WorldWideScience

Sample records for veterans service medal

  1. 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper features the winners of this year's National Medals for Museum and Library Service, the nation's highest honor for libraries and museums. The award celebrates libraries and museums that make a difference for individuals, families, and communities. Medal winners are selected from nationwide nominations for institutions that demonstrate…

  2. VeteranOtherInformationService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This service is used to create, read, delete and update additional information captured during the EVSS Disability Compensation interview in an effort to align with...

  3. 38 CFR 21.272 - Veteran-student services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veteran-student services.... Chapter 31 Monetary Assistance Services § 21.272 Veteran-student services. (a) Eligibility. Veterans who.... Veteran-student services may be utilized in connection with: (1) VA outreach service program as carried...

  4. Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: DoD Service Awards - Campaign, Expeditionary, and Service Medals. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    81 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...United States Code (at) Executive Order 13154, “Establishing the Kosovo Campaign Medal,” May 3, 2000 (au) Executive Order 12830 , “Establishing the...OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL (MOVSM) a. Introduction (1) The MOVSM was established by E.O. 12830 (Reference (au)). The MOVSM is

  5. 75 FR 24514 - Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... eligible homeless veterans, such as the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) Program, the Grant and Per... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 62 RIN 2900-AN53 Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program AGENCY: Department... concerning the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program (SSVF Program) of the Department of Veterans...

  6. Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human ServicesService Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA and Medicare Fee-For-Service, 1999-2004 According to findings in Service Utilization of Veterans Dually...

  7. Barriers to Psychosocial Services among Homeless Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAMILTON, ALISON B.; POZA, INES; HINES, VIVIAN; WASHINGTON, DONNA L.

    2015-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, CA, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women described three primary, proximal (current) barriers: lack of information about services, limited access to services, and lack of coordination across services. Compared to non-veteran homeless women, women veterans potentially face additional challenges of trauma exposure during military service, post-military readjustment issues, and few services specific to women veterans. Understanding their service needs and experiences is critical to the development of relevant and appropriate services that move homeless women veterans away from vulnerability, into safety. PMID:26617471

  8. Barriers to Psychosocial Services among Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Poza, Ines; Hines, Vivian; Washington, Donna L

    2012-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, CA, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women described three primary, proximal (current) barriers: lack of information about services, limited access to services, and lack of coordination across services. Compared to non-veteran homeless women, women veterans potentially face additional challenges of trauma exposure during military service, post-military readjustment issues, and few services specific to women veterans. Understanding their service needs and experiences is critical to the development of relevant and appropriate services that move homeless women veterans away from vulnerability, into safety.

  9. Barriers to Psychosocial Services among Homeless Women Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    HAMILTON, ALISON B.; POZA, INES; HINES, VIVIAN; WASHINGTON, DONNA L.

    2012-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, CA, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women described three primary, proximal (current) barriers: lack of information about services, limited access to se...

  10. Veterans Integrated Services Networks (VISN), Markets, Submarkets, Sectors and Counties by Geographic Location

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides healthcare services to its veterans across the USA including territories and possessions. Healthcare services are...

  11. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  12. Colleges' Experiences: Integrating Support Services for Military Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Klempin, Serena

    2017-01-01

    To improve the educational experiences and outcomes of student veterans, the Kisco Foundation developed the Kohlberg Prize in 2015. Two cohorts of colleges were awarded competitive grants to enhance their veterans services. This piece examines the process of creating integrated services for student veterans through the institutionalization of…

  13. 75 FR 68975 - Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ..., National Center for Homelessness Among Veterans, Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program Office... services pursuant to payments from the grantee be State-licensed because ``home run daycare and other... some jurisdictions, may include home run daycares. The commenter also requested that VA consider...

  14. Effectiveness of Service Dogs for Veterans with PTSD: Preliminary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Belleville, Geneviève; Gagnon, Dany H; Dumont, Frédéric; Auger, Edouard; Lavoie, Vicky; Besemann, Markus; Champagne, Noël; Lessart, Geneviève

    2017-01-01

    Limited scientific evidence on the effectiveness of psychiatric service dogs used by Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is available. This study investigated their short-term effectiveness among 15 Canadian veterans who received a first psychiatric service dog. Preliminary results suggest potential beneficial effects at 3 months on the psychiatric symptoms.

  15. Employing Our Veterans. Part 2. Service Member Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    one common website that will consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service...consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service providers should be used to enhance the

  16. Use of Veterans Affairs and Medicaid Services for Dually Enrolled Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Vanneman, Megan E; Dally, Sharon K; Trivedi, Amal N; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2017-06-13

    To examine how dual coverage for nonelderly, low-income veterans by Veterans Affairs (VA) and Medicaid affects their demand for care. Veterans Affairs utilization data and Medicaid Analytic Extract Files. A retrospective, longitudinal study of VA users prior to and following enrollment in Medicaid 2006-2010. Veterans Affairs reliance, or proportion of care provided by VA, was estimated with beta-binomial models, adjusting for patient and state Medicaid program factors. In a cohort of 19,890 nonelderly veterans, VA utilization levels were similar before and after enrolling in Medicaid. VA outpatient reliance was 0.65, and VA inpatient reliance was 0.53 after Medicaid enrollment. Factors significantly associated with greater VA reliance included sociodemographic factors, having a service-connected disability, comorbidity, and higher state Medicaid reimbursement. Factors significantly associated with less VA reliance included months enrolled in Medicaid, managed care enrollment, Medicaid eligibility type, longer drive time to VA care, greater Medicaid eligibility generosity, and better Medicaid quality. Veterans Affairs utilization following new Medicaid enrollment remained relatively unchanged, and the VA continued to provide the large majority of care for dually enrolled veterans. There was variation among patients as Medicaid eligibility and other program factors influenced their use of Medicaid services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. 38 CFR 21.155 - Services to a veteran's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C... furnished to family members under these provisions. (c) Providing services to a veteran's family. VR&E Staff...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to be...

  19. Factors Affecting Post-Service Wage Growth for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    block number) FIELD GROUP SUBGROUP National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY I, veterans, local unemployment 19. ABSTRACT (continue on reverse if...ings in these two years was the local unemployment rate. It was also discovered that the determinants of earnings in 1982 differed significantly...analyzes factors affecting the post-service -arnings and wage growth of veterans. The 1979-1987 National Longitudi-’nal Survey of Youth was tlbe

  20. Migration by Veterans Who Received Homeless Services From the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metraux, Stephen; Treglia, Dan; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    We examined migration patterns among 113,400 homeless veterans, focusing on the prevalence and the basic geographic patterns of this migration. Data were for all veterans who initiated use of Veterans Affairs homeless services in 2011 or 2012; and we followed them using Veterans Affairs administrative records for up to 2 years following this initial contact. Results showed that 15.3% of the veterans migrated across regions while homeless. Those who were homeless for longer periods were more likely to migrate, and migration, were it to occur, was most likely earlier on in veterans' homelessness episodes. There were no clear geographic correlates that explained the dynamics of this migration as, overall, in-migration tended to roughly balance out-migration in a region. These findings suggest that concerns about the extent of migration and its impact on localities are exaggerated, but also sets forth an agenda for more in-depth study of these data to gain a deeper and more expansive understanding of this phenomenon. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Gender and the use of Veterans Health Administration homeless services programs among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstock, Oni J; Haskell, Sally G; Brandt, Cynthia A; Desai, Rani A

    2012-04-01

    Female Veterans comprise 12% of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans, the largest proportion of women to serve of any prior cohort. We sought to determine the sex-specific risk of using a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) homeless program among OEF/OIF Veterans and to identify factors associated with increased risk of program use for women compared with men. We included OEF/OIF Veterans with at least 1 VHA clinical visit between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2009. The study's outcome was the time to first use of a VHA homeless program. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the relative risk of using a homeless program by sex, adjusting for relevant sociodemographic and clinical variables. Exploratory analyses examined interactions between sex and all covariates. Of 445,319 Veterans, 7431 (1.7%) used a VHA homeless program, of which 961 were females (1.8%), and 6470 were males (1.7%) during a median follow-up period of 3.20 years. Women were as likely as men to use a homeless program (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.09); median time to first use was similar for female and male Veterans (1.88 vs. 1.88 y, respectively, P=0.53). In exploratory analyses, we found increased risk of program use for women compared with men for the following subgroups: ages 26-35 years, 100% service-connected disability rating, posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and northeast location. Overall, there was no substantial difference in the sex-specific risk of using a VHA homeless program. In light of this finding, VHA homeless programs must be prepared to recognize and address the unique needs of female OEF/OIF Veterans.

  2. Assessment of Service Members Knowledge and Trust of the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom VA Department of Veterans Affairs VA OIG Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General VBA Veterans Benefits...reorganization into the three administrations: Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) and National Cemetery...features. VBA also implemented a similar program in coordination with DoD called eBenefits which allows Veterans, Service Members and their families to

  3. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. 38 CFR 3.453 - Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay. 3.453 Section 3.453 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation...

  5. Veteran Parents in Child Protective Services: Theory and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Wendy J.; Affronti, Melissa L.; Coombes, Margaret L.

    2009-01-01

    "Veteran parents" (VPs), or parents who have experienced challenges concerning their children's health and then mentor other families through similar situations, are widely used for parent support. This model has been adopted by Child Protective Services (CPS) to increase parent engagement. Here, we expand the theoretical discussion of VPs in CPS…

  6. Identifying US veterans who access services from health care for the homeless clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf-Amelung, Sarah M; Jenkins, Darlene M

    2013-12-01

    Research on veterans experiencing homelessness is predominantly focused on the US Department of Veterans Affairs setting, despite the fact that substantial numbers receive services from Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) clinics. We explored how HCH clinics identified veteran patients through a survey of administrators (49% response rate). The majority (98%) identified veterans but used varied language and approaches. Implementing a streamlined, culturally competent identification process is vital to collecting accurate data, connecting veterans with benefits, and informing treatment plans.

  7. Veterans' Mental Health in Higher Education Settings: Services and Clinician Education Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Noosha; Bennett, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Utilization of the GI Bill and attendance at higher education institutions among student veterans have significantly increased since passage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Campus counseling centers should be prepared to meet the mental health needs of student veterans. This study identified the mental health resources and services that colleges provide student veterans and the education needs of clinical staff on how to serve student veterans. Directors of mental health services from 80 California colleges completed a semistructured phone interview. Few schools track the number, demographic characteristics, or presenting needs of student veterans who utilize campus mental health services or offer priority access or special mental health services for veterans. Directors wanted centers to receive education for an average of 5.8 veteran-related mental health topics and preferred workshops and lectures to handouts and online training. Significant training needs exist among clinical staff of campus mental health services to meet the needs of student veterans.

  8. 38 CFR 21.6519 - Eligibility of qualified veterans for employment and counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... veterans for employment and counseling services. 21.6519 Section 21.6519 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... employment and counseling services. (a) General. A qualified veteran for whom vocational rehabilitation and achievenment of a vocational goal are reasonably feasible may be provided the employment and counseling...

  9. 38 CFR 21.6420 - Coordination with the Veterans Service Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational... Coordination with the Veterans Service Center. It is the responsibility of the VR&E Division to inform the...

  10. Availability of gynecologic services in the department of veterans affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Michelle D; Yano, Elizabeth M; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Lanto, Andy B; Washington, Donna L

    2008-01-01

    The optimum approach to providing the Congressionally mandated gender-specific services for which women veterans are eligible is unknown. We evaluated onsite availability of gynecologic services, clinic type and staffing arrangements, and the impact of having a gynecology clinic (GYN) and/or an obstetrician gynecologist (OBGYN) routinely available. We analyzed data from the 2001 national VHA Survey of Women Veterans Health Programs and Practices (n = 136 sites; response rate, 83%). We assessed availability of gynecologic services, and evaluated differences in availability by clinic type (designated women's health provider in primary care [PC], separate women's health clinic for primary care [WHC], and/or separate GYN) and staffing arrangements (OBGYN routinely involved versus not). Out of 133 sites, 77 sites (58%) offered services through a GYN and 56 sites (42%) did not have GYN. Seventy-two (54%) sites had a WHC. More sites with an OBGYN provided endometrial biopsies (91% vs. 20%), IUD insertion (85% vs. 14%), infertility evaluation (56% vs. 23%), infertility treatment (25% vs. none), gynecologic surgery (65 vs. 28%), p gynecologic surgery 2.3 (1.0-5.4). As the VA develops strategic plans for accommodating the growing number of women veterans, leaders should consider focusing on establishing WHC for primary care and routine availability of OBGYN or other qualified clinicians, rather than establishing separate GYN.

  11. Long-Term Care Services for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-14

    palliative care ,  adult day health care ,  homemaker/home health aide care ,  respite care , Long-Term Care Services for...8111A; §1785. 2 The VHA also provides dementia care ; transitional care ; health care workforce development; Geriatric Research Education, and...text (bold) = both VA and purchased community care . In addition, the VHA provides dementia care ; transitional care ; health care

  12. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0811 TITLE: Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Members and Veterans with SCI PRINCIPAL...criteria to include all veterans as well as civilians. 8 Products DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PAPER Long-term community reintegration ...2014 Presentation on rehabilitation outcomes and community reintegration experiences of servicemembers and veterans with extremity amputation or

  13. Services utilization among recently homeless veterans: a gender-based comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Byrne, Thomas H

    2014-03-01

    As women emerge as a significant segment of the Veteran population, there is a need to understand how they enter the homeless system, the impact of homelessness on healthcare, and how this varies by gender. This study provides a gender-based comparison of Veterans' utilization of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health and behavioral health services following the onset of a homeless episode and assesses the relationship between services utilization and Veterans' entry into the homeless system. Male and female veterans were equally as likely to use mainstream and VA homeless services. There were few differences between genders in inpatient services use following a homeless episode. Men used more substance abuse outpatient treatment and emergency services whereas women used outpatient medical treatment. Veterans who sought non-VA homeless services were less likely to use outpatient services but more likely to access emergency services. Veterans experiencing homelessness who do not use VA homeless assistance services are less engaged with preventative VA health and behavioral healthcare. Veterans who are homeless but not identified as such by VA, particularly women, need additional engagement. Ongoing study of gender-based differences in services utilization among homeless and at-risk Veterans is needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Growing Use of Mental and General Health Care Services Among Older Veterans With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechers, Ilse R; Karel, Michele J; Hoff, Rani; Karlin, Bradley E

    2015-11-01

    National data from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic medical records were used to examine rates of mental illness and service use among older veterans since mental health care transformation efforts were implemented in 2005. Data were extracted from VHA electronic medical records for each fiscal year from 2005 through 2013 for veterans ages 65 and older. Among those receiving any health care services, the number and proportion treated for a confirmed mental illness and the utilization of non-mental health care services were identified. In 2013, 2.6 million older veterans utilized services in VHA, 14% of whom had a confirmed mental illness, which was a 57% increase from 2005. Older veterans with confirmed mental illness accounted for a sizable and growing proportion of non-mental health service utilization. Preparing the workforce to address the mental health needs of older veterans and nonveterans is essential.

  15. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  16. State Policies on Service Dogs for Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James B

    2015-12-01

    U.S. service members returning home from combat often face physical, mental and emotional challenges. Providing service dogs to these veterans is one method being used successfully to help address the difficulties they face. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a service animal is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability." The work the dog undertakes must be directly related to the person's disability. Examples include guiding people who are blind, pulling a wheelchair, alerting a person with hearing loss, protecting a person having a seizure, and calming someone with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack or psychiatric episode.

  17. Nicotine Dependence and Its Risk Factors Among Users of Veterans Health Services, 2008-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Jack; Edens, Ellen L.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States and is disproportionately higher among veterans than nonveterans. We examined the prevalence of nicotine dependence and its associated risk factors among veterans who used health services in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system. Methods Using a case-control design, we compared all VA health service users in fiscal year 2008-2009 (N = 5,031,381) who received a nicotine dependence diagnosis with...

  18. 77 FR 70210 - Agency Information Collection (VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-owned Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-owned Small....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-owned Small Business and... from subcontractors to compare information obtained from subcontracting plans submitted by prime...

  19. Student service members/veterans on campus: Challenges for reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Yurasek, Ali; Miller, Mary Beth; Murphy, James G; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Martens, Matthew P; Darcy, Monica G; Carey, Kate B

    2017-01-01

    Many returning OIF/OEF/OND Veterans are seeking higher education in an effort to develop a meaningful career and financial stability. Evidence suggests that student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are experiencing less academic success than other students. The purpose of this review is to identify the unique challenges of SSM/Vs and evaluate current campus efforts to facilitate their retention and academic performance. With a focus on SSM/Vs attending colleges and universities, we obtained 57 peer-reviewed and 73 gray literature records published between 2001 and 2015. The current SSM/V literature contains an abundance of gray literature, and the empirical research tends to be limited by cross-sectional design and small sample sizes. SSM/Vs encounter significant personal and environmental challenges when transitioning from the military to college campuses. A variety of services have been developed to address the needs of the SSM/V population, but the efficacy of these services remains largely unknown. In conclusion, there is a clear need to provide education to faculty, students, and staff regarding the experiences of SSM/Vs. Efforts to enhance screening for, availability of, and SSM/V engagement in mental health services would also be beneficial, as would improved availability of and SSM/V access to academic support. All future programs designed to address the unique challenges of SSM/Vs in the academic environment should also be systematically implemented and evaluated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Differences in cause of death of Washington State veterans who did and did not use Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Boyko, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the cause of death in the veteran population, although more is known about the cause of death in Vietnam veterans or veterans receiving mental health services. This article compares characteristics and causes of death in Washington State veterans who did and did not use Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare services in the 5 years prior to death. This study included 62,080 veterans who died between 1998 and 2002, of whom 21% were users of VA healthcare services. The veterans who used VA healthcare services were younger, more often men, less educated, more often divorced, and more often smokers than the veterans who did not use VA healthcare services. Both female and male veterans who used VA healthcare services were more likely to die from drug- and/or alcohol-related causes. These findings suggest that the VA patient population is socially disadvantaged and more severely affected by substance-use disorders compared with veterans who do not use VA healthcare services.

  1. An Exploratory Study of Student Service Members/Veterans' Mental Health Characteristics by Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelts, Michael D; Albright, David L

    2015-01-01

    Explore the mental health differences of student veterans by sexual orientation. Student service members/veterans (N = 702) from the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment. Descriptive statistics and 2-sample proportion and mean tests were used to compare mental health characteristics. Student veterans who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or unsure had higher levels of mental health symptoms and treatment. Results suggest a need for continued examination of student service members/veterans as related to disparities in mental health by sexual orientation.

  2. The Earnings of Veterans: Effects of Military Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hirsch & Mehay, 2003, p. 681). Then, the authors use a logit model that predicts the selection sample are likely veterans serving on active duty using...veteran data, veteran regression model 17. SECURITY 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF CLASSIFICATION OF TffiS REPORT PAGE Unclassified Unclassified NSN...3 B. RESEARCH MODELS

  3. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War II...

  4. 13 CFR 125.8 - What definitions are important in the Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned (SDVO) Small Business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... undertake responsibility for managing the well-being of the service-disabled veteran with a permanent and... by one or more service-disabled veterans; (2) The management and daily business operations of which... the Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned (SDVO) Small Business Concern (SBC) Program? 125.8 Section 125.8...

  5. VA Health Service Utilization for Homeless and Low-income Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Gelberg, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Background The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program—the VA’s Housing First effort—is central to efforts to end Veteran homelessness. Yet, little is known about health care utilization patterns associated with achieving HUD-VASH housing. Objectives We compare health service utilization at the VA Greater Los Angeles among: (1) formerly homeless Veterans housed through HUD-VASH (HUD-VASH Veterans); (2) currently homeless Veterans; (3) housed, low-income Veterans not in HUD-VASH; and (4) housed, not low-income Veterans. Research Design We performed a secondary database analysis of Veterans (n = 62,459) who received VA Greater Los Angeles care between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. We described medical/surgical and mental health utilization [inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department (ED)]. We controlled for demographics, need, and primary care use in regression analyses of utilization data by housing and income status. Results HUD-VASH Veterans had more inpatient, outpatient, and ED use than currently homeless Veterans. Adjusting for demographics and need, HUD-VASH Veterans and the low-income housed Veterans had similar likelihoods of medical/surgical inpatient and outpatient utilization, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Adjusting first for demographics and need (model 1), then also for primary care use (model 2), HUD-VASH Veterans had the greatest decrease in incident rates of specialty medical/surgical, mental health, and ED care from models 1 to 2, becoming similar to the currently homeless, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that currently homeless Veterans underuse health care relative to housed Veterans. HUD-VASH may address this disparity by providing housing and linkages to primary care. PMID:24714583

  6. 78 FR 59861 - VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and Veteran-Owned Small Business Status...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... VOSBs to increase their Federal contracting and subcontracting. VA solicited comments on an interim... bears the risk that the delivery method chosen will not result in timely receipt by the Executive... and disruption of services for the benefit of veterans or a construction project may be so extensive...

  7. American Military Veteran Entrepreneurs: A Comprehensive Profile of Demographic, Service History, and Psychosocial Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; Freeman, Michael A.; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Pietrzak, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    American military veterans are nearly twice as likely to be self-employed compared to non-veterans, and are majority owners in nine percent of all businesses nationwide. Despite their contribution to the broader economy and the potential for training programs to cultivate and foster successful self-employment and veteran-lead entrepreneurial ventures, research on veteran entrepreneurs remains limited. In order to gain a better understanding of the potential strengths and vulnerabilities of veteran entrepreneurs, the current study utilized data from a large, nationally representative sample to profile self-employed veterans (n=230) and compare them to veterans who work as employees (n=1,055) with respect to demographic, military service history, and psychosocial characteristics. Results indicated that self-employed veterans were older and more educated and more likely to utilize VA healthcare. Self-employed veterans were more likely to serve in Vietnam and to serve in the military for fewer years. No differences were noted in perceived military experience, level of combat exposure, or military branch served as a function of self-employment. Although reporting more lifetime traumas, self-employed veterans did not experience higher rates of current or lifetime psychopathology or lower perceived quality of life. Potential protective resilience-promoting factors may be associated with the higher levels of openness, extraversion, optimism, achievement-orientation (purpose in life), and greater need for autonomy and professional development observed among self-employed veterans. Moreover, self-employed veterans demonstrated higher levels of gratitude, community integration, and altruistic service to others. Findings have potential to inform human resources management strategies and vocational training and reintegration initiatives for veterans. PMID:29290645

  8. An Observational Study of Service Dogs for Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Owen-Smith, Ashli A; Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Micah T; Perrin, Nancy A; Green, Carla A

    2017-07-01

    This study examined needs related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), assistance by service dogs, and feasibility of data collection among veterans receiving service dogs. Questionnaires assessed PTSD-related needs and services performed or expected to be performed by service dogs among 78 veterans who had or were on a wait list for a service dog (average age, 42; women, 31%). Analyses compared pre-post characteristics among 22 veterans who received a service dog as part of the study (91% follow-up; average follow-up=3.37±2.57 months). Veterans reported that the most important services performed were licking or nudging veterans to help them "stay present," preventing panic, and putting space between veterans and strangers. High follow-up rates and improvements in outcomes with moderate to large effect sizes among recipients of study-provided dogs suggest further study is warranted. Service dogs may be feasible supports for veterans with PTSD; randomized clinical trials are needed to assess effectiveness.

  9. Homelessness among a nationally representative sample of US veterans: prevalence, service utilization, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Link, Bruce; Rosenheck, Robert A; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    To examine the prevalence of lifetime homelessness among veterans and use of Veterans Affairs (VA) homeless services, as well as their association with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. A nationally representative sample of 1533 US veterans was surveyed July-August 2015. Among all veterans, 8.5 % reported any lifetime homelessness in their adult life, but only 17.2 % of those reported using VA homeless services. Prevalence of homelessness and VA homeless service use did not significantly differ by gender. Being low income, aged 35-44, and having poor mental and physical health were each independently associated with lifetime homelessness. Veterans who were White or lived in rural areas were significantly less likely to have used VA homeless services. Homelessness remains a substantial problem across different generations of veterans. The low reported uptake of VA homeless services suggests there are barriers to care in this population, especially for veterans who live in rural areas. Governmental resources dedicated to veteran homelessness should be supported, and obtaining accurate prevalence estimates are important to tracking progress over time.

  10. 77 FR 38395 - Agency Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as... of Veterans Affairs, will submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of... information collection and its expected cost and burden; it includes the actual data collection instrument...

  11. 77 FR 56709 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-Owned...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Information Collection (VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business and Veteran... needed to collect information from subcontractors to compare information obtained from subcontracting... collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VA Subcontracting Report...

  12. Qualitative Student Responses to Service Learning with Veterans who are Homeless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay A. Phillips

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a description of a service learning activity in which students assisted veterans who are homeless. The article outlines how the event was organized, provides resources for implementation, discusses student response using evaluations from 15 students, and discusses considerations made in organizing such an event. KEYWORDSService Learning, Qualitative Evaluation, Homeless Veterans

  13. Nicotine dependence and its risk factors among users of veterans health services, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Edens, Ellen L; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States and is disproportionately higher among veterans than nonveterans. We examined the prevalence of nicotine dependence and its associated risk factors among veterans who used health services in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system. Using a case-control design, we compared all VA health service users in fiscal year 2008-2009 (N = 5,031,381) who received a nicotine dependence diagnosis with those who did not. Independent risk and protective factors associated with receiving a nicotine dependence diagnosis were identified using logistic regression analysis. We conducted subgroup analyses on 2 groups of particular policy concern: homeless veterans and veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Among all recent VA health service users, 15% (n = 749,353) received a diagnosis of nicotine dependence. Substance abuse, other mental health diagnoses, and homelessness were identified as major risk factors. Veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan were not found to be at increased risk compared to veterans from other war eras. Major risk and protective factors within the subgroups of homeless veterans and veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan were broadly similar to those in the general VA population. Given that other studies have found higher rates of nicotine dependence among veterans, this risk behavior may be underdiagnosed in VA medical records. Veterans who are homeless or have mental health or substance abuse problems are at highest risk and should be targeted for smoking prevention and cessation interventions. These results support, in principle, efforts to integrate smoking cessation programs with mental health and homeless services.

  14. The mental health of partners of Australian Vietnam veterans three decades after the war and its relation to veteran military service, combat, and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Brian I; Outram, Sue; Catts, Stanley V; Pierse, Katherine R

    2010-11-01

    This study assessed psychiatric diagnoses in female partners of Australian Vietnam veterans, compared these with national Australian population statistics, and assessed their relationship with veterans' military service and mental health. Independent assessments of 240 veteran-partner couples used standardized physical and psychiatric diagnostic interviews that permitted comparison with Australian population data. Multivariate regression modeling examined associations of veterans' war service, combat, and psychiatric status with women's mental health. Anxiety disorders and severe recurrent depression were among 11 of 17 psychiatric diagnoses that were significantly in excess of population expectations. Veterans' combat and post-traumatic stress disorder were significant predictors of women's depressive disorder, particularly severe depression. We conclude that veterans' war service and mental health sequelae including post-traumatic stress disorder are associated with higher rates of mental disorder in their female partners 3 decades after the war.

  15. Motor neurone disease and military service: evidence from the Scottish Veterans Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Beverly P; Mackay, Daniel F; Pell, Jill P

    2015-12-01

    In 2003, it was reported that motor neurone disease was linked to military service in the 1990-1991 Gulf War. A large study in the US confirmed an association with military service but found no association with specific conflicts or length of service. Non-veteran studies have suggested an association with physical activity, smoking and other risk factors. We used data from the Scottish Veterans Health Study to investigate the association between motor neurone disease and military service in UK veterans. Retrospective cohort study of 57,000 veterans born 1945-1985, and 173,000 demographically matched civilians, using Cox proportional hazard models to compare the risk of motor neurone disease overall, and by sex, birth cohort, length of service and year of recruitment. We had no data on smoking prevalence. Veterans had an increased risk of motor neurone disease compared with non-veterans (adjusted HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.21, p=0.046). The increase was independent of birth cohort, length or period of service, or year of recruitment. Risk was associated with a history of trauma or road traffic accident in veterans and non-veterans. We confirmed an increased risk of motor neurone disease in military veterans, although the absolute risk is extremely low. We found no evidence that the increased risk was associated with any specific conflict. We could not rule out that smoking (and perhaps other lifestyle factors) may be responsible for our findings. Trauma may play a role in the increased risk but further studies are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Using a service sector segmented approach to identify community stakeholders who can improve access to suicide prevention services for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, Monica M; Gardiner, Giovanina; Ziegemeier, Ellen; Buxton, Miranda

    2014-04-01

    Veterans in need of social services may access many different community agencies within the public and private sectors. Each of these settings has the potential to be a pipeline for attaining needed health, mental health, and benefits services; however, many service providers lack information on how to conceptualize where Veterans go for services within their local community. This article describes a conceptual framework for outreach that uses a service sector segmented approach. This framework was developed to aid recruitment of a provider-based sample of stakeholders (N = 70) for a study on improving access to the Department of Veterans Affairs and community-based suicide prevention services. Results indicate that although there are statistically significant differences in the percent of Veterans served by the different service sectors (F(9, 55) = 2.71, p = 0.04), exposure to suicidal Veterans and providers' referral behavior is consistent across the sectors. Challenges to using this framework include isolating the appropriate sectors for targeted outreach efforts. The service sector segmented approach holds promise for identifying and referring at-risk Veterans in need of services. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. Supporting Our Troops: Library Services and Support for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMire, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Veterans are a unique population that can be found in libraries across the United States. Libraries of all types are developing new approaches to the veterans in their patron populations in the wake of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This study identifies several common strategies that libraries, especially public and academic libraries, are…

  18. PTSD and Use of Outpatient General Medical Services Among Veterans of the Vietnam War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlenger, William E; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Williams, Christianna S; Kulka, Richard A; Corry, Nida H; Mauch, Danna; Nagler, Caryn F; Ho, Chia-Lin; Marmar, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Objective:The primary goal of this analysis was to assess whether recent use of outpatient services for general medical concerns by Vietnam veterans varies according to level of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD...

  19. The Effects of Migration and Training on Post-Service Earnings of All- Volunteer Force Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    with military service. Daymont and Andrisani [Ref. 6] investigated the earnings trajectories of veterans and non-veterans. They used the NLSY to...exceed civilian earnings within two or three years after discharge from the service. Daymont and Andrisani argue that the conditions which generally...on civilian earnings. This result is similar to the previous results obtained by Daymont and Andrisani [Ref. 61, who used the NLSY survey. When

  20. Mental Health and Self-directed Violence Among Student Service Members/Veterans in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R.; Kopacz, Marek S.; McCarten, Janet; Bossarte, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using a sample of student service members/veterans, the current study aimed to examine the prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses and suicide-related outcomes and the association of hazardous duty with mental health. Participants Data are from the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment (n=27,774). Methods Logistic regression was used to examine (1) the association of student service member/veteran status with mental health outcomes and (2) the association of hazardous duty with mental health outcomes among student service members/veterans (n=706). Results Student service members/veterans had higher odds of self-harm than students without military experience. Among student service members/veterans, hazardous duty was positively associated (OR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.30–3.07) with having a psychiatric diagnosis but negatively associated (OR=0.41, 95% CI: 0.20–0.85) with suicidal ideation. Conclusions Self-harm may be a unique phenomenon among service members/veterans. Suicide prevention with this population should include information about self-harm, and future research should explore whether suicidal intent underlies self-harm. PMID:24918517

  1. Sociodemographic Correlates of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Among College Student Service Members/Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Bryan, AnnaBelle O

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to quantify the lifetime, past-year, and past-month incidence rates of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts; frequency of suicide attempts; and suicide attempt methods among college student service members/veterans. Four hundred twenty-two college student service members/veterans completing an online survey from January to October 2013. An anonymous online survey was conducted. Lifetime incidence rates were 33.4% (ideation), 13.7% (plan), and 6.9% (attempt). Past-year incidence rates were 14.7% (ideation), 3.6% (plan), and 0.7% (attempt). Past-month incidence rates were 7.6% (ideation), 1.9% (plan), and 0.5% (attempt). Rates among student service member/veterans were similar to general college student population rates. Native American student service members/veterans report significantly increased rates of ideation, plans, and attempts. Observed rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among student service members/veterans are comparable to general college study rates, but Native American student service members/veterans demonstrate increased risk.

  2. Anders receives Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Anders, Edward

    Edward Anders was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citation and Anders' response are given here.

  3. Multiple Agencies Provide Assistance to Service-disabled Veterans or Entrepreneurs, but Specific Needs Are Difficult to Identify and Coordination Is Weak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... In the Veterans Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-50), Congress stated that too little had been done to help veterans particularly service-disabled veterans, in starting small businesses...

  4. PTSD and Use of Outpatient General Medical Services Among Veterans of the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenger, William E; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Williams, Christianna S; Kulka, Richard A; Corry, Nida H; Mauch, Danna; Nagler, Caryn F; Ho, Chia-Lin; Marmar, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of this analysis was to assess whether recent use of outpatient services for general medical concerns by Vietnam veterans varies according to level of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology over time. Another goal was to determine whether PTSD symptomatology was associated with veterans' reports of discussing behavioral health issues as part of a general medical visit. Self-reported service use data and measures of PTSD were from a nationally representative sample of 848 male and female Vietnam theater veterans (individuals who were deployed to the Vietnam theater of operations) who participated in the National Vietnam Veterans Longitudinal Study, a 25-year follow-up of a cohort of veterans originally interviewed from 1984-1988 as part of the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study. Four categories of PTSD symptomatology course over 25 years were defined, and logistic regression models were used to assess their relationship with recent use of outpatient general medical services. Male and female theater veterans with high or increasing PTSD symptomatology over the period were more likely than those with low symptomatology to report recent VA outpatient visits. Males in the increasing and high categories were also more likely to discuss behavioral health issues at general medical visits. Vietnam veterans with high and increasing PTSD symptomatology over time were likely to use VA outpatient general health services. Attention to stressors of the aging process and to persistence of PTSD symptoms is important for Vietnam veterans, as is addressing PTSD with other psychiatric and medical comorbidities within the context of outpatient general medical care.

  5. Utilization of Mental Health Services by Veterans Living in Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Judith; Ali, Mir M; Lynch, Sean; Mutter, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    There is concern that veterans living in rural areas may not be receiving the mental health (MH) treatment they need. This study uses recent national survey data to examine the utilization of MH treatment among military veterans with a MH condition living in rural areas, providing comparisons with estimates of veterans living in urban areas. Multivariable logistic regression is utilized to examine differences in MH service use by urban/rural residence, controlling for other factors. Rates of utilization of inpatient and outpatient treatment, psychotropic medication, any MH treatment, and perceived unmet need for MH care are examined. There were significant differences in MH treatment utilization among veterans by rural/urban residence. Multivariate estimates indicate that compared to veterans with a MH condition living in urban areas, veterans in rural areas had 70% lower odds of receiving any MH treatment. Veterans with a MH condition in rural areas have approximately 52% and 64% lower odds of receiving outpatient treatment and prescription medications, respectively, compared to those living in urban areas. Differences in perceived unmet need for mental health treatment were not statistically significant. While research indicates that recent efforts to improve MH service delivery have resulted in improved access to services, this study found that veterans' rates of MH treatment are lower in rural areas, compared to urban areas. Continued efforts to support the provision of behavioral health services to rural veterans are needed. Telemedicine, using rural providers to their maximum potential, and engagement with community stakeholder groups are promising approaches. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guide for Caregivers of Service Members and Veterans: Becoming a Family Caregiver for a Service Member/Veteran with TBI. Module 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Liaison 64 Becoming a Family Caregiver for a Service Member/Veteran with TBI PROFESSIONAL - NAME CONTACT INFORMATION Orthopedic Specialist Physical...leave Turn off appliances when you finish using them Take out the garbage (attention, memory problems) 7. Is your front door house key color

  7. Trauma-informed care: a paradigm shift needed for services with homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnen, Stephanie; Kane, Vince; Cook, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to traumatic events is a highly prevalent, although often overlooked, aspect in the lives of homeless veterans. In this study, the prevalence and correlates of potentially traumatic events, including posttraumatic stress disorder, in the homeless veteran population are presented. Presently, there exists a lack of trauma-informed case management services for homeless veterans. Failing to recognize the association between trauma and homelessness may lead to further victimization, exacerbate mental health symptomology, and hinder a provider's ability to effectively intervene on behalf of homeless veterans. Subgroups of homeless veterans such as those who served in the Vietnam and post-Vietnam era, more recent returnees from Iraq and Afghanistan, women, rural-residing veterans, and those who are justice involved, are discussed for unique trauma histories and service needs. Barriers to receiving trauma-informed care among homeless veterans are reviewed. Information to assist providers in assessing trauma histories and current best practices in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder are noted. Suggestions for how this document can be used in varied organizational settings are made.

