of infectious-sharps waste/outpatient procedure. The compliance with regulations, initially 26-30%, then reached 30-38% a year later. the tool showed to be easy to use, bypassing the existence of a complex range of existing regulatory requirements, allowed to identify non-conformities, pointed out corrective measures and evaluated the performance of waste management. In this sense, it contributes to decision making and management practices relating to waste, tasks usually assigned to nurses. It is recommended that the tool be applied in similar healthcare units for comparative studies, and implementation of necessary adaptations for other medical services. propor instrumento para facilitar diagnóstico, elaboração e avaliação de Plano de Gerenciamento de Resíduos em Unidades Básicas de Saúde e apresentar os resultados da aplicação em quatro unidades selecionadas. pesquisa descritiva que contemplou as etapas de construção/aplicação do instrumento proposto e a avaliação de desempenho do gerenciamento de resíduos nas unidades estudadas. geração de instrumento composto por cinco formulários; proposta de indicadores específicos de geração de resíduos para unidades assistenciais de saúde sem

  9. Capacity of middle management in health-care organizations for working with people—the case of Slovenian hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective human resources management plays a vital role in the success of health-care sector reform. Leaders are selected for their clinical expertise and not their management skills, which is often the case at the middle-management level. The purpose of this study was to examine the situation in some fields that involve working with people in health-care organizations at middle-management level. Methods The study included eight state-owned hospitals in Slovenia. A cross-sectional study included 119 middle managers and 778 employees. Quota sampling was used for the subgroups. Structured survey questionnaires were administered to leaders and employees, each consisting of 24 statements in four content sets evaluated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Respondents were also asked about the type and number of training or education programmes they had participated in over the last three years. Descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression were used. The study was conducted from March to December 2008. Results Statistically significant differences were established between leaders and employees in all content sets; no significant differences were found when comparing health-care providers and health-administration workers. Employment position was found to be a significant predictor for employee development (β = 0.273, P leader–employee relationship (β = 0.291, P management programmes less frequently than do health-administration workers. Conclusion Employee participation in change-implementation processes was low, as was awareness of the importance of employee development. Education of employees in Slovenian hospitals for leadership roles is still not perceived as a necessary investment for improving work processes. Hospitals are state owned and a national strategy should be developed on how to improve leadership and management in Slovenian hospitals. PMID:23663315

  10. Global veterinary leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G Gale; Brown, Corrie C

    2002-11-01

    The public needs no reminder that deadly infectious diseases such as FMD could emerge in any country at any moment, or that national food security could be compromised by Salmonella or Listeria infections. Protections against these risks include the knowledge that appropriate and equivalent veterinary education will enable detection and characterization of emerging disease agents, as well as an appropriate response, wherever they occur. Global veterinary leadership is needed to reduce the global threat of infectious diseases of major food animal and public health importance. We believe that the co-curriculum is an excellent way to prepare and train veterinarians and future leaders who understand and can deal with global issues. The key to the success of the program is the veterinarian's understanding that there is a cultural basis to the practice of veterinary medicine in any country. The result will be a cadre of veterinarians, faculty, and other professionals who are better able (language and culture) to understand the effects of change brought about by free trade and the importance of interdisciplinary and institutional relationships to deal effectively with national and regional issues of food safety and security. New global veterinary leadership programs will build on interests, experience, ideas, and ambitions. A college that wishes to take advantage of this diversity must offer opportunities that interest veterinarians throughout their careers and that preferably connect academic study with intensive experiential training in another country. At its best, the global veterinary leadership program would include a partnership between veterinarians and several international learning centers, a responsiveness to the identified international outreach needs of the profession, and attention to critical thinking and reflection. The global veterinary leadership program we have described is intended to be a set of ideas meant to promote collaboration, coalitions, and

  11. Evaluating Effectiveness of evidence Based Decision-making Educational Course on Healthcare Domain Managers based Krick-Patrick Model

    OpenAIRE

    Behrouz soltany; Abol Hassan afkar; Seyedeh Hoda Mousavi; Tahereh Khazaei; Somaieh Roohani_Majd; Mohsen Nouri; Mohsen Mohammadi; Nasim Hatefi Moadab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Now a day, Increasing growth of information and increase in complexity of jobs has lead to an increasing importance of educating employees. Toffler believes that education is the most important action and way to face great changes in future life and accepting changes.present study aims to study the effect of evidence based decision making workshop on healthcare managers by means of Krick-Patrick model. Methods and Material:present study was executed among 60 of health...

  12. [Management of malaria in Benin: evaluation of the practices of healthcare professionals following the introduction of artemisinin derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogouyemi-Hounto, A; Kinde-Gazard, D; Nahum, A; Abdillahi, A; Massougbodji, A

    2009-12-01

    In 2004 the policy for malaria management in Benin changed when the National Malaria Coordination Program (NMCP) introduced artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Up to that time, chloroquine had been used for first-line therapy against uncomplicated malaria and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine had been used in case of failure. Artemisinin derivatives have been used for monotherapy in Benin since 2002. The purpose of this transverse study carried out among public and private centers in Cotonou from March 16 to May 17, 2005 was to determine the impact of the switch to ACT on the practices of healthcare professionals. Medical centers were randomly selected from each stratum after identification and stratification of all facilities in the healthcare pyramid. A survey questionnaire was sent to healthcare workers. A total of 690 health workers responded to the questionnaire. Most responders (95.5%) were familiar with artemisinin but a lower percentage (89.6%) prescribed them. Responders were less knowledgable about ACT drugs and Coartem was the best known combination in the minds of prescribers. Biological diagnosis was available for 50% of patients. Artemisinine (derivates) were mainly prescribed as a second choice treatment and as monotherapy whether for severe or uncomplicated malaria. They were prescribed to pregnant women in 34.6% of the cases. Dosage was incorrect in 26.1% of cases in adults and 20.9% of cases in children. These findings indicate that more effort is needed to inform healthcare workers. This is especially urgent since the country is now considering revising its malaria management policy to make ACT available at all levels of the healthcare system. An effective information campaign must be set up to ensure that health workers and drug retailers throughout the country are duly informed of the new malaria treatment policy.

  13. An integrated healthcare information system for end-to-end standardized exchange and homogeneous management of digital ECG formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez, Ignacio; Alesanco, Alvaro; Kollmann, Alexander; Escayola, Javier; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Günter; García, José

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the application of the enterprise information system (EIS) paradigm to standardized cardiovascular condition monitoring. There are many specifications in cardiology, particularly in the ECG standardization arena. The existence of ECG formats, however, does not guarantee the implementation of homogeneous, standardized solutions for ECG management. In fact, hospital management services need to cope with various ECG formats and, moreover, several different visualization applications. This heterogeneity hampers the normalization of integrated, standardized healthcare information systems, hence the need for finding an appropriate combination of ECG formats and a suitable EIS-based software architecture that enables standardized exchange and homogeneous management of ECG formats. Determining such a combination is one objective of this paper. The second aim is to design and develop the integrated healthcare information system that satisfies the requirements posed by the previous determination. The ECG formats selected include ISO/IEEE11073, Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted Electrocardiography, and an ECG ontology. The EIS-enabling techniques and technologies selected include web services, simple object access protocol, extensible markup language, or business process execution language. Such a selection ensures the standardized exchange of ECGs within, or across, healthcare information systems while providing modularity and accessibility.

  14. Next-generation sequencing in veterinary medicine: how can the massive amount of information arising from high-throughput technologies improve diagnosis, control, and management of infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borm, Steven; Belák, Sándor; Freimanis, Graham; Fusaro, Alice; Granberg, Fredrik; Höper, Dirk; King, Donald P; Monne, Isabella; Orton, Richard; Rosseel, Toon

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput molecular technologies and associated bioinformatics has dramatically changed the capacities of scientists to produce, handle, and analyze large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. A clear example of this step-change is represented by the amount of DNA sequence data that can be now produced using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Similarly, recent improvements in protein and peptide separation efficiencies and highly accurate mass spectrometry have promoted the identification and quantification of proteins in a given sample. These advancements in biotechnology have increasingly been applied to the study of animal infectious diseases and are beginning to revolutionize the way that biological and evolutionary processes can be studied at the molecular level. Studies have demonstrated the value of NGS technologies for molecular characterization, ranging from metagenomic characterization of unknown pathogens or microbial communities to molecular epidemiology and evolution of viral quasispecies. Moreover, high-throughput technologies now allow detailed studies of host-pathogen interactions at the level of their genomes (genomics), transcriptomes (transcriptomics), or proteomes (proteomics). Ultimately, the interaction between pathogen and host biological networks can be questioned by analytically integrating these levels (integrative OMICS and systems biology). The application of high-throughput biotechnology platforms in these fields and their typical low-cost per information content has revolutionized the resolution with which these processes can now be studied. The aim of this chapter is to provide a current and prospective view on the opportunities and challenges associated with the application of massive parallel sequencing technologies to veterinary medicine, with particular focus on applications that have a potential impact on disease control and management.

