WorldWideScience

Sample records for veterinary drug therapy

  1. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Whiting, M; Chambers, D; Toutain, P-L; Whitehead, M L

    2017-08-12

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. British Veterinary Association.

  2. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to the...

  3. Manual therapy in veterinary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesbach, Amie Lamoreaux

    2014-03-01

    As it matures, the field of animal rehabilitation is welcoming utilization of interventions that have proven efficacy in the specialty of physical therapy for human patients. More recently, manual therapy techniques have become more accepted. Range-of-motion and stretching techniques; mobilization or manipulation of soft tissues, peripheral joints, and the spine; neuromuscular facilitation techniques; techniques unique to osteopathy; chest physical therapy; manual lymphatic drainage techniques; and neural mobilization techniques are now commonly incorporated in clinical practice, and these interventions are more commonly cited in the veterinary literature. The following is a brief review of these manual therapy approaches including the goals, effects, indications, precautions, and contraindications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of veterinary drug residues among muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets tolerances for veterinary drug residues in muscle, but does not specify which muscle should be sampled for analysis. The goal of this research was to determine if antibiotic residue levels are dependent on muscle type. In this study, penicillin G (Pen G) d...

  5. Residues of veterinary drugs in milk in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani Faro de Novaes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Veterinary drugs are used in dairy cattle management mainly for therapy and prophylaxis of diseases, which chemicals may leave residues in milk. Human exposure and the unintentional consumption of residues of drugs can lead to side effects and development of resistant bacteria, representing a considerable concern to consumer health. This paper presents the occurrence of residues of veterinary drugs in milk from 2009 to 2011 in Brazil, monitored by the Official Program for Analysis of Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods of Animal Origin. A total of 961 samples were collected in the retail and evaluated for the main β-lactams, tetracyclines, amphenicol, aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulfonamides and avermectins. Residues of veterinary drugs did not exceed maximum residue limit (MRL; although, there is a considerable use of critically/highly important antimicrobials and avermectins in dairy cows, especially quinolones and tetracyclines. Doxycycline (9% and abamectin (1.6% were detected, even though these substances are not intended to be used in milk producing animals for human consumption. Norfloxacin (15% was observed; although, there are no MRL established, consequently, no residue level should have been detected. No residues of streptomycin, chloramphenicol and β-lactams were confirmed. Milk in Brazil contains low levels of veterinary drugs so that toxicological risk regarding milk consumption could not be considered as a public health concern. However, due to the nature of the samples, which correspond to milk from several farms, it could occur a dilution effect. The absence of MRL established for norfloxacin prevents suitable interpretation of the findings and makes tough the control of these chemical residues in food. Detection of some antimicrobials and avermectins may be linked to extra-label use or noncompliance withdrawal periods suggesting that good veterinary practices are not being followed, since residues of unauthorized

  6. Antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Paul S; Apley, Michael D; Besser, Thomas E; Burney, Derek P; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Papich, Mark G; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L; Weese, J Scott

    2005-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of antimicrobial resistance and the need for veterinarians to aid in efforts for maintaining the usefulness of antimicrobial drugs in animals and humans, the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine charged a special committee with responsibility for drafting this position statement regarding antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine. The Committee believes that veterinarians are obligated to balance the well-being of animals under their care with the protection of other animals and public health. Therefore, if an animal's medical condition can be reasonably expected to improve as a result of treatment with antimicrobial drugs, and the animal is under a veterinarian's care with an appropriate veterinarian-client-patient relationship, veterinarians have an obligation to offer antimicrobial treatment as a therapeutic option. Veterinarians also have an obligation to actively promote disease prevention efforts, to treat as conservatively as possible, and to explain the potential consequences associated with antimicrobial treatment to animal owners and managers, including the possibility of promoting selection of resistant bacteria. However, the consequences of losing usefulness of an antimicrobial drug that is used as a last resort in humans or animals with resistant bacterial infections might be unacceptable from a public or population health perspective. Veterinarians could therefore face the difficult choice of treating animals with a drug that is less likely to be successful, possibly resulting in prolonged or exacerbated morbidity, to protect the good of society. The Committee recommends that voluntary actions be taken by the veterinary profession to promote conservative use of antimicrobial drugs to minimize the potential adverse effects on animal or human health. The veterinary profession must work to educate all veterinarians about issues related to conservative antimicrobial drug use and

  7. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis TOUTAIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given that: (1 the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2 the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR of animal origin; (3 alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed green antibiotics, having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes.We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a turnstile exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s. For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  8. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed "green antibiotics," having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a "turnstile" exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  9. Applied photonic therapy in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Terry R.; McLaren, Brian C.

    2005-04-01

    There can be no question that specific systemic physiological results occur, when red light (660nm) is applied to the skin, it is now more a question of detailed mechanisms. Before gathering statistically signifcant clinical trial data, it is important to first enumerate the type of results observed in practice. Case histories are presented highlighting the use of photonic therapy in veterinary medicine. Over 900 surgical procedures have been performed and documented, utilizing the principles of photonic therapy, and while hemostasis, pain relief, and nausea relief, were the primary goals, the peri-operative death rate, the post-operative seroma, and post-operative infection were reduced to almost zero, and there was a noticeable increase in the healing rate. Scientifically applied photonic therapy, rather than supplanting conventional veterinary medicine, compliments and increases the veterinarian's set of skills. This paper proposes a hypothesis of how 660 nm light applied to specific points on the skin, produces various physiological changes in animals. By using animals, there can be no placebo, hypnotic or psychosomatic confounding effects.

  10. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary feed directive drugs. 558.6 Section 558.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS General Provisions...

  11. Prudent Use of Veterinary Drugs: Impact on Safe Animal Products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Like any other therapeutic compounds, veterinary drugs are used to alleviate diseases in animals as either therapeutic or prophylactic compounds for specific disease entities. They can also be used as production aids in food producing animals to increase market sale of these animals whereby the producers save on the ...

  12. Assessment of veterinary drug use and determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2009 and January 2010 to assess veterinary drug usage by broiler chicken farmers and to determine antimicrobial residues in broiler meat in Urban district, Zanzibar, Tanzania. Fifty five smallholder farmers were interviewed on types of antimicrobials, reasons for use, ...

  13. Maggot Therapy and its Implications in Veterinary Medicine: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latief Mohammad Dar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative therapies to conventional wound management are available now-a-days to facilitate faster wound healing without any complications. Among various alternative therapies, it has been well established that maggot therapy can be used successfully to treat chronic long-standing infected wounds which previously failed to respond to conventional treatment. Maggot therapy employs the use of freshly emerged, sterile larvae of the common greenbottle fly, Phaenicia (Lucilia sericata, and is a form of artificially induced myiasis in a controlled clinical situation. Maggot therapy, however, is used relatively little in veterinary medicine. Nevertheless, concern over antibiotic resistance and the increase in demand for organic husbandry and residue-free meat and milk, suggest that it is an option which merits further consideration. In this review article, authors’ discuss the role of maggots and their preparation for veterinary medical use.

  14. Therapy radiation apparatus for veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parris, D.M.

    1987-03-03

    A radiation device is described for use in veterinary medicine, for treating exterior and interior portions of animal bodies, comprising: (a) power supply means providing selected voltages; (b) high frequency oscillator means; (c) frequency divider means responsive to the oscillator means, and adapted to control switch means for modulating a voltage supply for at least one non-laser broad band infrared radiation diode providing an expanding beam of radiation; and (d) means for applying at least one one-laser broad band infrared radiation diode to a dermal surface of an animal.

  15. Health concerns and management of select veterinary drug residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Ronald E; Dedonder, Keith; Kissell, Lindsey; Mzyk, Danielle; Marmulak, Tara; Smith, Geof; Tell, Lisa; Gehring, Ronette; Davis, Jennifer; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to review the potential adverse health effects in humans if exposed to residues of selected veterinary drugs used in food-producing animals. Our other objectives are to briefly inform the reader of why many of these drugs are or were approved for use in livestock production and how drug residues can be mitigated for these drugs. The selected drugs include several antimicrobials, beta agonists, and phenylbutazone. The antimicrobials continue to be of regulatory concern not only because of their acute adverse effects but also because their use as growth promoters have been linked to antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, nitroimidazoles and arsenicals are no longer approved for use in food animals in most jurisdictions. In recent years, the risk assessment and risk management of beta agonists, have been the focus of national and international agencies and this manuscript attempts to review the pharmacology of these drugs and regulatory challenges. Several of the drugs selected for this review can cause noncancer effects (e.g., penicillins) and others are potential carcinogens (e.g., nitroimidazoles). This review also focuses on how regulatory and independent organizations manage the risk of these veterinary drugs based on data from human health risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. IL-12 based gene therapy in veterinary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlin Darja

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of large animals as an experimental model for novel treatment techniques has many advantages over the use of laboratory animals, so veterinary medicine is becoming an increasingly important translational bridge between preclinical studies and human medicine. The results of preclinical studies show that gene therapy with therapeutic gene encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12 displays pronounced antitumor effects in various tumor models. A number of different studies employing this therapeutic plasmid, delivered by either viral or non-viral methods, have also been undertaken in veterinary oncology. In cats, adenoviral delivery into soft tissue sarcomas has been employed. In horses, naked plasmid DNA has been delivered by direct intratumoral injection into nodules of metastatic melanoma. In dogs, various types of tumors have been treated with either local or systemic IL-12 electrogene therapy. The results of these studies show that IL-12 based gene therapy elicits a good antitumor effect on spontaneously occurring tumors in large animals, while being safe and well tolerated by the animals. Hopefully, such results will lead to further investigation of this therapy in veterinary medicine and successful translation into human clinical trials.

  17. IL-12 based gene therapy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Tozon, Natasa

    2012-11-21

    The use of large animals as an experimental model for novel treatment techniques has many advantages over the use of laboratory animals, so veterinary medicine is becoming an increasingly important translational bridge between preclinical studies and human medicine. The results of preclinical studies show that gene therapy with therapeutic gene encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) displays pronounced antitumor effects in various tumor models. A number of different studies employing this therapeutic plasmid, delivered by either viral or non-viral methods, have also been undertaken in veterinary oncology. In cats, adenoviral delivery into soft tissue sarcomas has been employed. In horses, naked plasmid DNA has been delivered by direct intratumoral injection into nodules of metastatic melanoma. In dogs, various types of tumors have been treated with either local or systemic IL-12 electrogene therapy. The results of these studies show that IL-12 based gene therapy elicits a good antitumor effect on spontaneously occurring tumors in large animals, while being safe and well tolerated by the animals. Hopefully, such results will lead to further investigation of this therapy in veterinary medicine and successful translation into human clinical trials.

  18. [Toxicological study of three veterinary drugs on Eisenia foetida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengmeng; Xu, Yun; Chen, Haigang; Li, Zhaoli; Sun, Liwei; Xu, Dijin; Kong, Zhiming; Sugiura, Norio

    2005-06-01

    By the methods of acute toxicity test and single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay), this paper evaluated the toxicological effects of three veterinary drugs olaquindox, arsanilic acid and oxytetracycline on earthworm (Eisenia foetida) coelomocytes in vivo. The results of acute toxicity test showed that only the highest dose of olaquidox caused the death of some earthworms, and none of the test drugs had any effects on earthworm at their environmentally relevant concentrations. The comet assay indicated that arsanilic acid had no genotoxicity to earthworm, while olaquindox and oxytetracycline induced significant DNA damage in earthworm coelomocytes (P .01).

  19. Magnesium physiology and clinical therapy in veterinary critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Sarah; Kirby, Rebecca; Rudloff, Elke

    2015-01-01

    To review magnesium physiology including absorption, excretion, and function within the body, causes of magnesium abnormalities, and the current applications of magnesium monitoring and therapy in people and animals. Magnesium plays a pivotal role in energy production and specific functions in every cell in the body. Disorders of magnesium can be correlated with severity of disease, length of hospital stay, and recovery of the septic patient. Hypermagnesemia is seen infrequently in people and animals with significant consequences reported. Hypomagnesemia is more common in critically ill people and animals, and can be associated with platelet, immune system, neurological, and cardiovascular dysfunction as well as alterations in insulin responsiveness and electrolyte imbalance. Measurement of serum ionized magnesium in critically or chronically ill veterinary patients is practical and provides information necessary for stabilization and treatment. Tissue magnesium concentrations may be assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as through the application of fluorescent dye techniques. Magnesium infusions may play a therapeutic role in reperfusion injury, myocardial ischemia, cerebral infarcts, systemic inflammatory response syndromes, tetanus, digitalis toxicity, bronchospasms, hypercoagulable states, and as an adjunct to specific anesthetic or analgesic protocols. Further veterinary studies are needed to establish the frequency and importance of magnesium disorders in animals and the potential benefit of magnesium infusions as a therapeutic adjunct to specific diseases. The prognosis for most patients with magnesium disorders is variable and largely dependent on the underlying cause of the disorder. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  20. Survey of Veterinary Drug Residues in Raw Milk in Hebei Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rong-Wei; Yu, Zhong-Na; Zhen, Tian-Yuan; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-17

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of veterinary drug residues in raw milk from Hebei, the second-largest dairy production province in the People's Republic of China. A total of 192 raw milk samples were collected from 64 milk stations in seven districts. Twenty-eight veterinary drug residues were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry based on a China National Standard. Raw milk samples with multiple residues of veterinary drugs were not found in the present study. Residues of four veterinary drugs, penicillin G, sulfacetamide, trimethoprim, and lincomycin, were detected in 12 (6.25%) raw milk samples, with detection ratios of 1.04, 0.52, 3.13, and 1.56%, respectively. All veterinary drug residues detected were under the maximum residue levels as regulated by China, the European Union, the United States, and the Codex Alimentarius Commission. In general, raw milk from Hebei province was considered relatively safe for human consumption because of the low prevalence of veterinary drug residues. However, stringent control measurements for veterinary drug residues in raw milk are required because some veterinary drugs were detected in milk from some areas of Hebei province.

  1. Stability during cooking of anthelmintic veterinary drug residues in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K M; Whelan, M; Danaher, M; Kennedy, D G

    2011-02-01

    Anthelmintic drugs are widely used for treatment of parasitic worms in livestock, but little is known about the stability of their residues in food under conventional cooking conditions. As part of the European Commission-funded research project ProSafeBeef, cattle were medicated with commercially available anthelmintic preparations, comprising 11 active ingredients (corresponding to 21 marker residues). Incurred meat and liver were cooked by roasting (40 min at 190°C) or shallow frying (muscle 8-12 min, liver 14-19 min) in a domestic kitchen. Raw and cooked tissues and expressed juices were analysed using a novel multi-residue dispersive solid-phase extraction method (QuEChERS) coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After correction for sample weight changes during cooking, no major losses were observed for residues of oxyclozanide, clorsulon, closantel, ivermectin, albendazole, mebendazole or fenbendazole. However, significant losses were observed for nitroxynil (78% in fried muscle, 96% in roast muscle), levamisole (11% in fried muscle, 42% in fried liver), rafoxanide (17% in fried muscle, 18% in roast muscle) and triclabendazole (23% in fried liver, 47% in roast muscle). Migration of residues from muscle into expressed cooking juices varied between drugs, constituting 0% to 17% (levamisole) of total residues remaining after cooking. With the exception of nitroxynil, residues of anthelmintic drugs were generally resistant to degradation during roasting and shallow frying. Conventional cooking cannot, therefore, be considered a safeguard against ingestion of residues of anthelmintic veterinary drugs in beef.

  2. Flexing the PECs: Predicting environmental concentrations of veterinary drugs in Canadian agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullik, Sigrun A; Belknap, Andrew M

    2017-03-01

    Veterinary drugs administered to food animals primarily enter ecosystems through the application of livestock waste to agricultural land. Although veterinary drugs are essential for protecting animal health, their entry into the environment may pose a risk for nontarget organisms. A means to predict environmental concentrations of new veterinary drug ingredients in soil is required to assess their environmental fate, distribution, and potential effects. The Canadian predicted environmental concentrations in soil (PECsoil) for new veterinary drug ingredients for use in intensively reared animals is based on the approach currently used by the European Medicines Agency for VICH Phase I environmental assessments. The calculation for the European Medicines Agency PECsoil can be adapted to account for regional animal husbandry and land use practices. Canadian agricultural practices for intensively reared cattle, pigs, and poultry differ substantially from those in the European Union. The development of PECsoil default values and livestock categories representative of typical Canadian animal production methods and nutrient management practices culminates several years of research and an extensive survey and analysis of the scientific literature, Canadian agricultural statistics, national and provincial management recommendations, veterinary product databases, and producers. A PECsoil can be used to rapidly identify new veterinary drugs intended for intensive livestock production that should undergo targeted ecotoxicity and fate testing. The Canadian PECsoil model is readily available, transparent, and requires minimal inputs to generate a screening level environmental assessment for veterinary drugs that can be refined if additional data are available. PECsoil values for a hypothetical veterinary drug dosage regimen are presented and discussed in an international context. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:331-341. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada

  3. Large-scale cross-species chemogenomic platform proposes a new drug discovery strategy of veterinary drug from herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Yang, Yang; Chen, Xuetong; Wang, Chao; Li, Yan; Zheng, Chunli; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary Herbal Medicine (VHM) is a comprehensive, current, and informative discipline on the utilization of herbs in veterinary practice. Driven by chemistry but progressively directed by pharmacology and the clinical sciences, drug research has contributed more to address the needs for innovative veterinary medicine for curing animal diseases. However, research into veterinary medicine of vegetal origin in the pharmaceutical industry has reduced, owing to questions such as the short of compatibility of traditional natural-product extract libraries with high-throughput screening. Here, we present a cross-species chemogenomic screening platform to dissect the genetic basis of multifactorial diseases and to determine the most suitable points of attack for future veterinary medicines, thereby increasing the number of treatment options. First, based on critically examined pharmacology and text mining, we build a cross-species drug-likeness evaluation approach to screen the lead compounds in veterinary medicines. Second, a specific cross-species target prediction model is developed to infer drug-target connections, with the purpose of understanding how drugs work on the specific targets. Third, we focus on exploring the multiple targets interference effects of veterinary medicines by heterogeneous network convergence and modularization analysis. Finally, we manually integrate a disease pathway to test whether the cross-species chemogenomic platform could uncover the active mechanism of veterinary medicine, which is exemplified by a specific network module. We believe the proposed cross-species chemogenomic platform allows for the systematization of current and traditional knowledge of veterinary medicine and, importantly, for the application of this emerging body of knowledge to the development of new drugs for animal diseases.

  4. Large-scale cross-species chemogenomic platform proposes a new drug discovery strategy of veterinary drug from herbal medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Huang

    Full Text Available Veterinary Herbal Medicine (VHM is a comprehensive, current, and informative discipline on the utilization of herbs in veterinary practice. Driven by chemistry but progressively directed by pharmacology and the clinical sciences, drug research has contributed more to address the needs for innovative veterinary medicine for curing animal diseases. However, research into veterinary medicine of vegetal origin in the pharmaceutical industry has reduced, owing to questions such as the short of compatibility of traditional natural-product extract libraries with high-throughput screening. Here, we present a cross-species chemogenomic screening platform to dissect the genetic basis of multifactorial diseases and to determine the most suitable points of attack for future veterinary medicines, thereby increasing the number of treatment options. First, based on critically examined pharmacology and text mining, we build a cross-species drug-likeness evaluation approach to screen the lead compounds in veterinary medicines. Second, a specific cross-species target prediction model is developed to infer drug-target connections, with the purpose of understanding how drugs work on the specific targets. Third, we focus on exploring the multiple targets interference effects of veterinary medicines by heterogeneous network convergence and modularization analysis. Finally, we manually integrate a disease pathway to test whether the cross-species chemogenomic platform could uncover the active mechanism of veterinary medicine, which is exemplified by a specific network module. We believe the proposed cross-species chemogenomic platform allows for the systematization of current and traditional knowledge of veterinary medicine and, importantly, for the application of this emerging body of knowledge to the development of new drugs for animal diseases.

  5. Fetal drug therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, M I; Pryde, P G; Reichler, A; Bardicef, M; Johnson, M P

    1993-01-01

    Fetal drug therapy encompasses several areas, including the prevention of external genital masculinization in 21-hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (congenital adrenal hyperplasia), biochemical amelioration of methylmalonic acidemia, and biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. The correction of cardiac arrhythmias has become relatively commonplace, and a reduction in the risks of neural tube defects is now possible with the use of preconceptual and early conceptual folic acid. Similar...

  6. Regulatory verification on safe use of cytotoxic drugs in veterinary clinics and animal hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, V; Seneviratne, M

    2016-11-01

    Veterinarians are increasingly being asked to provide chemotherapy for veterinary patients. However, chemotherapy agents have cytotoxic effects that can pose a health risk to workers from exposure. There are no published studies examining cytotoxic drug (CTD) contamination in veterinary practices in Australia. CTD use at 13 veterinary clinics and animal hospitals across New South Wales (NSW) was verified for compliance with Work, Health and Safety (WHS) legislation on the effectiveness of exposure control measures. Surface swab sampling was performed to detect the restricted carcinogen cyclophosphamide and seven other CTD. A total of 73 surface swab samples were collected from nine locations associated with CTD delivery, storage, treatment and waste disposal at four veterinary practices, with repeat sampling at two veterinary practices. Compliance with WHS legislation for systematic chemical management, including procedures for safe use of carcinogens, in veterinary practices was high: 4 of the 10 key clauses in WHS chemical management were complied with at all 13 verified workplaces. Surface contamination was detected in three locations, with levels of CTD contaminants ranging from 3.54 to 89 ng per sample. Results showed that, in general, there were safe systems in place to work with CTD in the veterinary practices that were verified in NSW. Areas for improvement were mainly in administrative measures related to hazardous chemical management. Particular attention should be given to raising awareness of the intrinsic hazards of CTD, through training and hazard information provision to staff. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Veterinary drug prescriptions: to what extent do pet owners comply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Separate questionnaires were designed for pet owners (clients) and veterinarians to ascertain the existence and extent of noncompliance in veterinary practice in lbadan and to elucidate the influence of such factors as logistics, education, economy, attitudes and veterinarian/client relationship on non-compliance. Analyses ...

  8. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung; Hur, Sun Jin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea.

  9. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea. PMID:27433102

  10. Misadministration of radiation therapy in veterinary medicine: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkans, M M; Gieger, T L; Nolan, M W

    2017-03-01

    Recent technical advancements in radiation therapy have allowed for improved targeting of tumours and sparing nearby normal tissues, while simultaneously decreasing the risk for medical errors by incorporating additional safety checks into electronic medical record keeping systems. The benefits of these new technologies, however, depends on their proper integration and use in the oncology clinic. Despite the advancement of technology for treatment delivery and medical record keeping, misadministration errors have a significant impact on patient care in veterinary oncology. The first part of this manuscript describes a medical incident that occurred at an academic veterinary referral hospital, in a dog receiving a combination of stereotactic radiation therapy and full-course intensity-modulated, image-guided radiation therapy. The second part of the report is a literature review, which explores misadministration errors and novel challenges which arise with the implementation of advancing technologies in veterinary radiation oncology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Beginnings of drug therapy: drug therapy in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, John K

    2003-01-01

    Four thousand years ago, the medical knowledge of the Indian subcontinent was codified into a system called the Ayurveda. Ayurveda remains a vital system of medicine and drug therapy in India and elsewhere. Plant alkaloids are the primary active ingredients of Ayurvedic drugs. Today the pharmacologically active ingredients of many Ayurvedic medicines are being identified and their usefulness in drug therapy being determined. (c) 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  12. Milk quality parameters associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Cristina Almeida Picinin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk are important to all sectors of the dairy chain because they are one of the major factors which determine the safety of the final product. This study attempted to identify milk quality parameters that are associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues using multivariate principal component analysis (PCA. A total of 132 raw milk samples were collected from 45 dairy farms in the state of Minas Gerais - Brazil and analyzed for 42 analytes, including pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones and antibacterials, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in tandem mode and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Out of the 132 milk samples, 40 samples tested positive for at least one analyte (above the detection limit. The milk parameters associated with the antimicrobial residues by confirmatory tests were lactose and nonfat concentrations, as revealed by PCA. This analysis showed that fat and total solid concentrations, as well as the somatic cell and total bacteria counts were associated with macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk. A PCA assessing pyrethroid residues in bulk tank milk revealed that the lactose and nonfat solid concentrations and titratable acidity were inversely associated with these residues. Thus, the data analysis indicated that the veterinary drug residues were associated with certain milk quality parameters that can be used to target farms at higher risk of veterinary drug residue contamination for testing programs in combination with incentives, education and training programs to improve mammary health, milk hygiene and safety.

  13. Database dedicated to information published during the Benelux conferences on hormone and veterinary drug residue analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Impens, S.; Brabander, H.F. de; Bergwerff, A.A.; Ginkel, L.A. van; Schilt, R.; Stephany, R.W.; Wasch, K. de; Courtheyn, D.; Peteghem, C. van

    2002-01-01

    Every other year scientists working in the field of residue analysis participate the "International Symposium on Hormone and Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis" and "Euroresidue" conferences. In each symposium a lot of innovative information is presented. In order to obtain a retrieval system for this

  14. Residues of veterinary drugs in eggs and their distribution between yolk and white

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.A.; Petz, M.

    2000-01-01

    Veterinary drugs and feed additives (especially some coccidiostats) can be absorbed by the digestive tract of laying hens and transferred to the egg. Physicochemical characteristics of these compounds determine their pharmacokinetic behavior and distribution to and within the egg. Traditionally the

  15. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  16. Drug resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance: a status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ray M

    2004-10-01

    Reports of drug resistance have been made in every livestock host and to every anthelmintic class. In some regions of world, the extremely high prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) in nematodes of sheep and goats threatens the viability of small-ruminant industries. Resistance in nematodes of horses and cattle has not yet reached the levels seen in small ruminants, but evidence suggests that the problems of resistance, including MDR worms, are also increasing in these hosts. There is an urgent need to develop both novel non-chemical approaches for parasite control and molecular assays capable of detecting resistant worms.

  17. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model.

  18. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Huang, Lingli; Hao, Haihong; Sanders, Pascal; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model.

  19. Therapy and prevention of parasitic insects in veterinary medicine using imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencke, Norbert; Jeschke, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Ectoparasitic insects play a major role in veterinary medicine. The flea, especially the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis felis Bouch 1835) is the most important ectoparasite worldwide. The cat flea parasitizes not only on dogs and cats but also on other warm-blooded animals including humans. The veterinary importance of flea infestation are dermatological conditions due to allergic reactions to antigens in the flea saliva and the transmission of infectious agents like bacteria, viruses and helminths. Insecticides used in veterinary medicine today have to fulfil criteria of elimination of a existing flea infestation (therapy) and prevention (prophylaxis) of new infestation for weeks. Imidacloprid is a compound of the chemical class of CNI (chloronicotinyl insecticides syn. neonicotinoids) that fits these criteria. The high selectivity towards the site of action within insects together with the high safety margin on mammals allowed to develop imidacloprid as an insecticide for agricultural use and finally for the application as a veterinary medicine. The major features of imidacloprid chemistry, toxicology and the development and use as a veterinary medicinal remedy are described.

  20. Stability during cooking of anthelmintic veterinary drug residues in beef

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Kevin Mark; Whelan, Michelle; Danaher, Martin; Kennedy, David Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Anthelmintic drugs are widely used for treatment of parasitic worms in livestock but little is known about the stability of their residues in food under conventional cooking conditions. As part of the European Commission-funded research project ProSafeBeef, cattle were medicated with commercially available anthelmintic preparations, comprising 11 active ingredients (corresponding to 21 marker residues). Incurred meat and liver were cooked by roasting (40 min at 190?C) or...

  1. Veterinary drug usage and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    In the production of food animals, large amounts of antimicrobial agents are used for therapy and prophylaxis of bacterial infections and in feed to promote growth. There are large variations in the amounts of antimicrobial agents used to produce the same amount of meat among the different Europe...... monitoring the occurrence and development of resistance and consumption of antimicrobial agents are strongly desirable, as is research into the most appropriate ways to use antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine....

  2. [The use of pharmacological criteria in the toxicological evaluation of veterinary drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F X

    1990-09-01

    The toxicological evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs in foods of animal origin, which is done within the framework of the Netherlands Veterinary Drugs Act, is based on an EEC guide line in which, in addition to the clinical and analytical criteria, the requirements regarding the pharmacological and toxicological evaluation are laid down. In principle, this evaluation is based on classical toxicological criteria. As veterinary drugs have a specific pharmacological action, it is essential that these pharmacological effects should be in included in the toxicological evaluation in view of an adequate protection of public health. The selected starting point is that a pharmacological effect desired in a target animal is regarded as an undesirable effect in consumers. In this presentation, two examples are referred to, viz. the bèta agonist clenbuterol and the bèta-blocking agent carazolol; the approach is compared with a 'classical' toxicological evaluation. This shows that the acceptable daily intake in human individuals (ADI), based on pharmacological criteria is lower by a factor of approximately 50 than is the ADI on the basis of 'classical' toxicological criteria. This clearly illustrates the value of this approach in protecting the health of consumers.

  3. Rapid Methods for detection of Veterinary Drug residues in Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of substances having hormonal or thyreostatic action as well as b-agonists is banned in many countries. However, sometimes forbidden drugs may be added to feeds for illegal administration to farm animals for promoting increased muscle development or increased water retention and thus obtain an economical benefit. The result is a fraudulent overweight of meat but, what is worse, residues of these substances may remain in meat and may pose a real threat to the consumer either through exposure to the residues, transfer of antibiotic resistance or allergy risk. This has exerted a great concern among the meat consumers. The control of the absence of these forbidden substances in animal foods and feeds is regulated in the European Union by Directive 96/23/EC on measures to monitor certain substances and residues in live animals and animal products. Analytical methodology, including criteria for identification and confirmation, for the monitoring of compliance was also given in Decisions 93/256/EEC and 93/257/EEC. More recently, Decision 2002/657/EC provided rules for the analytical methods to be used in testing of official samples. New substances with anabolic properties are being detected year by year increasing the list of forbidden compounds to be tested. Furthermore, the extended practice consisting in the use of “cocktails” (mixtures of low amounts of several substances that exert a synergistic effect to have a similar growth promotion, reduces the margin for an effective analytical detection. Thus, the evolution of the “black market” is making really difficult to have an effective analytical control of the residues of these substances in foods of animal origin. Control laboratories must face an increasing demand of analysis like the growing number of residues to be analysed in different types of samples, the strict guidelines for analytical methodologies according to the latest Directives, the increased costs of such new

  4. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. Methods One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface and JavaScript (program logic. Results Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs

  5. C-Peptides for diagnostics and therapy: a veterinary medicine point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A. Rosenfield

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Empirical studies proved that C-peptides are performing numerous intrinsic biological roles, and serve as a marker for pancreatic performance analysis. Since the last decade, C-peptide assays for differential diagnosis in veterinary diabetic patients are becoming more available, but still only for a very limited number of species. Studies on C-peptide as a diagnostic tool, therapy for associated complications, or as replacement therapies for C-peptide deficiency still showed not to be a common practice in veterinary medicine. This review was conducted to determine the potential importance of C-peptide in Veterinary Medicine, relevant in the diagnosis of diabetes and for other metabolic processes, as well as its proposed therapeutic benefits. Numerous articles were identified that reported positive results in their experimental studies, whether C-peptide as a biomarker for pancreatic performance in dogs, cats, and horses, as a non-invasive method to monitor nutritional status in primates, or to investigate its potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes-related illnesses.

  6. Antineoplastic drugs in veterinary oncology: excretion in dogs, contamination of the environment and exposure assessment of people at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, T.

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer drugs themselves can cause adverse health effects when administered to human patients. In addition, it has become apparent that personnel in human medicine, occupationally exposed to these anticancer drugs, may also be at risk. The past decades, the use of chemotherapy in veterinary

  7. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Drug therapy problems among renal patients were high. Inappropriate drug selection and drug interactions were the commonest drug therapy problems. The acceptance of pharmacists' interventions by prescribers was appreciable. Keywords: Drug therapy problems, Renal patients, Therapy, Intervention, ...

  8. Target screening of 105 veterinary drug residues in milk using UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap multiplexing data independent acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Leung, Daniel; Chow, Willis; Chang, James; Wong, Jon W

    2018-02-05

    This paper presents a multi-class target screening method for the detection of 105 veterinary drug residues from 11 classes in milk using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap). The method is based on a non-target approach of full mass scan and multiplexing data-independent acquisition (Full MS/mDIA). The veterinary drugs include endectocides, fluoroquinolones, ionophores, macrolides, nitroimidazole, NSAIDs, β-lactams, penicillins, phenicols, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines. Veterinary drug residues were extracted from milk using a salting-out and solid-phase extraction (SOSPE) procedure, which entailed the precipitation of milk proteins by an extraction buffer (oxalic acid and EDTA, pH 3) and acetonitrile, a salting-out acetonitrile/water phase separation using ammonium sulfate, and solid-phase extraction for clean-up using polymeric reversed-phase sorbent cartridges. The Q-Orbitrap Full MS/dd-MS2 (data-dependent acquisition) was used to acquire product-ion spectra of individual veterinary drugs to build a compound database and a mass spectral library, whereas its Full MS/mDIA was utilized to acquire sample data from milk for target screening of veterinary drugs fortified at 1.0 or 10.0 μg/kg. The in-spectrum mass correction or solvent background lock-mass correction was used to minimize mass error when building the compound database from experimental dd-MS2 accurate mass data. Retention time alignment and response threshold adjustment were used to eliminate or reduce false negatives and/or false positive rates. The validated method was capable of screening 58% and 96% of 105 veterinary drugs at 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg, respectively, without manually evaluating every compound during data processing, which will reduce the workload in routine practice.

  9. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. Keywords: Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine, Integrative veterinary course, Integrative veterinary curriculum, Integrative veterinary medicine, ...

  10. Ethno-Veterinary Drug Therapy for Ear Mange in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D.Hagawane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sheep from two flocks showed scab lesions around nostrils, eyes and on the face with facial alopecia and thickening of the skin. The case was confirmed as ear mite (Psorcopt ovis by microscopic examination of skin scrapings. Percent incidence in flock I and Flock II recorded was 12.5, 11.4 respectively. Affected sheep were divided into two groups each containing nine animals. Group I was treated with preparation containing 50ml Azadirachta indica oil, 50ml Pogamia pinnata oil, 25gm Camphor, 50gm Sulphur powder and 500ml coconut oil applied on an affected skin twice a day for 15 days and Group II treated with preparation having 50gm of Curcuma longa rhizome and 25gm of Azadirachta indica oil applied once a day for 15 days. The first preparation was found highly effective against ear mange in sheep. It was found to be very convenient for use in field conditions, did not cause any adverse reaction locally as well as systemically. [Vet. World 2010; 3(6.000: 295-296

  11. Assessment of veterinary drug retail outlets in two rural areas of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa requires significant improvements in animal health with adequate access to veterinary services. Since the 1980s, veterinary services in developing countries including Nigeria has witnessed a decline in government involvement and ...

  12. Comparison of veterinary drug residue results in animal tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole ... use of a commercial lipid removal product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods must be monitored to ensure food safety, verify proper veterinary practices, enforce legal limits in domestic and imported foods, and other purposes. A common goal in drug residue analysis in foods is to achieve acceptable monitoring results for as m...

  13. Adjuvant electrochemotherapy in veterinary patients: a model for the planning of future therapies in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The treatment of soft tissue tumors needs the coordinated adoption of surgery with radiation therapy and eventually, chemotherapy. The radiation therapy (delivered with a linear accelerator can be preoperative, intraoperative, or postoperative. In selected patients adjuvant brachytherapy can be adopted. The goal of these associations is to achieve tumor control while maximally preserving the normal tissues from side effects. Unfortunately, the occurrence of local and distant complications is still elevated. Electrochemotherapy is a novel technique that combines the administration of anticancer agents to the application of permeabilizing pulses in order to increase the uptake of antitumor molecules. While its use in humans is still confined to the treatment of cutaneous neoplasms or the palliation of skin tumor metastases, in veterinary oncology this approach is rapidly becoming a primary treatment. This review summarizes the recent progresses in preclinical oncology and their possible transfer to humans.

  14. Assessment of veterinary drug retail outlets in two rural areas of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2017-07-07

    Jul 7, 2017 ... Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ilorin, Kwara state,. Nigeria ... Lafiagi rural areas of Kwara state, to asses the owners', sales persons' and business characteristics of veterinary retail outlets with the aid of ... patronise veterinary hospitals. Furthermore, there.

  15. A Systematic Review of the Quality of IV Fluid Therapy in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Muir

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the quality of the veterinary literature investigating IV fluid therapy in dogs, cats, horses, and cattle.DesignSystematic review.ProceduresThe preferred reporting of items for systematic review and meta-analysis protocols (PRISMA-P was employed for systematic review of all relevant IV fluid therapy manuscripts published from January 1969 through December 2016 in the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux International (CABI database. Independent grading systems used to evaluate manuscripts included the updated CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials 2012 checklist, risk of bias for animal intervention studies, criteria for levels of evidence, and methodological quality (Jadad scale. The quality of articles published before and after 2010 was compared.ResultsOne hundred and thirty-nine articles (63 dogs, 7 cats, 39 horses, 30 cattle from 7,258 met the inclusion criteria. More than 50% of the manuscripts did not comply with minimal requirements for reporting randomized controlled trials. The most non-compliant items included identification of specific predefined objectives or a hypothesis, identification of trial design, how sample size was determined, randomization, and blinding procedures. Most studies were underpowered and at risk for selection, performance, and detection bias. The overall quality of the articles improved for articles published after 2010.Conclusion and clinical relevanceMost of the veterinary literature investigating the administration of IV fluid therapy in dogs, cats, horses, and cattle is descriptive, does not comply with standards for evidence, or provide adequate translation to clinical practice. Authors should employ and journal editors should enforce international consensus recommendations and guidelines for publication of data from animal experiments investigating IV fluid therapy.

  16. Immunology-Based Techniques for the Detection of Veterinary Drug Residues in Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Milagro; Toldrá, Fidel

    Veterinary drugs are used in farm animals, via the feed or the drinking water, to prevent the outbreak of diseases or even for the treatment of diseases. However, the growth of animals may be promoted through the use of hormones and antibiotics. Depending on the type of residue and the application and washing conditions, these substances or its metabolites may remain in meat and other foods of animal origin and may cause adverse effects on consumers’ health. This is the main reason why its use is strictly regulated or even banned (case of the European Union) in different countries. Antibiotics typically used for growth promotion include chloramphenicol, nitrofurans, and enrofloxacin but others like sulphonamides, macrolides etc. may also be used (Reig & Toldrá, 2007).

  17. Mobility of veterinary drugs in soil with application of manure compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jin-Wook

    2011-07-01

    Sulfonamides and tetracyclines are pharmaceuticals widely used to treat human and animal diseases. They are of considerable concern in Korea because of the potential risk of residues in aquatic and terrestrial environments. This study investigated the mobility of veterinary drugs in the soil column with the application of manure compost to assess the risk of groundwater contamination by leaching in the Korean agricultural environment. The degree of sulfonamides and tetracyclines mobility, measured by the concentration of leachates from silty loam soil for 9 days, was observed being on the first day of this study, in the order sulfathiazole, sulfamethazine > sulfamethoxazole > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline, and the sulfonamides concentrations were about ten times higher than the tetracyclines concentrations with continuous leaching. The results indicate that sulfonamides pose a high risk of ground and surface water contamination and tetracyclines have the potential to persist in soils with bioactive epimers.

  18. Aquatic toxicity of four veterinary drugs commonly applied in fish farming and animal husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziejska, Marta; Maszkowska, Joanna; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Steudte, Stephanie; Kumirska, Jolanta; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Doramectin (DOR), metronidazole (MET), florfenicol (FLO), and oxytetracycline (OXT) are among the most widely used veterinary drugs in animal husbandry or in aquaculture. Contamination of the environment by these pharmaceuticals has given cause for concern in recent years. Even though their toxicity has been thoroughly analyzed, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is still limited. We investigated their aquatic toxicity using tests with marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus), duckweed (Lemna minor) and crustaceans (Daphnia magna). All the ecotoxicological tests were supported by chemical analyses to confirm the exposure concentrations of the pharmaceuticals used in the toxicity experiments, since deviations from the nominal concentration can result in underestimation of biological effects. It was found that OXT and FLO have a stronger adverse effect on duckweed (EC50=3.26 and 2.96mgL(-1) respectively) and green algae (EC50=40.4 and 18.0mgL(-1)) than on bacteria (EC50=108 and 29.4mgL(-1)) and crustaceans (EC50=114 and 337mgL(-1)), whereas MET did not exhibit any adverse effect in the tested concentration range. For DOR a very low EC50 of 6.37×10(-5)mgL(-1) towards D. magna was determined, which is five orders of magnitude lower than values known for the toxic reference compound K2Cr2O7. Our data show the strong influence of certain veterinary drugs on aquatic organisms and contribute to a sound assessment of the environmental hazards posed by commonly used pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in animal products : annual report 2012 of the National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Sterk, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    This report if the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for residues of veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in products of animal origin according to Council Directive 96/23/EC describes the activities employed in 2012. The main tasks of the NRL are communication with Official Laboratories

  20. 75 FR 48928 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ....hhs.gov For further information about the public meeting, contact: Ken Lowery, ] International Issues... determination of veterinary drug residues in foods. The Committee is hosted by the United States. Issues To Be... all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age...