  8. Challenges associated with screening for traumatic brain injury among US veterans seeking homeless services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Leah M; Devore, Maria D; Barnes, Sean M; Forster, Jeri E; Hostetter, Trisha A; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Casey, Roger; Kane, Vincent; Brenner, Lisa A

    2013-12-01

    We identified the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among homeless veterans and assessed the TBI-4, a screening tool created to identify TBI history. Between May 2010 and October 2011, 800 US veterans from two hospitals, one eastern (n = 122) and one western (n = 678) completed some or all measures. Findings suggested that 47% of veterans seeking homeless services had a probable history of TBI (data for prevalence obtained only at the western hospital). However, psychometric results from the screening measure suggested that this may be an underestimate and supported comprehensive assessment of TBI in this population.

  9. Characteristics and service use of homeless veterans and nonveterans residing in a low-demand emergency shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, James C; Pollio, David E; North, Carol S

    2014-06-01

    This study examined use of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA services and predictors of service use among veterans and nonveterans who resided in a low-demand emergency shelter. Equal numbers (N=110) of veterans and nonveterans recruited between January and June 2008 at a low-demand emergency shelter were interviewed about demographic characteristics, histories of military service and homelessness, general medical and mental functioning, current alcohol and drug problems and substance use, and use of medical, psychiatric, and substance abuse services. The Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations was used to identify need-based, enabling, and predisposing variables for analysis. Both groups reported high rates of arrest and incarceration, very low incomes, extensive histories of homelessness, and a similar need for services. However, significantly more veterans than nonveterans used psychiatric services, nonemergency medical services, and inpatient substance use services. Similar proportions of veterans and nonveterans used public non-VA health care services. Need-based variables appropriately predicted service use, but veterans and individuals with insurance were also more likely to access services. The veterans and nonveterans residing in a low-demand shelter faced several barriers to escaping homelessness. Both groups made similar use of non-VA services, but veterans used more services overall because of their access to VA services. The predictive power of insurance indicated that veterans may experience barriers to care despite the availability of VA services. The presence of veterans in this low-demand shelter may represent evidence of barriers to veteran and other public housing services.

  10. Veterans and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    health care and rehabilitation services for homeless veterans (the Health Care for Homeless Veterans and Domiciliary Care for Homeless Veterans...Health Care for Homeless Veterans ................................................................................... 19 Domiciliary Care for Homeless...for Homeless Veterans (HCHV), Domiciliary Care for Homeless Veterans (DCHV), the Compensated Work Therapy/Therapeutic Residences Program, and the

  11. Mental Health Symptoms Among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Sandi D; Branscum, Adam J; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774 respondents from 44 colleges and universities. Participants were matched using propensity scores, and the prevalence of symptoms was compared using logistic regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models. The odds of feeling overwhelmed in the last 12 months were significantly lower among student service members/veterans with a history of hazardous duty (odd ratio [OR] = 0.46, adjusted p value students. Military service, with and without hazardous duty deployment, was not a significant predictor of the total number of symptoms of poor mental health. Current student service members/veterans may not be disproportionately affected by poor psychological functioning.

  12. Labor Force Reentry: Issues for Injured Service Members and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Johanna Klaus, James D. Tew, David Barrett, Erin Ingram, and David W. Oslin, “Psychiatric Status and Work Per- formance of Veterans of Operations...90407-2138 Offices Santa Monica, CA Washington, DC Pittsburgh, PA New Orleans , LA/Jackson, MS Boston, MA Doha, QA Abu Dhabi, AE Cambridge, Uk Brussels, BE

  13. Use of outpatient mental health services by homeless veterans after hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Barnett, Scott; Hickling, Edward; Frahm, Kathryn; Campbell, Robert R; Olney, Ronald; Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the impact of hurricanes on people who are homeless at the time a disaster occurs. Although researchers have extensively studied the psychosocial consequences of disaster produced homelessness on the general population, efforts focused on understanding how homeless people fare have been limited to a few media reports and the gray literature. In the event of a hurricane, homeless veterans may be at increased risk for negative outcomes because of their cumulative vulnerabilities. Health care statistics consistently document that homeless veterans experience higher rates of medical, emotional, substance abuse, legal, and financial problems compared with the general population. This study used the 2004 to 2006 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Outpatient Medical Dataset to examine the effects of hurricanes on use of outpatient mental health services by homeless veterans. Homeless veterans residing in hurricane-affected counties were significantly more likely to participate in group psychotherapy (32.4% vs. 13.4%, p homeless programs and the provision of VHA mental health services to homeless veterans postdisaster. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Vietnam War Service on Veterans' Perceptions of Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Charles C.; Anelli, Lisa M.

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed Vietnam veterans' (n=131 males, 4 females) perceptions of impact of their wartime experiences on their current family life. Found direct effects of war service on psychological impact and direct effects of psychological impact on family satisfaction and functioning. Found no direct effects between war service and family satisfaction and…

  15. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The Use of University Services and Student Retention: Differential Links for Student Service Members or Veterans and Civilian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Kenona H.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M.; Barry, Adam E.

    2018-01-01

    Grounded in research and theory on college student retention, this study assessed differences in the use of various university services and the influence of key personnel on retention-related outcomes of student service members or veterans (SSM/Vs) compared with civilian students. Participants included 386 students, 199 (154 male, 45 female) of…

  17. Persistent Super-Utilization of Acute Care Services Among Subgroups of Veterans Experiencing Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowiak, Dorota; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Johnson, Erin E; Manning, Todd; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-10-01

    Acute health care utilization often occurs among persons experiencing homelessness. However, knowing which individuals will be persistent super-utilizers of acute care is less well understood. The objective of the study was to identify those more likely to be persistent super-utilizers of acute care services. We conducted a latent class analysis of secondary data from the Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse, and Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System. The study sample included 16,912 veterans who experienced homelessness and met super-utilizer criteria in any quarter between July 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015. The latent class analysis included veterans' diagnoses and acute care utilization. Medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity rates were high. More than half of the sample utilized Veterans Health Administration Homeless Programs concurrently with their super-utilization of acute care. There were 7 subgroups of super-utilizers, which varied considerably on the degree to which their super-utilization persisted over time. Approximately a third of the sample met super-utilizer criteria for ≥3 quarters; this group was older and disproportionately male, non-Hispanic white, and unmarried, with lower rates of post-9/11 service and higher rates of rural residence and service-connected disability. They were much more likely to be currently homeless with more medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity. Only a subset of homeless veterans were persistent super-utilizers, suggesting the need for more targeted interventions.

  18. 38 CFR 17.82 - Contracts for outpatient services for veterans with alcohol or drug dependence or abuse...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services for veterans with alcohol or drug dependence or abuse disabilities. 17.82 Section 17.82 Pensions... Agencies § 17.82 Contracts for outpatient services for veterans with alcohol or drug dependence or abuse...) Comply with the requirements of the “Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records” (42 CFR...

  19. Use of VA and Medicare services by dually eligible veterans with psychiatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Rosen, Amy K; Christiansen, Cindy L; Loveland, Susan; Ettner, Susan L

    2008-08-01

    To examine how service accessibility measured by geographic distance affects service sector choices for veterans who are dually eligible for veterans affairs (VA) and Medicare services and who are diagnosed with mental health and/or substance abuse (MH/SA) disorders. Primary VA data sources were the Patient Treatment (acute care), Extended Care (long-term care), and Outpatient Clinic files. VA cost data were obtained from (1) inpatient and outpatient cost files developed by the VA Health Economics and Resource Center and (2) outpatient VA Decision Support System files. Medicare data sources were the denominator, Medicare Provider Analysis Review (MEDPAR), Provider-of-Service, Outpatient Standard Analytic and Physician/Supplier Standard Analytic files. Additional sources included the Area Resource File and Census Bureau data. We identified dually eligible veterans who had either an inpatient or outpatient MH/SA diagnosis in the VA system during fiscal year (FY)'99. We then estimated one- and two-part regression models to explain the effects of geographic distance on both VA and Medicare total and MH/SA costs. Results provide evidence for substitution between the VA and Medicare, demonstrating that poorer geographic access to VA inpatient and outpatient clinics decreased VA expenditures but increased Medicare expenditures, while poorer access to Medicare-certified general and psychiatric hospitals decreased Medicare expenditures but increased VA expenditures. As geographic distance to VA medical facility increases, Medicare plays an increasingly important role in providing mental health services to veterans.

  20. Long-term effects of military service on mental health among veterans of the Vietnam War era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew S; Laditka, Sarah B; Laditka, James N

    2008-06-01

    Comparing outcomes of veterans who served in Vietnam and those who served elsewhere, we examined treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, treatment of other mental health conditions, psychiatric treatment location, and six mental health well-being measures. The analytic sample consisted of nationally representative data from the 2001 National Survey of Veterans. Analyses included multivariate logistic regression that controlled for sociodemographic characteristics. Of Vietnam War-era veterans in the National Survey of Veterans (N = 7,914), 3,937 served in Vietnam and 3,977 served elsewhere. These veterans were stratified into or = 60 years of age (N = 1,766). Veterans who served in Vietnam had notably poorer mental health than did those who served elsewhere. There were striking mental health differences between younger and older veterans; younger veterans had substantially worse measures of mental health. These results suggest greater resource needs among younger Vietnam War veterans. Clinicians and the Department of Veterans Affairs should focus on mental health services for younger veterans.

  1. Veterans health administration vocational services for operation iraqi freedom/operation enduring freedom veterans with mental health conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth W. Twamley, PhD; Dewleen G. Baker, MD; Sonya B. Norman, PhD; James O. E. Pittman, MSW; James B. Lohr, MD; Sandra G. Resnick, PhD

    2013-01-01

    High rates of mental health conditions and unemployment are significant problems facing Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). We examined two national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) databases from fiscal years 2008–2009: a larger database (n = 75,607) of OIF/OEF Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, substance use disorder, or traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a smaller subset (n = 1,010) of those Veterans whose employment was tracked...

  2. 77 FR 20890 - Proposed Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as... of certain information by the agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, Federal... information, including each proposed extension of currently approved collection, and allow 60 days for public...

  3. 75 FR 17771 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Jobs for Veterans Act Priority of Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Comment Request for Information Collection for Jobs for Veterans Act Priority of Service Provisions: OMB...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and... data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is...

  4. Behavioral Health and Adjustment to College Life for Student Service Members/Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Lawrence; Braue, Lawrence A.; Stire, Sheryl; Gum, Amber M.; Cross, Brittany L.; Brown, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing numbers of student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are enrolling in college. However, little is known about how their previous military experience affects their adjustment to this new role. The present study tested the hypothesis that SSM/Vs who report adjustment problems in college have a higher incidence of posttraumatic…

  5. Community Reintegration, Participation, and Employment Issues in Veterans and Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Christina; Powell-Cope, Gail

    2018-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been called the signature injury of the post-9/11 wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and neighboring countries. Although similarities exist between veterans and service members with TBI, levels of severity and different constellations of coexisting comorbid conditions affect them differently. These conditions affect physical, cognitive, and emotional function, which in turn can complicate community reintegration (CR), or the ability to return to family, vocational, and community life. This special supplement of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation consists of articles written by accomplished teams from multiple disciplines, including anthropology, neuropsychology, nursing, occupational therapy, psychology, and rehabilitation sciences. Each article brings a different perspective to bear on what CR means for veterans and service members from examination of predictors and perceptions of veterans and service members and others to measurement studies. Collectively, this group of articles represents current thinking about CR and lays the groundwork for testing interventions to improve CR outcomes for veterans and service members (eg, employment, living situation, family life). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Student Service Members and Veterans: The Role of Personal Growth Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowa, Dominika; Robitschek, Christine; Harmon, Kevin Andrew; Shigemoto, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the extent to which personal growth initiative (PGI) may predict posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members/veterans (SSM/V). Participants: Participants were 136 SSM/V (79% men) representing multiple branches of the armed forces. Forty-four percent of participants reported having combat experience.…

  7. Mental health and health service use among post-national service veterans: results from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, C; Rona, R J; Iversen, A; MacManus, D; Hotopf, M; Dean, K; McManus, S; Meltzer, H; Brugha, T; Jenkins, R; Wessely, S; Fear, N T

    2011-02-01

    There is concern surrounding the psychological health and uptake of treatment services among veterans of the UK Armed Forces. Data from a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample were used to compare health outcomes and treatment seeking among 257 post-national service veterans aged 16-64 years and 504 age and sex frequency-matched non-veterans living in the community in England. Early leavers (<4 years service) were compared with longer serving veterans. Male veterans reported more childhood adversity and were more likely to have experienced a major trauma in adulthood than non-veterans. There was no association between any measure of mental health and veteran status in males, except reporting more violent behaviours [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-2.06]. In females, a significant association was found between veteran status and ever having suicidal thoughts (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.13-7.03). No differences in treatment-seeking behaviour were identified between veterans and non-veterans with any mental disorder. Early service leavers were more likely to be heavy drinkers (aOR 4.16, 95% CI 1.08-16.00), to have had suicidal thoughts (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.21-4.66) and to have self-harmed (aOR 12.36, 95% CI 1.61-94.68) than longer serving veterans. The findings of this study do not suggest that being a veteran is associated with adversity in terms of mental health, social disadvantage or reluctance to seek treatment compared with the general population. Some evidence implies that early service leavers may experience more mental health problems than longer-serving veterans.

  8. Chronic Pain Treatment and Health Service Utilization of Veterans with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Travis I.; Dobscha, Steven K.; Cavanagh, Renee; Turk, Dennis C.; Morasco, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect 2% of the general U.S. population and chronic pain is a common comorbidity among persons with HCV. The primary purpose of this study was to compare health service utilization of U.S. military veterans with HCV with and without the presence of comorbid chronic pain. Design Cross-sectional study with retrospective review of patient medical records. Patients One hundred seventy-one U.S. military veterans with confirmed HCV, recruited through a single U.S. Veterans Administration hospital. Outcome Measures Medical service utilization data from the past five years were extracted from participants’ electronic medical records. Results Sixty-four percent of veterans with HCV (n = 110) had chronic pain. Veterans with HCV and chronic pain utilized more health services including total inpatient stays (OR = 2.58 [1.46, 4.56]) and days hospitalized for psychiatric services (OR = 5.50 [3.37, 8.99]), compared to participants with HCV and no chronic pain, after statistically adjusting for demographic, psychiatric, substance use, medical comorbidity, and disability covariates. In addition, those with HCV and chronic pain had more total outpatient visits with primary care providers (OR = 1.73 [1.15, 2.59]), physical therapists (OR = 9.57 [4.79, 19.11]), and occupational therapists (OR = 2.72 [1.00, 7.48]). Conclusions Patients with HCV and chronic pain utilize medical services to a greater extent than patients with HCV but no chronic pain. Future studies that examine the efficacy of both pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain treatment for patients with comorbid HCV and chronic pain appear warranted. PMID:22958315

  9. Psychopharmacologic Services for Homeless Veterans: Comparing Psychotropic Prescription Fills Among Homeless and Non-Homeless Veterans with Serious Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Eric; Rosenheck, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrative data, this study evaluated differences in psychotropic medication use between homeless and non-homeless adults with serious mental illness (SMI) who used VHA services in 2010. The adjusted mean number of psychotropic prescription fills associated with homeless individuals were identified using regression models adjusted for socio-demographics, diagnoses, and use of health services. Of the 876,989 individuals with SMI using VHA services, 7.2 % were homeless at some time during 2010. In bivariate analysis, homeless individuals filled more psychotropic medication prescriptions compared with non-homeless individuals. However, after adjusting for potentially confounding variables, homeless individuals were found to have filled 16.2 % fewer prescriptions than non-homeless individuals when all psychotropics were analyzed together (F = 6947.1, p < .001) and for most individual classes of psychotropics. Greater use of residential/inpatient mental health services by the homeless was the most important single factor associated with filling more psychotropic prescriptions than non-homeless individuals.

  10. What do veterans service organizations' web sites say about tobacco control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara A; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about veterans service organizations (VSOs) and their perspectives on veterans smoking or military tobacco control. Veterans have high smoking rates and many started smoking in the military, where a culture promoting use exists. A qualitative content analysis of VSO Web sites was conducted to classify health topics and identify tobacco-related information. Web sites were coded by trained raters from January to June of 2011. Data were entered, cleaned, and analyzed from July 2011 to January 2012. Twenty-four active VSO Web sites meeting inclusion criteria were rated independently. A comprehensive form was used to code 15 veteran-relevant health topics across multiple content areas/domains within the Web sites. Raters achieved 94.5% interrater agreement over nearly 5000 data points. Health content was coded as present or not within multiple VSO Web site areas/domains. The frequency of coverage by each VSO Web site and the number of VSO Web sites that mentioned a health topic in different Web site areas/domains were tabulated. A total of 277 health topics were addressed, with the top five being insurance/Tricare/Veterans Administration issues (28.2%), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; 15.5%), disability/amputation/wounds (13.4%), Agent Orange (10.5%), and traumatic brain injury (9.0%). Tobacco was mentioned four times (1.4%) across all 24 VSO Web sites, and smoking cessation was never addressed. VSO Web sites provide little information on tobacco-related topics and none offered information about smoking cessation. Given the high rates of tobacco use among veterans and active-duty service members, and the interaction between smoking and PTSD symptoms and treatment outcomes, VSOs should consider making tobacco control and smoking cessation higher-priority health issues on their Web sites.

  11. Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment, and Physical Victimization during Military Service across Age Cohorts of Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carolyn J; Gray, Kristen E; Katon, Jodie G; Simpson, Tracy L; Lehavot, Keren

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to sexual and physical trauma during military service is associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Little is known about their prevalence and impact in women veterans across age cohorts. Data from a 2013 national online survey of women veterans was used to examine associations between age and trauma during military service, including sexual assault, sexual harassment, and physical victimization. Analyses were conducted using logistic regression, adjusting for service duration and demographic factors. In secondary analyses, the moderating role of age in the relationship between trauma and self-reported health was examined. The sample included 781 women veterans. Compared with the oldest age group (≥ 65), all except the youngest age group had consistently higher odds of reporting trauma during military service. These differences were most pronounced in women aged 45 to 54 years (sexual assault odds ratio [OR], 3.81 [95% CI, 2.77-6.71]; sexual harassment, OR, 3.99 [95% CI, 2.25-7.08]; and physical victimization, OR, 5.72 [95% CI, 3.32-9.85]). The association between trauma during military service and self-reported health status also varied by age group, with the strongest negative impact observed among women aged 45 to 54 and 55 to 64. Compared with other age groups, women in midlife were the most likely to report trauma during military service, and these experiences were associated with greater negative impact on their self-reported health. Providers should be aware that trauma during military service may be particularly problematic for the cohort of women currently in midlife, who represent the largest proportion of women who use Department of Veterans Affairs health care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA and Medicare Fee-For-Service: 1999–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humensky, Jennifer; Carretta, Henry; de Groot, Kristin; Brown, Melissa M.; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Hynes, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine care system choices for Veterans dually-eligible for VA and Medicare FFS following changes in VA eligibility policy, which expanded availability of VA health care services. Data Sources VA and Medicare FFS enrollment and outpatient utilization databases in 1999 and 2004. Study Design: Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine odds of VA-only and Medicare-only utilization, relative to dual utilization, in 1999 and 2004. Observational cohort comprising a 5% random sample of dually-eligible Veterans: 73,721 in 1999 and 125,042 in 2004. Principal Findings From 1999 to 2004, persons with the highest HCC risk scores had decreasing odds of exclusive VA reliance (OR=0.26 in 1999 and 0.17 in 2004, p<0.05), but had increasing odds of exclusive Medicare reliance (OR=0.43 in 1999 and 0.56 in 2004, p<0.05).Persons in high VA priority groups had decreasing odds of exclusive VA reliance, as well as decreasing odds of exclusive Medicare reliance, indicating increasing odds of dual use. Newly eligible Veterans with the highest HCC risk scores had higher odds of dual system use, while newly eligible Black Veterans had lower odds of dual system use. Conclusions Veterans newly eligible for VA healthcare services, particularly those with the highest risk scores, had higher odds of dual system use compared to earlier eligibles. Providers should ensure coordination of care for Veterans who may be receiving care from multiple sources. Provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may help to ensure care coordination for persons receiving care from multiple systems. PMID:24800148

  13. Dessler receives Fleming Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Thomas W.; Dessler, Alex

    Alexander J. Dessler was presented with the John Adam Fleming Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore last May. The award recognizes original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences. The citation was delivered by Thomas W. Hill.

  14. Dalgarno receives Fleming Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Dalgarno, Alexander

    The John Adam Fleming Medal, given for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences, was presented to Alexander Dalgarno at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The award citation and Dalgarno's response are given here.

  15. Ringwood receives Hess medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Dave

    The 1993 Harry H. Hess Medal, given by AGU for outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets, was awarded posthumously to Alfred E. Ringwood at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on December 9, 1993, in San Francisco, Calif. The award citation and the response by Ringwood's son, Peter, are given here.

  16. Characteristics of traumatic brain injuries sustained among veterans seeking homeless services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sean M; Russell, Leah M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Forster, Jeri E; Devore, Maria D; Brenner, Lisa A

    2015-02-01

    This hypothesis-generating research describes the characteristics of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) sustained among 229 Veterans seeking homeless services. Nearly all participants (83%) had sustained at least one TBI prior to their first episode of homelessness. Among participants with a TBI, assaults, transportation-related accidents, and falls were the most common causes of these injuries. Thirty percent of individuals sustained injuries with severity levels that would be expected to be associated with ongoing TBI-related deficits. Forty-three percent of the Veterans sustained at least one brain injury following their first episode of homelessness. Median lifetime number of TBIs was three. The severity of TBIs was similar among Veterans who sustained injuries before or after their first incident of homelessness. Findings suggest that future research should directly examine the potential bi-directional relationship between TBI and homelessness, as well as the impact of TBI-related deficits on Veterans' ability to benefit from homeless services and/or maintain stable housing.

  17. Exploring Student Service Members/Veterans Social Support and Campus Climate in the Context of Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Love

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Now that the financial needs of post 9/11 student service members/veterans have begun to be addressed, the attention has shifted to disabilities and recovery strategies of student service members/veterans. Therefore, in a cross sectional design, this study electronically surveyed 189 enrolled student service members/veterans attending a large urban state university about their experiences of returning to school. Specifically, this study described the students’ rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and alcohol abuse, perceived stress, adaptive and non-adaptive coping strategies, social support, participation in campus activities, and perceived campus climate. Moreover, correlates of recovery were examined. Although the majority of the returning students were doing well, 36.1% reported a high level of stress, 15.1% reported a high level of anger, 17.3% reported active symptoms of PTSD, and 27.1% screened positive for alcohol problems. Social networks were found to be the most salient factor in recovery. The study’s limitations are discussed and specific support strategies are presented that can be employed by disability services, counseling services and college administrators.

  18. D-Day: The French Jubilee of Liberty Medal and the 60th Anniversary Commemoration on June 6, 2004, and Events for June 6, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Torreon, Barbara S

    2005-01-01

    This report details the Jubilee of Liberty Medal awarded to U.S. veterans by the French government to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy by the Allied forces on June 6, 1994 (D-Day...

  19. Stevenson receives Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, William M.; Stevenson, David J.

    David J. Stevenson was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on May 27, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts. The Harry H. Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in the research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets.A meaningful understanding of the Earth and planets requires explaining their differences. This explanation of planetary processes is difficult partly because it entails a wide range of scales—from microscale, operating at the atomic level, to macroscale, determined by boundaries thousands of kilometers apart. David Stevenson's graduate study was mainly in theoretical condensedmatter physics, but he is remarkable in his grasp of large-scale planetary processes such as mantle convection and the dynamos. He is also remarkable in his ‘instinct to attack the jugular,’ that is to go for the most important problems and for the versatility of his approaches thereto.

  20. Veterans Affairs: Presumptive Service Connection and Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    associated with nutritional deficiencies such as osteoporosis. Section 106 of P.L. 110-389 provides a presumptive service connection for...tissue sarcoma (soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of soft tissues such as muscles, tendons , and blood vessels). Does not include osteosarcoma... tendon sheath; Malignant schwannoma, including malignant schwannoma with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (malignant Triton tumor); glandular and

  1. Rationale and design: telepsychology service delivery for depressed elderly veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Lisa K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older adults who live in rural areas experience significant disparities in health status and access to mental health care. "Telepsychology," (also referred to as "telepsychiatry," or "telemental health" represents a potential strategy towards addressing this longstanding problem. Older adults may benefit from telepsychology due to its: (1 utility to address existing problematic access to care for rural residents; (2 capacity to reduce stigma associated with traditional mental health care; and (3 utility to overcome significant age-related problems in ambulation and transportation. Moreover, preliminary evidence indicates that telepsychiatry programs are often less expensive for patients, and reduce travel time, travel costs, and time off from work. Thus, telepsychology may provide a cost-efficient solution to access-to-care problems in rural areas. Methods We describe an ongoing four-year prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of an empirically supported treatment for major depressive disorder, Behavioral Activation, delivered either via in-home videoconferencing technology ("Telepsychology" or traditional face-to-face services ("Same-Room". Our hypothesis is that in-homeTelepsychology service delivery will be equally effective as the traditional mode (Same-Room. Two-hundred twenty-four (224 male and female elderly participants will be administered protocol-driven individual Behavioral Activation therapy for depression over an 8-week period; and subjects will be followed for 12-months to ascertain longer-term effects of the treatment on three outcomes domains: (1 clinical outcomes (symptom severity, social functioning; (2 process variables (patient satisfaction, treatment credibility, attendance, adherence, dropout; and (3 economic outcomes (cost and resource use. Discussion Results from the proposed study will provide important insight into whether telepsychology service delivery is as effective

  2. An End of Service Life Assessment of PMMA Lenses from Veteran Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Khonkar, Hussameldin I.; Herrero, Rebecca; Anton, Ignacio; Johnson, David K.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Deutch, Steve; To, Bobby; Sala, Gabriel; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2017-03-21

    The optical performance of poly(methyl methacrylate) lenses from veteran concentrator photovoltaic modules was examined after the end of their service life. Lenses from the Martin-Marietta and Intersol module designs were examined from the 'Solar Village' site near Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as well as the Phoenix Sky Harbor airport, followed by the Arizona Public Service Solar Test and Research (APS-STaR) center in Tempe, Arizona. The various lens specimens were deployed for 20, 27, and 22 years, respectively. Optical characterizations included lens efficiency (Solar Simulator instrument), material transmittance and haze (of coupons cut from veteran lenses, then measured again after their faceted back surface was polished, and then measured again after the incident front surface was polished), and direct transmittance (as a function of detector's acceptance angle, using the Very Low Angular Beam Spread ('VLABS') instrument). Lens efficiency measurements compared the central region to the entire lens, also using hot and cold mirror measurements to diagnose differences in performance. A series of subsequent characterizations was performed because a decrease in performance of greater than 10% was observed for some of the veteran lenses. Surface roughness was examined using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Facet geometry (tip and valley radius) was quantified on cross-sectioned specimens. Molecular weight was compared between the incident and faceted surfaces of the lenses.

  3. Alcohol Use and Trauma Exposure among Male and Female Veterans Before, During, and After Military Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L.; Runnals, Jennifer; Pearson, Matthew R.; Miller, Marinell; Fairbank, John A.; Brancu, Mira

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined lifespan and combat-related trauma exposure as predictors of alcohol use among male and female veterans. Posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms were examined as mediators of the effects of trauma exposure on alcohol use. Data were examined from 1825 (1450 male, 375 female) veterans and active duty service members who took part in a multi-site research study conducted through the Department of Veterans Affairs Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (VISN 6 MIRECC). For both men and women, depressive symptoms significantly mediated the effects of non-combat trauma exposure experienced before, during and after the military, as well as combat- exposure, on alcohol use. With posttraumatic stress symptoms, the models for men and women differed. For men, the effects of non-combat trauma exposure during and after military service, and combat exposure, on alcohol use were mediated by PTSD symptoms; however, for women, PTSD symptoms did not mediate these relationships. Findings are discussed in the context of potential gender differences in response to trauma such as use of alcohol to cope with traumatic events. PMID:24054989

  4. 75 FR 3203 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... technological innovation based upon solid science, resulting in commercially successful products and services... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010... nominations for its National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in...

  5. Ahrens receives the Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Guy; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    Tom Ahrens was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honor Ceremony on December 17,1996, in San Francisco. The Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citation and Ahren's response are given here.

  6. Ahrens Receives the Hess Medal

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Tom Ahrens was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honor Ceremony on December 17, 1996, in San Francisco. The Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citation and Ahren's response are given here.

  7. America's Women Veterans: Military Service History and VA Benefit Utilization Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This comprehensive report chronicles the history of women in the military and as Veterans, profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2009, illustrates how...

  8. Morel Receives 2005 Maurice Ewing Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Morel, François M. M.

    2006-02-01

    François M. M. Morel received the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. François Morel has led the search to understand the role of metals in the ocean, starting with a focus on inorganic processes and aquatic chemistry, and leading to a blend of geochemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics. His influence comes from his research and from the way he has educated an entire community of scientists with his textbooks, with his teaching, and through his former students and postdocs who hold faculty positions at universities throughout the world.

  9. Remote eye care screening for rural veterans with Technology-based Eye Care Services: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, April Y; Wojciechowski, Barbara; Hunt, Kelly; Dismuke, Clara; Janjua, Rabeea; Lynch, Mary G

    2017-01-01

    Veterans are at high risk for eye disease because of age and comorbid conditions. Access to eye care is challenging within the entire Veterans Hospital Administration's network of hospitals and clinics in the USA because it is the third busiest outpatient clinical service and growing at a rate of 9% per year. Rural and highly rural veterans face many more barriers to accessing eye care because of distance, cost to travel, and difficulty finding care in the community as many live in medically underserved areas. Also, rural veterans may be diagnosed in later stages of eye disease than their non-rural counterparts due to lack of access to specialty care. In March 2015, Technology-based Eye Care Services (TECS) was launched from the Atlanta Veterans Affairs (VA) as a quality improvement project to provide eye screening services for rural veterans. By tracking multiple measures including demographic and access to care metrics, data shows that TECS significantly improved access to care, with 33% of veterans receiving same-day access and >98% of veterans receiving an appointment within 30 days of request. TECS also provided care to a significant percentage of homeless veterans, 10.6% of the patients screened. Finally, TECS reduced healthcare costs, saving the VA up to US$148 per visit and approximately US$52 per patient in round trip travel reimbursements when compared to completing a face-to-face exam at the medical center. Overall savings to the VA system in this early phase of TECS totaled US$288,400, about US$41,200 per month. Other healthcare facilities may be able to use a similar protocol to extend care to at-risk patients.

  10. The Availability and Utility of Services to Address Risk Factors for Recidivism among Justice-Involved Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonigen, Daniel M; Rodriguez, Allison L; Manfredi, Luisa; Britt, Jessica; Nevedal, Andrea; Finlay, Andrea K; Rosenthal, Joel; Smelson, David; Timko, Christine

    2017-10-01

    The availability and utility of services to address recidivism risk factors among justice-involved veterans is unknown. We explored these issues through qualitative interviews with 63 Specialists from the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) Veterans Justice Programs. To guide the interviews, we utilized the Risk-Need-Responsivity (RNR) model of offender rehabilitation. Specialists reported that justice-involved veterans generally have access to services to address most RNR-based risk factors (substance abuse; lack of positive school/work involvement; family/marital dysfunction; lack of prosocial activities/interests), but have less access to services targeting risk factors of antisocial tendencies and associates and empirically-based treatments for recidivism in VA. Peer-based services, motivational interviewing/cognitive-behavioral therapy, and Veterans Treatment Courts were perceived as useful to address multiple risk factors. These findings highlight potential gaps in provision of evidence-based care to address recidivism among justice-involved veterans, as well as promising policy-based solutions that may have widespread impact on reducing recidivism in this population.

  11. Push-Pull Tensions: A Grounded Theory on Social Experience of Use of Healthcare Services Among Homeless Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Samiley, Romanitchiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop, from the perspective of the user, a better understanding of the factors that influence use of healthcare services by homeless veterans in the U.S. The study employed the Grounded Theory (GT) methodology and was guided by Critical Social Theory (CST) and Symbolic Interactionism (SI) as the philosophical underpinnings. There is a scant but growing number of studies on the social experience of homeless veterans in accessing care at the Department of Vete...

  12. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A.; Fisher, Michael P.; Blevins, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  13. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Fisher, Michael P; Blevins, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years ( n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined ( n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  14. Protocol for the evaluation of a digital storytelling approach to address stigma and improve readiness to seek services among veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Brian E; Davidson, Tatiana M; Hamblen, Jessica L; Cook, Danna L; Grubaugh, Anouk L; Lozano, Brian E; Tuerk, Peter W; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that at least 10% of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan meet criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to their military experiences. National dissemination initiatives have increased veterans' access to best-practice interventions. However, treatment-seeking remains low among veterans with PTSD, often due to perceived stigma and other associated barriers. The National Center for PTSD recently developed and launched AboutFace, a digital storytelling (DST) resource designed to help veterans recognize PTSD and motivate them to seek evidence-based treatment. The Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) and the National Center for PTSD have partnered to conduct pilot work to evaluate veterans' reactions to AboutFace to set the stage for a large-scale study to examine whether AboutFace effectively reduces stigma and improves attitudes toward treatment-seeking among veterans. If effective, this DST approach may serve as a valuable national model for a variety of treatment-seeking populations. During the first phase of the pilot, in-person usability assessments of AboutFace will be conducted via semi-structured interviews with 20 veterans. Audio recordings of interviews will undergo transcription and coding. A report of the results of qualitative analyses of these interviews will be provided to the National Center for PTSD and will inform revisions to the site. In the second phase of the pilot, 60 veterans referred to a specialized PTSD clinic will be recruited to demonstrate and refine the methodology that we propose to use in a larger randomized controlled trial evaluation of AboutFace. Veterans will be randomly assigned to receive AboutFace plus standard education vs. standard education alone. Baseline and 2-week telephone assessments will be conducted with participating veterans to measure stigma, attitudes toward seeking mental health services, and treatment access/engagement. The feedback we receive in this

  15. Health of national service veterans: an analysis of a community-based sample using data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Charlotte; Rona, Roberto J; Iversen, Amy C; MacManus, Deirdre; Hotopf, Matthew; Dean, Kimberlie; McManus, Sally; Meltzer, Howard; Brugha, Traolach; Jenkins, Rachel; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2011-07-01

    In the context of increasing concerns for the health of UK armed forces veterans, this study aims to compare the prevalence of current mental, physical and behavioural difficulties in conscripted national service veterans with population controls, and to assess the impact of length of service in the military. The compulsory nature of national service sets these veterans apart from younger veterans. Data are drawn from a nationally representative community-dwelling sample of England. We compared 484 male national service veterans to 301 male non-veterans aged 65+ years. There were no differences in mental, behavioural or physical outcomes, except that veterans were less likely to have "any mental disorder" than non-veterans (age adjusted OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.31, 0.99). Longer serving veterans were older but were not different in terms of mental, behavioural or physical outcomes. Community-dwelling national service veterans are at no greater risk of current adverse mental, physical or behavioural health than population controls.