  15. The management of risk arising from the use of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine in EU/EEA countries - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törneke, K; Torren-Edo, J; Grave, K; Mackay, D K J

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobials are essential medicines for the treatment of many microbial infections in humans and animals. Only a small number of antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action have been authorized in recent years for use in either humans or animals. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) arising from the use of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine is a concern for public health due to the detection of increasing levels of resistance in foodborne zoonotic bacteria, particularly gram-negative bacteria, and due to the detection of determinants of resistance such as Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in bacteria from animals and in foodstuffs of animal origin. The importance and the extent of the emergence and spread of AMR from animals to humans has yet to be quantified. Likewise, the relative contribution that the use of antimicrobial agents in animals makes to the overall risk to human from AMR is currently a subject of debate that can only be resolved through further research. Nevertheless, risk managers have agreed that the impact on public health of the use of antimicrobials in animals should be minimized as far as possible and a variety of measures have been introduced by different authorities in the EU to achieve this objective. This article reviews a range of measures that have been implemented within European countries to reduce the occurrence and the risk of transmission of AMR to humans following the use of antimicrobial agents in animals and briefly describes some of the alternatives to the use of antimicrobial agents that are being developed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. IT-enabled Quality Management implementations in Small Healthcare Institutions: Method and Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koen Smit; Pascal Ravesteijn; Joris Mens; Johan Versendaal; Navin Sewberath Misser

    2013-01-01

    In the dynamic environment of increasing regulations, increasing patient demand, decentralization of budgets and enforcement of efficiency, small sized healthcare institutions in the Netherlands are having a difficult time. Although these service providers are usually capable of flexibly delivering

  17. Team innovation climate and knowledge sharing among healthcare managers: mediating effects of altruistic intentions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Chao, Minston; Tseng, Hsu-Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide empirical evidence concerning the impact of team climate on knowledge sharing behavior and the mediating effects of individuals' altruistic intentions in the context of healthcare settings...

  18. Understanding frailty: a qualitative study of European healthcare policy-makers' approaches to frailty screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwyther, Holly; Shaw, Rachel; Jaime Dauden, Eva-Amparo; D'Avanzo, Barbara; Kurpas, Donata; Bujnowska-Fedak, Maria; Kujawa, Tomasz; Marcucci, Maura; Cano, Antonio; Holland, Carol

    2018-01-13

    To elicit European healthcare policy-makers' views, understanding and attitudes about the implementation of frailty screening and management strategies and responses to stakeholders' views. Thematic analysis of semistructured qualitative interviews. European healthcare policy departments. Seven European healthcare policy-makers representing the European Union (n=2), UK (n=2), Italy (n=1), Spain (n=1) and Poland (n=1). Participants were sourced through professional networks and the European Commission Authentication Service website and were required to be in an active healthcare policy or decision-making role. Seven themes were identified. Our findings reveal a 'knowledge gap', around frailty and awareness of the malleability of frailty, which has resulted in restricted ownership of frailty by specialists. Policy-makers emphasised the need to recognise frailty as a clinical syndrome but stressed that it should be managed via an integrated and interdisciplinary response to chronicity and ageing. That is, through social co-production. This would require a culture shift in care with redeployment of existing resources to deliver frailty management and intervention services. Policy-makers proposed barriers to a culture shift, indicating a need to be innovative with solutions to empower older adults to optimise their health and well-being, while still fully engaging in the social environment. The cultural acceptance of an integrated care system theme described the complexities of institutional change management, as well as cultural issues relating to working democratically, while in signposting adult care , the need for a personal navigator to help older adults to access appropriate services was proposed. Policy-makers also believed that screening for frailty could be an effective tool for frailty management. There is potential for frailty to be managed in a more integrated and person-centred manner, overcoming the challenges associated with niche ownership within the

  19. Healthcare leadership and the ethics of managing expectations of caregivers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Alister

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare providers and patients are often disappointed by the level of care public hospitals can deliver. The remedy is to lower expectations. Providers should be brought to see their obligations as only to give the best care resources allow. The public should be clearly told what care hospitals can and cannot provide and involved in decision-making. Healthcare leaders can play innovative roles in both these remedies. © 2016 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  20. Capacity of middle management in health-care organizations for working with people-the case of Slovenian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skela Savič, Brigita; Robida, Andrej

    2013-05-10

    Effective human resources management plays a vital role in the success of health-care sector reform. Leaders are selected for their clinical expertise and not their management skills, which is often the case at the middle-management level. The purpose of this study was to examine the situation in some fields that involve working with people in health-care organizations at middle-management level. The study included eight state-owned hospitals in Slovenia. A cross-sectional study included 119 middle managers and 778 employees. Quota sampling was used for the subgroups. Structured survey questionnaires were administered to leaders and employees, each consisting of 24 statements in four content sets evaluated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Respondents were also asked about the type and number of training or education programmes they had participated in over the last three years. Descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression were used. The study was conducted from March to December 2008. Statistically significant differences were established between leaders and employees in all content sets; no significant differences were found when comparing health-care providers and health-administration workers. Employment position was found to be a significant predictor for employee development (β = 0.273, P employee relationship (β = 0.291, P work (β = 0.113, P = 0.010) and employment position (β = 0.389, P Employee participation in change-implementation processes was low, as was awareness of the importance of employee development. Education of employees in Slovenian hospitals for leadership roles is still not perceived as a necessary investment for improving work processes. Hospitals are state owned and a national strategy should be developed on how to improve leadership and management in Slovenian hospitals.

  1. Ethnography in the Danish Veterinary Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Kirketerp Nielsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this project is research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based learning concept to be used in the veterinary education. Herd visits and animal contact are essential for the development of veterinary competences and skills during education. Yet veterinary students have little occasion to reach/attain a proper level of confidence in their own skills/abilities, as they have limited “training-facilities” (Kneebone & Baillie, 2008. One possible solution mightbe to provide a safe, virtual environment (game-based where students could practise interdisciplinary clinical skills in an easily-accessible, interactive setting. A playable demo using Classical Swine Fever in a pig herd as an example has been produced for this purpose. In order totailor the game concept to the specific veterinary learning environment and to ensure compliance with both learning objectives and the actual learning processes/procedures of the veterinary students, the project contains both a developmental aspect (game development and an exploration of the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context. The initial phase of the project was a preliminary exploration of the actual learning context, providing an important starting point for the upcoming phase in which I will concentrate on research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based virtual environment in this course context. In the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context of a veterinary course in Herd Health Management (Pig module,ethnographic studies have been conducted by using multiple data collection methods; participant observation, spontaneous dialogues and interviews (Borgnakke, 1996; Hammersley & Atkinson, 2007. All courserelated activities in the different learning spaces (commercial pig herds, auditoriums, post-mortem examinations, independent group work were followed.This paper will

  2. Integration of Personalized Healthcare Pathways in an ICT Platform for Diabetes Managements: A Small-Scale Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fico, Giuseppe; Fioravanti, Alessio; Arredondo, Maria Teresa; Gorman, Joe; Diazzi, Chiara; Arcuri, Giovanni; Conti, Claudio; Pirini, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    The availability of new tools able to support patient monitoring and personalized care may substantially improve the quality of chronic disease management. A personalized healthcare pathway (PHP) has been developed for diabetes disease management and integrated into an information and communication technology system to accomplish a shift from organization-centered care to patient-centered care. A small-scale exploratory study was conducted to test the platform. Preliminary results are presented that shed light on how the PHP influences system usage and performance outcomes.

  3. You never transition alone! Exploring the experiences of youth with chronic health conditions, parents and healthcare providers on self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T; Henderson, D; Stewart, D; Hlyva, O; Punthakee, Z; Gorter, J W

    2016-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fostering strategies to enable youth with chronic health conditions to work towards gradual self-management of their health is key in successful transition to adult healthcare. To date, there is limited research on self-management promotion for youth. The purpose of this study is to explore self-management from the perspectives of youth, parents and healthcare providers in transition to adult healthcare. Part of a larger longitudinal transition (TRACE-2009-2013) study, interpretive phenomenology was used to explore the meaning of the lived experiences and perceptions of youth, parents, and healthcare providers about transition to adult healthcare. Purposeful sampling was utilized to select youth with a range of chronic health conditions from the TRACE cohort (spanning 20 diagnoses including developmental disabilities and chronic conditions), their parents and healthcare providers. The emerging three themes were: increasing independence of youth; parents as safety nets and healthcare providers as enablers and collaborators. The findings indicate that the experiences of transitioning youth, parents and service providers are interconnected and interdependent. Results support a dynamic and developmentally appropriate approach when working with transitioning youth and parents in practice. As youth depend on parents and healthcare providers for support in taking charge of their own health, parents and healthcare providers must work together to enable youth for self-management. At a policy level, adequate funding, institutional support and accreditation incentives are recommended to allow for designated time for healthcare providers to foster self-management skills in transitioning youth and parents. © 2016 The Authors. Child: Care, Health and Development published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diagnostic microbiology in veterinary dermatology : present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter; Stamm, Ivonne; Kopp, Peter A; Broens, Els M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314627723; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    BACKGROUND: The microbiology laboratory can be perceived as a service provider rather than an integral part of the healthcare team. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to discuss the current challenges of providing a state-of-the-art diagnostic veterinary microbiology service including the

  5. Veterinary Forensic Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney-Brant, S M

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists working in diagnostic laboratories are sometimes presented with cases involving animal poisonings that become the object of criminal or civil litigation. Forensic veterinary toxicology cases can include cases involving animal cruelty (malicious poisoning), regulatory issues (eg, contamination of the food supply), insurance litigation, or poisoning of wildlife. An understanding of the appropriate approach to these types of cases, including proper sample collection, handling, and transport, is essential so that chain of custody rules are followed and proper samples are obtained for toxicological analysis. Consultation with veterinary toxicologists at the diagnostic laboratory that will be processing the samples before, during, and after the forensic necropsy can help to ensure that the analytical tests performed are appropriate for the circumstances and findings surrounding the individual case. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. A Review of Electronic Hand Hygiene Monitoring: Considerations for Hospital Management in Data Collection, Healthcare Worker Supervision, and Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Maryanne; Govednik, John

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in U.S. acute care hospitals lead to a burden of $96-$147 billion annually on the U.S. health system and affect 1 in 20 hospital patients (Marchetti & Rossiter, 2013). Hospital managers are charged with reducing and eliminating HAIs to cut costs and improve patient outcomes. Healthcare worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) practice is the most effective means of preventing the spread of HAIs, but compliance is at or below 50% (McGuckin, Waterman, & Govednik, 2009). For managers to increase the frequency of HCW HH occurrences and improve the quality of HH performance, companies have introduced electronic technologies to assist managers in training, supervising, and gathering data in the patient care setting. Although these technologies offer valuable feedback regarding compliance, little is known in terms of capabilities in the clinical setting. Less is known about HCW or patient attitudes if the system allows feedback to be shared. Early-adopting managers have begun to examine their experiences with HH technologies and publish their findings. We review peer-reviewed research on infection prevention that focused on the capabilities of these electronic systems, as well as the related research on HCW and patient interactions with electronic HH systems. Research suggests that these systems are capable of collecting data, but the results are mixed regarding their impact on HH compliance, reducing HAIs, or both and their costs. Research also indicates that HCWs and patients may not regard the technology as positively as industry or healthcare managers may have intended. When considering the adoption of electronic HH monitoring systems, hospital administrators should proceed with caution.