  1. Veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in animal products : annual report 2010 of the National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Sterk, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    This report of the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for residues of veterinary drugs in products of animal origin according to 96/23/EC describes the activities employed in 2010. The main tasks of the NRL are the communication with Routine Field Laboratories (RFL), the preparation of quality

  2. Veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in animal products : annual report 2011 of the National Reference Laborator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Sterk, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    This report of the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for residues of veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in products of animal origin according to Council Directive 96/23/EC describes the activities employed in 2011. The main tasks of the NRL are the communication with Routine Field

  3. 77 FR 16806 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... accessible via the World Wide Web at the following address: http://www.codexalimentarius.org/ . Kevin... Science & Policy, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation, HFV-100, FDA, Center for Veterinary Medicine, 7520... World Health Organization (WHO). Through adoption of food standards, codes of practice, and other...

  4. Alternative Drugs in Pain Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Various treatment modalities of acute and chronic pain have been an area of interest of medicine and investigators for centuries. There are two major classes of drugs that are used to control pain: opioid and non-opioid analgesics. They could be used in the case of monotherapy or combination therapy in pain management. However, these agents are not accepted as ideal drugs in clinical approaches against pain because of their serious side effects such as development of tolerance and addiction, renal failure and gastrointestinal bleeding. As a consequent, developing new forms of pain relievers that are more safe and effective without any other side effects has became the main goal of researchers. In recent studies, it has been shown that conotoxin therapies are not addictive, and have tolerable indexes unlike opioids. In addition, conotoxins side effects are much milder and easier to manage than those of opioids. In this regard, it has been emphasized that biotoxins such as conotoxins obtained from marine creatures can be better choices in pain management for future prospects.

  5. [Simultaneous determination of residual veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Hiroko; Hatakeyama, Eriko

    2008-01-01

    A rapid multiresidue method was developed for determination of 98 veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish by LC/MS/MS. The drugs were extracted with methanol, and the extracted solution was diluted with water. The methanol concentration was adjusted to 50%, and finally the diluted solution was filtered through a microfiltration membrane (0.02 microm diameter pore size) prior to LC/MS/MS. Recoveries of 87 drugs from 4 foods (milk, egg, rainbow trout and cattle muscle) fortified at 0.2 microg/g were in the range of 50-150% with a coefficient of variation (%) of less than 20%. The values obtained by this method from livestock products containing antibiotics were similar to those obtained by the official methods. This proposed method is expected to be useful as a multiresidue analysis method for screening of veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish.

  6. The Role of Veterinary Education in Safety Policies for Animal-Assisted Therapy and Activities in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Deborah E; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Siebens, Hannah C; Freeman, Lisa M

    Animal-assisted activities (AAA) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT) programs are increasing in popularity, but current programs vary in their safety and health policies. Veterinarians can have an important role in ensuring the safety of both the animals and humans involved, but it is unclear how best to educate veterinary students to serve effectively in this role. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the knowledge gaps and perceptions of first-year veterinary students on health and safety aspects of AAA/AAT programs by administering a survey. This information could then guide future educational training in veterinary schools to address the knowledge gaps in this area. Formal education during the veterinary curriculum had not yet been provided to these students on AAA/AAT before the survey. Of 98 first-year veterinary students, 91 completed the survey. When asked about policies on visiting animals, 58% of students responded that nursing homes are required to have a policy and 67% responded that hospitals are required to have one. Three quarters of students reported that veterinarians, animal handlers, and facilities should share the responsibility for ensuring safe human-animal interaction in AAA/AAT programs. Most (82%) of the students responded that all or most national and local therapy animal groups prohibit animals that consume raw meat diets from participating in AAA/AAT programs. The results of this survey will help veterinary schools better identify knowledge gaps that can be addressed in veterinary curricula so future veterinarians will be equipped to provide appropriate public health information regarding AAA/AAT programs.

  7. Improved low-power semiconductor diode lasers for photodynamic therapy in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susanne M.; Mueller, Eduard K.; Van de Workeen, Brian C.; Mueller, Otward M.

    2001-05-01

    Cryogenically cooling semiconductor diode lasers provides higher power output, longer device lifetime, and greater monochromaticity. While these effects are well known, such improvements have not been quantified, and thus cryogenically operated semiconductor lasers have not been utilized in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report quantification of these results from laser power meter and photospectrometer data. The emission wavelengths of these low power multiple quantum well semiconductor lasers were found to decrease and become more monochromatic with decreasing temperature. Significant power output improvements also were obtained at cryogenic temperatures. In addition, the threshold current, i.e. the current at which lasing begins, decreased with decreasing temperature. This lower threshold current combined with the increased power output produced dramatically higher device efficiencies. It is proposed that cryogenic operation of semiconductor diode lasers will reduce the number of devices needed to produce the requisite output for many veterinary and medical applications, permitting significant cost reductions.

  8. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(3). 2017. Gberindyer et al. 250. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2017. Vol 38 (3): 250-259. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Drugs Prescription Pattern in Dogs Diagnosed with Parvovirus Enteritis in Some Veterinary Clinics in Nigeria. Gberindyer, F. A.. 1.

  9. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  10. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH TUBERCULOSIS THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    most relevant to tuberculosis drug interactions is drug metabolism, which is explained in more detail below. Drug metabolism interactions. Drugs are metabolised by two types of reactions: phase I reactions that involve oxi- dation, reduction or hydrolysis in which drugs are turned into more polar com- pounds, and phase II ...

  11. Screening of veterinary drug residues in milk from individual farms in Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrieska-Stojkovic Elizabeta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of 497 raw milk samples collected at individual farms and collection tanks for milk from eight regions from Macedonia were examined for chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, quinolones and tetracyclines from October 2008 until April 2011. Immunoassay methods were used for the determination of chloramphenicol, sulfonamides and quinolones, and high performance liquid chromatography with Diode Array detection was applied for screening of tetracyclines. The methods were validated according to the recommendations laid down by European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The obtained data confirmed that the methods were appropriate for detection of antibiotics determined, at the concentration level of interest. Measured range of concentrations (in μg/kg was 13.5-147.9 for sulfonamides, 0.6-22.0 for quinolones and 17.4-149.1 for tetracyclines, with calculated mean values (in μg/kg 24.7 for sulfonamides, 12.6 for qinolones and 41.9 for tetracyclines. None of the analyzed samples showed presence of chloramphenicol over the minimum required performance level value of the screening method. The calculated estimated daily intakes for the average daily consumption of 200 mL of milk for an adult in Macedonia, for the examined antimicrobials, obtained levels 2 to 100 times lower than the values of the acceptable daily intakes fixed by World Health Organization. This indicates that toxicological risk associated with the consumption of analyzed milk could not be considered as a public health issue with regards to these veterinary drugs.

  12. [Non-drug therapies for CRPS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, H H; Tanislav, C; Birklein, F

    2012-06-01

    State of the art CRPS therapy comprises medication, interventional therapies and non-pharmaceutical treatments like physiotherapy (PT), occupational therapy, PT with cognitive behavioural elements (mirror therapy, 'motor imagery', and 'graded exposure'), psychotherapeutic methods, local therapies and neurostimulation. These treatments are mostly as successful as medical or interventional treatment. These effects have been demonstrated in small but randomised controlled studies. Adjuvant therapies were shown to reduce pain and the severity of dysfunction in CRPS. Therefore, these non-drug therapies should be an essential part of any multimodal CRPS treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Interspecies allometric meta-analysis of the comparative pharmacokinetics of 85 drugs across veterinary and laboratory animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Q; Gehring, R; Tell, L A; Li, M; Riviere, J E

    2015-06-01

    Allometric scaling is widely used for the determination of first dosage regimen and the interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetic parameters across many animal species during drug development. In this article, 85 drugs used in veterinary medicine obtained from the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank database were selected for allometric scaling analysis. Outlier species were identified by statistical methods. The results showed that 77% and 88% of drugs displayed significant correlations between total systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady status (Vss) vs. body weight (P allometric exponent b for CL and Vss displays approximate normal distribution, with means (0.87 and 0.99) and standard deviations (0.143 and 0.157) for CL and Vss, respectively. Twelve drugs were identified to have at least one outlier species for CL and ten drugs for Vss. The human CL and Vss were predicted for selected drugs by the obtained allometric equations. The predicted CL and Vss were within a threefold error compared to observed values, except the predicted CL values for antipyrine, warfarin and diazepam. The results can be used to estimate cross-species pharmacokinetic profiles for predicting drug dosages in veterinary species, and to identify those species for which interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetics properties may be problematic. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Veterinary drug residues in meat: Concerns and rapid methods for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Milagro; Toldrá, Fidel

    2008-01-01

    The use of substances having hormonal or thyreostatic action as well as β-agonists is banned in the European Union. However, sometimes forbidden drugs may be added to feeds for illegal administration to farm animals for promoting increased muscle development or increased water retention and thus obtain an economical benefit. The result is a fraudulent overweight of meat but, what is worse, residues of these substances may remain in meat and may pose a real threat to the consumer either through exposure to the residues, transfer of antibiotic resistance or allergy risk. This has exerted a great concern among European consumers. The control of the absence of these forbidden substances in animal foods and feeds is regulated in the European Union by Directive96/23/EC on measures to monitor certain substances and residues in live animals and animal products. Analytical methodology, including criteria for identification and confirmation, for the monitoring of compliance was also given in Decisions 93/256/EEC and 93/257/EEC. More recently, Decision 2002/657/EC provided rules for the analytical methods to be used in testing of official samples. A crucial step is the screening of veterinary drug residues in live animals, feeds and animal products in view of the remarkable number of samples and large variety of residues to be analysed. In recent years, different rapid methods having easy performance, high sensitivity and high throughput have been proposed and are being extensively used. These methods as well as other new methods are reviewed in this manuscript.

  15. Analysis of veterinary drugs and metabolites in milk using quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Clark, Susan B; Miller, Keith E

    2011-07-27

    A quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was developed to analyze veterinary drug residues in milk. Milk samples were extracted with acetonitrile. A molecular weight cutoff filter was the only cleanup step in the procedure. Initially, a set of target compounds (including representative sulfonamides, tetracyclines, β-lactams, and macrolides) was used for validation. Screening of residues was accomplished by collecting TOF (MS(1)) data and comparing the accurate mass and retention times of found compounds to a database containing information for veterinary drugs. The residues included in the study could be detected in samples fortified at the levels of concern with this procedure 97% of the time. Although the method was intended to be qualitative, an evaluation of the MS data indicated a linear response and acceptable recoveries for a majority of target compounds. In addition, MS/MS data were also generated for the [M + H](+) ions. Product ions for each compound were identified, and their mass accuracy was compared to theoretical values. Finally, incurred milk samples from cows dosed with veterinary drugs, including sulfamethazine, flunixin, cephapirin, or enrofloxacin, were analyzed with Q-TOF LC-MS. In addition to monitoring for the parent residues, several metabolites were detected in these samples by TOF. Proposed identification of these residues could be made by evaluating the MS and MS/MS data. For example, several plausible metabolites of enrofloxacin, some not previously observed in milk, are reported in this study.

  16. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: A rapid screening tool for veterinary drug preparations and forensic samples from hormone crime investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielen, M.W.F. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: michel.nielen@wur.nl; Hooijerink, H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Claassen, F.C. [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Engelen, M.C. van [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Beek, T.A. van [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2009-04-01

    Hormone and veterinary drug screening and forensics can benefit from the recent developments in desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS). In this work the feasibility of DESI application has been studied. Using a linear ion trap or quadrupole time-of-flight (TOF) MS instrument both full-scan and data-dependent collision-induced dissociation MS{sup n} spectra were acquired in seconds without sample preparation. Preliminary data are presented for the rapid screening of (pro)hormone supplement samples, an illegal steroid cocktail and forensic samples from veterinary drug investigations. The potential of this DESI approach is clearly demonstrated since compounds observed could be independently confirmed by liquid chromatography/TOFMS with accurate mass measurement, and/or proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Specific concerns related to false-positive and false-negative findings due to limitations in quantification and memory-effects are briefly discussed. It is envisaged that DESI will achieve a prominent role in hormone and veterinary drug analysis in the near future.

  17. Structural characterization of product ions of regulated veterinary drugs by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (part 3) Anthelmintics, thyreostats, and flukicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Previously we have reported a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of regulated veterinary drugs. The methods used three selected transition ions but most of these ions lacked structural characterization. The work presented here ...

  18. Characterizing chronic and acute health risks of residues of veterinary drugs in food: latest methodological developments by the joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobis, Alan; Cerniglia, Carl; Chicoine, Alan; Fattori, Vittorio; Lipp, Markus; Reuss, Rainer; Verger, Philippe; Tritscher, Angelika

    2017-11-01

    The risk assessment of residues of veterinary drugs in food is a field that continues to evolve. The toxicological end-points to be considered are becoming more nuanced and in light of growing concern about the development of antimicrobial resistance, detailed analysis of the antimicrobial activity of the residues of veterinary drugs in food is increasingly incorporated in the assessment. In recent years, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has refined its approaches to provide a more comprehensive and fit-for-purpose risk assessment. This publication describes in detail the consideration of acute and chronic effects, the estimation of acute and chronic dietary exposure, current approaches for including microbiological endpoints in the risk assessment, and JECFA's considerations for the potential effects of food processing on residues from veterinary drugs. JECFA now applies these approaches in the development of health-based guidance values (i.e. safe exposure levels) for residues of veterinary drugs. JECFA, thus, comprehensively addresses acute and chronic risks by using corresponding estimates for acute and chronic exposure and suitable correction for the limited bioavailability of bound residues by the Gallo-Torres model. On a case-by-case basis, JECFA also considers degradation products that occur from normal food processing of food containing veterinary drug residues. These approaches will continue to be refined to ensure the most scientifically sound basis for the establishment of health-based guidance values for veterinary drug residues.

  19. Completeness of reporting of radiation therapy planning, dose, and delivery in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts from 2005 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyerleber, Michele A; McEntee, Margaret C; Farrelly, John; Podgorsak, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Surrounding a shift toward evidence-based medicine and widespread adoption of reporting guidelines such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement, there has been a growing body of literature evaluating the quality of reporting in human and veterinary medicine. These reviews have consistently demonstrated the presence of substantive deficiencies in completeness of reporting. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts in regards to treatment planning methods, dose, and delivery and to introduce a set of reporting guidelines to serve as a standard for future reporting. Forty-six veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts published between 2005 and 2010 were evaluated for reporting of 50 items pertaining to patient data, treatment planning, radiation dose, delivery of therapy, quality assurance, and adjunctive therapy. A mean of 40% of checklist items were reported in a given manuscript (range = 8-75%). Only 9/50 (18%) checklist items were reported in > or = 80% manuscripts. The completeness of reporting was best in regards to a statement of prescription radiation protocol (91-98% reported) and worst in regards to specification of absorbed dose within target volumes and surrounding normal tissues (0-6% reported). No manuscripts met the current International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) dose specification recommendations. Incomplete reporting may stem from the predominance of retrospective manuscripts and the variability of protocols and equipment in veterinary radiation oncology. Adoption of reporting guidelines as outlined in this study is recommended to improve the quality of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology.

  20. Residues of veterinary drugs in eggs and possible explanations for their distribution between egg white and yolk

    OpenAIRE

    Kan,Cornelis Adriaan

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary drugs are therapeutically used for laying hens but may also reach them unintentionally via the feed e.g. as a result of cross-contamination during premix manufacture, feed preparation in the feed mill or during feed transport. When these compounds reach the bloodstream, they will occur in the ovary with growing follicles and the oviduct, where the egg white is formed and secreted. The deposition of drugs in either yolk or white or both phases determines where one should look fo...

  1. Veterinary Drugs and Growth Promoters Residues in Meat and Processed Meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Milagro; Toldrá, Fidel

    Veterinary drugs, which comprise a large number of different types of substances, are generally intended for therapeutic (to control infectious diseases) and prophylactic (to prevent against infections) purposes in farm animals. Other substances with growth promoting effect may exert antimicrobial effect against the microbial flora in the gut to take maximum profit of nutrients in the feed or by affecting the animal’s metabolism. Most of these substances are orally active and can be administered either in the feed or in the drinking water. Other active hormones are applied in the form of small implants into the subcutaneous tissue of the ears. These are slow release (several weeks or months) devices and the ears are discarded at the slaughter. Growth promoters allow a better efficiency in the feed conversion rate. The net effect is an increased protein deposition, partly due to muscle proteases inhibition (Fiems, Buts, Boucque, Demeyer, & Cottyn, 1990), usually linked to fat utilization (Brockman & Laarveld, 1986). The result is a leaner meat (Lone, 1997) with some toughness derived from the production of connective tissue and collagen crosslinking (Miller, Judge, Diekman, Hudgens, & Aberle, 1989; Miller, Judge, & Schanbacher, 1990). Some recent fraudulent practices, consisting of the use of a kind of “cocktails” or mixtures of several substances like β-agonists and corticosteroids at very low amounts (Monsón et al., 2007), are difficult to detect with modern analytical instrumentation. They try to obtain a synergistic effect for a similar growth promotion with lower probability of detection by official control laboratories (Reig & Toldrá, 2007).

  2. Questions and Challenges in the Development of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devireddy, Lax R; Boxer, Lynne; Myers, Michael J; Skasko, Mark; Screven, Rudell

    2017-10-01

    The therapeutic potential of stem cells has fascinated those interested in treating diseases in both human and animal subjects. Although the exact mechanism of action and the definitive effectiveness of stem cell therapies remain unclear, animal owner perceptions and a desire for improved treatment options have fueled the interest of clinicians and stakeholders. Standards do not yet exist to define the critical attributes of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC)-based products derived from veterinary species such as the dog, cat, and horse. This has led veterinary stakeholders to adopt those guidelines and criteria set forth for human MSC-based products; however, these criteria are not always applicable to MSCs from dogs, cats, and horses (e.g., variability in species-specific cell surface marker expression and antibody cross reactivity). Establishing useful standards and meaningful product quality criteria as well as the understanding of full spectrum of MSC functions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy for veterinary (companion and recreational animals) MSC-based-products will be critical to furthering product development, and may ultimately facilitate the availability of FDA-approved MSC-based products for use in veterinary medicine.

  3. Enhancing human-animal relationships through veterinary medical instruction in animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Caroline Brunsman

    2008-01-01

    Instruction in animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and animal-assisted activities (AAAs) teaches veterinary medical students to confidently and assertively maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of this union of animals and people. Instruction in AAT/AAA also addresses requirements by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education that accredited schools/colleges of veterinary medicine include in their standard curriculum the topics of the human-animal bond, behavior, and the contributions of the veterinarian to the overall public and professional health care teams. Entry-level veterinarians should be prepared to: (1) assure that animals who provide AAT/AAA are healthy enough to visit nursing homes, hospitals, or other institutions; (2) promote behavior testing that selects animals who will feel safe, comfortable, and connected; (3) advise facilities regarding infection control and ways to provide a safe environment where the animals, their handlers, and the people being visited will not be injured or become ill; and (4) advocate for their patients and show compassion for their clients when animals are determined to be inappropriate participants in AAT/AAA programs. This article presents AAT/AAA terminology, ways in which veterinarians can advocate for AAT/AAA, the advantages of being involved in AAT/AAA, a model AAT/AAA practicum from Tuskegee University's School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM), and examples of co-curricular activities in AAT/AAA by TUSVM's student volunteers.

  4. [Drug interactions in pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syhr, K M J; Oertel, B G; Geisslinger, G

    2015-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons for consulting a physician. Chronic pain patients often suffer from a variety of comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety and they are therefore often simultaneously treated with more than one drug. The probability of drug interactions increases with every additional drug. A systematic internet and literature search up to February 2015 was carried out. Systematic lists were included. In addition, the drug prescription information sheets were used and an internet search via Pubmed and google.com was carried out for drugs alone and in combination in order to find substance-specific interactions. A differentiation is made between pharmaceutical, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmaceutical interactions are caused by chemical, physical or physicochemical incompatibility of drugs or adjuvants used. These can even occur outside the body and during concomitant administration via the same route. A pharmacodynamic interaction in pain management is for example the additive sedative effect of opioids and benzodiazepines when taken together. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur during the absorption, distribution, metabolism and in the elimination phases. Many drug interactions can be avoided by careful and continuous evaluation of pharmacotherapy and if necessary its adaptation; however, a sound knowledge of the underlying pharmacological mechanisms and the properties of currently used analgesics is necessary.

  5. Inhalable drugs for systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkery, K

    2000-07-01

    Although oral and injectable drug formulations still dominate the market, interest in pulmonary delivery has been rising steadily. Given patients' desire for an alternative to injections, and recent advances in aerosol science and pulmonary medicine, the potential for improved disease management outcomes by using aerosols for systemic drug delivery should lead the way for a shift to inhalables.

  6. Laboratory markers in personalized drug therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, A.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade two major trends have influenced the thinking about the benefit-risk balance in drug therapy.The first trend showed that this balance is not only determined by the interaction of the pharmacological properties of the drug with the patient’s (patho)physiological profile, but is

  7. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Workshop report: the 2012 antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine: exploring the consequences of antimicrobial drug use: a 3-D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Blondeau, J; Cerniglia, C E; Fink-Gremmels, J; Guenther, S; Hunter, R P; Li, X-Z; Papich, M; Silley, P; Soback, S; Toutain, P-L; Zhang, Q

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge that impacts both human and veterinary health care. The resilience of microbes is reflected in their ability to adapt and survive in spite of our best efforts to constrain their infectious capabilities. As science advances, many of the mechanisms for microbial survival and resistance element transfer have been identified. During the 2012 meeting of Antimicrobial Agents in Veterinary Medicine (AAVM), experts provided insights on such issues as use vs. resistance, the available tools for supporting appropriate drug use, the importance of meeting the therapeutic needs within the domestic animal health care, and the requirements associated with food safety and food security. This report aims to provide a summary of the presentations and discussions occurring during the 2012 AAVM with the goal of stimulating future discussions and enhancing the opportunity to establish creative and sustainable solutions that will guarantee the availability of an effective therapeutic arsenal for veterinary species. © Published (2014). This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Determination of pesticides and veterinary drug residues in food by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiá, Ana [Food and Environmental Safety Research Group, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Research Center on Desertification (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GV), Carretera Moncada-Náquera, Moncada (Spain); Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin [Unit of Public Health, Hygiene and Environmental Health, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Center for Advanced Research in Public Health (CSISP-FISABIO), Valencia (Spain); Picó, Yolanda, E-mail: Yolanda.Pico@uv.es [Food and Environmental Safety Research Group, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Research Center on Desertification (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GV), Carretera Moncada-Náquera, Moncada (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-14

    Monitoring of pesticides and veterinary drug residues is required to enforce legislation and guarantee food safety. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the prevailing technique for assessing both types of residues because LC offers a versatile and universal separation mechanism suitable for non-gas chromatography (GC) amenable and the majority of GC-amenable compounds. This characteristic becomes more relevant when LC is coupled to MS because the high sensitivity and specificity of the detector allows to apply generic sample preparation procedures, which simultaneously extract a wide variety of residues with different physico-chemical properties. Determination of metabolites and degradation products, non-target suspected screening of an increasing number of residues, and even unknowns identification are also becoming inherent LC-MS advantages thanks to the latest advances. For routine analysis and, in particular, for official surveillance purposes in food control, analytical methods properly validated following strict guidelines are needed. After a brief introduction and an outline of the legislation applicable around the world, aspects such as improvement of specificity of high-throughput methods, resolution and mass accuracy of identification strategies and quantitative accuracy are critically reviewed in this article. In them, extraction, separation and determination are emphasized. The main objective is to offer an assessment of the state of the art and identify research needs and future trends in determining pesticide and veterinary drug residues in food by LC-MS. - Highlights: • An overview of status and future trends in this field. • Analytical method's compliance with guidelines to ensure reliability. • QuEChERS platform is a referent to extract both, pesticides and veterinary drugs in food. • The progress that liquid chromatography has shown in recent years is revised. • Determination of target, non-target and unknowns is

  11. Quantitative analysis of veterinary drugs in bovine muscle and milk by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito-Shida, Shizuka; Sakai, Takatoshi; Nemoto, Satoru; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    A simple and reliable multiresidue method for quantitative determination of veterinary drugs in bovine muscle and milk using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) was developed. Critical MS parameters such as capillary voltage, cone voltage, collision energy, desolvation gas temperature and extraction mass window were carefully optimised to obtain the best possible sensitivity. Analytical samples were prepared using extraction with acetonitrile and hexane in the presence of anhydrous sodium sulphate and acetic acid, followed by ODS cartridge clean-up. The developed method was validated for 82 veterinary drugs in bovine muscle and milk at spike levels of 0.01 and 0.1 mg kg(-)(1). With the exception of cefoperazone and phenoxymethylpenicillin, all these compounds exhibited sufficient signal intensity at 0.01 μg ml(-1) (equivalent to 0.01 mg kg(-)(1)), indicating the high sensitivity of the developed method. For most targets, the determined accuracies were within 70-120%, with repeatability and reproducibility being below 20% at both levels. Except for sulfathiazole in bovine muscle, no interfering peaks at target compound retention times were detected in the blank extract, indicating that the developed method is highly selective. The absence of sulfathiazole in bovine muscle was confirmed by simultaneous acquisition at low and high collision energies to afford exact masses of molecular adduct and fragment ions. Satisfactory linearity was observed for all compounds, with matrix effects being negligible for most targets in bovine muscle and milk at both spike levels. Overall, the results suggest that the developed LC-QTOF-MS method is suitable for routine regulatory-purpose analysis of veterinary drugs in bovine muscle and milk.

  12. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Beate; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G; Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-05-29

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two), six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the interventions of media alone as well as through the intervention of

  13. Sample-based reporting of official national control of veterinary drug residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Hinge; Jensen, Louise Grønhøj Hørbye; Madsen, Helle L.

    Data collection is an essential prerequisite for assessing compliance of chemical residues in food and for risk assessment. The present system for collecting aggregated data of residues of veterinary medicinal products and other substances in animals and animal products has limitations for risk...

  14. [Development of the databases for ADI (acceptable daily intake) and relevant information on food additives, pesticides and veterinary drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Takiko; Sasaki, Shiho; Tanaka, Keiko; Toda, Miou; Uneyama, Chikako; Yamamoto, Miyako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2006-01-01

    Databases for ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake) and relevant information on food additives, pesticides and veterinary drugs were developed. The databases we developed are easily accessible on the web, and contain ADIs, latest evaluation year, classification and use, as well as synonym and CAS registry number. The databases are designed to be easily updated by researchers as ADI and relevant information are updated or added without delay. The database for food additives has already provided from the homepage of NIHS, and the access log of the web site was 1325/month in December 2005 and 2179/month in March 2006.

  15. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  16. [Pharmacogenetics and tailored drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F.C.; Borregaard, N.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics traditionally designates the study of genetically determined variation in metabolism of drugs and toxins from the environment. The concept of phamacogenetics has been widened to encompass how essential genetic alterations central to the development of diseases may by used to target...

  17. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function; all of these may change from patient to patient or even in the same patient depending on the clinical status. However, CRRT modalities are generally more efficient than intermittent hemodialysis at drug removal, in some cases approximating or even exceeding normal renal function, resulting in a significant risk of subtherapeutic dosing if conventional hemodialysis dosing recommendations are followed. This annotated bibliography provides a summary of publications analyzing drug removal during CRRT, including CRRT settings and drug clearance values found in each study. Caution is warranted as findings from one study may not be generalizable to all patients due to the many factors that influence drug removal. Serum drug concentrations should be monitored when available, and patient clinical status is exceedingly important for following expected and unexpected responses to drug therapies. Reviews on general drug dosing calculations in CRRT are available elsewhere.

  19. Drug Therapy in Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Salem

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The behavior and dietary treatments are not so successful for extremely obese adolescents. Therefore, using drugs to treat extremely obese children and adolescents are among the modern approaches. This research aims to study the pharmaceutical interventions performed for treatment of obese children. Materials and Methods: The strategy of research was using of key words ‘obesity’, ‘adolescence’, ‘treatment’ and ‘anti-obesity drugs’ were searched in websites of PubMed, Iranian Medical Digital Library, SID, Iran Medex, Magiran. This study reviewed all the available published papers in English and Farsi languages during 2000-2010. The Criteria for exclusion was The papers that had been published on interventions and treatment of eating disorders, type II diabetes or the obesity caused by the secondary syndromes. Results: Twelve papers were found as short-term clinical trials and/or long-term follow-ups. In these studies, the positive effects of ‘sibutramine’ in some studies are shown; although some other side effects are reported as well. A significant weight-loss had been reported on ‘orlistat’ medicine, but digestive complications had been observed as well. None of the studies had followed up patients for more than one year. Apparently, ‘Metformin’ requires further studies.Conclusion: The FDA has only approved ‘sibutramine’ and ‘orlistat’ drugs. But side effects of long-term these drugs have already been unknown. However, it seems that ‘orlistat’ is applied for ≥12-year-old children and ‘sibutramine’ for ≥ 16-year-old children.

  20. Considerations on the aquaculture development and on the use of veterinary drugs: special issue for fluoroquinolones--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Silvia Pilco; Paschoal, Jonas Augusto Rizzato; Reyes, Felix Guillermo Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Aquaculture has become an important source of fish available for human consumption. In order to achieve greater productivity, intensive fish cultivation systems are employed, which can cause greater susceptibility to diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Antimicrobial substances are compounds used in livestock production with the objectives of inhibiting the growth of microorganisms and treatment or prevention of diseases. It is well recognized that the issues of antimicrobial use in food animals are of global concern about its impact on food safety. This paper present an overview of the aquaculture production in the whole world, raising the particularities in Brazil, highlighting the importance of the use of veterinary drugs in this system of animal food production, and address the potential risks arising from their indiscriminate use and their impacts on aquaculture production as they affect human health and the environment. The manuscript also discusses the analytical methods commonly used in the determination of veterinary drug residues in fish, with special issue for fluroquinolones residues and with emphasis on employment of LC-MS/MS analytical technique. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry for the screening of veterinary drugs in cross-contaminated feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seró, Raquel; Núñez, Oscar; Bosch, Jaume; Grases, José M; Rodríguez, Pilar; Moyano, Encarnacion; Galceran, Martia Teresa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-HRMS) screening method was developed for fast identification of veterinary drugs in cross-contaminated feedstuffs. The reliable detection was performed working at high resolution (70,000 full width half maximum, FWHM) using an orbitrap mass analyzer. Among the optimized DESI parameters, the solvent (acetonitrile/water, 80:20, v/v) and the sample substrate (poly-tetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) were critical to obtain the best sensitivity. To analyze the solid feed samples, different approaches were tested and a simple solid-liquid extraction and the direct analysis of an aliquot (2 μL) of the extract after letting it dry on the PTFE printed spot provided the best results. The identification of the veterinary drugs (target and non-target) in the cross-contaminated feedstuffs based on the accurate mass measurement and the isotopic pattern fit was performed automatically using a custom-made database. The positive cross-contaminated feed samples were quantified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The results obtained demonstrate that DESI-HRMS can be proposed as a fast and suitable screening method to identify positive cross-contaminated feedstuffs reducing the number of samples to be subsequently quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS, thus improving the productivity in quality control laboratories.

  2. Drug therapy in the neonatal foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggot, J D

    1994-04-01

    The neonatal period in foals refers to the first 7 days of postnatal life. The effects of drugs (pharmacologic agents) may be different in neonatal foals, particularly during the first 3 days of postnatal life, from those in older foals and adult horses. The changed drug effects decrease as the physiologic processes that affect absorption, distribution, and elimination (metabolism and excretion) of drugs mature. Dosage regimens should take into account the altered pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs, and because of wide individual variation, the response to therapy should be closely monitored for signs of toxicity. In conjunction with the prudent use of drugs, good nursing care and the provision of supportive therapy are critical in the management of neonatal foal diseases. Over-crowding imposes stress upon young foals and predisposes them to an increased incidence of bacterial and parasitic infections. The collection of specimens for precise microbiologic diagnosis and correction of deficits in serum immunoglobulins should precede antimicrobial therapy. Although E. coli is by far the most common cause of bacterial infections in neonatal foals, other bacterial pathogens of unpredictable susceptibility often cause infection. The selection of an antimicrobial drug for specific therapy should be based on both the microbiologic (quantitative susceptibility) and pharmacologic (pharmacokinetic) properties of the drug. The use of an antimicrobial drug or combination of drugs that will produce a bactericidal effect is highly desirable. Whenever possible, a parenteral preparation that can be administered intravenously should be chosen. The bioavailability and selectivity of action of pharmacologic agents are influenced by the dosage form and route of administration. Diazepam is the sedative drug of choice for neonatal foals. Cimetidine, an H2-receptor antagonist, may be indicated in foals diagnosed to have gastric ulcers; hepatic microsomal oxidative metabolism of drugs

  3. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  4. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harter, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, most patients who required parenteral anticoagulation received heparin, whereas those patients requiring oral anticoagulation received warfarin. Due to the narrow therapeutic index and need for frequent laboratory monitoring associated with warfarin, there has been a desire to develop newer, more effective anticoagulants. Consequently, in recent years many novel anticoagulants have been developed. The emergency physician may institute anticoagulation therapy in the short term (e.g. heparin for a patient being admitted, or may start a novel anticoagulation for a patient being discharged. Similarly, a patient on a novel anticoagulant may present to the emergency department due to a hemorrhagic complication. Consequently, the emergency physician should be familiar with the newer and older anticoagulants. This review emphasizes the indication, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and potential reversal strategies for various anticoagulants that the emergency physician will likely encounter. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:11–17.

  5. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory... [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Veterinary Medicine Committee was...

  6. 75 FR 52605 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. General Function of the...-1100. Contact Person: Aleta Sindelar, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-3), Food and Drug...

  7. Targeted Multiresidue Analysis of Veterinary Drugs in Milk-Based Powders Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, James B; Simon, Kelli A; Wong, Jon W

    2017-08-30

    An analytical method was developed and validated for the determination of 40 veterinary drugs in various milk-based powders. The method involves acetonitrile/water extraction, solid-phase filtration for lipid removal in fat-containing matrices, and analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limits of quantitation (LOQ) ranged from 0.02 to 82 ng/g. Acceptable recoveries (70-120%, RSD powder. Similar results were obtained for whole milk powder, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate, and whey protein isolate. This new method will allow for better monitoring of a wide range of veterinary drugs in milk-based powders.

  8. Effectiveness of action in India to reduce exposure of Gyps vultures to the toxic veterinary drug diclofenac.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cuthbert

    Full Text Available Contamination of their carrion food supply with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac has caused rapid population declines across the Indian subcontinent of three species of Gyps vultures endemic to South Asia. The governments of India, Pakistan and Nepal took action in 2006 to prevent the veterinary use of diclofenac on domesticated livestock, the route by which contamination occurs. We analyse data from three surveys of the prevalence and concentration of diclofenac residues in carcasses of domesticated ungulates in India, carried out before and after the implementation of a ban on veterinary use. There was little change in the prevalence and concentration of diclofenac between a survey before the ban and one conducted soon after its implementation, with the percentage of carcasses containing diclofenac in these surveys estimated at 10.8 and 10.7%, respectively. However, both the prevalence and concentration of diclofenac had fallen markedly 7-31 months after the implementation of the ban, with the true prevalence in this third survey estimated at 6.5%. Modelling of the impact of this reduction in diclofenac on the expected rate of decline of the oriental white-backed vulture (Gyps bengalensis in India indicates that the decline rate has decreased to 40% of the rate before the ban, but is still likely to be rapid (about 18% year(-1. Hence, further efforts to remove diclofenac from vulture food are still needed if the future recovery or successful reintroduction of vultures is to be feasible.

  9. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Combination With Trastuzumab in Patients With HER2-Positive, Metastatic Breast Cancer Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Herceptin ...Trastuzumab ( Herceptin ) -Refractory, Metastatic Breast Cancer Active, not recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Capecitabine|Drug: Lapatinib Lapatinib...Lapatinib Plus Herceptin With or Without Endocrine Therapy Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Herceptin |Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Letrozole

  10. Multiresidue Screening of Veterinary Drugs in Meat, Milk, Egg, and Fish Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, JeongWoo; Park, Su-Jeong; Park, Hae-Chul; Hossain, Md Akil; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Son, Seong-Wan; Lim, Chae-Mi; Kim, Tae-Wan; Cho, Byung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    New approaches to veterinary drug screening based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF/MS) are rapid and have high selectivity and sensitivity. In this study, we developed a multiresidue method for screening over 100 veterinary drug residues using ion trap (IT)-ToF/MS. The screened compounds comprised major drug classes used in veterinary practice, representing the following: amphenicols, anthelmintics, benzimidazoles, β-lactams, coccidiostats, ionophores, macrolides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and tranquilizers. The method was developed based on chromatographic retention time, specific accurate mass, isotope distribution, and fragment data. Each compound was validated at three levels, and the mass accuracy, accuracy, and repeatability were calculated. All parameters showed acceptable values and conformed to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria. This screening method can simultaneously analyze over 100 veterinary drugs in meat, milk, eggs, and fish in a single analytical run.

  11. PRINCIPLES OF DRUG THERAPY IN NEWBORNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Yatsyk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the neonats adequate pharmacotherapy, including use of medications off-label. The authors emphasize the characteristics of a newborn child organism (as a full-term and preterm that define the distinct processes of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the older children. This paper discusses the problem of the optimal route of administration choice, provides basic information about medications used in the most common pathological conditions in newborns. Key words: drug therapy, drugs, newborns, premature infants. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 50–56.

  12. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  13. Identification of transformation products of pesticides and veterinary drugs in food and related matrices: use of retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Vidal, José Luis Martínez; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2015-04-10

    Retrospective analysis has been applied in different samples, including honey, meat, feed and nutraceutical products from ginkgo biloba, soya, royal jelly and green tea, with the aim of searching transformation products of pesticides and veterinary drugs, which were not included in an initial analysis. Generic extraction and analytical procedures based on high resolution mass spectrometry (Exactive-Orbitrap analyser was used) have been applied. All obtained data have been reprocessed and some compounds as anhydroerythromycin in honey and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in feed have been detected, demonstrating the applicability and the utility of the procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of retrospective approach have been highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 15387 - Veterinary Feed Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 514, and 558 Veterinary Feed Directive... relating to veterinary feed directive (VFD) drugs. FDA's VFD regulation, which became effective on January... CONTACT: Neal Bataller, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-230), Food and Drug Administration, 7500...

  15. Development of starch based mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems for application in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gök, Mehmet Koray; Özgümüş, Saadet; Demir, Kamber; Cirit, Ümüt; Pabuccuoğlu, Serhat; Cevher, Erdal; Özsoy, Yıldız; Bacınoğlu, Süleyman

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate the mucoadhesive, biocompatible and biodegradable progesterone containing vaginal tablets based on modified starch copolymers for the estrus synchronization of ewes. Starch-graft-poly(acrylic acid) copolymers (S-g-PAA) were synthesized and characterized. The vaginal tablets were fabricated with S-g-PAA and their equilibrium swelling degree (Qe) and matrix erosion (ME%) were determined in lactate buffer solution. In vitro, mucoadhesive properties of the tablets were investigated by using ewe vaginal mucosa and in vivo residence time were also investigated. In vitro and in vivo progesterone release profiles from the tablets were compared with two commercial products. Tablet formulation containing wheat starch based grafted copolymer (WS-g-PAA)gc indicated promising results and might be convenient as an alternative product to the commercial products in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug Dosing During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A. Jill

    2008-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal func...