  16. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos Homeless Resources Additional Information ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does ...

  17. 77 FR 14600 - Public Availability of the Department of Veterans Affairs Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... Management Service, in the Office of Acquisition, Logistics, and Construction at (202) 461-6918, or email... Inventory AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventories. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 743 of Division C of the Consolidated...

  18. Exploring the association between exposure to suicide and suicide risk among military service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Melanie A; Stanley, Ian H; Gutierrez, Peter M; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    Past research suggests that suicide has a profound impact on surviving family members and friends; yet, little is known about experiences with suicide bereavement among military populations. This study aimed to characterize experiences with suicide exposure and their associations with lifetime and current psychiatric symptoms among military service members and veterans. A sample of 1753 United States military service members and veterans completed self-report questionnaires assessing experiences with suicide exposure, lifetime history of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, current suicidal symptoms, and perceived likelihood of making a future suicide attempt. The majority of participants (57.3%) reported knowing someone who had died by suicide, and of these individuals, most (53.1%) reported having lost a friend to suicide. Chi-square tests, one-way ANOVAs, and logistic regression analyses revealed that those who reported knowing a suicide decedent were more likely to report more severe current suicidal symptoms and a history of suicidal thoughts and behaviors compared to those who did not know a suicide decedent. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that greater self-reported interpersonal closeness to a suicide decedent predicted greater self-reported likelihood of a future suicide attempt, even after controlling for current suicidal symptoms and prior suicidal thoughts and behaviors. This study utilized cross-sectional data, and information regarding degree of exposure to suicide was not collected. Military personnel and veterans who have been bereaved by suicide may themselves be at elevated risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Additional work is needed to delineate the relationship between these experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The development and implications of peer emotional support for student service members/veterans and civilian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Barry, Adam E; Mroczek, Daniel K; Macdermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-04-01

    Student service members/veterans represent a growing population on college campuses. Despite this growth, scholarly investigations into their health- and adjustment-related issues are almost nonexistent. The limited research that is available suggests that student service members/veterans may have trouble connecting with their civilian counterparts and be at risk for social isolation. The present study compared the development and implications of emotional support from peers among 199 student service members/veterans and 181 civilian students through 3 distinct occasions over the course of 1 calendar year. Data were collected via electronic survey. Measured constructs included perceived emotional support from university friends, mental health, alcohol use, and academic functioning. A series of multilevel models revealed that student service members/veterans reported less emotional support from their peers compared with their civilian counterparts; yet, emotional support from peers increased similarly for both groups over time. Although, increasing peer emotional support was generally related to better academic and mental health outcomes for both groups, the links between emotional support and mental health were stronger for civilian students. Results suggest that mental health practitioners, particularly those on college campuses, should be prepared to deal with veteran-specific experiences that occur before and during college.

  20. Wetherill receives 1991 Hess medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Richard; Wetherill, George

    George W. Wetherill was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU 1991 Fall Meeting in San Francisco for outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets

  1. Community Reintegration Problems Among Veterans and Active Duty Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Suzanne; Barnett, Scott D; Lamberty, Greg; Kretzmer, Tracy; Powell-Cope, Gail; Patel, Nitin; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To examine community reintegration problems among Veterans and military service members with mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 1 year postinjury and to identify unique predictors that may contribute to these difficulties. VA Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Participants were 154 inpatients enrolled in the VA TBI Model Systems Program with available injury severity data (mild = 28.6%; moderate/severe = 71.4%) and 1-year postinjury outcome data. Prospective, longitudinal cohort. Community reintegration outcomes included independent driving, employability, and general community participation. Additional measures assessed depression, posttraumatic stress, and cognitive and motor functioning. In the mild TBI (mTBI) group, posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of various community reintegration outcomes. In the moderate/severe TBI group, cognition and motor skills were significantly associated with lower levels of community participation, independent driving, and employability. Community reintegration is problematic for Veterans and active duty service members with a history of TBI. Unique comorbidities across injury severity groups inhibit full reintegration into the community. These findings highlight the ongoing rehabilitation needs of persons with TBI, specifically evidence-based mental healthcare, in comprehensive rehabilitation programs consistent with a chronic disease management model.

  2. Osteoporosis screening and treatment among Veterans with recent fracture after implementation of an electronic consult service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard H.; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Pearson, Megan; Barnard, Karen; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Less than 24 percent of Veterans received appropriate evaluation and/or treatment for osteoporosis within 6 months of an index fracture. An electronic consult (E-consult) service was implemented at 3 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers to facilitate identification of and to recommend management for patients with recent fracture. Method The E-consult service used clinical encounter data based on ICD9 diagnosis codes to prospectively identify patients with potential osteoporotic fractures. Eligible patients' medical records were reviewed by a metabolic bone specialist and an E-consult note was sent to the patient's primary provider with specific recommendations for further management. Recommendations were initiated at the provider's discretion. Results Between 2011 and 2013, the E-consult service identified 444 eligible patients with a low-trauma fracture who were not already on treatment. One hundred twenty-nine (29.1%) consults recommended immediate bisphosphonate treatment and 258 (58.1%) recommended bone density assessments. Primary providers responded by prescribing bisphosphonates in 74 patients (57.4%) and by ordering bone density testing in 183 (70.9%) patients. At the facility level, prior to implementation of the E-consult service, the rate of osteoporosis treatment following a fracture was 4.8% for bisphosphonates and 21.3% for calcium/vitamin D. After implementation, the treatment rate increased to 7.3% for bisphosphonates (P = 0.02) and 35.2% for calcium/vitamin D (P < 0.01). Conclusion While feasible and relatively low cost, an E-consult service modestly improved the rate of osteoporosis treatment among patients with a recent fracture. These results suggest that a program with direct patient interaction is probably required to substantially improve treatment rates. PMID:24699797

  3. Hart receives the Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Hart, Stanley R.

    Stanley Hart was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 28, 1997, in Baltimore, Md. The Hess medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citations, given by the official presenter who was unable to attend and a stand-in presenter, and Hart's response are given here.

  4. For Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for VA health care services and are experiencing homelessness. VA case managers may connect these Veterans with ... Veterans who have experienced long-term or repeated homelessness. As of Sept. 30, 2015, HUD had allocated ...

  5. Master Veteran Index (MVI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As of June 28, 2010, the Master Veteran Index (MVI) database based on the enhanced Master Patient Index (MPI) is the authoritative identity service within the VA,...

  6. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans. Testimony. CT-428

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Miller, Laura L.; Buryk, Peter; Wenger, Jennie W.

    2015-01-01

    This testimony was presented before the House Veterans' Affairs Committee, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity on March 17, 2015. To inform the Subcommittee hearing on the Department of Veterans Affairs' administration of its education programs, and the educational and training needs of post-9/11 veterans, the presenters offered the statement in…

  7. 78 FR 55671 - Hospital Care and Medical Services for Camp Lejeune Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ..., Drug abuse, Health care, Health facilities, Health professions, Health records, Homeless, Medical.... 17.400;''. 0 3. Amend Sec. 17.108(e)(2) by removing ``or post-Gulf War combat- exposed veterans'' and adding, in its place, ``post-Gulf War combat- exposed veterans, or Camp Lejeune veterans pursuant to Sec...

  8. Mental health measurement among women veterans receiving co-located, collaborative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienthal, Kaitlin R; Buchholz, Laura J; King, Paul R; Vair, Christina L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Beehler, Gregory P

    2017-12-01

    Routine use of measurement to identify patient concerns and track treatment progress is critical to high quality patient care. This is particularly relevant to the Primary Care Behavioral Health model, where rapid symptom assessment and effective referral management are critical to sustaining population-based care. However, research suggests that women who receive treatment in co-located collaborative care settings utilizing the PCBH model are less likely to be assessed with standard measures than men in these settings. The current study utilized regional retrospective data obtained from the Veterans Health Administration's electronic medical record system to: (1) explore rates of mental health measurement for women receiving co-located collaborative care services (N = 1008); and (2) to identify predictors of mental health measurement in women veterans in these settings. Overall, only 8% of women had documentation of standard mental health measures. Measurement was predicted by diagnosis, facility size, length of care episode and care setting. Specifically, women diagnosed with depression were less likely than those with anxiety disorders to have standard mental health measurement documented. Several suggestions are offered to increase the quality of mental health care for women through regular use of measurement in integrated care settings.

  9. Veterans service organization engagement in 'POWER,' a peer-led hypertension intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosack, Katie E; Wendorf, Angela R; Brouwer, Amanda M; Patterson, Leslie; Ertl, Kristyn; Whittle, Jeff; Morzinski, Jeff; Fletcher, Kathlyn

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of program factors on participant engagement in POWER, a peer-led intervention designed to reduce hypertension, increase hypertension knowledge, and improve other relevant health behaviors, such as diet and exercise, among US veterans involved in veterans service organizations throughout Southeastern Wisconsin. Two hundred and nineteen hypertensive members from 58 VSOs participated in a year-long peer-led intervention designed to improve hypertension knowledge, disease self-management behaviors, and health outcomes. This study represents a qualitative evaluation of post and participant engagement in this intervention. We triangulated data collected via three qualitative approaches (observations, focus groups, and in-depth interviews) from intervention posts to derive a model of engagement. Our findings indicate that discrete characteristics of the peer leaders, post members, posts, and the intervention itself contributed to intervention engagement. We make suggestions for future research studies, particularly as related to understanding how peer leader identities and cultural norms within VSOs might contribute to peer-led health intervention success.

  10. Collaborating across the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense to integrate mental health and chaplaincy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwsma, Jason A; Jackson, George L; DeKraai, Mark B; Bulling, Denise J; Cantrell, William C; Rhodes, Jeffrey E; Bates, Mark J; Ethridge, Keith; Lane, Marian E; Tenhula, Wendy N; Batten, Sonja V; Meador, Keith G

    2014-12-01

    Recognizing that clergy and spiritual care providers are a key part of mental health care systems, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense (DoD) jointly examined chaplains' current and potential roles in caring for veterans and service members with mental health needs. Our aim was to evaluate the intersection of chaplain and mental health care practices in VA and DoD in order to determine if improvement is needed, and if so, to develop actionable recommendations as indicated by evaluation findings. A 38-member multidisciplinary task group partnered with researchers in designing, implementing, and interpreting a mixed methods study that included: 1) a quantitative survey of VA and DoD chaplains; and 2) qualitative interviews with mental health providers and chaplains. Quantitative: the survey included all full-time VA chaplains and all active duty military chaplains (n = 2,163 completed of 3,464 invited; 62 % response rate). Qualitative: a total of 291 interviews were conducted with mental health providers and chaplains during site visits to 33 VA and DoD facilities. Quantitative: the online survey assessed intersections between chaplaincy and mental health care and took an average of 37 min to complete. Qualitative: the interviews assessed current integration of mental health and chaplain services and took an average of 1 h to complete. When included on interdisciplinary mental health care teams, chaplains feel understood and valued (82.8-100 % of chaplains indicated this, depending on the team). However, findings from the survey and site visits suggest that integration of services is often lacking and can be improved. Closely coordinating with a multidisciplinary task group in conducting a mixed method evaluation of chaplain-mental health integration in VA and DoD helped to ensure that researchers assessed relevant domains and that findings could be rapidly translated into actionable recommendations.

  11. Benchmarking US Department of Veterans Affairs dermatologic services: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L Kendall; Townsend, Leilani; Orser, Michael L; Mulhausen, Jennifer; Duke, Jodi; Waxweiler, Weston T; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2012-03-01

    How well Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dermatology services provide clinical care, medical education, and innovative research is a largely unexplored topic in the literature. We sought to benchmark VA dermatology services by surveying VA dermatologists about their environment, resources, and the pros and cons of working in the VA. Printed surveys were mailed to VA dermatologists and responses were compiled and analyzed. Of 105 dermatology services surveyed, 48% returned surveys completed by board-certified dermatologists (n = 50); 20 surveys completed by nondermatologists were excluded from the analysis. Most services trained dermatology residents (72%) and medical students (80%). One third of services reported significant research involvement. Qualitative analysis revealed the academic environment, patient population, and decreased business management responsibilities as the 3 most commonly cited advantages to VA employment. The most commonly listed disadvantages included low salaries, bureaucracy, and lack of resources. The survey data were self-reported and not independently verified. Not all services returned the survey. Outpatient VA dermatology services accomplish significant primary care and preventive services (eg, sun safety counseling, skin cancer screening, and treatment). However, the small number of dedicated dermatology services, their irregular geographic distribution, and the lack of staffing and resources may adversely affect optimal patient care. Dermatologist responses regarding the positive and negative aspects of working in the VA system may lead to improved management strategies to better retain and recruit dermatologists to provide patient care, medical education, and medical research despite dramatically lower dermatologist salaries within the VA system compared with private practice. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparing MSW Students to Provide Mental and Behavioral Health Services to Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families in Rural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Hartnett, Helen P.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders constitutes a nationwide public health crisis. Estimates suggest that more than 90 million people live in areas designated mental health professional shortage areas, with almost 6,000 additional practitioners needed to meet the service needs in these areas. Military personnel and veterans have greater…

  13. Posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members and veterans: The role of personal growth initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowa, Dominika; Robitschek, Christine; Harmon, Kevin Andrew; Shigemoto, Yuki

    2016-10-01

    This study explored the extent to which personal growth initiative (PGI) may predict posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members/veterans (SSM/V). Participants were 136 SSM/V (79% men) representing multiple branches of the armed forces. Forty-four percent of participants reported having combat experience. Data collection occurred from October 2013 to February 2014. Data were collected via a Web-based survey that included demographics and measures of personal growth initiative, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic growth, and perceived social support. Results indicated that PGI is not a unique predictor of posttraumatic stress but is a unique predictor of higher levels of posttraumatic growth. PGI appears to be at least as important as perceived social support in facilitating growth in SSM/V. This study provides further evidence for PGI's potential to facilitate growth after a traumatic event.

  14. VA health service utilization for homeless and low-income Veterans: a spotlight on the VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program in greater Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H; Andersen, Ronald M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Gelberg, Lillian

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program-the VA's Housing First effort-is central to efforts to end Veteran homelessness. Yet, little is known about health care utilization patterns associated with achieving HUD-VASH housing. We compare health service utilization at the VA Greater Los Angeles among: (1) formerly homeless Veterans housed through HUD-VASH (HUD-VASH Veterans); (2) currently homeless Veterans; (3) housed, low-income Veterans not in HUD-VASH; and (4) housed, not low-income Veterans. We performed a secondary database analysis of Veterans (n=62,459) who received VA Greater Los Angeles care between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. We described medical/surgical and mental health utilization [inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department (ED)]. We controlled for demographics, need, and primary care use in regression analyses of utilization data by housing and income status. HUD-VASH Veterans had more inpatient, outpatient, and ED use than currently homeless Veterans. Adjusting for demographics and need, HUD-VASH Veterans and the low-income housed Veterans had similar likelihoods of medical/surgical inpatient and outpatient utilization, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Adjusting first for demographics and need (model 1), then also for primary care use (model 2), HUD-VASH Veterans had the greatest decrease in incident rates of specialty medical/surgical, mental health, and ED care from models 1 to 2, becoming similar to the currently homeless, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Our findings suggest that currently homeless Veterans underuse health care relative to housed Veterans. HUD-VASH may address this disparity by providing housing and linkages to primary care.

  15. The loss of a fellow service member: Complicated grief in post-9/11 service members and veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Naomi M; O'Day, Emily B; Hellberg, Samantha N; Hoeppner, Susanne S; Charney, Meredith E; Robinaugh, Donald J; Bui, Eric; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Baker, Amanda W; Rogers, Andrew H; Nadal-Vicens, Mireya; Venners, Margaret R; Kim, Hyungjin M; Rauch, Sheila A M

    2018-01-01

    Bereavement is a potent and highly prevalent stressor among service members and veterans. However, the psychological consequences of bereavement, including complicated grief (CG), have been minimally examined. Loss was assessed in 204 post-9/11, when service members and veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) took part in a multicenter treatment study. Those who reported the loss of an important person completed the inventory of complicated grief (ICG; n = 160). Over three quarters (79.41%) of the sample reported an important lifetime loss, with close to half (47.06%) reporting the loss of a fellow service member (FSM). The prevalence of CG was 24.75% overall, and nearly one third (31.25%) among the bereaved. CG was more prevalent among veterans who lost a fellow service member (FSM) (41.05%, n = 39) compared to those bereaved who did not (16.92%, n = 11; OR = 3.41, 95% CI: 1.59, 7.36). CG was associated with significantly greater PTSD severity, functional impairment, trauma-related guilt, and lifetime suicide attempts. Complicated grief was prevalent and associated with adverse psychosocial outcomes in veterans and service members with combat-related PTSD. Clinicians working with this population should inquire about bereavement, including loss of a FSM, and screen for CG. Additional research examining CG in this population is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Examining the Effects of Self-Reported Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Positive Relations with Others on Self-Regulated Learning for Student Service Members/Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Bryan M.; Middleton, Michael J.; Hildebrandt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationships between self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, perceived positive relations with others, self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation among student service members/veterans (SSM/V) enrolled in postsecondary education. Participants: SSM/V (N = 214), defined as veterans, active…

  17. Use of health services and medicines amongst Australian war veterans: a comparison of young elderly, near centenarians and centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughead, Elizabeth E; Kalisch, Lisa M; Ramsay, Emmae N; Ryan, Philip; Gilbert, Andrew L

    2010-11-04

    Age and life expectancy of residents in many developed countries, including Australia, is increasing. Health resource and medicine use in the very old is not well studied. The purpose of this study was to identify annual use of health services and medicines by very old Australian veterans; those aged 95 to 99 years (near centenarians) and those aged 100 years and over (centenarians). The study population included veterans eligible for all health services subsidised by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) aged 95 years and over at August 1st 2006. A cohort of veterans aged 65 to 74 years was identified for comparison. Data were sourced from DVA claims databases. We identified all claims between August 1st 2006 and July 31st 2007 for medical consultations, pathology, diagnostic imaging and allied health services, hospital admissions, number of prescriptions and unique medicines. Chi squared tests were used to compare the proportion of centenarians (those aged 100 years and over) and near centenarians (those aged 95 to 99 years) who accessed medicines and health services with the 65 to 74 year age group. For those who accessed health services during follow up, Poisson regression was used to compare differences in the number of times centenarians and near centenarians accessed each health service compared to 65 to 74 year olds. A similar proportion (98%) of centenarians and near centenarians compared to those aged 65 to 74 consulted a GP and received prescription medicine during follow up. A lower proportion of centenarians and near centenarians had claims for specialist visits (36% and 57% respectively), hospitalisation (19% and 24%), dental (12% and 18%), physiotherapy (13% and 15%), pathology(68% and 78%) and diagnostic imaging services (51% and 68%) (p < 0.0001) and a higher proportion had claims for care plans (19% and 25%), occupational therapy (15% and 17%) and podiatry services (54% and 58%) (p < 0.0001). Compared to those aged 65 to 74, a lower proportion

  18. Use of health services and medicines amongst Australian war veterans: a comparison of young elderly, near centenarians and centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Philip

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age and life expectancy of residents in many developed countries, including Australia, is increasing. Health resource and medicine use in the very old is not well studied. The purpose of this study was to identify annual use of health services and medicines by very old Australian veterans; those aged 95 to 99 years (near centenarians and those aged 100 years and over (centenarians. Methods The study population included veterans eligible for all health services subsidised by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA aged 95 years and over at August 1st 2006. A cohort of veterans aged 65 to 74 years was identified for comparison. Data were sourced from DVA claims databases. We identified all claims between August 1st 2006 and July 31st 2007 for medical consultations, pathology, diagnostic imaging and allied health services, hospital admissions, number of prescriptions and unique medicines. Chi squared tests were used to compare the proportion of centenarians (those aged 100 years and over and near centenarians (those aged 95 to 99 years who accessed medicines and health services with the 65 to 74 year age group. For those who accessed health services during follow up, Poisson regression was used to compare differences in the number of times centenarians and near centenarians accessed each health service compared to 65 to 74 year olds. Results A similar proportion (98% of centenarians and near centenarians compared to those aged 65 to 74 consulted a GP and received prescription medicine during follow up. A lower proportion of centenarians and near centenarians had claims for specialist visits (36% and 57% respectively, hospitalisation (19% and 24%, dental (12% and 18%, physiotherapy (13% and 15%, pathology(68% and 78% and diagnostic imaging services (51% and 68% (p Conclusions Medical consultations and medicines are the health services most frequently accessed by Australian veteran centenarians and near centenarians. For most

  19. The use of data to assist in the design of a new service system for homeless veterans in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Claire; Bainbridge, Jay; Keaton, Kim; Kenton, Martha; Guz, Meghan; Kanis, Becky

    2008-03-01

    Operation Home is an agreement between the City of New York and the US Department of Veterans Affairs to design a new service system to help end veteran homelessness in New York City. The authors' task was to obtain data to inform the design of this new system. A variety of methods were used. The group reviewed relevant literature and data from street homeless survey samples, analyzed shelter data, and consulted with VA homeless program staff on the findings. We then surveyed case managers at a veterans' shelter regarding their clients and determined their housing eligibility using a standardized logic model, and led two focus groups of veterans at this shelter regarding their views of the current shelter system and services for homeless veterans and how these might be improved. Among those resident in shelters during 2006, 37.2% of self-identified veterans compared to 0.9% of others reported their prior residence as supported housing, suggesting the need for more intensive case management at veterans' supported housing sites to help them sustain their tenure. The lack of interconnectedness among the various information systems made it more difficult to collect and analyze pertinent data. To begin to address this, a data match was undertaken to estimate the proportion of veterans resident in the veterans' shelter who were not in receipt of VA benefits to which they may be entitled. The data obtained through collaboration between staff from NYC's Department of Homelessness Services, US Department of Veterans Affairs facilities in the New York/New Jersey region and Common Ground Community led to information that informed the evaluation design of the new system. The identification of gaps in available data on homeless veterans will lead to projects both to improve and share data.

  20. Veterans Administration Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  1. The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Brian I; Catts, Stanley V; Outram, Sue; Pierse, Katherine R; Cockburn, Jill

    2009-08-01

    The long-term health consequences of war service remain unclear, despite burgeoning scientific interest. A longitudinal cohort study of a random sample of Australian Vietnam veterans was designed to assess veterans' postwar physical and mental health 36 years after the war (2005-2006) and to examine its relation to Army service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed 14 years previously (1990-1993). Prevalences in veterans (n = 450) were compared with those in the Australian general population. Veterans' Army service and data from the first assessments were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression prediction modeling. Veterans' general health and some health risk factors were poorer and medical consultation rates were higher than Australian population expectations. Of 67 long-term conditions, the prevalences of 47 were higher and the prevalences of 4 were lower when compared with population expectations. Half of all veterans took some form of medication for mental well-being. The prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses exceeded Australian population expectations. Military and war service characteristics and age were the most frequent predictors of physical health endpoints, while PTSD was most strongly associated with psychiatric diagnoses. Draftees had better physical health than regular enlistees but no better mental health. Army service and war-related PTSD are associated with risk of illness in later life among Australian Vietnam veterans.

  2. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  3. 76 FR 4245 - Herbicide Exposure and Veterans With Covered Service in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... and Drug Dependence; 64.022, Veterans Home Based Primary Care; 64.026, Veterans State Adult Day Health... procedure, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse, Foreign relations... prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents; wartime...

  4. A descriptive analysis of medical health services utilization of Veterans living in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study using administrative healthcare data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Alice B; Mahar, Alyson L; Kurdyak, Paul; Whitehead, Marlo; Groome, Patti A

    2016-08-04

    Health services utilization by Veterans following release may be different than the general population as the result of occupational conditions, requirements and injuries. This study provides the first longitudinal overview of Canadian Veteran healthcare utilization in the Ontario public health system. This is a retrospective cohort study designed to use Ontario's provincial healthcare data to study the demographics and healthcare utilization of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) & RCMP Veterans living in Ontario. Veterans were eligible for the study if they released between January 1, 1990 and March 31, 2013. Databases at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences were linked by a unique identifier to study non-mental health related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and physician visits. Overall and age-stratified descriptive statistics were calculated in five-year intervals following the date of release. The cohort is comprised of 23, 818 CAF or RCMP Veterans. Following entry into the provincial healthcare system, 82.6 % (95 % CI 82.1-83.1) of Veterans saw their family physician at least once over the first five years following release, 60.7 % (95 % CI 60.0-61.3) saw a non-mental health specialist, 40.8 % (95 % CI 40.2-41.5) went to the emergency department in that same time period and 9.9 % (9.5-10.3) were hospitalized for non-mental health related complaints. Patterns of non-mental health services utilization appeared to be time and service dependant. Stratifying health services utilization by age of the Veteran at entry into the provincial healthcare system revealed significant differences in service use and intensity. This study provides the first description of health services utilization by Veterans, following release from the CAF or RCMP. This work will inform the planning and delivery of support to Veterans in Ontario.

  5. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Suicide Prevention PSA for Military Families see more videos ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does ...

  6. Military service member and veteran reintegration: A critical review and adapted ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Blevins, Cara L; Fisher, Michael P; Magruder, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) experience a wide range of stress-related disorders in addition to social and occupational difficulties when reintegrating to the community. Facilitating reintegration of MSMVs following deployment is a societal priority. With an objective of identifying challenges and facilitators for reintegration of MSMVs of the current war era, we critically review and identify gaps in the literature. We searched 8 electronic databases and identified 1,764 articles. Screening of abstracts and full-text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 186 articles for review. Two investigators evaluating relevant articles independently found a lack of clear definition or comprehensive theorizing about MSMV reintegration. To address these gaps, we linked the findings from the literature to provide a unified definition of reintegration and adapted the social ecological systems theory to guide research and practice aimed at MSMV reintegration. Furthermore, we identified individual, interpersonal, community, and societal challenges related to reintegration. The 186 studies published from 2001 (the start of the current war era) to 2015 included 6 experimental studies or clinical trials. Most studies do not adequately account for context or more than a narrow set of potential influences on MSMV reintegration. Little evidence was found that evaluated interventions for health conditions, rehabilitation, and employment, or effective models of integrated delivery systems. We recommend an ecological model of MSMV reintegration to advance research and practice processes and outcomes at 4 levels (individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Fit to Serve? Exploring Mental and Physical Health and Well-Being Among Transgender Active-Duty Service Members and Veterans in the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Brandon J.; Bouris, Alida; Barnett, Joshua Trey; Walker, Dayna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Although transgender people are currently excluded from enlistment and discharged from service based on medical and psychological fitness policies, the current mental and physical health of transgender active-duty U.S. military personnel and veterans is poorly understood. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the military histories, lifetime mental and physical health diagnoses, and transgender transition-related health of transgender active-duty service members (ADSM) and veterans. Methods: Participants were recruited through private LGBT military and veteran organizational listservs, snowball sampling, and in-person recruitment to complete an anonymous and confidential self-administered online questionnaire. Results: A total of 106 transgender ADSM (n=55) and veterans (n=51) completed the questionnaire. Transgender veterans were significantly older (44 mean years vs. 29.5 mean years, t=−6.23, ptransgender transition-related health. Conclusion: Our data represent the first descriptive statistics of lifetime mental and physical health issues among transgender ADSM and veterans. Data indicate that transgender ADSM report fewer lifetime mental and physical health problems than transgender veterans. Taken together, our findings suggest that more research, specifically among transgender ADSM, is needed to challenge the exclusion of transgender persons from U.S. military service based on the presumption of poor mental or physical health. PMID:29159293

  8. Sexual dysfunction is associated with suicidal ideation in female service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Rebecca K; Monteith, Lindsey L; Kugler, Jordan

    2018-01-15

    Suicide is a leading cause of premature death among military service members/veterans (SM/Vs). The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (Joiner, 2007) proposes that higher thwarted belonging, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability confer increased risk for suicide. However, no studies have examined the association of sexual dysfunction, a possible component of thwarted belonging and perceived burdensomeness, with suicidal ideation. The present study explored whether sexual dysfunction was associated with suicidal ideation when accounting for mental health, demographic, and military characteristics among female SM/Vs. Female SM/Vs (n = 710) completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographics, mental health, military characteristics, sexual dysfunction, and suicidal ideation. One hundred fifty-nine participants (22.39%) reported suicidal ideation during the preceding two weeks. A multivariable ordinal regression adjusted for age, marital status, probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), probable depression, race/ethnicity, Army service, and deployment history. Lower sexual functioning (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.98, 95% confidence interval[CI] = 0.95-0.99), probable PTSD (AOR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.61-4.01), and probable depression (AOR = 5.28, 95% CI = 3.34-8.34) were associated with suicidal ideation. Post-hoc analyses examined the association of suicidal ideation with specific components of sexual functioning: difficulties with sexual arousal (AOR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.79-0.97) and sexual satisfaction (AOR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75-0.96) were associated with suicidal ideation. Data were cross-sectional and limited to self-report. Sexual dysfunction is associated with suicidal ideation, accounting for established mental health, military, and demographic characteristics among female SM/Vs. Efforts to prevent suicidal ideation in female SM/Vs may be enhanced by screening for and treating sexual dysfunction, particularly sexual arousal and satisfaction

  9. 76 FR 13022 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Service-Disabled Veterans Insurance) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... review and comment. The PRA submission describes the nature of the information collection and its.... Veterans completing VA Form 29-4364c do not need to provide medical information to qualify for this...

  10. The Impact of Couple Therapy on Service Utilization among Military Veterans: The Moderating Roles of Pretreatment Service Utilization and Premature Termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Joshua W; Tomfohr-Madsen, Lianne M; Doss, Brian D

    2017-09-01

    Couple therapy reduces relational and individual distress and may affect utilization of other health services, particularly among higher service utilizers. Although average decreases in service utilization are predicted among recipients of couple therapy, low utilizers of services may appropriately increase use. The relationship between couple therapy and service utilization was examined among a sample of 179 U.S. military veterans who received treatment in Veterans Affairs (VA) specialty couple therapy clinics. Consistent with hypotheses, overall mental and physical health visits decreased from the 12 months preceding couple therapy to the 12 months following treatment. Moderator analyses showed that decreases were greatest among individuals who were rated by their therapist as having completed a full course of couple therapy, suggesting that change was attributable to intervention. Pretreatment service utilization also moderated observed change-higher utilizers' use of services decreased substantially, whereas lower utilizers' slightly increased. Cost analyses revealed that the estimated per person mean cost in our sample decreased by $930.33 in the year following compared to the year prior to couple therapy, as per 2008 VA cost data. As service utilization data were only available for one partner and only for 1 year posttherapy, the true magnitude of this effect may be underestimated. Our findings are relevant to policy makers as they demonstrate that couple therapy reduces average service utilization and associated costs and addresses calls for analyses of cost effectiveness of systemic interventions. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  11. Service Members in School: Military Veterans’ Experiences Using the Post-9/11 GI Bill and Pursuing Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA); Brian Hawthorne, legisla- tive director of the Student Veterans of America ( SVA ); Derek Blumke, president of SVA ...Veterans of America ( SVA ), a national student veterans’ organization; the National Association of Veterans’ Program Administrators (NAVPA), a

  12. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  13. Elevated rates of memory impairment in military service-members and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Nikki H; Lippa, Sara M; Green, Deborah L; McGlynn, Susan M; Grande, Laura J; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2017-10-01

    Studies investigating the neurocognitive effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) routinely find "deficits" in various cognitive domains. However, the rate of cognitive impairment in individuals with PTSD remains unclear, as studies have focused on null hypothesis testing (NHT) and inferring patterns of impairment rather than empirically determining the rate of cognitive impairment in this sample. This study examined rates of cognitive impairment using a domain-specific approach in non-treatment-seeking Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn service members and veterans with (n = 92) and without (n = 79) PTSD and without substance abuse/dependence who passed a performance validity measure and were matched on age, education, estimated IQ, and ethnicity. Chi-square analyses were used to compare the rate of cognitive impairment across groups based on normative scores using three cutoffs (-1, -1.5, and -2 SDs). NHT was also used to compare performances across groups. Individuals with PTSD showed higher rates of impairment in memory (-1-SD cutoff) than controls, but equivalent rates of impairment in attention, processing speed, and executive functioning; no significant differences were found on NHT. Impairment in any domain was also more prevalent in PTSD (-1-, -1.5-, and -2-SD cutoffs). No differences were found on NHT or rates of impairment in individuals with PTSD with (n = 34) and without (n = 58) depression. Patients with PTSD were more likely to meet criteria for memory impairment and to show impairment in any domain than controls. Patients with PTSD and comorbid depression were no more likely to be impaired in any cognitive domain or to have lower scores on individual cognitive tasks than patients with PTSD alone. Clinicians noting cognitive impairment in individuals with PTSD should exercise caution before ascribing that impairment to another etiology if deficits are limited to memory.

  14. 46 CFR 350.3 - Other original recognition of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Conflict Service. Korean Service bar and medal for merchant seamen who served in waters adjacent to Korea... Conflict. Vietnam Service bar and medal awarded to merchant seamen who served in waters adjacent to Vietnam... period December 7, 1941 to July 25, 1947; (2) Victory Medal, awarded to merchant seamen who served as...

  15. Kohlstedt Receives 2003 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Reid F.

    2004-02-01

    David L. Kohlstedt was awarded the Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The medal honors ``outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets''.

  16. Navrotsky Awarded 2006 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Charles T.; Liebermann, Robert C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Alexandra Navrotsky was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting honors ceremony, which was held on 13 December 2006 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets.

  17. Nicolas Receives 2004 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allègre, Claude J.

    2005-02-01

    Adolphe Nicolas received the Hess Medal at the 2004 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on 15 December, in San Francisco, California. The medal is given for outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets. Citation. Adolphe Nicolas is a pioneer in Earth sciences. He has almost created a new field that we can name: the textural geodynamics.

  18. Melosh Receives 2008 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael J.; Melosh, H. Jay

    2009-01-01

    H. Jay Melosh was awarded the 2008 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets.''

  19. Schubert receives 2002 Harry H. Hess medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David A.; Schubert, Gerald

    Gerald Schubert was awarded the Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 8 December 2002, in San Francisco, California. The medal is given for outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets.

  20. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richardson, Glenda

    2004-01-01

    .... Although the Persian Gulf War, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom are listed in the Table of Contents, as of this writing, no Medals of Honor have been awarded for actions in these conflicts. For further information, see CRS Report 95-519, "Medal of Honor: History and Issues." This report will be updated as new recipients are named.

  1. 78 FR 37278 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV... Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of... application and servicing processes for the VBA Compensation Service (CS), Pension Service (P&F), Education...

  2. War Veterans' Memoirs as Narrated to Students: An Intergenerational Service-Learning Project for Interpersonal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Toni S.; Conis, Annick D.