  7. Swedish primary healthcare nurses' perceptions of using digital eHealth services in support of patient self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, Ulrika; Orre, Carl Johan; Isaksson, Ulf; Schimmer, Robyn; Larsson, Håkan; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2017-09-28

    Nurses have expressed doubts about the ongoing digitalisation of Swedish primary health care. Given the potential role of eHealth in primary health care, including supporting interactive self-management for people with chronic conditions, it is important to highlight nurses' experiences. This study is part of a larger project aimed at implementing person-centred interactive self-management support (iSMS) in primary health care. The aim of this study was to describe Swedish primary healthcare nurses' perceptions of using digital eHealth systems and services to support patient self-management. Focus group interviews were conducted with primary healthcare nurses (n = 20). The interview transcriptions were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged from the content analysis: caregiving in the midst of digital chaos; a lack of overview and control in daily work; and mixed feelings towards digitalisation. Each theme was subdivided into three subthemes. The results of this study provide insight into a number of concerns that stand in the way of success when it comes to the implementation and use of digital technology. If nurses are to adapt to the new policies and practices that accompany the current digitalised development in Swedish primary health care, the concept of a nurse's traditional work role needs to be amended in terms of the scope of work tasks and established views of traditional nursing. The study also highlights the need for more research to enable eHealth systems/services to be designed to fulfil multiple requirements. The digitised systems should be a tool for achieving good quality self-management support as well as giving the primary healthcare nurses adequate resources to support patients' self-management while still maintaining the values associated with person-centred care. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. The 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunney, Joan K; Kai, Chieko; Inumaru, Shigeki; Onodera, Takashi

    2012-07-15

    This special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune systems of numerous food animals and wildlife, probing basic immunity and the influence of stress, genetics, nutrition, endocrinology and reproduction. Major presentations addressed defense against pathogens and alternative control and prevention strategies including vaccines, adjuvants and novel biotherapeutics. A special Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme Sponsored Conference on "Vaccination and Diagnosis for Food Safety in Agriculture" highlighted the particular issue of "Immunology in Bovine Paratuberculosis". In April 2010 there was an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the southern part of Japan. This stimulated a special 9th IVIS session on FMD, sponsored by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) of Japan, to discuss improvements of FMD vaccines, their use in FMD control, and risk assessment for decision management. The 9th IVIS was supported by the Veterinary Immunology Committee (VIC) of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) and included workshops for its MHC and Toolkit Committees. Finally VIC IUIS presented its 2010 Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Kazuya Yamanouchi for "outstanding contributions to the veterinary immunology community" and its 2010 Distinguished Veterinary Immunologist Award to Dr. Douglas F. Antczak for "outstanding research on equine immunology". Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Lessons of history in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    The future of veterinary medicine is best understood in the context of history. What began as a profession rooted in urban centers in proximity to horses, physicians, and medical schools, was transformed into a land grant-based agricultural profession with the arrival of the internal combustion engine in the early twentieth century. Most of the United States' current veterinary colleges are still located in towns or small cities in the middle section of the country, outside the largest metropolitan areas where most veterinarians practice companion-animal medicine. Throughout veterinarian history, substantial numbers of US students have been educated in foreign colleges and this continues today, creating an even greater geographic imbalance between the veterinary educational process and US population centers and major medical schools. Three themes deserve special attention as we celebrate the profession's 150th anniversary. We must first move beyond the land-grant culture and develop a more geographically balanced approach to establishing new veterinary colleges that are also in closer association with schools of medicine and public health. We must also facilitate more opportunities for women leadership in organized veterinary medicine, in practice ownership, in academia, and in the corporate structures that educate, hire, and interface with veterinarians. Finally, we need to expand our understanding of One Health to include the concept of zooeyia (the role of animals in promoting human health), as well as continue to emphasize veterinarians' special roles in the control and management of zoonotic diseases and in advancing comparative medicine in the age of the genome.

  10. Cultural competency as it intersects with racial/ethnic, linguistic, and class disparities in managed healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana, Ruth Enid; Molnar, Christine; Munoz, Helen Baras; Lopez, Debbie Salas

    2004-09-01

    Culture in and of itself is not the most central variable in the patient-provider encounter. The effect of culture is most pronounced when it intersects with low education, low literacy skills, limited proficiency in English, culture-specific values regarding the authority of the physician, and poor assertiveness skills. These dimensions require attention in Medicaid managed care settings. However, the promise of better-coordinated and higher quality care for low-income and working-poor racial/ethnic populations--at a lower cost to government--has yet to be fully realized. This paper identifies strategies to reduce disparities in access to healthcare that call for partnerships across government agencies and between federal and state governments, provider institutions, and community organizations. Lessons learned from successful precedents must drive the development of new programs in Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) to reduce disparities. Collection of population-based data and analyses by race, ethnicity, education level, and patient's primary language are critical steps for MCOs to better understand their patients' healthcare status and improve their care. Research and experience have shown that by acknowledging the unique healthcare conditions of low-income racial and ethnic minority populations and by recruiting and hiring primary care providers who have a commitment to treat underserved populations, costs are reduced and patients are more satisfied with the quality of care.

  11. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. Keywords: Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine, Integrative veterinary course, Integrative veterinary curriculum, Integrative veterinary medicine, ...

  12. Beyond feedback control: the interactive use of performance management systems. Implications for process innovation in Italian healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, Chiara; Mella, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how the use of performance management systems affects managers' perception of satisfaction, the effectiveness of the control system and the performance related to process innovation. An exploratory empirical research has been conducted on 85 managers operating in Italian healthcare organizations. Empirical findings put forward that the interactive--as opposed to diagnostic--use of performance management systems enhances managerial satisfaction with the control system and managerial perception of effectiveness. The present study then showed that it is not the control itself that is an obstacle to innovation in organizations in general (and in health organizations in particular) but the diagnostic use of the control mechanisms, which impedes the interaction between the control personnel and those subject to the control. Finally, this paper addresses managerial implications and further research avenues. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Quality documentation challenges for veterinary clinical pathology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchini, Federico; Freeman, Kathleen P

    2008-05-01

    An increasing number of veterinary laboratories worldwide have obtained or are seeking certification based on international standards, such as the International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission 17025. Compliance with any certification standard or quality management system requires quality documentation, an activity that may present several unique challenges in the case of veterinary laboratories. Research specifically addressing quality documentation is conspicuously absent in the veterinary literature. This article provides an overview of the quality system documentation needed to comply with a quality management system with an emphasis on preparing written standard operating procedures specific for veterinary laboratories. In addition, the quality documentation challenges that are unique to veterinary clinical pathology laboratories are critically evaluated against the existing quality standards and discussed with respect to possible solutions and/or recommended courses of action. Documentation challenges include the establishment of quality requirements for veterinary tests, the use or modification of human analytic methods for animal samples, the limited availability of quality control materials satisfactory for veterinary clinical pathology laboratories, the limited availability of veterinary proficiency programs, and the complications in establishing species-specific reference intervals.

  14. The project management office: transforming healthcare in the context of a hospital redevelopment project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Marie-Claire; Marchionni, Caroline; Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Aubry, Monique

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that classifying projects into a typology allows improved allocation of resources and promotes project success. However, a typology of healthcare projects has yet to be developed. The projects encountered by the Transition Support Office at the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, where a major redevelopment project is under way, were classified into a typology unique to the healthcare context. Examples of the 3 project types, Process, People, and Practice, are provided to clarify the specific support strategies and context-adapted interventions that were instrumental to their success.