  17. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Masoud; Farhoudi, Ramin

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome), are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. PMID:29317800

  18. The veterinary drug ivermectin influences immune response in the yellow dung fly (Scathophaga stercoraria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Helen M. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: helen.west@nottingham.ac.uk; Tracy, Saoirse R. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Phenoloxidase (PO) is a key enzyme involved in the immune response of insects. We show that egg-to-adult exposure to residues of 0.001, but not 0.0005 mg kg{sup -1} ivermectin elevated PO activity in yellow dung flies (Scathophaga stercoraria) developing in cattle dung. Fly fat content was unaffected by the treatments. Therefore, the response of PO was a direct effect of ivermectin and not an indirect one caused by an alteration in body 'condition'. This supports the non-intuitive conclusion that flies surviving exposure to faecal residues may have enhanced immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the effects on PO activity of insecticidal residues in livestock dung. The non-target effects of such residues are of wide interest, given the global use of veterinary products. - Phenoloxidase activity in Scathophaga stercoraria is enhanced by ivermectin and that effect is transferred to the adult fly from the larval stage.

  19. [Drug therapy for benign prostatic syndrome (BPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, R

    2006-09-01

    Alpha1-receptor blockers (alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin and terazosin), 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (dutasteride and finasteride) and combinations thereof are used in the drug treatment of benign prostatic syndrome. As before, there is still no evidence supporting the use of plant extracts, the use of anticholinergic substances alone or in combination with other BPS drugs is currently under investigation and should not be attempted outside of clinical trials. For all drugs the placebo effect is considerable. Accordingly, deviations from the recommended doses are rapidly associated with an activity loss over that of placebo. alpha1-Receptor blockers show a rapid onset of action and are slightly superior to 5alpha-reductase inhibitors with regard to the relief of symptoms. All alpha1-receptor blockers are similarly effective at adequate doses, however, quantitative differences are seen in the side effect profiles. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors also provide relief from BPS-associated symptoms with the relief being volume-dependent. Prostate volume-dependent complications of BPS (operation risk and risk of acute urine retention) can be reduced by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. Long-term drug studies have demonstrated the superiority of combination therapies over monotherapies with alpha1-receptor blockers and 5alpha-reductase inhibitors in patients with a high risk for progression. This superiority is accompanied by a combination of the respective side-effect profiles and their absolute increase. Besides poorer tolerability, combination therapies also result in higher costs. Thus, it is important to decide at an early stage which patients are to be treated with drugs and which by surgery.

  20. Ion-exchange solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of veterinary drugs in organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yanmei; Xuan, Yanfang; Song, Wei; Si, Wenshuai; Zhao, Zhihui; Rao, Qinxiong

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of veterinary drugs in organic fertilizers is crucial for an assessment of potential risks to soil microbial communities and human health. We develop a robust and sensitive method to quantitatively determine 19 veterinary drugs (amantadine, sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones) in organic fertilizers. The method involved a simple solid-liquid extraction step using the combination of acetonitrile and McIlvaine buffer as extraction solvent, followed by cleanup with a solid-phase extraction cartridge containing polymeric mixed-mode anion-exchange sorbents. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was used to separate and detect target analytes. We particularly focused on the optimization of sample clean-up step: different diluents and dilution factors were tested. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity, recovery, precision, sensitivity and specificity. The recoveries of all the drugs ranged from 70.9% to 112.7% at three concentration levels, with the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 15.7%. The limits of quantification were between 1.0 and 10.0μg/kg for all the drugs. Matrix effect was minimized by matrix-matched calibration curves. The analytical method was successfully applied for the survey of veterinary drugs contamination in 20 compost samples. The results indicated that fluoroquinolones had higher incidence rate and mean concentration levels ranging from 31.9 to 308.7μg/kg compared with other drugs. We expect the method will provide the basis for risk assessment of veterinary drugs in organic fertilizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In Vitro Research Tools in the Field of Human Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity and Their Present Use in Small Animal Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Lavergne S.

    2016-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) are immune-mediated idiosyncratic adverse drug events. Type I DHR are often referred to as “immediate” and involve B lymphocyte-secreted IgE that bind to the membrane of basophils and mast cells, inducing their degranulation. This review presents various in vitro tests that were developed in the field of human type I HS and implemented as clinical diagnostic tools in human cases of immediate DHR. The respective strengths and weaknesses of each test will be discussed in parallel of validation data such as specificity and sensitivity whenever available. Some of them have also been used as diagnostic tools in veterinary medicine, but not in cases of immediate DHR. Most of these diagnostic tools can be categorized into humoral and cellular tests. The former tests measure serum concentrations of factors, such as histamine, tryptase, and drug-specific IgE. The latter assays quantify markers of drug-induced basophil activation or drug-specific lymphocyte proliferation. Pharmacogenetic markers have also been investigated in immediate DHR, but not as extensively as in non-immediate ones. Throughout, practical aspects and limitations of the tests, as well as sensitivity and specificity parameters, will be presented. In addition, the experience of veterinary medicine with these diagnostic tools will be summarized. However, to date, none of them has ever been reported in a veterinary case of type I DHR. PMID:29056660

  2. Drug Therapy for Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Jeffrey S.; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases (VHDs) are progressive. When not caused by acute comorbidities they are generally characterized by long asymptomatic phases during which hemodynamic severity may progress leading to morbidity and mortality. Treatment depends on VHD type and severity but when severe and symptomatic, usually involves mechanical intervention. Asymptomatic patients, and those who lack objective descriptors associated with high risk, are closely observed clinically with optimization of associated cardiovascular risk factors until surgical indications develop. Though often prescribed based on theory, no rigorous evidence supports pharmacological therapy in most chronic situations though drugs may be appropriate in acute valvular diseases, or as a bridge to surgery in severely decompensated patients. Herein, we examine evidence supporting drug use for chronic VHDs. PMID:26371236

  3. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Masoud Ghorbani, Ramin Farhoudi Department of Viral Vaccine Production, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Research and Production Complex, Karaj, Iran Abstract: Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome, are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. Keywords: leishmania, leishmania treatment, vaccine, recombinant antigens

  4. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Mariann D; Mueller, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has given clinicians an important option in the care of critically ill patients. The slow and continuous dialysate and ultrafiltrate flow rates that are employed with CRRT can yield drug clearances similar to an analogous glomerular filtration rate of the native kidneys. Advantages such as superior volume control, excellent metabolic control, and hemodynamic tolerance by critically ill patients are well documented, but an understanding of drug dosing for CRRT is still a bit of a mystery. Although some pharmaceutical companies have dedicated postmarket research in this direction, many pharmaceutical companies have chosen not to pursue this information as it is not mandated and represents a relatively small part of their market. This lack of valuable information has created many challenges in the care of the critically ill patient as intermittent hemodialysis drug dosing recommendations cannot be extrapolated to CRRT. This drug dosing review will highlight factors that clinicians should consider when determining a pharmacotherapy regimen for a patient receiving CRRT.

  5. VETSTAT - the Danish system for surveillance of the veterinary use of drugs for production animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stege, H.; Bager, Flemming; Jacobsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The Danish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries funds a monitoring system based on drug usage information collected at the herd level: VETSTAT. VETSTAT is constructed as a relational database and data originates from three sources: pharmacies, veterinarians and feed mills. All administration...

  6. 21 CFR 530.5 - Veterinary records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary records. 530.5 Section 530.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS General Provisions § 530.5 Veterinary records...

  7. Can psychedelic compounds play a part in drug dependence therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Ben; Johnson, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    After a 40-year hiatus there is now a revisiting of psychedelic drug therapy throughout psychiatry, with studies examining the drugs psilocybin, ketamine, ibogaine and ayahuasca in the treatment of drug dependence. Limitations to these therapies are both clinical and legal, but the possibility of improving outcomes for patients with substance dependency imposes an obligation to research this area. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  8. Metabolomics has the potential to improve drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Claus; Jürgens, Gesche; Dalhoff, Kim Peder

    2014-01-01

    Until now drug therapy has primarily been controlled by dose titration on the basis of effects and side effects. However, a lot of people being treated with a drug experience too little effect or too many side effects. Therefore it will be advantageous to improve drug therapy and make it even more...

  9. Periodontal Therapy in Dogs Using Bone Augmentation Products Marketed for Veterinary Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Molly

    Periodontal disease is extremely common in companion animal practice. Patients presenting for a routine oral examination and prophylaxis may be found to have extensive periodontal disease and attachment loss. Vertical bone loss is a known sequela to periodontal disease and commonly involves the distal root of the mandibular first molar. This case report outlines two dogs presenting for oral examination and prophylaxis with general anesthesia. Both patients did not have any clinical symptoms of periodontal disease other than halitosis. Both patients were diagnosed with three-walled vertical bone loss defects of one or both mandibular first molars utilizing dental radiography as well as periodontal probing, measuring, and direct visual inspection. These defects were consistent with periodontal disease index stage 4 (>50% attachment loss). The lesions were treated with appropriate root planing and debridement. Bone augmentation products readily available and marketed for veterinary use were then utilized to fill the defects to promote both the re-establishment of normal alveolar bone height and periodontal ligament reattachment to the treated surface. Follow-up assessment and owner dedication is critical to treatment outcome. Both patients' 6 mo follow-up examinations radiographically indicated bone repair and replacement with visible periodontal ligament space.

  10. Simultaneous determination of multi-class veterinary drugs in chicken processed foods and muscle using solid-supported liquid extraction clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Souichi; Nagano, Chieko; Kanda, Maki; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Matsushima, Yoko; Nakajima, Takayuki; Tsuruoka, Yumi; Nagata, Marie; Koike, Hiroshi; Sekimura, Kotaro; Hashimoto, Tsuneo; Takano, Ichiro; Shindo, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    We developed a simultaneous determination method for 37 veterinary drugs in two chicken processed foods (deep-fried chicken and non-fried chicken cutlet) and muscle via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The veterinary drugs belong to 7 different classes, including 4 antifolics, 4 benzimidazoles, 5 macrolides, 7 polyethers, 2 quinolones, 7 sulfonamides, and 8 other classes. The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate followed by acetonitrile with salt and buffers extraction. The two-step extraction enabled analyte extraction from highly lipid samples. The clean-up procedure, a solid-supported liquid extraction clean-up using a diatomaceous earth mini-cartridge, eliminated lipid co-extraction. The prepared sample matrix did not have an effect on the 36 analytes. The method was validated in accordance with the requirements of Japanese validation guidelines. Almost all targeted veterinary drugs successfully satisfied the guideline criteria in the three types of food matrices. The method exhibited recoveries of 70-105%, and the precision of repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility ranged from 1 to 11% and 1 to 15%, respectively. The limits of quantification were estimated to range from 0.2 to 1.0μg/kg. Applying this method to samples commercially available in Tokyo, residues were detected in 3 out of 26 deep-fried chickens, 5 out of 20 non-fried chicken cutlets, and 17 out of 39 chicken muscles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Medical quality circles for drug replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönies, Hans; Maier, Manfred; Bäwert, Andjela

    2006-08-01

    Drug replacement therapy using synthetic opioids is in Vienna mostly carried out by primary care physicians. Group teaching in quality assurance groups has been installed in order to give these doctors the necessary personal and informational assistance. Evaluation has shown that: 1. 90% of the doctors were highly or well satisfied with the teaching. Only 10% were slightly critical. 2. They could better communicate with, and were able to show more tolerance towards, the "difficult" patients. 3. Specialized knowledge increased (risk of infection, "management of hepatitis", contact with authorities, co-medication). 4. Some critical remarks pointed towards ways in which this particular further education could in future be better organized and dealt with more intensively.

  12. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  13. New developments in atrial antiarrhythmic drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burashnikov, Alexander; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing clinical problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Currently available antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), although highly effective in acute cardioversion of paroxysmal AF, are generally only moderately successful in long-term maintenance of sinus rhythm. The use of AADs is often associated with an increased risk of ventricular proarrhythmia, extracardiac toxicity, and exacerbation of concomitant diseases such as heart failure. AF is commonly associated with intracardiac and extracardiac disease, which can modulate the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy. In light of the multifactorial intracardiac and extracardiac causes of AF generation, current development of anti-AF agents is focused on modulation of ion channel activity as well as on upstream therapies that reduce structural substrates. The available data indicate that multiple ion channel blockers exhibiting potent inhibition of peak INa with relatively rapid unbinding kinetics, as well as inhibition of late INa and IKr, may be preferable for the management of AF when considering both safety and efficacy. PMID:20179721

  14. Molecular Target Homology as a Basis for Species Extrapolation to Assess the Ecological Risk of Veterinary Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased identification of veterinary pharmaceutical contaminants in aquatic environments has raised concerns regarding potential adverse effects of these chemicals on non-target organisms. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for predictive species extrapolation ut...

  15. Studies of human and veterinary drugs' fate in environmental solid samples--analytical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilga, Joanna; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2008-08-01

    The improvement of medical care worldwide is one of the reasons for the increasing production of pharmaceutical products. Human medicines are affordable to a greater proportion of the world's population. But a significant amount of used pharmaceuticals can create problems--accessibility to high volume production pharmaceuticals contributes to an increased contamination in the environment and the possibility of adverse effects on humans and animals. Many of these substances and their metabolites end up in the soil, sediments, and sludge. Knowledge regarding the environmental occurrence of pharmaceutical products is increasing, but information in the peer-reviewed literature regarding the fate and effects of most pharmaceuticals is limited. One of the reasons for this lack of data is that, until now, there have been few analytical methods capable of detecting these compounds at the low levels, which might be expected in the environment. This review article covers recent developments in the analysis of pharmaceuticals in environmental solid matrices (including soil, sediments, and sludge). We will report applications of different solid sample extraction methods, and current advances in liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for detection and identification of selected drugs in sludge, soils, manure, and sediments.

  16. Activities and influence of veterinary drug marketers on antimicrobial usage in livestock production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Ernest Ojo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial usage in animals contributes to the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains. Investigations were carried out on how the characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practices of antimicrobial marketers influenced antimicrobials usage in animal production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to gather information about the characteristics and activities of antimicrobial marketers. Overall, 70 (56.9 % of 123 marketers had post-secondary education while 76 (61.8 % were trained on the use of antimicrobials. Eighteen (14.6 % of the marketers were licensed veterinarians. Only 51 (41.5 % marketers displayed adequate knowledge about antimicrobials and antimicrobial usage. Sixty-seven (54.6 % marketers requested a prescription before selling antimicrobials while 113 (91.9 % marketer recommended antimicrobials for use in animals. Two-third of the marketers (66.7 % prescribed antimicrobials without physically examining sick animals but based their prescriptions on verbal reports of clinical signs by farmers and on their personal experience. Marketers with higher educational qualification displayed more adequate knowledge of antimicrobials and antimicrobial usage than those with basic education background only. More years of experience in antimicrobial marketing did not translate to better knowledge on antimicrobial usage. Only 45 (36.6 % respondents were aware of the existence of regulatory agencies monitoring the use of antimicrobials in animals. Farmers ignored the services of veterinarians in the diagnosis and control of animal diseases but resorted to drug marketers for help. Effective communication of existing legislations on antimicrobial usage, improved access to veterinary services and strict enforcement of regulatory policies are recommended for checking non-judicious use of antimicrobial agents in animal production. Sales of

  17. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  18. Efficiency of the Clinical Veterinary Diagnostic Practices and Drug Choices for Infectious Diseases in Livestock in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Najmul; Khan, S. U.; Islam, A.

    2017-01-01

    As in most low-income countries, adequate laboratory facilities are not available in Bangladesh to assist veterinarians in diagnosing animal diseases. We aimed to determine the efficiency of veterinary diagnoses for two common ruminant diseases in Bangladesh: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR......) and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). We conducted the study from May 2009 to August 2010 in three government veterinary hospitals where veterinarians collected samples from sick livestock and recorded the presumptive diagnosis on the basis of clinical presentations. Samples were tested for PPR and FMD using...

  19. Personalized Drug Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis: From Fiction to Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Personalized drug therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) is a long-term dream for CF patients, caregivers, physicians and researchers. After years of study, the fiction of personalized treatment has turned to hope. Basic information about CFTR mutations classes and new treatments is needed if we are to deal properly with the new CF era. The problems involved in this issue, however, should be evaluated with greater care and attention. VX-770 is a new drug available to treat CF patients with some class III CFTR mutations and other drugs are being studied regarding other classes. The scientific literature has constantly given information about each therapy, both in vitro and in vivo. The hope is increasing. Nevertheless the "scientific world" still lacks information about patients' reality and daily health related practical needs. Clinical trials have showed good evaluation of some drugs so far, but clinical response is a wide spectrum yet to be analyzed: CFTR mutations spectrum, costs related to the treatment with new drugs (for VX-770 therapy), variability of CF clinical expression, limitations to test in vitro drugs, absence of good clinical markers to evaluate drug response, absence of long-term studies and with patients below six years old, multidrug treatment used to improve the expression response, and finally, the most important problem, who will benefit from the new drugs therapy, are issues that constitute a barrier that should be overcome. Personalized drug therapy may not be a fiction anymore, but it is not yet a reality for all CF patients.

  20. Development, validation and different approaches for the measurement uncertainty of a multi-class veterinary drugs residues LC-MS method for feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valese, Andressa Camargo; Molognoni, Luciano; de Souza, Naielly Coelho; de Sá Ploêncio, Leandro Antunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Barreto, Fabiano; Daguer, Heitor

    2017-05-15

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous residues analysis of 62 veterinary drugs in feeds by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry has been developed and validated in accordance to Commission Decision 657/2002/EC. Additionally, limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantitation (LOQ), matrix effects and measurement uncertainty were also assessed. Extraction was performed for all analytes and respective internal standards in a single step and chromatographic separation was achieved in only 12min. LOQ were set to 0.63-5.00μgkg-1 (amphenicols), 0.63-30.00μgkg-1 (avermectins), 0.63μgkg-1 (benzimidazoles), 0.25-200.00μgkg-1 (coccidiostats), 0.63-200.00μgkg-1 (lincosamides and macrolides), 0.25-5.00μgkg-1 (nitrofurans), 0.63-20.00μgkg-1 (fluoroquinolones and quinolones), 15.00μgkg-1 (quinoxaline), 0.63-7.50μgkg-1 (sulfonamides), 0.63-20.00μgkg-1 (tetracyclines), 0.25μgkg-1 (β-agonists), and 30.00μgkg-1 (β-lactams). The top-down approach was adequate for the calculation of measurement uncertainty for all analytes, except the banned substances, which should be rather assessed by the bottom-up approach. Routine analysis of different types of feeds was then carried out. An interesting profile of residues of veterinary drugs among samples was revealed, enlightening the need for stricter control in producing animals. Among the total of 27 feed samples, 20 analytes could be detected/quantified, ranging from trace levels to very high concentrations. A high throughput screening/confirmatory method for the residue analysis of several veterinary drugs in feeds was proposed as a helpful control tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simultaneous detection for three kinds of veterinary drugs: Chloramphenicol, clenbuterol and 17-beta-estradiol by high-throughput suspension array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Nan; Su Pu [Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin 300050 (China); Gao Zhixian [Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin 300050 (China)], E-mail: gaozhx@163.com; Zhu Maoxiang; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Fang Yanjun; Chao Fuhuan [Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin 300050 (China)

    2009-01-19

    Suspension array technology for simultaneous detection of three kinds of veterinary drugs, chloramphenicol (CAP), clenbuterol and 17-beta-estradiol has been developed. Conjugates of chloramphenicol and clenbuterol coupled with bovine serum albumin were synthesized and purified. Probes of suspension array were constituted by coupling the three conjugates on the fluorescent microspheres/beads and the microstructures of the beads' surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy which was a direct confirmation for the successful conjugates' coupling. The optimal addition of conjugates and the amounts of antibodies were optimized and selected, respectively. Standard curves were plotted and the coefficient of determination-R{sup 2} was greater than 0.989 which suggested good logistic correlation. The detection ranges for the three veterinary drugs are 40-6.25 x 10{sup 5} ng L{sup -1}, 50-7.81 x 10{sup 5} ng L{sup -1} and 1 x 10{sup 3-}7.29 x 10{sup 5} ng L{sup -1}, respectively and the lowest detection limits (LDLs) of them are 40, 50 and 1000 ng L{sup -1}, respectively. The suspension array is specific and has no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. Meanwhile, unknown samples were detected by suspension array and ELISA in comparison with each other. The errors between found and real for the detection of the unknown samples were relatively small to both of the two methods, whereas, the detection ranges of suspension array are broader and sensitive than that of the traditional ELISA. The high-throughput suspension array is proved to be a novel method for multi-analysis of veterinary drugs with simple operation, high sensitivity and low cost.

  2. Simultaneous detection for three kinds of veterinary drugs: chloramphenicol, clenbuterol and 17-beta-estradiol by high-throughput suspension array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Su, Pu; Gao, Zhixian; Zhu, Maoxiang; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Xiujie; Fang, Yanjun; Chao, Fuhuan

    2009-01-19

    Suspension array technology for simultaneous detection of three kinds of veterinary drugs, chloramphenicol (CAP), clenbuterol and 17-beta-estradiol has been developed. Conjugates of chloramphenicol and clenbuterol coupled with bovine serum albumin were synthesized and purified. Probes of suspension array were constituted by coupling the three conjugates on the fluorescent microspheres/beads and the microstructures of the beads' surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy which was a direct confirmation for the successful conjugates' coupling. The optimal addition of conjugates and the amounts of antibodies were optimized and selected, respectively. Standard curves were plotted and the coefficient of determination-R(2) was greater than 0.989 which suggested good logistic correlation. The detection ranges for the three veterinary drugs are 40-6.25x10(5) ng L(-1), 50-7.81x10(5) ng L(-1) and 1x10(3-)7.29x10(5) ng L(-1), respectively and the lowest detection limits (LDLs) of them are 40, 50 and 1000 ng L(-1), respectively. The suspension array is specific and has no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. Meanwhile, unknown samples were detected by suspension array and ELISA in comparison with each other. The errors between found and real for the detection of the unknown samples were relatively small to both of the two methods, whereas, the detection ranges of suspension array are broader and sensitive than that of the traditional ELISA. The high-throughput suspension array is proved to be a novel method for multi-analysis of veterinary drugs with simple operation, high sensitivity and low cost.

  3. [Matrix effect and retention efficiency of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance cartridges in multi-residual determination of veterinary drugs in river water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shanshan; Yi, Qitong; Hong, Jiajun; Chen, Meng; Yuan, Dongxing

    2013-10-01

    Matrix effect is an important interfering factor in LC-MS quantitative analysis. In this paper, matrix effects and retention efficiencies of 33 veterinary drugs spiked in river water were studied on hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) cartridges of 3 brands (Waters, Supelco, and CNW), using LC-MS/MS for detection and reverse osmosis (RO) water as the control under 500-fold concentration. In RO water, only the exogenous matrix effects were observed on three brands of HLB cartridges. Most quinolones and tetracyclines showed positive matrix effects. Estrogens showed negative matrix effects on two brands of HLB cartridges. Sulfonamides were not obviously affected by matrix effects. Chloramphenicols showed negative matrix effects on one brand of HLB cartridge. In river water, matrix effects were different from those of the RO water due to the combined exogenous and endogenous interfering substances. Sulfonamides showed slight matrix effects as those in RO water. Most quinolones and tetracyclines showed positive matrix effects. Chloramphenicols and estrogens showed negative matrix effects. Compared to the external standard method, matrix matched calibration method effectively overcame the matrix effects with better quantitative results. The recoveries of 33 target veterinary drugs spiked in river water at 50 ng/L and 200 ng/L levels were in the ranges of 40.3%-146.0% (Waters), 37.8%-104.2% (Supelco), and 52.9%-150.1% (CNW) with RSDs (n = 4) of 0.2%-14.6%. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in the retention efficiency between the 3 HLB cartridges with the matrix matched calibration method. This study provided supporting data for the HLB cartridge selection in multi-residual determination of the veterinary drugs in river water samples.

  4. Carry-over of veterinary drugs from medicated to non-medicated feeds in commercial feed manufacturing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Zuidema, T.; Egmond, van H.J.; Deckers, E.R.; Herbes, R.; Hooglught, J.; Olde Heuvel, E.; Jong, de J.

    2013-01-01

    Different compound feeds have to be manufactured in the same production line. As a consequence, traces of the first produced feed may remain in the production and get mixed with the next feed batches. This "carry-over" is unavoidable, and so non-medicated feed can be contaminated with veterinary

  5. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  7. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A. Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. Methods: This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. Results: It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson’s disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α-synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Conclusion: Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson’s disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson’s Disease therapy and reduce its side effects. PMID:26714584

  8. Recommendations for Clinical Pathology Data Generation, Interpretation, and Reporting in Target Animal Safety Studies for Veterinary Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, William; Gupta, Aradhana; Tomlinson, Lindsay; Tripathi, Niraj; von Beust, Barbara

    Clinical pathology testing is routinely performed in target animal safety studies in order to identify potential toxicity associated with administration of an investigational veterinary pharmaceutical product. Regulatory and other testing guidelines that address such studies provide recommendations for clinical pathology testing but occasionally contain outdated analytes and do not take into account interspecies physiologic differences that affect the practical selection of appropriate clinical pathology tests. Additionally, strong emphasis is often placed on statistical analysis and use of reference intervals for interpretation of test article-related clinical pathology changes, with limited attention given to the critical scientific review of clinically, toxicologically, or biologically relevant changes. The purpose of this communication from the Regulatory Affairs Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology is to provide current recommendations for clinical pathology testing and data interpretation in target animal safety studies and thereby enhance the value of clinical pathology testing in these studies.

  9. Analysis of Veterinary Drug and Pesticide Residues Using the Ethyl Acetate Multiclass/Multiresidue Method in Milk by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniye Imamoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and simple multiclass, ethyl acetate (EtOAc multiresidue method based on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS detection was developed for the determination and quantification of 26 veterinary drugs and 187 total pesticide residues in milk. Sample preparation was a simple procedure based on liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate containing 0.1% acetic acid, followed by centrifugation and evaporation of the supernatant. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate with 0.1% acetic acid and centrifuged prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Chromatographic separation of analytes was performed on an Inertsil X-Terra C18 column with acetic acid in methanol and water gradient. The repeatability and reproducibility were in the range of 2 to 13% and 6 to 16%, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 75 to 120% with the RSD (n=18. The developed method was validated according to the criteria set in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANTE/11945/2015. The validated methodology represents a fast and cheap alternative for the simultaneous analysis of veterinary drug and pesticide residues which can be easily extended to other compounds and matrices.

  10. Target analysis and retrospective screening of veterinary drugs, ergot alkaloids, plant toxins and other undesirable substances in feed using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Nuria; Pastor, Agustín; Yusà, Vicent

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive strategy combining a quantitative method for 77 banned veterinary drugs, mycotoxins, ergot alkaloids and plant toxins, and a post-target screening for 425 substances including pesticides and environmental contaminants in feed were developed using a QuEChERS-based extraction and an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). The quantitative method was validated after previous statistical optimisation of the main parameters governing ionisation, and presented recoveries ranging, in general, from 80 to 120%, with a precision in terms of Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) lower than 20%. The full-scan accurate mass data were acquired with a resolving power of 50000 FWHM and a mass accuracy lower than 5ppm. The method LOQ was lower than 12.5µgkg(-1) for the majority of the veterinary drugs and plant toxins and 20µgkg(-1) for ergot alkaloids. For post-target screening a customised theoretical database including the exact mass, the polarity of acquisition and the expected adducts was built and used for post-run retrospective screening. The analytical strategy was applied to 32 feed samples collected from farms of the Valencia Region (Spain). Florfenicol, zearalenone and atropine were identified and quantified at concentrations around 10µgkg(-1). In the post-target screening of the real samples, Sulfadiazine, Thrimetoprin and Pirimiphosmethyl were tentatively identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Wide-scope analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues in meat matrices by high resolution MS: detection and identification using Exactive-Orbitrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Génin, Eric; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    A multiresidue and multiclass method for the simultaneous determination of more than 350 compounds including pesticides, biopesticides and veterinary drugs in different meat matrices (beef, pork and chicken) by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap MS has been developed. In the present study, the determination of fragments was accomplished as an essential tool for a reliable identification of compounds using high resolution MS. To obtain these fragments, different strategies have been carried out in order to ensure an appropriate fragment assignment and identification. The analytical method is suitable for qualitative analysis, and it was also evaluated for quantitative analysis. Generic extraction conditions were optimized, obtaining adequate recovery and precision values for most of the studied analytes (>290). The limits of detection ranged from 2 to 16 µg kg(-1). Limits of quantification were 10 µg kg(-1) with the exception of few compounds with a higher value (50 or 100 µg kg(-1)). Limits of identification were also established, and they ranged from 2 to 150 µg kg(-1). This method was applied to the analysis of 18 meat samples and some veterinary drugs as enrofloxacin and sulfadiazine were detected and further identified/quantified (with triple quadrupole) in two different samples at 33 µg kg(-1) and trace levels, respectively. No pesticides were detected in the analyzed samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Analysis of veterinary drug residues in frog legs and other aquacultured species using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Clark, Susan B; Storey, Joseph M; Carr, Justin R

    2012-05-09

    A liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry method was developed to analyze veterinary drug residues in frog legs and other aquacultured species. Samples were extracted using a procedure based on a method developed for the analysis of fluoroquinolones (FQs) in fish. Briefly, the tissue was extracted with dilute acetic acid and acetonitrile with added sodium chloride. After centrifugation, the extracts were evaporated and reconstituted in mobile phase. A molecular weight cutoff filter was used to clean up the final extract. A set of target compounds, including trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, quinolones, and FQs, was used to validate the method. Screening of residues was accomplished by collecting TOF (MS¹) data and comparing the accurate mass and retention times of compounds to a database containing information for veterinary drugs. An evaluation of the MS data in fortified frog legs indicated that the target compounds could be consistently detected at the level of concern. The linearity and recoveries from matrix were evaluated for these analytes to estimate the amount of residue present. MS/MS data were also generated from precursor ions, and the mass accuracy of the product ions for each compound was compared to theoretical values. When the method was used to analyze imported frog legs, many of these residues were found in the samples, often in combination and at relatively high concentrations (>10 ng/g). The data from these samples were also evaluated for nontarget analytes such as residue metabolites and other chemotherapeutics.

  13. Comprehensive qualitative and quantitative determination of pesticides and veterinary drugs in honey using liquid chromatography-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Romero-González, Roberto; Martínez-Vidal, José Luis; Garrido-Frenich, Antonia

    2012-07-27

    A database has been created for the simultaneous analysis of more than 350 pesticides and veterinary drugs (including antibiotics) using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS). This is a comprehensive exact mass database built using the Exactive-Orbitrap analyzer. The developed database includes exact masses of the target ions and retention time data, and allows the automatic search of the included compounds. Generic chromatographic and MS conditions have been applied. The presented database is suitable for qualitative analysis, and it was also evaluated for quantitative purposes in routine analysis, after the optimization and validation of a generic extraction method in honey samples. Adequate recovery and precision values for most of the studied analytes were obtained and the limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 1 to 50 μg kg(-1). For pesticides, LODs were always lower than the MRLs established by European Union in honey, except for a few compounds. This method was applied to the analysis of 26 real honey samples and some pesticides (azoxystrobin, coumaphos, dimethoate and thiacloprid) were detected in 4 samples. Azoxystrobin and coumaphos were determined in two different samples (organic honey) at 1.5 μg kg(-1) and 5.1 μg kg(-1). Veterinary drugs were not detected in the analyzed samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug Therapy Problems in Patients on Antihypertensives and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug therapy problems (DTPs), with the associated risks inherent in antihypertensive and antidiabetic therapy require utmost attention. This present study was aimed at assessing the DTPs observed in the management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) in two tertiary health facilities in Niger Delta region. In this ...

  15. Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse planning in developed countries: Can developing countries afford and learn from this experience? ... However, various studies and preventive approaches have been tried in the US on drug abusers in order to prevent the associated adverse health outcomes.

  16. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wasem, Jürgen; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G; Kossmann, Beate; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Und...

  17. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-01-01

    ... in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function...

  18. Evaluation of the Most Frequently Prescribed Extemporaneously Compounded Veterinary Medications at a Large Independent Community Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karara, Adel H; Hines, Ryan; Demir, Zehra; Nnorom, Bethran; Horsey, Robert; Twigg, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Extemporaneous drug formulation is essential to provide optimal pharmaceutical care to veterinary patients. The need for this is exacerbated by the fact that commercially produced veterinary-specific products, without a human indication, require specialty veterinary manufacturing facilities and a new animal drug application process to gain marketing approval. This study examined the prescription patterns of extemporaneously compounded veterinary preparations in the compounding department at a large independent community pharmacy. Data was obtained from a total of 1348 prescriptions requiring extemporaneous compounding over the course of a two-year period (2014-2015). A database was constructed and each compounded prescription was allocated to a therapeutic category based on the American Hospital Formulary Service Drug Information. Data analysis showed that the most commonly prescribed preparations belonged to the central nervous system (39%), anti-infective agents (21%), and hormones (12%) therapeutic categories. Overall, suspensions were the most dispensed (47%), extemporaneously compounded dosage forms followed by solutions (28%), and capsules (10%). The majority (88%) of compounded preparations were administered by the oral route. The top three drugs that are compounded for veterinary medicine were (1) potassium bromide oral solution for canine epilepsy, (2) methimazole solution used to treat hyperthyroidism in cats, and (3) metronidazole suspension, an antibiotic for the treatment of diarrhea and other infections in dogs and cats. Remarkably, our findings are in good agreement with previously published survey data on the top drugs that are compounded for veterinary medicine. In the era of personalized medicine, veterinary extemporaneous compounding for specialized needs will continue to play an important role providing optimum therapy for veterinary patients. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  19. Targeting the environmental assessment of veterinary drugs with the multi-species-soil system (MS{center_dot}3) agricultural soil microcosms: the ivermectin case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell-Martin, G.; Pro-Gonzalez, J.; Aragones-Grunert, P.; Babib-Vich, M. M.; Fernandez-Rorija, C.; Tarazona-Lafarga, J. V.

    2011-07-01

    The environmental risk assessment of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin is receiving significant attention. This paper assesses the capacity of the MS{center_dot}3 soil microcosm as a tool for targeting the environmental impact assessment of veterinary drugs, using ivermectin as model. Two screening MS{center_dot}3 were performed using different European soils; one with a soil collected in an agricultural station near to Madrid, Spain and a second with a soil collected in a farm area close to York, UK. Soils were fortified with ivermectin at the following ranges: 0.01-10 mg kg{sup -}1 and 0.1-100 mg kg{sup -}1 in the Madrid and York studies, respectively. The effects on earthworms, plants and soil microorganisms were assessed in the Madrid soil. Toxicity tests on aquatic organisms (algae, cladocerans and in vitro fish cell line RTLW1) were also conducted with the leachates. No effects were observed in earthworms and plants at any tested concentration; reduction in the respiration rate (< 5%) of soil microorganisms was detected. Earthworm/soil bioconcentration factors decreased with the increase in soil concentrations and were higher for the York soil. Effects on daphnids were observed in tested leachates; based on measured levels of ivermectin in the leachates an EC50 of about 0.5{mu}gL{sup -}1 can be estimated. Comparisons based on toxicity data and equilibrium partitioning confirmed that the main risk is expected to be related to the high sensitivity of cladocerans. The results confirm that MS{center_dot}3 systems are cost-effective tools for assessing the impact of veterinary pharmaceuticals when applied to agricultural land, as previously demonstrated for antimicrobials. (Author) 39 refs.

  20. Assessment of veterinary drugs in plants using pharmacokinetic approaches: The absorption, distribution and elimination of tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole in ephemeral vegetables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ru Chen

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to demonstrate novel use of pharmacokinetic approaches to characterize drug behaviors/movements in the vegetables with implications to food safety. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and most importantly, the elimination of tetracycline (TC and sulfamethoxazole (SMX in edible plants Brassica rapa chinensis and Ipomoea aquatica grown hydroponically were demonstrated and studied using non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The results revealed drug-dependent and vegetable-dependent pharmacokinetic differences and indicated that ephemeral vegetables could have high capacity accumulating antibiotics (up to 160 μg g-1 for TC and 38 μg g-1 for SMX within hours. TC concentration in the root (Cmax could reach 11 times higher than that in the cultivation fluid and 3-28 times higher than the petioles/stems. Based on the volume of distribution (Vss, SMX was 3-6 times more extensively distributed than TC. Both antibiotics showed evident, albeit slow elimination phase with elimination half-lives ranging from 22 to 88 hours. For the first time drug elimination through the roots of a plant was demonstrated, and by viewing the root as a central compartment and continuous infusion without a loading dose as drug administration mode, it is possible to pharmacokinetically monitor the movement of antibiotics and their fate in the vegetables with more detailed information not previously available. Phyto-pharmacokinetic could be a new area worth developing new models for the assessment of veterinary drugs in edible plants.

  1. Drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgons, R.; Seliger, C.; Hilpert, A.; Trahms, L.; Odenbach, S.; Alexiou, C.

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. In medicine they are used for several approaches such as magnetic cell separation or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is the focus of medical research, especially for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the vascular system. In an experimental cancer model, we performed targeted drug delivery and used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, bound to a chemotherapeutic agent, which were attracted to an experimental tumour in rabbits by an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting). Complete tumour remission could be achieved. An important advantage of these carriers is the possibility for detecting these nanoparticles after treatment with common imaging techniques (i.e. x-ray-tomography, magnetorelaxometry, magnetic resonance imaging), which can be correlated to histology.

  2. Drug therapy during pregnancy: implications for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanounou, A; Haas, D A

    2016-04-22

    Pregnancy is accompanied by various physiological and physical changes, including those found in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and haematological systems. These alterations in the pregnant patient may potentially affect drug pharmacokinetics. Also, pharmacotherapy presents a unique matter due to the potential teratogenic effects of certain drugs. Although medications prescribed by dentists are generally safe during pregnancy, some modifications may be needed. In this article we will discuss the changes in the physiology during pregnancy and its impact on drug therapy. Specific emphasis will be given to the drugs commonly given by dentists, namely, local anaesthetics, analgesics, antibiotics and sedatives.

  3. [Drug therapy and hypertension in the newspapers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Johanne; Hughes, David

    2010-01-01

    The most recent country-wide Canadian data have revealed that only 33% of people with hypertension take medication and fewer than half of them have their blood pressure under control. One of the most important reasons for difficulty in controlling blood pressure is lack of drug treatment compliance. In addition, media coverage of health facts has an impact on beliefs, attitudes and behaviours related to health. Our goal was to analyze newspaper coverage of drugs related to hypertension. We conducted a thematic content analysis of newspapers covering medications related to hypertension. The study comprised 104 articles drawn from three of the most important francophone daily newspapers in Canada--a reference one, a general broadsheet and a tabloid. We identified three major themes: 1) drugs as an effective treatment, 2) specific problematic cases, and 3) problems with the pharmacological approach in general. We noted a gradual change from positive to negative as we moved from the most serious newspaper to the most popular. We discuss the Fiske hypothesis which suggests that tabloid-format newspapers are a repository of popular opposition to the discourse of groups who hold power in society. In the tabloid, the most widely-read newspaper in Quebec, medications are often presented in negative fashion in articles on hypertension. However, further studies are required to determine if there is a causal association between media discourse and the phenomenon of lack of drug treatment compliance.

  4. Monitoring drug therapy in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijtendaal, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of adverse drug events that may result from medication errors is challenging. The safety of medication treatment is mostly determined on an average population and medication errors may be prevented when pharmacotherapy is better tailored to the individualized needs of the hospitalized

  5. Simultaneous multi-residue determination of twenty one veterinary drugs in poultry litter by modeling three-way liquid chromatography with fluorescence and absorption detection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teglia, Carla M; Peltzer, Paola M; Seib, Silvia N; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Culzoni, María J; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2017-05-15

    A method for the simultaneous investigation of twenty one veterinary active ingredients in poultry litter based on MCR-ALS modeling of three-way liquid chromatography with fluorescence and UV detection data is presented. The chromatographic procedure was optimized in terms of both the nature of the organic solvent and the pH of the mobile phase to maximize the resolution of the analytes. In order to improve the simultaneous extraction efficiency of the twenty one veterinary drugs, a simplex-centroid design with combinations of the three components of the extracting mixture, i.e. MeOH, ACN and sodium phosphate buffer 10mmolL(-1) pH =3.50, was carried out. The second-order advantage was exploited in the analysis of highly complex samples containing unmodeled components. The qualitative and quantitative results showed that the application of MCR-ALS was appropriate to resolve highly overlapped peaks in the presence of unknown matrix compounds. Limits of quantification, relative errors of prediction (REP) and average recoveries ranging from 0.02 to 0.61µgg(-1), 3.09-9.35% and 91.0-105.6%, respectively, were obtained. Eventually, the method was successfully applied to the determination of active ingredients in five poultry litter samples collected from different poultry livestock in Argentina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Veterinary Parasitology

    OpenAIRE

    Rondon, F. C. M.; Bevilaqua, C.M.L.; Franke,C.R.; Barros, R. S.; Oliveira,F.R.; Alcântara, Adriano Costa de; Diniz, A. T.