    2006-01-01

    Faculty members constantly struggle to integrate "learning" and "doing" in the classroom in order to increase their students' understanding of course concepts--the interpersonal communication class is no different. The Library of Congress Veterans History Project seemed perfectly adapted to the goal of bringing interpersonal communication theories…

  3. E-cigarette Use in Veterans Seeking Mental Health and/or Substance Use Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Kathryn; Rosenheck, Robert; Merrel, Jeremy; Coffman, Marcedes; Valentine, Gerry; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders smoke at elevated rates and tend to have greater difficulty quitting smoking as compared to the general population. Some believe that e-cigarettes may reduce harm associated with smoking, but little is known about e-cigarette use, perceptions, and motivations for their use among individuals with mental health and/or substance use disorders. Rates and correlates of e-cigarette use, perceptions, and sources of information about e-cigarettes among smokers seeking mental health and/or substance use services (N = 188) at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System were assessed via a brief survey. The Pearson χ(2) test of independence was used to compare veterans who currently used e-cigarettes with those who did not. Logistic regression was used to examine independent attitudinal differences controlling for potentially confounding variables. Participants were generally male (90%), Caucasian (54%), and older than 50 (69%), with high rates of at least one mental health condition (82%), at least one substance use disorder (73%), and comorbid mental health and substance use disorders (55%). A relatively high proportion of the sample (30.9%) used e-cigarettes. These participants, compared to those who did not use e-cigarettes, were more likely to have a mental health disorder and less likely to have a substance use disorder, started smoking later in life, spent less money on smoking, and were more likely to have tried to quit "cold turkey." Knowledge of e-cigarettes originated most often from TV, radio, or personal contacts. Respondents held generally positive perceptions and motivations regarding e-cigarette use (i.e., it is socially acceptable, may help reduce/quit smoking, less harmful to others). Despite positive attributions, rates of dual use of e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes was high (86.2%), and very few people using e-cigarettes (6.9%) indicated that e-cigarettes actually helped them quit smoking

  4. Geographic access and use of infectious diseases specialty and general primary care services by veterans with HIV infection: implications for telehealth and shared care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Michael E; Richardson, Kelly; Kaboli, Peter J; Perencevich, Eli N; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Rural-dwelling persons with HIV infection often have limited access to HIV specialty care, and they may instead use more nearby primary care. This study described use of infectious disease (ID) specialty and general primary care services among rural compared with urban veterans with HIV in the United States and determined associations between geographic access to ID and primary care and use of care. The sample included all veterans in the national Veterans Administration (VA) HIV clinical case registry in 2009 (N = 23,669, 10.2% rural). Geographic access was measured by calculating travel times to the nearest VA primary care and ID specialty clinic. Rural veterans were less likely than urban to use ID clinics (82% of rural vs 87% of urban, P shared care" relationships with distant primary care providers. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  5. 38 CFR 17.101 - Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for a nonservice-connected... MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.101 Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or... section covers collection or recovery by VA, under 38 U.S.C. 1729, for medical care or services provided...

  6. Military service member and veteran self reports of efficacy of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, insomnia, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Price, Larry R; Nichols, Francine; Marksberry, Jeffrey A; Platoni, Katherine T

    2014-01-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is being prescribed for service members and veterans for the treatment of anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), insomnia and depression. The purpose of this study was to examine service members' and veterans' perceptions of the effectiveness and safety of CES treatment. Service members and veterans (N=1,514) who had obtained a CES device through the Department of Defense or Veterans Affairs Medical Center from 2006-2011 were invited to participate in the web based survey via email. One hundred fifty-two participants returned questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants reported clinical improvement of 25% or more from using CES for anxiety (66.7%), PTSD (62.5%), insomnia (65.3%) and depression (53.9%). The majority of these participants reported clinical improvement of 50% or more. Respondents also perceived CES to be safe (99.0%). Those individuals who were not taking any prescription medication rated CES more effective than the combined CES and prescription medication group. CES provides service members and veterans with a safe, noninvasive, nondrug, easy to use treatment for anxiety, PTSD, insomnia, and depression that can be used in the clinical setting or self-directed at home.

  7. Solomon Receives 2005 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, G. Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-02-01

    Sean C. Solomon received the Harry H. Hess Medal at the 2005 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of the Earth and other planets. It is a privilege to present Sean C. Solomon as the American Geophysical Union's Harry H. Hess Medal recipient. During more than 30 years of accomplished research he has established himself as one of the remarkable leadersin geophysical research today.

  8. From profession-based leadership to service line management in the Veterans Health Administration: impact on mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Greg A; Rosenheck, Robert A; Charns, Martin P

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the impact of implementing service line organization on the delivery of mental health services. Survey data on the implementation of service lines and facility-level administrative data on the delivery of mental health services at 139 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs), over a 6-year period, were used to examine the relationship between service line implementation and subsequent performance in 4 areas: 1) continuity of care (COC), 2) readmission after inpatient discharge, 3) emphasis on community-based mental health care (as contrasted with inpatient care), and 4) maintenance of proportionate funding for mental health care. Models were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling techniques to control for potential autocorrelation. Of 6 COC measures, 1 strongly improved in all years following service line implementation, and 3 of the 5 other measures demonstrated improvement in the first year. One of 2 readmission measures showed a decline in the first year after service line implementation. Service line implementation was associated with only 1 indicator of increased emphasis on community-based mental health care (and only in the first year), whereas 3 of the 4 other measures suggested a decline in such emphasis. Lastly, although there were increases in per capita mental health expenditures 3 or more years after service line implementation, 2 related measures indicated that service line implementation was associated with a decline in mental health expenditures relative to nonmental health services. Service line implementation was associated with significant, although predominantly short-term, improvement in patient level variables such as continuity of care and hospital readmission, but less so with regard to institutional measures addressing emphasis on outpatient care and maintaining proportionate funding of mental health services.

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guide for Caregivers of Service Members and Veterans. Welcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    pages 90-91 Traumatic Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance ( TSGLI ) - Module 4, page 85 Intensive Care Unit (ICU) - Module 1, page 31...PNOK – Primary Next of Kin SSN – Social Security Number TSGLI – Traumatic Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance VA – Department of Veterans Affairs...pages 90-92 TBI Prevalence - Module 1, page 3 TBI Types - Module 1, pages 13-14 TSGLI (Traumatic Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance

  10. 76 FR 4152 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV... Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of... application and servicing processes for the VBA Compensation and Pension (C&P) Service, Education (EDU...

  11. A Health Services Research Agenda for Bariatric Surgery Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, L M; Gunnar, W; Dominitz, J A; Eisenberg, D; Frayne, S; Maggard-Gibbons, M; Kalarchian, M A; Livingston, E; Sanchez, V; Smith, B R; Weidenbacher, H; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    In 2016, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) held a Weight Management State of the Art conference to identify evidence gaps and develop a research agenda for population-based weight management for veterans. Included were behavioral, pharmacologic, and bariatric surgery workgroups. This article summarizes the bariatric surgery workgroup (BSWG) findings and recommendations for future research. The BSWG agreed that there is evidence from randomized trials and large observational studies suggesting that bariatric surgery is superior to medical therapy for short- and intermediate-term remission of type 2 diabetes, long-term weight loss, and long-term survival. Priority evidence gaps include long-term comorbidity remission, mental health, substance abuse, and health care costs. Evidence of the role of endoscopic weight loss options is also lacking. The BSWG also noted the limited evidence regarding optimal timing for bariatric surgery referral, barriers to bariatric surgery itself, and management of high-risk bariatric surgery patients. Clinical trials of pre- and post-surgery interventions may help to optimize patient outcomes. A registry of overweight and obese veterans and a workforce assessment to determine the VHA's capacity to increase bariatric surgery access were recommended. These will help inform policy modifications and focus the research agenda to improve the ability of the VHA to deliver population-based weight management.

  12. Do faith-based residential care services affect the religious faith and clinical outcomes of homeless veterans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kasprow, Wesley J; McGuire, James F

    2012-12-01

    Data on 1,271 clients in three residential care services funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs was used to examine: (1) how religious-oriented programs differ in their social environment from secular programs, (2) how religious-oriented programs affect the religiosity of clients, and (3) how client religiosity is associated with outcomes. Programs were categorized as: secular, secular now but religious in the past, and currently religiously oriented. Results showed (1) participants in programs that were currently religious reported the greatest program clarity, but secular services reported the most supportive environments; (2) participants in programs that were currently religious did not report increases in religious faith or religious participation over time; nevertheless (3) greater religious participation was associated with greater improvement in housing, mental health, substance abuse, and quality of life. These findings suggest religious-oriented programs have little influence on clients' religious faith, but more religiously oriented clients have somewhat superior outcomes.

  13. Do Alcohol Misuse, Service Utilisation, and Demographic Characteristics Differ between UK Veterans and Members of the General Public Attending an NHS General Hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Murphy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to provide insights into alcohol misuse within UK veterans to inform as to whether their presentations differ from the general public. This was done by exploring differences in the severity of alcohol misuse between UK veterans and the general public admitted to a general NHS hospital over an 18 month period using retrospective data. All patients admitted to the hospital were screened for alcohol misuse. Those deemed as experiencing problems were referred for specialist nurse-led support. A total of 2331 individuals were referred for this supported and administered with a standardised assessment that included measures of the severity of alcohol difficulties (AUDIT, dependency levels (LDQ, and assessed for the presence of withdrawal symptoms (CIWA-Ar. In addition, information was collected on service utilisation, referral category (medical or mental health, other substance misuse, and demographic characteristics. No differences were found between the severity of reported alcohol difficulties between veterans and non-veterans. Evidence was found to suggest that veterans were more likely to be referred for support with alcohol difficulties at an older age and to be admitted to hospital for longer periods of time. This could have considerable cost implications for the NHS. It was more common for veterans to present at hospital with physical health difficulties prior to being referred for support for alcohol.

  14. Women Veterans’ Healthcare Delivery Preferences and Use by Military Service Era: Findings from the National Survey of Women Veterans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Washington, Donna L; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Hamilton, Alison B; Cordasco, Kristina M; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    The number of women Veterans (WVs) utilizing the Veterans Health Administration (VA) has doubled over the past decade, heightening the importance of understanding their healthcare delivery preferences and utilization patterns...

  15. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Military Service Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    According to research (Fargo et al, 2012) and federal data (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development [HUD], 2015), veterans experience homelessness at a higher rate than non-veterans. Many veterans experience homelessness as individuals, while others experience homelessness with their families (2015), which may include school-age children.…

  16. CERN physicist receives Einstein Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 29 June the CERN theorist Gabriele Veneziano was awarded the prestigious Albert Einstein Medal for significant contributions to the understanding of string theory. This award is given by the Albert Einstein Society in Bern to individuals whose scientific contributions relate to the work of Einstein. Former recipients include exceptional physicists such as Murray Gell-Mann last year, but also Stephen Hawking and Victor Weisskopf. Gabriele Veneziano, a member of the integrated CERN Theory Team since 1977, led the Theory Division from 1994 to 1997 and has already received many prestigious prizes for his outstanding work, including the Enrico Fermi Prize (see CERN Courier, November 2005), the Dannie Heineman Prize for mathematical physics of the American Physical Society in 2004 (see Bulletin No. 47/2003), and the I. Ya. Pomeranchuk Prize of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow) in 1999.

  17. Characteristics and Use of Services Among Literally Homeless and Unstably Housed U.S. Veterans With Custody of Minor Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kasprow, Wesley J; Kane, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The study examined the number of homeless veterans with minor children in their custody ("children in custody"), compared sociodemographic and clinical characteristics among homeless veterans with and without children in custody, and observed differences in referral and admission patterns among veterans with and without children in custody for a variety of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) programs for homeless veterans. Data were obtained from the VA Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System for 89,142 literally homeless and unstably housed veterans. Sociodemographic, housing, health, and psychosocial characteristics of veterans were analyzed. Among literally homeless veterans, 9% of men and 30% of women had children in custody; among unstably housed veterans, 18% of men and 45% of women had children in custody. Both male and female veterans with children in custody were younger and less likely to have chronic general medical conditions and psychiatric disorders compared with other veterans, but, notably, 11% of homeless veterans with children in custody had psychotic disorders. Veterans with children in custody were more likely than other veterans to be referred and admitted to the VA's permanent supported housing program, and women were more likely than men to be admitted to the program. A substantial proportion of homeless veterans served by the VA have severe mental illness and children in custody, which raises concerns about the parenting environment for their children. Particular focus should be directed at VA's supported-housing program, and the practical and ethical implications of serving homeless parents and their children need to be considered.

  18. Thwarted belongingness as an explanatory link between insomnia symptoms and suicidal ideation: Findings from three samples of military service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Melanie A; Chu, Carol; Schneider, Matthew E; Lim, Ingrid C; Hirsch, Jameson K; Gutierrez, Peter M; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    Although insomnia has been identified as a robust predictor of suicidal ideation and behaviors, little is known about the mechanisms by which sleep disturbances confer risk for suicide. We investigated thwarted belongingness as an explanatory link between insomnia symptoms and suicidal ideation across three military service member and veteran samples. Data were collected among United States military service members and veterans (N1=937, N2=3,386, N3=417) who completed self-report measures of insomnia symptoms, thwarted belongingness, suicidal ideation, and related psychiatric symptoms (e.g., anxiety, hopelessness). Bias-corrected bootstrap mediation analyses were utilized to examine the indirect effects of insomnia symptoms on suicidal ideation through thwarted belongingness, controlling for related psychiatric symptoms. Consistent with study hypotheses, thwarted belongingness significantly accounted for the relationship between insomnia and suicidal ideation across all three samples; however, insomnia symptoms did not significantly account for the relationship between thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation, highlighting the specificity of our findings. This study utilized cross-sectional self-report data. Insomnia may confer suicide risk for military service members and veterans, in part, through the pathway of thwarted belongingness. Additional prospective studies are warranted to further delineate this model of risk. Our results offer a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of suicide, via the promotion of belongingness, among service members and veterans experiencing insomnia symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of a Web-based Intervention for Concerned Spouses of Service Members and Veterans with Alcohol Misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osilla, Karen Chan; Trail, Thomas E; Pedersen, Eric R; Gore, Kristie L; Tolpadi, Anagha; Rodriguez, Lindsey M

    2017-10-03

    Concerned partners (CPs) of service members and veterans who misuse alcohol face help-seeking barriers and mental health problems. We used multiple regression to evaluate the efficacy of Partners Connect, a four-session web-based intervention (WBI) to address military CPs' mental health and communication. We randomized 312 CPs to the WBI or a control group. Five months later, WBI CPs reported significant reductions in their anxiety and increases in their social support compared to control CPs. Intervention dose was also associated with improved WBI CP outcomes. Partners Connect appears to fill a need for families who face help-seeking barriers and provides an alternative to traditional care for those who may not otherwise seek help. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  20. Lessons learned from a quality improvement intervention with homeless veteran services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; Hannah, Gordon; McCarthy, Sharon

    2012-08-01

    Homeless veterans are a vulnerable population, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Evidence-based practices for homelessness have been challenging to implement. This study engaged staff members from three VA homeless programs to improve their quality using Getting-To-Outcomes (GTO), a model and intervention of trainings and technical assistance that builds practitioner capacity to plan, implement, and self-evaluate evidence-based practices. Primarily used in community-based, non-VA settings, this study piloted GTO in VA by creating a GTO project within each homeless program and one across all three. The feasibility and acceptability of GTO in VA is examined using the results of the projects, time spent on GTO, and data from focus groups and interviews. With staff members averaging 33 minutes per week on GTO, each team made significant programmatic changes. Homeless staff stated GTO was helpful, and that high levels of communication, staff member commitment to the program, and technical assistance were critical.

  1. 77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse.... SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for Kennedy Half-Dollar bags and rolls, bronze medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal Set and the Birth Set. Product Retail price Kennedy Half-Dollar...

  2. Protective and Vulnerability Factors Contributing to Resilience in Post-9/11 Veterans With Service-Related Injuries in Postsecondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakman, Aaron M; Schelly, Catherine; Henry, Kimberly L

    2016-01-01

    To examine differences in psychosocial protective factors (social support, meaningful occupation, and academic self-efficacy) and health-related vulnerability factors (posttraumatic stress, depression, and somatic symptoms) contributing to resilience in post-9/11 veterans with service-related injuries and nonveterans in postsecondary education. A cross-sectional, matched-participants design using propensity score matching was used to test differences in mean levels of protective and vulnerability factors between injured veterans (n = 26) and nonveterans (n = 19); zero-order correlations explored relationships among study variables. The veteran sample demonstrated lower levels of psychosocial protective factors and higher levels of health-related vulnerability factors compared with nonveterans (|0.49| to |1.56|). Psychosocial protective factors were consistently negatively associated with health-related vulnerability factors (-.27 to -.63). Post-9/11 veterans with service-related injuries are at a substantial disadvantage in terms of resilience; lower protective factors and elevated vulnerability factors may increase their risk for poor campus integration and impede academic achievement. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  3. Veterans Benefits: Burial Benefits and National Cemeteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    hospital, nursing home, or domiciliary care facility; and (2) a plot allowance for a veteran eligible for burial in a national cemetery who is not... domiciliary care . The VA was permitted to enter into contracts to provide the burial and funeral services for veterans who died in VA facilities...Veterans Affairs (VA) provides a range of benefits and services to veterans who meet certain eligibility rules; benefits include hospital and medical care

  4. 75 FR 14257 - Pricing for Bronze Medals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for Bronze Medals AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the 1\\5/16\\- inch bronze...

  5. A review of the Tom Rozwadowski medal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His research contributions to the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis .... comments concerning the medal are then given as well as an analysis of the institutions of .... R de Jongh. PSI (part of Institute for Maritime. Technology (IMT)). Future: A Knowledge-Based System For. Threat Assessment (De Jongh et al. 1994). 1995.

  6. 14 medals for the CERN Ski Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    From 22 to 29 January, the ski resort of La Clusaz in Haute Savoie hosted the 11th Winter Atomiades. With nine gold medals and four silver medals in cross-country skiing, and a bronze medal in downhill skiing, the team from the CERN Ski Club finished third in the medals table.   Group photo at the 2011 Atomiades Organised by the Association of Sports Communities of European Research Institutes, nearly 260 participants from 15 research centres throughout Europe competed against each other in this skiing event. Each in their own discipline and age category, the fourteen members of the CERN team defended the colours of the Organization in the spirit of fun and fair play: “I had a really good week,” explained Simone Campana from the IT Department. “There was a great atmosphere. I’m only sorry that there was no general ranking this year. Let’s hope they’ll think about having one next time!” Despite the competition, the event is ...

  7. Psychology and the National Medal of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Robert P.; Benjamin, Ludy T., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When Congress created the National Medal of Science in 1959 to be awarded by the president of the United States, psychology was not among the eligible sciences. A concerted lobbying effort in the late 1970s changed that situation, adding social and behavioral sciences to the listing of eligible disciplines. This article describes how the award…

  8. 78 FR 90 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2013 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... Medal highlights the national importance of fostering technological innovation resulting in commercially... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2013...) is accepting nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since...

  9. The long-term hospitalization experience following military service in the 1991 Gulf War among veterans remaining on active duty, 1994–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Tomoko I; DeBakey, Samar F; Nagaraj, Barbara E; Bellis, Kimberly S; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C; Gackstetter, Gary D

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite more than a decade of extensive, international efforts to characterize and understand the increased symptom and illness-reporting among veterans of the 1991 Gulf War, concern over possible long-term health effects related to this deployment continue. The purpose of this study was to describe the long-term hospitalization experience of the subset of U.S. Gulf War veterans still on active duty between 1994 and 2004. Methods Gulf War veterans on active duty rosters as of October 1, 1994, were identified (n = 211 642) and compared with veterans who had separated from military service and then assessed for attrition at three-year intervals during a 10-year follow-up period, examining demographic and military service characteristics, Gulf War exposure variables, and hospitalization data. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate independent predictors of all-cause hospitalization among those still on active duty and to estimate cumulative probability of hospitalization, 1994–2004, by service branch. Results Members of our 1994 active duty cohort were more likely to be officers, somewhat older, and married compared with those who had separated from the military after serving in the 1991 Gulf War. Selected war-related exposures or experiences did not appear to influence separation with the exception of in-theater presence during the brief ground combat phase. Overall the top three diagnostic categories for hospitalizations were musculo-skeletal, injury and poisoning, and digestive disorders. Diseases of the circulatory system and symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions increased proportionately over time. In-theater hospitalization was the only significant independent predictor of long-term hospitalization risk among selected war-related exposures or experiences examined. The cumulative probability of hospitalization was highest for Army and lowest for Marines. Conclusion Our results were generally consistent with a previous

  10. The long-term hospitalization experience following military service in the 1991 Gulf War among veterans remaining on active duty, 1994–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Besa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite more than a decade of extensive, international efforts to characterize and understand the increased symptom and illness-reporting among veterans of the 1991 Gulf War, concern over possible long-term health effects related to this deployment continue. The purpose of this study was to describe the long-term hospitalization experience of the subset of U.S. Gulf War veterans still on active duty between 1994 and 2004. Methods Gulf War veterans on active duty rosters as of October 1, 1994, were identified (n = 211 642 and compared with veterans who had separated from military service and then assessed for attrition at three-year intervals during a 10-year follow-up period, examining demographic and military service characteristics, Gulf War exposure variables, and hospitalization data. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate independent predictors of all-cause hospitalization among those still on active duty and to estimate cumulative probability of hospitalization, 1994–2004, by service branch. Results Members of our 1994 active duty cohort were more likely to be officers, somewhat older, and married compared with those who had separated from the military after serving in the 1991 Gulf War. Selected war-related exposures or experiences did not appear to influence separation with the exception of in-theater presence during the brief ground combat phase. Overall the top three diagnostic categories for hospitalizations were musculo-skeletal, injury and poisoning, and digestive disorders. Diseases of the circulatory system and symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions increased proportionately over time. In-theater hospitalization was the only significant independent predictor of long-term hospitalization risk among selected war-related exposures or experiences examined. The cumulative probability of hospitalization was highest for Army and lowest for Marines. Conclusion Our results were generally consistent

  11. 76 FR 74849 - Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... unanticipated delays, computer service outages, or other delivery-related problems. For a Copy of the... from an institution in which the person has been a resident for more than 180 days (including prisons... standards for the housing unit size); o. Past institutional care (prison, treatment facility, hospital); p...

  12. Invisible Wounds: Serving Service Members and Veterans with PTSD and TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, 2009

    2009-01-01

    More than 1.6 million American service members have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). As of December 2008, more than 4,000 troops have been killed and over 30,000 have returned from a combat zone with visible wounds and a range of permanent disabilities. In addition, an…

  13. Unemployment, earnings and enrollment among post 9/11 veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleykamp, Meredith

    2013-05-01

    This paper examines three outcomes characterizing different aspects of post 9/11 veterans' economic reintegration to civilian life: unemployment, earnings and college enrollment, using Current Population Survey data from 2005 to 2011. Analyses include interactions of veteran status with sex, race/ethnicity and educational attainment to evaluate whether diverse veterans experience diverse consequences of service. In brief, I find that the basic unemployment differences between veterans and non-veterans often reported in the media understate the effect of military service on unemployment for men, since veterans have other characteristics that are associated with higher employment rates. Female veterans appear to suffer a steeper employment penalty than male veterans, but black veterans appear to suffer less of a penalty than white veterans. But on two other measures, earnings and college enrollment, veterans appear to be doing better than their civilian peers. Veterans with a high school education or less outearn their civilian peers, but veterans with at least some college education appear to lose some or all of the veteran earnings advantage compared to veterans with a high school degree, suggesting the greatest wage returns to military service accrue among the least educated. Veterans with at least a high school education are more likely to be enrolled in college than their civilian peers. Treating veterans as a monolithic block obscures differences in the consequences of military service across diverse groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 77 FR 20849 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Veterans' Reintegration Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS), Department of...: Section 2021 of Title 38 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) reauthorizes the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) through fiscal year (FY) 2012 and indicates: ``the Secretary of Labor shall conduct...

  15. O'Hara Receives 2007 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaoling; O'Hara, Michael John

    2008-01-01

    Michael John O'Hara was awarded the 2007 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The Harry H. Hess Medal recognizes ``outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets.'' It is thus most appropriate that Mike O'Hara receive the 2007 Hess Medal of the American Geophysical Union.

  16. The Department of Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Service, "transforming nursing in a national healthcare system: an example of transformation in action".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Chapman, Kathleen M; Wright-Brown, Salena

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Service has embarked on a multiyear transformational process, an example of which is the development of an organization-wide nursing handbook. The development of this handbook offered the opportunity to improve collaboration, redefine expectations and behavior, as well as prepare for the future of Nursing within the Veterans Health Administration. The lessons learned from this process have revolved around the themes of leadership skills for managing high-level change often in a virtual environment; constant collaboration; that the practice of nursing will continue to evolve on the basis of new evidence, technology, customer expectations, and resources; and that the process to accomplish this goal is powerful.

  17. Women Veterans' Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Assault in the Context of Military Service: Implications for Supporting Women's Health and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Melissa E; Wagner, Clara; True, Gala

    2016-09-20

    Women who have served in the military in the United States experience high rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual assault (SA). The military setting presents challenges and opportunities not experienced in other employment contexts that may compound the negative impacts of IPV/SA on women's lives. The purpose of this study was to explore the intersection of women's experiences of IPV/SA and military service through analysis of women veterans' narrative accounts. We conducted in-depth face-to-face qualitative interviews with 25 women veterans receiving primary care at a U.S. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We draw upon Adler and Castro's (2013) Military Occupational Mental Health Model to frame our understanding of the impact of IPV/SA as a stressor in the military cultural context and to inform efforts to prevent, and support women service members who have experienced, these forms of violence. Our findings highlight the impact of IPV/SA on women's military careers, including options for entering and leaving military service, job performance, and opportunities for advancement. Women's narratives also reveal ways in which the military context constrains their options for responding to and coping with experiences of IPV/SA. These findings have implications for prevention of, and response to, intimate partner or sexual violence experienced by women serving in the military and underscore the need for both military and civilian communities to recognize and address the negative impact of such violence on women service members before, during, and after military service. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. 1987 Hess Medal presented to Julius Goldsmith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Julian R.

    This is only the second time that the Harry H. Hess Medal has been awarded. This award is given for “outstanding achievement in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets.” The fundamental building blocks of Earth and its nearest siblings are rocks and minerals. Julian Goldsmith's scientific life has been dedicated to understanding, on a fundamental level, how minerals behave, in order that we may better comprehend how Earth as a whole behaves.

  19. 1985 Hess Medal to Gerald J. Wasserburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, William M.; Wasserburg, Gerald

    This is the first presentation of the Harry Hess Medal. Harry Hess was long Professor of Geology at Princeton. He is most renowned as a founding father of seafloor spreading but contributed significantly to a variety of advances in geology and petrology. Harry Hess died in 1969 after seeing man land on the moon, an event of interest to him as chair of the Space Science Board.

  20. 1985 Hess Medal to Gerald J. Wasserburg

    OpenAIRE

    Kaula, William M.; Wasserburg, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    This is the first presentation of the Harry Hess Medal. Harry Hess was long Professor of Geology at Princeton. He is most renowned as a founding father of seafloor spreading but contributed significantly to a variety of advances in geology and petrology. Harry Hess died in 1969 after seeing man land on the moon, an event of interest to him as chair of the Space Science Board.

  1. Kushiro receives 1999 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn; Kushiro, Iko

    Ikuo Kushiro was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on June 2, 1999, in Boston, Massachusetts. The medal recognizes outstanding achievements in the research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets.Characterization of rock-forming processes requires laboratory experiments to determine the physicochemical properties of materials or their analog model compounds at high temperatures and high pressures. The experimental data, however, are not particularly useful unless integrated with observational and theoretical information. Ikuo Kushiro, this year's winner of the Harry H. Hess Medal, approaches experiments with this integrated view as his guiding light. He does experimental petrology, geochemistry and geophysics, but always with the understanding that the experimental data provide only a piece of a more complex puzzle. It is perhaps in part because of this attitude that Ikuo and his colleagues have provided the fundamental experimental data on phase equilibria, element partitioning, and equation-of-state of molten silicate applicable to most major rock-forming processes in the Earth. All too often we ask what we can do with our instrumentation and proceed from there. Ikuo first asks the real question and then designs the experiment.

  2. Veterans and Military Family Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service members and veterans face some different health issues from civilians. Their families also face some unique challenges. Families may have to cope with Separation from their loved ones Anxiety over loved ones' safety in combat ...

  3. Veterans' homecomings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Refslund

    2015-01-01

    social identity and find a meaningful life in the civilian world. When doing so, they need to navigate an ambiguous political environment and emergent public imaginaries of the veteran while also wrestling with their own military socialization and personal experiences of war. The certainty previously...... experiences, present conditions, and future ambitions are embedded in webs of concealment, disclosure, exposure, deception, lying, silence, and so forth, only partially controlled by the veterans themselves. The intricacies and anxieties associated with secrecy work are discussed in relation to three veteran...

  4. Barriers and Facilitators Related to Mental Health Care Use Among Older Veterans in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blais, Rebecca K; Tsai, Jack; Southwick, Steven M; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric disorders are more prevalent among older veterans compared with their civilian counterparts, but many veterans with symptoms of psychiatric disorders do not utilize mental health services...

  5. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of the...

  6. David Walker Receives 2010 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Carl B.; Walker, David

    2011-01-01

    David Walker was awarded the 2010 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding achievements in research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets.”

  7. Maria T. Zuber Receives 2012 Harry H. Hess Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-01-01

    Maria T. Zuber was awarded the 2012 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets."

  8. Dick receives 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaoling

    2012-01-01

    Henry J. B. Dick was awarded the 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets."

  9. Frank M. Richter Receives 2009 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, David B.; Richter, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Frank M. Richter was awarded the 2009 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 16 December 2009 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets.”

  10. Dick receives 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Henry J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Henry J. B. Dick was awarded the 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets."

  11. Rural veteran access to healthcare services: investigating the role of information and communication technologies in overcoming spatial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin L; Horan, Thomas A; Lee, Pamela W; West, Priscilla A

    2010-04-01

    This multimethod pilot study examined patient and practitioner perspectives on the influence of spatial barriers to healthcare access and the role of health information technology in overcoming these barriers. The study included a survey administered to patients attending a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health visit, and a focus group with VA care providers. Descriptive results and focus group findings are presented. Spatial distance is a significant factor for many rural veterans when seeking healthcare. For this sample of rural veterans, a range of telephone, computer, and Internet technologies may become more important for accessing care as Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and as younger veterans begin using the VA health system. The focus group highlighted the negative impact of distance, economic considerations, geographic barriers, and specific medical conditions on access to care. Lack of adequate technology infrastructure was seen as an obstacle to utilization. This study discusses the need to consider distance, travel modes, age, and information technology infrastructure and adoption when designing health information technology to care for rural patients.

  12. Rehospitalization in the First Year Following Veteran and Service Member TBI: A VA TBI Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Johanna; Hammond, Flora; Dams-OʼConnor, Kristen; Tang, Xinyu; Eapen, Blessen; McCarthy, Marissa; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To determine the incidence and causes of rehospitalization following military or Veteran traumatic brain injury (TBI). Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Health Administration Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers (VHA PRCs). Consecutive sample of VHA TBI Model System participants (N = 401). Prospective observational cohort study. Number and type of rehospitalizations in first year post-TBI. Forty-one percent of 401 participants were rehospitalized. Rehospitalization status was associated with greater injury severity and receipt of TBI while active duty. Of those rehospitalized, 30% had 2 or more readmissions. Participants experiencing multiple rehospitalizations (2+) were more likely to have sustained their TBI during deployment than those with none or single rehospitalization. This group also sustained more severe injuries and spent more time in VA PRC inpatient rehabilitation. Common reasons for rehospitalization included inpatient rehabilitation (33%), unspecified (26%), orthopedic (10%), seizures (8%), infection (8%), and psychiatric (7%). This is the first study examining military and Veteran rehospitalization following TBI requiring inpatient rehabilitation at a VA PRC. Findings indicate frequent rehospitalizations in the first year postinjury, suggesting the need for preventive models of health maintenance following inpatient rehabilitation discharge. Greater surveillance of those with deployment-related TBI or active duty at the time of injury and greater TBI severity may be warranted.

  13. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Carla J.; Bridier, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1310 - Who is a World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a World War II veteran. 404.1310... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1310 Who is a World War II veteran. You are a World War II veteran if you were in the active...

  15. 76 FR 21107 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs... VA health care to enrolled Veterans residing in rural areas and discusses ways to improve and enhance... Secretary, VA Veteran Centers services, rural women Veteran health care, and the meeting agenda and planning...

  16. Women Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report summarizes the history of women Veterans in the military and as Veterans. It profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2015, and illustrates how...

  17. Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here VA » Veterans Health Administration Veterans Health Administration Veterans – Here's how to Avoid Getting the Flu ... Read more » VA Medical Centers The Veterans Health Administration is home to the United States’ largest integrated ...

  18. Dalrymple receives National Medal of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Brent Dalrymple, who served as AGU president from 1990-1992, has been selected as a one of eight recipients of the 2003 National Medal of Science, the White House announced on 14 February The presidential award, which will be presented on 14 March, is considered the nation's highest honor for scientists and engineers.A former research geologist-geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey and former dean of oceanic and atmospheric sciences at Oregon State University, Dalrymple helped to lay the foundation for the theory of plate tectonics.

  19. Psychology and the National Medal of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Robert P; Benjamin, Ludy T

    2012-04-01

    When Congress created the National Medal of Science in 1959 to be awarded by the president of the United States, psychology was not among the eligible sciences. A concerted lobbying effort in the late 1970s changed that situation, adding social and behavioral sciences to the listing of eligible disciplines. This article describes how the award program was created with more restricted eligibility and the behind-the-scenes actions that led to eligibility being broadened, noting particularly the efforts of one very prominent psychologist who was angry about the exclusion of his science.

  20. ParticipantService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Given a VeteranÆs File Number or Social Security Number the service will return information about the other people and organizations related to the Veteran (family...

  1. Examining aggression in male Vietnam veterans who receive VA services: the role of traumatic events and combat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Jenna M; Howard, Jamie M; Taft, Casey T; Kaloupek, Danny G; Keane, Terence M

    2012-08-01

    We examined the relationship between trauma exposure and the perpetration of aggression by male Vietnam veterans (N = 1,328) using archival data from a multisite study conducted by the Cooperative Studies Program of the Department of Veteran Affairs (CSP-334) in the early 1990s. Both traumatic events in civilian life and combat exposure were examined as correlates of aggression. Results indicated that pre- and postmilitary traumatic events and combat exposure were all related to perpetration of aggression at the bivariate level; r = .07, r = .20, and r = .13, respectively. When these variables were examined simultaneously, only combat exposure (β = .14, p traumatic events (β = .20, p effects were found for civilian traumatic events and combat in relation to aggression. Results highlight the importance of attending to the psychological aftermath of exposure to traumatic events experienced during and following deployment before aggressive patterns develop. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    services to veterans who meet certain eligibility rules including hospital and medical care , disability compensation and pensions,3 education ,4...prosthetic and orthotic devices, including eyeglasses and hearing aids; home health services, hospice care , palliative care , and institutional respite care ...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Veterans Medical Care : FY2011 Appropriations Sidath Viranga

  3. Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post Traumatic Headaches in OEF/OIF/OND Service Members and Veterans with Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Department of Veterans Affairs, 4/1/12-3/31/16 New Support on: 1. Neurobehavior, Neuropathology, and Risk Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease (T32 AG052354...Detection, Diagnosis, Course, and Risk Factors (U01 NS093334, Robert Stern), National Institutes of Health / NINDS, 12/15/15-11/30/22, $2,252,000, 0.6 CM...Role: Co-Investigator  What other organizations were involved as partners? A subcontract to Henry Jackson Foundation provides support for

  4. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and help get the word ... Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does not store mobile phone numbers of users ...

  5. Patrick Janot receives the CNRS silver medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Patrick Janot during the award ceremony. (Photo Schwemling, Paris) On 25 November, Patrick Janot of the CERN Physics Department received the CNRS silver medal for IN2P3 (Institut national de physique nucléaire et de physique des particules). This prize, one of the most prestigious awarded by the French research centre, is given to scientists for the 'originality, quality and importance of their work, as recognised both nationally and internationally'. Patrick Janot joined the ALEPH collaboration, one of the four experiments at LEP, then under construction, in 1987. First a CERN Fellow, he went on to work for the CNRS at LAL in 1989. Together with his team, he developed innovative algorithms for the reconstruction of events. This work and others earned him the bronze CNRS medal in 1993, which is awarded to scientists for their first achievements. In 1997, he became a permanent physicist at CERN, where he continued to work for ALEPH. He was appointed LEP scientific co-ordinator for the last two years of the ac...