  15. Factors influencing healthcare service quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production o...

  16. New oral targeted therapies for metastatic breast cancer disrupt the traditional patients' management-A healthcare providers' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E; Pourtau, L; Di Palma, M; Delaloge, S

    2017-11-01

    Although a cure still cannot be expected for metastatic breast cancer, thanks to progressive advances in treatments, life expectancy has been increasing over the past 15 years. This study aims to present the impact on the organisation of patients' management of newly released oral targeted therapies dedicated to metastatic breast cancer and the obstacles to their diffusion. Our work is based on the analysis of 40 semi-structured interviews, conducted with oncology healthcare professionals in three regions of France (2015-2016). It shows three main results. First, the prescription of an oral targeted therapy requires greater collaboration between healthcare professionals than traditional intravenous oncology drugs, which may be challenging. Second, there remain many barriers to the dissemination of oral targeted therapies. Third, taking an oral targeted therapy keeps the patient away from the hospital facility and asks for a strong therapeutic alliance. The management of oral targeted therapies is time-consuming for medical oncologists and disrupts the traditional care pathway. The multiplication of actors involved in patients' management reinforces the slowdown in the deployment and acceptance of therapeutic innovations. More players equal a higher risk of slowdown. Questioning and re-designing hospital organisation and management modalities towards this type of care are critical. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Chronic disease management: a qualitative study investigating the barriers, facilitators and incentives perceived by Swiss healthcare stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvergeon, Stéphanie; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2012-06-22

    Chronic disease management has been implemented for some time in several countries to tackle the increasing burden of chronic diseases. While Switzerland faces the same challenge, such initiatives have only emerged recently in this country. The aim of this study is to assess their feasibility, in terms of barriers, facilitators and incentives to participation. To meet our aim, we used qualitative methods involving the collection of opinions of various healthcare stakeholders, by means of 5 focus groups and 33 individual interviews. All the data were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was then performed and five levels were determined to categorize the data: political, financial, organisational/ structural, professionals and patients. Our results show that, at each level, stakeholders share common opinions towards the feasibility of chronic disease management in Switzerland. They mainly mention barriers linked to the federalist political organization as well as to financing such programs. They also envision difficulties to motivate both patients and healthcare professionals to participate. Nevertheless, their favourable attitudes towards chronic disease management as well as the fact that they are convinced that Switzerland possesses all the resources (financial, structural and human) to develop such programs constitute important facilitators. The implementation of quality and financial incentives could also foster the participation of the actors. Even if healthcare stakeholders do not have the same role and interest regarding chronic diseases, they express similar opinions on the development of chronic disease management in Switzerland. Their overall positive attitude shows that it could be further implemented if political, financial and organisational barriers are overcome and if incentives are found to face the scepticism and non-motivation of some stakeholders.

  18. Chronic disease management: a qualitative study investigating the barriers, facilitators and incentives perceived by Swiss healthcare stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauvergeon Stéphanie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management has been implemented for some time in several countries to tackle the increasing burden of chronic diseases. While Switzerland faces the same challenge, such initiatives have only emerged recently in this country. The aim of this study is to assess their feasibility, in terms of barriers, facilitators and incentives to participation. Methods To meet our aim, we used qualitative methods involving the collection of opinions of various healthcare stakeholders, by means of 5 focus groups and 33 individual interviews. All the data were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was then performed and five levels were determined to categorize the data: political, financial, organisational/ structural, professionals and patients. Results Our results show that, at each level, stakeholders share common opinions towards the feasibility of chronic disease management in Switzerland. They mainly mention barriers linked to the federalist political organization as well as to financing such programs. They also envision difficulties to motivate both patients and healthcare professionals to participate. Nevertheless, their favourable attitudes towards chronic disease management as well as the fact that they are convinced that Switzerland possesses all the resources (financial, structural and human to develop such programs constitute important facilitators. The implementation of quality and financial incentives could also foster the participation of the actors. Conclusions Even if healthcare stakeholders do not have the same role and interest regarding chronic diseases, they express similar opinions on the development of chronic disease management in Switzerland. Their overall positive attitude shows that it could be further implemented if political, financial and organisational barriers are overcome and if incentives are found to face the scepticism and non-motivation of some stakeholders.

  19. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    um chafe

    191-203. FACULTY OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. USMANU DANFODIYO UNIVERSITY. P.M.B. 2346, SOKOTO. NIGERIA. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences. ISSN 1595-093X. Nwanta et al. /Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences (2008). 7(2): 42-45. Field trial of Malaysian thermostable Newcastle disease vaccine in.

  20. African Journals Online: Veterinary Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... ... of the Kenya Veterinary Association. It publishes original papers in English, within the whole field of animal science and veterinary medicine and those addressing legal and policy issues related to the veterinary profession. The journal accepts articles and reports in the areas of Anatomy and Histology, ...

  1. Veterinary management of snake reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Scott J

    2002-09-01

    The reptile veterinarian should approach the breeder with a comprehensive plan involving a review of proper husbandry, nutrition, record keeping, and a thorough prebreeding evaluation of the snakes. In addition, an evaluation of the reproductive strategy, assistance with confirming and monitoring gestation, and a review of potential reproductive complications will help to prepare the snake owner for a successful breeding season.

  2. HOMEOPATHY IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Šuran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathy is an alternative medicine practice, which has been used for the past 200 years but, until now, scientific methods have not proven its effectiveness. The use of highly diluted natural substances based on the principal that similar heals similar is contrary to the scientific theories of the conventional medicine. In veterinary medicine homeopathic remedies are most frequently used for chronic conditions of small animals, but also their application in organic farming is increasing. Minimal number of clinical studies about the use of homeopathy in veterinary medicine has been published in scientific literature. The results of effectiveness are contradictory, which can be explained by being a consequence of different research methodologies. However, there is a significant inverse proportionality between the quality of research and results that approve of the use of homeopathy. In evidence based veterinary medicine scientific approach is fundamental for objective diagnostics and treatment prescription, and homeopathy is an excellent teaching model for possible methodological failures in scientific research. Key words: homeopathy, alternative medicine, evidence based veterinary medicine

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria; 2Department of Animal Health .... and Tucker, 2004). Even for animals for which direct observation of intraocular structures is possible, ultrasonography may be helpful for tumor identification, ..... determination of the size of eye prosthesis in.

  4. ,3. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Vol 34 pi res-sea. Epizootiologicul Survey of Bovine Brucellosis in. Nomadic Pastoral ... brucellosis in the pastoral herds of Niger State despite its high cattle population and no research has ..... Brucella abortus infection in Cattle in Chile. Archivos de Med.Veterin.. 27: 45-50. ROTH, F., ZINSSTAG ...

  5. Veterinary Replicon Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, Mia C.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is essential in livestock farming and in companion animal ownership. Nucleic acid vaccines based on DNA or RNA provide an elegant alternative to those classical veterinary vaccines that have performed suboptimally. Recent advances in terms of rational design, safety, and efficacy have

  6. . Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leptospirosis. Case report. An 1 1 year old male Alsatian dog was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the. University of lbadan (VTH-Ul) with a hist01y of anorexia, weakness and exercise intolerance of5 days duration. On clinical examination, the rectal temperature was normal andlung auscultation revealed a ...

  7. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. This journal did not publish any issues between 2002 and 2015 but has been revived and and it actively accepting papers ...

  8. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    according to International guiding principles for biochemical research involving animals. (C. I .O. M .S .1985). Source of Trypanosomes. Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federe strain) used for the study was obtained from donor rats maintained at the postgraduate laboratory of the Department of Veterinary. Microbiology and ...

  9. '*Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    '*Nigerian Veterinary Journal. ~. Vol35 (1)9~8· 955. ARTICLE. Prevalence of Aeromonas hydrophila. Isolates in cultured and Feral Clarias gariepinus of the Kainji Lake Area, Nigeria,. OMEJE, V.O.' and CHUKWU, C.C.. Aquaculture Programme. National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries Researcl1. PMB 6006, New Bussa, ...

  10. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Although the safety profile of short term dexamethasone treatment has been established, there has been ... Although low-dose dexamethasone treatment has been used in veterinary and human clinics for many years and produced no severe ..... in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PcOS) (Keay et al., 2001).

  11. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  12. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    prevalence of diseases and available veterinary services were noticed to be present in these communities. The draught animal survival ability rather ... labour in farming and transportation. (Chantalakhana and Bunyavejehewin, 1994) ..... spreading of these diseases such as. Babesiosis and Anaplasmosis to these animals.

  13. g Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ovemight in a cool box. Serum was extracted using a plastic micropipette and transferred into sample bottles and was frozen until tested. Detection of antibodies to N DV. Antigen. Newcastle disease virus LaSota strain obtained from the National Veterinary Research Institute. (NVRI), Vom, was used as antigen for HI-test.

  14. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., March 2017. Vol 38 (1): 57-68. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. An Audit of Castration of Male Dogs in Enugu Metropolis, South. Eastern Nigeria. Raheem, K. A.. 1Department of Veterinary ..... The internal genital organs like the prostate gland, urethra, penis, bulbis ... As biotechnology and medicine continue to advance, other ...

  15. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., June 2016. Vol. 37 (2): 82-87. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Cystographic Evaluation Post Colocystoplasty in Two Nigerian. Indigenous Dogs. Muhammad S. T.*. 1 ., Awasum C. A.. 2 ... integrity/morphology of most internal body organs or system(s) of an individual, ..... Journal of Veterinary. Medicine and Animal Health, 7(1):.

  16. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    En-Joy

    Lungworms of Small Ruminants Slaughtered in Restaurants of Ambo, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia. 1. 1. 1. 2. GAROMSSA, T. , BERSISSA, K. , DINKA, A.* and ENDRIAS, Z. 1. 2. School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University. Ambo University. *Corresponding author: dinka_ayana@yahoo.com. INTRODUCTION.

  17. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 24-31. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Occurrence of Klebsiella Species in Cultured African Catfish in Oyo. State, South-West Nigeria. Adeshina, I. 1. *; Abdrahman, S. A.. 2 and Yusuf, A. A.. 3. 1Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, ...

  18. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUMMARY. An audit of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, lbadan between 2008 and 2011 was conducted to evaluate the level of compliance with standard practices. The study involved retrospective case note audit of surgical procedures performed during the period. A total number of 108.