    2008-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 24-31 Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the most important reemerging parasitic disease in the world. The domestic dog is the main reservoir in urban environments. The aim of this work was to extend the knowledge on canine Leishmania infection in the city of Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil, identifying the risk factors inherent in dog susceptibility to the infection. Two populations were analyzed, domestic dogs from clinics and the Veterinary ...

  7. Multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex infection outbreak in dogs and cats in a veterinary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzi, S; Blum, S E; Kahane, N; Adler, A; Hussein, O; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2016-11-01

    Members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause severe outbreaks in humans, and are increasingly reported in animals. A retrospective study, describing a severe outbreak in dogs and cats caused by a multidrug resistant member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a veterinary hospital, between July 2010 and November 2012. The study included 19 dogs and 4 cats. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex bacteria were isolated from urine (9 animals), respiratory tract (11), tissues (3) and blood (1). The most common infection-associated findings included fever, purulent discharge from endotracheal tubes, hypotension, and neutropaenia. Infections led to pneumonia, urinary tract infection, cellulitis and sepsis. Infection was transmitted in the intensive care unit, where 22 of 23 animals were initially hospitalised. The mortality rate was 70% (16 of 23 animals), and was higher in cases of respiratory infection compared to other infections. Aggressive environmental cleaning and disinfection, with staff education for personal hygiene and antisepsis, sharply decreased the infection incidence. Health care-associated outbreaks with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in dogs and cats are potentially highly fatal and difficult to eradicate, warranting monitoring, antiseptic techniques and judicious antibiotic use. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  9. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients' engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants ( n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed.

  10. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  11. [New concepts in human oncology: is it possible to use them in veterinary medicine as well?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconato, L; Ruess-Melzer, K; Buchholz, J; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2011-08-01

    In human oncology, novel targeted therapy focusing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors has become an attractive anticancer strategy. The introduction of antiangiogenetic drugs and metronomic chemotherapy has also increased the therapeutic arsenal. Chemotherapy still plays a key role in the treatment of many tumors affecting dogs and cats. However, novel anticancer strategies (including tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, as well as antiangiogenetic treatments) are becoming relevant in veterinary medicine, too. The goal of this review is to describe new therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment in veterinary medicine, including less well-known chemotherapeutic drugs.

  12. [Non-drug therapies, working on emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detournay-Hentgen, Marie-Carmel

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapies are indicated for people in mental pain and also recommended in the treatment of a variety of psychological disorders. The aim is to replace the inappropriate behaviour by more adapted behaviour. Positive psychology is interested not so much in mental health disorders as in well-being and happiness. A variety of therapeutic trends which the caregiver can use to help and support patients in regaining their bearings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Spiritual self-schema therapy, drug abuse, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, David; Avants, S Kelly; Margolin, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes the use of Spiritual Self-Schema (3-S) therapy in the treatment of an HIV-positive inner-city drug user maintained on methadone and referred for additional treatment due to unremitting cocaine use. 3-S therapy is a manual-guided intervention based on cognitive self-schema theory. Its goal is to help the patient create, elaborate, and make accessible a cognitive schema--the "spiritual" self-schema-that is incompatible with drug use and other HIV risk behaviors. 3-S therapy facilitates a cognitive shift from the habitual activation of the "addict" self-schema, with its drug-related cognitions, scripts and action plans, to the "spiritual" self-schema, with its associated repertoire of harm reduction beliefs and behaviors.

  14. Nanotechnology approaches for pain therapy through transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptu, Cristian; Rotaru, Razvan; Ignat, Leonard; Humelnicu, Andra Cristina; Harabagiu, Valeria; Peptu, Catalina Anisoara; Leon, Maria-Magdalena; Mitu, Florin; Cojocaru, Elena; Boca, Andreea; Tamba, Bogdan Ionel

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on the advances in the field of pain treatment by transdermal delivery of specific drugs. Starting from a short description of the skin barrier, the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics including absorption, distribution, action mechanism, metabolism and toxicity, aspects related to the use of pain therapy drugs are further discussed. Most recent results on topical anesthetic agents as well as the methods proved to overcome the skin barrier and to provide efficient delivery of the drug are also discussed. The present review is proposing to summarize the recent literature on the pharmacotherapeutic principles of local anesthetics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, generally used to alleviate pain but also the drugs as nanoformulations with potential applications in transdermal delivery. A special attention is given to efficient formulations meant for transdermal penetration enhancement of anesthetics where the drug is encapsulated into macrocyclic molecules (cyclodextrins, cyclodextrin derivatives), liposomes or polymer nanoparticles and hydrogels.

  15. The role of veterinary medicine regulatory agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M V

    2013-08-01

    An effective animal medicine regulatory programme includes a systematic, evidence-based means of documenting the safety and effectiveness of products before they are produced, marketed or used in a particular country or region. The programme must also include adequate monitoring and controls over the use of these substances. It is clearthat such programmes provide veterinarians, farmers and other animal medicine users with greater assurance that veterinary drugs and biologicals will be safe and effective in preventing and mitigating disease. It is important that these regulatory controls include programmes to ensure that human food obtained from treated animals is safe and that all potential toxicological and microbiological hazards that may be associated with the use of veterinary medicines have been adequately evaluated. There is a great need worldwide for veterinary medicines that provide needed therapies for vast numbers of animals and animal species and, in the case of food-producing animals, for medicinal products that enhance the productivity and efficiency of food production and ensure food safety when they are used in accordance with their approval specifications. The public health mission of regulatory agencies succeeds when they are able to put into the hands of the user an approved, safe and effective, well-manufactured and appropriately labelled medicine, and when there are adequate controls in place to assure proper compliance.

  16. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    OpenAIRE

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia; DOGARU Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone....

  17. Qualitative Multiresidue Screening Method for 143 Veterinary Drugs and Pharmaceuticals in Milk and Fish Tissue Using Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenaki, Marilena E; Bletsou, Anna A; Koulis, George A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-05-13

    A wide-scope screening methodology has been developed for the identification of veterinary drugs and pharmaceuticals in fish tissue and milk using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). The method was validated using a qualitative approach at two concentration levels. The detection of the residues was accomplished by retention time, accurate mass, and the isotopic fit using an in-house database. Product-ion spectra were used for unequivocal identification of the compounds. Generic sample treatment was applied. The majority of the compounds were successfully detected and identified at concentration levels of 150 ng mL(-1) in milk and 200 μg kg(-1) in fish (>80% of the compounds in both matrices), whereas satisfactory results were also obtained at concentration levels of 15 ng mL(-1) in milk and 20 μg kg(-1) in fish (>60% of the compounds detected and identified).

  18. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  19. Primary care veterinary usage of systemic glucocorticoids in cats and dogs in three UK practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Hendricks, A; Summers, J; Brodbelt, D

    2012-04-01

    To describe systemic glucocorticoid usage in cats and dogs by three primary care -veterinary practices in England and to ascertain risk factors for clinical use. To evaluate consistency of prescribing patterns across clinics. To validate a merged database of primary veterinary clinical data as a functional tool for clinical epidemiological research. A merged database was established from clinical data on 31,273 cat and dog consultations with pharmacotherapy from three veterinary practices in England. Descriptive statistics described systemic glucocorticoid drug use in cats and dogs while mixed-effects logistic regression modelling evaluated risk factors. Individual clinic usage was compared. Overall, 1877 (16·68%) cat consultations and 2913 (14·55%) dog consultations resulted in systemic glucocorticoid therapy. Cats received higher parenteral (Pveterinary clinical database was effective for epidemiological research. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Drug Therapy in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Tahmeed; Levin, Vadim; Mandapati, Ravi

    2017-06-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are at risk for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias that can lead to an increased morbidity as well as mortality. When catheter ablation is not an option or unsuccessful, antiarrhythmic drugs are the mainstay of treatment. There is limited data on the use of antiarrhythmics in this population. The purpose of this article is to discuss the practical aspects of the use of antiarrhythmics in adults with congenital heart disease. Several tables have been provided to provide clinicians a reference for daily use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-residue determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceutical residues in milk powder, butter, fish tissue and eggs using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenaki, Marilena E; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-06-23

    A simple and sensitive multi-residue method for the determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceuticals, belonging in more than 20 different classes, in butter, milk powder, egg and fish tissue has been developed. The method involves a simple generic solid-liquid extraction step (solvent extraction, SE) with 0.1% formic acid in aqueous solution of EDTA 0.1% (w/v)-acetonitrile (ACN)-methanol (MeOH) (1:1:1, v/v) with additional ultrasonic-assisted extraction. Precipitation of lipids and proteins was promoted by subjecting the extracts at very low temperature (-23°C) for 12h. Further cleanup with hexane ensures fat removal from the matrix. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Two separate runs were performed for positive and negative ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Particular attention was devoted to extraction optimization: different sample-to-extracting volume ratios, different concentrations of formic acid in the extraction solvent and different ultrasonic extraction temperatures were tested in butter, egg and milk powder samples. The method was also applied in fish tissue samples. It was validated, on the basis of international guidelines, for all four matrices. Quantitative analysis was performed by means of standard addition calibration. For over 80% of the analytes, the recoveries were between 50% and 120% in all matrices studied, with RSD values in the range of 1-18%. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.008 μg kg(-1) (oxfendazole in butter) to 3.15 μg kg(-1) (hydrochlorthiazide in egg). The evaluated method provides reliable screening, quantification, and identification of 115 veterinary drug and pharmaceutical residues in foods of animal origin and has been successfully applied in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  3. [Drug therapy for older people : Choosing wisely].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Martin

    2017-09-22

    Elderly people are the most rapidly growing sector of our society. Due to their multimorbidity they are exposed to a multitude of medications, which are accompanied by chances and risks. The problem of inappropriate medication in the elderly is exacerbated by the fact that only a holistic view can help these patients and that this is predominantly the responsibility of the general practitioner. The closely measured paid contact time is often insufficient to optimize complex medications. Clinically successfully tested aids in the form of lists give reason for hope: in particular, the positive/negative assessment of limitations of the elderly with respect to drugs by the STOPP/START criteria and the FORTA classification are clinically successful aids. Purely negative lists, such as the Beers or PRISCUS lists, have been disappointing in clinical application because they do not consider the needs, prognostic and particularly symptomatic importance and weighting of the diagnosis of patients. Further implementation of these aids to decision making should help to improve the problem of care of elderly patients in the field of drug treatment, even in IT systems.

  4. Efficiency of the Clinical Veterinary Diagnostic Practices and Drug Choices for Infectious Diseases in Livestock in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, N; Khan, S U; Islam, A; Osmani, M G; Rahman, M Z; Epstein, J H; Daszak, P; Zeidner, N S

    2017-08-01

    As in most low-income countries, adequate laboratory facilities are not available in Bangladesh to assist veterinarians in diagnosing animal diseases. We aimed to determine the efficiency of veterinary diagnoses for two common ruminant diseases in Bangladesh: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). We conducted the study from May 2009 to August 2010 in three government veterinary hospitals where veterinarians collected samples from sick livestock and recorded the presumptive diagnosis on the basis of clinical presentations. Samples were tested for PPR and FMD using real-time RT-PCR. We estimated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the presumptive diagnoses when compared to laboratory tests. We tested 539 goats for PPR and 340 cattle and goats for FMD. Our results indicate that the veterinarians' presumptive diagnoses were different from laboratory findings for both PPR (P clinical diagnoses was 54% (95% CI: 47-61%) while specificity was 81% (95% CI: 78-84%) compared to real-time RT-PCR tests. The kappa value obtained in our validation process for PPR (kappa: 0.25) and FMD (kappa 0.36) indicated a poor performance of the presumptive diagnoses. Most of the animals (93%) were treated with antibiotics. Our findings indicate that veterinarians can detect animals not infected with FMD or PPR but miss the true cases. The clinical competency of these veterinarians needs to be improved and access to laboratory diagnostic facilities could help veterinarians to improve the diagnostics and outcomes. The rational use of antibiotics by veterinarians in animals must be ensured. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. [Dyslipidemia: news in diagnosis and drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Luigi; Spangano, Franco; Fonda, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Plasma lipid levels are to a large extent determined by genetic factors. In its more extreme forms this is manifested as familial hyperlipidemias, which are an important cause of premature coronary heart disease. It has been demonstrated that rigorous treatment of familial forms reduces the burden of ischemic heart disease. Statins are among the most studied drugs in cardiovascular prevention; a number of large-scale clinical trials have demonstrated that statins substantially reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in both primary and secondary prevention. The currently available evidence suggests that the clinical benefit is largely independent of the type of statin, but depends on the extent of LDL-C lowering. When the most potent statins are insufficient, LDL-C apheresis should be used.

  6. Hydrogen bond replacement--unearthing a novel molecular mechanism of surface solid dispersion for enhanced solubility of a drug for veterinary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deshvir; Pathak, Kamla

    2013-01-30

    The project was aimed to enhance the solubility of ivermectin using surface solid dispersion (SSD), elucidate the mechanism of drug release and to develop its tablet that can draw rapid clinical effects on dogs for controlling Ascaris parasites. Superdisintegrants and adsorbents were used to formulate SSDs by co-evaporation method. Formulation 9th that constituted from drug:aerosil (1:10) was selected after solubility and in vitro dissolution evaluation, and characterized by DSC, XRPD, DRS and SEM analysis. In vitro evaluation and in vivo efficacy of its tablet on dogs (fecal egg and tick counting studies) were compared with marketed tablets. This formulation enhanced the solubility of ivermectin to 456.25±1.70% and released 93.55±0.47% in 60 min. DRS spectral analysis unearthed a novel molecular mechanism of hydrogen bond replacement that drifts the drug into the medium from the surface of the SSD particles. Reduced crystallinity was confirmed by XRPD and supported by SEM. During in vitro and in vivo studies, the formulated tablet showed superiority over marketed tablet with higher parasite inhibition (p<0.001). Thus SSD is a promising technique for enhancing IVM solubility at molecular level enabling its rapid oral delivery to control endo- as well as ectoparasites for veterinary purpose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) on Nonopioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to quantitatively synthesize study results.  Results: The search yielded five studies that met inclusion criteria. MDFT was found to be more effective than other treatments on drug abuse problem severity and drug use frequency in the short run but not in the long...... run and demonstrated positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions.  Discussion: While additional research is needed, the review offers support for MDFT as a treatment to young nonopioid drug abusers. The number of studies included in this review was limited, however......Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence of the effects of multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) on drug use reduction in young people for the treatment of nonopioid drug use.  Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized...

  8. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of drug therapy problems (DTPs), identify the types of DTPs and assess outcomes of DTP interventions among renal patients receiving care in three Nigerian tertiary hospitals. Methods: This prospective descriptive study was conducted in nephrology units of three tertiary hospitals in ...

  9. Assessment of patients' knowledge of their drug therapy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' knowledge of their medications is an important factor in ensuring adherence. Medication adherence is essential for rational drug use and derivation of optimal therapy. This study was conducted to assess knowledge of outpatients regarding their medications. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 200 ...

  10. Multimodal ultrasound mediated drug release model in local cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhr, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Increased cancer survival rates over the last decades are probably less due to advances of a single treatment modality than to optimization of adjuvant treatment procedures. The efficiency of drug delivery in solid tumours is crucial for achieving local tumour control as cytotoxic agents do not target cancer cells selectively. To enhance tumour uptake and selectivity of drugs, liposomally encapsulated microbubbles with drugs or temperature sensitive liposomes with therapeutics have been suggested as new drug delivery vehicles, in combination with ultrasound or hyperthermia, respectively. The presented release model goes beyond simple drug delivery or traditional adjuvant therapies. It represents targeting, real time monitoring and imaging, and exerts concurrent application of therapeutic modalities, within a multimodal treatment regime, thus enhancing synergism. An appropriate diagnostic tool is applied to determine the region of interest with respect to reference coordinates. The delineated region of interest can be modelled by topographic modelling techniques. A subsequent adequate digital tumour model can facilitate an optimal treatment procedure. The system integrates a diagnostic unit with a therapeutic ultrasonic transmitting component, together with a central processing unit, encompassing algorithms for data processing and visualization. Actual drug uptake is based on passive accumulation of drug carriers. Selective drug release of e.g. cytostatic drugs is achieved by ultrasound induced cavitation well defined to the tumour region. Monitoring of drug release can be achieved by imaging techniques. Measurement and monitoring of cavitational activities within the volume of release, and established functional relationships between cavitation level and drug release, will be bridged to various control functions by the processing unit. Further concurrent thermal treatment approaches and ionizing radiation modi are proposed within the comprehensive treatment model

  11. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  12. Wunderlich syndrome during antiplatelet drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanini, A; Tavolaro, A; Rosellini, M; Rossi, A

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneous hemorrhage in the kidney, also known as Wunderlich Syndrome, is a rare clinical problem. The most common cause of spontaneous renal hemorrhage is tumor. Other causes are rupture of a renal cyst, vasculitis, hydronephrosis, preeclampsia, and kidney infections. A 67-year-old man was admitted complaining left flank colic pain. A contrast CT scan showed the presence of a subcapsular hematoma of the left kidney extending from the upper to the lower pole. He had no history of trauma and immunological screening tests for vasculitis were normal. His current therapy included acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/daily) and lisinopril (20 mg/ daily). The patient was hospitalized for 4 days and his circulatory state remained stable. Nine months later an ultrasound examination showed complete resolution of the hematoma. One year later the patient was admitted again because of a spontaneous right calf hematoma and a thoroughly investigation of his coagulation pattern was carried out. Laboratory finding revealed a platelet defect, as the number of adenine nucleotides and other marker related to platelet activation were increased: ADP 1 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, ADP 2 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, Adrenalina 5 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, Adrenalina 10 mcM lack 2 masculine wave. Platelet activation markers: Gp53 in lysosomal membrane 0.48 Dpar (0 - 0.26). Our case describes the recurrence of spontaneous hemorrhages (perirenal and intramuscular hematoma) as a result of an underlying platelet aggregation defect worsened by administration of acetylsalicylic acid. In patients on antiplatelet treatment with a history of excessive bleeding a thorough investigation of coagulation status appears beneficial.

  13. Veterinary clinical pathologists in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, A Eric; Bounous, Denise I; Bolliger, Anne Provencher

    2008-06-01

    There is an international shortage of veterinary clinical pathologists in the workplace. Current trainees in veterinary clinical pathology may choose to pursue careers in academe, diagnostic laboratories, government health services, biopharmaceutical companies, or private practice. Academic training programs attempt to provide trainees with an exposure to several career choices. However, due to the proprietary nature of much of the work in the biopharmaceutical industry, trainees may not be fully informed regarding the nature of work for veterinary clinical pathologists and the myriad opportunities that await employment in the biopharmaceutical industry. The goals of this report are to provide trainees in veterinary clinical pathology and other laboratory personnel with an overview of the work-life of veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry, and to raise the profile of this career choice for those seeking to enter the workforce. Biographical sketches, job descriptions, and motivation for 3 successful veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry are provided. Current and past statistics for veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry are reviewed. An overview of the drug development process and involvement of veterinary clinical pathologists in the areas of discovery, lead optimization, and candidate evaluation are discussed. Additional duties for veterinary clinical pathologists employed in the biopharmaceutical industry include development of biomarkers and new technologies, service as scientific resources, diagnostic support services, and laboratory management responsibilities. There are numerous opportunities available for trainees in veterinary clinical pathology to pursue employment in the biopharmaceutical industry and enjoy challenging and rewarding careers.

  14. Effects of a new intravenous electrolyte solution for veterinary therapy on the electrolyte and acid-base balances of healthy horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Fajardo Valente Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The effects of a new intravenous electrolyte solution for veterinary therapy on electrolyte and acid-base balances of horses were evaluated, assessing the potential of the use of this solution as a rational alternative in fluid therapy. Eight healthy adult horses, including 4 males and 4 females, received two treatments in a cross-over design: isotonic saline solution (IS and a test solution (TS containing 145mEq of Na+, 5mEq of K+, 4mEq of Ca++, 2mEq of Mg++, 96mEq of Cl-, 60mEq of lactate, 50g of dextrose, and 4mg of cyanocobalamin per liter. Solutions were IV infused in a volume corresponding to 5% of BW, over 3 hours. Venous blood samples were taken 5 times before and after the infusion (at 0, 3, 6, 9 e 24h, for pHv, pCO2v, HCO3 -v, BEv, Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca++, Ca, P, Mg, glucose and L-lactate measurements, and AG and SID calculations. The data were analyzed through repeated measures ANOVA. The IS caused mild acidifying effect by increasing Cl- and decreasing plasma SID. In contrast, the TS induced mild and transient hypochloremia without changes in acid-base balance. Hyperglycemia was present at the end of the TS infusion and reversed 6 hours later. The horses did not exhibit any clinical changes. We concluded that TS is an option for fluid therapy in horses.

  15. Antimalarial drug therapy: the role of parasite biology and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Johanna P

    2006-12-01

    Malaria continues to affect public health and economic growth in many regions of the world. The number of infections continues to rise and is associated with increased mortality, despite basic science and public health efforts. Drug therapy remains the mainstay of treatment and prevention of this disease. Plasmodium has a complex life cycle involving an arthropod vector and distinct stages within the human host. Each parasite stage plays a unique role in transmission, disease, and latency. These different stages may vary in their response to the various antimalarial compounds. This article will review antimalarial therapies and drug resistance in the context of the parasites' biology.

  16. Holistic pediatric veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Holistic veterinary medicine treats the whole patient including all physical and behavioral signs. The root cause of disease is treated at the same time as accompanying clinical signs. Herbal and nutritional supplements can help support tissue healing and proper organ functioning, thereby reducing the tendency of disease progression over time. Proper selection of homeopathic remedies is based on detailed evaluation of clinical signs. Herbal medicines are selected based on organ(s) affected and the physiologic nature of the imbalance. Many herbal and nutraceutical companies provide support for veterinarians, assisting with proper formula selection, dosing, drug interactions, and contraindications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ADHD and drug therapy: is it still a valid treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, A Mark

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss alternative treatments other than drug therapy for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) in educational settings. There is an increasing body of knowledge that supports interventions for improving cognitive outcomes without the use of medication. The article explores the risks to ADHD children, shows the potential linkage between gifted children and ADHD, explores recent brain research, and examines various alternative treatment options. Information is presented on alternative treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapies, educational interventions, electroencephalograph (EEG) neuro-feedback, and diet.

  18. Assessment of veterinary services in central Ethiopia: A case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003; Halderman, 2005). Animals provide highly nutritious foods, and provide. Ethiop. Vet. .... providing veterinary services in the. District include veterinary drugs shops and mobile clinics providing full time ... 4) The public veterinary service was chosen as first choice for effectiveness and costliness compared to private ...

  19. 75 FR 4576 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. General Function of the... PROHEART 6 (NADA 141-189), the subsequent safety data collected under the Center for Veterinary Medicine's...

  20. 75 FR 36588 - Veterinary Feed Directive; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 514, and 558 Veterinary Feed Directive... need for improvements to the veterinary feed directive (VFD) regulation. The agency is taking this..., rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Neal Bataller, Center for Veterinary...

  1. Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Bellan, Steven E

    2017-06-28

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of infection and modelled the patients' life expectancy as a function of ART initiation timing. We fitted this model to the annual AIDS incidence and death data directly, and to resistance data and demographic data indirectly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. Using counterfactual scenarios, we assessed the impact on total and drug-resistant HIV incidence of ART initiation timing, frequency of acquired drug resistance, and second-line drug effectiveness (defined as the combination of resistance monitoring, biomedical drug efficacy and adherence). Earlier ART initiation could decrease the number of both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence when second-line drug effectiveness is sufficiently high (greater than 80%), but increase the proportion of new infections that are drug resistant. Thus, resistance may paradoxically appear to be increasing while actually decreasing. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  3. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for anti-aging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Srinivasan, Bharath; Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    There is great interest in drugs that are capable of modulating multiple aging pathways, thereby delaying the onset and progression of aging. Effective strategies for drug development include the repurposing of existing drugs already approved by the FDA for human therapy. FDA approved drugs have known mechanisms of action and have been thoroughly screened for safety. Although there has been extensive scientific activity in repurposing drugs for disease therapy, there has been little testing of these drugs for their effects on aging. The pool of FDA approved drugs therefore represents a large reservoir of drug candidates with substantial potential for anti-aging therapy. In this paper we employ FINDSITE(comb), a powerful ligand homology modeling program, to identify binding partners for proteins produced by temperature sensing genes that have been implicated in aging. This list of drugs with potential to modulate aging rates was then tested experimentally for lifespan and healthspan extension using a small invertebrate model. Three protein targets of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas corresponding to products of the transient receptor potential gene 7, ribosomal protein S6 polypeptide 2 gene, or forkhead box C gene, were screened against a compound library consisting of DrugBank drugs including 1347 FDA approved, non-nutraceutical molecules. Twenty nine drugs ranked in the top 1 % for binding to each target were subsequently included in our experimental analysis. Continuous exposure of rotifers to 1 µM naproxen significantly extended rotifer mean lifespan by 14 %. We used three endpoints to estimate rotifer health: swimming speed (mobility proxy), reproduction (overall vitality), and mitochondria activity (cellular senescence proxy). The natural decline in swimming speed with aging was more gradual when rotifers were exposed to three drugs, so that on day 6, mean swimming speed of females was 1.19 mm/s for naproxen (P = 0.038), 1.20 for fludarabine (P = 0

  4. Development of a simple multi-residue determination method of 80 veterinary drugs in Oplegnathus punctatus by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Gao, Xin; Tang, Zhixu; Luo, Xin; Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Jiachao; Fu, Xiaoting

    2017-10-15

    A simple, rapid and sensitive multi-residue analytical method was developed and validated for 80 veterinary drugs in Oplegnathus punctatus using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The analytes belong to 12 different families include benzimidazoles, β-lactams, lincosamides, macrolides, nitromidazoles, quinolones, sulfonamides and trimethoprim, tetracyclines, triphenylmethane dyes, amphenicols, nonsteroidal estrogens and steroid hormones. The sample preparation was optimized base on QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) procedure. A very simple and sufficient preparation procedure without salting-out and complex clean-up process was studied. It had been proved that water in the extract was helpful for extracting hydrophilic compounds and precipitating the lipids during the subsequent cleaning process. In addition, an appropriate percent of methanol was necessary to some analytes. Finally, a mixture of acetonitrile, methanol and water (3:1:1, v/v/v) which include 1% acetic acid and 10mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt 2-hydrate was selected as the extraction solvent, and the clean-up step consisted of a low temperature procedure and two times of high-speed centrifugation to deproteinize and remove lipids. The detection and quantification of all compounds were performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry in positive and negative ion mode. This methodology was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANTE/11945/2015. The recoveries ranged from 60.74%-109.85% with relative standard deviations (RSDs)<20%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.25-25ug/kg, for the analytes which the MRL or MRPL had been established in fish tissue, the LOQs were all lower than their own legal tolerances. The values of decision limit (CCα) and detection capability

  5. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Okorie-Kanu et al. 160. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): ... Nigeria; 3Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu state,. Nigeria. ...... (ASVCP), International Veterinary.

  6. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.. 2Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Abeokuta, Ogun State,. Nigeria. *Corresponding Authors: .... medial and lateral canthi of each eye. Philtrum Height (PH). Measured ...

  7. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2000-07-02

    Jul 2, 2000 ... Nigerian Veterinary Journal 36(4). 2015. Owoyemi et al. 1341. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., December 2015 ... medicine, 3Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. .... in wound or burn healing, internal intake of.

  8. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2016-03-28

    Mar 28, 2016 ... and sports medicine and herbal therapy. Current curricular trends ..... competitive pursuits and in the demand from veterinary clients for accelerated ..... Effects of nutrition choices and lifestyle changes on the well- being of cats ...

  9. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, M A; Shmalberg, J; Adair, H S; Allweiler, S; Bryan, J N; Cantwell, S; Carr, E; Chrisman, C; Egger, C M; Greene, S; Haussler, K K; Hershey, B; Holyoak, G R; Johnson, M; Jeune, S Le; Looney, A; McConnico, R S; Medina, C; Morton, A J; Munsterman, A; Nie, G J; Park, N; Parsons-Doherty, M; Perdrizet, J A; Peyton, J L; Raditic, D; Ramirez, H P; Saik, J; Robertson, S; Sleeper, M; Dyke, J Van; Wakshlag, J

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative.

  10. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  11. Assessment of Veterinary Pharmaceutical Products Registered in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Topically administered dosage forms included solutions, sprays, ointments, creams, shampoos and powders, while those delivered via the intrauterine route included pessaries, solutions and suspensions. Keywords: dosage forms, administration route, veterinary pharmaceutical products, animal species, drug delivery.

  12. Drug therapy for the prevention and treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Anjali; Davis, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: As more infants are surviving at younger gestational ages, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains as a frequent neonatal complication occurring after preterm birth. The multifactorial nature of the disease process makes BPD a challenging condition to treat. While multiple pharmacologic therapies have been investigated over the past two decades, there have been limited advances in the field. Often multiple therapies are used concurrently without clear evidence of efficacy, with potential for significant side effects from drug-drug interactions. Methods: Systematic literature review. Conclusion: Although there is physiologic rationale for the use of many of these therapies, none of them has single-handedly altered the incidence, severity, or progression of BPD. Future research should focus on developing clinically significant end-points (short and long term respiratory assessments), investigating biomarkers that accurately predict risk and progression of disease, and creating appropriate stratification models of BPD severity. Applying a multi-modal approach to the study of new and existing drugs should be the most effective way of establishing the optimal prevention and treatment regimens for BPD. PMID:25762933

  13. Radioiodine therapy in veterinary medicine: treatment of hyperthyroidism in a cat; Die Radioiodtherapie in der Veterinaermedizin: Behandlung der Schilddruesenueberfunktion bei einer Katze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinartz, P.; Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kinzel, S.; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Bachmann, T. [Tierarztpraxis Dr. med. vet. Thomas Bachmann, Glashhuetten (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    A nine-year-old cat with symptoms of a distinct hyperthyroidism was presented at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. The clinical symptoms as well as the diagnostic procedures performed at the hospital confirmed the diagnosis. After five weeks of thyreostatic medication a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland was established, followed by a radioiodine therapy with 70.3 MBq 131-iodine. Subsequently, the cat was hospitalized for two days before it could be released in good condition. Six weeks after treatment the former drastically reduced weight of the cat recovered to near normal. Even though the chemical analysis detected a discrete hyperthyroidism, clinical symptoms were no longer prominent. Three months after treatment, the final examination showed a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland without a specific thyroidal medication. The presented case illustrates that radioiodine therapy is a safe and efficient treatment of thyroidal dysfunctions in veterinary medicine. (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine neun Jahre alte, europaeische Langhaarkatze wurde mit Symptomen einer ausgepraegten Schilddruesenueberfunktion im Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen vorgestellt. Sowohl die klinische Symptomatik als auch die Labordiagnostik und die apparativ erhobenen Befunde belegten das Vorliegen einer Hyperthyreose. Im Anschluss an eine fuenfwoechige thyreostatische Therapie, mit der eine euthyreote Stoffwechsellage erreicht werden konnte, wurde eine Radioiodtherapie mit 70,3 MBq 131-Iod durchgefuehrt. Nach einer nur zweitaegigen komplikationslosen Hospitalisierung konnte die Katze in gutem Allgemeinzustand entlassen werden. Sechs Wochen nach der Therapie hatte sich das zuvor deutlich reduzierte Koerpergewicht auf nahezu normgerechte Werte erhoeht; klinische Symptome der Schilddruesenueberfunktion liessen sich trotz einer laborchemisch diagnostizierten diskreten Gesamtthyroxiderhoehung nicht mehr nachweisen. Bei einer abschliessenden Kontrolle drei Monate nach Entlassung wies

  14. 75 FR 29352 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Data Elements for Submission of Veterinary Adverse Event Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... of Veterinary Adverse Event Reports to the Center for Veterinary Medicine; Availability AGENCY: Food... Veterinary Adverse Event Reports to the Center for Veterinary Medicine.'' The purpose of this draft guidance is to assist sponsors or non-applicants with filling out form FDA 1932, ``Veterinary Adverse Drug...

  15. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  16. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  17. Chitosan in Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery: Focus on Local Vaginal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toril Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive drug therapy destined for localized drug treatment is gaining increasing importance in today’s drug development. Chitosan, due to its known biodegradability, bioadhesiveness and excellent safety profile offers means to improve mucosal drug therapy. We have used chitosan as mucoadhesive polymer to develop liposomes able to ensure prolonged residence time at vaginal site. Two types of mucoadhesive liposomes, namely the chitosan-coated liposomes and chitosan-containing liposomes, where chitosan is both embedded and surface-available, were made of soy phosphatidylcholine with entrapped fluorescence markers of two molecular weights, FITC-dextran 4000 and 20,000, respectively. Both liposomal types were characterized for their size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and the in vitro release profile, and compared to plain liposomes. The proof of chitosan being both surface-available as well as embedded into the liposomes in the chitosan-containing liposomes was found. The capability of the surface-available chitosan to interact with the model porcine mucin was confirmed for both chitosan-containing and chitosan-coated liposomes implying potential mucoadhesive behavior. Chitosan-containing liposomes were shown to be superior in respect to the simplicity of preparation, FITC-dextran load, mucoadhesiveness and in vitro release and are expected to ensure prolonged residence time on the vaginal mucosa providing localized sustained release of entrapped model substances.

  18. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions.

  19. Investigation of the role of environmental contamination in the occurrence of residues of the veterinary drug phenylbutazone in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul; Fodey, Terence L; Smyth, Wesley G; Crooks, Steven R H

    2017-04-01

    Phenylbutazone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug licensed for use in horses to treat musculoskeletal disorders. It is not permitted in the European Union for use in animals destined for the food chain. Official statistics provided by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) show that 0.18% of bovines tested in the European Union between 2008 and 2014 for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were non-compliant, with phenylbutazone representing over 28% of these. Anecdotal evidence suggests animals that have not been treated with the drug may have produced non-compliant samples, possibly through some form of contamination. In this study, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometric detection was applied to bovine plasma samples to determine if detectable residues (CCα = 0.28 ng ml-1) may occur in untreated animals as a result of environmental contamination through normal farming practice. The study demonstrates that waste from animals treated with phenylbutazone, and spread on an area of pasture, can contaminate untreated bovines grazing the pasture many weeks later. It was determined that this contamination, which can persist over a significant period, may be due to the ingestion of as little as 30 μg phenylbutazone by a 500 kg bullock.

  20. Matrix-effect free multi-residue analysis of veterinary drugs in food samples of animal origin by nanoflow liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Durán, Jaime; Moreno-González, David; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F

    2018-04-15

    In this work, a sensitive method based on nanoflow liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry has been developed for the multiresidue determination of veterinary drugs residues in honey, veal muscle, egg and milk. Salting-out supported liquid extraction was employed as sample treatment for milk, veal muscle and egg, while a modified QuEChERS procedure was used in honey. The enhancement of sensitivity provided by the nanoflow LC system also allowed the implementation of high dilution factors as high as 100:1. For all matrices tested, matrix effects were negligible starting from a dilution factor of 100, enabling, thus, the use of external standard calibration instead of matrix-matched calibration of each sample, and the subsequent increase of laboratory throughput. At spiked levels as low as 0.1 or 1 µg kg-1 before the 1:100 dilution, the obtained signals were still significantly higher than the instrumental limit of quantitation (S/N 10). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of veterinary drug and pesticide residues in animal feed by high-resolution mass spectrometry: comparison between time-of-flight and Orbitrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    The use of medium-high-resolution mass spectrometers (M-HRMS) provides many advantages in multi-residue analysis. A comparison between two mass spectrometers, medium-resolution (MRMS) time-of-flight (TOF) and high-resolution (HRMS) Orbitrap, has been carried out for the analysis of toxic compounds in animal feed. More than 300 compounds belonging to several classes of veterinary drugs (VDs) and pesticides have been determined in different animal feed samples using a generic extraction method. The use of a clean-up procedure has been evaluated in both instruments, and several validation parameters have been established, such as the matrix effect, linearity, recovery and sensitivity. Finally, both instruments have been used during the analysis of 18 different feed samples (including chicken, hen, rabbit and horse). Some VDs (sulfadiazine, trimethoprim, robenidine and monensin sodium) and one pesticide (chlorpyrifos) have been identified. In general, better results were obtained using the Orbitrap, such as sensitivity (1-12.5 µg kg(-1)) and recovery values (60-125%). Moreover, this analyser had several software tools, which reduced the time for data processing and were easy to use, performing quick screening for more than 450 compounds in less than 5 min. However, some disadvantages such as the high cost and a decrease in the number of detected compounds at low concentrations must be taken into account.

  2. The future of veterinary parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, G C

    2001-07-12

    Current evidence suggests research in veterinary parasitology is in decline despite its importance. This is particularly true in the UK where research funds have been diverted into BSE. Decline in interest in veterinary parasitology is at least in part due to the success of major pharmaceutical companies in producing a range of effective and safe anti-parasitic drugs. Research is needed because of the effects of parasites on animal welfare and the economic costs of parasites. However, there is little information on the actual costs of animal parasites. Another major reason for research is the development of drug resistance in protozoa, helminths and arthropods of veterinary importance. This is a serious problem particularly for sheep and goats in the southern hemisphere. A prioritised list of research requirements is suggested: (i) new drugs; (ii) resistance management; (iii) vaccines; (iv) breeding for resistance; (v) improved diagnostics; (vi) zoonoses; (vii) global warming and parasites. There is a major political challenge to raise the profile of veterinary parasitology and thus the funding essential for its advancement and the continued welfare and productivity of animals.

  3. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs.

  4. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szandra Klátyik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical substances applied in animal husbandry or veterinary medicine and in crop protection represent substantial environmental loads, and their residues occur in food and feed products. Product approval is governed differently in these two sectors in the European Union (EU, and the occurrence of veterinary drug (VD and pesticide residues indicated by contamination notification cases in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed of the EU also show characteristic differences. While the initial high numbers of VD residues reported in 2002 were successfully suppressed to less than 100 cases annually by 2006 and on, the number of notification cases for pesticide residues showed a gradual increase from a low (approximately 50 cases annually initial level until 2005 to more than 250 cases annually after 2009, with a halt occurring only in 2016. Main notifiers of VD residues include Germany, Belgium, the UK, and Italy (63, 59, 42, and 31 notifications announced, respectively, and main consigning countries of non-compliances are Vietnam, India, China, and Brazil (88, 50, 34, and 23 notifications, respectively. Thus, countries of South and Southeast Asia are considered a vulnerable point with regard to VD residues entering the EU market. Unintended side effects of VDs and plant protection products may be caused not only by the active ingredients but also by various additives in these preparations. Adjuvants (e.g., surfactants and other co-formulants used in therapeutic agents and feed additives, as well as in pesticide formulations have long been considered as inactive ingredients in the aspects of the required main biological effect of the pharmaceutical or pesticide, and in turn, legal regulations of the approval and marketing of these additives specified significantly less stringent risk assessment requirements, than those specified for the active ingredients. However, numerous studies have shown additive, synergistic, or antagonistic side effects

  5. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klátyik, Szandra; Bohus, Péter; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Chemical substances applied in animal husbandry or veterinary medicine and in crop protection represent substantial environmental loads, and their residues occur in food and feed products. Product approval is governed differently in these two sectors in the European Union (EU), and the occurrence of veterinary drug (VD) and pesticide residues indicated by contamination notification cases in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed of the EU also show characteristic differences. While the initial high numbers of VD residues reported in 2002 were successfully suppressed to less than 100 cases annually by 2006 and on, the number of notification cases for pesticide residues showed a gradual increase from a low (approximately 50 cases annually) initial level until 2005 to more than 250 cases annually after 2009, with a halt occurring only in 2016. Main notifiers of VD residues include Germany, Belgium, the UK, and Italy (63, 59, 42, and 31 notifications announced, respectively), and main consigning countries of non-compliances are Vietnam, India, China, and Brazil (88, 50, 34, and 23 notifications, respectively). Thus, countries of South and Southeast Asia are considered a vulnerable point with regard to VD residues entering the EU market. Unintended side effects of VDs and plant protection products may be caused not only by the active ingredients but also by various additives in these preparations. Adjuvants (e.g., surfactants) and other co-formulants used in therapeutic agents and feed additives, as well as in pesticide formulations have long been considered as inactive ingredients in the aspects of the required main biological effect of the pharmaceutical or pesticide, and in turn, legal regulations of the approval and marketing of these additives specified significantly less stringent risk assessment requirements, than those specified for the active ingredients. However, numerous studies have shown additive, synergistic, or antagonistic side effects between the

  6. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klátyik, Szandra; Bohus, Péter; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Chemical substances applied in animal husbandry or veterinary medicine and in crop protection represent substantial environmental loads, and their residues occur in food and feed products. Product approval is governed differently in these two sectors in the European Union (EU), and the occurrence of veterinary drug (VD) and pesticide residues indicated by contamination notification cases in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed of the EU also show characteristic differences. While the initial high numbers of VD residues reported in 2002 were successfully suppressed to less than 100 cases annually by 2006 and on, the number of notification cases for pesticide residues showed a gradual increase from a low (approximately 50 cases annually) initial level until 2005 to more than 250 cases annually after 2009, with a halt occurring only in 2016. Main notifiers of VD residues include Germany, Belgium, the UK, and Italy (63, 59, 42, and 31 notifications announced, respectively), and main consigning countries of non-compliances are Vietnam, India, China, and Brazil (88, 50, 34, and 23 notifications, respectively). Thus, countries of South and Southeast Asia are considered a vulnerable point with regard to VD residues entering the EU market. Unintended side effects of VDs and plant protection products may be caused not only by the active ingredients but also by various additives in these preparations. Adjuvants (e.g., surfactants) and other co-formulants used in therapeutic agents and feed additives, as well as in pesticide formulations have long been considered as inactive ingredients in the aspects of the required main biological effect of the pharmaceutical or pesticide, and in turn, legal regulations of the approval and marketing of these additives specified significantly less stringent risk assessment requirements, than those specified for the active ingredients. However, numerous studies have shown additive, synergistic, or antagonistic side effects between the

  7. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p terapia de antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles

  8. Progress in Psoriasis Therapy via Novel Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Nitha; Ramya, Devi D; Vedha, Hari Bn

    2014-02-17

    Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient's quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment.