  6. Optimizing fitness for duty and post-combat clinical services for military personnel and combat veterans with ADHD—a systematic review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliyan Ivanov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention deficit hyper activity disorder (ADHD is a developmental disorder, most often diagnosed in childhood, and characterized by hyperactivity and inattention that negatively impacts one's ability to function and fulfill social and personal obligations. Individuals with past history of ADHD may enlist in the military under certain conditions, however the full impact of military training and deployment of later in life ADHD symptoms is unclear. It is of particular interest how military experience may affect ADHD in remission and if such individuals might be at elevated risk for relapse of ADHD symptoms. Method: We performed a systematic review f the available literature including the Department of Defense (DOD guidelines for both eligibility to enlist and fitness for deployment based on reported history and current symptomatology of ADHD. Results: The after care for veterans with ADHD relapse is inconsistent and presents with number of challenges. We evaluate the DOD policies regarding the implications of ADHD for fitness for military service and post-combat mental health. Conclusion: The full extend of the interaction between pre-existing ADHD and post-combat PTSD are not fully understood. The development of comprehensive and clear algorithms for diagnosing and treating ADHD in the military before and after deployment will have a strong positive impact on the quality of care delivered to soldiers and veterans.

  7. The Long-Term Impact of Military Service on Health: Evidence from World War II and Korean War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Kelly; Deschênes, Olivier

    2006-03-01

    During the World War II and Korean War era, the U.S. military freely distributed cigarettes to overseas personnel and provided low-cost tobacco products on domestic military bases. In fact, even today the military continues to sell subsidized tobacco products on its bases. Using a variety of instrumental variables approaches to deal with nonrandom selection into the military and into smoking, we provide substantial evidence that cohorts with higher military participation rates subsequently suffered more premature mortality. More importantly, we show that a large fraction, 35 to 79 percent, of the excess veteran deaths due to heart disease and lung cancer are attributable to military-induced smoking.

  8. Military Sexual Trauma Among Homeless Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Pavao, Joanne; Turchik, Jessica A.; Hyun, Jenny K.; Karpenko, Julie; Saweikis, Meghan; McCutcheon, Susan; Kane, Vincent; Kimerling, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Military sexual trauma (MST) is the Veteran Health Administration?s (VHA) term for sexual assault and/or sexual harassment that occurs during military service. The experience of MST is associated with a variety of mental health conditions. Preliminary research suggests that MST may be associated with homelessness among female Veterans, although to date MST has not been examined in a national study of both female and male homeless Veterans. OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevale...

  9. Military sexual trauma among homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Joanne; Turchik, Jessica A; Hyun, Jenny K; Karpenko, Julie; Saweikis, Meghan; McCutcheon, Susan; Kane, Vincent; Kimerling, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Military sexual trauma (MST) is the Veteran Health Administration's (VHA) term for sexual assault and/or sexual harassment that occurs during military service. The experience of MST is associated with a variety of mental health conditions. Preliminary research suggests that MST may be associated with homelessness among female Veterans, although to date MST has not been examined in a national study of both female and male homeless Veterans. To estimate the prevalence of MST, examine the association between MST and mental health conditions, and describe mental health utilization among homeless women and men. National, cross-sectional study of 126,598 homeless Veterans who used VHA outpatient care in fiscal year 2010. All variables were obtained from VHA administrative databases, including MST screening status, ICD-9-CM codes to determine mental health diagnoses, and VHA utilization. Of homeless Veterans in VHA, 39.7 % of females and 3.3 % of males experienced MST. Homeless Veterans who experienced MST demonstrated a significantly higher likelihood of almost all mental health conditions examined as compared to other homeless women and men, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, bipolar disorders, personality disorders, suicide, and, among men only, schizophrenia and psychotic disorders. Nearly all homeless Veterans had at least one mental health visit and Veterans who experienced MST utilized significantly more mental health visits compared to Veterans who did not experience MST. A substantial proportion of homeless Veterans using VHA services have experienced MST, and those who experienced MST had increased odds of mental health diagnoses. Homeless Veterans who had experienced MST had higher intensity of mental health care utilization and high rates of MST-related mental health care. This study highlights the importance of trauma-informed care among homeless Veterans and the success of VHA homeless

  10. Veterans' use of Department of Veterans Affairs care and perceptions of outsourcing inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine veterans' perceptions of problems and benefits of outsourcing inpatient care from Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to private sector hospitals. Primary data were collected from a cross-section of 42 veterans who were VA users and nonusers using focus groups. Focus group discussion examined reasons patients use VA care, differences between VA and civilian care, positive and negative impacts of outsourcing, and special needs of veterans. Analyses revealed five domains related both to use of VA services and perceptions of outsourcing: costs, access, quality of care, contract (i.e., a covenant between veterans and the U.S. government), veteran milieu, and special needs. Participants identified a variety of potential positive and negative impacts. In general, veterans perceived more advantages than disadvantages to outsourcing VA care but still expressed significant concerns related to outsourcing. These issues should be considered in the development of future policy toward outsourcing VA care to the private sector.

  11. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Administration » Health Programs for Veterans Veterans Health Administration Health Programs for Veterans Beyond the doctors and ... families of patients receiving medical care at major military and VA medical centers Geriatrics & Extended Care Geriatric ...

  12. Veterans Crisis Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The caring responders at the Veterans Crisis Line are specially trained and experienced in helping Veterans of all ages and circumstances. Some of the responders are...

  13. 75 FR 14633 - Veterans Workforce Investment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...' Employment and Training Service Veterans Workforce Investment Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and...' Workforce Investment Program (VWIP) for Program Year (PY) 2010, as authorized under section 168 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. This Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) notice contains all...

  14. Risk factors for homelessness among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Donna L; Yano, Elizabeth M; McGuire, James; Hines, Vivian; Lee, Martin; Gelberg, Lillian

    2010-02-01

    Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate exact standard errors of the model coefficients and p-values. Characteristics associated with homelessness were sexual assault during military service, being unemployed, being disabled, having worse overall health, and screening positive for an anxiety disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Protective factors were being a college graduate or married. Efforts to assess housed women veterans' risk factors for homelessness should be integrated into clinical care programs within and outside the Veterans Administration. Programs that work to ameliorate risk factors may prevent these women's living situations from deteriorating over time.

  15. A Latent Content Analysis of Barriers and Supports to Healthcare: Perspectives From Caregivers of Service Members and Veterans With Military-Related Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Lange, Rael T; French, Louis M; Sander, Angelle M; Freedman, Jenna; Brickell, Tracey A

    2018-01-30

    To identify barriers and supports that caregivers of individuals with military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) encounter when navigating the military healthcare system; this information will be used as the foundation of a new patient-reported outcome measure. Community. Forty-five caregivers of service members and veterans (SMV) who sustained a medically documented mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating TBI. Latent content analysis. Nine focus group discussions of barriers and supports to navigating the military healthcare system and community resources. Latent content analysis indicated that caregivers discussed barriers (66%) and supports (34%) to obtaining care within the military healthcare system and the community. Caregivers most frequently discussed SMVs' interactions with healthcare, their own interactions with healthcare, family care, and community organizations. Caregivers confront numerous challenges while pursuing healthcare services. Although much of the discussion focused on barriers and perceived unmet needs within the military healthcare system, caregivers also recognized supports within the military healthcare system and general community. Increased attention to accessibility and quality of services, as well as reducing financial burden, can lead to improved health-related quality of life for caregivers and their SMVs.

  16. 78 FR 25476 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Bureau... announcement of a meeting (via conference call-in) of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to... Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U.S.C. 15202. Pursuant...

  17. 77 FR 26790 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board (``Board'') to vote on the position of Board Chairperson... Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U.S.C...

  18. 77 FR 51826 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Bureau.... SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to review and vote on recommendations for the 2011-2012 Medal of Valor nominations, consider issues relevant...

  19. 76 FR 37375 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office...: This is an announcement of a meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor... Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U.S.C. 15202. Pursuant...

  20. 75 FR 54915 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting/conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on recommendations for the 2009-2010 Medal of Valor nominations, review issues relevant to the nomination review...

  1. 75 FR 30859 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on the... . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory...

  2. 76 FR 56226 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote of the... Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U...

  3. 78 FR 43227 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office.... SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to review and vote on recommendations for the 2012-2013 Medal of Valor nominations, consider issues relevant...

  4. 76 FR 76388 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... highlighting the national importance of technological innovation, the Medal also seeks to inspire future... Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application ACTION....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The National Medal of Technology and Innovation is the highest honor for...

  5. profile of a research project: the medal publications of the south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (ie up to the date of publication). (The work also included the ribbons and details of awards of the South West. African Police.) The book formed a milestone in ...... Medal (1952) (instituted 1954)*. '1. John Chard Decoration. (1952) (instituted. 1954 )*. ~2. John Chard Medal (1952) instituted 1954)*. ~3. Korea Medal (1953).

  6. Design and challenges for a randomized, multi-site clinical trial comparing the use of service dogs and emotional support dogs in Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Biswas, Kousick; Serpi, Tracey; McGovern, Stephanie; Groer, Shirley; Stock, Eileen M; Magruder, Kathryn M; Storzbach, Daniel; Skelton, Kelly; Abrams, Thad; McCranie, Mark; Richerson, Joan; Dorn, Patricia A; Huang, Grant D; Fallon, Michael T

    2017-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a leading cause of impairments in quality of life and functioning among Veterans. Service dogs have been promoted as an effective adjunctive intervention for PTSD, however published research is limited and design and implementation flaws in published studies limit validated conclusions. This paper describes the rationale for the study design, a detailed methodological description, and implementation challenges of a multisite randomized clinical trial examining the impact of service dogs on the on the functioning and quality of life of Veterans with PTSD. Trial design considerations prioritized participant and intervention (dog) safety, selection of an intervention comparison group that would optimize enrollment in all treatment arms, pragmatic methods to ensure healthy well-trained dogs, and the selection of outcomes for achieving scientific and clinical validity in a Veteran PTSD population. Since there is no blueprint for conducting a randomized clinical trial examining the impact of dogs on PTSD of this size and scope, it is our primary intent that the successful completion of this trial will set a benchmark for future trial design and scientific rigor, as well as guiding researchers aiming to better understand the role that dogs can have in the management of Veterans experiencing mental health conditions such as PTSD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. 77 FR 3842 - Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... (SGLI) to Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) for Disabled Service Members. OMB Control Number: 2900... members, especially service members with disabilities are informed about their life insurance option... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

  8. 78 FR 55338 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting Amendment The Department of Veterans... Committee on Homeless Veterans meeting on September 11-13, 2013, in the William Phillip King room at The... services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review...

  9. 76 FR 56881 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on September 20- 21, 2011. On September 20, the Committee will... services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review...

  10. 78 FR 53820 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on September 11- 13, 2013, in the William Phillip King Room at..., organizational structures, and services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall...

  11. 75 FR 4453 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held February 24-26, 2010, in the Lafayette Park Room at the Hamilton... services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review...

  12. 76 FR 24087 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held May 18-20, 2011, in the Harbor View Room at the Best Western Bay... services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review...

  13. 77 FR 26069 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ...: 2012-10524] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on June 1-2, 2012..., organizational structures, and services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall...

  14. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... various organizations and individuals are doing to challenge perceptions about women Veterans. Learn more » #VeteranOfTheDay - Nominate a Veteran Today! Veteran of the Day has been a tradition on VA’s social media pages for more than two years now. This ...

  15. CERN firefighters win medals in New York

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2011-01-01

    This year CERN's firefighters have taken part for the first time in the World Police and Fire Games,held in New York at the end of August. After an intensive training programme and some glorious achievements, the members of the CERN Fire Brigade taking part in the event enthusiastically share their experience with us.   Tomi Salmi (left) and Toni Rasanen (next to him) with their medals. Everybody has heard of the Olympic Games, but did you know that every two years firefighters and police officers from around the world hold their own version, which is second in size only to the Olympics? Since the mid-1980s, the World Police and Fire Games have taken place on three different continents, making waves in the cities that have hosted them. This year, the CERN Fire Brigade was part of a 10-day sports extravaganza in the city that never sleeps. Five CERN firefighters, two from Britain and three from Finland, participated in the Games in their chosen disciplines of triple jump, open water ...

  16. Mental Health Among Military Personnel and Veterans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pickett, Treven; Rothman, David; Crawford, Eric F; Brancu, Mira; Fairbank, John A; Kudler, Harold S

    2015-01-01

    This commentary describes the prevalence of mental health problems affecting military service members and veterans in North Carolina and the rest of the nation, with a special emphasis on those who...

  17. Attitudes about the VA health-care setting, mental illness, and mental health treatment and their relationship with VA mental health service use among female and male OEF/OIF veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Annie B; Meyer, Eric C; Vogt, Dawne

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, the authors explored gender differences in attitudinal barriers to and facilitators of care for Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and examined the relationship of those factors with VA mental health service use among female and male veterans with probable mental health conditions. Data were collected as part of a national cross-sectional survey of OEF/OIF veterans; the current sample was limited to participants with a probable diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or alcohol abuse (N = 278). Although negligible gender differences were observed in attitudes about VA care and perceived fit in the VA setting, men reported slightly more negative beliefs about mental illness and mental health treatment than women. In addition, logistic regressions revealed different associations with VA mental health service use for women and men. For women only, positive perceptions of VA care were associated with increased likelihood of seeking mental health treatment. For men only, perceived similarity to other VA care users and negative beliefs about mental health treatment were associated with increased likelihood of service use, whereas negative beliefs about mental illness were associated with lower likelihood of service use. For both women and men, perceived entitlement to VA care was associated with increased likelihood of service use and negative beliefs about treatment-seeking were associated with a reduced likelihood of seeking mental health care in the past 6 months. Results support the need for tailored outreach to address unique barriers to mental health treatment for female and male OEF/OIF veterans.

  18. A CERN physicist receives the Gian Carlo Wick Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    T.D. Lee, Chairman of the Gian Carlo Wick Medal selection committee, André Martin, the 2007 recipient, and Antonino Zichichi, President of the World Federation of Scientists (WFS)(Copyright : WFS) The 2007 Gian Carlo Wick Gold Medal was presented to the CERN theoretical physicist André Martin in Erice (Italy) on 20 August. The prize is awarded each year by the WFS (World Federation of Scientists), whose president is Professor Antonino Zichichi, to a theoretical physicist for his outstanding contributions to particle physics. The selection committee is composed of eminent physicists and is chaired by the Nobel Physics Prize Laureate, T.D. Lee. André Martin was awarded the Medal in recognition of his work on the total cross-section for interactions between two particles and his contributions to the understanding of heavy quark-antiquark (or quarkonium) systems. In 1965, André Martin established a theoretical basis for the so-call...

  19. Luciano Maiani and Jean Iliopoulos awarded the Dirac Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Luciano Maiani, when he was Director-General of CERN. Jean Iliopoulos in 1999. (©CNRS Photothèque - Julien Quideau)On 8 August, the 2007 Dirac Medal, one of the most prestigious prizes in the fields of theoretical physics and mathematics, was awarded to Luciano Maiani, professor at Rome’s La Sapienza University and former Director-General of CERN, and to Jean Iliopoulos, emeritus Director of Research at the CNRS Laboratory of Theoretical Physics. The medal was awarded to both physicists for their joint "work on the physics of the charm quark, a major contribution to the birth of the Standard Model, the modern theory of Elementary Particles." Founded by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in 1985, the Dirac Medal is awarded annually on 8 August, the birthday of the famous physicist Paul Dirac, winner of the 1933 Nobel Prize for Physics. It is awarded to ...

  20. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented, but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain underinvestigated. Furthermore, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non-veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of individuals in recovery (N = 3,208), we compare addiction and recovery experiences among veterans (n = 481) and non-veterans. Veterans' addiction phase was 4 years longer than non-veterans and they experienced significantly more financial and legal problems. Dramatic improvements in functioning were observed across the board in recovery with subgroup differences leveling off. We discuss possible strategies to address the specific areas where veterans are most impaired in addiction and note study limitations including the cross-sectional design.

  1. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  2. In Brief: Rita Colwell receives National Medal of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-07-01

    Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004, was awarded a U.S. National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony on 27 July 2007. Colwell, currently a professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland at College Park and a professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the award for her research on global infectious diseases and marine microbes, specifically the bacterium that causes pandemic cholera. The National Medal of Science is the United States' highest honor for scientific achievement. Colwell currently serves on AGU's development board.

  3. Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antó, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2017-01-01

    Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgE-associated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links of aller......Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgE-associated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links...

  4. Variation in Veteran Identity as a Factor in Veteran-Targeted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Samantha M; DeForge, Bruce R; Lucksted, Alicia

    2017-07-01

    The sociocultural identities that people self-assign or accept influence their interpersonal interactions and decision making. Identity-based interventions attempt to influence individuals by associating healthy behaviors with in-group membership. Outreach and educational efforts aimed at veterans may rely on "typical" veteran identity stereotypes. However, as discussed in this Open Forum, there is evidence that veteran identity is not monolithic but rather fluctuates on the basis of personal characteristics and individual military service experiences. Overall, the impact of veteran identity on veterans' health behaviors and use of health care is not known and has been understudied. A major limiting factor is the lack of a standardized measure of veteran identity that can assess variations in salience, prominence, and emotional valence.

  5. 76 FR 52272 - Technical Revisions To Conform to the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... active duty service in the Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. Consistent with the... designee, approved this document and authorized the undersigned to sign and submit the document to the...

  6. The Application of Strategic Planning Tools for Enhanced Palliative Care Services at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mylan, Marci M

    2005-01-01

    .... Using selected strategic planning tools, the study examined the gaps in services by gathering staff opinions, examining local statistics regarding end-of-life care, and looking at community and national trends...

  7. Social networks, mental health problems, and mental health service utilization in OEF/OIF National Guard veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bohnert, Amy S B; Teo, Alan R; Levine, Debra S; Pfeiffer, Paul N; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Mizruchi, Mark S; Chermack, Stephen T; Ganoczy, Dara; Walters, Heather; Valenstein, Marcia

    2015-09-01

    Low social support and small social network size have been associated with a variety of negative mental health outcomes, while their impact on mental health services use is less clear. To date, few studies have examined these associations in National Guard service members, where frequency of mental health problems is high, social support may come from military as well as other sources, and services use may be suboptimal. Surveys were administered to 1448 recently returned National Guard members. Multivariable regression models assessed the associations between social support characteristics, probable mental health conditions, and service utilization. In bivariate analyses, large social network size, high social network diversity, high perceived social support, and high military unit support were each associated with lower likelihood of having a probable mental health condition (p social support (OR .90, CI .88-.92) and high unit support (OR .96, CI .94-.97) continued to be significantly associated with lower likelihood of mental health conditions. Two social support measures were associated with lower likelihood of receiving mental health services in bivariate analyses, but were not significant in adjusted models. General social support and military-specific support were robustly associated with reduced mental health symptoms in National Guard members. Policy makers, military leaders, and clinicians should attend to service members' level of support from both the community and their units and continue efforts to bolster these supports. Other strategies, such as focused outreach, may be needed to bring National Guard members with need into mental health care.

  8. Joint replacement surgery in homeless veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase G. Bennett, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Total joint arthroplasty (TJA in a homeless patient is generally considered contraindicated. Here, we report our known medical and social (housing and employment results of homeless veterans who had TJA. Thirty-seven TJAs were performed on 33 homeless patients (31 men at our hospital between November 2000 and March 2014. This was 1.2% of all TJAs. Average age was 54 years. Average hospital stay was 4.1 days. There were no major inpatient complications. Thirty-four cases had at least 1-year follow-up in any clinic within the Veterans Affairs health care system. There were no known surgery-related reoperations or readmissions. At final follow-up, 24 patients had stable housing and 9 were employed. The extensive and coordinated medical and social services that were provided to veterans from the Department of Veterans Affairs contributed to our positive results. Keywords: Homeless, Veteran, Joint replacement, Total hip, Total knee, Employment

  9. Honoring our Nation's Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Today is Armistice Day, renamed Veterans Day in 1954, to honor our Nation's Veterans. In Washington the rhetoric from both the political right and left supports our Veterans. My cynical side reminds me that this might have something to do with Veterans voting in a higher percentage than the population as a whole, but let me give the politicians this one. Serving our Country in the military is something that deserves to be honored. I was proud to serve our Veterans over 30 years at the four Department of Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals. However, the VA has had a very bad year. First, in Washington there were the resignations of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Eric Shinseki; the undersecretary for the Veterans Health Administration, Robert Petzel; and the undersecretary for the Veterans Benefits Administration, Allison Hickey. Locally, in the light of the VA wait scandal there were the firing of ...

  10. Identifying and overcoming implementation challenges: Experience of 59 noninstitutional long-term services and support pilot programs in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jennifer L; Adjognon, Omonyêlé L; Engle, Ryann L; Shin, Marlena H; Afable, Melissa K; Rudin, Whitney; White, Bert; Shay, Kenneth; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2017-01-25

    From 2010 to 2013, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) funded a large pilot initiative to implement noninstitutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) programs to support aging Veterans. Our team evaluated implementation of 59 VA noninstitutional LTSS programs. The specific objectives of this study are to (a) examine the challenges influencing program implementation comparing active sites that remained open and inactive sites that closed during the funding period and (b) identify ways that active sites overcame the challenges they experienced. Key informant semistructured interviews occurred between 2011 and 2013. We conducted 217 telephone interviews over four time points. Content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. The study team met regularly to define each challenge, review all codes, and discuss discrepancies. For each follow-up interview with the sites, the list of established challenges was used as a priori themes. Emergent data were also coded. The challenges affecting implementation included human resources and staffing issues, infrastructure, resources allocation and geography, referrals and marketing, leadership support, and team dynamics and processes. Programs were able to overcome challenges by communicating with team members and other areas in the organization, utilizing information technology solutions, creative use of staff and flexible schedules, and obtaining additional resources. This study highlights several common challenges programs can address during the program implementation. The most often mentioned strategy was effective communication. Strategies also targeted several components of the organization including organizational functions and processes (e.g., importance of coordination within a team and across disciplines to provide good care), infrastructure (e.g., information technology and human resources), and program fit with priorities in the organization (e.g., leadership support). Anticipating potential pitfalls of

  11. 20 CFR 404.1320 - Who is a post-World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a post-World War II veteran. 404.1320... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1320 Who is a post-World War II veteran. You are a post-World War II veteran if you...

  12. 38 CFR 8.30 - Appeal to Board of Veterans Appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal to Board of Veterans Appeals. 8.30 Section 8.30 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Appeals § 8.30 Appeal to Board of Veterans Appeals. (a) The provisions of Part 19 of this chapter will be followed i...

  13. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Dennis Adrian; Passannante, Marian; Helmer, Drew; Holland, Bart K; Halperin, William E

    2017-02-01

    Authors comparatively analyzed health and social isolation between U.S. military veterans denied Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and veterans awarded VA disability compensation. The 2001 National Survey of Veterans was used to create a sample of 4,522 veterans denied or awarded VA disability compensation. Using the Andersen health services utilization model as a conceptual framework, multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess relationships between VA disability compensation award status, three separate domains of health, and correlates of social isolation. Results indicate that denied applicants were more likely than those awarded to have poor overall health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23, 1.70), and limitations in activities of daily living (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21). Denied applicants' physical functioning (40.3) and mental functioning (41.2) composite summary scores were not clinically different from those of awarded applicants (39.0 and 40.1, respectively), indicating that both were comparably impaired. Veterans denied VA disability compensation had poor health and functional impairments. They also experienced poverty and isolation, suggesting that they may be in need of additional supportive services. Connecting veterans to community resources could be a vital service to provide to all veterans applying for disability compensation. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  14. Audit of the Transfer of DoD Service Treatment Records to the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    2010, an STR is a record of all essential medical, mental health, and dental care received by service members during their military career . The STR is...care repository that contains results of annual health care assessments and information from private physicians and dentists . Although the Army

  15. The Gold Medal Fitness Program: A Model for Teacher Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jan; Konza, Deslea; Hearne, Doug; Okely, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: Following the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the NSW Premier, Mr Bob Carr, launched a school-based initiative in NSW government primary schools called the "Gold Medal Fitness Program" to encourage children to be fitter and more active. The Program was introduced into schools through a model of professional development, "Quality…

  16. Florence Nightingale'i medal / tõlk. Tiina Vilberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Medal on asutatud 16. mail 1912 inglise halastajaõe Florence Nightingale'i mälestuseks, kelle omakasupüüdmatu töö haavatute eest hoolitsemisel Krimmi sõjas juhtis haigeravi täiesti uutele radadele

  17. MILITARY MEDALS: AMERICAN STRATEGIC CULTURE and AIR POWER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    betrayed by this action and many pundits argued that it cost Kerry the election. Military medals, protected by law and able to influence presidential...discourse on war was sharply divided. The main body of the Army argued future wars would still be won by soldiers on the ground. The alternative

  18. Prevalence of probable mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among veteran and non-veteran community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, John C; Curran, Geoffrey M; Hunt, Justin B; Cheney, Ann M; Lu, Liya; Valenstein, Marcia; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of disadvantaged youth and returning veterans are enrolled in community colleges. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among community college students. Veterans (n=211) and non-veterans (n=554) were recruited from 11 community colleges and administered screeners for depression (PHQ-9), generalized anxiety (GAD-7), posttraumatic stress disorder (PC-PTSD), non-lethal self-injury, suicide ideation and suicide intent. The survey also asked about the perceived need for, barriers to and utilization of services. Regression analysis was used to compare prevalence between non-veterans and veterans adjusting for non-modifiable factors (age, gender and race/ethnicity). A large proportion of student veterans and non-veterans screened positive and unadjusted bivariate comparisons indicated that student veterans had a significantly higher prevalence of positive depression screens (33.1% versus 19.5%, Pdepression (OR=2.10, P=.01) and suicide ideation (OR=2.31, P=.03). Student veterans had significantly higher odds of perceiving a need for treatment than non-veterans (OR=1.93, P=.02) but were more likely to perceive stigma (beta=0.28, P=.02). Despite greater need among veterans, there were no significant differences between veterans and non-veterans in use of psychotropic medications, although veterans were more likely to receive psychotherapy (OR=2.35, P=.046). Findings highlight the substantial gap between the prevalence of probable mental health disorders and treatment seeking among community college students. Interventions are needed to link community college students to services, especially for student veterans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Don’t worry, we got it, Honey , you go. We got it.” And no matter what’s happening we’re not allowed to talk about that because he has to be safe...soldier, “Don’t worry, we got it, Honey , you go. We got it.” And no matter what’s happening we’re not allowed to talk about that because he has to be safe...community. Team members were told that local civilians use marijuana, crystal methamphetamine, and heroin, but service members are tested monthly, so

  20. Veterans and Homelessness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perl, Libby

    2007-01-01

    .... The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) estimates that it has served approximately 300 returning veterans in its homeless programs and has identified over 1,000 more as being at risk of homelessness...

  1. Minority Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  2. Minority Veteran Report 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  3. Paralyzed Veterans of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clothing Donate a Vehicle Matching Gifts Buy PVA Gear Donate Donate Now Give Monthly Planned Giving View ... PVA1946 National Veterans Wheelchair Games App Download Now TOP Contact Us Paralyzed Veterans of America 801 Eighteenth ...

  4. Faith-Based Organizations and Veteran Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, Laura; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rudnick, Mollie; Harrell, Margaret C.; Naranjo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are an important community-based resource for veterans as they readjust to civilian life. Through interviews with both national-level and smaller, local FBOs, the authors sought to understand better the current and potential roles for FBOs in veteran reintegration. Interviewees suggested that veterans may look to FBOs for support because they offer privacy and confidentiality, two features that may be especially critical when a potential stigma is involved. Some FBOs have also developed a reputation as safe places for veterans, providing supportive, judgment-free environments. FBOs not only help veterans with spiritual matters but address diverse areas of veteran health and wellness, including vocation, education, financial and legal stability, shelter, access to goods and services, mental health, access to health care, physical health, family, and social networks. In some cases, the support is offered to veterans directly; in other instances, the support is indirect, via training individuals to help veterans or educating the public about them. In the process of providing support, FBOs interact with varied organizations, including government entities, private nonprofits, and one another, for training, outreach, referrals, information exchange, obtaining donations, and collaboration. Yet challenges exist, including insufficient connections with chaplains working in different settings and others in the web of support, resource and capacity constraints, lack of awareness of experience with veterans, issues related to religious philosophy or orientation, and characteristics of veterans themselves. To move forward, the authors offer recommendations for policymakers, organizations that interact with FBOs, and FBOs themselves to help FBOs engage fully in the web of reintegration support. PMID:28083391

  5. Behavioral Health and Service Use Among Civilian Wives of Service Members and Veterans: Evidence from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    residents of micropolitan and small towns and rural areas. • Military wives living close to an MTF showed lower use of behavioral health services than...residing in rural areas was negatively associated with behavioral health care service use for both groups. That is, women who lived small towns or...comparison group. Compared with those living in urban cores of metropolitan areas, people in noncore areas, small towns , or rural areas are less likely to

  6. Psychotherapy for Depression in Older Veterans Via Telemedicine: Effect on Quality of Life, Satisfaction, Treatment Credibility, and Service Delivery Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egede, Leonard E; Acierno, Ron; Knapp, Rebecca G; Walker, Rebekah J; Payne, Elizabeth H; Frueh, B Christopher

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the impact of telepsychology and same-room care on functioning, satisfaction, and perception of care based on a noninferiority trial of psychotherapy delivered via telemedicine or same-room care to elderly patients with depression. 241 elderly patients with depression (meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) were randomly assigned to either telemedicine (n = 120) or same-room treatment (n = 121) between April 1, 2007, and July 31, 2011. The primary outcomes included quality of life (36-item Short Form Survey [SF-36]), satisfaction (Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale), treatment credibility, and service delivery perception scores obtained at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months. Comparisons of intervention means were carried out at each time point using independent sample t tests and SAS Procedure MIANALYZE to combine results across the multiply imputed complete data sets. If significant differences were detected for a given outcome within a domain, a Bonferroni correction was applied to determine if significance was maintained. None of the SF-36 scores showed a significant difference between the 2 treatment groups by the end of the study period, with little significance shown throughout the intermediate time points. Similarly, over all time points, there was no statistically significant difference in patient satisfaction or treatment credibility. This study found that telemedicine is a viable alternative modality for providing evidence-based psychotherapy for elderly patients with depression. Results provide evidence that quality of life and satisfaction with care are not adversely influenced by the decision to use a telehealth modality instead of in-person treatment, and, as a result, resources can be devoted to offering services in patients' homes through telemedicine. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00324701.

  7. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  8. 78 FR 45996 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... goals for small business concerns owned and controlled by veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans... emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however, will be...

  9. 75 FR 62438 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... concerns owned and controlled by veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the... to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however, will be limited to...

  10. 78 FR 21492 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... small business concerns owned and controlled by veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S... emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however, will be...

  11. 78 FR 70087 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... small business concerns owned and controlled by veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S... emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however, will be...

  12. 77 FR 71471 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  13. 78 FR 23970 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... business concerns owned and controlled by veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S... emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however, will be...

  14. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day...

  15. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and...

  16. 120 years of Italian and Vesuvius history in the lava medals collection of the Osservatorio Vesuviano

    OpenAIRE

    De Lucia, M.; Russo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Lava medals constitute a unique example that links Vesuvian eruptions to history, politics and science. Medals coined in the Vesuvius lava date back to the period in which the state of the volcano was characterized by an open conduit, so that warm lava was still used. This state of activity lasted from 1631 to 1944, a period of time during which effusive or effusive-explosive eruptions frequently occurred, followed by very short periods of rest. The medals were realized thro...

  17. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18-44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty.

  18. Distance to Veterans Administration Medical Centers as a Barrier to Specialty Care for Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Lori M; Pettey, Warren B P; Redd, Andrew M; Suo, Ying; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2017-01-01

    Homeless women Veterans have a high prevalence of chronic mental and physical conditions that necessitate frequent healthcare visits, but travel burdens to specialty services may be overwhelming to navigate for this population, especially for those in rural settings. Access to specialty care is a key priority in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and understanding the geographic distribution and rural designation of this population in relation to medical centers (VAMC) can assist in care coordination. We identified 41,747 women Veterans age 18-44y with administrative evidence of homelessness in the VHA anytime during 2002-2015. We found 7% live in rural settings and 29% live >40miles from a VAMC. The mean travel distance for homeless women Veterans with a rural designation to a VAMC specialty center was 107 miles. Developing interventions to overcome this travel burden and engage vulnerable Veterans in necessary care can improve overall health outcomes for this high-risk population.

  19. Veterans’s Medical Care: FY2014 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    B and flu vaccinations . 25 Department of Veterans Affairs, FY2014 Budget Submission, Medical Programs and Information Technology Programs, Volume 2...veterans of World War II allied nations, and employees receiving preventative occupational immunizations such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations . The...based counseling centers that provide a wide range of social and psychological services such as professional readjustment counseling to veterans who

  20. VnpPersonService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Common Web Service for VONAPP. Retrieves, creates, updates and deletes a veteranÆs VNP_PERSON record in the Corporate database for a claim selected in the GUI by the...

  1. [German Society of Urology Congress, Hamburg and the Presidential Medal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, K; Schultheiss, D

    2017-02-01

    The German Society of Urology (DGU) e. V. meeting has been an integral part of knowledge sharing among national and international experts since 1907. Hamburg was the host city for this meeting nine times (until 2015), including the 47th Annual Meeting of the DGU in 1995 under the presidency of Prof. Dr. U. Jonas (Hannover). As part of the 47th conference, a new insignia in the form of the Presidential Medal was given to the designated successor for the first time. The medal, which is in the form of a chain, was made in a small workshop in Idar-Oberstein, Germany.

  2. Gender disparities in Veterans Health Administration care: importance of accounting for veteran status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Susan M; Yano, Elizabeth M; Nguyen, Vu Q; Yu, Wei; Ananth, Lakshmi; Chiu, Victor Y; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2008-05-01

    In an effort to assess and reduce gender-related quality gaps, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has promoted gender-based research. Historically, such appraisals have often relied on secondary databases, with little attention to methodological implications of the fact that VHA provides care to some nonveteran patients. To determine whether conclusions about gender differences in utilization and cost of VHA care change after accounting for veteran status. Cross-sectional. All users of VHA in 2002 (N = 4,429,414). Veteran status, outpatient/inpatient utilization and cost, from centralized 2002 administrative files. Nonveterans accounted for 50.7% of women (the majority employees) but only 3.0% of men. Among all users, outpatient and inpatient utilization and cost were far lower in women than in men, but in the veteran subgroup these differences decreased substantially or, in the case of use and cost of outpatient care, reversed. Utilization and cost were very low among women employees; women spouses of fully disabled veterans had utilization and costs similar to those of women veterans. By gender, nonveterans represent a higher proportion of women than of men in VHA, and some large nonveteran groups have low utilization and costs; therefore, conclusions about gender disparities change substantially when veteran status is taken into account. Researchers seeking to characterize gender disparities in VHA care should address this methodological issue, to minimize risk of underestimating health care needs of women veterans and other women eligible for primary care services.

  3. John Tyndall and the Royal Medal that was never struck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Just once in its long history has a Royal Medal been awarded but not presented. John Tyndall FRS (1820–93) was the chosen recipient in 1853 for his early work on diamagnetism but declined to accept it. The story of why Tyndall felt compelled to turn down this considerable honour sheds light on the scientific politics and personal relationships of the time, on the importance given to the study of magnetism, and on Tyndall's own character and career. PMID:24921107

  4. Helping Veterans and Their Families Fight On!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Hazle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This new generation of veterans is coming home to families, friends, employers, and communities that likely do not understand military culture, nor the effects that military service and reintegration have on a veteran’s life, leading to the next war – the Reintegration War. Military servicemembers, veterans, and their families face challenges within the Reintegration War that are different from their civilian counterparts and are complicated by military-specific circumstances. In order to more effectively and efficiently address the challenges servicemembers, veterans, and their families face, we need to work together in a comprehensive effort. Strategies are presented to help win the Reintegration War and ease the transition for servicemembers, veterans, and their families.