  19. Factors influencing the implementation of integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) by healthcare workers at public health centers & dispensaries in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplagat, Augustine; Musto, Richard; Mwizamholya, Damas; Morona, Domenica

    2014-03-25

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations International Children's Fund (UNICEF) and aims at reducing childhood morbidity and mortality in resource-limited settings including Tanzania. It was introduced in 1996 and has been scaled up in all districts in the country. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the implementation of IMCI in the health facilities in Mwanza, Tanzania since reports indicates that the guidelines are not full adhered to by the healthcare workers. A cross-sectional study design was used and a sample size of 95 healthcare workers drawn from health centers and dispensaries within Mwanza city were interviewed using self-administered questionnaires. Structured interview was also used to get views from the city IMCI focal person and the 2 facilitators. Data were analyzed using SPSS and presented using figures and tables. Only 51% of healthcare workers interviewed had been trained. 69% of trained Healthcare workers expressed understanding of the IMCI approach. Most of the respondents (77%) had a positive attitude that IMCI approach was a better approach in managing common childhood illnesses especially with the reality of resource constraint in the health facilities. The main challenges identified in the implementation of IMCI are low initial training coverage among health care workers, lack of essential drugs and supplies, lack of onsite mentoring and lack of refresher courses and regular supportive supervision. Supporting the healthcare workers through training, onsite mentoring, supportive supervision and strengthening the healthcare system through increasing access to essential medicines, vaccines, strengthening supply chain management, increasing healthcare financing, improving leadership & management were the major interventions that could assist in IMCI implementation. The healthcare workers can implement better IMCI through the

  20. Updated CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus-infected health-care providers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    This report updates the 1991 CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected health-care providers and students to reduce risk for transmitting HBV to patients during the conduct of exposure-prone invasive procedures (CDC. Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures. MMWR 1991;40[No. RR-8]). This update reflects changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in the United States and advances in the medical management of chronic HBV infection and policy directives issued by health authorities since 1991. The primary goal of this report is to promote patient safety while providing risk management and practice guidance to HBV-infected health-care providers and students, particularly those performing exposure-prone procedures such as certain types of surgery. Because percutaneous injuries sustained by health-care personnel during certain surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures provide a potential route of HBV transmission to patients as well as providers, this report emphasizes prevention of operator injuries and blood exposures during exposure-prone surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures. These updated recommendations reaffirm the 1991 CDC recommendation that HBV infection alone should not disqualify infected persons from the practice or study of surgery, dentistry, medicine, or allied health fields. The previous recommendations have been updated to include the following changes: no prenotification of patients of a health-care provider's or student's HBV status; use of HBV DNA serum levels rather than hepatitis B e-antigen status to monitor infectivity; and, for those health-care professionals requiring oversight, specific suggestions for composition of expert review panels and threshold value of serum HBV DNA considered "safe" for practice (<1,000 IU/ml). These recommendations also explicitly address the issue of medical and

  1. Cooperative innovation through a talent management pool : A qualitative study on cooperation in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Judith; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.; Paauwe, J.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the Dutch healthcare sector has been confronted with increased competition. Not only are financial resources scarce, Dutch hospitals also need to compete with other hospitals in the same geographic area to attract and retain talented employees due to considerable labour shortages.

  2. Patients, not purchases. Customer relationship management is slowly, and carefully, finding its way into healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Daphne

    2009-08-01

    Though patient satisfaction initiatives exist in healthcare, they rarely fall under the CRM moniker. Some subscription software can help hospitals track patient demographics. Building brand loyalty begins with improving patient experience. Report cards are often used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  3. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  4. Necessary organizational changes according to Burke-Litwin model in the head nurses system of management in healthcare and social welfare institutions - the Slovenia experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filej, Bojana; Skela-Savic, Brigita; Vicic, Visnja H; Hudorovic, Narcis

    2009-05-01

    To discover which changes should be implemented in the system of head nursing management in Slovenian healthcare institutions and social welfare institutions. The questionnaire was distributed to 155 head nurses of Slovenian hospitals, primary healthcare centres and social welfare institutions. The Burke-Litwin organizational change model has been used to look at which changes have to be implemented in the management system of head nurses. In hospitals head nurses have greater independent competence for planning professional training of nursing employees (psocial welfare institutions, and "system (policies and procedures)" for primary healthcare centres. According to results of our study, changes are needed in leadership and management of nursing in primary healthcare centres. In social welfare institutions changes are only required in leadership. Organizational changes are not necessary for any element of the Burke-Litwin model for hospitals.

  5. Intercultural and Interlinguistical Mediation in the Healthcare System: The Challenge of Conflict Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Farini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, young women and their children are the most important migrant users of health-care services. In particular, these people may encounter different cultural constructions of health, disease, therapy, and motherhood. The observed difficulties in intercultural communication encourage healthcare systems to promote mediation. Mediation consists of the intervention of a third person, who promotes reciprocal understanding and acceptance between participants. The research presented in this article focuses on the intercultural communication that is produced in these services between health-care personnel and migrant patients. To achieve this goal, the research aims at integrating different theoretical and methodological approaches: conversation analysis, in order to observe the interaction between healthcare personnel and patients, pointing out the cues of the participants’ turn-taking sequences; analysis of the cultural presuppositions of the healthcare system as a communication system with a specific function in society, by highlighting contextualization cues, that is, cultural presuppositions that steer the interaction system, which result from the wider social context and are cues of the cultural identities that characterize it. It was observed that the patients in most cases have very few opportunities to answer the physicians’ questions or to pose questions or doubts. Substituting the patients as the main participants in interactions, the mediator never refuses the physicians’ indications, never expresses doubts, and never asks the patients if they have some reason to doubt or refuse. In these cases, interlinguistic and intercultural mediation de-emphasizes the importance of the larger social context, of the durability of relationships between the parties, and of their social and political recognition.

  6. Self-management support to people with type 2 diabetes - a comparative study of Kaiser Permanente and the Danish Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Self-management support is considered to be an essential part of diabetes care. However, the implementation of self-management support within healthcare settings has appeared to be challenging and there is increased interest in "real world" best practice examples to guide policy efforts. In order...... to explore how different approaches to diabetes care and differences in management structure influence the provision of SMS we selected two healthcare systems that have shown to be comparable in terms of budget, benefits and entitlements. We compared the extent of SMS provided and the self-management...

  7. Assessment of health-care waste management in a humanitarian crisis: A case study of the Gaza Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniato, Marco; Tudor, Terry Louis; Vaccari, Mentore

    2016-12-01

    Health-care waste management requires technical, financial and human resources, and it is a challenge for low- and middle income countries, while it is often neglected in protracted crisis or emergency situations. Indeed, when health, safety, security or wellbeing of a community is threatened, solid waste management usually receives limited attention. Using the Gaza Strip as the case study region, this manuscript reports on health-care waste management within the context of a humanitarian crisis. The study employed a range of methods including content analyses of policies and legislation, audits of waste arisings, field visits, stakeholder interviews and evaluation of treatment systems. The study estimated a production from clinics and hospitals of 683kg/day of hazardous waste in the Gaza Strip, while the total health-care waste production was 3357 kg/day. A number of challenges was identified including lack of clear definitions and regulations, limited accurate data on which to base decisions and strategies and poor coordination amongst key stakeholders. Hazardous and non-hazardous waste was partially segregated and treatment facilities hardly used, and 75% of the hazardous waste was left untreated. Recommendations for mitigating these challenges posed to patients, staff and the community in general are suggested. The outputs are particularly useful to support decision makers, and re-organize the system according to reliable data and sound assumptions. The methodology can be replicated in other humanitarian settings, also to other waste flows, and other sectors of environmental sanitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The provincial health office as performance manager: change in the local healthcare system after Thailand's universal coverage reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaranongpai, Siranee; Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of Thailand's universal coverage healthcare reforms in a rural province, using data from field studies undertaken in 2003-2005 and 2008-2011. We focus on the strand of policy that aimed to develop primary care by allocating funds to contracting units for primary care (CUPs) responsible for managing local service networks. The two studies document a striking change in the balance of power in the local healthcare system over the 8-year period. Initially, the newly formed CUPs gained influence as 'power followed the money', and the provincial health offices (PHOs), which had commanded the service units, were left with a weaker co-ordination role. However, the situation changed as a new insurance purchaser, the National Health Security Office, took financial control and established regional outposts. National Health Security Office outposts worked with PHOs to develop rationalised management tools-strategic plans, targets, KPIs and benchmarking-that installed the PHOs as performance managers of local healthcare systems. New lines of accountability and changed budgetary systems reduced the power of the CUPs to control resource allocation and patterns of services within CUP networks. Whereas some CUPs fought to retain limited autonomy, the PHO has been able to regain much of its former control. We suggest that implementation theory needs to take a long view to capture the complexity of a major reform initiative and argue for an analysis that recognises the key role of policy networks and advocacy coalitions that span national and local levels and realign over time. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Control of the development and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of food animal origin in Japan: a new approach for risk management of antimicrobial veterinary medicinal products in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tetsuo; Hiki, Mototaka; Ozawa, Manao; Koike, Ryoji; Eguchi, Kaoru; Kawanishi, Michiko; Kojima, Akemi; Endoh, Yuuko S; Hamamoto, Shuichi; Sakai, Masato; Sekiya, Tatsuro

    2014-03-01

    Antimicrobial agents are essential for controlling bacterial disease in food-producing animals and contribute to the stable production of safe animal products. The use of antimicrobial agents in these animals affects the emergence and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and animal products. As disease-causing bacteria are often transferred from food-producing animals to humans, the food chain is considered a route of transmission for the resistant bacteria and/or resistance genes. The Food Safety Commission of Japan (FSC) has been assessing the risk posed to human health by the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria from livestock products via the food chain. In addition to the FSC's risk assessments, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries has developed risk-management guidelines to determine feasible risk-management options for the use of antimicrobial veterinary medicinal products during farming practices. This report includes information on risk assessment and novel approaches for risk management of antimicrobial veterinary medicinal products for mitigating the risk of development and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria originating from food-producing animals in Japan.