  9. Computer-Aided Optimization of Combined Anti-Retroviral Therapy for HIV: New Drugs, New Drug Targets and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, Maurizio; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Prosperi, Mattia C F

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral drugs is a complex and evolving area with relevant implications in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several rules, algorithms and full-fledged computer programs have been developed to assist the HIV specialist in the choice of the best patient-tailored therapy. Experts' rules and statistical/machine learning algorithms for interpreting HIV drug resistance, along with their program implementations, were retrieved from PubMed and other on-line resources to be critically reviewed in terms of technical approach, performance, usability, update, and evolution (i.e. inclusion of novel drugs or expansion to other viral agents). Several drug resistance prediction algorithms for the nucleotide/nucleoside/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase inhibitors as well as coreceptor antagonists are currently available, routinely used, and have been validated thoroughly in independent studies. Computer tools that combine single-drug genotypic/phenotypic resistance interpretation and optimize combination antiretroviral therapy have been also developed and implemented as web applications. Most of the systems have been updated timely to incorporate new drugs and few have recently been expanded to meet a similar need in the Hepatitis C area. Prototype systems aiming at predicting virological response from both virus and patient indicators have been recently developed but they are not yet being routinely used. Computing HIV genotype to predict drug susceptibility in vitro or response to combination antiretroviral therapy in vivo is a continuous and productive research field, translating into successful treatment decision support tools, an essential component of the management of HIV patients.

  10. Drug: D08165 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08165 Drug Medetomidine (INN); Domitor [veterinary] C13H16N2 200.1313 200.2795 D08165.gif Analgesic [veteri...nary]; Hypnotic, sedative [veterinary] alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist [HSA:150

  11. Drug: D08429 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08429 Drug Proligestone (INN); Covinan [veterinary] (TN); Delvosteron [veterinary]... (TN) C24H34O4 386.2457 386.5244 D08429.gif Progestin veterinary medicine progesterone receptor agonist [HSA

  12. Drug: D04883 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04883 Drug Medetomidine hydrochloride (USAN) C13H16N2. HCl 236.108 236.7405 D04883.gif Analgesic [veterinar...y]; Sedative [veterinary] veterinary medicine alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist [H

  13. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  14. Drug Discovery of Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blat, Yuval; Blat, Shachar

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic, lethal, muscle disorder caused by the loss of the muscle protein, dystrophin, leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and muscle weakness. Drug discovery efforts targeting DMD have used two main approaches: (1) the restoration of dystrophin expression or the expression of a compensatory protein, and (2) the mitigation of downstream pathological mechanisms, including dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and muscle ischemia. The aim of this review is to introduce the disease, its pathophysiology, and the available research tools to a drug discovery audience. This review will also detail the most promising therapies that are currently being tested in clinical trials or in advanced preclinical models. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  16. [Experimental therapy of cardiac remodeling with quercetin-containing drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, M A; Pavlyuchenko, V B; Tumanovskaya, L V; Dosenko, V E; Moybenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that continuous beta-adrenergic hyperstimulation resulted in cardiac function disturbances and fibrosis of cardiac tissue. Treatment with quercetin-containing drugs, particularly, water-soluble corvitin and tableted quertin exerted favourable effect on cardiac hemodynamics, normalized systolic and diastolic function in cardiac remodeling, induced by sustained beta-adrenergic stimulation. It was estimated that conducted experimental therapy limited cardiac fibrosis area almost three-fold, that could be associated with first and foremost improved cardiac distensibility, characteristics of diastolic and also pump function in cardiac remodeling.

  17. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Yi Tan,1 Aniruddha Agarwal,2 Cecilia S Lee,3 Jay Chhablani,4 Vishali Gupta,5 Manoj Khatri,6 Jayabalan Nirmal,7 Carlos Pavesio,8 Rupesh Agrawal1,7–9 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Vitreoretina, Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Department of Vitreoretina, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 5Department of Retina and Uvea, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 6Department of Retina, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 8Department of Medical Retina, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Department of Ophthalmology, National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis. Keywords: intravitreal therapy, noninfectious uveitis, posterior uveitis

  18. Longterm maintenance therapy with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Hilary

    2002-11-01

    Longterm safety and efficacy of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) have been challenging to assess. There are few studies that have evaluated patient outcome beyond 5 years. As patients may receive several DMARD over the course of their disease a long with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and other drugs for comorbidities, it is difficult to design and implement a trial to define a specific drug's longterm effect. Based on the findings of several key studies, however, it does appear that DMARD are safe when taken longterm, and that they are more likely to be discontinued because of inefficacy than toxicity. Although DMARD are often discontinued because of lack of efficacy, 12 year data suggest that DMARD can provide benefit over this period. The toxicity profiles vary significantly between DMARD. In addition, the time during therapy when the majority of these adverse effects most frequently appear is DMARD-specific. Prospective studies are needed to further clarify longterm safety and efficacy of the newer DMARD.

  19. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  20. Hirudotherapy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Natalia; Kantyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The saliva of medicinal leeches, e.g., Hirudo medicinalis and Hirudo verbana commonly used in hirudotherapy, contains more than 100 bioactive substances with various therapeutic effects, including anticoagulant, vasodilator, thrombolytic, anti-inflammatory and anaesthetic properties. Recently, leeches have been used very successfully in veterinary medicine to treat many diseases of animals, especially dogs, cats and horses. The most common indications for the use of leeches are hip and elbow dysplasia, acute and chronic arthritis, diseases associated with inflammation of tendons, ligaments, and fascia, diseases of the vertebrae and the treatment of scars. Leech therapy is a painless procedure which takes an average of 30 to 120 minutes, the time being dependent on the size of the animal. All leeches used in medical procedures should originate only from certified biofarms. The maintenance of sterile conditions for the culture, transport and storage of medical leeches is very important to protect animals from microbial infections. Hirudotherapy is successfully used in veterinary medicine, especially when traditional treatment is not effective, the effects of treatment are too slow, or after surgery, when the tissues may be threatened by venous congestion.

  1. Treating adolescent drug abuse: a randomized trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A; Dakof, Gayle A; Turner, Ralph M; Henderson, Craig E; Greenbaum, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of two adolescent drug abuse treatments: individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT). A 2 (treatment condition) x 4 (time) repeated-measures intent-to-treat randomized design. Data were gathered at baseline, termination, 6 and 12 months post-termination. Analyses used latent growth curve modeling. Community-based drug abuse clinic in the northeastern United States. A total of 224 youth, primarily male (81%), African American (72%), from low-income single-parent homes (58%) with an average age of 15 years were recruited into the study. All youth were drug users, with 75% meeting DSM-IV criteria for cannabis dependence and 13% meeting criteria for abuse. Five outcomes were measured: (i) substance use problem severity; (ii) 30-day frequency of cannabis use; (iii) 30-day frequency of alcohol use; (iv) 30-day frequency of other drug use; and (v) 30-day abstinence. Both treatments produced significant decreases in cannabis consumption and slightly significant reductions in alcohol use, but there were no treatment differences in reducing frequency of cannabis and alcohol use. Significant treatment effects were found favoring MDFT on substance use problem severity, other drug use and minimal use (zero or one occasion of use) of all substances, and these effects continued to 12 months following treatment termination. Both interventions are promising treatments. Consistent with previous controlled trials, MDFT is distinguished by the sustainability of treatment effects.

  2. Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for veterinary technologists and technicians. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of veterinary technologists and ...

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology; Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, ... Parasitic diseases have a debilitating impact on human and animal health worldwide particularly in developing countries. Haemoparasitism have largely been ..... exerts a major health concern in domestic.

  4. Wide-scope analysis of veterinary drug and pesticide residues in animal feed by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Luiz, María M; Romero-González, Roberto; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2013-08-01

    A fast and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous monitoring of >250 pesticides and veterinary drugs (VDs) in animal feed. A 'dilute-and-shoot' extraction with water and acetonitrile (1% formic acid) followed by a clean-up step with Florisil cartridges was applied. The extracts were analysed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid analyser quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative electrospray ionisation. The detection of the residues was accomplished by retention time and accurate mass using an in-house database. The identification of the detected compounds was carried out by searching of fragment ions for each compound and isotopic pattern. The optimised method was validated and recoveries ranged from 60% to 120% at three concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg kg(-1)) for 30%, 68% and 80% of compounds, respectively, included in the database (364) in chicken feed. Document SANCO 12495/2011 and Directive 2002/657/CE were used as guidelines for method validation. Intra-day and inter-day precisions, expressed as relative standard deviations, were lower than 20% for more than 90% of compounds. The limits of quantification ranged from 4 to 200 μg kg(-1) for most analytes, which are sufficient to verify compliance of products with legal tolerances. The applicability of the procedure was further tested on different types of feed (chicken, hen, rabbit and horse feed), evaluating recoveries and repeatability. Finally, the method was applied to the analysis of 18 feed samples, detecting some VDs (sulfadiazine, trimethoprim, robenidin and monensin Na) and only one pesticide (chlorpyrifos).

  5. Generalized lichenoid drug eruption associated with imatinib mesylate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM, an anticancer drug, has been widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, and dermato-fibrosarcoma protuberans. Cutaneous reactions to IM have been reported to occur in varying number of patients in different case series. Non-lichenoid cutaneous reactions secondary to IM have been well-documented in the literature and are the commonest non-hematologic adverse reactions associated with its use. Lichenoid drug eruption (LDE associated with IM therapy has rarely been reported in the literature. A case of a generalized LDE associated with IM therapy has been described here for its rarity and interesting clinical presentation. As the clinical usage of IM is increasing, one might expect an increasing number of similar patients in the future. It is thus important to realize the potential of IM to produce LDE and to differentiate this entity from idiopathic lichen planus. In the present article, the reports of IM-associated LDE, described in the PubMed and Medline database (in English language literature, have also been reviewed.

  6. A study of the frequency and pattern of non-drug therapies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since complications and therapeutic failures are common with cardiovascular diseases, it became necessary to assess the pattern of Non-drug therapies as a tool in enhancing the outcome of therapy. Aim: To assess the frequency of Non-drug therapies among patients with some cardiovascular diseases in the ...

  7. Progress in psoriasis therapy via novel drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitha Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment.

  8. Veterinary practice marketeer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Justin

    2015-01-24

    Justin Phillips is marketing manager at White Cross Vets and the Veterinary Marketing Association's (VMA's) Young Veterinary Marketeer of the Year. Here, he describes what he does and why he believes other practices should embrace marketing to improve their quality and client care. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) has been in existence since 1971. The NVJ is published by the Nigerian Veterinary Medical Association (NVMA) as part of the association's commitment to the advancement of Veterinary Medicine in Nigeria and other parts of the world, with a general view of enhancing the livestock ...

  10. Tanzania Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanzania Veterinary Journal (The Tropical Veterinarian) is a biannual Journal, which publishes original contribution to knowledge on Veterinary Science, Animal Science and Production, and allied sciences including new techniques and developments in Veterinary Medicine. The target readers of the Journal are the ...

  11. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria, 2Department of. Veterinary Anatomy ... laboratory technologists and academic staff of the departments of veterinary anatomy, pathology and public health. Design of the ... Early histology and histopathology based research was ...

  12. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(2). 2017. Mustapha et al. 129 ... 1 Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta,. Abeokuta, Ogun State; 2 ..... lamina 9; IB: Internal basilar nucleus; ICI: Intercalated nucleus; ICo9: Intercostal muscle motor neurons of lamina 9; ...

  13. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Thomas et al. 123 .... Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of. Agriculture Abeokuta and were ..... immunogenic Salmonella ghost confers protection against internal organ colonization and egg contamination. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology,. 162(1-2): 41–50. JOSHI ...

  14. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1288. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., December 2015. Vol. 36 (4): 1288-1298. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Anatomical Studies of ... 1Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria; 2 Department of .... back, the internal organs were measured in.

  15. Identification of Drug Therapy Problems among Elderly in-patients of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of drug related problems among elderly in-patients and to identify those at risk of DTPs. ... major Polypharmacy 60 (66.7%), unnecessary drug therapy 29 (32.2%), adverse drug reactions 28 (31.1%), need for additional therapy 27 (30%) and non compliance 13 (14.4%).

  16. Clinically important ocular reactions to systemic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, I G

    1993-09-01

    Many systemically administered drugs produce ocular adverse effects. Fortunately, relatively few are capable of causing significant, irreversible visual impairment. It is the responsibility of every clinician when prescribing systemic therapeutic agents to be aware of potential adverse ocular reactions, to appreciate their significance, and to inform the patient of the potential risks of treatment. In instances where serious adverse reactions relate to the cumulative effects of prolonged treatment, it is the responsibility of the prescribing physician to institute appropriate methods of visual screening. In this respect, it is most important to obtain the necessary individual baseline measurements before treatment is commenced. Chloroquine retinopathy is probably the most feared of all adverse ocular reactions to systemic drug therapy. However, it occurs only rarely if the daily dosage of chloroquine does not exceed 250mg. Regular screening using automated perimetry is mandatory if prolonged therapy is contemplated. Amiodarone almost inevitably produces corneal deposits. These rarely produce symptoms, and resolve upon withdrawal of the drug. Optic neuropathy has recently been described with amiodarone. Systemic anticoagulant therapy may be associated with intraocular hemorrhage in patients with pre-existing disciform macular degeneration, and such agents should be used with caution in affected individuals. Systemic corticosteroids produce posterior subcapsular cataracts in susceptible individuals which may profoundly affect visual acuity. Although elevated intraocular pressure may also result from systemic therapy, the relationship between the pressure rise and development of glaucomatous changes remains unclear. Ethambutol may produce optic neuropathy if the daily dosage exceeds 15 mg/kg. The changes are usually reversible within a few weeks of stopping treatment. High doses of tamoxifen may produce a maculopathy with loss of visual acuity, if given for prolonged

  17. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  18. Repurposing of gallium-based drugs for antibacterial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchi, Carlo; Imperi, Francesco; Minandri, Fabrizia; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    While the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is vanishing current anti-infective therapies, the antibiotic discovery pipeline is drying up. In the last years, the repurposing of existing drugs for new clinical applications has become a major research area in drug discovery, also in the field of anti-infectives. This review discusses the potential of repurposing previously approved gallium formulations in antibacterial chemotherapy. Gallium has no proven function in biological systems, but it can act as an iron-mimetic in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The activity of gallium mostly relies on its ability to replace iron in redox enzymes, thus impairing their function and ultimately hampering cell growth. Cancer cells and bacteria are preferential gallium targets due to their active metabolism and fast growth. The wealth of knowledge on the pharmacological properties of gallium has opened the door to the repurposing of gallium-based drugs for the treatment of infections sustained by antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens, such as Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and for suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. The promising antibacterial activity of gallium both in vitro and in different animal models of infection raises the hope that gallium will confirm its efficacy in clinical trials, and will become a valuable therapeutic option to cure otherwise untreatable bacterial infections. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Development of drug delivery systems for radionuclide therapy using a combination therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, On Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    For the development of new controlled drug delivery systems, the application of combination therapy using angiogenesis inhibitor and tumor static agents has drawn great attention. This approach would be very beneficial for cancer treatment especially when a new drug deliver system utilizing biodegradable polymers is developed. Therefore, the present study for the combination therapy of angiogenesis inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents was to carry out prior to the development of the novel drug delivery. In present study, the ability of inhibition on cell growth was investigated with treatment of anti-angiogenetic agent and anticancer agent. Thalidomide was used as an antivasculatory agents and Doxorubicine was treated as a chemotherapeutic agent. To demonstrate apoptotic process in in-vitro study, TUNEL assay was carried out. Also, the alteration of p53 level was examined by using western blotting. For the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR3, MKN45, SNU719, C6, L929, T98G, Hep3B and Calu6 were applied. Results showed that Thalidomide inhibited cell growth in tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner and Doxorubicin as well. A significant synergistic effect on the apoptotic was noticed in the combination treatment of Thalidomide and Doxorubicin compared to a single treatment of either drug. Therefore, it can be concluded that the mechanism of cytotoxicity was due to the enhancement of apoptosis in early cell death with combination treatment in tumor cell lines.

  20. Veterinary applications of induced pluripotent stem cells: regenerative medicine and models for disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian-Serrano, Alberto; Stout, Tom; Dinnyes, Andras

    2013-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be derived from a tissue biopsy and represent a promising new platform for disease modelling, drug and toxicity testing, biomarker development and cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine. In regenerative medicine, large animals may represent the best models for man, and thereby provide invaluable systems in which to test the safety and the potential of iPSCs. Hence, testing iPSCs in veterinary species may serve a double function, namely, developing therapeutic products for regenerative medicine in veterinary patients while providing valuable background information for human clinical trials. The production of iPSCs from livestock or wild species is attractive because it could improve efficiency and reduce costs in various fields, such as transgenic animal generation and drug development, preservation of biological diversity, and because it also offers an alternative to xenotransplantation for in vivo generation of organs. Although the technology of cellular reprogramming using the so-called 'Yamanaka factors' is in its peak expectation phase and many concerns still need to be addressed, the rapid technical progress suggests that iPSCs could contribute significantly to novel therapies in veterinary and biomedical practice in the near future. This review provides an overview of the potential applications of iPSCs in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Reid, Molly C; Kallur Siddaramaiah, Latha; Müller, Joachim; Winzer, Pablo; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Merritt, Ethan A; Hol, Wim G J; Maly, Dustin J; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1) is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs) previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for therapy of bovine

  2. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode K Ojo

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1 is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for

  3. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD...

  4. 78 FR 14801 - Veterinary Oversight of Antimicrobial Use in Livestock: Impact on Stakeholders; Public Meetings...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Oversight of Antimicrobial Use in Livestock... areas that may lack access to adequate veterinary services. The meetings are jointly sponsored by FDA...: Patricia Arnwine, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-6), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl...

  5. 77 FR 22247 - Veterinary Feed Directive; Draft Text for Proposed Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 Veterinary Feed Directive; Draft Text for... draft text for a proposed regulation intended to improve the efficiency of FDA's Veterinary Feed... CONTACT: Sharon Benz, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-220), Food and Drug Administration, 7519...

  6. Engineered nanoparticles for drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianmeng; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Pang, Bo; Hyun, Dong Choon; Yang, Miaoxin; Xia, Younan

    2014-11-10

    In medicine, nanotechnology has sparked a rapidly growing interest as it promises to solve a number of issues associated with conventional therapeutic agents, including their poor water solubility (at least, for most anticancer drugs), lack of targeting capability, nonspecific distribution, systemic toxicity, and low therapeutic index. Over the past several decades, remarkable progress has been made in the development and application of engineered nanoparticles to treat cancer more effectively. For example, therapeutic agents have been integrated with nanoparticles engineered with optimal sizes, shapes, and surface properties to increase their solubility, prolong their circulation half-life, improve their biodistribution, and reduce their immunogenicity. Nanoparticles and their payloads have also been favorably delivered into tumors by taking advantage of the pathophysiological conditions, such as the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and the spatial variations in the pH value. Additionally, targeting ligands (e.g., small organic molecules, peptides, antibodies, and nucleic acids) have been added to the surface of nanoparticles to specifically target cancerous cells through selective binding to the receptors overexpressed on their surface. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that multiple types of therapeutic drugs and/or diagnostic agents (e.g., contrast agents) could be delivered through the same carrier to enable combination therapy with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance, and real-time readout on the treatment efficacy. It is anticipated that precisely engineered nanoparticles will emerge as the next-generation platform for cancer therapy and many other biomedical applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. VisANT 4.0: Integrative network platform to connect genes, drugs, diseases and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenjun; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; Huang, Chia-Ling; Liu, Yang; Tian, Feng; Granger, Brian; Delisi, Charles

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid accumulation of our knowledge on diseases, disease-related genes and drug targets, network-based analysis plays an increasingly important role in systems biology, systems pharmacology and translational science. The new release of VisANT aims to provide new functions to facilitate the convenient network analysis of diseases, therapies, genes and drugs. With improved understanding of the mechanisms of complex diseases and drug actions through network analysis, novel drug methods (e.g., drug repositioning, multi-target drug and combination therapy) can be designed. More specifically, the new update includes (i) integrated search and navigation of disease and drug hierarchies; (ii) integrated disease-gene, therapy-drug and drug-target association to aid the network construction and filtering; (iii) annotation of genes/drugs using disease/therapy information; (iv) prediction of associated diseases/therapies for a given set of genes/drugs using enrichment analysis; (v) network transformation to support construction of versatile network of drugs, genes, diseases and therapies; (vi) enhanced user interface using docking windows to allow easy customization of node and edge properties with build-in legend node to distinguish different node type. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu.

  8. Mitochondrial ROS and cancer drug resistance: Implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Imoh S; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Under physiological conditions, a well-coordinated and balanced redox system exists to ensure that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are appropriately utilized to accomplish specific functions, such as signaling and protein regulation. The influence of ROS within malignant cells, whether for good or bad may depend on several factors, such as tumor and tissue type, disease stage, treatment strategy, as well as duration, specificity and levels of ROS. What then are the known roles of ROS in cancer? Firstly, ROS significantly impacts cancer phenotypes. Secondly, the oxidative ROS property responsible for killing cancer cells, also impact secondary signaling networks. Thirdly, a strong correlation exist between ROS and genetic instability which may promote mutations. Finally, emerging observations suggest a role for mitochondrial ROS in cancer drug resistance, with implications for therapy. The mitochondria is a key regulator of metabolic-redox (meta-redox) alterations within cancer cells. Like a double-edged sword, mitochondrial ROS perturbations in cancer therapy may be beneficial or detrimental. However, harnessing ROS-specific cancer-targeting benefits remain a major challenge. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Gastrointestinal traits: individualizing therapy for obesity with drugs and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this article were to review the discrepancy between numbers of people requiring weight loss treatment and results and to assess the potential effects of pharmacologic treatments (recently approved for obesity) and endoscopically deployed devices on quantitative GI traits in development for obesity treatment. We conducted a review of relevant literature to achieve our objectives. The 2013 guidelines increased the number of adults recommended for weight loss treatment by 20.9% (116.0 million to 140.2 million). There is an imbalance between efficacy and costs of commercial weight loss programs and drug therapy (average weight loss about 5 kg). The number of bariatric procedures performed in the United States has doubled in the past decade. The efficacy of bariatric surgery is attributed to reduction in the volume of the stomach, nutrient malabsorption with some types of surgery, increased postprandial incretin responses, and activation of farnesoid X receptor mechanisms. These GI and behavioral traits identify sub-phenotypes of obesity, based on recent research. The mechanisms or traits targeted by drug and device treatments include centrally mediated alterations of appetite or satiation, diversion of nutrients, and alteration of stomach capacity, gastric emptying, or incretin hormones. Future treatment may be individualized based on quantitative GI and behavioral traits measured in obese patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G J; Smyth, Wesley G; Armstrong Hewitt, S; van Ginkel, Leen; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-05-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance of two product ions, acquired in selected reaction monitoring mode, the ion ratio should be within certain ranges for confirmation of the identity of a substance. The acceptable tolerance of the ion ratio varies with the relative abundance of the two product ions and for retention time, CD 2002/657/EC allows a tolerance of 5%. Because of rapid technical advances in analytical instruments and new approaches applied in the field of contaminant testing in food products (multi-compound and multi-class methods) a critical assessment of these criteria is justified. In this study a large number of representative, though challenging sample extracts were prepared, including muscle, urine, milk and liver, spiked with 100 registered and banned veterinary drugs at levels ranging from 0.5 to 100 µg/kg. These extracts were analysed using SRM mode using different chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometers from different vendors. In the initial study, robust data was collected using four different instrumental set-ups. Based on a unique and highly relevant data set, consisting of over 39 000 data points, the ion ratio and retention time criteria for applicability in confirmatory analysis were assessed. The outcomes were verified based on a collaborative trial including laboratories from all over the world. It was concluded that the ion ratio deviation is not related to the value of the ion ratio, but rather to the intensity of the lowest product ion. Therefore a fixed ion ratio deviation tolerance of 50% (relative) is proposed, which also is applicable for compounds present at sub-ppb levels or having poor ionisation efficiency. Furthermore, it was observed that retention time

  11. Drug dosing during intermittent hemodialysis and continuous renal replacement therapy : special considerations in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Michael A; Neu, Alicia M; Fivush, Barbara A; Parekh, Rulan S; Furth, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is, fortunately, an unusual occurrence in children; however, many children with various underlying illnesses develop acute renal failure, and transiently require renal replacement therapy - peritoneal dialysis, intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). As children with acute and chronic renal failure often have multiple comorbid conditions requiring drug therapy, generalists, intensivists, nephrologists, and pharmacists need to be aware of the issues surrounding the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. This article summarizes the pharmacokinetics and dosing of many drugs commonly prescribed for pediatric patients, and focuses on the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing IHD and CRRT in the intensive care unit setting. Peritoneal dialysis is not considered in this review. Finally, a summary table with recommended initial dosages for drugs commonly encountered in pediatric patients requiring IHD or CRRT is presented.

  12. The history of veterinary cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W

    2013-03-01

    Throughout civilization, animals have played a pivotal role in the advancement of science and medicine. From as early as 400 BC when Hippocrates recognized that diseases had natural causes, the steadfast advances made by biologists, scientists, physicians and scholars were fueled by timely and important facts and information- much of it gained through animal observations that contributed importantly to understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology. There have been many breakthroughs and historic developments. For example, William Harvey in the 16th and 17th centuries clarified the importance of the circulatory system, aided by observations in dogs and pigs, which helped to clarify and confirm his concepts. The nineteenth century witnessed advances in physical examination techniques including auscultation and percussion. These helped create the basis for enhanced proficiency in clinical cardiology. An explosion of technologic advances that followed in the 20th century have made possible sophisticated, accurate, and non-invasive diagnostics. This permitted rapid patient assessment, effective monitoring, the development of new cardiotonic drugs, clinical trials to assess efficacy, and multi-therapy strategies. The latter 20th century has marshaled a dizzying array of advances in medical genetics and molecular science, expanding the frontiers of etiologies and disease mechanisms in man, with important implications for animal health. Veterinary medicine has evolved during the last half century, from a trade designed to serve agrarian cultures, to a diverse profession supporting an array of career opportunities ranging from private, specialty practice, to highly organized, specialized medicine and subspecialty academic training programs in cardiology and allied disciplines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric Exposures to Veterinary Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Suzanne; Roberts, Kristin J; Stull, Jason; Spiller, Henry A; McKenzie, Lara B

    2017-03-01

    To describe the epidemiology of veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures to children based on calls to a regional poison control center. A retrospective analysis of pediatric (≤19 years of age) exposures to pharmaceutical products intended for animal use, managed by a regional poison control center from 1999 through 2013, was conducted. Case narratives were reviewed and coded for exposure-related circumstances and intended species. Descriptive statistics were generated. From 1999 through 2013, the Central Ohio Poison Center received 1431 calls that related to a veterinary pharmaceutical exposure for children ≤19 years of age. Most of the pediatric calls (87.6%) involved children ≤5 years of age. Exploratory behavior was the most common exposure-related circumstance (61.4%) and ingestion accounted for the exposure route in 93% of cases. Substances commonly associated with exposures included: veterinary drugs without human equivalent (17.3%), antimicrobial agents (14.8%), and antiparasitics (14.6%). Based on substance and quantity, the majority of exposures (96.9%) were not expected to result in long-term or lasting health effects and were managed at home (94.1%). A total of 80 cases (5.6%) were referred to a health care facility, and 2 cases resulted in a moderate health effect. Children ≤5 years of age are most at risk for veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures. Although most exposures do not result in a serious medical outcome, efforts to increase public awareness, appropriate product dispensing procedures, and attention to home storage practices may reduce the risk of veterinary pharmaceutical exposures to young children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Multi-class, multi-residue analysis of trace veterinary drugs in milk by rapid screening and quantification using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqian; Li, Xiang; Liu, Xiaomao; Zhang, Jinjie; Cao, Yanzhong; Shi, Zhihong; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid multi-class multi-residue analytical method was developed for the screening and quantification of veterinary drugs in milk by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). A total of 90 veterinary drugs investigated belonged to almost 20 classes including lincomycins, macrolides, sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-agonists, β-lactams, sedatives, β-receptor antagonists, sex hormones, glucocorticoids, nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, nitrofurans, and some others. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) procedure was developed for the sample preparation without the solid-phase extraction step. The linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility of the method were fully validated. The response of the detector was linear for each target compound in a wide concentration range with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9973 to 0.9999 (among them R(2)>0.999 for 73 of 90 analytes). The range of the limit of quantification for these compounds in the milk ranged from 0.10 to 17.30μg/kg. The repeatability and reproducibility were in the range of 2.11 to 9.62% and 2.76 to 13.9%, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 72.62 to 122.2% with the RSD (n=6) of 1.30 to 9.61% at 3 concentration levels. For the screening method, the data of the precursor and product ions of the target analytes were simultaneously acquired under the all ions MS/MS mode in a single run. An accurate mass database for the confirmation and identification of the target compounds was established. The applicability of the screening method was verified by applying to real milk samples. The proposed analytical method allows the identification and confirmation of the target veterinary drugs at trace levels employing quick analysis time. Certain veterinary drugs were detected in some cases. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  15. Veterinary Services Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Mission:To provide quality veterinary medical care and environmental enrichment programs for all animals, representing nine different species.To provide guidance for...

  16. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were randomly assigned to drug therapy (Normoretic: Hydrochlorothiazide + amiloride hydrochloride, and Amlodipine) (control: n=33) and aerobic dance combined with drug therapy (exercise: n=30) groups. Intervention in each group lasted 12 weeks. BP was measured at baseline and during and pos-intervention.

  17. The Flint Animal Cancer Center (FACC) Canine Tumour Cell Line Panel: a resource for veterinary drug discovery, comparative oncology and translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, J S; Dailey, D D; Gustafson, D L; Thamm, D H; Duval, D L

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian cell tissue culture has been a critical tool leading to our current understanding of cancer including many aspects of cellular transformation, growth and response to therapies. The current use of large panels of cell lines with associated phenotypic and genotypic information now allows for informatics approaches and in silico screens to rapidly test hypotheses based on simple as well as complex relationships. Current cell line panels with large amounts of associated drug sensitivity and genomics data are comprised of human cancer cell lines (i.e. NCI60 and GDSC). There is increased recognition of the contribution of canine cancer to comparative cancer research as a spontaneous large animal model with application in basic and translational studies. We have assembled a panel of canine cancer cell lines to facilitate studies in canine cancer and report here phenotypic and genotypic data associated with these cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Infants of drug-addicted mothers: pitfalls of replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Paul; Hamon, Isabelle; Hubert, Claire; Legagneur, Michel; Hascoet, Jean-Michel

    2008-05-01

    Maternal drug addiction can cause problems for the fetus and the newborn, and hamper long-term development. The prevalence of drug addiction during pregnancy varies from 1 % to more than 10 % depending on the country and the maternity unit. Management of these mothers can be further complicated by medical, social and psychological problems. Compared to methadone, heroin replacement therapy with buprenorphine provides better stabilization of the mother and causes fewer withdrawal symptoms in the newborn. Despite numerous publications on the effects of this partly preventive medication, data on buprenorphine pharmacology at birth are scarce. In this study, 20 newborns of mothers using oral buprenorphine were observed until the end of the withdrawal syndrome, when present. Buprenorphine plasma levels were determined with HPLC and mass spectrometry in the mother at delivery and in the newborn at birth (cord blood), 24 and 48 hours. Fifteen newborns were born at term (mean +/- SD birth weight 3029 +/- 273 g), and the other five between 32 and 36 weeks. All Apgar scores were > or =7. Withdrawal symptoms were observed in 8 of the 15 infants born to mothers taking buprenorphine alone, and lasted between 5 and 35 days. The newborns were classified in three groups. Groups I (N8) and II (N7) comprised newborns with and without withdrawal symptoms, respectively. In group III (N5), the mothers were polyintoxicated (as shown by urinary drug or neurotropic substance screening) and the newborns were symptomatic for 1 to 69 days. Buprenorphine plasma levels in the mothers ranged from 0 to 2.9 microg/L, suggesting large differences in adherence. At birth there was no significant difference in the mean plasma buprenorphine level between newborns with and without withdrawal symptoms; the respective values were 0.7 (0.4-1.3) and 0.5 (0-0.6) microg/L. In asymptomatic newborns (group II), buprenorphine was no longer detectable at 48 h, whereas in symptomatic newborns (group I), the mean

  19. A Smart, Photocontrollable Drug Release Nanosystem for Multifunctional Synergistic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yi; Wang, Huijing; Wang, Xuewei; Liu, Qiaoling; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2017-02-22

    Multifunctional synergistic therapy holds promise in biomedical studies and clinical practice. However, strategies aimed at easily integrating the components of such multimodal therapies are needed. Therefore, we herein report a smart drug release nanosystem able to perform photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy and chemotherapy in a photocontrollable manner. Doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapy drug, and 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl) porphyrin (TMPyP4), a photosensitizer, were physically intercalated into a DNA assembly immobilized on gold nanorods. The drugs were efficiently delivered to target cells and released under light irradiation, resulting in a synergism that combined phototherapy and chemotherapy for cancer treatment. This smart, photocontrollable drug release nanosystem promises precisely controlled drug release for multifunctional synergistic cancer therapy.

  20. [Morbidity spectrum and drug therapy of homeless persons in Munich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egen, V

    1998-01-01

    In Germany there are currently approx. 200,000 homeless single people, and the trend is rising. As a result of the situation in which they find themselves, many of these persons are ill and in need of medical treatment. A study was performed in Munich/Germany, focussing on a medical practice providing care for the homeless, to investigate their illnesses and pharmacological therapy. The medical practice was located in a municipal shelter. Each year about 350 different destitute homeless men--about 15 per cent of all single homeless people in Munich--were cared for. The men, whose ages ranged from about 17 to 74 years were single and the majority lived in shelters, bed and breakfast accommodations, or shared apartments. About ten per cent lived on the street. For the study, 171 randomly selected medical records were analysed for the period of July 1994 to June 1995. The homeless men suffered principally from the following illnesses: psychiatric illnesses (36%), infectious and parasitic diseases (31%), skin diseases (30%), injuries (29%), diseases of the skeleton, of the muscles and of the connective tissues (28%), diseases of the respiratory organs (27%), cardiovascular diseases (24%), and diseases of the digestive organs (17%). Seventy-five per cent of the patients received drug treatment. In the case of 37% of the patients, wounds were treated and dressed in the medical practice itself. The most frequently prescribed drugs were: analgesics (12%), antibiotics (10%), antihypertensives (10%), gastrointestinal treatments (9%), treatments for colds (9%), and dermatopharmacological preparations (6%). It was surprising that only 16% of the psychic ill patients were treated with drugs, while over 60% of the other illnesses were mostly treated pharmacologically. The interaction with alcohol was the reason for that. The study showed that the practice did not sufficiently reach women and homeless people living on the street. The homeless situation, the personal and social

  1. Veterinary microbiology and microbial disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinn, P. J

    2011-01-01

    "Veterinary Microbiology is one of the core subjects for veterinary students. Fully revised and expanded, this new edition covers every aspect of veterinary microbiology for students in both paraclinical and clinical years...

  2. Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sahel Journal of Veterinary Sciences is the official journal of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria. The journal welcomes original research articles, short communications and reviews on all aspects of veterinary sciences and related disciplines.

  3. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  4. Immediate and Delayed Drug Therapy Effects on Low Dose Sarin Exposed Mice Myocardial Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    antiarrhythmic drug which acts as a β-adrenergic receptor blockade (Ramos, et al. 2003). Major benefits of propranolol are reduced heart rate, decrease...IMMEDIATE AND DELAYED DRUG THERAPY EFFECTS ON LOW DOSE SARIN EXPOSED MICE MYOCARDIAL PERFORMANCE THESIS Joshua T. Miller, Major, USA...IMMEDIATE AND DELAYED DRUG THERAPY EFFECTS ON LOW DOSE SARIN EXPOSED MICE MYOCARDIAL PERFORMANCE THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of

  5. Chitosan from shrimp shells: A renewable sorbent applied to the clean-up step of the QuEChERS method in order to determine multi-residues of veterinary drugs in different types of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Jean Lucas de Oliveira; Schneider, Antunielle; Batista-Andrade, Jahir Antonio; Vieira, Augusto Alves; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2018-02-01

    Clean extracts are essential in LC-MS/MS, since the matrix effect can interfere in the analysis. Alternative materials which can be used as sorbents, such as chitosan in the clean-up step, are cheap and green options. In this study, chitosan from shrimp shell waste was evaluated as a sorbent in the QuEChERS method in order to determine multi-residues of veterinary drugs in different types of milk, i. e., fatty matrices. After optimization, the method showed correlation coefficients above 0.99, LOQs ranged between 1 and 50μgkg-1 and recoveries ranged between 62 and 125%, with RSD<20% for all veterinary drugs in all types of milk under study. The clean-up step which employed chitosan proved to be effective, since it reduced both the matrix effect (from values between -40 and -10% to values from -10 to +10%) and the extract turbidity (up to 95%). When the proposed method was applied to different milk samples, residues of albendazole (49μgkg-1), sulfamethazine (

  6. Implanted cardioverter-defibrillators are preferable to drugs as primary therapy in sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, S; Madan, N; Lewis, C

    1996-01-01

    The choice of initial therapy for patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias is examined based on clinical efficacy, patient safety, and cost. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy can be administered using a guided or empiric approach. Guided type-1 antiarrhythmic drug therapy has been associated with high arrhythmia recurrence rates (> 40% at 1 year) and moderate sudden death rates (10% at 1 year). Sotalol is associated with lower arrhythmia recurrence rates (20% at 1 year) that increase to 50% at 4 years. Beta-blocking agents have a limited role as stand-alone therapy in this condition. Empiric amiodarone therapy has sudden death-free survival rates of 82% at 2 years but has significantly poorer results in patients with ejection fractions death recurrence rates of 1% to 2% per year, with a cumulative index of 10% at 5 years. Total survival rate of ICD recipients ranges from 85% to 92% at 2 years. In patients with good left ventricular function, it approaches 90% at 5 years, whereas it is between 50% to 60% in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. Data from device memory indicate an absolute reduction in mortality rates with ICD intervention. Comparison of drug and device therapy has been performed in retrospective and prospective studies. Improved survival with device therapy is noted, particularly in patients with ejection fractions rate of ICD therapy of 0.8% contrasts favorably with a 13% mortality rate in the ESVEM trial with antiarrhythmic drugs and a 3.5% mortality rate in the CASCADE study. Economic analyses show that drug therapy and device therapy are both within the range of other current cardiovascular therapies. An improving economic profile for device therapy has been observed with nonthoracotomy and pectoral implantation and direct use of ICD therapy because primary therapy shortens hospital stay and reduces costs. Based on available data, ICD therapy is preferable as initial therapy in patients with malignant ventricular

  7. Protein Kinases as Drug Development Targets for Heart Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L. Müller

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are intimately integrated in different signal transduction pathways for the regulation of cardiac function in both health and disease. Protein kinase A (PKA, Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK, protein kinase C (PKC, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK are not only involved in the control of subcellular activities for maintaining cardiac function, but also participate in the development of cardiac dysfunction in cardiac hypertrophy, diabetic cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Although all these kinases serve as signal transducing proteins by phosphorylating different sites in cardiomyocytes, some of their effects are cardioprotective whereas others are detrimental. Such opposing effects of each signal transduction pathway seem to depend upon the duration and intensity of stimulus as well as the type of kinase isoform for each kinase. In view of the fact that most of these kinases are activated in heart disease and their inhibition has been shown to improve cardiac function, it is suggested that these kinases form excellent targets for drug development for therapy of heart disease.