  5. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenick M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Olenick,1 Monica Flowers,1 Valerie J Diaz1,21Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies

  6. Helping Student Servicemembers and Veterans Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Ron; Jarrat, Dave

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of current and former service members enter college each year, and their ranks are expected to swell as several major US military engagements overseas wind down. This article presents the following questions: (1) What is the overall success rate for student service members and veterans attending US colleges and universities;…

  7. An Open Door and a Leg Up: Increasing Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) Participation in Defense Contracting Through Simplified Acquisitions (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    4/1999 Rejection of Access to 8(a) Program in HR 1460 Veterans Entrepreneurship and Benefits Improvement Act of 2003 6/5/2003 Unutilized...acquisition threshold… (1) of the simplified acquisition threshold definition at 2.101), the requirement at 19.502-2(a) to exclusively reserve

  8. 77 FR 54368 - Service Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Service Dogs AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final... use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance...

  9. Veterans' Employment and Training Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Military Spouse Employment Partnership #MSEP2017 NOTICE: Impact from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma NOTICE: In order to accommodate the needs of those impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Federal contractors who file their VETS-4212 Reports ...

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury service (TBI) Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This Service provides access to Tramatic Brain injury patient data consult notes. The service also provides one write service method writeNote. The Service supports...

  11. Perspectives of family and veterans on family programs to support reintegration of returning veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ellen P; Sherman, Michelle D; McSweeney, Jean C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Owen, Richard R; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-08-01

    Combat deployment and reintegration are challenging for service members and their families. Although family involvement in mental health care is increasing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, little is known about family members' preferences for services. This study elicited the perspectives of returning Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and their families regarding family involvement in veterans' mental health care. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 veterans receiving care for posttraumatic stress disorder at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System or Oklahoma City VA Medical Center and 36 veteran-designated family members. Interviews addressed perceived needs related to veterans' readjustment to civilian life, interest in family involvement in joint veteran/family programs, and desired family program content. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Both groups strongly supported inclusion of family members in programs to facilitate veterans' postdeployment readjustment and reintegration into civilian life. Both desired program content focused on information, practical skills, support, and gaining perspective on the other's experience. Although family and veteran perspectives were similar, family members placed greater emphasis on parenting-related issues and the kinds of support they and their children needed during and after deployment. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on preferences regarding VA postdeployment reintegration support that incorporates the perspectives of returning male and female veterans and those of their families. Findings will help VA and community providers working with returning veterans tailor services to the needs and preferences of this important-to-engage population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. 77 FR 2047 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2012 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... highlights the national importance of fostering technological innovation based upon solid science, resulting... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2012... nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in the...

  13. 75 FR 82378 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2011 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... highlights the national importance of fostering technological innovation based upon solid science, resulting... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2011... nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in the...

  14. 78 FR 78838 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... of life. The NMTI highlights the national importance of fostering technological innovation based upon... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014... nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in the...

  15. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Bonnie R. Strickland. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Gilbert O. Sanders. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Richard M. Lerner. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  18. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Thomas J. Bouchard Jr. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Olympic medals: Success predictions for Río-2016 | Sánchez ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medals are the maximum exponent of successful sporting events. One of the most relevant of these sporting events is the Olympic Games, which gathers major athletes and teams from across the world every four years. Predicting the distribution of the medals at these Games is nothing new. As a matter of fact, this practice ...

  20. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Charles Silverstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  1. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: Walter C. Borman

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  2. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Marcia K. Johnson

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  3. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Bernice Lott

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in…

  4. Review of medal predictions for South Africa in the Delhi 2010 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This paper reviews South Africa's performance in the Delhi 2010 Commonwealth Games relative to predicted medal success. Methods. Forecasts based on the nation's previous success are compared against medals won in Delhi. Results. Actual performance is in line with predicted performance in terms of gold ...

  5. National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Continues Support of National Campaign to End Veteran Homelessness Nov. 14, 2017 This Veterans Day, Harbor Freight ... support of the national campaign to end veteran homelessness through generous contributions to the National Coalition for ...

  6. Korean War Veterans by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The spreadsheet of Korean War Veterans by State includes the total Korean War Veteran population for each state and broken out by age and gender. It also includes...

  7. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA

  8. Infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)-Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001-December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Less than 2% (n=1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women's use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA's commitment to comprehensive medical care for

  9. Research on rural veterans: an analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William B; Wallace, Amy E; West, Alan N; Heady, Hilda R; Hawthorne, Kara

    2008-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) provides comprehensive health care services to veterans across the United States. Recently, the VA established an Office of Rural Health to address the health care needs of rural veterans. To review the literature on rural veterans' health care needs in order to identify areas for future research. We conducted a literature review of articles listed in the Medline, CINAHL, and BIOSIS datasets since 1950. We reviewed and summarized the findings of 50 articles that specifically examined rural veterans. The literature on rural veterans included 4 articles examining access to care, 7 evaluating distance technology, 4 examining new models of care delivery, 11 studying rural veterans' patient characteristics, 10 evaluating programs provided in a rural setting, 6 examining rural health care settings, and 8 exploring rural veterans' health services utilization patterns. Most studies were small, based on data obtained before 2000, and consisted of uncontrolled, retrospective, descriptive studies of health care provided in rural VA settings. Definitions of rural were inconsistent, and in 20% of the articles examined the rural aspect of the setting was incidental to the study. The literature on rural veterans' health care needs warrants expansion and investment so that policy makers can make informed decisions in an environment of limited resources and competing interests.

  10. 78 FR 48543 - Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per... continue to deliver services to the homeless Special Need veteran population as outlined in their FY 2009.... Quarles, Director, VA's Homeless Providers GPD Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770 N. 46th...

  11. 5 CFR 335.106 - Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... veterans under merit promotion. 335.106 Section 335.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROMOTION AND INTERNAL PLACEMENT General Provisions § 335.106 Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion. Preference eligibles or veterans who have...

  12. Universal screening for homelessness and risk for homelessness in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Fargo, Jamison D; Byrne, Thomas H; Kane, Vincent R; Culhane, Dennis P

    2013-12-01

    We examined data for all veterans who completed the Veterans Health Administration's national homelessness screening instrument between October 1, 2012, and January 10, 2013. Among veterans who were not engaged with the US Department of Veterans Affairs homeless system and presented for primary care services, the prevalence of recent housing instability or homelessness was 0.9% and homelessness risk was 1.2%. Future research will refine outreach strategies, targeting of prevention resources, and development of novel interventions.

  13. Arthritis, comorbidities, and care utilization in veterans of operations enduring and Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jessica C; Amuan, Megan E; Morris, Ruth M; Johnson, Anthony E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2017-03-01

    Veteran populations are known to have frequencies of arthritis higher than civilian populations. The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of arthritis among a cohort of veterans from ongoing U.S. military operations. A retrospective cohort study using Veterans Administration data sources for service connected disability, comorbidities, clinic utilization, and pharmacy utilization was conducted including veterans who deployed in service to operations in Afghanistan or Iraq, comparing veterans with a diagnosis of arthritis, arthritis plus back pain, and veterans with no pain diagnoses. The frequency of arthritis was 11.8%. Veterans with arthritis and arthritis plus back pain had greater frequencies of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity compare to veterans with no pain diagnosis. Veterans with arthritis plus back pain had the highest pain clinic utilization and prescription use of opioids and anti-inflammatories. Veterans with no pain diagnosis had higher frequencies of diagnosis and clinic utilization for mental health disorders. Arthritis is prevalent among the latest generation of combat veterans and is associated with diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. The need for arthritis care and associated comorbidities is expected to increase as the Veterans Administration and the civilian health care sector assumes care of these veterans. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:682-687, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The influence of veteran race and psychometric testing on veterans affairs posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) disability exam outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Brian P; Engel-Rebitzer, Eden; Bovin, Michelle J; Parker-Guilbert, Kelly S; Moshier, Samantha; Barretto, Kenneth; Szafranski, Derek; Gallagher, Matthew W; Holowka, Darren W; Rosen, Raymond C; Keane, Terence M

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the influence of veterans' race and examiners' use of psychometric testing during a Department of Veterans Affairs posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) disability examination on diagnostic and service connection status outcomes. Participants were 764 veterans enrolled in a national longitudinal registry. Current and lifetime PTSD diagnostic status was determined with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and was compared with PTSD diagnosis conferred upon veterans by their compensation and pension (C&P) examiners as well as with ultimate Veterans Affairs (VA) PTSD service connected status. The concordance rate between independent SCID current PTSD diagnosis and PTSD disability examination diagnosis was 70.4%, and between SCID lifetime PTSD diagnosis and PTSD disability examination diagnosis was 77.7%. Among veterans with current SCID diagnosed PTSD, Black veterans were significantly less likely than White veterans to receive a PTSD diagnosis from their C&P examiner (odds ratio [OR] = .39, p = .003, confidence interval [CI] = .20-.73). Among veterans without current SCID diagnosed PTSD, White veterans were significantly more likely than Black veterans to receive a PTSD diagnosis from their C&P examiner (OR = 4.07, p = .005, CI = 1.51-10.92). Splitting the sample by use of psychometric testing revealed that examinations that did not include psychometric testing demonstrated the same relation between veteran race and diagnostic concordance. However, for examinations in which psychometric testing was used, the racial disparity between SCID PTSD status and disability exam PTSD status was no longer significant. Results suggest that psychometric testing may reduce disparities in VA PTSD disability exam outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Help-Seeking Stigma and Mental Health Treatment Seeking Among Young Adult Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Corrigan, Patrick; Marshall, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Veterans underutilize mental health services. We investigated the association between treatment seeking stigma and utilization of mental health services in a sample of 812 young adult veterans. Higher perceived public stigma of treatment seeking was significantly related to lower treatment utilization. Although many veterans were concerned about negative perceptions if they were to seek treatment, a much smaller number of them endorsed that they would judge a fellow veteran negatively in similar situation. Targeting perceived public stigma of treatment seeking, through perceived norms interventions, might help in narrowing the gap between the need and receipt of help among veterans. PMID:26664795

  16. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  17. 76 FR 71442 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... homeless and at-risk Veterans and their families; and provide a supportive services program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044), Department of Veterans...

  18. 76 FR 35162 - Service Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN51 Service Dogs AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Proposed... veterans in need of service dogs. Under current regulations, VA provides benefits to veterans with guide dogs, and this rulemaking would broaden and clarify those benefits. This rulemaking would also...

  19. Applying behavior change theory to technology promoting veteran mental health care seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealin, Julia M; Kuhn, Eric; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Despite the availability of effective mental health interventions, the vast majority of veterans with a mental disorder underutilize psychological services. Contemporary research has revealed that several factors such as low education, stigma, stoicism, lack of knowledge, and negative beliefs about mental health services are associated with veterans' underutilization of services. In this article, the authors provide an overview of factors that affect symptomatic veterans' decisions about whether to seek mental health services. Second, they describe the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), a useful model for understanding mental health care seeking that can inform the development of technology-based interventions designed to increase veterans' willingness to seek psychological services. Third, the authors describe the development of Considering Professional Help, a personalized web-based tool developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has been designed to promote mental health care seeking in veterans with mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... see more videos from Blue Star Families These Hands PSA see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ... Line text-messaging service does not store mobile phone numbers of users who access information via text ...

  1. 38 CFR 21.6521 - Employment of qualified veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational Training and....S.C. 1163(c)) (b) Coordination with the Veterans Service Center. The VR&E Division will inform the...

  2. Female Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan seeking care from VA specialized PTSD Programs: comparison with male veterans and female war zone veterans of previous eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Alan; Rosenheck, Robert; Desai, Rani

    2010-04-01

    Differences in the characteristics and mental health needs of female veterans of the Iraq/Afghanistan war compared with those of veterans of other wars may have useful implications for VA program and treatment planning. Female veterans reporting service in the Iraq/Afghanistan war were compared with women reporting service in the Persian Gulf and Vietnam wars and to men reporting service in the Iraq/Afghanistan war. Subjects were drawn from VA administrative data on veterans who sought outpatient treatment from specialized posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment programs. A series of analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to control for program site and age. In general, Iraq/Afghanistan and Persian Gulf women had less severe psychopathology and more social supports than did Vietnam women. In turn, Iraq/Afghanistan women had less severe psychopathology than Persian Gulf women and were exposed to less sexual and noncombat nonsexual trauma than their Persian Gulf counterparts. Notable differences were also found between female and male veterans of the Iraq/Afghanistan war. Women had fewer interpersonal and economic supports, had greater exposure to different types of trauma, and had different levels of diverse types of pathology than their male counterparts. There appear to be sufficient differences within women reporting service in different war eras and between women and men receiving treatment in VA specialized treatment programs for PTSD that consideration should be given to program planning and design efforts that address these differences in every program treating female veterans reporting war zone service.

  3. The Veterans Choice Program (VCP): Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    to VACAA and challenges encountered during implantation of the law. Table 1 provides major highlights pertaining to the Veterans Choice Program (VCP...outpatient medical, surgical, and mental healthcare; pharmaceuticals; pregnancy and delivery services; dental care; and durable medical equipment, and

  4. 77 FR 4471 - Tribal Veterans Cemetery Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Code, and the 2002 edition of the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, may be obtained from the National... Frank Salvas, Director of Veterans Cemetery Grants Service, National Cemetery Administration (41E... cemetery grants under the authority of title 38 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 39.'' Further, on...

  5. Which Homeless Veterans Benefit From a Peer Mentor and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Ekerholm, Sarah; Johnson, Erin E; Ellison, Marsha L; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-09-01

    Veterans Affairs (VA) is expanding peer support. Research is limited on Veterans' perspective on benefits from peer services. We describe homeless Veteran perceptions of value and examine characteristics associated with benefit. From a sample of Veterans in a multisite randomized control trial, we studied addition of peers in VA Primary Care and homeless-oriented primary care clinics. We used qualitative methods to study the perceptions of peer services among a subsample of homeless Veterans. Quantitative methods were used to validate findings in both samples. Sixty-five percent of the subsample and 83% of the full sample benefited from a peer mentor. Participants who benefited had more peer visits and minutes of intervention (p<.05), were more likely to be minority, and were less likely to have posttraumatic stress disorder. The majority of Veteran participants in this study benefited from receiving peer mentor intervention. African American Veterans were more likely to benefit and Veterans with PTSD were less likely to benefit. Client endorsement of the peer's role influenced outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characteristics and Health Needs of Veterans in Jails and Prisons: What We Know and Do Not Know about Incarcerated Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Janice D; Tsai, Jack

    2017-12-04

    The majority of U.S. veterans in prisons and local jails are men, but incarcerated women veterans remain an important and understudied group. This study reported differences in sociodemographic, health, and criminal justice characteristics using Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data on a national sample of 30,964 incarcerated veterans (30,440 men and 524 women) who received outreach from the VA Health Care for Reentry Veterans program between 2007 and 2011. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regressions determined gender and racial differences in this population. Compared with incarcerated veterans who were men, incarcerated women veterans were younger (d = 0.68), had significantly lower lifetime arrests (AOR, 0.65; p problems, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and seizure disorder, and were more likely to receive a preliminary diagnosis of mood disorder than men. Women were more likely to have received VA benefits, used VA health care before, and be willing to use VA services after release. A few important differences emerged when stratified by race. These findings suggest that incarcerated women veterans are interested in VA health care services, but there is lack of information about women's health needs through the Health Care for Reentry Veterans program. The inclusion of Health Care for Reentry Veterans screening questions about women's health issues may support the VA's interests to better engage women veterans in care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Validation of self-reported veteran status among two sheltered homeless populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metraux, Stephen; Stino, Magdi; Culhane, Dennis P

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of self-reported veteran status among sheltered homeless adults to assess the reliability of using self-report to determine the number of veterans in homeless populations and examine whether there are demographic correlates to inaccurate reporting of veteran status. Records on 5,860 sheltered adults from Columbus, Ohio, and 16,346 sheltered adults from New York City (NYC) were matched with U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) records. We analyzed the agreement between veteran self-reporting and official records using descriptive measures, diagnostic tests, and logistic regression. The degree of concordance was moderate. Using VA records rather than self-report data to determine veteran status increased homeless veteran prevalence rates by 27% in Columbus and 39% in NYC. Veterans with discordant veteran status (i.e., false positive or false negative) showed lower levels of services use in the VA (both cities) and in the municipal shelter system (NYC only). Younger veterans and women were at higher risk of not being identified as veterans. Administrative records can help to more accurately identify homeless veterans and to connect them to available services and benefits.

  8. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  9. The association of military discharge variables with smoking status among homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Patrick; Fu, Steven S; Lando, Harry A; Owen, Greg; Okuyemi, Kolawale S

    2015-12-01

    There is a dearth of research examining the health correlates of tobacco use within the homeless population, particularly with respect to homeless Veterans. An aim of the present study was to compare homeless Veteran and homeless non-Veteran smokers across a series of socio-demographic and health variables, and to determine whether any of these variables were independently associated with Veteran status. A subsequent aim was to compare the socio-demographic and health profiles of Veteran smokers and Veteran nonsmokers, and to determine whether any of these variables were independently associated with current smoking. Data were obtained from the 2009 Homelessness in Minnesota survey conducted by the Wilder Research Foundation. The final sample included 4750 homeless individuals living throughout Minnesota. The prevalence of smoking was greater among homeless Veterans (74%) than homeless non-Veterans (70%). The prevalence of physical and mental health problems was higher among homeless Veteran smokers than homeless non-Veteran smokers, although these variables were not independently associated with Veteran status after controlling for socio-demographics. Analyses of the homeless Veteran sample indicated that receipt of Veterans' benefits, type of discharge, and alcohol and/or chemical dependence were independently associated with current smoking. Homeless Veteran smokers exhibit heightened rates of physical and mental health problems compared to homeless non-Veteran smokers. Military service and discharge characteristics may contribute to this high smoking prevalence. Future efforts should focus on increasing Veterans' access to and knowledge of Veterans' health resources, and on developing innovative strategies to boost cessation in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of emotional approach coping and hope on PTSD and depression symptoms in a trauma exposed sample of Veterans receiving outpatient VA mental health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassija, Christina M; Luterek, Jane A; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Moore, Sally A; Simpson, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation evaluates the relationship between coping style, dispositional hope, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptom severity in a trauma-exposed Veteran sample. Specifically, we evaluated the adaptive value of emotional avoidant and approach coping strategies and perceptions of hope in a sample of 209 trauma-exposed Veterans receiving outpatient mental health care at a VA facility. Participants completed a life events questionnaire and inventories assessing coping, dispositional hope, and PTSD and depression symptom severity. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted controlling for relevant demographic variables. Greater levels of emotional avoidance and lower levels of emotional expression were significantly associated with increased PTSD and depression symptom severity. Dispositional hope was positively associated with depression symptoms only and perceptions of hope moderated the association between emotional avoidance coping and depression symptoms. Findings highlight the value of emotional coping strategies and perceptions of hope in posttraumatic adjustment. Specifically, employing coping techniques that encourage emotional expression may promote improved adjustment among trauma-exposed individuals, while reduced perceptions of hope and the use of avoidant coping strategies may place individuals at greater risk for depression following exposure to traumatic events.

  11. Fertility Counseling and Treatment for Certain Veterans and Spouses. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-19

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulation regarding fertility counseling and treatment available to certain veterans and spouses. VA currently provides certain infertility services other than in vitro fertilization (IVF) to veterans as part of the medical benefits package. IVF is the process of fertilization by manually fertilizing an egg, and then transferring the embryo to the uterus. This interim final rulemaking adds a new section authorizing IVF for a veteran with a service-connected disability that results in the inability of the veteran to procreate without the use of fertility treatment. In addition, we add a new section stating that VA may provide fertility counseling and treatment using assisted reproductive technologies (ART), including IVF, to a spouse of a veteran with a service-connected disability that results in the inability of the veteran to procreate without the use of fertility treatment. VA will provide ART treatment, including IVF, to these veterans and spouses as specified in the Continuing Appropriations and Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2017, and Zika Response and Preparedness Act to the extent such services are consistent with the services available to enrolled veterans under the medical benefits package.

  12. Perceptions of homelessness in older homeless veterans, VA homeless program staff liaisons, and housing intervention providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Victor A; Brown, Lisa M; Frahm, Kathryn A; Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger

    2013-05-01

    To understand the needs and challenges encountered by older homeless veterans. We conducted six focus groups of older veterans, two focus groups, and one semi-structured interview of VA staff liaisons, and two focus groups and one semi-structured interview of housing intervention providers. Major themes for older veterans: 1) negative homelessness experience; 2) benefits of the structured transitional housing program; 3) importance of peer outreach; and 4) need for age-tailored job placement programs. Major themes for VA staff liaison/housing intervention providers: 1) belief that the transitional housing program has made a positive change; 2) need for individualized criteria to address the unique needs of veterans; 3) distinct differences between older and younger homeless veterans; 4) outreach services; 5) permanent housing issues; and 6) coordination of services. Compared with younger veterans, older veterans have less social support, greater employment and health challenges, and, perhaps greater motivation to change.

  13. Engaging, Supporting, and Sustaining the Invisible Partners in Care: Young Caregivers of Veterans From the Post-9/11 Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine M; Kabat, Margaret; Henius, Jennifer; Harold, Courtney; Van Houtven, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the health effects of caregiving for post-9/11 veterans who have been traumatically injured, have traumatic brain injuries, or have post-traumatic stress disorder. Post-9/11 veterans and their caregivers tend to be younger than veterans who served exclusively prior to 9/11. In response to the needs of caregivers, Public Law 111-163, the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010, was passed, providing unprecedented support for informal caregivers of veterans. This support includes a monthly stipend and health insurance for caregivers who meet eligibility criteria. The uptake in these support services, and the resulting cost of services, has far surpassed expectations. As the Department of Veterans Affairs continues to provide caregiver support services, it is essential to determine the value and direct impact of the services provided to caregivers and veterans.

  14. Veterans Health Administration (VHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is for SSA to verify SSNs and other identifying information for the Department of Veterans Affairs, VHA. DVA will use the information...

  15. Veterans Choice Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — If you are already enrolled in VA health care, the Choice Program allows you to receive health care within your community. Using this program does NOT impact your...

  16. Impact of Supported Housing on Social Relationships Among Homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    This study examined social network structure and function among a sample of 460 homeless veterans who participated in an experimental trial of the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. Participants were randomly assigned to HUD-VASH (housing subsidies and case management), case management only, or standard care. Mixed-model longitudinal analysis was used to compare treatment groups on social network outcomes over 18 months. Veterans in HUD-VASH reported significantly greater increases in social support than veterans in the two other groups, as well as greater frequency of contacts, availability of tangible and emotional support, and satisfaction with nonkin relationships over time. These gains largely involved relationships with providers and other veterans encountered in treatment. Supported housing may play a pivotal role in fostering constructive new relationships with persons associated with service programs but may have a more limited impact on natural support networks.

  17. Homeless Veterans Eligible for Medicaid Under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Kasprow, Wesley J; Culhane, Dennis; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Among homeless veterans and those at risk of homelessness currently enrolled in Veterans Affairs (VA) health care, this study examined the proportion likely to become eligible for Medicaid in 2014 and their health needs. A total of 114,497 homeless and at-risk veterans were categorized into three groups: currently covered by Medicaid, likely to become eligible for Medicaid, and not likely. Seventy-eight percent of the sample was determined to be likely to become eligible for Medicaid in states that expand Medicaid. Compared with veterans not likely to become eligible for Medicaid, those likely to become eligible were less likely to have general medical and psychiatric conditions and to have a VA service-connected disability but more likely to have substance use disorders. Programs serving homeless and at-risk veterans should anticipate the potential interplay between VA health care and the expansion of Medicaid in states that implement the expansion.

  18. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1221 - Congressional Space Medal of Honor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...—Congressional Space Medal of Honor Obverse description A circular green enamel wreath of laurel surmounted by a.... cable nos. of colors Gold 65021 (old gold). Dark Blue 70076 (independence blue). Blue 65014 (light blue...

  19. Kroll, Murakami, and Seneviratne Receive 2013 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation for Motohiko Murakami

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bass, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The James B. Macelwane Medal of AGU is presented to Motohiko Murakami for his discovery of the postperovskite phase of MgSiO 3 , for a new class of sound velocity measurements under lower mantle pressure...

  20. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  1. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    construction of state- owned nursing homes and domiciliary facilities and collaborates with the Department of Defense (DOD) in sharing health care ... domiciliary care , or travel for family members of veterans receiving mental health services from the VA except for such travel performed beyond a 100-mile...institutional respite care , geriatric evaluation, adult day healthcare - $15 per day; domiciliary care - $5 per day) Priority Group 1 (service

  2. Grants for transportation of veterans in highly rural areas. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations to establish a new program to provide grants to eligible entities to assist veterans in highly rural areas through innovative transportation services to travel to VA medical centers, and to otherwise assist in providing transportation services in connection with the provision of VA medical care to these veterans, in compliance with section 307 of title III of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010. This final rule establishes procedures for evaluating grant applications under the new grant program, and otherwise administering the new grant program.

  3. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  4. Health Care for Homeless Veterans program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its medical regulations concerning eligibility for the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program. The HCHV program provides per diem payments to non-VA community-based facilities that provide housing, outreach services, case management services, and rehabilitative services, and may provide care and/or treatment to homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule modifies VA's HCHV regulations to conform to changes enacted in the Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012. Specifically, the rule removes the requirement that homeless veterans be diagnosed with a serious mental illness or substance use disorder to qualify for the HCHV program. This change makes the program available to all homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule also updates the definition of homeless to match in part the one used by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The rule further clarifies that the services provided by the HCHV program through non-VA community-based providers must include case management services, including non-clinical case management, as appropriate.

  5. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed.

  6. A Comparison of Homeless Male Veterans in Metropolitan and Micropolitan Areas in Nebraska: A Methodological Caveat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Bhatia, Subhash C; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    This study explored differences between homeless male veterans in metropolitan and micropolitan cities in Nebraska on sociodemographic, housing, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics as well as health service use. A convenience sample of 151 homeless male veterans (112 metropolitan, 39 micropolitan) were recruited from Veterans Affairs facilities and area shelters in Omaha, Lincoln, Grand Island, and Hastings in Nebraska. Research staff conducted structured interviews with homeless veterans. Results showed that compared to homeless veterans in metropolitans, those in micropolitans were more likely to be White, unmarried, living in transitional settings, and were far more transient but reported greater social support and housing satisfaction. Veterans in micropolitans also reported more medical problems, diagnoses of anxiety and personality disorders, and unexpectedly, were more likely to report using various health services and less travel time for services. Together, these findings suggest access to homeless and health services for veterans in micropolitan areas may be facilitated through Veterans Affairs facilities and community providers that work in close proximity to one another. Many homeless veterans in these areas are transient, making them a difficult population to study and serve. Innovative ways to provide outreach to homeless veterans in micropolitan and more rural areas are needed.

  7. Veterans Affairs: Data Needed to Help Improve Decisions Concerning Veterans’ Access to Burial Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Appendix II Objectives, Scope, and Methodology 45 Appendix III Printer Friendly Version of National Service Area Map 50 Appendix IV Leading...Unserved Veterans by the end of Fiscal Year 2017, Calculated Using Different Methodologies 15 Figure 4: National Service Area Map 17 Figure 5...different ways using the national service area map we created. 20 2. Methodology 2, proportional distribution of county populations: We multiplied the

  8. Physical and Mental Health and Access to Care among Nonmetropolitan Veterans Health Administration Patients Younger than 65 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alan; Weeks, William B.

    2006-01-01

    Context: The 4.5 million military veterans treated by the Veterans Health Administration (VA) are believed to experience poorer physical and mental health than nonveterans. Furthermore, nonmetropolitan residents have less access to medical services, whether or not they are veterans in VA care. A direct comparison of metropolitan and…

  9. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  10. AllotmentDecnService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The AllotmentDecnService is a service supporting operations to access/update data related to (Compensation and Pension) Awards. This service also supports business...

  11. Electronic Medical Record Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This service provides web services used to obtain clinical data for patients. There are three service methods that allow write functionality signNote, writeNote and...

  12. Homeless female U.S. veterans in a national supported housing program: comparison of individual characteristics and outcomes with male veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kane, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    As more women serve in the U.S. military, the proportion of females among homeless veterans is increasing. The current study compares the individual characteristics and 1-year outcomes of homeless female and male veterans in the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program nationally. Administrative data on 43,853 veterans (10.69% females; 89.31% males) referred to HUD-VASH were analyzed for gender differences at baseline and over a 1-year period. Homeless female veterans were younger, had shorter homeless and incarceration histories, and were less likely to have substance use disorders than men. However, despite being less likely to report combat exposure, female veterans were more likely to have posttraumatic stress disorder. Homeless female veterans were also much more likely to have dependent children with them and to plan to live with family members in supported housing. Once admitted to HUD-VASH, there were no gender differences in attrition or main housing outcomes. Case managers were faster to admit female veterans to the program, reported better working alliances, and provided more services related to employment and income than male veterans. These findings suggest homeless female veterans may have certain strengths, including being younger, less involved in the criminal justice system, and more adept at relating to professional and natural supports; but special attention to noncombat trauma and family-oriented services may be needed.

  13. Deserving Veterans' Disability Compensation: A Qualitative Study of Veterans' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Casey; Heilemann, MarySue V

    2017-05-01

    Veterans recently returned from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) experience many health and mental health problems after deployment. These OEF/OIF veterans are applying and appealing for veterans' disability compensation (VDC) at rapidly increasing rates, often for "invisible conditions" such as posttraumatic stress disorder. Little is known about how veterans experience the process of applying and receiving VDC. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with OEF/OIF veterans ages 35 and younger (N = 18). This article addresses how veterans perceive themselves, and other veterans, of being deserving and undeserving of VDC. Veterans' rationales can be categorized into four primary areas: (1) risking and suffering, (2) the cause of the condition, (3) intentions to become self-sufficient, and (4) putting VDC to "good use." © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  14. Bernard J. Wood Receives 2013 Harry H. Hess Medal: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    President Finn, friends, and colleagues, I am truly delighted to accept the Hess Medal for 2013. It is difficult to express one's feelings adequately on receipt of such a prestigious award, but a mixture of pride, humility, and thankfulness for a long and lucky career all occur. It did not start propitiously as my high school grades would only ensure undergraduate entry into the Northern Polytechnic, a second-tier institution in London. Nevertheless, I was enthused by several great teachers, including John Charalambous (inorganic chemistry) and Stephen Morel, a field geologist who had worked for many years in Malawi. They pushed me into trying for graduate school, and I was fortunate to find the eclectic Roger Strens my supervisor at Newcastle.

  15. Editorial-The Rudolf Kingslake Medal and Prize, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1980-10-01

    The winner of the Rudolf Kingslake Medal and Prize for 1979 is Dr. J. R. Fienup of the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan. His award-winning paper on "Space Object Imaging through the Turbulent Atmosphere" appeared in Optical Engineering 18(5), 529 (1979). This work, begun with his 1975 thesis work at Stanford, developed in several papers prior to this one, and was summarized by him in Optical Engineering 19(3), 297 (1980). Fienup showed that an iterative computer process can reconstruct an object scene from a noisy record of the modulus of its Fourier transform. Since speckle interferometry can be used to derive a diffraction-limited modulus of the Fourier transform, application of Fienup's analysis to the retrieval of diffraction-limited images in speckle interferometry proved quite promising.

  16. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients’ military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty. PMID:26664252

  17. Cancer incidence in Australian Vietnam veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Horsley, K. [Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs (Australia); Hoek, R. van der [Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel participated in the Vietnam Conflict from 1962 to 1973, involving nearly 60,000 personnel, of whom over 500 died during service and 3131 were severely physically wounded. Service in the Vietnam conflict presented distinct health challenges. Besides the hazards of combat conditions for extended periods, herbicides and other toxic chemicals were used extensively. The United States military sprayed more than 76,000,000L of herbicide over Vietnam in their Air Force Ranch Hand and Operation Trail Dust programs. The most heavily used herbicide was Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Since the Vietnam conflict, ex-Service organisations (ESOs) have maintained that Vietnam service adversely affected the health of veterans. Initial studies showed no excess risk attributable to their service. However, more recent studies have shown that Vietnam veterans have excess incidence and mortality rates from several conditions such as cancers and heart disease. This paper describes the first cancer incidence study for all ADF Vietnam veterans.

  18. From Camouflage to Classrooms: An Empirical Examination of Veterans at a Regional Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberweis, Trish; Bradford, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Despite a large and growing population of former military service members entering colleges and universities, there is very little empirical work that examines veterans' perspectives on service needs or their perceptions and attitudes about their college experience. Much of what we know of student veterans' views is based on a different generation…

  19. 77 FR 51579 - Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Employment and Training Services' (VETS) core programs and new initiatives regarding efforts that assist... Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service, Labor. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the...

  20. 76 FR 72977 - Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...' Employment and Training Services' (VETS) core programs and new initiatives regarding efforts that assist... Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service, Labor. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the...

  1. 77 FR 20436 - Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...' Employment and Training Services' (VETS) core programs and new initiatives regarding efforts that assist... Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service, Labor. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the...

  2. 77 FR 30330 - Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...' Employment and Training Services' (VETS) core programs and new initiatives regarding efforts that assist... Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service, Labor. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the...

  3. 77 FR 76074 - Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ...' Employment and Training Services' (VETS) core programs and new initiatives regarding efforts that assist... Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer Outreach (ACVETEO): Meeting AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service, Labor. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the...

  4. Three Generations, Three Wars: African American Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K

    2016-02-01

    This article emerged from pilot research exploring experiences of war and suffering among African American veterans who served in World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War. Men's experiences as soldiers reflected both racism and the social change that occurred in the Unites States while they served. We used techniques of narrative elicitation, conducting qualitative, ethnographic interviews with each of five veterans in his home. Interviews focused on unique and shared experiences as an African American man and a soldier. Three important themes emerged: (a) Expectations related to War--Although men viewed service to country as an expected part of life, they also expected equal treatment in war, which did not occur; (b) Suffering as an African American--Informants interpreted experiences of suffering in war as related to the lower status of African American servicemen; and (c) Perception of present identity--Each man was honed by the sum of his experiences, including those of combat, racism, and postwar opportunities and obstacles. From 40 to 70 years after the wars were fought, there are few scholarly narrative studies on African American veterans, despite the fact that Korean War Veterans are entering old-old age and few World War II Veterans are alive. The value of pilot research that offers narratives of unheard voices is significant; larger studies can interview more African American veterans to advance knowledge that might soon be lost. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Rural Veterans by State (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  6. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  7. Veteran Religious Affiliation by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset provide a count of Veteran by their religious affiliation and state of residence. The dataset set covers all 50 states, District of Columbia and other...

  8. Rural Veterans by State (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This spreadsheet contains data from the 2015 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  9. VA Is Here for the People Who Support Our Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of ... word about the Veterans Crisis Line. Access confidential Homeless Veterans Chat and see resources for homeless Veterans . Network ...

  10. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of ...

  11. Veterans' attitudes toward work and disability compensation: associations with substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshberg-Cohen, Sarah; Reid-Quiñones, Kathryn; Black, Anne C; Rosen, Marc I

    2014-02-01

    Veterans deemed disabled for conditions resulting from, or aggravated by, their service in the military are eligible for service-connected disability payments. Despite many positive effects of disability payments, one concern is that Veterans with psychiatric conditions who receive disability payments are less likely to be employed compared to those who are denied benefits. Little is known about the attitudes of substance using Veterans, for whom work is a particularly important part of recovery, toward work and disability compensation. This study compared the responses of Veterans with (n=33) and without substance use problems (n=51) to questions about work's significance and its relationship to disability payments. T- and chi-square tests were conducted to determine if Veterans with substance use problems differed from the others on work-related attitudes and perceptions of the relation between work and Veterans' benefits. Veterans endorsed high levels of agreement with statements that working would lead to loss of benefits. Veterans with substance use agreed more strongly that they would rather turn down a job offer than lose financial benefits. The greater preference for disability payments among substance-using Veterans may reflect a realistic concern that they are particularly likely to have difficulty maintaining employment. The widespread concern among Veterans that work will lead to loss of VA disability payments is striking given the ambiguity about how likely loss of benefits actually is, and should be addressed during the service-connection application process. © 2013.