  10. Management accounting use and financial performance in public health-care organisations: evidence from the Italian National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinati, Manuela S; Anessi-Pessina, E

    2014-07-01

    Reforms of the public health-care sector have emphasised the role of management accounting (MA). However, there is little systematic evidence on its use and benefits. To fill this gap, we propose a contingency-based model which addresses three related issues, that is, whether: (i) MA use is influenced by contextual variables and MA design; (ii) top-management satisfaction with MA mediates the relationship between MA design and MA use; and (iii) financial performance is influenced by MA use. A questionnaire was mailed out to all Italian public health-care organisations. Structural equation modelling was performed to validate the research hypotheses. The response rate was 49%. Our findings suggest that: (i) cost-containment strategies encourage more sophisticated MA designs; (ii) MA use is directly and indirectly influenced by contingency, organisational, and behavioural variables; (iii) a weakly significant positive relationship exists between MA use and financial performance. These findings are relevant from the viewpoint of both top managers and policymakers. The former must make sure that MA is not only technically advanced, but also properly understood and appreciated by users. The latter need to be aware that MA may improve performance in ways and along dimensions that may not fully translate into better financial results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Business Process Management to drive the deployment of a speech recognition system in a healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, María José; Framiñán Torres, José Manuel; Parra Calderón, Carlos Luis; Del Río Ortega, Juan Antonio; Vigil Martín, Eduardo; Nieto Cervera, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    We present a methodology based on Business Process Management to guide the development of a speech recognition system in a hospital in Spain. The methodology eases the deployment of the system by 1) involving the clinical staff in the process, 2) providing the IT professionals with a description of the process and its requirements, 3) assessing advantages and disadvantages of the speech recognition system, as well as its impact in the organisation, and 4) help reorganising the healthcare process before implementing the new technology in order to identify how it can better contribute to the overall objective of the organisation.

  12. Applicability of the 5S management method for quality improvement in health-care facilities: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Shogo; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    The 5S management method (where 5S stands for sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain) was originally implemented by manufacturing enterprises in Japan. It was then introduced to the manufacturing sector in the West and eventually applied to the health sector for organizing and standardizing the workplace. 5S has recently received attention as a potential solution for improving government health-care services in low- and middle-income countries. We conducted a narrative literature review to explore its applicability to health-care facilities globally, with a focus on three aspects: (a) the context of its application, (b) its impacts, and (c) its adoption as part of government initiatives. To identify relevant research articles, we researched public health databases in English, including CINAHL, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. We found 15 of the 114 articles obtained from the search results to be relevant for full-text analysis of the context and impacts of the 5S application. To identify additional information particularly on its adoption as part of government initiatives, we also examined other types of resources including reference books, reports, didactic materials, government documents, and websites. The 15 empirical studies highlighted its application in primary health-care facilities and a wide range of hospital areas in Brazil, India, Jordan, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, the UK, and the USA. The review also found that 5S was considered to be the starting point for health-care quality improvement. Ten studies presented its impacts on quality improvements; the changes resulting from the 5S application were classified into the three dimensions of safety, efficiency, and patient-centeredness. Furthermore, 5S was adopted as part of government quality improvement strategies in India, Senegal, Sri Lanka, and Tanzania. 5S could be applied to health-care facilities regardless of locations. It could be not only a tool for health workers and

  13. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Mandigers, Paul J J; Pakozdy, Akos; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Fischer, Anea; Long, Sam; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heiun; Pumarola, Martí Batlle; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Anea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    Dogs with epilepsy are among the commonest neurological patients in veterinary practice and therefore have historically attracted much attention with regard to definitions, clinical approach and management...

  14. Veterinary teaching hospitals: current challenges and pathways for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, John A E

    2008-01-01

    University-based veterinary teaching hospitals must change to maintain their viability. A number of factors both internal and external to universities and the veterinary profession have contributed to the need for change. A task force formed by the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and the American Association of Veterinary Clinicians was convened to identify the issues and propose individual and collective strategies for the future. Primary issues include a shortage of faculty and staff, the nature of the case load, the need for fiscal management strategies, and the need to manage stakeholder expectations. The majority of the proposed strategies for the future will be managed individually by the colleges. Proposed collective strategies center on increasing the number of specialists and improving recruitment and retention of faculty and staff.

  15. Patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong: a focus group study from different healthcare professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fiona Y Y; Chan, Frank W K; You, Joyce H S; Wong, Eliza L Y; Yeoh, E K

    2011-05-24

    deterioration and to save healthcare costs. The role of pharmacists should not be limited to drugs and should be extended in the primary healthcare system. Pharmacist-led patient self-management could be developed gradually with the support of government by enhancing pharmacists' responsibilities in health services and developing public-private partnership with community pharmacists. Developing facilitating measures to enhance the implementation of the pharmacist-led approach should also be considered, such as allowing pharmacists to access electronic health records, as well as deregulation of more prescription-only medicines to pharmacy-only medicines.

  16. Analysis of integrated healthcare networks' performance: a contingency-strategic management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B Y; Wan, T T

    1999-12-01

    Few empirical analyses have been done in the organizational researches of integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) or integrated healthcare delivery systems. Using a contingency derived contact-process-performance model, this study attempts to explore the relationships among an IHN's strategic direction, structural design, and performance. A cross-sectional analysis of 100 IHNs suggests that certain contextual factors such as market competition and network age and tax status have statistically significant effects on the implementation of an IHN's service differentiation strategy, which addresses coordination and control in the market. An IHN's service differentiation strategy is positively related to its integrated structural design, which is characterized as integration of administration, patient care, and information system across different settings. However, no evidence supports that the development of integrated structural design may benefit an IHN's performance in terms of clinical efficiency and financial viability.

  17. [Patients' characteristics and clinical management of atrial fibrillation in primary healthcare in Spain: FIATE Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-Bejarano, José María; del Castillo-Rodríguez, José Carlos; Mena-González, Amparo; Alemán-Sánchez, José J; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Pastor-Fuentes, Agustín

    2013-10-05

    The main therapeutic objective in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is stroke prevention. This study is aimed to determine whether the anticoagulant therapy may be appropriate regarding to the Guidelines and patients' profile in primary healthcare in Spain. A national, multicenter, cross-sectional study of AF patients attended in primary healthcare in Spain has been conducted. The study involved 185 family physicians whose patients were randomized. A total of 3,759 AF patients were randomized from the clinical records, and 2,070 were included in the study, at an average age of 74 (11) years old (50.7% female). Most of them (78%) had permanent AF and high comorbidity rates (hypertension 75%, obesity 30%, diabetes 27%, heart failure 20%, coronary heart disease 17%, and social risk 15%). Patients diagnosed in primary healthcare were more frequently asymptomatic than in hospital setting (36%; P<.001). The therapeutic strategy was based on the heart rate control in 4 out of 5 patients. Anticoagulation therapy was widely used (84%), more frequently in patients with permanent vs. non-permanent AF (91 vs. 60%, P<.001). Follow-up and monitoring was mainly performed in primary care (72%). The anticoagulation control was suboptimal, with a 66% of the international normalized ratio (INR) in therapeutic range, dropping to 33% when the last 3 available INR were included (P<.001). A high rate of patients with anticoagulant therapy in primary healthcare has been found in this research. INR control, however, remains suboptimal. Heart rate control is the most commonly used strategy. The decision about the anticoagulation should be based on the thromboembolic risk rather than in the arrhytmia type. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Managing an online survey about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-09

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2-1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders.

  19. Cost-Effective Mobile-Based Healthcare System for Managing Total Joint Arthroplasty Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsaki, Marina; Koutras, George; Heep, Hansjoerg; Koutras, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care after total joint arthroplasty is essential to evaluate hip and knee arthroplasty outcomes, to provide information to physicians and improve arthroplasty performance, and to improve patients' health condition. In this paper, we aim to improve the communication between arthroplasty patients and physicians and to reduce the cost of follow-up controls based on mobile application technologies and cloud computing. We propose a mobile-based healthcare system that provides cost-effective follow-up controls for primary arthroplasty patients through questions about symptoms in the replaced joint, questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36v2) and the radiological examination of knee or hip joint. We also perform a cost analysis for a set of 423 patients that were treated in the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden. The estimation of healthcare costs shows significant cost savings (a reduction of 63.67% for readmission rate 5%) in both the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia when the mobile-based healthcare system is applied. We propose a mHealth system to reduce the cost of follow-up assessments of arthroplasty patients through evaluation of diagnosis, self-monitoring, and regular review of their health status.

  20. Swedish Healthcare Managers and the Media – A Study of Strategies and Support During Mass Media Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wramsten Wilmar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore how Healthcare managers handle media attention focused on themselves or their organizations and the kind of support they seek and receive at such times. Altogether 40 persons were interviewed, of which 24 were managers with recent experiences of being the focus of mass media attention and 16 were people working with or otherwise familiar with the managers. Thematic analysis was used to extract themes from the data. The results showed that managers used both problem-focused coping such as openness and emotion-focused coping as avoidance of dealing with media representatives. The data implied that earlier experience of meeting the media influenced the coping with media attention, more positive experiences contributed to more openness. The openness strategy could be proactive or reactive, and the avoidance strategy could entail either avoiding information from media or contact with reporters. The managers identified several potential sources of social support that they seek within their organizations. However, receiving support from close actors within the organizations seldom occurred. The main support came from people who were particularly trusted by the managers as information specialists or family members. The findings contribute to an understanding for the complexity of interpersonal behavior and communication. It also makes us aware of the relevance of shared strategies with regard to communication with the media.