  8. Diabetes Insipidus: A Challenging Diagnosis with New Drug Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifan, Chadi; Nasr, Rabih; Mehta, Suchita; Sharma Acharya, Pranab; Perrera, Isera; Faddoul, Giovanni; Nalluri, Nikhil; Kesavan, Mayurakhan; Azzi, Yorg; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is either due to deficient secretion of arginine vasopressin (central) or to tubular unresponsiveness (nephrogenic). Drug induced DI is a well-known entity with an extensive list of medications. Polyuria is generally defined as urine output exceeding 3 liters per day in adults. It is crucial to identify the cause of diabetes insipidus and to implement therapy as early as possible to prevent the electrolyte disturbances and the associated mortality and morbidity. It is very rare to have an idiosyncratic effect after a short use of a medication, and physicians should be aware of such a complication to avoid volume depletion. The diagnosis of diabetes insipidus is very challenging because it relies on laboratory values, urine output, and the physical examination of the patient. A high clinical suspicion of diabetes insipidus should be enough to initiate treatment. The complications related to DI are mostly related to the electrolyte imbalance that can affect the normal physiology of different organ systems. PMID:24977135

  9. Collaborative drug therapy management and comprehensive medication management-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBane, Sarah E; Dopp, Anna L; Abe, Andrew; Benavides, Sandra; Chester, Elizabeth A; Dixon, Dave L; Dunn, Michaelia; Johnson, Melissa D; Nigro, Sarah J; Rothrock-Christian, Tracie; Schwartz, Amy H; Thrasher, Kim; Walker, Scot

    2015-04-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) previously published position statements on collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in 1997 and 2003. Since 2003, significant federal and state legislation addressing CDTM has evolved and expanded throughout the United States. CDTM is well suited to facilitate the delivery of comprehensive medication management (CMM) by clinical pharmacists. CMM, defined by ACCP as a core component of the standards of practice for clinical pharmacists, is designed to optimize medication-related outcomes in collaborative practice environments. New models of care delivery emphasize patient-centered, team-based care and increasingly link payment to the achievement of positive economic, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Hence clinical pharmacists practicing under CDTM agreements or through other privileging processes are well positioned to provide CMM. The economic value of clinical pharmacists in team-based settings is well documented. However, patient access to CMM remains limited due to lack of payer recognition of the value of clinical pharmacists in collaborative care settings and current health care payment policy. Therefore, the clinical pharmacy discipline must continue to establish and expand its use of CDTM agreements and other collaborative privileging mechanisms to provide CMM. Continued growth in the provision of CMM by appropriately qualified clinical pharmacists in collaborative practice settings will enhance recognition of their positive impact on medication-related outcomes. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris

    2013-01-01

    . This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible...

  11. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture,. Umudike, P.M.B 7267 Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria. *Corresponding author: Email: docoleji@yahoo.com; Tel. No:+234 8034509991. SUMMARY. This study investigated comparatively the genetic influence on the ...

  12. Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 49 of 49 ... Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 49 of 49 Items ...

  13. Nigerian Veterinary Journal (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of computers in all works of life need not to be overemphasized. However, in. Nigeria, the application of computers in veterinary medicine has not been fully utilized. Computer aided diagnosis is a process that has significantly improved the practice of veterinary medicine in other parts of the world. This paper ...

  14. Nigerian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCOPE The Editorial Board of the Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) welcomes contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, clinical case reports, and short communications on all aspects of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Animal Production. Submissions are accepted on the understanding that ...

  15. Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 16 of 16 ... Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Ethiopian Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 16 of 16 Items ...

  16. Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Tanzania Veterinary Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 15 of 15 Items ...

  17. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Meseko et al. 155. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): 155-159. SHORT COMMUNICATION. Detection of Haemagglutination inhibition antibody to Pandemic and. Classical Swine Influenza Virus in Commercial Piggery in ...

  18. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(1). 2016. Igado et al. 54. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 54-63. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Cranio-facial and Ocular Morphometrics of the Male Greater Cane Rat. (Thryonomys swinderianus). Igado, O. O.. 1. *; Adebayo, A. O.. 2.

  19. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 37(3). 2016. Ogunro et al. 187. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., September 2016. Vol. 37 (3): 187-191. CASE REPORT. Management of Epitheliogenesis Imperfecta in a Piglet (Sus Scrofa domesticus) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Ogunro, B. N.. 1. ; Otuh, P. I.. 1.

  20. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal 38(2). 2017. Meseko et al. 124. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., June 2017. Vol 38 (2): 124-128. SHORT COMMUNICATION. Fowlpox Virus from Backyard Poultry in Plateau State Nigeria: Isolation and Phylogeny of the P4b Gene Compared to a Vaccine Strain.

  1. Open Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Veterinary Journal is a peer reviewed international open access online and printed journal that publishes high-quality original research articles, reviews, short communications and case reports dedicated to all aspects of veterinary sciences and its related subjects. Other websites associated with this journal: ...

  2. Open Veterinary Journal: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Dr. Ibrahim Eldaghayes Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P. O. Box 13662, Tripoli, Libya Phone: +218 21 462 8422. Fax: +218 21 462 8421. Email: ibrahim.eldaghayes@vetmed.edu.ly ...

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    variegatum (Acari: Ixodidae) Ticks from Nigeria. Ogo, N. I.. 1. ; Okubanjo, O. O.. 2. ; Inuwa, H. M.. 3 and Agbede, R. I. S.. 4. 1National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom, Plateau State. 2Department of Veterinary Parasitology and. Entomology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. 3Department of Biochemistry, Ahmadu ...

  4. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., December 2015. Vol. 36 (4): 1272-1282. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Gross and Morphometric Anatomical Changes of the Thyroid Gland in the West African Dwarf ... Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. .... common carotid artery, internal jugular vein,.

  5. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 45-53. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. A Retrospective Evaluation of Intravenous Fluid Usage in Animal. Patients Treated at Veterinary Teaching Hospital Nsukka, 2005-2015 ... 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. ... they carried with them their own internal sea.

  6. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    SUMMARY. The prevalence and morphological pathology of renal failure in exotic breeds of dog in Lagos and Ogun States, within Southwestern Nigeria were determined from postmortem records of the. Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of. Agriculture, Abeokuta ...

  7. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    at the Maiduguri municipal abattoir and were used for this study. Thyroid glands collected were transported in ice packs to the Department of Veterinary Pathology laboratory, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria for gross examination and thereafter, fixed and sent to Department of Veterinary. Anatomy, University of Abuja, were it ...

  8. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  9. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  11. Vermittlung von Naturheilverfahren in der Veterinärmedizin mittels E-Learning [Teaching methods of alternative therapy in veterinary medicine via e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelak, Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] The Free University’s Veterinary Clinic of Reproduction in the Department of Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, has been offering courses on alternative and complementary veterinary medicine to its students for several years. Due to time constraints and shortages in teaching staff, it has not been possible to satisfy student demand for instruction in these areas. To provide more detailed information as well as more opportunities for discussion and practica, subject area courses were modified in two steps. Initially, blended learning was implemented to include e-learning and in-class formats of instruction. Subsequently, an entire block of courses offered were transferred to e-learning format. Students may now voluntarily register for the e-learning course entitled “Introduction of alternative and complementary veterinary medicine” via the Internet and learn the basic principles of homoeopathy, herbal medicine, acupuncture and other alternative methods in veterinary medicine. After passing this basic course, blended learning courses enable advanced students to learn more about fundamentals of methods in greater detail as well as to perform practica with animal subjects. The evaluation of these courses showed that students rated e-learning to be a reasonable addendum to in-class instruction. More than two thirds of the students recommended an increased integration of e-learning into veterinary education. [german] Die Tierklinik für Fortpflanzung in Berlin bietet den Studierenden der Veterinärmedizin seit einigen Semestern Wahlpflichtkurse zu den Naturheilverfahren an. Der enormen Nachfrage seitens der Studierenden standen personelle und zeitliche Begrenzungen des Lehrpersonals gegenüber. Um den Interessenten dennoch umfangreiche Informationen zu bieten sowie Freiräume für Diskussionen und praktische Übungen zu schaffen, wurde das Ausbildungsangebot in zwei Projektphasen ausgebaut. Zunächst wurde dabei die Methode des Blended

  12. Therapeutic laser in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Brian; Millis, Darryl L

    2015-01-01

    Laser therapy is an increasingly studied modality that can be a valuable tool for veterinary practitioners. Mechanisms of action have been studied and identified for the reduction of pain and inflammation and healing of tissue. Understanding the basics of light penetration into tissue allows evaluation of the correct dosage to deliver for the appropriate condition, and for a particular patient based on physical properties. New applications are being studied for some of the most challenging health conditions and this field will continue to grow. Additional clinical studies are still needed and collaboration is encouraged for all practitioners using this technology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Locoregional cancer therapy using polymer-based drug depots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramazani, F.; van Nostrum, C.F.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Hennink, W.E.; Kok, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional delivery of anticancer drugs is an attractive approach to minimize adverse effects associated with intravenous chemotherapy. Polymer-based drug depots injected or implanted intratumorally or adjacent to the tumor can provide long-term local drug exposure. This review highlights studies

  15. drug use evaluation on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy for people

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    BACKGROUND: Drug use evaluation is a performance improvement method that focuses on evaluation and improvement of drug use ... KEY WORDS: drug use evaluation, cotrimoxazole, HIV/AIDS, Jimma, Ethiopia. INTRODUCTION .... female was pregnant but the pregnancy history of 11. (35.5%) females was not ...

  16. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are expressly...

  17. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person seeking...

  18. 76 FR 46818 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Veterinary Feed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Veterinary Feed Directive AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... on reporting and recordkeeping requirements for distribution and use of Veterinary Feed Directive... technology. Veterinary Feed Directive--21 CFR Part 558 (OMB Control Number 0910- 0363)--Extension With the...

  19. [Comparing the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyung

    2007-08-01

    This research was conducted to compare the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain. The research design of this study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects of this study were 28 patients for the drug therapy & physical therapy, 24 patients for the drug therapy & exercise, and 22 patients for the physical therapy & exercise. Data was collected by MVAS, Oswestry disability questionnaires, and questionnaires of depression. It was analyzed by paired t-test for effectiveness, ANOVA, and Scheffe for comparison of the effects of the 3 experimental treatments, using SPSS/WIN 12.0. There were no effects of drug therapy & physical therapy on pain, disability, and depression. However, there were effects of drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression. The effects of physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression were the greatest, but there was no statistically significant differences between the drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise. Exercise is regarded as a more effective and easily accessible nursing intervention to apply alone than drug therapy or physical therapy simultaneously in reducing pain, disability and depression.

  20. Drug: D08150 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08150 Drug Lufenuron (INN); Program [veterinary] (TN) C17H8Cl2F8N2O3 509.9784 511....1502 D08150.gif Antiparasitic [veterinary]; Insecticide [veterinary] Same as: C18434 veterinary medicine CAS

  1. What’s in a Name? Student Pharmacists’ Novel Extracurricular Process of Drug Therapy Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenric B. Ware

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fostering excitement in pharmacy student learning can be achieved through reinforcing drug therapies in curricular and extracurricular endeavors. This paper described an extracurricular initiative that elevated awareness of drug therapy in its current, future, and past members. This process occurred on an annual basis. Upon invitation, participants were expected to attend meetings with current and graduate organizational members. These settings provided opportunities for recognition and remembrance of organizational history and drug therapies. Checkpoints were inserted to verify progression towards full membership. The primary role of graduate members in this process was the yielding of their professional insights. A student – led, peer – facilitated model of drug therapy exposure along these lines resonates with calls for increased innovative learning strategies.

  2. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Key words: Aerobic exercise, drug therapy, blood pressure, randomised controlled trial. African Health ... of home settings, and that could allow for supports in terms of family ... not and whether each number in a set should remain unique ...

  3. Tuberculosis treatment and management--an update on treatment regimens, trials, new drugs, and adjunct therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Mwaba, Peter; Bates, Matthew; Kapata, Nathan; Nyirenda, Thomas; Chanda, Duncan; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Hoelscher, Michael; Maeurer, Markus; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-03-01

    WHO estimates that 9 million people developed active tuberculosis in 2013 and 1·5 million people died from it. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis continue to spread worldwide with an estimated 480,000 new cases in 2013. Treatment success rates of MDR and XDR tuberculosis are still low and development of new, more effective tuberculosis drugs and adjunct therapies to improve treatment outcomes are urgently needed. Although standard therapy for drug-sensitive tuberculosis is highly effective, shorter, more effective treatment regimens are needed to reduce the burden of infectious cases. We review the latest WHO guidelines and global recommendations for treatment and management of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis, and provide an update on new drug development, results of several phase 2 and phase 3 tuberculosis treatment trials, and other emerging adjunct therapeutic options for MDR and XDR tuberculosis. The use of fluoroquinolone-containing (moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin) regimens have failed to shorten duration of therapy, and the new tuberculosis drug pipeline is sparse. Scale-up of existing interventions with increased investments into tuberculosis health services, development of new antituberculosis drugs, adjunct therapies and vaccines, coupled with visionary political leadership, are still our best chance to change the unacceptable status quo of the tuberculosis situation worldwide and the growing problem of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser and radiosurgery in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Lasers and radiosurgery frequently used in human dentistry are rapidly entering veterinary dental use. The carbon dioxide, diode, and low-level therapy lasers have features including hemostasis control, access to difficult to reach areas, and decreased pain, that make them useful for oral surgery. Periodontal pocket surgery, gingivectomy, gingivoplasty, gingival hyperplasia, operculectomy, tongue surgery, oropharyngeal inflammation therapy, oral mass surgery, crown, and frenectomy laser surgeries are described, including images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polypathology, polypharmacy, medication regimen complexity and drug therapy appropriateness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Aguirre, N; Caudevilla Martínez, A; Bellostas Muñoz, L; Crespo Avellana, M; Velilla Marco, J; Díez-Manglano, J

    Polypathological patients are usually elderly and take numerous drugs. Polypharmacy affects 85% of these individuals and is not associated with greater survival. On the contrary, polypharmacy exposes these individuals to more adverse effects, such as weight loss, falls, functional and cognitive impairment and hospitalisations. The complexity of a drug regimen covers more aspects than the simple number of drugs consumed. The galenic form, the dosage and the method for preparing the drug can impede the understanding of and compliance with prescriptions. Both polypharmacy and therapeutic complexity are associated with poorer adherence by patients. To prevent polypharmacy, reduce complexity and improve adherence, the appropriate use of drugs is needed. Proper prescribing consists of selecting drugs that have clear evidence for their use in the indication, which are appropriate for the patient's circumstances, are well tolerated and cost-effective and whose benefits outweigh the risks. To improve the drug prescription, periodic reviews of the drugs need to be conducted, especially when the patient changes doctor and during healthcare transitions. The Beers and STOPP/START (Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to the Right Treatment) criteria are effective tools for this improvement. Deprescription for polymedicated polypathological patients that considers their clinical circumstances, prognosis and preferences can contribute to a more appropriate use of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Telemedicine in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mars

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary surgeons have a long tradition of consulting one another about problem cases and many have unwittingly practised telemedicine when discussing cases by telephone or by sending laboratory reports by telefax. Specific veterinary telemedicine applications have been in use since the early 1980s, but little research has been undertaken in this field. The Pubmed and CAB International databases were searched for the following Boolean logic-linked keywords; veterinary AND telemedicine, veterinary AND telecare, animal AND telemedicine, animal AND telecare and veterinary AND e-mail and an additional search was made of the worldwide web, using Google Scholar. This returned 25 papers which were reviewed. Of these only 2 report research. Sixteen papers had no references and 1 author was associated with 13 papers. Several themes emerge in the papers reviewed. These include remarks about the use of telemedicine, the benefits that can and are derived from the use of telemedicine, areas of practice in which telemedicine is being used, ethical and legal issues around the practice of telemedicine, image standards required for telemedicine, the equipment that is required for the practice of telemedicine, advice on ways in which digital images can be obtained and educational aspects of telemedicine. These are discussed. Veterinary practice has lagged behind its human counterpart in producing research on the validity and efficacy of telemedicine. This is an important field which requires further research.

  7. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  8. Mortality and Macrovascular Risk in Elderly with Hypertension and Diabetes: Effect of Intensive Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkin, Arseniy P; Kravchenko, Julia; Yashin, Anatoliy I; Sloan, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This study identifies the effect of intensive drug therapy in individuals age 65+ with diabetes (T2D) and hypertension on all-cause death, congestive heart failure (CHF) and hospitalization for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke/transient ischemic attack (stroke/TIA). Individuals from the Medicare 5% dataset with hypertension and T2D undergoing intensive drug therapy for these conditions were propensity score matched to a non-intensive-drug-therapy group. Hazard ratios (HR) were obtained using the Cox proportional hazard model. Intensive drug therapy was associated with increased risk of CHF [HR: 2.32; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.32-2.38], MI [HR: 4.27; CI: 4.05-4.52], and stroke/TIA [HR: 1.80; CI: 1.70-1.89] but decreased risk of death [HR: 0.95; CI: 0.93-0.97]. Risk for CHF [HR: 0.73; CI: 0.71-0.73], MI [HR: 0.64; CI: 0.62-0.67], stroke/TIA [HR: 0.82; CI: 0.78-0.86] and death [HR: 0.29; CI: 0.28-0.29] was decreased by adherence to diabetes management guidelines. Use of intensive drug therapy in a high-risk population delays death but not severe macrovascular outcomes. Protective effects of intensive drug therapy in high risk patients likely outweigh polypharmacy-related health concerns.

  9. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... Medical and Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics, was formed by the Food and Drug Administration to study, and...

  10. Improving the therapy of Cat II and drug resistant tuberculosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... drug resistant tuberculosis. Improving methods for DST ( IRL and NRLs). Initiating DOTS plus treatment in selected centres. New drug regimens comprising of quinolones, ansamycins, clofazimine, PAS etc. Standard DOTS plus immunotherapy ( M.vaccae, Mw etc) : Eight centre multicentric trial of DOTS + Mw progressing.

  11. Development of Combination Therapy with Anti-Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes early clinical trials with anti-cancer drugs in combination with commonly applied and registered chemotherapy and single agent studies with compounds that are intended for use in combination with registered or other targeted anti-cancer drugs. Gemcitabine is a prodrug that

  12. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  13. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  14. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  15. 42 CFR 410.30 - Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.30 Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive therapy. (a) Scope. Payment...

  16. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two…

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Jorgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to…

  18. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, M.B.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and

  19. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  20. Database on veterinary clinical research in homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Jürgen; Albrecht, Henning

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of the first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy. Detailed searches in the database 'Veterinary Clinical Research-Database in Homeopathy' (http://www.carstens-stiftung.de/clinresvet/index.php). The database contains about 200 entries of randomised clinical trials, non-randomised clinical trials, observational studies, drug provings, case reports and case series. Twenty-two clinical fields are covered and eight different groups of species are included. The database is free of charge and open to all interested veterinarians and researchers. The database enables researchers and veterinarians, sceptics and supporters to get a quick overview of the status of veterinary clinical research in homeopathy and alleviates the preparation of systematical reviews or may stimulate reproductions or even new studies. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Global veterinary leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G Gale; Brown, Corrie C

    2002-11-01

    The public needs no reminder that deadly infectious diseases such as FMD could emerge in any country at any moment, or that national food security could be compromised by Salmonella or Listeria infections. Protections against these risks include the knowledge that appropriate and equivalent veterinary education will enable detection and characterization of emerging disease agents, as well as an appropriate response, wherever they occur. Global veterinary leadership is needed to reduce the global threat of infectious diseases of major food animal and public health importance. We believe that the co-curriculum is an excellent way to prepare and train veterinarians and future leaders who understand and can deal with global issues. The key to the success of the program is the veterinarian's understanding that there is a cultural basis to the practice of veterinary medicine in any country. The result will be a cadre of veterinarians, faculty, and other professionals who are better able (language and culture) to understand the effects of change brought about by free trade and the importance of interdisciplinary and institutional relationships to deal effectively with national and regional issues of food safety and security. New global veterinary leadership programs will build on interests, experience, ideas, and ambitions. A college that wishes to take advantage of this diversity must offer opportunities that interest veterinarians throughout their careers and that preferably connect academic study with intensive experiential training in another country. At its best, the global veterinary leadership program would include a partnership between veterinarians and several international learning centers, a responsiveness to the identified international outreach needs of the profession, and attention to critical thinking and reflection. The global veterinary leadership program we have described is intended to be a set of ideas meant to promote collaboration, coalitions, and

  2. Boosting immunity by antiviral drug therapy: A simple relationship among timing, efficacy, and success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Barnes, Eleanor; Klenerman, Paul; Wodarz, Dominik

    2003-02-01

    Drug therapies against persistent human infections such as hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, and HIV fail to consistently eradicate the infection from the host. Hence, recent emphasis has shifted to the study of antiviral therapy aimed at boosting specific immune responses. It was argued that structured therapy interruptions were required to achieve this, because such regimes have shown promising results in early HIV infection. Using mathematical models, we show that, contrary to this notion, a single phase of drug therapy can result in the establishment of sustained immunity. We present a simple relationship between timing of therapy and efficacy of the drugs required for success. In the presence of strong viral suppression, we show that therapy should be stopped relatively early, and that a longer duration of treatment leads to failure. On the other hand, in the presence of weaker viral suppression, stopping treatment too early is detrimental, and therapy has to be continued beyond a time threshold. We discuss our modeling results primarily in the context of HCV therapy during chronic infection. Although the therapy regimes explored here also have implications for HIV, virus-mediated destruction of specific immune cells renders success unlikely during the chronic phase of the infection.

  3. Assessment of drug therapy in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arbouw, M.E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacological management of motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the central theme of this thesis. In a literature study, we revealed that relatively few efforts have been made to investigate the role of pharmacogenetics in the response to anti-PD drugs and that only few replication studies have been performed. Some interesting associations between genetic variants and anti-PD drug response have been found, but these were conflicting. We concluded that pharmacogen...

  4. Errors in veterinary practice: preliminary lessons for building better veterinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, T; Guile, D; May, S A

    2015-11-14

    Case studies in two typical UK veterinary practices were undertaken to explore teamwork, including interprofessional working. Each study involved one week of whole team observation based on practice locations (reception, operating theatre), one week of shadowing six focus individuals (veterinary surgeons, veterinary nurses and administrators) and a final week consisting of semistructured interviews regarding teamwork. Errors emerged as a finding of the study. The definition of errors was inclusive, pertaining to inputs or omitted actions with potential adverse outcomes for patients, clients or the practice. The 40 identified instances could be grouped into clinical errors (dosing/drugs, surgical preparation, lack of follow-up), lost item errors, and most frequently, communication errors (records, procedures, missing face-to-face communication, mistakes within face-to-face communication). The qualitative nature of the study allowed the underlying cause of the errors to be explored. In addition to some individual mistakes, system faults were identified as a major cause of errors. Observed examples and interviews demonstrated several challenges to interprofessional teamworking which may cause errors, including: lack of time, part-time staff leading to frequent handovers, branch differences and individual veterinary surgeon work preferences. Lessons are drawn for building better veterinary teams and implications for Disciplinary Proceedings considered. British Veterinary Association.

  5. An outline of main factors of drug resistance influencing cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączek, Natalia; Bronisz, Iwona; Pietryka, Magdalena; Kępińska, Dorota; Strzała, Patrycja; Mielnicka, Kamila; Korga, Agnieszka; Dudka, Jaroslaw

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance in cancer therapy is a multifactorial phenomenon that determines remission or progression. It is known that resistance to used anticancer drugs may be the consequence of drug transport to the cell or intracellular distribution. It may also be the result of its molecular target structural change, apoptosis inhibition or increase in some enzymes activity, e.g. pentose phosphate pathway enzymes. Intrinsic (pre-existed) drug resistance is related to the phenotype of cancer as well as normal cells. Acquired, after partial administration of chemotherapy, type of drug resistance in addition to the starting phenotype is closely linked to the development of new more aggressive clones and adaptive processes. In both, the intrinsic and acquired resistance, role play also mutations. These may be partially spontaneous, but in terms of acquired resistance, they are mostly induced by the exposure to the drugs. The article mentions some traditional mechanisms related to the acquisition of resistance by cancer cells during therapy, through the protein transporters, apoptosis deregulation, angiogenesis and the impact of the tumour microenvironment. We focused however on some more alternative ways of therapy resistance, such as, hypoxia and tumour acidification, cancer stem cells (CSCs), exosomes and radiotherapy resistance. A concise summary of the drug resistance presented in the paper may be an important aspect in studies to increase the effectiveness of cancer therapies.

  6. Various pharmacogenetic aspects of antiepileptic drug therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael W; Pons, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics concerns the influence of an individual's genetic background on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of xenobiotics. Much of the pharmacogenetic data in the field of epilepsy deals with the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In particular, two polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2C9 are known to slow down the metabolism of phenytoin to a degree that increases the risk of the neurotoxic adverse effects of this drug among carriers of these polymorphisms. A significant number of patients with epilepsy do not respond to AEDs and such pharmacoresistance is a major, largely unsolved, problem that is likely to be multifactorial in nature. In this regard, genetic factors may influence transmembrane drug transporter proteins, thereby modifying the intracerebral penetration of AEDs. Monogenic idiopathic epilepsies are rare and frequently associated with ion channel mutations; however, to date, a consistent relationship between changes in channel properties and clinical phenotype has not been established nor has any association between genotype and response to specific treatment options. Polymorphisms of drug targets may represent another genetic facet in epilepsy: a recent study demonstrated for the first time a polymorphism of a drug target (the alpha-subunit of a voltage-gated sodium channel) associated in clinical practice with differing response to two classic AEDs. Adverse drug reactions and teratogenicity of AEDs remain a major concern. Whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism profiling might in the future help to determine genetic predisposing factors for adverse drug reactions. Recently, in Han Chinese treated with carbamazepine and presenting with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, a strong association was found with HLA B*1502. If genetically targeted drug development becomes more affordable/cost efficient in the near future, the development of new drugs for relatively rare diseases could become economically viable for the pharmaceutical

  7. Intravenous lipids: antidotal therapy for drug overdose and toxic effects of local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Dana

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion is an accepted therapy for the treatment of severe cardiac toxic effects caused by local anesthetics. Lipid emulsion therapy has also been used successfully to treat cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmias caused by overdoses of antiepileptic drugs, cardiovascular drugs, and psychotropic medications, but experience with intravenous lipids as antidotal therapy in these clinical situations is limited. However, intravenous lipids are relatively safe, widely available, and easy to administer, and many published case reports document their dramatic effectiveness. Patients who have not responded to standard therapies have been quickly revived by administration of intravenous lipids. Use of lipids most likely will increase, and critical care nurses should be familiar with lipid therapy. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and economic outcomes of pharmacist-managed antiepileptic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C A; Raehl, Cynthia L

    2006-10-01

    This study explores the associations between pharmacist-managed antiepileptic drug therapy in hospitalized Medicare patients and diagnoses indicating the need for these drugs. It also explores the following major heath care outcomes: death rate, hospital length of stay (LOS), Medicare charges, drug charges, laboratory charges, complications, and adverse drug reactions. Data were drawn from the 1998 MedPAR and 1998 National Clinical Pharmacy Services databases. Pharmacist-managed antiepileptic drug therapy was evaluated in a study population of 9380 Medicare patients with diagnosed epilepsy or seizure disorders treated in 794 United States hospitals. This population was derived from the 38,311 hospitalized Medicare patients with epilepsy or seizure disorders (MedPAR). In hospitals without pharmacist-managed antiepileptic drug therapy, death rates were 120.61% higher, with 374 excess deaths (chi(2)=5.983, df=1, p=0.014, odds ratio [OR]=1.553, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.102-2.189). Hospital LOS was 14.68% higher, with 8069 patient-days (Mann-Whitney U test [U]=3833132, p=0.0009); total Medicare charges were 11.19% higher, with 14,372,550 dollars in excess total charges (U=3644199, p=0.0003); per-patient drug charges were $115 +/- $92 higher (p=NS); laboratory charges were 32.24% higher, with 5,664,970 dollars in excess charges; and aspiration pneumonia rate was 54.61% higher (chi(2)=5.848, df=1, p=0.015, OR=1.233, 95% CI 1.081-1.901). Although the frequencies of other complications and adverse effects were higher, these differences were not statistically significant compared with hospitals with pharmacist-managed antiepileptic drug therapy. Clinical and economic outcomes were improved among hospitalized Medicare patients whose antiepileptic drug therapy was managed by pharmacists.

  10. Dual drug delivery from vitamin E loaded contact lenses for glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuan-Hui; Carbia, Blanca E; Plummer, Caryn; Chauhan, Anuj

    2015-08-01

    Glaucoma patients frequently instill eye drops multiple times each day, which is a cause for reduced compliance. Additionally, eye drops suffer from other limitations including low bioavailability, which can lead to side effects. We propose to develop drug-eluting contact lenses for managing glaucoma with increased bioavailability and improved compliance. Contact lenses are developed for extended simultaneous release of timolol and dorzolamide, both of which are commonly prescribed hydrophilic drugs. The extended release is achieved by loading lenses with vitamin E barriers. In vitro release studies are performed with control and vitamin E loaded lenses for both drugs loaded separately and then together in the same lens. The safety and efficacy of combination therapy by contacts are demonstrated in a Beagle model of glaucoma. Simultaneous loading of timolol and dorzolamide increases the release duration of both drugs. Also vitamin E incorporation is highly effective in increasing the release durations of both drugs to about 2-days. The lenses loaded with both drugs exhibited superior IOP reduction compared to eye drops with about 6-fold lower drug loading. More importantly, combination therapy by continuous wear of vitamin E loaded contact for 2-days, followed by a new set of contacts for another two days, reduced IOP during the 4days of wear time and for another 8days after removal of the contacts. Vitamin E loading is very effective for providing combination therapy by contact lenses due to the increase in release durations of several drugs. The contact lens based therapy reduces IOP with lower drug dose compared to eye drops and may significantly improve the compliance as the effect of the therapy lasts significantly longer than the wear-duration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  12. Extensive variation in drug-resistance mutational profile of Brazilian patients failing antiretroviral therapy in five large Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Brites

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The resistance mutational profile of Brazilian patients failing antiretroviral therapy is quite variable, depending on the city where patients were tested. This variation likely reflects distinctive choice of antiretrovirals drugs to initiate therapy, adherence to specific drugs, or circulating HIV-1 strains. Overall, etravirine and DRV/r remain as the most active drugs.

  13. Colon cancer therapy: recent developments in nanomedicine to improve the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, J; Melguizo, C; Ortiz, R; Perazzoli, G; Cabeza, L; Alvarez, P J; Rodriguez-Serrano, F; Aranega, A

    2013-10-01

    The number of patients with colorectal cancer, the third most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the world, has increased markedly over the past 20 years and will continue to increase in the future. Despite recent advances in chemotherapy, currently used anticancer molecules are unable to improve the prognosis of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer, which remains incurable. The transport of classical drugs by nanoparticles has shown great promise in terms of improving drug distribution and bioavailability, increasing tissue half-life and concentrating anticancer molecules in the tumor mass, providing optimal drug delivery to tumor tissue, and minimizing drug toxicity, including those effects associated with pharmaceutical excipients. In addition, colon cancer targeting may be improved by incorporating ligands for tumor-specific surface receptors. Similarly, nanoparticles may interact with key drug-resistance molecules to prevent a reduction in intracellular drug levels drug. Recently published data have provided convincing pre-clinical evidence regarding the potential of active-targeted nanotherapeutics in colon cancer therapy, although, unfortunately, only a few of these therapies have been translated into early-phase clinical trials. As nanotechnology promises to be a new strategy for improving the prognosis of colon cancer patients, it would be very useful to analyze recent progress in this field of research. This review discusses the current status of nanoparticle-mediated cancer-drug delivery, the challenges restricting its application, and the potential implications of its use in colon cancer therapy.

  14. Veterinary Forensic Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney-Brant, S M

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists working in diagnostic laboratories are sometimes presented with cases involving animal poisonings that become the object of criminal or civil litigation. Forensic veterinary toxicology cases can include cases involving animal cruelty (malicious poisoning), regulatory issues (eg, contamination of the food supply), insurance litigation, or poisoning of wildlife. An understanding of the appropriate approach to these types of cases, including proper sample collection, handling, and transport, is essential so that chain of custody rules are followed and proper samples are obtained for toxicological analysis. Consultation with veterinary toxicologists at the diagnostic laboratory that will be processing the samples before, during, and after the forensic necropsy can help to ensure that the analytical tests performed are appropriate for the circumstances and findings surrounding the individual case. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of orally applicable new drug or drug combinations from natural origin capsaicinoids for human medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mózsik, Gyula; Past, Tibor; Dömötör, András; Kuzma, Mónika; Perjési, Pál

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the capsaicin stimulates (in small doses) or impairs (in high doses) the capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerves and the final effects of capsaicin depend on its applied doses. The effects of capsaicin were analyzed on the gastrointestinal mucosal protection and injury in animal experiments and in human beings (from 1980 up to now). From 2005 to 2008 an interdisciplinary group (21 researchers) participated in the production of orally applicable drug or drug combinations from capsaicin for human medical therapy of patients suffering from cardiovascular, degenerative joint and locomotor diseases, who received in their treatments non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds (NSAIDs). Our studies were based on the results of the NSAIDs-induced gastrointestinal side effects could be detected by application of small doses of capsaicin. Because natural (plant origin) capsaicin is chemically does not represent a uniform entity and used in the international research, consequently the authors met a lot of unpredictable scientific problems during the time of production of new capsaicin containing (alone or in combinations) drug before receiving official permissions from the different national and international authorities to start the classical human clinical pharmacological studies. This paper summarizes the different steps from the basic physiological and pharmacological notes (in animals), plant cultivation, chemistry of substance(s), animal (general and germinative) acute and chronic toxicology, human actions, basic clinical pharmacology of natural capsaicin (capsaicinoids) to introduce and to develop a new drug (or drug combinations) in the human medical therapy.

  17. A Drug Discovery Partnership for Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Bhattacharjee , Biology Department, “Peptidomimetic therapy of angiogenesis” 8- Monday December 2, 2013, Dr. Hector Biliran, Biology Department, “TLE1...Karen Zhang, Computer Science Department 22- Monday April 28, 2014, Dr. Partha Bhattacharjee , Biology Department In addition, the researchers on each

  18. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist...

  19. Amiodarone therapy for drug-refractory fetal tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strasburger, JF; Cuneo, BF; Michon, MM; Gotteiner, NL; Deal, BJ; McGregor, SN; Oudijk, MA; Meijboom, EJ; Feinkind, L; Hussey, M; Parilla, BV

    2004-01-01

    Background - Fetal tachycardia complicated by ventricular dysfunction and hydrops fetalis carries a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. Transplacental digoxin is effective therapy in a small percentage, but there is no consensus with regard to antiarrhythmic treatment if digoxin fails. This

  20. Combination Drug Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BPH symptom reduction and shrinkage of prostate size by the use of a combination of alpha adrenergic uroselective blocker (Tamsulosin) and 5 alpha iso-enzyme inhibitor (Dutasteride) is a first option of therapy in the management of BPH especially in those cases that are surgical risks with the category of mild to moderate ...

  1. Role of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs versus cytotoxic agents in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J R

    1988-10-14

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are used to modify or alter the rheumatoid arthritis disease process. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs do not demonstrate the characteristic analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory actions of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, since weeks or months of treatment are required before clinical benefit is observed. Although they have not been proved to delay, prevent, or reverse articular damage, therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, when successful, is associated with decreased pain and joint swelling and improved function. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and cytotoxic agents should not be considered as routine treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Before disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy is implemented, an optimal basic program of physical therapy, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be implemented, and it must be documented that the patient still has sufficient disease to justify the costs, risks, and benefits of these treatments. Drugs that are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are preferred over nonapproved drugs. Hydroxychloroquine, parenteral gold salts, oral gold, D-penicillamine, and the cytotoxic drug azathioprine are the FDA-approved disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for use in rheumatoid arthritis. Many, not all, rheumatologists would employ hydroxychloroquine as the first-choice disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in patients who have early, mild, and nonerosive disease; treatment should be continued for six months before being abandoned for lack of efficacy, and appropriate ophthalmologic examination every four to six months is indicated. An alternative would be auranofin, whose efficacy approaches that of parenteral gold, yet may be safer. For patients who have severe active rheumatoid arthritis, especially with erosive changes, parenteral gold salts are usually a first choice. D-penicillamine is also effective in

  2. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... prone to experience gynaecomastia and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, patients aged 30–44 years reported the most ADRs. Most reactions resulted from the use of stavudine, efavirenz, zidovudine, nevirapine and tenofovir in the population groups identified in this study. Keywords: pharmacovigilance, drug safety, ...

  3. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  4. A Drug Discovery Partnership for Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    for each compound. 2D NMR spectra clarify the stereochemistry of compounds. Through molecular simulation and conformational analysis , dual...1A2-targeting cancer preventive agents. Wiese/Burow Subproject (Identification of novel estrogens and antiestrogens in the USDA Phytochemical and...antagonists) and then virtually screen the USDA Phytochemical , Chinese Herbal Medicine, and the FDA Marketed Drug Databases for new estrogens. Task 1

  5. Assessment of drug therapy in Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbouw, M.E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacological management of motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the central theme of this thesis. In a literature study, we revealed that relatively few efforts have been made to investigate the role of pharmacogenetics in the response to anti-PD drugs and that only few

  6. Drug treatment of obesity: established and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, M Luisa; Cordido, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    Available anti-obesity pharmacotherapy options remain very limited. The development of more effective drugs has become a priority. The potential strategies to achieve weight loss are to reduce energy intake, by stimulating anorexigenic signals or by blocking orexigenic signals, and to increase energy expenditure. This review will focus on approved obesity medications, as well as potential new pharmacological treatment options.

  7. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Haeseung Lee; Seungmin Kang; Wankyu Kim

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile...

  8. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in veterinary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin E Gade

    Full Text Available Stem cell research acquired great attention during last decade inspite of incredible therapeutic potential of these cells the ethical controversies exists. Stem cells have enormous uses in animal cloning, drug discovery, gene targeting, transgenic production and regenerative therapy. Stem cells are the naïve cells of body which can self-renew and differentiate into other cell types to carry out multiple functions, these properties have been utilized in therapeutic application of stem cells in human and veterinary medicine. The application of stem cells in human medicine is well established and it is commonly used for chronic and accidental injuries. In Veterinary sciences previous studies mostly focused on establishing protocols for isolation and their characterization but with advancement in array of techniques for in vitro studies, stem cells rapidly became a viable tool for regenerative therapy of chronic, debilitating and various unresponsive clinical diseases and disorders. Multipotent adult stem cells have certain advantages over embryonic stem cells like easy isolation and expansion from numerous sources, less immunogenicity and no risk of teratoma formation hence their use is preferred in therapeutics. Adult stem cells have been utilized for treatment of spinal injuries, tendonitis, cartilage defects, osteoarthritis and ligament defects, liver diseases, wounds, cardiac and bone defects in animals. The multi-potential capability of these cells can be better utilized in near future to overcome the challenges faced by the clinicians. This review will emphasize on the therapeutic utilization and success of stem cell therapies in animals. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 499-507

  9. How does emotional intelligence fit into the paradigm of veterinary medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Richard P

    2006-01-01

    The term ''emotional intelligence'' (EI) has become very popular in the business world and has recently infiltrated veterinary medical education. The term purports to encompass those qualities and skills that are not measured by IQ tests but do play an important role in achieving success in life. Veterinary medical educators often incorporate these in a category called ''non-technical competencies'' (which includes, for example, communication skills) and acknowledge that veterinarians need more training in this area in order to be successful. Although EI looks promising as a means for teaching these non-technical competencies to students and practitioners, there are some challenges to its application. To begin with, there are three competing models of EI that differ in definition and measuring instruments. Although some research has suggested that high EI is associated with success in school and in business, there are no studies directly correlating high EI with greater success in the veterinary profession. Nor have any studies confirmed that increasing a student's EI will improve eventual outcomes for that student. It is important that educators approach the implementation of new techniques and concepts for teaching non-technical competencies the same way they would approach teaching a new surgical technique or drug therapy. EI is an intriguing and promising construct and deserves dedicated research to assess its relevance to veterinary medical education. There are opportunities to investigate EI using case control studies that will either confirm or discredit the benefits of incorporating EI into the veterinary curriculum. Implementing EI training without assessment risks wasting limited resources and alienating students.