  12. Grants for the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP). Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule, without change, the proposal to establish a pilot program known as the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP). The RVCP will provide grants to eligible community-based organizations and local and State government entities to be used by these organizations and entities to assist veterans and their families who are transitioning from military service to civilian life in rural or underserved communities. VA will use information obtained through the pilot program to evaluate the effectiveness of using community-based organizations and local and State government entities to improve the provision of services to transitioning veterans and their families. Five RVCP grants will be awarded for a 2-year period in discrete locations pursuant to a Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) to be published in the Federal Register.

  13. An Analysis of Homeless Veterans Participating in the Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katrina Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis on ex post facto data of the federal grant supported Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) administered at Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina. Pre-existing data on variables such as performance goals, training activities, support services, and demographics from program years…

  14. Delivery of mental health treatment to combat veterans with psychiatric diagnoses and TBI histories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon R Miles

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI and mental health (MH disorders are prevalent in combat veterans returning from Afghanistan and/or Iraq (hereafter referred to as returning veterans. Accurate estimates of service utilization for veterans with and without TBI exposure (referred to as TBI history are imperative in order to provide high quality healthcare to returning veterans. We examined associations between TBI history and MH service utilization in a subsample of returning veterans who were newly diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, and/or anxiety in the 2010 fiscal year (N = 55,458. Data were extracted from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA National Patient Care Database. Veterans with MH diagnoses and TBI histories attended significantly more psychotherapy visits, (M = 8.32 visits, SD = 17.15 and were more likely to attend at least 8 psychotherapy visits, (15.7% than veterans with MH diagnoses but no TBI history (M = 6.48 visits, SD = 12.12; 10.1% attended at least 8 sessions. PTSD and TBI history, but not depression or anxiety, were associated with a greater number of psychotherapy visits when controlling for demographic and clinical variables. PTSD, anxiety, depression, and TBI history were associated with number of psychotropic medication-management visits. TBI history was related to greater MH service utilization, independent of MH diagnoses. Future research should examine what MH services are being utilized and if these services are helping veterans recover from their disorders.

  15. Evidence of poorer life-course mental health outcomes among veterans of the Korean War cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew Stephen; Fulton, Lawrence

    2010-03-01

    Comparing the outcomes of veterans who served in Korea and those who served elsewhere, we examined the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other mental health conditions, psychiatric treatment locations, and six mental health well-being measures. The analytic sample consisted of nationally representative data from the 2001 National Survey of Veterans (NSV). Analyses included multiple logistic regressions that controlled for sociodemographic characteristics. Korean era veterans in the NSV (n = 4030): 1498 served in Korea; 2532 elsewhere during the era. Veterans who served in Korea have notably poorer mental health than those who served elsewhere. These results suggest higher resource needs among aging Korean era veterans. Clinicians, policy makers and the Department of Veterans Affairs should focus on mental health services to older veterans.

  16. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  17. MyHealtheVet Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This service provides web services used to obtain MyHealtheVet related data. The service does not support multiple Vista sites data access. Users of this service are...

  18. The war veteran identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković-Savić Olivera S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses how war veterans perceive themselves and how they answer the question 'Who am I?'. War veterans face many challenges in the process of re-socialization from a state of war and war traumatization to a peacetime society. There are several reasons why their re-socialization is a slow process: the first one is that a war engagement is in itself a highly stressful situation which carries traumas of different degrees, the other reason is the changed system of values in relation to war engagement. Namely, at the time they went to war, they had a strong social support, but at the time of their return and today this support is lost to the point of judgment. And the third reason which limits their re-socialization is the situation of social transition they found on their return from war, which specifically means that a large percentage of the population in general, and thus the war veterans after returning from the war, lost their jobs, creating a large social group of 'transition losers'. Such a condition often generates an identity crisis. This set of socio-cultural circumstances together with the ontological insecurity carried by war trauma generate an identity crisis, which is manifested among the respondents in nihilistic answers when responding to questions about their own personality. Studying the identity of war veterans, it was found that a strong attachment to the veteran identity is dominant. In fact, this paper discusses the different ways in which this attachment is refracted in the personality and identity of subjects, from negative attitudes to the pride in belonging to a group of war veterans and personal fulfillment in the activism in associations of war participants.

  19. Homelessness among female veterans: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Dichter, Melissa E

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic, critical review of the literature to assess and summarize existing research on homelessness among female veterans. They searched seven electronic databases (ERIC, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, and Sociological Abstracts), websites of several government and research organizations, and reference lists of prior studies. They abstracted data on study design, funding source, and topic from studies meeting inclusion criteria and classified each study into one of the following categories: epidemiology, health and other services utilization, and interventions. The authors included both experimental and observational studies of interventions in the review and performed a narrative synthesis for each of the 26 studies identified. No studies were experimental, 20 were observational, and the remainder were either qualitative or descriptive. Of the 26 identified studies, 14 were epidemiologic, 7 focused on the health and additional service utilization, and 5 were intervention studies. Findings provided important baseline epidemiologic information about homelessness among female veterans and indicated that female veterans were at an increased risk of homelessness relative to their male veteran and female non-veteran counterparts. Additional research is needed to develop and implement effective, evidence-based programs to prevent and end homelessness among women veterans.

  20. Protective mechanisms and prevention of violence and aggression in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Johnson, Sally C; Newton, Virginia M; Timko, Christine; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Van Male, Lynn M; Wagner, H Ryan; Beckham, Jean C

    2014-05-01

    Although a subset of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans show aggression toward others after they return home from military service, little is known about protective mechanisms that could be bolstered to prevent violence. A national longitudinal survey was conducted between 2009 and 2011 using a random sample of veterans who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. One thousand and ninety veterans, from 50 states representing all military branches, completed 2 waves of data collection, 1 year apart (retention rate = 79%). The final sample resembled the U.S. military post 9/11 in terms of age, sex, ethnicity, geography, and service branch. Protective mechanisms in socioeconomic (money to cover basic needs, stable employment), psychosocial (resilience, perceiving control over one's life, social support), and physical (healthy sleep, no physical pain) domains were examined. We found these protective mechanisms predicted decreased aggression and violence at follow-up, particularly among higher risk veterans. Multivariable analyses confirmed that protective mechanisms lowered violence through their interaction with risk factors. This study identifies protective mechanisms related to decreased community violence in veterans and indicates that rehabilitation aimed at improving socioeconomic, psychosocial, and physical well-being has potential promise to reduce aggression and violence among veterans after returning home from military service. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. 38 CFR 3.16 - Service pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service pension. 3.16 Section 3.16 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.16 Service pension. In computing the 70 or...

  2. Rooted in the Community: Assessing the Reintegration Effects of Agriculture on Rural Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterman-Dahan, Karen; Chavez, Margeaux; Njoh, Eni

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effect of a veteran-oriented community agricultural initiative on transitioning rural veterans. Convergent mixed-method program evaluation. Veteran-oriented farm-to-market community agricultural initiative. Veterans (N=43) who were members of the community agricultural initiative. Health, well-being, and reintegration were assessed by self-reported data from interviews, a demographic survey, a validated health quality of life measure (Veterans RAND-12 [VR-12]), a validated reintegration measure (Military to Civilian Questionnaire), and a general satisfaction survey. Veteran participants were primarily white (88.4%, n=38) and men (74.4%, n=32), and most had a service-connected disability rating (58.2%, n=25). Qualitative and quantitative data revealed that the veterans participating in this community agricultural initiative experienced health and reintegration benefits. Results on the Military to Civilian Questionnaire, VR-12, and satisfaction survey suggest that participating in this community agricultural initiative contributed to improved mental, physical, and emotional health and vocational skills, community connectedness, and interpersonal communication. Qualitative interviews supported quantitative findings and revealed that participating in the community agricultural initiative provided veterans with a sense of satisfaction, a sense of belonging, and helped decrease the stigma surrounding their veteran status. Veterans who participate in this community agricultural initiative reported general improvements in physical and mental health, including improvements in sleep, nutrition, and exercise, and decreases in anxiety, pain, depression, and medication and substance use, all known factors which effect veteran reintegration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Homelessness in a national sample of incarcerated veterans in state and federal prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kasprow, Wesley J; McGuire, James F

    2014-05-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has been increasing efforts to reach out to assist incarcerated veterans. While previous studies have shown strong associations between incarceration and homelessness, few studies have examined distinctive characteristics of incarcerated homeless and non-homeless veterans. National administrative data on 30,348 incarcerated veterans served by the Health Care for Re-entry Veterans (HCRV) program were analyzed. Incarcerated veterans were classified into four groups based on their history of past homelessness: not homeless, transiently homeless, episodically homeless, and chronically homeless. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compare groups on sociodemographic characteristics, criminal justice status, clinical status, and their interest in using VHA services. Of the sample, 70 % were classified as not homeless, 8 % as transiently homeless, 11 % as episodically homeless, and 11 % as chronically homeless. Thus, 30 % of the sample had a homeless history, which is five times the 6 % rate of past homelessness among adult men in the general population. Compared to non-homeless incarcerated veterans, all three homeless groups reported significantly more mental health problems, more substance abuse, more times arrested in their lifetime, more likely to be incarcerated for a non-violent offense, and were more interested in receiving VHA services after release from prison. Together, these findings suggest re-entry programs, like HCRV, can address relevant mental health-related service needs, especially among formerly homeless veterans and veterans in need of services are receptive to the offer of assistance.

  4. Mental health utilization among older Veterans with coexisting depression and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A DiNapoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We compared mental health service utilization among older, depressed Veterans (60 years or older with and without coexisting dementia. Methods: This retrospective study examined data from the 2010 Veterans Health Administration National Patient Care Database outpatient treatment files of Veterans with a newly recognized diagnosis of depression (N = 177,710. Results: Approximately 48.84% with coexisting depression and dementia and 32.00% with depression only received mental health services within 12 months of diagnosis (p < .0001. Veterans with coexisting depression and dementia were more likely to receive medication-management appointments (33.40% vs 20.62%, individual therapy (13.39% vs 10.91%, and family therapy (3.77% vs 1.19% than depressed Veterans without dementia. Conclusion: In general, Veterans with recently diagnosed depression are significantly underusing Veterans Affairs mental health treatment services. Those Veterans who have comorbid dementia are more likely than those with just depression to be enrolled in mental health treatments. Systemic improvements are needed to increase use of mental health services for older, depressed Veterans.

  5. Homelessness and money mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Sullivan, Connor P; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean C

    2013-12-01

    We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009-2011. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n = 1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one's credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR] = 4.09, 95% CI = 1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.26, 5.33), and income (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.71). Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness.

  6. Supporting Veterans in Massachusetts: An Assessment of Needs, Well-Being, and Available Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Carrie M; Tanielian, Terri; Fischer, Shira H; Duffy, Erin L; Dellva, Stephanie; Butcher, Emily; Brown, Kristine M; Hoch, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Massachusetts is home to approximately 380,000 of the nation's more than 21 million veterans, but there has been little research on the resources available to this population at the state level. There are numerous resources available to veterans and other military-affiliated groups in Massachusetts, but there are still pockets of unmet need in the areas of education, employment, health care, housing, financial, and legal services-particularly for newer veterans and current National Guard/reserve members. Although Massachusetts veterans fare better overall than their peers in other states, they lag behind other Massachusetts residents in terms of health and financial status. Massachusetts veterans and National Guard/reserve members who need support and services face such barriers as a lack of knowledge about how to access services, a lack of awareness about eligibility, and geographic distance from service providers. As the veteran population changes both nationally and in Massachusetts, it will be important for public- and private-sector providers serving Massachusetts veterans and service members to continue addressing unmet needs while ensuring that resources are responsive to shifts in these populations. A better understanding of the unique needs of Massachusetts veterans can help inform investments in initiatives that target these populations and guide efforts to remedy barriers to accessing available support services and other resources.

  7. 78 FR 76061 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ....009, Veterans Medical Care Benefits; 64.010, Veterans Nursing Home Care; 64.011, Veterans Dental Care... Domiciliary Care; 64.015, Veterans State Nursing Home Care; 64.018, Sharing Specialized Medical Resources; 64... furnished hospital care, nursing home care, domiciliary care, or medical services, and requires medical...

  8. 38 CFR 21.6370 - Authorization of transportation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of transportation services. 21.6370 Section 21.6370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... becomes feasible for the veteran to commute to school with family, friends or fellow students. (Authority...

  9. Paving the way of systems biology and precision medicine in allergic diseases : The MeDALL success story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Anto, J. M.; Akdis, M.; Auffray, C.; Keil, T.; Momas, I.; Postma, D. S.; Valenta, R.; Wickman, M.; Cambon-Thomsen, A.; Haahtela, T.; Lambrecht, B. N.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Koppelman, G. H.; Sunyer, J.; Zuberbier, T.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Arno, A.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; De Carlo, G.; Forastiere, F.; Heinrich, J.; Kowalski, M. L.; Maier, D.; Melen, E.; Palkonen, S.; Smit, H. A.; Standl, M.; Wright, J.; Asarnoj, A.; Benet, M.; Ballardini, N.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gehring, U.; Guerra, S.; Hohman, C.; Kull, I.; Lupinek, C.; Pinart, M.; Skrindo, I.; Westman, M.; Smagghe, D.; Akdis, C.; Albang, R.; Anastasova, V.; Anderson, N.; Bachert, C.; Ballereau, S.; Ballester, F.; Basagana, X.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergstrom, A.; von Berg, A.; Brunekreef, B.; Burte, E.; Carlsen, K. H.; Chatzi, L.; Coquet, J. M.; Curin, M.; Demoly, P.; Eller, E.; Fantini, M. P.; Gerhard, B.; Hammad, H.; von Hertzen, L.; Hovland, V.; Jacquemin, B.; Just, J.; Keller, T.; Kerkhof, M.; Kiss, R.; Kogevinas, M.; Koletzko, S.; Lau, S.; Lehmann, I.; Lemonnier, N.; McEachan, R.; Makela, M.; Mestres, J.; Minina, E.; Mowinckel, P.; Nadif, R.; Nawijn, M.; Oddie, S.; Pellet, J.; Pin, I.; Porta, D.; Ranciere, F.; Rial-Sebbag, A.; Saeys, Y.; Schuijs, M. J.; Siroux, V.; Tischer, C. G.; Torrent, M.; Varraso, R.; De Vocht, J.; Wenger, K.; Wieser, S.; Xu, Chengjian

    2016-01-01

    MeDALL Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy; EU FP7-CP-IP; Project No: 261357; 20 (10) -2015 proposed an innovative approach to develop early indicators for the prediction, diagnosis, prevention and targets for therapy(.) MeDALL linked epidemiological, clinical and basic research using a

  10. "Remember to Hand out Medals": Peer Rating and Expertise in a Question-and-Answer Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study of giving medals as part of a peer rating system in a question-and-answer (Q&A) study group on Python, a programming language. There are no professional teachers tutoring learners. The study aimed to understand whether and how medals, awarded to responses in a peer-based learning environment, can…

  11. Prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Aging Vietnam-Era Veterans: Veterans Administration Cooperative Study 569: Course and Consequences of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Vietnam-Era Veteran Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jack; Magruder, Kathryn M; Forsberg, Christopher W; Friedman, Matthew J; Litz, Brett T; Vaccarino, Viola; Heagerty, Patrick J; Gleason, Theresa C; Huang, Grant D; Smith, Nicholas L

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among aging Vietnam-era veterans is not well characterized. In a cross-sectional study, 5,598 male Vietnam-era veterans and members of the Vietnam Era Twin Registry were assessed for PTSD using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Current symptoms were measured with the PTSD Checklist (PCL). PTSD was estimated according to age (aged at least 60 years was 16.9% (95% CI: 13.9%-20.5%) and higher than the 5.5% (95% CI: 4.3%-7.0%) among nontheater veterans. Among veterans younger than 60 years, the comparable prevalence was 22.0% for theater (95% CI: 16.7%-28.4%) and 15.7% for nontheater (95% CI: 13.4%-18.2%) veterans. Similar results were found for theater service and current PTSD prevalence (past 12 months). PCL scores were significantly higher in theater compared with nontheater veterans in both younger and older cohorts. In both the younger and older cohorts significant differences in lifetime and current PTSD prevalence and PCL scores persisted in theater service discordant twin pairs. Vietnam service is related to elevated PTSD prevalence and current symptom burden in aging veterans. More than 30 years after the end of the Vietnam conflict, many veterans continue to suffer from PTSD, which highlights the need for continuing outreach throughout the life course. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  12. National Cemetery Administration Summary of Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments: FY2000 to FY2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Total Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments at National Cemetery, and shown by Interment Type of Casket or Cremain, FY2000 to FY2012. Non-Veteran includes dependents,...

  13. Service dogs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  14. Cancer in US Air Force veterans not involved with spraying herbicides during the Vietnam War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuk, M. [SpecPro, Inc. (United States); Michalek, J.; Ketchum, N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, San Antonio, TX (United States); Akhtar, F. [The START Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year prospective study examining the health, mortality and reproductive outcomes in US Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand who sprayed herbicides in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971. Comparison veterans flew or serviced C-130 transport aircraft in Southeast Asia (SEA) during the same time period but did not spray herbicides. They were stationed mostly in Taiwan, the Philippines, Guam, Japan, and Thailand and spent on average less than 30% of their SEA service in Vietnam. Comparison veterans also spent approximately 30% more time in SEA than Ranch Hand veterans. No increases in Ranch Hand cancer mortality and morbidity were found in earlier investigations, but a recent study contrasting cancer rates in Air Force veterans and in the general US (white male) population reported increases in cancer at all SEER sites, prostate cancer and melanoma in Ranch Hand veterans and cancer at all SEER sites and prostate cancer in Comparison veterans. Associations between dioxin exposure category and cancer were found after restriction to Ranch Hand veterans who served in SEA no more than 2 years and to those who spent all of their SEA service in Vietnam. Overall cancer incidence in the general population in countries of SEA is about half of that in the United States, but cancers of the oral cavity/nasopharynx and liver are more prevalent in this region. Here we examine in more detail whether years served in SEA had any effect on the risk of cancer among Comparison veterans.

  15. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N=12 also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations.

  16. Moral injury, meaning making, and mental health in returning veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M; Holland, Jason M; Malott, Jesse

    2015-03-01

    This study examined whether exposure to morally injurious experiences (MIEs) contribute to mental health problems among returning Veterans via meaning made of possible traumas. A total of 131 Iraq and/or Afghanistan Veterans completed assessments of exposure to possible warzone traumas, meaning made of a salient stressor from their lives, and mental health symptomatology (e.g., posttraumatic stress, depression, suicidality). Structural equation modeling findings revealed that MIEs were indirectly linked with mental health outcomes via the extent to which Veterans were able to make meaning of their identified stressors. However, we also found that the direct path from MIEs to mental health problems was statistically significant. These findings provide preliminary evidence that difficulties with meaning making could serve as a mediating pathway for how MIEs increase the risk for adjustment problems after warzone service, but that other factors associated with moral injury also have a bearing on psychological functioning among Veterans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Civilian Social Work: Serving the Military and Veteran Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Laura; Illingworth, Maria; DuLaney, Megan

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses social work practice areas for civilian social workers who provide services to military service members, veterans, and their families. These practice areas include education, child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, health care, substance abuse, and criminal justice. The authors examine the impact of the contemporary…

  18. Disaster Relief and Recovery Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Schools Types of Emergencies Mobile Apps Military Families Emergency Communication Financial Assistance Deployment Information & Referral Services for Veterans Disaster Preparedness & Recovery ...

  19. Winter Atomiades 2014: CERN skiers win 31 medals!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The 12th Winter Atomiades took place at Flachau, Austria, from 8 to 15 March 2014. The event, organised by the Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes (see here), brought together 18 research centres, including CERN, AIT, ESRF, PSI and many others, with a total of about 280 participants.   Lots of fun and a great result for the 13 CERN skiers at the 2014 Winter Atomiades in Flachau, Austria. From left to right and from bottom to top: Lennart Jirden (PH), Anna Lipniacka (PH), Guillaume Michet (DGS), Vera Chetvertkova (TE), Thierry Boileau (external), Jean-Louis Grenard (EN), Clement Bovet (EN), Marc Tavlet (BE), Rob Knoops (PH), Giuseppe Lo Presti (IT), Simone Campana (IT), Sylviane Gander (external) and Javier Pablos (TE).   The team of 13 athletes from six different CERN departments won 31 medals across all disciplines, in a spirit of fun and fair play. CERN came second in the general ranking of all participating institutes! The next Winter Atomiades...

  20. Emergency department visits during an Olympic gold medal television broadcast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2011-01-01

    Practice pattern variations are often attributed to physician decision-making with no accounting for patient preferences. To test whether a mass media television broadcast unrelated to health was associated with changes in the rate and characteristics of visits for acute emergency care. Time-series analysis of emergency department visits for any reason. Population-based sample of all patients seeking emergency care in Ontario, Canada. The broadcast day was defined as the Olympic men's gold medal ice hockey game final. The control days were defined as the 6 Sundays before and after the broadcast day. A total of 99 447 visits occurred over the 7 Sundays, of which 13 990 occurred on the broadcast day. Comparing the broadcast day with control days, we found no significant difference in the hourly rate of visits before the broadcast (544 vs 537, p = 0.41) or after the broadcast (647 vs 639, p = 0.55). In contrast, we observed a significant reduction in hourly rate of visits during the broadcast (647 vs 783, p broadcast was particularly large for adult men with low triage severity. The greatest reductions were for patients with abdominal, musculoskeletal or traumatic disorders. Mass media television broadcasts can influence patient preferences and thereby lead to a decrease in emergency department visits.

  1. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Beatrice A. Wright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in 4 areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Beatrice A. Wright. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are: Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: David W. Johnson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is David W. Johnson. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Sandra L. Shullman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Sandra L. Shullman. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Gender Differences in Service Utilization among OEF/OIF Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after a Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Increase Treatment Engagement: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Autumn M; Wolff, Kristina B; Streltzov, Nicholas A; Adams, Leslie B; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Joanne; Stecker, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Women veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom [OEF/OIF]) have a moderately higher risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than male veterans. However, gender disparities in treatment engagement may prevent women veterans from initiating the care they need. Understanding gender differences in predictors of and barriers to treatment is essential to improving engagement and mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in treatment utilization after a brief, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention among male and female OEF/OIF veterans. Participants were assigned randomly to either the intervention or control conditions. Intervention participants received the telephone-based CBT intervention. Participants were 35 female and 238 male OEF/OIF veterans who screened positive for PTSD and had never initiated PTSD treatment. Participants were asked about treatment utilization, beliefs about PTSD treatment, and symptoms at months 1, 3, and 6 months subsequent to the baseline telephone assessment. The PTSD Checklist-Military Version was used to assess PTSD and the Patient's Health Questionnaire was used to assess symptoms of depression. Female veterans who received an intervention were significantly more likely to have attended treatment over the 6-month follow-up period than male veterans who received an intervention (χ(2) = 7.91; df = 3; odds ratio, 3.93; p = .04). The CBT intervention may be a critical mechanism to engage female veterans in treatment. Further research is needed to understand how to engage male veterans with PTSD in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. All rights reserved.

  5. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran, bereavement... mental health services in connection with treatment of the veteran under 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1712, 1712A...

  6. 76 FR 37201 - Reimbursement Offsets for Medical Care or Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Offsets for Medical Care or Services AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... reimbursement of medical care and services delivered to veterans for nonservice-connected conditions. This rule... States reasonable charges for the cost of medical care or services furnished to a veteran for a...

  7. VIERS- User Preference Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Preferences service provides a means to store, retrieve, and manage user preferences. The service supports definition of enterprise wide preferences, as well as...

  8. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Kosovo Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoza Shahini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD at veterans 8 years after war, to find out relation of PTSD with other demographic and health related variables and discover the impact of depression and trauma on PTSD on 687 veterans from six municipalities in Kosovo. Method: Participants were 687 war veterans selected from six regions of Kosovo during 2008. The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ-40, was administered to measure PTSD and Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25 for depression and anxiety. Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Results: Results indicated that 11.2 % of veterans even 8 years after the war ended were suffering from PTSD. Six percent of veterans with PTSD did not seek medical help. They reported to have had emotional problems and physical problems, but they did not seek medical help. The findings suggest that self-medication may be one way of veterans dealing with PTSD symptoms. Veterans with PTSD symptoms were more concerned with “family issues” than those without PTSD symptoms. Conclusions: The study found that 8 years after the war the veterans of the war in Kosovo suffer PTSD symptoms and that a good number of them do not seek help for this problem. The establishment of adequate services by the state would transform these veterans’ dealing with PTSD not into a moral challenge but into a fundamental right to equal and high-quality services.

  9. All-Cause Mortality Among US Veterans of the Persian Gulf War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han K.; Bullman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We determined cause-specific mortality prevalence and risks of Gulf War deployed and nondeployed veterans to determine if deployed veterans were at greater risk than nondeployed veterans for death overall or because of certain diseases or conditions up to 13 years after conflict subsided. Methods: Follow-up began when the veteran left the Gulf War theater or May 1, 1991, and ended on the date of death or December 31, 2004. We studied 621   901 veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War and 746   247 veterans who served but were not deployed during the Gulf War. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate rate ratios adjusted for age at entry to follow-up, length of follow-up, race, sex, branch of service, and military unit. We compared the mortality of (1) Gulf War veterans with non–Gulf War veterans and (2) Gulf War army veterans potentially exposed to nerve agents at Khamisiyah in March 1991 with those not exposed. We compared standardized mortality ratios of deployed and nondeployed Gulf War veterans with the US population. Results: Male Gulf War veterans had a lower risk of mortality than male non–Gulf War veterans (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95-0.99), and female Gulf War veterans had a higher risk of mortality than female non–Gulf War veterans (aRR = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03-1.28). Khamisiyah-exposed Gulf War army veterans had >3 times the risk of mortality from cirrhosis of the liver than nonexposed army Gulf War veterans (aRR = 3.73; 95% CI, 1.64-8.48). Compared with the US population, female Gulf War veterans had a 60% higher risk of suicide and male Gulf War veterans had a lower risk of suicide (standardized mortality ratio = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.80-0.88). Conclusion: The vital status and mortality risk of Gulf War and non–Gulf War veterans should continue to be investigated. PMID:28123229

  10. Child sexual abuse and adulthood sexual assault among military veteran and civilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jessica R; Bell, Kathryn M; Naugle, Amy E; Polusny, Melissa A

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate childhood sexual abuse (CSA), adulthood sexual victimization (ASV), and adulthood sexual assault experiences in a comparison sample of female military veterans (n = 142) and civilian community members (n = 81). Women veterans were significantly more likely than civilian women to report adult sexual assault. Although comparable rates of CSA and ASV were found across groups, veterans more frequently reported having been sexually abused by a parental figure, reported longer durations of CSA, and significantly greater severity of ASV than civilians. Implications for mental health professionals providing sexual trauma services to female military personnel and veterans are discussed.

  11. 2001 National Survey of Veterans (NSV)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2001 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the fifth in a series of comprehensivenationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  12. Profile of Vietnam War Veterans (2015).

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Profile of Vietnam War Veterans uses the 2015 ACS to provide a view into the demographic characteristics and socioeconomic conditions of the Vietnam War Veteran...

  13. 2015 Veteran Economic Opportunity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and data analysis to the VBA and stakeholders. PA&I developed the VBA Enterprise Data Warehouse to enable the generation of recurring and ad hoc...reports in response to VBA decision-making and business needs. PA&I will be a primary source of information on Veteran education, vocational...Servicemembers UI Unemployment Insurance URL Uniform Resource Locator USB Under Secretary for Benefits VA Department of Veterans Affairs VBA Veterans

  14. 20 CFR 408.216 - Are you a World War II veteran?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are you a World War II veteran? 408.216 Section 408.216 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification and Entitlement Military Service § 408.216 Are you a World War II...

  15. Rural women veterans demographic report: defining VA users' health and health care access in rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Dailey, Nancy; Bair, Byron; Shore, Jay

    2014-01-01

    While many women choose to live in rural areas after retiring from active military duty, a paucity of studies examine rural women veterans' health care needs. This report is the first of its kind to describe the population demographics and health care utilization of rural female veteran patients enrolled in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Using the National Patient Care Datasets (n = 327,785), we ran adjusted regression analyses to examine service utilization between (1) urban and rural and (2) urban and highly rural women veterans. Rural and highly rural women veterans were older and more likely to be married than their urban counterparts. Diagnostic rates were generally similar between groups for several mental health disorders, hypertension, and diabetes, with the exception of nonposttraumatic stress anxiety that was significantly lower for highly rural women veterans. Rural and highly rural women veterans were less likely to present to the VA for women's specific care than urban women veterans; highly rural women veterans were less likely to present for mental health care compared to urban women veterans. Among the users of primary care, mental health, women's specific, and all outpatient services, patients' annual utilization rates were similar. Improved service options for women's specific care and mental health visits may help rural women veterans access care. Telehealth technologies and increased outreach, perhaps peer-based, should be considered. Other recommendations for VA policy and planning include increasing caregiver support options, providing consistency for mental health services, and revising medical encounter coding procedures. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  16. Understanding Barriers to Mental Health Care for Recent War Veterans Through Photovoice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Rigg, Khary K; Butler, Anneliese

    2015-10-01

    Despite an urgent need for mental health care among U.S. service members returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, many veterans do not receive timely or adequate treatment. We used photovoice methods to engage veterans in identifying barriers to utilizing mental health services. Veterans described how key aspects of military culture and identity, highly adaptive during deployment, can deter help-seeking behavior and hinder recovery. Veterans' photographs highlighted how mental health symptoms and self-coping strategies operated as barriers to care. Many veterans' photos and stories revealed how negative health care encounters contributed to avoidance and abandonment of treatment; some veterans described these experiences as re-traumatizing. Visual methods can be a powerful tool for engaging recent war veterans in research. In particular, community-based participatory research approaches, which have rarely been used with veterans, hold great promise for informing effective interventions to improve access and enhance provision of patient-centered care for veterans. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Veterans' Education Benefits: Enhanced Guidance and Collaboration Could Improve Administration of the Post-9/11 GI Bill Program. GAO-11-356R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, George A.

    2011-01-01

    With the passage of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 (Post- 9/11 GI Bill), Congress created a comprehensive education benefit program for veterans, service members, and their dependents pursuing postsecondary education. Since implementation, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has provided just over $5.7 billion for…

  18. Health care utilization and costs after entry into an outreach program for homeless mentally ill veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, R; Gallup, P; Frisman, L K

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a Department of Veterans Affairs outreach and residential treatment program for homeless mentally ill veterans on utilization and cost of health care services provided by the VA. Veterans at nine program sites (N = 1,748) were assessed with a standard intake instrument. Services provided by the outreach program were documented in quarterly clinical reports and in residential treatment discharge summaries. Data on nonprogram VA health service utilization and health care costs were obtained from national VA data bases. Changes in use of services and cost of services from the year before initial contact with the program to the year after were analyzed by t test. Multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationship of these changes to indicators of clinical need and to participation in the outreach program. Although utilization of inpatient service did not increase after veterans' initial contact with the program, use of domiciliary and outpatient services increased substantially. Total annual costs to the VA also increased by 35 percent, from $6,414 to $8,699 per veteran per year. Both clinical need and participation in the program were associated with increased use of health services and increased cost. Veterans with concomitant psychiatric and substance abuse problems used fewer health care services than others. Specialized programs to improve the access of homeless mentally ill persons to health care services appear to be effective, but costly. Dually diagnosed persons seem especially difficult to engage in treatment.

  19. Spiro K. Antiochos Receives 2013 John Adam Fleming Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The John Adam Fleming Medal is awarded for "original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences." Originality and technical leadership are exactly the characteristics that distinguish the research of Spiro K. Antiochos. Spiro possesses a truly unique combination of physical insight, creativity, and mastery of the concepts and mathematical and numerical tools of space physics. These talents have allowed him to develop completely original theories for major observational problems and to test and refine those theories using sophisticated numerical simulation codes that he himself helped to develop. Spiro's physical insight is especially impressive. He has an uncanny ability to identify the fundamental aspects of complex problems and to see physical connections where others do not. This can sometimes involve ideas that may initially seem counterintuitive to those with less creativity. Many of Spiro's revolutionary advances have opened up whole new areas of study and shaped the course of space physics. Examples include the breakout model for coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the S-web model for the slow solar wind, and the thermal nonequilibrium model for solar prominences. The breakout model is of special significance to AGU as it strives to promote science for the betterment of humanity. CMEs are enormous explosions on the Sun that can have major "space weather" impacts here on Earth. They affect technologies ranging from communication and navigation systems to electrical power grids. Breakout is the leading theory for why CMEs occur and may one day be the foundation for more accurate space weather forecasting.

  20. Five-year trends in women veterans' use of VA maternity benefits, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Frayne, Susan; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Yano, Elizabeth M; Zephyrin, Laurie; Shryock, Holly; Haskell, Sally; Katon, Jodie; Sullivan, J Cherry; Weinreb, Linda; Ulbricht, Christine; Bastian, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of young women veterans are returning from war and military service and are seeking reproductive health care from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Many of these women seek maternity benefits from the VHA, and yet little is known regarding the number of women veterans utilizing VHA maternity benefits nor the characteristics of pregnant veterans using these benefits. In May 2010, VHA maternity benefits were expanded to include 7 days of infant care, which may serve to entice more women to use VHA maternity benefits. Understanding the changing trends in women veterans seeking maternity benefits will help the VHA to improve the quality of reproductive care over time. The goal of this study was to examine the trends in delivery claims among women veterans receiving VHA maternity benefits over a 5-year period and the characteristics of pregnant veterans utilizing VHA benefits. We undertook a retrospective, national cohort study of pregnant veterans enrolled in VHA care with inpatient deliveries between fiscal years (FY) 2008 and 2012. We included pregnant veterans using VHA maternity benefits for delivery. Measures included annualized numbers and rates of inpatient deliveries and delivery-related costs, as well as cesarean section rates as a quality indicator. During the 5-year study period, there was a significant increase in the number of deliveries to women veterans using VHA maternity benefits. The overall delivery rate increased by 44% over the study period from 12.4 to 17.8 deliveries per 1,000 women veterans. A majority of women using VHA maternity benefits were age 30 or older and had a service-connected disability. From FY 2008 to 2012, the VHA paid more than $46 million in delivery claims to community providers for deliveries to women veterans ($4,993/veteran). Over a 5-year period, the volume of women veterans using VHA maternity benefits increased by 44%. Given this sizeable increase, the VHA must increase its capacity to care

  1. Adaptation of Lean Six Sigma Methodologies for the Evaluation of Veterans Choice Program at 3 Urban Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry L; Stevenson, Lauren D; Ladebue, Amy C; McCreight, Marina S; Lawrence, Emily C; Oestreich, Taryn; Lambert-Kerzner, Anne C

    2017-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is adapting to meet the changing needs of our Veterans. VHA leaders are promoting quality improvement strategies including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). This study used LSS tools to evaluate the Veterans Choice Program (VCP), a program that aims to improve access to health care services for eligible Veterans by expanding health care options to non-VHA providers. LSS was utilized to assess the current process and efficiency patterns of the VCP at 3 VHA Medical Centers. LSS techniques were used to assess data obtained through semistructured interviews with Veterans, staff, and providers to describe and evaluate the VCP process by identifying wastes and defects. The LSS methodology facilitated the process of targeting priorities for improvement and constructing suggestions to close identified gaps and inefficiencies. Identified key process wastes included inefficient exchange of clinical information between stakeholders in and outside of the VHA; poor dissemination of VCP programmatic information; shortages of VCP-participating providers; duplication of appointments; declines in care coordination; and lack of program adaptability to local processes. Recommendations for improvement were formulated using LSS. This evaluation illustrates how LSS can be utilized to assess a nationally mandated health care program. By focusing on stakeholder, staff, and Veteran perspectives, process defects in the VCP were identified and improvement recommendations were made. However, the current LSS language used is not intuitive in health care and similar applications of LSS may consider using new language and goals adapted specifically for health care.