  1. Allergens in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Janda, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Rhyner, C; Marti, E

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. © 2015 The Authors Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Adherence to Healthcare Waste Management Guidelines among Nurses and Waste Handlers in Thika Sub-county- Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njue, P Mwaniki; Cheboi, K Solomon; Shadrak, Oiye

    2015-10-01

    Despite the set guidelines on Healthcare Waste Management in Kenya, mixing of different categories of waste, crude dumping and poor incineration are still a common phenomenon in public health facilities in Thika Subcounty, Kenya. Thika Subcounty generates 560 Kilograms of healthcare waste daily, which is risk to the many patients (admission rate of 26%). This may pose a potential environmental risk and be a source of disease diffusion. This research explored the adherence to healthcare waste management waste guidelines in health care facilities among the nurses and waste handlers. This was a cross sectional survey in which mixed methods were applied. A census and proportionate random sampling method were used. Quantitative data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 20.0, while qualitative data was analyzed manually into themes. Full adherence to the seven waste disposal guidelines was low (16.3%). Knowledge on waste segregation, waste separation then disposal and means of transports were statistically significant in relation to adherence. The type of incinerator and burning status, protection maintenance and supply of adequate waste bins were also important to adherence level. Adherence level was low (16.3%,) and insignificantly different among nurses and waste handlers. From this finding, compliance remains a key challenge. Strategies targeted at contextualizing waste regulations and guidelines into local settings are necessary and important. Policy makers may design and implement standard incinerators across all the health facilities. This study is not exhaustive; therefore, it is necessary to carry out a study linking poor treatment and disposal of clinical waste to purported health outcomes in Kenya.

  3. Healthcare professionals' and policy makers' views on implementing a clinical practice guideline of hypertension management: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yein Lee

    Full Text Available Most studies have reported barriers to guideline usage mainly from doctors' perspective; few have reported the perspective of other stakeholders. This study aimed to determine the views and barriers to adherence of a national clinical practice guideline (CPG on management of hypertension from the perspectives of policymakers, doctors and allied healthcare professionals.This study used a qualitative approach with purposive sampling. Seven in depth interviews and six focus group discussions were conducted with 35 healthcare professionals (policy makers, doctors, pharmacists and nurses at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February and June 2013. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. Thematic approach was used to analyse the data.Two main themes and three sub-themes emerged from this study. The main themes were (1 variation in the use of CPG and (2 barriers to adherence to CPG. The three sub-themes for barriers were issues inherent to the CPG, systems and policy that is not supportive of CPG use, and attitudes and behaviour of stakeholders. The main users of the CPG were the primary care doctors. Pharmacists only partially use the guidelines, while nurses and policy makers were not using the CPG at all. Participants had suggested few strategies to improve usage and adherence to CPG. First, update the CPG regularly and keep its content simple with specific sections for allied health workers. Second, use technology to facilitate CPG accessibility and provide protected time for implementation of CPG recommendations. Third, incorporate local CPG in professional training, link CPG adherence to key performance indicators and provide incentives for its use.Barriers to the use of CPG hypertension management span across all stakeholders. The development and implementation of CPG focused mainly on doctors with lack of involvement of other healthcare stakeholders. Guidelines should be made simple, current

  4. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  5. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Veterinary students and non-academic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R; McConnell, Sherry L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Students in veterinary schools can experience stress in balancing the different demands on them-academic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and professional or work related-as well as managing potential conflict between animal and human interests. Practicing veterinarians report many similar stressors and reactions. Stressful stimuli produce stress reactions that can be inimical to physical and psychological well-being, and students' performance in veterinary programs can be adversely affected if they do not have coping resources. While there has been some research into stress among university students in general, and among medical students in particular, there is little on the experience of veterinary students. This article describes a study by the School of Psychology, commissioned by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, at Murdoch University in Western Australia. It was designed to investigate the levels and causes of stress among, and the frequency and type of coping strategies used by, fourth- and fifth-year students. Results indicate that the students in this cohort faced frequent stressors and felt at least moderately stressed but did not routinely and systematically use a range of coping strategies. Academic stressors and perceived responsibilities attached to moving into practical or professional areas figured strongly and were associated with higher levels of stress in the students, in particular physical sequelae. Though the numbers were small, it is of concern that some students were using measures that were potentially harmful. Some recommendations are made here about measures that veterinary programs may be able to incorporate to address stress in their students. Information is included on current strategies within the curriculum to manage potential stressful situations as part of students' professional development.

  7. Vaccine adverse events in a safety net healthcare system and a managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwaney, Komal J; Breslin, Kristin; Ross, Colleen A; Shoup, Jo Ann; Wain, Kris F; Weintraub, Eric S; McNeil, Michael M; Hambidge, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine, in a 2013 report, recommended that the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) expand collaborations to include more diversity in the study population. Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO), an established VSD site, partnered with Denver Health (DH), an integrated safety net healthcare system, to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating DH data within the VSD. Prior to incorporating the data, we examined the identification of specific vaccine associated adverse events (VAEs) in these two distinct healthcare systems. We conducted retrospective cohort analyses within KPCO and DH to compare select VAEs between the two populations. We examined the following associations between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013: Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine and febrile seizures in children 2years and younger, intussusception after rotavirus vaccine in infants 4-34weeks, syncope after adolescent vaccines (Tetanus, Diphtheria, acellular Pertussis; Meningococcal and Human Papillomavirus) in adolescents 13-17years and medically attended local reactions after pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccine in adults 65years and older. Both sites used similar data procurement methods and chart review processes. For seizures after MMR vaccine (KPCO - 3.15vs. DH - 2.97/10,000 doses) and syncope after all adolescent vaccines (KPCO - 3.0vs. DH - 2.37/10,000 doses), the chart confirmed rates were comparable at the two sites. However, for medically attended local reactions after PPSV23, there were differences in chart confirmed rates between the sites (KPCO - 31.65vs. DH - 14.90/10,000 doses). For intussusception after rotavirus vaccine, the number of cases was too low to make a valid comparison (KPCO - 0vs. DH - 0.13/10,000 doses). We demonstrated that data on important targeted VAEs can be captured at DH and rates appear similar to those at KPCO. Work is ongoing on the optimal approach to assimilate DH data as a potential safety net healthcare system in the VSD

  8. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta P. de Moraes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95 with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%. The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078. The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77, hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively, and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64. The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0-10 IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7-56 IU in the Control Group (p<0.001, and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16. CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed.

  9. Optimizing Patient Surgical Management Using WhatsApp Application in the Italian Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardo, Bruno; Cannistrà, Marco; Diaco, Vincenzo; Naso, Agostino; Novello, Matteo; Zullo, Alessandra; Ruggiero, Michele; Grande, Raffaele; Sacco, Rosario

    2016-09-01

    Smartphones changed the method by which doctors communicate with each other, offer modern functionalities sensitive to the context of use, and can represent a valuable ally in the healthcare system. Studies have shown that WhatsApp™ application can facilitate communication within the healthcare team and provide the attending physician a constant oversight of activities performed by junior team members. The aim of the study was to use WhatsApp between two distant surgical teams involved in a program of elective surgery to verify if it facilitates communication, enhances learning, and improves patient care preserving their privacy. We conducted a focused group of surgeons over a 28-month period (from March 2013 to July 2015), and from September 2014 to July 2015, a group of selected specialists communicated healthcare matters through the newly founded "WhatsApp Surgery Group." Each patient enrolled in the study signed a consent form to let the team communicate his/her clinical data using WhatsApp. Communication between team members, response times, and types of messages were evaluated. Forty six (n = 46) patients were enrolled in the study. A total of 1,053 images were used with an average of 78 images for each patient (range 41-143). 125 h of communication were recorded, generating 354 communication events. The expert surgeon had received the highest number of questions (P, 0.001), while the residents asked clinical questions (P, 0.001) and were the fastest responders to communications (P, 0.001). Our study investigated how two distant clinical teams may exploit such a communication system and quantifies both the direction and type of communication between surgeons. WhatsApp is a low cost, secure, and fast technology and it offers the opportunity to facilitate clinical and nonclinical communications, enhance learning, and improve patient care preserving their privacy.

  10. Implementation of pregnancy weight management and obesity guidelines: a meta-synthesis of healthcare professionals' barriers and facilitators using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslehurst, N; Newham, J; Maniatopoulos, G; Fleetwood, C; Robalino, S; Rankin, J

    2014-06-01

    Obesity in pregnancy is rising and is associated with severe health consequences for both the mother and the child. There is an increasing international focus on guidelines to manage the clinical risks of maternal obesity, and for pregnancy weight management. However, passive dissemination of guidelines is not effective and more active strategies are required for effective guideline implementation into practice. Implementation of guidelines is a form of healthcare professional behaviour change, and therefore implementation strategies should be based on appropriate behaviour change theory. This systematic review aimed to identify the determinants of healthcare professionals' behaviours in relation to maternal obesity and weight management. Twenty-five studies were included. Data synthesis of the existing international qualitative and quantitative evidence base used the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify the barriers and facilitators to healthcare professionals' maternal obesity and weight management practice. The domains most frequently identified included 'knowledge', 'beliefs about consequences' and 'environmental context and resources'. Healthcare professionals' weight management practice had the most barriers compared with any other area of maternal obesity practice. The results of this review will be used to inform the development of an intervention to support healthcare professional behaviour change. © 2014 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  11. [The physician manager--building a clinical leadership in community medicine--the Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS) model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokia, Ehud; Siegal, Neomi; Shemer, Joshua

    2008-05-01

    Community medicine around the world is facing constant trends of changes. The need to overcome the huge burden of chronic diseases, the need to prioritize and adapt new technologies, and above all, the fact that all these must be done within a given, restricted budget, calls for advanced medical management. In this review we focused on the development of the role of the physician manager in Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS) over the last 60 years. From what was once a reactive, utilization control-oriented administrative physician role, there has emerged a proactive, formally educated, health quality leader who is expected to lead his clinical colleagues towards achieving the organization's goals. Every organization should answer 4 basic questions in order to encourage/develop the new generation of physician managers. 1. Who am I?--What is the profile and what are the tasks of the physician manager's role? 2. What is the time allocation allotted to the physician manager by the organization to enable him to do his job? 3. What are the educational and managerial tools provided for the 'new" physician manager? 4. What are the rewards that the organization grants to its best people? By addressing the above questions MHS has successfully developed new generations of young clinical leaders who can help MHS management conduct a real dialogue with its clinical physicians in order to maximize the services that our beneficiaries are receiving from the HMO. Our conclusion is that choosing the right people, providing them with the right tools and positioning the physician manager appropriately in the organization's hierarchy will enable the medical care delivery system in Israel to achieve the level of clinical leadership that can lead us towards a better future.