  10. Magnetic Nanomaterials for Hyperthermia-based Therapy and Controlled Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.; Mohammad, Faruq

    2011-01-01

    Previous attempts to review the literature on magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy focused primarily on magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using mono metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles. The term “Hyperthermia” in the literature was also confined only to include use of heat for therapeutic applications. Recently, there have been a number of publications demonstrating magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to generate local heat resulting in the release of drugs either bound to the magnetic nanoparticle or encapsulated within polymeric matrices. In this review article, we present a case for broadening the meaning of the term “hyperthermia” by including thermotherapy as well as magnetically modulated controlled drug delivery. We provide a classification for controlled drug delivery using hyperthermia: Hyperthermia-based controlled Drug delivery through Bond Breaking (DBB) and Hyperthermia-based controlled Drug delivery through Enhanced Permeability (DEP). The review also covers, for the first time, core-shell type magnetic nanomaterials, especially nanoshells prepared using layer-by-layer self-assembly, for the application of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery. The highlight of the review article is to portray potential opportunities in the combination of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug release paradigms for successful application in personalized medicine. PMID:21447363

  11. Magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S S R; Mohammad, Faruq

    2011-08-14

    Previous attempts to review the literature on magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy focused primarily on magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using mono metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles. The term "hyperthermia" in the literature was also confined only to include use of heat for therapeutic applications. Recently, there have been a number of publications demonstrating magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to generate local heat resulting in the release of drugs either bound to the magnetic nanoparticle or encapsulated within polymeric matrices. In this review article, we present a case for broadening the meaning of the term "hyperthermia" by including thermotherapy as well as magnetically modulated controlled drug delivery. We provide a classification for controlled drug delivery using hyperthermia: Hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through bond breaking (DBB) and hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through enhanced permeability (DEP). The review also covers, for the first time, core-shell type magnetic nanomaterials, especially nanoshells prepared using layer-by-layer self-assembly, for the application of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery. The highlight of the review article is to portray potential opportunities for the combination of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug release paradigms--towards successful application in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. How could preventive therapy affect the prevalence of drug resistance? Causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Amber; Colijn, Caroline; Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2015-06-05

    Various forms of preventive and prophylactic antimicrobial therapies have been proposed to combat HIV (e.g. pre-exposure prophylaxis), tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid preventive therapy) and malaria (e.g. intermittent preventive treatment). However, the potential population-level effects of preventative therapy (PT) on the prevalence of drug resistance are not well understood. PT can directly affect the rate at which resistance is acquired among those receiving PT. It can also indirectly affect resistance by altering the rate at which resistance is acquired through treatment for active disease and by modifying the level of competition between transmission of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pathogens. We propose a general mathematical model to explore the ways in which PT can affect the long-term prevalence of drug resistance. Depending on the relative contributions of these three mechanisms, we find that increasing the level of coverage of PT may result in increases, decreases or non-monotonic changes in the overall prevalence of drug resistance. These results demonstrate the complexity of the relationship between PT and drug resistance in the population. Care should be taken when predicting population-level changes in drug resistance from small pilot studies of PT or estimates based solely on its direct effects.

  13. Drug: D08455 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as: C18605 ... veterinary medicine Juvenile hormone mimic Larval growth inhibitor ... CAS: 95737-68-1 PubChem: ... D08455 Drug Pyriproxyfen; Cyclio [veterinary] (TN) ... C20H19NO3 D08455.gif ... Same

  14. Drug: D07613 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07613 Drug Carbaryl (BAN); Carbaril; Flea and tick powder [veterinary] (TN) ... C12H...11NO2 D07613.gif ... Same as: C07491 ... carbamate insecticide cholinesterase inhibitor veterinary medicine ...

  15. Drug: D08251 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08251 Drug Nandrolone laurate; Nandrolone dodecanoate; Laurabolin [veterinary] (T...14AB01 S01XA11 Chemical group: DG00142 ... Estren derivative veterinary medicine NR3C4 (AR) [HSA:367] [KO:K085

  16. Drug: D08251 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08251 Drug Nandrolone laurate; Nandrolone dodecanoate; Laurabolin [veterinary] (TN...) C30H48O3 456.3603 456.7003 D08251.gif Anabolic ATC code: A14AB01 anabolic steroids veterinary medicine and

  17. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    um chafe

    191-203. FACULTY OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. USMANU DANFODIYO UNIVERSITY. P.M.B. 2346, SOKOTO. NIGERIA. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences. ISSN 1595-093X. Nwanta et al. /Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences (2008). 7(2): 42-45. Field trial of Malaysian thermostable Newcastle disease vaccine in.

  18. African Journals Online: Veterinary Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... ... of the Kenya Veterinary Association. It publishes original papers in English, within the whole field of animal science and veterinary medicine and those addressing legal and policy issues related to the veterinary profession. The journal accepts articles and reports in the areas of Anatomy and Histology, ...

  19. The ABCG2 Efflux Transporter in the Mammary Gland Mediates Veterinary Drug Secretion across the Blood-Milk Barrier into Milk of Dairy Cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnke, Hanna; Ballent, Mariana; Baumann, Sven; Imperiale, Fernanda; von Bergen, Martin; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Honscha, Walther; Halwachs, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    In human and mice ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 represents the main route for active drug transport into milk. However, there is no detailed information on the role of ABCG2 in drug secretion and accumulation in milk of dairy animals. We therefore examined ABCG2-mediated drug transport in the bovine mammary gland by parallel pharmacokinetic studies in lactating Jersey cows and in vitro flux studies using the anthelmintic drug monepantel (MNP) as representative bovine ABCG2 (bABCG2) drug substrate. Animals received MNP (Zolvix, Novartis Animal Health Inc.) once (2.5 mg/kg per os) and the concentrations of MNP and the active MNP metabolite MNPSO2 were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the parent drug MNP, we detected higher MNPSO2 plasma concentrations (expressed as area under the concentration-versus-time curve). Moreover, we observed MNPSO2 excretion into milk of dairy cows with a high milk-to-plasma ratio of 6.75. In mechanistic flux assays, we determined a preferential time-dependent basolateral-to-apical (B > A) MNPSO2 transport across polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells-bABCG2 monolayers using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The B > A MNPSO2 transport was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C in bABCG2- but not in mock-transduced MDCKII cells. Additionally, the antibiotic drug enrofloxacin, the benzimidazole anthelmintic oxfendazole and the macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic moxidectin caused a reduction in the MNPSO2(B > A) net efflux. Altogether, this study indicated that therapeutically relevant drugs like the anthelmintic MNP represent substrates of the bovine mammary ABCG2 transporter and may thereby be actively concentrated in dairy milk. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar, E-mail: swatantrakushwaha@yahoo.co.in [Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Singh, Satyawan [Saroj Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (India)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  1. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field.

  2. HOMEOPATHY IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Šuran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathy is an alternative medicine practice, which has been used for the past 200 years but, until now, scientific methods have not proven its effectiveness. The use of highly diluted natural substances based on the principal that similar heals similar is contrary to the scientific theories of the conventional medicine. In veterinary medicine homeopathic remedies are most frequently used for chronic conditions of small animals, but also their application in organic farming is increasing. Minimal number of clinical studies about the use of homeopathy in veterinary medicine has been published in scientific literature. The results of effectiveness are contradictory, which can be explained by being a consequence of different research methodologies. However, there is a significant inverse proportionality between the quality of research and results that approve of the use of homeopathy. In evidence based veterinary medicine scientific approach is fundamental for objective diagnostics and treatment prescription, and homeopathy is an excellent teaching model for possible methodological failures in scientific research. Key words: homeopathy, alternative medicine, evidence based veterinary medicine

  3. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    1Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria; 2Department of Animal Health .... and Tucker, 2004). Even for animals for which direct observation of intraocular structures is possible, ultrasonography may be helpful for tumor identification, ..... determination of the size of eye prosthesis in.

  4. ,3. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal. Vol 34 pi res-sea. Epizootiologicul Survey of Bovine Brucellosis in. Nomadic Pastoral ... brucellosis in the pastoral herds of Niger State despite its high cattle population and no research has ..... Brucella abortus infection in Cattle in Chile. Archivos de Med.Veterin.. 27: 45-50. ROTH, F., ZINSSTAG ...

  5. Veterinary Replicon Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, Mia C.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is essential in livestock farming and in companion animal ownership. Nucleic acid vaccines based on DNA or RNA provide an elegant alternative to those classical veterinary vaccines that have performed suboptimally. Recent advances in terms of rational design, safety, and efficacy have

  6. . Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leptospirosis. Case report. An 1 1 year old male Alsatian dog was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the. University of lbadan (VTH-Ul) with a hist01y of anorexia, weakness and exercise intolerance of5 days duration. On clinical examination, the rectal temperature was normal andlung auscultation revealed a ...

  7. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. This journal did not publish any issues between 2002 and 2015 but has been revived and and it actively accepting papers ...

  8. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    according to International guiding principles for biochemical research involving animals. (C. I .O. M .S .1985). Source of Trypanosomes. Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federe strain) used for the study was obtained from donor rats maintained at the postgraduate laboratory of the Department of Veterinary. Microbiology and ...

  9. '*Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    '*Nigerian Veterinary Journal. ~. Vol35 (1)9~8· 955. ARTICLE. Prevalence of Aeromonas hydrophila. Isolates in cultured and Feral Clarias gariepinus of the Kainji Lake Area, Nigeria,. OMEJE, V.O.' and CHUKWU, C.C.. Aquaculture Programme. National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries Researcl1. PMB 6006, New Bussa, ...

  10. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Although the safety profile of short term dexamethasone treatment has been established, there has been ... Although low-dose dexamethasone treatment has been used in veterinary and human clinics for many years and produced no severe ..... in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PcOS) (Keay et al., 2001).

  11. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  12. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    prevalence of diseases and available veterinary services were noticed to be present in these communities. The draught animal survival ability rather ... labour in farming and transportation. (Chantalakhana and Bunyavejehewin, 1994) ..... spreading of these diseases such as. Babesiosis and Anaplasmosis to these animals.

  13. g Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ovemight in a cool box. Serum was extracted using a plastic micropipette and transferred into sample bottles and was frozen until tested. Detection of antibodies to N DV. Antigen. Newcastle disease virus LaSota strain obtained from the National Veterinary Research Institute. (NVRI), Vom, was used as antigen for HI-test.

  14. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., March 2017. Vol 38 (1): 57-68. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. An Audit of Castration of Male Dogs in Enugu Metropolis, South. Eastern Nigeria. Raheem, K. A.. 1Department of Veterinary ..... The internal genital organs like the prostate gland, urethra, penis, bulbis ... As biotechnology and medicine continue to advance, other ...

  15. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Vet. J., June 2016. Vol. 37 (2): 82-87. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Cystographic Evaluation Post Colocystoplasty in Two Nigerian. Indigenous Dogs. Muhammad S. T.*. 1 ., Awasum C. A.. 2 ... integrity/morphology of most internal body organs or system(s) of an individual, ..... Journal of Veterinary. Medicine and Animal Health, 7(1):.

  16. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    En-Joy

    Lungworms of Small Ruminants Slaughtered in Restaurants of Ambo, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia. 1. 1. 1. 2. GAROMSSA, T. , BERSISSA, K. , DINKA, A.* and ENDRIAS, Z. 1. 2. School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University. Ambo University. *Corresponding author: dinka_ayana@yahoo.com. INTRODUCTION.

  17. NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    NIGERIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL. ISSN 0331-3026. Nig. Vet. J., March 2016. Vol. 37 (1): 24-31. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Occurrence of Klebsiella Species in Cultured African Catfish in Oyo. State, South-West Nigeria. Adeshina, I. 1. *; Abdrahman, S. A.. 2 and Yusuf, A. A.. 3. 1Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, ...

  18. Nigerian Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUMMARY. An audit of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, lbadan between 2008 and 2011 was conducted to evaluate the level of compliance with standard practices. The study involved retrospective case note audit of surgical procedures performed during the period. A total number of 108.

  19. An update on applications of nanostructured drug delivery systems in cancer therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberoumandi, Seyed Mohsen; Mohammadhosseini, Majid; Abasi, Elham; Saghati, Sepideh; Nikzamir, Nasrin; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Panahi, Yunes; Davaran, Soodabeh

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is a main public health problem that is known as a malignant tumor and out-of-control cell growth, with the potential to assault or spread to other parts of the body. Recently, remarkable efforts have been devoted to develop nanotechnology to improve the delivery of anticancer drug to tumor tissue as minimizing its distribution and toxicity in healthy tissue. Nanotechnology has been extensively used in the advance of new strategies for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Compared to customary drug delivery systems, nano-based drug delivery method has greater potential in different areas, like multiple targeting functionalization, in vivo imaging, extended circulation time, systemic control release, and combined drug delivery. Nanofibers are used for different medical applications such as drug delivery systems.

  20. Veterinary pharmacovigilance in India: A need of hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rishi; Kalaiselvan, Vivekanandan; Verma, Ravendra; Kaur, Ismeet; Kumar, Pranay; Singh, G N

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary pharmacovigilance (PV) is important for the Medicine which are used for treating disease in animals. It becomes more important when these animals are further used for producing food. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have a direct impact on animals and indirect impact on human beings, for example, through milk products, other animal producing food products. Currently, PV program of India is playing a vital role in assessing the safety of medicines in Indian Population. The safety of medicine in animals can be assessed by veterinary PV. The research institutes involved in animal research and veterinary hospitals can be considered as ADR monitoring centers to assess the safety of medicines on animals.

  1. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide. This review focuses on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as a treatment for young people who misuse non-opioid drugs, such as cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine, which are strongly associated with a range of health and social...... problems. CBT is an individualized and multicomponent intervention that combines behavioural and cognitive therapy. While behavioural therapy mainly focuses on external settings and observable behaviour, cognitive therapy is concerned with internal cognitive processes. The primary focus of CBT is to reduce...... literature databases, citations in other reviews and in the included primary studies, hand searches of relevant journals, and Internet searches using Google. We also corresponded with researchers in the CBT field. No language or date restrictions were applied to the searches. SELECTION CRITERIA Studies were...

  2. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Drug-loaded biodegradable microspheres for image-guided combinatory epigenetic therapy in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Zuo, Tao; Shen, Rulong; Huang, Tim H.; Tweedle, Michael F.

    2011-02-01

    We synthesize drug-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres for image-guided combinatory epigenetic therapy in MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells. LY294002 and Nile Red are encapsulated in microspheres for sustained drug release and fluorescence microscopic imaging. Drug-loaded microspheres target MCF-10A cells through a three-step binding process involving biotinylated antibody, streptavidin, and biotinylated microspheres. LY294002 loaded microspheres and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine are applied to MCF-10A cells for combinatory PI3K/AKT inhibition and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylation. Our study implies the technical potential of disease targeting and image-guided combinatory epigenetic therapy using drug-loaded multifunctional biodegradable PLGA microspheres.

  4. Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Saidj, Madina; Kowalski, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide, and the use of cannabis, amphetamine ecstasy and cocaine, referred to as non-opioid drugs, are strongly associated with a range of health and social problems. This review focuses on Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) as a treatment for young...... people who misuse non-opioid drugs. FBT is a manual-based family therapy approach. The program is behavior and skill-oriented. It is concerned with identifying psychological and situational stimuli and triggers presumed to be directly related to the youth’s drug use, and skills training to improve self...... language nor date restrictions were applied to the searches. SELECTION CRITERIA Studies eligible for inclusion in the review are required to meet several eligibility criteria. Studies must: • have involved a manual-based FBT treatment for young people aged 11-21 years enrolled in outpatient treatment...

  5. pH-sensitive nano-systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Huang, Yuran; Kumar, Anil; Tan, Aaron; Jin, Shubin; Mozhi, Anbu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been widely used in the development of new strategies for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Compared to traditional drug delivery systems, nano-based drug delivery system have greater potential in a variety of areas, such as multiple targeting functionalization, in vivo imaging, combined drug delivery, extended circulation time, and systemic control release. Nano-systems incorporating stimulus-responsive materials have remarkable properties which allow them to bypass biological barriers and achieve targeted intracellular drug delivery. As a result of the active metabolism of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment (TME) is highly acidic compared to normal tissues. pH-Sensitive nano-systems have now been developed in which drug release is specifically triggered by the acidic tumor environment. Studies have demonstrated that novel pH-sensitive drug delivery systems are capable of improving the efficiency of cancer treatment. A number of these have been translated from bench to clinical application and have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of various cancerous diseases. Herein, this review mainly focuses on pH-sensitive nano-systems, including advances in drug delivery, mechanisms of drug release, and possible improvements in drug absorption, with the emphasis on recent research in this field. With deeper understanding of the difference between normal and tumor tissues, it might be possible to design ever more promising pH-responsive nano-systems for drug delivery and cancer therapy in the near future. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Continuous Drug Infusion for Diabetes Therapy: A Closed-Loop Control System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While a typical way for diabetes therapy is discrete insulin infusion based on long-time interval measurement, in this paper, we design a closed-loop control system for continuous drug infusion to improve the traditional discrete methods and make diabetes therapy automatic in practice. By exploring the accumulative function of drug to insulin, a continuous injection model is proposed. Based on this model, proportional-integral-derivative (PID and fuzzy logic controllers are designed to tackle a control problem of the resulting highly nonlinear plant. Even with serious disturbance of glucose, such as nutrition absorption at meal time, the proposed scheme can perform well in simulation experiments.

  7. Is Resistance to Dolutegravir Possible When This Drug Is Used in First-Line Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Mesplède

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is an HIV integrase inhibitor that was recently approved for therapy by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. When used as part of first-line therapy, DTG is the only HIV drug that has not selected for resistance mutations in the clinic. We believe that this is due to the long binding time of DTG to the integrase enzyme as well as greatly diminished replication capacity on the part of viruses that might become resistant to DTG. We further speculate that DTG might be able to be used in strategies aimed at HIV eradication.

  8. Elsinochrome A photosensitizers: Alternative drugs for photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinghui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has already been a multifunctional modality for various tumors and nontumorous diseases. However, the development of photosensitizers is relatively delayed, compared with the tremendous progress in laser technology. Elsinochrome A (EA, a perylenequinonoid pigment from China, has all the typical advantages of perylenequinones. Moreover, singlet oxygen quantum yield of EA is superior to other kinds of photosensitizers and EA could be artificially biosynthesized at present, which make it an alternative candidate for PDT. In this review, the photophysics, photochemistry, photobiology and chemical or biological syntheses of EA photosensitizers are briefly presented. Besides, the future prospects of EA photosensitizers are also proposed.

  9. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection

  10. [Drug therapy in pregnancy--a practical guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reister, F; Paulus, W; Kreienberg, R

    2004-03-11

    Pharmacotherapy in pregnancy is often problematic, since both the mother-to-be and her doctor are often concerned about possible risks for the unborn child. On the other hand, we now have sufficient knowledge of a whole range of medications, to enable the recommendation of safe drug treatment in almost any clinical situation. The family doctor, too, is often consulted by pregnant women requiring treatment for internistic problems. These include such pregnancy-unrelated problems as essential hypertension or bronchial asthma, as well as pregnancy-related disorders such as urinary tract infection or gastrointestinal problems.

  11. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  12. Effective Infusion Therapy of Drug-Induced Liver and Pancreas Injuries in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Gubergrits

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors examined 328 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had drug-induced hepatitis and drug-induced pancreatitis due to polychemotherapy. Patients had metabolic intoxication syndrome associated with increasing level of «average molecules» in the blood. Not only reliable decrease of this indicator but also its normalization was achieved under the influence of treatment with a usage of succinic acid preparation for infusion therapy.

  13. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes as a Potential Drug Delivery System for Photodynamic Therapy of Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peres,Maristela F. S.; Nigoghossian,Karina; Primo,Fernando L.; Saska,Sybele; Capote,Ticiana S. O.; Caminaga,Raquel M. S.; Messaddeq,Younes; Ribeiro,Sidney J. L.; Tedesco,Antonio C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is increasingly demanded due to the hydrophobicity presented by most of photosensitizers molecules. Bacterial cellulose (BC), a highly pure cellulose produced by bacteria, possesses the essential features for applications in drug delivery systems, such as large surface area and excellent loading capacity. BC membranes prepared containing a photosensitizer, chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc), were tested aiming applica...

  14. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  15. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  16. Antithyroid Drug Therapy for Graves’ Disease and Implications for Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease (GD is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism worldwide. Current therapeutic options for GD include antithyroid drugs (ATD, radioactive iodine, and thyroidectomy. ATD treatment is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians due to some advantages including normalizing thyroid function in a short time, hardly causing hypothyroidism, and ameliorating immune disorder while avoiding radiation exposure and invasive procedures. However, the relatively high recurrence rate is a major concern for ATD treatment, which is associated with multiple influencing factors like clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and genetic and environmental factors. Of these influencing factors, some are modifiable but some are nonmodifiable. The recurrence risk can be reduced by adjusting the modifiable factors as much as possible. The titration regimen for 12–18 months is the optimal strategy of ATD. Levothyroxine administration after successful ATD treatment was not recommended. The addition of immunosuppressive drugs might be helpful to decrease the recurrence rate of GD patients after ATD withdrawal, whereas further studies are needed to address the safety and efficacy. This paper reviewed the current knowledge of ATD treatment and mainly focused on influencing factors for recurrence in GD patients with ATD treatment.

  17. Association between duration of breastfeeding and drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gomes Chaves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the existence of an association between the use of medication by nursing women and duration of breastfeeding in Itaúna, MG, Brazil. Methods: Longitudinal cohort study was carried out with 12-month follow-up, including 246 women admitted in the only Maternity Hospital of the city of Itaúna, MG, Brazil. The effect of medications on duration of breastfeeding was analyzed with the Cox regression model, with time-dependent covariables. Drugs were classified for safety during breastfeeding according to criteria established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (2001 and Hale (2004. Results: Ninety-eight percent of nursing women used medications after hospital discharge. The duration of breastfeeding was longer for mothers who did not use medications or who used drugs considering safety during lactation (P<0.05. Conclusions: Health professionals should prescribe medications with well established safety for both infants and for the lactation process, so that maternal medication is compatible with breastfeeding.

  18. Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA) based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs), particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients. PMID:23140144

  19. Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firer Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs, particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients.

  20. New directions for veterinary technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Linda M; Lloyd, James W; Pazak, Helene E

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary technology has generally established itself well in companion-animal and mixed-animal veterinary medical practice, but the career's growth trajectory is uncertain. Michigan State University (MSU) convened a national conference, "Creating the Future of Veterinary Technology-A National Dialogue," in November 2011 to explore ways to elevate the veterinary technician/technologist's role in the veterinary medical profession and to identify new directions in which the career could expand. Veterinary technicians/technologists might advance their place in private practice by not only improving their clinical skills, but by also focusing on areas such as practice management, leadership training, business training, conflict resolution, information technology, and marketing/communications. Some new employment settings for veterinary technicians/technologists include more participation within laboratory animal medicine and research, the rural farm industry, regulatory medicine, and shelter medicine. Achieving these ends would call for new training options beyond the current 2-year and 4-year degree programs. Participants suggested specialty training programs, hybrid programs of various types, online programs, veterinary technician residency programs of 12-18 months, and more integration of veterinary technician/technology students and veterinary medicine students at colleges of veterinary medicine.

  1. Bisphosphonate Treatment in Osteoporosis: Optimal Duration of Therapy and the Incorporation of a Drug Holiday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Jordan C; Gianakos, Arianna; Lane, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely used treatment for osteoporosis. They accumulate in the bone for years, and therefore, their inhibitory effects on osteoclasts may persist after drug discontinuation. The ideal duration of therapy remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to review the literature to determine the (1) indications for drug holiday, (2) the duration of drug holiday, (3) the evaluation during drug holiday, and (4) the proper treatment and maintenance after drug holiday. A review of two electronic databases (PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE) was conducted using the term "(Drug holiday)," in January 29, 2015. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) clinical trials and case control, (2) human studies, (3) published in a peer-review journal, and (4) written in English. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (1) case reports, (2) case series, and (3) in vitro studies. The literature supports a therapeutic pause after 3-5 years of bisphosphonate treatment in patients with minor bone deficiencies and no recent fragility fracture (low risk) and in patients with moderate bone deficiencies and/or recent fragility fracture (moderate risk). In these patients, a bone health reevaluation is recommended every 1-3 years. Patients with high fracture risk should be maintained on bisphosphonate therapy without drug holiday. The duration and length of drug holiday should be individualized for each patient. Evaluation should be based on serial bone mass measurements, bone turnover rates, and fracture history evaluation. If after drug therapy, assessments show an increased risk of fracture, the patient may benefit from initiating another treatment. Raloxifene, teriparatide, or denosumab are available options.

  2. Indefinite antithyroid drug therapy in toxic Graves′ disease: What are the cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Rajput

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing treatment modalities for Graves′ disease includes antithyroid drugs (ATDs, radioactive iodine, and surgery. There has been a lack of general agreement as to which therapy is the best as none is ideal since all effectively restore euthyroidism, but with some limitations. Previously, therapies were selected with the goal of achieving euthyroidism. Instead, hypothyroidism is now the goal of treatment, to ensure that hyperthyroidism does not recur. Current evidences suggest that high relapse rate and not so rare fatal side effects seen with ATD therapy compel one to consider other definite modes of treatment like radiotherapy and surgery for toxic Graves′ disease after discussing this with the patient.

  3. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  4. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  5. Parallel demand-withdraw processes in family therapy for adolescent drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Kristina N; Rohrbaugh, Michael J; Lebensohn-Chialvo, Florencia; Shoham, Varda

    2014-06-01

    Isomorphism, or parallel process, occurs in family therapy when patterns of therapist-client interaction replicate problematic interaction patterns within the family. This study investigated parallel demand-withdraw processes in brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) for adolescent drug abuse, hypothesizing that therapist-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (TD/AW) cycles observed early in treatment would predict poor adolescent outcomes at follow-up for families who exhibited entrenched parent-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (PD/AW) before treatment began. Participants were 91 families who received at least four sessions of BSFT in a multisite clinical trial on adolescent drug abuse (Robbins et al., 2011). Prior to receiving therapy, families completed videotaped family interaction tasks from which trained observers coded PD/AW. Another team of raters coded TD/AW during two early BSFT sessions. The main dependent variable was the number of drug-use days that adolescents reported in timeline follow-back interviews 7 to 12 months after family therapy began. Zero-inflated Poisson regression analyses supported the main hypothesis, showing that PD/AW and TD/AW interacted to predict adolescent drug use at follow-up. For adolescents in high PD/AW families, higher levels of TD/AW predicted significant increases in drug use at follow-up, whereas for low PD/AW families, TD/AW and follow-up drug use were unrelated. Results suggest that attending to parallel demand-withdraw processes in parent-adolescent and therapist-adolescent dyads may be useful in family therapy for substance-using adolescents.

  6. Consideration of Drug Therapy in Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Diamantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH has become a major global health problem both in its frequency by which it determines the complications and the problems of diagnosis and treatment it requires. BPH is a heterogeneous disease. The symptoms attributed to BPH may have other coexisting causes and growth factors both androgen-dependent and independent, which promotes prostate enlargement. It is well known that prostate size correlates poorly with the symptoms so that reducing prostate using 5-alphareductase or alphablocants inhibitors may not always be sufficient. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of BPH and its interactions with other drugs will help the development of new substances with a better efficiency. This present work aims to be a modest contribution related to medical treatment in benign prostatic hyperplasia and the role that the generalist practitioner should play in managing of this urinary disease quite common in elderly men.

  7. Antiparasitic peptides from arthropods and their application in drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ferreira Lacerda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Africa, Asia and Latin America are regions highly affected by endemic diseases, such as Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Chagas’ disease. They are responsible for the death of thousands of patients every year, as there is not yet a cure for them and the drugs used are inefficient against the pathogenic parasites. During the life cycle of some parasitic protozoa, insects become the most important host and disseminator of the diseases triggered by these microorganisms. As infected insects do not develop nocive symptoms, they can carry the parasites for long time inside their body, enabling their multiplication and life cycle completion. Eventually, parasites infect human beings after insects transmission through their saliva and/or feces. Hence, host insects and general arthropods, which developed a way to coexist with such parasites, are a promising source for the prospection of antiparasitic compounds, as alternative methods for the treatment of protozoa-related diseases. Among the molecules already isolated and investigated, there are proteins and peptides with high activity against parasites, able to inhibit parasite activity in different stages of development. Although studies are still taking their first steps, initial results show new perspectives on the treatment of parasitic diseases. Therefore, in this report, we describe about peptides from host insect sources with activity against the three most endemic parasites: Leishmania sp, Plasmodium sp. and Trypanosomes. Moreover, we discuss the future application insect peptides as anti-parasitic drugs and the use of non-hosts insect transcriptomes on the prospection of novel molecules for the treatment of parasitic neglected diseases.

  8. Progress in antihypertensive therapy with a multiple-action drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, B N; Tomlinson, B

    1988-01-01

    The beta-blockers in clinical use have been classified into 2 major divisions, nonselective or selective agents, and those with or without intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA). These properties confer differing pharmacological properties with some relevance to the treatment of hypertension. A beta-blocker with significant beta 2-ISA can be regarded as a multiple-action drug. A third division of beta-blockers is a newer development; these agents, besides blocking the beta-receptor, possess important peripheral vasodilator activity. Labetalol was the first drug of this group and prizidolol followed, but has been withdrawn because of toxicity. Several other agents now under evaluation include bucindolol and medroxolol, and carvedilol and dilevalol (1 of the isomers of labetalol), which have been the most widely studied in hypertension. Combined action results in important haemodynamic differences compared with pure beta-blockade. Notably, peripheral resistance is reduced, and there is less reduction in, or no effect on, cardiac output. The 3 following mechanisms have been described as responsible for peripheral vasodilatation: alpha-receptor blockade, beta 2-agonism, and a dilator action independent of either the alpha- or beta-receptors. Evidence for these various mechanisms is more readily obtainable from animal experiments, but some confirmatory evidence has been obtained in man. Inhibition of alpha-stimulation has been found with labetalol and to a small degree with medroxalol and carvedilol. beta 2-Mediated vasodilatation has been shown by dilevalol and medroxolol, and evidence of vasodilatation independent of alpha- or beta-receptors has been obtained with carvedilol. More evidence is required to confirm the exact contribution of each of these mechanisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. DRUG THERAPY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN: SURVEY IN MASHHAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Karimi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For future health planning of our country, the type and amount of drugs used for treatment of chronic diseases should be known. Therefore, in the present study the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad was studied. Methods. To study the different types of drugs in the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad, we evaluated the treatment regimen of 366 primary school children with asthma disease. Starting, maximum and duration of action of three different bronchodilators (salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup were compared. Findings. The results of the first part of this study showed that only 31.6 percent of asthmatic children had history of treatment and only 10.6 percent had current medication. In addition, most of the treated children (38.8 percent had only bronchodilator (salbutamol syrup in their treatment regimen. The effect of salbutamol inhaler on lung function tests starts in 5 min, salbutamol syrup in 15 min and theophylline syrup at 30 min after administration. The maximum response to salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup occurred 15 min, 4 hr and 3 hr after administration, respectively. The reduction of response to salbutamol inhaler occurs after 3 hr, but there was no any reduction in response to salbutamol and theophylline syrup during study period. Conclusion. The prevalence of asthma among children in the city of Mashhad is relatively high, but most of asthmatic children are not treated. Although the oral bronchodilator in mild asthma is effective, salbutamol inhaler is needed for emergency use.

  10. Important Drug-Drug Interactions in HIV-Infected Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Update on New Interactions Between HIV and Non-HIV Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Alice; Foisy, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Advances in antiretroviral therapy have turned HIV into a chronic, manageable disease. Patients often require treatment for co-morbid conditions as well as HIV, and consequently, pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretrovirals (ARVs) and other drug classes are an increasing concern. Protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the CYP450 or other transporter systems, and may be associated with higher risk of clinically significant drug interactions. One reverse transcriptase inhibitor, abacavir, has demonstrated weak inhibition of CYP3A4, 2D6 and 2C9 in vitro, but is not associated with any clinically significant interactions involving the CYP450 system. The integrase inhibitor raltegravir is not involved in the CYP450 system, and may be a suitable option to use when trying to minimize interactions with other drug classes. This review summarizes recently published data on clinically significant drug interactions between ARVs and other drug classes including antineoplastics, immunosuppressant transplant drugs, directly acting antivirals for hepatitis C, antifungals, antimalarials, corticosteroids, psychotropics, hormonal contraceptives, anticoagulants, drugs for pulmonary hypertension, and herbal products. In situations of suspected or potential interactions, close monitoring is warranted, and dose adjustments or substitutions may be required.

  11. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  12. Brief strategic family therapy for young people in treatment for drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis...... and interpretation. Results: The results are mixed: BSFT does not seem to have better or worse effects on drug use frequency and family functioning than other treatments but has positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions. Longer retention in treatment has been identified as a consistent...

  13. Mono- and combination drug therapies in hospitalized patients with bipolar depression. Data from the European drug surveillance program AMSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For the pharmacological treatment of bipolar depression several guidelines exist. It is largely unknown, to what extent the prescriptions in daily clinical routine correspond to these evidence based recommendations and which combinations of psychotropic drugs are frequently used. Methods The prescriptions of psychotropic drugs were investigated of all in-patients with bipolar depression (n = 2246; time period 1994–2009) from hospitals participating in the drug surveillance program AMSP. For the drug use in 2010, 221 cases were analysed additionally. Results From 1994 to 2009, 85% of all patients received more than one class of psychotropic substances: 74% received antidepressants in combination therapy, 55% antipsychotics, 48% anticonvulsants and 33% lithium. When given in combination, lithium is the most often prescribed substance for bipolar depression (33%), followed by valproic acid (23%), mirtazapine and venlafaxine (16% each), quetiapine (15%), lamotrigine (14%) and olanzapine (13%). Both, lithium and valproic acid are often combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), but also with mirtazapine und venlafaxine. Combinations of more than one antidepressant occur quite often, whereby combinations with bupropion, paroxetine, fluoxetine or fluvoxamine are very rare. In 2010, quetiapine (alone and combined) was the most frequently prescribed drug (39%); aripiprazole was administered in 10%. Conclusion Combinations of antidepressants (SSRI, mirtazapine, venlafaxine) with mood stabilizers (lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine) and / or atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, olanzapine) are common. Of most of those combinations the efficacy has not been studied. The use of aripiprazole and the concomitant use of two or three antidepressants contrast the guidelines. PMID:22998655

  14. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Maponga, Charles C.; Khoza, Star; Ma, Qing; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2%) of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%), Bidens pilosa (66.0%), Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%), Moringa oleifera (44.1%), Lippia javanica (36.3%), and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%). Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828) and Peltoforum africanum (OR = 0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839) reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles. PMID:22506106

  15. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe Mudzviti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2% of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%, Bidens pilosa (66.0%, Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%, Moringa oleifera (44.1%, Lippia javanica (36.3%, and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%. Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR=0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828 and Peltoforum africanum (OR=0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839 reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles.

  16. Electrochemotherapy as First Line Cancer Treatment: Experiences from Veterinary Medicine in Developing Novel Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, E P; Azzarito, T; Fais, S; Fanciulli, M; Baldi, A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is one of the major obstacles to the efficacy of chemotherapy in cancer patients. The abnormal blood flow within the tumor results in uneven drug distribution. Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a tumor treatment that adopts the systemic or local delivery of anticancer drugs with the application of permeabilizing electric pulses having appropriate amplitude and waveforms. This allows the use of lipophobic drugs that frequently have a narrow therapeutic index maintaining at the same time a reduced patient morbidity and preserving appropriate anticancer efficacy. Its use in humans is addressed to the treatment of cutaneous neoplasms or the palliation of skin tumor metastases, and a standard operating procedure has been devised. On the other hand, in veterinary oncology this approach is gaining popularity, thus becoming a first line treatment for different cancer histotypes, in a variety of clinical conditions due to its high efficacy and low toxicity. This review summarizes the state of the art in veterinary oncology as a preclinical model and reports the new protocols in terms of drugs and therapy combination that have been developed.

  17. [Pharmacokinetic principles and drug-dosing adjustments during continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, S; Guzzo, I; Vitaliano, E; Muzi, L; Solazzo, A; Pistolesi, V; Pierucci, A

    2006-01-01

    In the critically ill, acute renal failure (ARF) and "Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome" (MODS) can be associated with significant modifications of many pharmacokinetic parameters, such as protein binding, volume of distribution and total body clearance. The start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) represents an additional variable to take in consideration for drug-dosing adjustments. Drugs significantly eliminated by the kidney are likely to be removed during RRT and a supplemental dose or further dosing adjustments are required if extracorporeal clearance is more than 25-30% of total body clearance. The impact of RRT on plasma drug concentrations can be substantially different in relation to the type of treatment (diffusive, convective or both), membrane characteristics (low-flux or high-flux), filter surface area and prescribed dialysis dose. The molecular weight cut-offs of high-flux membrane are much higher than the molecular weight of most drugs. Therefore, molecular size will not be a limitation for the removal of the unbound fraction of the drugs most commonly used in the critically ill undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, diffusive clearance could be significantly lower than convective clearance for drugs in the middle molecular weight range. In any case, the extracorporeal clearances report-ed with the use of high-volume CRRT (>50-60 L/2 h) are often surprisingly elevated and can lead to drug underdosing in clinical conditions where adequate antibiotic treatment is essential.

  18. [Difficulties in the transfer of drug therapy from inpatient to ambulatory treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adl, S; Weltermann, B M; Küching, A; Martin, C; Korbonits, G; Höpp, H W

    2001-10-01

    The prospective study compares prescribed drugs of 192 primarily cardiological patients at discharge and 7 weeks later in ambulatory care. The data were determined by discharge summaries and by standardized patient-questionnaires. The drug division was made with the ATC-classification according to the recommendations of the World Health Organisation for Drug Utilisation Studies. The intraindividual cost comparison was calculated by current pharmacy sale prices. The findings were changes in hospital discharge medications in ambulatory care in over 2/3 of the cases. The most frequent change was the additional prescribing of drug groups. The average daily tablet number increased in patients with the same or worsened subjective feeling after discharge. Additionally we found in a number of patients a change of drug therapy within the ATC-groups, or in fact, withdrawal of drug therapy all together. The frequency of changes increased with the number of patient/doctor contacts. The observation that the average daily therapeutical cost decreased just slightly could give an indication that cost saving was a minor part of the doctors decision for drug changing. However, the frequency of changes has shown to be dependent upon the specialities of the physician or pharmaceutical group.

  19. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  20. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized...... and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two studies that met inclusion criteria. Only one study provided numerical results on the effect of FFT on drug use reduction. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to allow any conclusion to be drawn on the effect of FFT for young people in treatment...... for nonopioid drug use. There is a need for more research and particularly for more methodologically rigorous studies in the field of treatment for young drug users....

  1. Allergens in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Janda, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Rhyner, C; Marti, E

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. © 2015 The Authors Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. An overview of anti-allergic drug therapy and the histamine-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and corticosteroid medication (when indicated, and in most instances, used locally). The article provides an overview of the nature and the management of allergic disease and the histamine 1 antihistamines. Keywords: anti-allergic drug therapy, H1 antihistamines, histamine receptors, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, allergy ...

  3. Lessons Learned from Gemcitabine: Impact of Therapeutic Carrier Systems and Gemcitabine's Drug Conjugates on Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Kumar, Animesh; Chourasia, Manish K

    2017-01-01

    Currently, drug delivery systems have a high impact in cancer therapy and are receiving more attention than conventional cancer treatment modalities. Compared with current cancer therapies, gemcitabine (2', 2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) has been proven to be an effective chemotherapeutic agent against pancreatic, colon, bladder, breast, ovarian, non-small-cell lung, and head and neck cancers in combination with other anticancer agents. To improve the safety and efficacy of cytotoxic drugs, several drug delivery systems have been explored. This review outlines the recent work directed toward gemcitabine delivery systems for cancer therapy, including aerosols, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles, carbon nanotubes, and multifunctional theranostic nanomedicines. It also provides insight into the design and development of gemcitabine conjugation for safe and effective cancer therapy. Despite the clinical promises of gemcitabine, many therapeutic challenges remain. Specifically, its therapeutic use in cancer chemotherapy is impeded by a short biological half-life, caused by its rapid metabolism, and resistance due to increased expression of ribonucleotide reductase. In our opinion, many research investigations have contributed to improve the selectivity and efficacy of gemcitabine. This combined approach of drug delivery systems and gemcitabine conjugates has shown promising efficacy in preclinical models and significant potential for future clinical cancer-therapeutic applications. Also, these strategies overcome most of the aforementioned limits of gemcitabine.

  4. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  5. Liposomes as a drug delivery system in photodynamic therapy for colon cancer treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maduray, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a drug termed a photosensitizer (PS), light (laser) of an appropriate wavelength and molecular oxygen (tissue) to elicit cell death of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the enhancement of PDT...

  6. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  7. Pharmacy Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Drug Therapy Services in Nonmetropolitan Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Abhijit S.; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.; Bonnarens, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Higher prevalence of chronic diseases and reduced access to other health professionals in rural areas suggest that rural Medicare enrollees will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services (DTS). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe non-metropolitan community pharmacy sites in Wisconsin, the provision of DTS at…

  8. Biologically Inspired Polydopamine Capped Gold Nanorods for Drug Delivery and Light-Mediated Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhao, Xinyuan; Wang, Shaochuan; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing

    2016-09-21

    Multifunctional drug delivery and combined multimodal therapy strategies are very promising in tumor theranostic applications. In this work, a simple and versatile nanoplatform based on biologically inspired polydopamine capped gold nanorods (GNR-PDA) is developed. Dopamine, a well-known neurotransmitter associated with many neuronal disorders, can undergo self-polymerization on the surface of GNRs to form a stable PDA shell. Its unique molecular adsorption property, as well as its high chemical stability and biocompatibility, facilitate GNR-PDA as an ideal candidate for drug delivery. Methylene blue (MB) and doxorubicin (DOX) are directly adsorbed on GNR-PDA via electrostatic and/or π-π stacking interactions, forming GNR-PDA-MB and GNR-PDA-DOX nanocomposites, respectively. The GNR-PDA-MB can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, from MB) or hyperthermia (from GNR-PDA) with high efficiency under deep-red/NIR laser irradiation, while the GNR-PDA-DOX exhibits light-enhanced drug release under NIR laser irradiation. The combined dual-modal light-mediated therapy, by using GNR-PDA-MB [photodynamic/photothermal therapy (PDT/PTT)] and GNR-PDA-DOX (Chemo/PTT), is carried out and shows remarkable cancer cell killing efficiency in vitro and significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo, which are much more distinct than any single-modal therapy strategy. Our work illustrates that GNR-PDA could be a promising nanoplatform for multifunctional drug delivery and multimodal tumor theranostics in the future.

  9. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and systems to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that... medication error identification and reduction systems. (5) Provision of information to CMS regarding its... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...

  10. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Although aerobic exercise has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in human beings, its additive BP- reducing effect on antihypertensive drug therapy seems to have been investigated in only laboratory animals. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of aerobic dance combined with ...

  11. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    reducing effect on antihypertensive drug therapy seems to have been investigated in only laboratory animals. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of .... pregnant or diabetic or had a history of coronary or valvular heart, renal, cerebral vascular, ... Participants with recent history of smoking and alcohol abuse (<6 ...

  12. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  13. Veterinary critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Kevin T T; Mathews, Karol; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Bain, Fairfield T; Hughes, Dez

    2003-04-01

    Veterinary species experience similar perturbations of their health to those of human patients. When the long-term prognosis is good and providing suffering can be minimized, animals stand to benefit greatly from recent advances in the field of emergency and critical care. Outcomes in many conditions in small and large animals have improved markedly in the last 15 years, as management has improved, making the financial and emotional investment in critical care worthwhile for many owners.

  14. Application of the Pareto principle to identify and address drug-therapy safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; Dormann, Harald; Pfistermeister, Barbara; Sonst, Anja; Patapovas, Andrius; Vogler, Renate; Hartmann, Nina; Plank-Kiegele, Bettina; Kirchner, Melanie; Bürkle, Thomas; Maas, Renke

    2014-06-01

    Adverse drug events (ADE) and medication errors (ME) are common causes of morbidity in patients presenting at emergency departments (ED). Recognition of ADE as being drug related and prevention of ME are key to enhancing pharmacotherapy safety in ED. We assessed the applicability of the Pareto principle (~80 % of effects result from 20 % of causes) to address locally relevant problems of drug therapy. In 752 cases consecutively admitted to the nontraumatic ED of a major regional hospital, ADE, ME, contributing drugs, preventability, and detection rates of ADE by ED staff were investigated. Symptoms, errors, and drugs were sorted by frequency in order to apply the Pareto principle. In total, 242 ADE were observed, and 148 (61.2 %) were assessed as preventable. ADE contributed to 110 inpatient hospitalizations. The ten most frequent symptoms were causally involved in 88 (80.0 %) inpatient hospitalizations. Only 45 (18.6 %) ADE were recognized as drug-related problems until discharge from the ED. A limited set of 33 drugs accounted for 184 (76.0 %) ADE; ME contributed to 57 ADE. Frequency-based listing of ADE, ME, and drugs involved allowed identification of the most relevant problems and development of easily to implement safety measures, such as wall and pocket charts. The Pareto principle provides a method for identifying the locally most relevant ADE, ME, and involved drugs. This permits subsequent development of interventions to increase patient safety in the ED admission process that best suit local needs.

  15. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  16. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUG THERAPY FOR HYPERTENSIVE DISORDERS IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Jankovic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension in pregnancy is associated with increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. About 8 % of all pregnancies are complicated with hypertensive disorders. There is concordance that severe hypertension should be treated without delay to reduce maternal risks of acute cerebrovascular complications. Intravenous labetalol and oral nifedipine are as effective as intravenous hydralazine in control of severe hypertension, with less adverse effects. Still, there is no consensus as to whether mild-to-moderate hypertension in pregnancy should be treated, considering that there are no definitive conclusions which can be made about the relative maternal or perinatal benefits/risks of antihypertensive treatment. Considering their safe usage during pregnancy, methyldopa, labetalol and nifedipine are commonly used blood-pressure lowering drugs for pregnant women with hypertension. The cardio-selective β- blocker atenolol should be avoided in pregnancy, because it has been associated with lower birth weights and fetal growth impairment. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are contraindicated in pregnancy.

  17. Drug Discovery by Molecular Imaging and Monitoring Therapy Response in Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Jeong, Ju Hye; Oh, Ji Min; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-07-27

    Molecular imaging allows a noninvasive assessment of biochemical and biological processes in living subjects. Treatment strategies for malignant lymphoma depend on histology and tumor stage. For the last two decades, molecular imaging has been the mainstay diagnostic test for the staging of malignant lymphoma and the assessment of response to treatment. This technology enhances our understanding of disease and drug activity during preclinical and clinical drug development. Here, we review molecular imaging applications in drug development, with an emphasis on oncology. Monitoring and assessing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies in preclinical or clinical models are essential and the multimodal molecular imaging approach may represent a new stage for pharmacologic development in cancer. Monitoring the progress of lymphoma therapy with imaging modalities will help patients. Identifying and addressing key challenges is essential for successful integration of molecular imaging into the drug development process. In this review, we highlight the general usefulness of molecular imaging in drug development and radionuclide-based reporter genes. Further, we discuss the different molecular imaging modalities for lymphoma therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications.

  18. Drug Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Management: Where Do We Stand in 2010?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Montazeri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a commonly encountered arrhythmia in our daily practice. Every year a huge bulk of data is published about different management strategies, new antiarrhythmic drugs, anticoagulation protocols and ablation procedures in these patients. In this review article, we discuss different management strategies and new antiarrhythmic drugs as well as those commonly used. We will also have a brief look at anticoagulation in AF.We try to introduce the most recent publications in this field and we think that this review article may not only give information about the current state of antiarrhythmic therapy of AF, it may also show some progresses that we may anticipate in the near future. New drugs are promising in the management of AF because of better safety profile and also acceptable efficacy. A comparison between the catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic therapy is beyond the scope of this article.

  19. Current therapies and future possibilities for drug development against liver-stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphemot, Rene; Posfai, Dora; Derbyshire, Emily R

    2016-06-01

    Malaria remains a global public health threat, with half of the world's population at risk. Despite numerous efforts in the past decade to develop new antimalarial drugs to surmount increasing resistance to common therapies, challenges remain in the expansion of the current antimalarial arsenal for the elimination of this disease. The requirement of prophylactic and radical cure activities for the next generation of antimalarial drugs demands that new research models be developed to support the investigation of the elusive liver stage of the malaria parasite. In this Review, we revisit current antimalarial therapies and discuss recent advances for in vitro and in vivo malaria research models of the liver stage and their importance in probing parasite biology and the discovery of novel drug candidates.

  20. Impacts of recent advances in cardiovascular regenerative medicine on clinical therapies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Mitsushige; Tohyama, Shugo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-05-01

    Although stem-cell technology holds great promise for the treatment of degenerative diseases and the development of new drugs, progress has been hindered by immune and ethical problems in association with the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The recent development of reprogramming of differentiated human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) should overcome these obstacles and facilitate clinical applications of stem cells. One of the advantages of reprogramming is that it allows the establishment of patient- and disease-specific in vitro models of human hereditary diseases for pathophysiologic and developmental studies. These in vitro models can be used for drug development and testing, moving us a step closer to personalized therapies. This review outlines the current status of pluripotent stem cells and focuses on the potential applications of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for clinical therapies, as well as for drug development and testing. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of a transition to more restrictive drug formulary on therapy discontinuation and medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirneshan, E; Kyrychenko, P; Matlin, O S; Avila, J P; Brennan, T A; Shrank, W H

    2016-02-01

    There is conclusive evidence demonstrating that formulary restrictions are associated with reduced utilization and pharmacy spending of the restricted drugs. However, prior efforts to implement restrictive formularies have been associated with inconsistent rates of therapy discontinuation and mixed impacts on adherence to therapy. Also, the impact of transferring patients from an already restrictive formulary to a more aggressive model has not been previously examined. This study evaluated the impact of implementation of a more restrictive formulary on therapy disruption, adherence rates, pharmacy costs and generic utilization among patients with common chronic conditions. In 2014, CVS Health implemented Value Formulary (VF), a restrictive benefit design with the aim of reducing spending while preserving access to and adherence to essential therapy, was used. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to assess changes in therapy disruption rates, pharmacy costs and generic dispensing rate (GDR) (for continuers) and medication adherence (for initiators) following the implementation of VF. The study group was selected from members of three existing employer clients transitioned from standard formulary (SF) to VF on January 2014. The control population was a matched group of six employers with the same preperiod formulary structure, business unit, adherence programmes and patient out-of-pocket cost as the study group. The control group retained SF in 2014. To assess therapy disruption after VF implementation, we categorized patients by their subsequent medication use into three groups: (i) therapy stopped, (ii) therapy continued and (iii) therapy switched. Medication adherence was measured as monthly proportion of days covered (PDC). Pharmacy cost and GDR were measured per utilizer per month (PUPM). Rates of therapy disruption in study and control groups were compared using the chi-square test. Differences in monthly PDC between matched groups were evaluated using

  2. Effects of hospital generic drug substitution on diabetes therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hui-Yin Chen,1 Hui-Ru Chang,2 Hui-Chu Lang3 1Department of Auditing, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Social Insurance, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Objectives: To evaluate the effects on physicians’ prescribing behavior and on the therapeutic outcome of non-insulin-dependent diabetes patients of substituting different generic brands of metformin. Methods: We adopt a retrospective cohort study involving 280 type-2 diabetes patients who regularly used the outpatient services of one medical center and who had changed metformin brands five times between 2003 and 2008. The aim was to examine the effects of switching brands. The generalized estimating equation was used to determine whether drug brand switching affected patient glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels, their prescribed daily dose, or their adherence to medication with metformin. Results: HbA1c levels increased from 7.91 to 8.34 throughout the study period, although it was found that brand switching did not adversely affect HbA1c levels after controlling for patient characteristics and the time course of the study. Furthermore, the prescribed daily dose of metformin was stable throughout the study period, and was approximately 0.8 of the defined daily dose. Finally, although adherence was significantly higher with the original metformin than with the four generic brands, patients still maintained high levels of adherence of >0.8. Conclusion: Although switching between different brands of metformin slightly affected the prescribing behavior of the physicians, there was no unfavorable effect on patient HbA1c levels. Thus, the policy of substituting between different generic brands of metformin is a good cost-effective approach that does not adversely affect the quality of diabetes patient care. Keywords: metformin, generic substitution, glycemic

  3. Analysis of combination drug therapy to develop regimens with shortened duration of treatment for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Drusano

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, particularly with the advent of multi-drug resistance. Shortening therapy duration for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major goal, requiring generation of optimal kill rate and resistance-suppression. Combination therapy is required to attain the goal of shorter therapy.Our objective was to identify a method for identifying optimal combination chemotherapy. We developed a mathematical model for attaining this end. This is accomplished by identifying drug effect interaction (synergy, additivity, antagonism for susceptible organisms and subpopulations resistant to each drug in the combination.We studied the combination of linezolid plus rifampin in our hollow fiber infection model. We generated a fully parametric drug effect interaction mathematical model. The results were subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to extend the findings to a population of patients by accounting for between-patient variability in drug pharmacokinetics.All monotherapy allowed emergence of resistance over the first two weeks of the experiment. In combination, the interaction was additive for each population (susceptible and resistant. For a 600 mg/600 mg daily regimen of linezolid plus rifampin, we demonstrated that >50% of simulated subjects had eradicated the susceptible population by day 27 with the remaining organisms resistant to one or the other drug. Only 4% of patients had complete organism eradication by experiment end.These data strongly suggest that in order to achieve the goal of shortening therapy, the original regimen may need to be changed at one month to a regimen of two completely new agents with resistance mechanisms independent of the initial regimen. This hypothesis which arose from the analysis is immediately testable in a clinical trial.

  4. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014 in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P=0.002. After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43 and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08 related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD.

  5. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  6. Cross-sectional study of antimicrobials used for surgical prophylaxis by bovine veterinary practitioners in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardefeldt, Laura Y; Browning, Glenn F; Thursky, Karin A; Gilkerson, James R; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Stevenson, Mark A; Bailey, Kirsten E

    2017-10-21

    Antimicrobials are widely used in veterinary practices, but there has been no investigation of antimicrobial classes used or the appropriateness of their use in bovine practice. This study investigated antimicrobial use for surgical prophylaxis in bovine practice in Australia. A cross-sectional study of veterinarian antimicrobial usage patterns was conducted using an online questionnaire. Information solicited included respondent's details, the frequency with which antimicrobials were used for specific surgical conditions (including the dose, timing and duration of therapy) and details of practice antimicrobial use policies and sources of information about antimicrobials. In total, 212 members of the Australian veterinary profession working in bovine practice completed the survey. Antimicrobials were always or frequently used by more than 75 per cent of respondents in all scenarios. Generally, antimicrobial drug choice was appropriate for the reported surgical conditions. Procaine penicillin and oxytetracycline accounted for 93 per cent of use. However, there was a wide range of doses used, with underdosing and inappropriate timing of administration being common reasons for inappropriate prophylactic treatment. There was very low use of critically important antimicrobials (3.3 per cent of antimicrobials reported). Antimicrobial use guidelines need to be developed and promoted to improve the responsible use of antimicrobials in bovine practice. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Drug-Encoded Biomarkers for Monitoring Biological Therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Tsoneva

    Full Text Available Blood tests are necessary, easy-to-perform and low-cost alternatives for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy and other biological therapies in translational research. Here we assessed three candidate proteins with the potential to be used as biomarkers in biological fluids: two glucuronidases from E. coli (GusA and Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 (GusPlus, and the luciferase from Gaussia princeps (GLuc. The three genes encoding these proteins were inserted individually into vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 genome under the control of an identical promoter. The three resulting recombinant viruses were used to infect tumor cells in cultures and human tumor xenografts in nude mice. In contrast to the actively secreted GLuc, the cytoplasmic glucuronidases GusA and GusPlus were released into the supernatants only as a result of virus-mediated oncolysis. GusPlus resulted in the most sensitive detection of enzyme activity under controlled assay conditions in samples containing as little as 1 pg/ml of GusPlus, followed by GusA (25 pg/ml and GLuc (≥375 pg/ml. Unexpectedly, even though GusA had a lower specific activity compared to GusPlus, the substrate conversion in the serum of tumor-bearing mice injected with the GusA-encoding virus strains was substantially higher than that of GusPlus. This was attributed to a 3.2 fold and 16.2 fold longer half-life of GusA in the blood stream compared to GusPlus and GLuc respectively, thus a more sensitive monitor of virus replication than the other two enzymes. Due to the good correlation between enzymatic activity of expressed marker gene and virus titer, we conclude that the amount of the biomarker protein in the body fluid semiquantitatively represents the amount of virus in the infected tumors which was confirmed by low light imaging. We found GusA to be the most reliable biomarker for monitoring oncolytic virotherapy among the three tested markers.

  8. Drug persistence and need for dose intensification to adalimumab therapy; the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Lorant; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Rutka, Mariann; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Klaudia; Lovasz, Barbara D; Golovics, Petra A; Gecse, Krisztina B; Szalay, Balazs; Molnar, Tamas; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-08-08

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aid therapeutic decision making in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who lose response to anti-TNF therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predictive factors of loss of response (LOR) to adalimumab using TDM in IBD patients. One hundred twelve IBD patients (with 214 TDM measurements, CD/UC 84/28, male/female 50/62, mean age CD/UC: 36/35 years) were enrolled in this consecutive cohort from two referral centres in Hungary. Demographic data were comprehensively collected and harmonized monitoring strategy was applied. Previous and current therapy, laboratory data and clinical activity were recorded at the time of TDM. Patients were evaluated either at the time of suspected LOR or during follow-up. TDM measurements were determined by commercial ELISA (LISA TRACKER, Theradiag, France). Among 112 IBD patients, LOR/drug persistence was 25.9%/74.1%. The cumulative ADA positivity (>10 ng/mL) and low TL (<5.0 μg/mL) was 12.1% and 17.8% after 1 year and 17.3% and 29.5% after 2 years of adalimumab therapy. Dose intensification was needed in 29.5% of the patients. Female gender and ADA positivity were associated with LOR (female gender: p < 0.001, OR:7.8 CI 95%: 2.5-24.3, ADA positivity: p = 0.007 OR:3.6 CI 95%: 1.4-9.5). ADA development, low TL and need for dose intensification were frequent during adalimumab therapy and support the selective use of TDM in IBD patients treated with adalimumab. ADA positivity and gender were predictors of LOR.

  9. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-09-24

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL 'opens' to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy.

  10. [Drugs dosing in intensive care unit during continuous renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Vincent; Ponte, Belén; Saudan, Patrick; Martin, Pierre-Yves

    2009-11-01

    Drug dosing in the intensive care unit can be challenging. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis and a part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used as dialysis therapy in this critically ill population. Available data demonstrate that sepsis, AKI and different modalities of CRRT can profoundly change drugs pharmacokinetic. The severity of these changes depends on molecules characteristics (volume of distribution, plasma protein binding, molecular weight, plasma half-life, plasma clearance), patient itself (volemia, residual renal function, tissue perfusion, hepatic dysfunction) and modality of CRRT (diffusion, convection, adsorption). There are no available recommendations to adapt drug dosing in a given critically ill patient with a given modality of CRRT. It is necessary to fully understand the different methods of CRRT and drug pharmacokinetic to prescribe the appropriate dose and to avoid under or potentially toxic overdosing. Monitoring the plasma level of drug - when available - can establish a relation between the blood concentration and its effect; thus, facilitating drug dosing.

  11. Drug-Free Platelets Can Act as Seeds for Aggregate Formation During Antiplatelet Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Thomas; Armstrong, Paul C.; Finsterbusch, Michaela; Chan, Melissa V.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective— Reduced antiplatelet drug efficacy occurs in conditions of increased platelet turnover, associated with increased proportions of drug-free, that is, uninhibited, platelets. Here, we detail mechanisms by which drug-free platelets promote platelet aggregation in the face of standard antiplatelet therapy. Approach and Results— To model standard antiplatelet therapy, platelets were treated in vitro with aspirin, the P2Y12 receptor blocker prasugrel active metabolite, or aspirin plus prasugrel active metabolite. Different proportions of uninhibited platelets were then introduced. Light transmission aggregometry analysis demonstrated clear positive associations between proportions of drug-free platelets and percentage platelet aggregation in response to a range of platelet agonists. Using differential platelet labeling coupled with advanced flow cytometry and confocal imaging we found aggregates formed in mixtures of aspirin-inhibited platelets together with drug-free platelets were characterized by intermingled platelet populations. This distribution is in accordance with the ability of drug-free platelets to generate thromboxane A2 and so drive secondary platelet activation. Conversely, aggregates formed in mixtures of prasugrel active metabolite–inhibited or aspirin plus prasugrel active metabolite–inhibited platelets together with drug-free platelets were characterized by distinct cores of drug-free platelets. This distribution is consistent with the ability of drug-free platelets to respond to the secondary activator ADP. Conclusions— These experiments are the first to image the interactions of inhibited and uninhibited platelets in the formation of platelet aggregates. They demonstrate that a general population of platelets can contain subpopulations that respond strikingly differently to overall stimulation of the population and so act as the seed for platelet aggregation. PMID:26272940

  12. A green approach to dual-drug nanoformulations with targeting and synergistic effects for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Lu, Yue; Fan, Zhongxiong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Yuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2017-11-01

    Exploration of efficient dual-drug nanohybrids, particularly those with high drug loading, specific targeting property, and long-termed stability, is of highly importance in cancer therapy. A pH-driven coprecipitation was performed in the aqueous phase to obtain a dual-drug nanoformulation, composed of 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) nanoneedles integrated with an exterior thin layer of the methotrexate (MTX)-chitosan conjugate. The high stability of nanohybrids in water and the targeting property provided by the MTX ingredient function synergistically to the prolonged and sustained drug release property in tumor tissues and the increased cellular uptake. The cytotoxicity test illustrates that dual-drug nanoneedles possess the remarkable killing ability to HeLa cells with the combination index at 0.33 ± 0.07. After cellular internalization, the release of both drug ingredients results in an excellent anticancer activity in vivo with the minimized adverse side effects. Design of a green approach to the carrier-free, dual-drug nanoformulations enables to develop emerging drug delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Radiation protection for veterinary practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelton, R.; McCaffery, A. (National Radiological Protection Board, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Scottish Centre)

    1993-01-01

    This brief article discusses radiation protection for diagnostic radiography in veterinary practices. It includes aspects such as a radiation protection adviser, personal dosimetry but in particular a Veterinary Monitoring Service, developed by the NRPB, which offers veterinary practitioners the convenience of making simple but essential measurements for themselves using photographic films contained in a 'vet pack' to determine the operating condition of their X-ray machine. (U.K.).

  15. How is veterinary parasitology taught in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ming; Suo, Xun; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2006-12-01

    Many parasites of domestic animals in China are of major socioeconomic and medical importance. Hence, veterinary parasitology is one of the core subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary science. Here, we review the teaching of veterinary parasitology in Chinese universities, including a description of the veterinary science curricula and measures to improve the quality of veterinary parasitology teaching in China.

  16. [Effects of drug cupping therapy on immune function in chronic asthmatic bronchitis patients during protracted period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cai-qing; Liang, Tie-jun; Zhang, Wei

    2006-11-01

    To observe the clinical effect of drug cupping therapy (DCT, cupping therapy with pingchuan ointment made by the authors themselves in the cups) on chronic asthmatic bronchitis (CAB) during the protracted period, and explore its effect on immune function. Seventy-seven patients were randomly divided into two groups:the treated group (n=40) treated by orally taken Liuwei Dihuang Pill (LDP) and DCT and the control group (n=37) with LDP and common cupping therapy without drug in cups. The changes of T-lymphocyte subset, levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL), immunoglobulin (Ig), complement 3 and 4 (C3 and C4) were detected before and after treatment. The total effective rate was higher in the treated group than that in the control group (90.0% vs. 59.5%, P < 0.01). The levels of CD4+, CD4+ /CD8+, IL-2, IFN-gamma, C3, C4, IgA, IgG and IgM increased, while the levels of IgE, IL-4, IL-10 and CD8+ decreased after treatment in both groups (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), the improvements were better in the treated group than that in the control group (P < 0.05). DCT shows better curative effects than that of common cupping therapy without drug, it could improve the cellular and humoral immunity in CAB patients.

  17. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Melanoma Antitumoral Therapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Balansin Rigon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma (MEL is a less common type of skin cancer, but it is more aggressive with a high mortality rate. The World Cancer Research Fund International (GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates that there were 230,000 new cases of MEL in the world in 2012. Conventional MEL treatment includes surgery and chemotherapy, but many of the chemotherapeutic agents used present undesirable properties. Drug delivery systems are an alternative strategy by which to carry antineoplastic agents. Encapsulated drugs are advantageous due to such properties as high stability, better bioavailability, controlled drug release, a long blood circulation time, selective organ or tissue distribution, a lower total required dose, and minimal toxic side effects. This review of scientific research supports applying a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for MEL therapy.

  18. Understanding epigenetics of schizophrenia in the backdrop of its antipsychotic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathy, Babu; Banerjee, Moinak

    2017-05-01

    The diatheses of gene and environment interaction in schizophrenia (SCZ) are becoming increasingly evident. Genetic and epigenetic backgrounds are being considered in stratifying and addressing phenotypic variation and drug response in SCZ. But how much of these epigenetic alterations are the primary contributing factor, toward disease pathogenesis and drug response, needs further clarity. Evidence indicates that antipsychotic drugs can also alter the epigenetic homeostasis thereby inducing pharmacoepigenomic effects. We re-examine the context of epigenetics in disease pathogenesis and antipsychotic drug therapy in SCZ to understand how much of these observations act as real indicators of the disease or therapeutic response. We propose that epigenetic viewpoint in SCZ needs to be critically examined under the genetic, epigenetic and pharmacoepigenetic background.

  19. Nuclear medicine: proof of principle for targeted drugs in diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitha, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Delivering a drug to a specific target in the body is comparable to the "magic bullet principle" applied in Nuclear Medicine. If clinical medicine today found treatment options by targeting specific receptors, proteins or enzymes by "small-molecule drugs" it utilizes concepts that have been initially described by Nobel Laureate George von Hevesy as "tracer principle". This article is going to show that molecular imaging probes in Nuclear Medicine can be regarded as proof of principle of many of recent trends in diagnosis and therapy and offers exciting opportunities for further developments. Radioiodine therapy of benign and malignant thyroid disease has been established in Nuclear Medicine over six decades ago and is a fine example for using the same highly specific probe for diagnosis and treatment of a given disease. The use of radio labeled monoclonal antibodies against surface receptors of tumor cells (e.g. CEA) dominated diagnostic Nuclear Medicine in the eighties and sees a recent revival in lymphoma treatment radioimmunotherapy. Finally Nuclear Medicine has shown that it may advance drug development by visualizing its biodistribution and site of action. On the other hand some drugs like somatostatin analogues have been reinvented as diagnostic and therapeutic probes over a decade after their initial introduction as therapeutics. Molecular Imaging and targeted therapy are merging and potentiate their individual strength. Nuclear Medicine has ample experience in applying Molecular Imaging in clinical research and practice and has a bright future in this exciting field.

  20. Regional Lymphotropic Therapy in Combination with Low Level Laser Therapy for Treating Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Dogorova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the growing incidence of Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB in newly identified patients, novel multimodality treatment methods are needed, aimed at reducing the time to sputum conversion and cavity healing, which would be applicable in MDR cases. Our experimental treatment consisted of the following: 1 chemotherapy based on the drug sensitivity profile, 2 local laser irradiation therapy for 25 days, and lymphotropic administration of isoniazid (to subcutaneous tissue in alternating locations: underarm area; fifth intercostal space along the sterna border; subclavian area where the first rib meets the sternum in a daily dose of 10mg/kg 5 times a week. This treatment was significantly more effective in newly detected destructive MDR-TB versus the standard Category IV regimen for MDR-TB in terms of reduced time for sputum culture conversion and cavity healing, estimated to be 6 months after initiation of treatment.

  1. Decreased tacrolimus plasma concentrations during HCV therapy: a drug-drug interaction or is there an alternative explanation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, E J; Pape, S; de Kanter, C T M M; van den Berg, A P; Drenth, J P H; Burger, D M

    2017-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause severe liver cirrhosis, for which liver transplantation is the only therapy. To prevent organ rejection, transplanted patients are treated with immunosuppressive agents. We describe two transplanted patients treated with tacrolimus who were simultaneously treated with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for their chronic HCV infection. No pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) were expected between tacrolimus and the selected DAAs. However, in both patients, tacrolimus plasma concentrations decreased during HCV treatment. We hypothesise that decreased plasma concentrations were not caused by a DDI but were an indirect result of the clearance of the HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, pro-inflammatory cytokines may inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which are primarily responsible for tacrolimus metabolism. If this is true, then with clearance of the virus the activity of these enzymes will normalise and tacrolimus metabolism will increase. These changes were clinically relevant because the tacrolimus dosage needed to be adjusted. Therefore, physicians should be aware that CYP substrates with narrow therapeutic ranges might require dose adaption during HCV therapy with DAAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Mono- and combination drug therapies in hospitalized patients with bipolar depression. Data from the European drug surveillance program AMSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeberle Anne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the pharmacological treatment of bipolar depression several guidelines exist. It is largely unknown, to what extent the prescriptions in daily clinical routine correspond to these evidence based recommendations and which combinations of psychotropic drugs are frequently used. Methods The prescriptions of psychotropic drugs were investigated of all in-patients with bipolar depression (n = 2246; time period 1994–2009 from hospitals participating in the drug surveillance program AMSP. For the drug use in 2010, 221 cases were analysed additionally. Results From 1994 to 2009, 85% of all patients received more than one class of psychotropic substances: 74% received antidepressants in combination therapy, 55% antipsychotics, 48% anticonvulsants and 33% lithium. When given in combination, lithium is the most often prescribed substance for bipolar depression (33%, followed by valproic acid (23%, mirtazapine and venlafaxine (16% each, quetiapine (15%, lamotrigine (14% and olanzapine (13%. Both, lithium and valproic acid are often combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, but also with mirtazapine und venlafaxine. Combinations of more than one antidepressant occur quite often, whereby combinations with bupropion, paroxetine, fluoxetine or fluvoxamine are very rare. In 2010, quetiapine (alone and combined was the most frequently prescribed drug (39%; aripiprazole was administered in 10%. Conclusion Combinations of antidepressants (SSRI, mirtazapine, venlafaxine with mood stabilizers (lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine and / or atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, olanzapine are common. Of most of those combinations the efficacy has not been studied. The use of aripiprazole and the concomitant use of two or three antidepressants contrast the guidelines.

  3. Drug: D07767 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07767 Drug Cyromazine (USP/INN); Neporex (TN) C6H10N6 166.0967 166.1838 D07767.gif Insecticide [veterinary...]; Antiparasitic [veterinary] Same as: C14147 veterinary medicine CAS: 66215-27-8 Pu

  4. Drug: D02547 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02547 Drug Pamaquine; Plasmoquine [veterinary] (TN) C19H29N3O 315.2311 315.4531 D0...2547.gif Antimalarial [veterinary] veterinary medicine map07025 Quinolines CAS: 491-92-9 PubChem: 17396718 L

  5. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug-drug interactions in intensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2015-09-01

    Evaluate the potential Drug-Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Prospective study (January-December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to "avoid concomitant use" or "suspension of medication", while 306 had as recommendation "continuous and adequate monitoring". The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management.

  6. Possible drug–drug interaction in dogs and cats resulted from alteration in drug metabolism: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Sasaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (in particular at metabolism may result in fatal adverse effects in some cases. This basic information, therefore, is needed for drug therapy even in veterinary medicine, as multidrug therapy is not rare in canines and felines. The aim of this review was focused on possible drug–drug interactions in dogs and cats. The interaction includes enzyme induction by phenobarbital, enzyme inhibition by ketoconazole and fluoroquinolones, and down-regulation of enzymes by dexamethasone. A final conclusion based upon the available literatures and author’s experience is given at the end of the review.

  7. Veterinary Oncology Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2018-03-01

    The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells, be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells, and be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor. Tumor immunology and immunotherapy are among the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields; cancer immunotherapy is now recognized as a pillar of treatment alongside traditional modalities. This article highlights approaches that seem to hold particular promise in human clinical trials and many that have been tested in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. I. An introduction on traditional and drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pasero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of anti-rheumatic therapy are very old and mainly related to the use of traditional, sometimes extravagant, treatments, as a part of folk medicine. Spa therapy has long been used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, as well as, in later times, physical treatments, including electrotherapy. Drug treatment has developed beginning from substances of vegetable origin, such as willow and colchicum extracts. Then it has been spread out through the chemical synthesis of compounds with specific action and therefore more effective, owing to the great development of pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Microsponge based drug delivery system for augmented gastroparesis therapy: Formulation development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyaz Ali M. Osmani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention behind the present work was to develop a microsponge based novel dosage form for sustained delivery of domperidone. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was employed using Eudragit RS-100 with various drug–polymer ratios for the preparation of microsponges. For optimization purposes, several factors which affect microparticles' physical properties were investigated. Characterization techniques followed for the formed microsponges were DSC, FTIR, SEM, XRD and particle size analysis, along with morphology, drug loading and in vitro drug release. It was found that there were no chemical interactions between drugs and polymers used as per DSC and FTIR results. The drug–polymer ratio showed remarkable impact on drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. SEM micrographs revealed that microsponges were spherical in shape with porous surface, and had 104 ± 0.22 µm mean particle size. The microsponges were then loaded in capsules followed by in vitro drug release study; which depicted that microsponges with drug–polymer ratio of 1:2 were more proficient to give extended drug release of 76.38% at the end of 8 h, superior in contrast to conventional marketed formulation Domstal®, which got exhausted incredibly earlier by releasing 82.57% drug at the end of ½ h only. Hence, the developed microsponge based formulation of domperidone would be an expectant, promising substitute to conventional therapy of gastroparesis, emesis and alike gastric ailments.

  10. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  11. Advances in research and development of new drugs for antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Yanhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is one of the major disease burdens worldwide. At present, the antiviral therapy for hepatitis B includes interferons and nucleos(tide analogues. Current therapeutic regimens based on these drugs cannot significantly increase the proportion of patients with functional cure. With a better understanding of HBV replication cycle and specific virus-host cell interactions, this article summarizes and reviews the advances in the research and development of new drugs for HBV with a focus on different action targets during the above processes.

  12. Therapies for inborn errors of metabolism: what has the orphan drug act delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talele, Sonali S; Xu, Kui; Pariser, Anne R; Braun, M Miles; Farag-El-Massah, Sheiren; Phillips, M Ian; Thompson, Barry H; Coté, Timothy R

    2010-07-01

    The 1983 US Orphan Drug Act established a process through which promising therapies are designated as orphan products and, later, with satisfactory safety and efficacy data, receive marketing approval and fiscal incentives. We examined accomplishments in drug development for inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs). Food and Drug Administration data were used to identify orphan product designations and approvals for IEMs, and the trends for the past 26 years were summarized. Individual clinical development times (CDTs) from filing investigational new drug application to marketing approval were determined. We examined 1956 orphan product designations from 1983 through 2008 and found 93 (4.8%) for IEMs. Of those, 24 (25.8%) received marketing approval. This proportion of approval was significantly (P = .036) higher than that for non-IEM orphan products (17%). Among the IEM products, disorders of complex molecules received the most designations and approvals (61 and 11, respectively). Among the subgroups, lysosomal storage diseases received the most designations and approvals (43 and 9, respectively), whereas mitochondrial diseases (other than fatty acid oxidation disorders) received 7 designations with no approvals. We then examined the CDTs for the approved IEM products and found a median of 6.4 years (range: 2.6-25.1 years). Biological products had significantly shorter CDTs than drugs (mean: 4.6 vs 11.0 years; P = .003). For 26 years, the Orphan Drug Act has generated new therapies for IEMs. Why some IEMs have motivated successful drug development and others have not remains enigmatic; yet the needs of IEM patients without treatment are a certainty.

  13. Stimuli responsive drug delivery systems based on nano-graphene for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-10-01

    Nano-graphene as a class of two-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterial has attracted tremendous attentions in various fields in the past decade. Utilizing its unique physical and chemical properties, nano-graphene has also shown great promises in the area of biomedicine, for application in biosensing, imaging and therapy. In particular, with all atoms exposed on its surface, nano-graphene exhibits ultra-high surface area available for efficient binding/loading of various biomolecules of interests, and has been widely used as multifunctional nano-carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this review article, we will summarize the recent advances in the development of nano-graphene as stimuli-responsive nano-carriers for drug delivery, as well as the applications of these smart systems for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. APPLICABILITY OF THE NON STEROID ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS IN FEVER THERAPY OF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Mubarakshina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are widely applied in the pediatric practices for the fever therapy among children. While choosing the medications from this group to prescribe them to the children, it is essential to get guided towards the highly efficient medications with the least risk of the side effects. Only Paracetamol and ibuprofen are fully compliant with this requirement. They are officially recommended by who as the anti febrile medications for use in pediatrics. In the given article, the author reviews the advantages of ibuprofen over to Paracetamol based on the data from the foreign randomized research. She pays certain attention to the safety issues during the ibuprofen based treatment and to the opportunities of the combined Paracetamol and ibuprofen based therapy.Key words: fever, treatment, non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, children.

  15. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillai, Kiruthikah; Ross, Paul; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing cause of cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease offering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensive genomic mapping has improved understanding of the genetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), this knowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The last few years have seen the failure of several first and second line phase III clinical trials of novel molecularly targeted therapies, warranting a change in the way new therapies are investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for these failures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trial design and a lack of biomarkers. This review discusses the current crisis in HCC drug development and how we should learn from recent trial failures to develop a more effective personalised treatment paradigm for patients with HCC. PMID:26909132

  16. The impact of epigenomics on future drug design and new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christopher A; Costa, Fabricio F

    2011-07-01

    The future of drug design and the development of new therapeutics will rely on our ability to unravel the complexities of the epigenome in normal and disease states. Proper epigenetic regulation is essential for normal differentiation in embryogenesis and development. Conversely, abnormal epigenetic regulation is a feature of complex diseases, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other pathologies. Epigenetic therapies hold promise for a wide range of biological applications, from cancer treatment to the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells. The creation of more specific and effective epigenetic therapies, however, requires a more complete understanding of epigenomic landscapes. Here, we give a historical overview of the epigenomics field and how epigenetic modifications can affect embryo development and disease etiology. We also discuss the impact of current and future epigenetic drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune regulation of therapy-resistant niches: emerging targets for improving anticancer drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-09-01

    Emerging evidence has unveiled a critical role for immunological parameters in predicting tumor prognosis and clinical responses to anticancer therapeutics. On the other hand, responsiveness to anticancer drugs greatly modifies the repertoires, phenotypes, and immunogenicity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, serving as a critical factor to regulate tumorigenic activities and the emergence of therapy-resistant phenotypes. Tumor-associated immune functions are influenced by distinct or overlapping sets of therapeutic modalities, such as cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or molecular-targeted therapy, and various anticancer modalities have unique properties to influence the mode of cross-talk between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Thus, it is critical to understand precise molecular machineries whereby each anticancer strategy has a distinct or overlapping role in regulating the dynamism of reciprocal communication between tumor and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Such an understanding will open new therapeutic opportunities by harnessing the immune system to overcome resistance to conventional anticancer drugs.

  18. Update zum Therapeutic Drug Monitoring und zu pharmakogenetischen Untersuchungen zur Optimierung der Therapie mit Psychopharmaka

    OpenAIRE

    Rentsch, Katharina M.

    2017-01-01

    Das Therapeutic Drug Monitoring von Psychopharmaka wird in zahlreichen Laboratorien immer häufiger durchgeführt, ebenso wie pharmakogenetische Untersuchungen. In diesem Übersichtsartikel wurde die dazugehörige Literatur aus den Jahren 2011 und 2012 zusammengefasst. Die Guidelines der AGNP enthalten alle wichtigen Informationen, die notwendig sind, um Konzentrationen von Psychopharmaka richtig zu interpretieren. Die Bestimmung von Serotonin im Urin könnte ein Marker zur Beurteilung des Therapi...

  19. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  20. Surgical Lasers In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, H. C.

    1987-03-01

    Veterinary medicine is a latecomer in benefiting from the advent of surgical lasers. It is ironic that although most of the basic work in lasers is carried out in animal species with which we are most conversant, veterinary medicine as a profession has not been very extensively involved.