  12. Performance management in healthcare: performance indicator development, task uncertainty, and types of performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geer, Eric; van Tuijl, Harrie F J M; Rutte, Christel G

    2009-11-01

    In healthcare, performance indicators are increasingly used to measure and control quality and efficiency of care-providing teams. This article demonstrates that when controllability is emphasized during indicator development, the level of task uncertainty influences the type of resulting performance indicators. We report findings from a field study in a medical rehabilitation centre in The Netherlands, where four low task uncertain teams ('hand trauma', 'heart failure', 'amputation', 'chronic pain'), and four high task uncertain teams ('children with developmental coordination disorders (DCD)', 'parkinson's disease', 'young children (0-4 years) with developmental disorders', and 'acquired brain injuries') participated in the development of performance indicators using the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System (ProMES) method. Results show that teams higher on task uncertainty developed relatively more process indicators compared to outcome indicators, whereas the reverse was true for teams lower on task uncertainty. Additionally, process indicators developed by high task uncertain teams were more of a problem solving nature than process indicators developed by low task uncertain teams, which had a more procedural character. The study expands existing knowledge by providing a framework which explicates the task processes to be executed under different levels of task uncertainty, and in line with that appropriate performance indicators for healthcare teams.

  13. Practice of Pain Management by Indian Healthcare Practitioners: Results of a Paper Based Questionnaire Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Billa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Understanding factors while selecting an analgesic and its usage pattern by Indian healthcare practitioners (HCPs. Methods. Questionnaire-based survey was conducted among six healthcare specialties. Results. Total 448 HCPs participated. Patient’s age (72.8%, 74.4%, 87.5%, and 78.9% and duration of therapy (70.8%, 66.2%, 69.6%, and 73.6% were main attributes for selecting an opioid according to general practitioners (GPs, dentists, consulting physicians (CPs, and surgeons, respectively. Patient’s age was important factor while selecting NSAID according to 77.60%, 66.91%, and 84.20% of GPs, dentists, surgeons, respectively. For mild pain, paracetamol was the choice according to 77%, 78.57% and 74% of GPs, CPs, and surgeons, respectively. For moderate pain, 77%, 87.50%, 68%, and 80.30% of GPs, CPs, surgeons and orthopedicians, respectively, preferred the use of paracetamol + tramadol combination. For moderate pain, NSAID + paracetamol and paracetamol+diclofenac were used by 68.94% and 47.73% of orthopedicians, respectively. Lack of pain clinic (38.8% in city was commonly cited reason for not referring patients to pain clinics. Conclusion. Patient’s age, duration of therapy, comorbid conditions, frequency of dosing, and severity of pain are important parameters while selecting analgesics. Paracetamol and its combinations are commonly used for mild and moderate pain, respectively. Pain clinics currently have limited presence in India.

  14. Radiation protection for veterinary practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelton, R.; McCaffery, A. (National Radiological Protection Board, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Scottish Centre)

    1993-01-01

    This brief article discusses radiation protection for diagnostic radiography in veterinary practices. It includes aspects such as a radiation protection adviser, personal dosimetry but in particular a Veterinary Monitoring Service, developed by the NRPB, which offers veterinary practitioners the convenience of making simple but essential measurements for themselves using photographic films contained in a 'vet pack' to determine the operating condition of their X-ray machine. (U.K.).

  15. How is veterinary parasitology taught in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ming; Suo, Xun; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2006-12-01

    Many parasites of domestic animals in China are of major socioeconomic and medical importance. Hence, veterinary parasitology is one of the core subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary science. Here, we review the teaching of veterinary parasitology in Chinese universities, including a description of the veterinary science curricula and measures to improve the quality of veterinary parasitology teaching in China.

  16. Diagnostic microbiology in veterinary dermatology: present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter; Stamm, Ivonne

    2017-01-01

    Background The microbiology laboratory can be perceived as a service provider rather than an integral part of the healthcare team. Objectives The aim of this review is to discuss the current challenges of providing a state-of-the-art diagnostic veterinary microbiology service including...... the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of key pathogens in veterinary dermatology. Methods The Study Group for Veterinary Microbiology (ESGVM) of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) identified scientific, technological, educational...... and regulatory issues impacting the predictive value of AST and the quality of the service offered by microbiology laboratories. Results The advent of mass spectrometry has significantly reduced the time required for ID of key pathogens such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. However, the turnaround time...

  17. iLead-a transformational leadership intervention to train healthcare managers' implementation leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richter, Anne; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Lornudd, Caroline; Lundmark, Robert; Mosson, Rebecca; Hasson, Henna

    .... However, in studying leadership and implementation, only few studies rely on established leadership theory, which makes it difficult to draw conclusions regarding what kinds of leadership managers...

  18. Healthcare Managers' Experiences of Leading the Implementation of Video Conferencing in Discharge Planning Sessions: An Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofflander, Malin; Nilsson, Lina; Eriksén, Sara; Borg, Christel

    2016-03-01

    This article describes healthcare managers' experiences of leading the implementation of video conferencing in discharge planning sessions as a new tool in everyday practice. Data collection took place through individual interviews and the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. The results indicate that managers identified two distinct leadership perspectives when they reflected on the implementation process. They described a desired way of leading the implementation and communicating about the upcoming change, understanding and securing support for decisions, as well as ensuring that sufficient time is available throughout the change process. They also, however, described how they perceived that the implementation process was actually taking place, highlighting the lack of planning and preparation as well as the need for support and to be supportive, and having the courage to adopt and lead the implementation. It is suggested that managers at all levels require more information and training in how to encourage staff to become involved in designing their everyday work and in the implementation process. Managers, too, need ongoing organizational support for good leadership throughout the implementation of video conferencing in discharge planning sessions, including planning, start-up, implementation, and evaluation.

  19. Use of healthcare resources and costs of acute cardioembolic stroke management in the Region of Madrid: The CODICE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés-Nogales, F; Vivancos Mora, J; Barriga Hernández, F J; Díaz Otero, F; Izquierdo Esteban, L; Ortega-Casarrubios, M Á; Castillo Moreno, L; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Á; Martín Torres, M P; Gómez-Escalonilla Escobar, C I; Torres González, C; de Salas-Cansado, M; Casado Gómez, M Á; Soto Álvarez, J; Gil-Núñez, A

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of admission to Neurology departments and cardioembolic stroke (CS) is one of the most common subtypes of stroke. A multicentre prospective observational study was performed in 5 Neurology departments in public hospitals in the Region of Madrid (Spain). The objective was to estimate the use of healthcare resources and costs of acute CS management. Patients with acute CS at<48h from onset were recruited. Patients' socio-demographic, clinical, and healthcare resource use data were collected during hospitalisation and at discharge up to 30 days after admission, including data for rehabilitation treatment after discharge. During an 8-month recruitment period, 128 patients were recruited: mean age, 75.3±11.25; 46.9% women; mortality rate, 4.7%. All patients met the CS diagnostic criteria established by GEENCV-SEN, based on medical history or diagnostic tests. Fifty per cent of the patients had a history of atrial fibrillation and 18.8% presented other major cardioembolic sources. Non-valvular atrial fibrillation was the most frequent cause of CS (33.6%). Data for healthcare resource use, given a mean total hospital stay of 10.3±9.3 days, are as follows: rehabilitation therapy during hospital stay (46.9%, mean 4.5 days) and after discharge (56.3%, mean 26.8 days), complications (32%), specific interventions (19.5%), and laboratory and diagnostic tests (100%). Head CT (98.4%), duplex ultrasound of supra-aortic trunks (87.5%), and electrocardiogram (85.9%) were the most frequently performed diagnostic procedures. Average total cost per patient during acute-phase management and rehabilitation was €13,139. Hospital stay (45.0%) and rehabilitation at discharge (29.2%) accounted for the largest part of resources used. Acute CS management in the Region of Madrid resulted consumes large amounts of resources (€13,139), mainly due to hospital stays and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espa

  20. The recognition of LpxC inhibitors as potential antibiotics could revolutionise the management of sepsis in veterinary patients if their unknown biological properties are widely evaluated in suitable animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Chemonges

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Current studies continue to show that UDP-3-O-((R-3-hydroxymyristoyl-N-acetyl glucosamine deacetylase (LpxC inhibitors such as pyridone methylsulfone hydroxymate 1 and 2a (LpxC-2 downregulate the lethal effects of sepsis initiated by multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGNB by curtailing lipopolysaccharide (LPS synthesis in murine models. Sepsis initiated by MDRGNB is a leading cause of shock and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS in intensive care unit (ICU patients. To date however, the biological effects of LpxC-2 and related molecules in companion and production animals remain largely unexplored in vivo and are therefore unknown. Such studies would be greatly informative in the expectation of LpxC-2 progressing to human clinical trials. Mechanistic studies to interrogate this novel antibiotic candidate in realistic and clinically applicable large animal models of veterinary importance are sorely lacking. To be relevant, the physiology of the chosen animal models should closely match that of humans such as ovine or porcine, or even better, non-human primate based studies, as they are more genetically similar to humans than murine models. If discovered to have subtle or negligible side effects, LpxC-2 could have a future role in the treatment and management of MDRGNB-induced infections that lead to sepsis in both animals and humans. More research is indicated on LpxC-2 use in many veterinary species, as data remains scarce.