  2. Review of medal predictions for South Africa in the Delhi 2010 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    relatively novel concept given that host nations in the Olympic Games have almost exclusively been the ... Africa most underperformed relative to the total medal forecast. Cluster 4: ... The analysis of the actual perform- ance of South ... Shibli S, Bingham J. A forecast of the performance of China in the Beijing. Olympic Games ...

  3. Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL) : Introducing novel concepts in allergy phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anto, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Akdis, Mubeccel; Auffray, Charles; Keil, Thomas; Momas, Isabelle; Postma, Dirkje S; Valenta, Rudolf; Wickman, Magnus; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Haahtela, Tari; Lambrecht, Bart N; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sunyer, Jordi; Zuberbier, Torsten; Annesi-Maesano, Isabelle; Arno, Albert; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Forastiere, Francesco; Heinrich, Joachim; Kowalski, Marek L; Maier, Dieter; Melén, Erik; Smit, Henriette A; Standl, Marie; Wright, John; Asarnoj, Anna; Benet, Marta; Ballardini, Natalia; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gehring, Ulrike; Guerra, Stefano; Hohmann, Cynthia; Kull, Inger; Lupinek, Christian; Pinart, Mariona; Skrindo, Ingebjorg; Westman, Marit; Smagghe, Delphine; Akdis, Cezmi; Andersson, Niklas; Bachert, Claus; Ballereau, Stephane; Ballester, Ferran; Basagana, Xavier; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergstrom, Anna; von Berg, Andrea; Brunekreef, Bert; Burte, Emilie; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Chatzi, Leda; Coquet, Jonathan M; Curin, Mirela; Demoly, Pascal; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria Pia; von Hertzen, Leena; Hovland, Vergard; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Just, Jocelyne; Keller, Theresa; Kiss, Renata; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lau, Susanne; Lehmann, Irina; Lemonnier, Nicolas; Mäkelä, Mika; Mestres, Jordi; Mowinckel, Peter; Nadif, Rachel; Nawijn, Martijn C; Pellet, Johan; Pin, Isabelle; Porta, Daniela; Rancière, Fanny; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Saeys, Yvan; Schuijs, Martijn J; Siroux, Valerie; Tischer, Christina G; Torrent, Mathies; Varraso, Raphaelle; Wenzel, Kalus; Xu, Cheng-Jian

    Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgE-associated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links of allergic

  4. Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL) : Introducing novel concepts in allergy phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anto, Josep M.; Bousquet, Jean; Akdis, Mubeccel; Auffray, Charles; Keil, Thomas; Momas, Isabelle; Postma, Dirkje S.; Valenta, Rudolf; Wickman, Magnus; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Haahtela, Tari; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sunyer, Jordi; Zuberbier, Torsten; Annesi-Maesano, Isabelle; Arno, Albert; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Forastiere, Francesco; Heinrich, Joachim; Kowalski, Marek L.; Maier, Dieter; Melen, Erik; Smit, Henriette A.; Standl, Marie; Wright, John; Asarnoj, Anna; Benet, Marta; Ballardini, Natalia; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gehring, Ulrike; Guerra, Stefano; Hohmann, Cynthia; Kull, Inger; Lupinek, Christian; Pinart, Mariona; Skrindo, Ingebjorg; Westman, Marit; Smagghe, Delphine; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Andersson, Niklas; Bachert, Claus; Ballereau, Stephane; Ballester, Ferran; Basagana, Xavier; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergstrom, Anna; von Berg, Andrea; Brunekreef, Bert; Burte, Emilie; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Chatzi, Leda; Coquet, Jonathan M; Curin, Mirela; Demoly, Pascal; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria Pia; von Hertzen, Leena; Hovland, Vergard; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Just, Jocelyne; Keller, Theresa; Kiss, Renata; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lau, Susanne; Lehmann, Irina; Lemonnier, Nicolas; Maekelae, Mika; Mestres, Jordi; Mowinckel, Peter; Nadif, Rachel; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Pellet, Johan; Pin, Isabelle; Porta, Daniela; Ranciere, Fanny; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Saeys, Yvan; Schuijs, Martijn J; Siroux, Valerie; Tischer, Christina G.; Torrent, Mathies; Varraso, Raphaelle; Wenzel, Kalus; Xu, Cheng-Jian

    Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgEassociated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links of allergic

  5. Phenotyping asthma, rhinitis and eczema in MeDALL population-based birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Benet, M; Saeys, Y

    2015-01-01

    at 4 years and 14 585 at 8 years from seven European population-based birth cohorts (MeDALL project). At each age period, children were grouped, using partitioning cluster analysis, according to the distribution of 23 variables covering symptoms 'ever' and 'in the last 12 months', doctor diagnosis, age...

  6. 77 FR 15997 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Intellectual Property, to the Secretary who, in turn, forwards his recommendations for the Medal to the President. Dated: March 13, 2012. Teresa Stanek Rea, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual... Law 96-480 (15 U.S.C. 3711), as amended August 9, 2007, specifically with regard to recommendations of...

  7. President Nixon speaks at Hickam AFB prior to presenting Medal of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon speaks at Hickam Air Force Base prior to presenting the nation's highest civilian award to the Apollo 13 crew. Receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom were Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (next to the Chief Executive), commander; John L. Swigert Jr. (left), command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot.

  8. 32 CFR 901.13 - Children of Medal of Honor recipients category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... defined as the natural children of a parent and adopted children whose adoption proceedings were initiated... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Children of Medal of Honor recipients category... MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY Nomination Procedures and...

  9. 76 FR 36176 - Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum...

  10. 76 FR 80901 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... to the review and selection of finalists for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and must uphold the confidential nature of an independent peer review and competitive selection process... the following SPECIAL EMPHASIS areas are particularly sought: Microbiology, Medical Science, Energy...

  11. Discourse following award of Kepler Gold Medal. [Kepler Laws, planetary astronomy and physics, and Jupiter studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Kuiper briefly reviews Kepler's contributions to the field of planetary astronomy and physics, along with references to his own background in the study of stars, planets, and the solar system. He mentions his participation in NASA programs related to planetary astronomy. He concludes his remarks with thanks for being honored by the award of the Kepler Gold Medal.

  12. Andreas Vesalius and the Occo medals of Augsburg. Evidence of a professional friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtzager, H L

    2000-06-01

    The friendly connection that existed between Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and his learned friends in Augsburg comprised three periods in the life of the emperor's court physician. The close ties that must have connected Adolphus Occo II and III and Vesalius are expressed in a number of medals carrying their images.

  13. Serving Our Homeless Veterans: Patient Perpetrated Violence as a Barrier to Health Care Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz M. Semeah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA set a goal to end veteran homelessness by 2015. Since then there has been a 36% reduction in homelessness due, in part, to the VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH program. These services include the receipt of home-based services to the veterans’ home. However, safety concerns and the threat of violence toward health care workers remain problematic in non-institutional care settings. This article discusses the concept of access to care and how safety concerns act as a barrier to services and optimal patient outcomes. Our study provides information on the prevalence of patient violence toward health care workers in the HUD-VASH program in a large veterans’ health system. Results suggest 70% of home-based service providers were exposed to violence and aggression. Providing services to veterans outside of institutional care settings, and the goal of eradicating homelessness among veterans, warrants further examination of access barriers.

  14. Developing programs for homeless veterans: understanding driving forces in implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, John; McGuire, Jim; Berman, Stephen; Daniels, William

    2004-01-01

    Between 1992 and 2003, services for homeless veterans at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System went from inappropriate utilization of hospital medical and psychiatric beds, to a continuum of residential treatment, transitional housing, and employment programs through arrangements with private agencies. The authors use elements of Hasenfeld and Brock's Political Economy Model (1991) to explain this transformation in service delivery that was spearheaded by a VA social work leadership team. It is argued that three driving forces crucial to program implementation were present: technological certainty, economic stability, and concentration of power. Evidence of the implementation's impact includes creation of new homeless program beds, a reduction in use of medical/psychiatric beds, and a large number of formerly homeless veterans with housing and employment at program discharge. Study limitations and implications for future studies are discussed.

  15. Examining the role of combat loss among Vietnam War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M; Holland, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Military combat often presents service members with a dual burden of coping with traumas of various types while also grappling with the deaths of close personal friends. At present, much less is known about the effects of bereavement in the context of war compared to other combat-related stressors. Studying a sample of combat veterans from the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS), we examined the contribution of combat loss in psychological functioning and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). When controlling for gender, age, ethnicity, educational background, exposure to nonbereavement combat stressors, and recent bereavement experiences, combat loss was uniquely associated with past and current functional impairments among the veterans, βs = .07 and .06, respectively, but was not related to the severity of PTSD. These findings highlight that combat loss might act as a uniquely challenging stressor among many service members and more empirical research is needed on this topic. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  16. Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL): Introducing novel concepts in allergy phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anto, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Akdis, Mubeccel; Auffray, Charles; Keil, Thomas; Momas, Isabelle; Postma, Dirkje S; Valenta, Rudolf; Wickman, Magnus; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Haahtela, Tari; Lambrecht, Bart N; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sunyer, Jordi; Zuberbier, Torsten; Annesi-Maesano, Isabelle; Arno, Albert; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Forastiere, Francesco; Heinrich, Joachim; Kowalski, Marek L; Maier, Dieter; Melén, Erik; Smit, Henriette A; Standl, Marie; Wright, John; Asarnoj, Anna; Benet, Marta; Ballardini, Natalia; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gehring, Ulrike; Guerra, Stefano; Hohmann, Cynthia; Kull, Inger; Lupinek, Christian; Pinart, Mariona; Skrindo, Ingebjorg; Westman, Marit; Smagghe, Delphine; Akdis, Cezmi; Andersson, Niklas; Bachert, Claus; Ballereau, Stephane; Ballester, Ferran; Basagana, Xavier; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergstrom, Anna; von Berg, Andrea; Brunekreef, Bert; Burte, Emilie; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Chatzi, Leda; Coquet, Jonathan M; Curin, Mirela; Demoly, Pascal; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria Pia; von Hertzen, Leena; Hovland, Vergard; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Just, Jocelyne; Keller, Theresa; Kiss, Renata; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lau, Susanne; Lehmann, Irina; Lemonnier, Nicolas; Mäkelä, Mika; Mestres, Jordi; Mowinckel, Peter; Nadif, Rachel; Nawijn, Martijn C; Pellet, Johan; Pin, Isabelle; Porta, Daniela; Rancière, Fanny; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Saeys, Yvan; Schuijs, Martijn J; Siroux, Valerie; Tischer, Christina G; Torrent, Mathies; Varraso, Raphaelle; Wenzel, Kalus; Xu, Cheng-Jian

    2017-02-01

    Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgE-associated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links of allergic diseases at the clinical and mechanistic levels by linking epidemiologic, clinical, and mechanistic research, including in vivo and in vitro models. MeDALL integrated 14 European birth cohorts, including 44,010 participants and 160 cohort follow-ups between pregnancy and age 20 years. Thirteen thousand children were prospectively followed after puberty by using a newly standardized MeDALL Core Questionnaire. A microarray developed for allergen molecules with increased IgE sensitivity was obtained for 3,292 children. Estimates of air pollution exposure from previous studies were available for 10,000 children. Omics data included those from historical genome-wide association studies (23,000 children) and DNA methylation (2,173), targeted multiplex biomarker (1,427), and transcriptomic (723) studies. Using classical epidemiology and machine-learning methods in 16,147 children aged 4 years and 11,080 children aged 8 years, MeDALL showed the multimorbidity of eczema, rhinitis, and asthma and estimated that only 38% of multimorbidity was attributable to IgE sensitization. MeDALL has proposed a new vision of multimorbidity independent of IgE sensitization, and has shown that monosensitization and polysensitization represent 2 distinct phenotypes. The translational component of MeDALL is shown by the identification of a novel allergic phenotype characterized by polysensitization and multimorbidity, which is associated with the frequency, persistence, and severity of allergic symptoms. The results of MeDALL will help integrate personalized, predictive, preventative, and participatory approaches in allergic diseases. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  17. Danish Gulf War Veterans Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian; Nielsen, Anni B Sternhagen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the assumption that postdeployment incidence of sickness and other absence from work are higher among Gulf War Veterans compared with nonveterans. METHODS: A prospective registry study including a cohort of 721 Danish Gulf War Veterans and a control cohort of 3,629 nonvetera...

  18. College Is for Veterans, Too

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Douglas; Raybeck, Douglas; Wilson, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Last summer Congress passed the new GI Bill, and the president signed it into law. Americans can take great pride in such a program, one that helps veterans attend college after they return home. However, few are aware that many of those veterans will also encounter a variety of non-financial problems that require substantial adjustment as they…

  19. Induced abortion among women veterans: data from the ECUUN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Sileanu, Florentina E; Zhao, Xinhua; Mor, Maria K; Callegari, Lisa S; Borrero, Sonya

    2018-01-01

    We compared rates of induced abortion among women veterans receiving Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare to rates in the general US population, as current policy prohibits VA provision of abortion counseling or services even when pregnancy endangers a veteran's life. We analyzed data from 2298 women veterans younger than 45 years who completed a telephone-based, cross-sectional survey of randomly sampled English-speaking women from across the United States who had received VA healthcare. We compared lifetime, last-5-year and last-year rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion among participants to age-matched data from the National Survey of Family Growth. As few abortions were reported in the last year, we used multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between abortion in the last 5 years and age, race/ethnicity, income, education, religion, marital status, parity, geography, deployment history, housing instability, and past medical and mental health among VA patients. Women veterans were more likely than matched US women to report ever having an abortion [17.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 16.1%-19.3% vs. 15.2% of US women]. In the last 5 years, unintended pregnancy and abortion were reported by veterans at rates similar to US women. In multivariable models, VA patients were more likely to report abortion in the last 5 years if their annual income was less than $40,000 (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.95, 95% CI 1.30-6.70), they had experienced homelessness or housing instability (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.01-3.62), they were single (adj. OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.23-4.91) and/or they had given birth (adjusted OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.19-4.40). Women veterans face unintended pregnancy and seek abortion as often as the larger US population. The Veterans Health Care Act, which prohibits provision of abortion services, increases vulnerable veterans' out-of-pocket healthcare costs and limits veterans' reproductive freedom. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Street outreach and other forms of engagement with literally homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Kasprow, Wesley J; Kane, Vincent; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-05-01

    Street outreach is one of the most direct methods of engaging homeless individuals, but the characteristics of those most likely to be engaged this way is not well-understood. Data from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System showed that of the 70,778 literally homeless veterans engaged in VA homeless services in 2011-2012, 12% were through street outreach while the majority was through provider referrals (41%) and self-referrals (28%). Veterans engaged through street outreach had more extensive histories of recent homelessness, were more likely to be chronically homeless, and were more likely to be referred and admitted to the VA's supported housing program than other veterans. These findings suggest street outreach is an especially important approach to engaging chronic street homeless veterans in services and linking them to permanent supported housing.

  1. In-vivo job development training among peer providers of homeless veterans supported employment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ni; Dolce, Joni; Rio, John; Heitzmann, Carma; Loving, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    This column describes a goal-oriented, time-limited in vivo coaching/training approach for skills building among peer veterans vocational rehabilitation specialists of the Homeless Veteran Supported Employment Program (HVSEP). Planning, implementing, and evaluating the training approach for peer providers was intended, ultimately, to support veterans in their goal of returning to community competitive employment. The description draws from the training experience that aimed to improve the ability of peer providers to increase both rates of employment and wages of the homeless veterans using their services. Training peers using an in vivo training approach provided a unique opportunity for the veterans to improve their job development skills with a focus to support employment outcomes for the service users. Peers who received training also expressed that learning skills through an in vivo training approach was more engaging than typical classroom trainings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Factors associated with receipt of pension and compensation benefits for homeless veterans in the VBA/VHA Homeless Outreach Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joyce H; Rosenheck, Robert A; Greenberg, Greg A; Seibyl, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    Public support payments may facilitate exit from homelessness for persons with mental illness. We examined data from 10,641 homeless veterans contacted from October 1, 1995 to September 30, 2002 in a collaborative outreach program designed to facilitate access to Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability benefits. Those who were awarded benefits (22% of contacted veterans) were more likely to report disability, poor to fair self-rated health, and were more likely to have used VA services in the past. Thus, this program achieved only modest success and was most successful with veterans who were already receiving VA services and who might have received benefits even without the outreach effort.

  3. Mental Health and Medical Health Disparities in 5135 Transgender Veterans Receiving Healthcare in the Veterans Health Administration: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George R; Jones, Kenneth T

    2016-04-01

    There are no large controlled studies of health disparities in transgender (TG) or gender dysphoric patients. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is the largest healthcare system in the United States and was an early adopter of electronic health records. We sought to determine whether medical and/or mental health disparities exist in VHA for clinically diagnosed TG veterans compared to matched veterans without a clinical diagnosis consistent with TG status. Using four ICD-9-CM codes consistent with TG identification, a cohort of 5135 TG veterans treated in VHA between 1996 and 2013 was identified. Veterans without one of these diagnoses were matched 1:3 in a case-control design to determine if medical and/or mental health disparities exist in the TG veteran population. In 2013, the prevalence of TG veterans with a qualifying clinical diagnosis was 58/100,000 patients. Statistically significant disparities were present in the TG cohort for all 10 mental health conditions examined, including depression, suicidality, serious mental illnesses, and post-traumatic stress disorder. TG Veterans were more likely to have been homeless, to have reported sexual trauma while on active duty, and to have been incarcerated. Significant disparities in the prevalence of medical diagnoses for TG veterans were also detected for 16/17 diagnoses examined, with HIV disease representing the largest disparity between groups. This is the first study to examine a large cohort of clinically diagnosed TG patients for psychiatric and medical health outcome disparities using longitudinal, retrospective medical chart data with a matched control group. TG veterans were found to have global disparities in psychiatric and medical diagnoses compared to matched non-TG veterans. These findings have significant implications for policy, healthcare screening, and service delivery in VHA and potentially other healthcare systems.

  4. 38 CFR 3.15 - Computation of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of service. 3.15 Section 3.15 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.15 Computation of service...

  5. Increased risk for substance use and health-related problems among homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eugene M; Burrell, Larry E; Diggins, Allyson D; Whitehead, Nicole Ennis; Latimer, William W

    2015-10-01

    The first aim of this study was to compare self-reported causes of homelessness between veterans and nonveterans. A second aim examined whether homeless male veterans were more likely than homeless male nonveterans to experience current problems with addictions, mental health, and physical health. Additionally, a third aim was to compare frequency of emergency room visits and treatment needs between the two groups. Secondary data analyses compared male homeless veterans and nonveterans (N = 353) enrolled in the Alachua County Point in Time study in central Florida. Participants completed a questionnaire on demographics and health variables. Additional questions included recent emergency room visits and medical or other needs not being met. Veterans reported higher rates of substance use and mental health problems as a primary cause of homelessness when compared to nonveterans. Homeless veterans were more likely than nonveterans to report current problems with addictions (OR = 6.29, 95% CI: 3.43-11.53, p homeless veterans (53.1%) reported an ER visit in the past year compared to only 40.9% of nonveterans (OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.07-2.80, p Veterans may be more likely to become homeless due to addiction and mental health and over half of homeless veterans are presenting to hospital emergency rooms. Given the greater utilization among homeless veterans, emergency rooms may serve as a prime opportunity to provide brief treatment and referrals for needed services. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Examination of Veteran Fathers' Parenting and Their Adolescent Children's Substance Use in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipari, Rachel; Palen, Lori-Ann; Ashley, Olivia Silber; Penne, Michael; Kan, Marni; Pemberton, Michael

    2017-05-12

    Adolescent children of U.S. military veterans may be at increased risk for engaging in substance use; however, this has yet to be examined using nationally representative data. Parental involvement and communication are potential protective factors to target with prevention efforts, but veterans' parenting has not been studied in general, nonclinical populations. This study presents data on parenting characteristics among fathers who are veterans of the U.S. military and the substance use behaviors of their adolescent children. Data were analyzed from approximately 2,200 veteran fathers, 13,100 nonveteran fathers, and their children aged 12 to 17 who participated in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from 2004 to 2013. Parenting characteristics and adolescent substance use were compared by fathers' veteran status. Compared with nonveteran fathers, veteran fathers were less likely to have talked with their children about the dangers of substance use, were more likely to believe that their children used substances, and were just as likely to be parentally involved. Higher percentages of adolescent children of veterans than those of nonveterans engaged in tobacco use and nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs. Parental involvement and father-child communication about the dangers of substance use did not explain differences in substance use among adolescents with veteran versus nonveteran fathers. Conclusions/Importance: Adolescent children of veterans appear to be a group in particular need of substance use prevention services. Parental involvement and father-child communication may be appropriate protective factors to address in prevention efforts.

  7. The Attraction of Gravity (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    remains elusive, and much remains to be explored. New missions and new tools are needed. In the next five years the planetary community will see the launch of BepiColombo and JUICE, two spacecraft equipped with a powerful suite of instruments devoted to the tomography of Mercury and Ganymede. Innovative instrumentation and probes are being conceived and designed. The Cassini Medal Lecture will review the past successes and future trends of planetary geodesy and radio science, from the peculiar perspective of someone whose attraction for gravity kept him at the ill-defined boundary between science and engineering, measuring angles, distances and velocities in the solar system.

  8. 78 FR 59769 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-21), this notice announces that the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA...-0782.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran...

  9. 76 FR 20823 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV... U.S.C. 3501-21), this notice announces that the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department... INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV) Pilot Surveys. a...

  10. Screening for homelessness among individuals initiating medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhuber, Marcus A; Roberts, Christopher B; Metraux, Stephen; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of homelessness and risk for homelessness among veterans with opioid use disorder initiating treatment. Addiction treatment programs operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). All veterans initiating treatment with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder between October 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014 (n = 2,699) who were administered the VA's national homelessness screener. Self-reported homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness. The prevalence of homelessness was 10.2 percent and 5.3 percent were at risk for homelessness. Compared to male veterans, women veterans were less likely to report homelessness (8.9 percent vs 10.3 percent) but more likely to be at risk (11.8 percent vs 4.9 percent). By age group, veterans aged 18-34 and 45-54 years most frequently reported homelessness (12.0 and 11.7 percent, respectively) and veterans aged 45-54 and 55-64 years most frequently reported risk for homelessness (6.5 and 6.8 percent, respectively). The prevalence of homelessness in this population is approximately 10 times that of the general veteran population accessing care at VA. Screening identified a substantial number of veterans who could benefit from VA housing assistance and had not received it recently. Programs to address veteran homelessness should engage with veterans seeking addiction treatment. Integration of homelessness services into addiction treatment settings may, in turn, improve outcomes.

  11. Long-acting Reversible Contraception Among Homeless Women Veterans With Chronic Health Conditions: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Lori M; Redd, Andrew; Suo, Ying; Pettey, Warren; Turok, David K; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2017-09-01

    US women Veterans are at increased risk of homelessness and chronic health conditions associated with unintended pregnancy. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provision of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) can assist in healthy pregnancy planning. To evaluate perinatal risk factors and LARC exposure in ever-homeless women Veterans. A retrospective cohort study of women Veterans using VHA administrative data from fiscal years 2002-2015. We included 41,747 ever-homeless women Veterans age 18-44 years and 46,391 housed women Veterans matched by military service period. A subgroup of 7773 ever-homeless and 8674 matched housed women Veterans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan [Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND)] conflicts comprised a second analytic cohort. Descriptive statistics compared demographic, military, health conditions, and LARC exposure in ever-homeless versus housed women Veterans. Multivariable logistic regression explored factors associated with LARC exposure in the OEF/OIF/OND subgroup. All health conditions were significantly higher in ever-homeless versus housed Veterans: mental health disorder in 84.5% versus 48.7% (Phomeless women Veterans and providing LARC access. The prevalence of perinatal risk factors in ever-homeless women Veterans highlights a need for further programmatic enhancements to improve reproductive planning.

  12. Suicide among War Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod Rozanov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation and suffer from mental health problems. Suicides are more frequent in those who develop PTSD, depression and comorbid states due to war exposure. Combat stress and its’ frequency may be an important factor leading to suicide within the frame of the stress-vulnerability model. According to this model, the effects of stress may interact with social factors, interpersonal relations and psychological variables producing suicidal tendencies. Modern understanding of stress-vulnerability mechanisms based on genetic predispositions, early life development, level of exposure to stress and stress-reactivity together with interpersonal aspects may help to build more effective suicide prevention programs based on universal/selective/indicated prevention principles.

  13. Suicide among War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Vsevolod; Carli, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation and suffer from mental health problems. Suicides are more frequent in those who develop PTSD, depression and comorbid states due to war exposure. Combat stress and its’ frequency may be an important factor leading to suicide within the frame of the stress-vulnerability model. According to this model, the effects of stress may interact with social factors, interpersonal relations and psychological variables producing suicidal tendencies. Modern understanding of stress-vulnerability mechanisms based on genetic predispositions, early life development, level of exposure to stress and stress-reactivity together with interpersonal aspects may help to build more effective suicide prevention programs based on universal/selective/indicated prevention principles. PMID:22851956

  14. Who is served by programs for the homeless? Admission to a domiciliary care program for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, R; Leda, C

    1991-02-01

    Demographic and clinical data are presented on 4,138 veterans assessed in the 20-site Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Domiciliary Care for Homeless Veterans program during its first year of operation. More than two-thirds of the veterans who were screened had been hospitalized in VA medical centers during the year before assessment, and 34 percent were hospitalized at the time of assessment. Compared with veterans who were not admitted for residential treatment, veterans who were admitted were more likely to be previously involved in mental health treatment, literally homeless rather than at risk for homelessness, and without public financial support. Specialized service programs for the homeless such as the VA domiciliary care program may also be called on to play a broader role in the discharge and rehabilitative efforts of public mental health service systems.

  15. Veterans Health Care: Improvements Needed in Operationalizing Strategic Goals and Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    veteran’s experience, (2) improving the employee experience , (3) improving internal support services, (4) establishing a culture of continuous...progress in reducing veteran homelessness, improving the employee experience , staffing critical positions, transforming Office of Information

  16. 77 FR 1548 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSBs). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  17. 76 FR 56863 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and...'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal...

  18. 75 FR 75187 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and...'' of the Task Force and e-mailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record; verbal...

  19. 75 FR 62611 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... to the ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the...

  20. 76 FR 8393 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... areas'' of the Task Force and e-mailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record; verbal...

  1. Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: General Information, Medal of Honor, and Defense/Joint Decorations and Awards. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    Committee. The notification letter sent to the requesting MOC should NOT include the draft statutory time waiver language . It should make the requesting...surmounting two swords hilts to base saltirewise enclosed within a wreath of laurel. Overall an eagle, wings displayed, grasps a serpent in its claws...On the reverse, the eagle, serpent , and swords from the front of the medal with the encircling inscription “WAR ON TERRORISM EXPEDITIONARY MEDAL

  2. 76 FR 33788 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Solicitation for Grant Applications. The full announcement is posted on http://www.grants.gov . Funding Opportunity Number: SGA 11-01. Key Dates: The closing date for receipt of applications is 30 DAYS AFTER... service delivery systems that will address the complex problems facing homeless veterans. The full...

  3. Experiences with VHA care: a qualitative study of U.S. women veterans with self-reported trauma histories

    OpenAIRE

    Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Harwood, Eileen M.; Spoont, Michele R.; Sayer, Nina A.; Gerould, Heather; Murdoch, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Background Women veterans in the United States, particularly those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or a history of military sexual assault, have unique health care needs, but their minority status in the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has led to documented healthcare disparities when compared to men. This study?s objective was to obtain a richer understanding of the challenges and successes encountered by women veterans with self-reported service-related trauma histories (p...

  4. 38 CFR 12.21 - Action upon death of veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... veteran at a Department of Veterans Affairs hospital, center or domiciliary activity while receiving care... of the Department of Veterans Affairs hospital, center, or domiciliary activity having jurisdiction...

  5. Military and mental health correlates of unemployment in a national sample of women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Williams, Lindsay; Washington, Donna L

    2015-04-01

    The unemployment rate is currently higher among women Veterans than among male Veterans and civilian women. Employment is a key social determinant of health, with unemployment being strongly associated with adverse health. To identify military-related and health-related characteristics associated with unemployment in women Veterans. Secondary analysis of workforce participants (n=1605) in the National Survey of Women Veterans telephone survey. Demographics, mental health conditions, health care utilization, and military experiences and effects. Unemployment was defined as being in the labor force but unemployed and looking for work. The χ analyses to identify characteristics of unemployed women Veterans; logistic regression to identify independent factors associated with unemployment. Ten percent of women Veterans were unemployed. Independent correlates of unemployment were screening positive for depression [odds ratio (OR)=4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-12.4], military service during wartime (OR=2.9; 95%, CI 1.1-7.3), and service in the regular military (vs. in the National Guards/Reserves only) (OR=6.8; 95% CI, 2.2-20.5). Two postactive duty perceptions related to not being respected and understood as a Veteran were each independently associated with unemployment. Whether depression underlies unemployment, is exacerbated by unemployment, or both, it is critical to identify and treat depression among women Veterans, and also to investigate women Veterans' experiences and identities in civilian life. Community-based employers may need education regarding women Veterans' unique histories and strengths. Women who served in the regular military and during wartime may benefit from job assistance before and after they leave the military. Gender-specific adaptation of employment services may be warranted.

  6. Lifetime Sexual Assault and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vinita; Mengeling, Michelle A; Booth, Brenda M; Torner, James C; Syrop, Craig H; Sadler, Anne G

    2017-07-01

    Women veterans report a high prevalence of sexual assault. Unfortunately, there are limited data on the reproductive health sequelae faced by these women. Our objective was to evaluate the association between completed lifetime sexual assault (LSA) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among a cohort of women veterans, adjusting for sexual risk behaviors. We conducted a retrospective study among women veterans aged 51 years or younger who enrolled for care at two Veterans Administration (VA) healthcare sites between 2000 and 2008. Participants completed a telephone interview assessing reproductive health and sexual violence history. We compared the frequencies of past STI diagnoses among those who had and had not experienced LSA. We used logistic regression to assess the effect of sexual assault with history of an STI diagnosis after adjusting for age, sexual risk behaviors, and substance abuse treatment. Among 996 women veterans, a history of STIs was reported by 32%, including a lifetime history of gonorrhea (5%), chlamydia (15%), genital herpes infection (8%), and human papillomavirus infection (15%), not mutually exclusive; 51% reported LSA. Women with a history of LSA were significantly more likely to report a history of STIs (unadjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-2.50; adjusted OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.07-2.08). Women veterans who have experienced LSA are at increased risk for lifetime STI diagnoses. To adequately address the reproductive health needs of the growing population of women veterans, STI risk assessments should include queries of military service and LSA histories.

  7. Using facebook to recruit young adult veterans: online mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Helmuth, Eric D; Marshall, Grant N; Schell, Terry L; PunKay, Marc; Kurz, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more than half screening positive for

  8. Using Facebook to Recruit Young Adult Veterans: Online Mental Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. Objective In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Methods Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. Results We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more

  9. Student veterans' construction and enactment of resilience: A constructivist grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A T; Kearney, C A; Isla, K; Bryant, R

    2018-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Resilience is an ability and a process that allows an individual to develop positive adaptation despite challenges and adversities. Many military veterans returning to college after their military service have difficulty transitioning to civilian life. Although some research exists that explores factors related to the resilience of college student veterans, limited theoretical descriptions exist that explain how student veterans construct resilience, and how resilience is enacted and enhanced in their academic and personal (non-academic) lives. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The resilience of student veterans involves a complex process of transitioning from military to civilian life and an iterative journey between positive adaptation and transient perturbations. Student veterans' resilience is a result of integrating and resolving various aspects of their academic and personal challenges. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Nurses can apply this grounded theory as a practical framework for equipping student veterans with effective strategies to develop and enhance resilience. Nurses can employ a holistic approach of care in their interactions with military veterans and student veterans that includes fostering psychological resilience, helping to manage their multiple non-academic responsibilities and supporting their academic success. Introduction Adjusting to college life is one of the most difficult experiences in a military veteran's transition to civilian life. Many military veterans returning to college not only encounter academic challenges, but also deal with physical and psychiatric disabilities, loss of military camaraderie and social disconnect. These often negatively affect their personal and academic lives. Hence, it is important to explore resilience to best support student veterans as they transition from military to civilian life. Aim The aim of this study was to explore how student veterans

  10. Tobacco use among Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators, and treatment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierisch, Jennifer M; Straits-Tröster, Kristy; Calhoun, Patrick S; Beckham, Jean C; Acheson, Shawn; Hamlett-Berry, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Military service and combat exposure are risk factors for smoking. Although evidence suggests that veterans are interested in tobacco use cessation, little is known about their reasons for quitting, treatment preferences, and perceived barriers to effective tobacco use cessation treatment. Our study objective was to elicit perspectives of Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans who had not yet quit smoking postdeployment to inform the development of smoking cessation services for this veteran cohort. We conducted 3 focus groups among 20 participants in October 2006 at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center to explore issues on tobacco use and smoking cessation for Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans who continued to smoke postdeployment. We used qualitative content analysis to identify major themes and organize data. Veterans expressed the belief that smoking was a normalized part of military life and described multiple perceived benefits of smoking. Although veterans expressed a high level of interest in quitting, they listed several behavioral, situational, and environmental triggers that derailed smoking cessation. They expressed interest in such cessation treatment features as flexible scheduling, free nicotine replacement therapy, peer support, and family inclusion in treatment. Our results indicate that the newest cohort of veterans perceives smoking as endemic in military service. However, they want to quit smoking and identified several personal and environmental obstacles that make smoking cessation difficult. Our findings may inform programmatic efforts to increase successful quit attempts in this unique veteran population.

  11. Correlates of major depressive disorder with and without comorbid alcohol use disorder nationally in the veterans health administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Gihyun; Petrakis, Ismene L; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    This study assesses medical and psychiatric comorbidities, service utilization, and psychotropic medication prescriptions in veterans with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) relative to veterans with MDD alone. Using cross-sectional administrative data (fiscal year [FY]2012: October 1, 2011-September 30, 2012) from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), we identified veterans with a diagnosis of current (12-month) MDD nationally (N = 309,374), 18.8% of whom were also diagnosed with current (12-month) AUD. Veterans with both MDD and AUD were compared to those with MDD alone on sociodemographic characteristics, current (12-month) medical and psychiatric disorders, service utilization, and psychotropic prescriptions. We then used logistic regression analyses to calculate odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of characteristics that were independently different between the groups. Dually diagnosed veterans with MDD and AUD, relative to veterans with MDD alone, had a greater number of comorbid health conditions, such as liver disease, drug use disorders, and bipolar disorder as well as greater likelihood of homelessness and higher service utilization. Dually diagnosed veterans with MDD and AUD had more frequent medical and psychiatric comorbidities and more frequently had been homeless. These data suggest the importance of assessing the presence of comorbid medical/psychiatric disorders and potential homelessness in order to provide appropriately comprehensive treatment to dually diagnosed veterans with MDD and AUD and indicate a need to develop more effective treatments for combined disorders. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  12. Veterans Employment Pay for Success Grant Program. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is establishing a grant program (Veterans Employment Pay for Success (VEPFS)) under the authority of the U.S.C. to award grants to eligible entities to fund projects that are successful in accomplishing employment rehabilitation for Veterans with service-connected disabilities. VA will award grants on the basis of an eligible entity's proposed use of a Pay for Success (PFS) strategy to achieve goals. This interim final rule establishes regulations for awarding a VEPFS grant, including the general process for awarding the grant, criteria and parameters for evaluating grant applications, priorities related to the award of a grant, and general requirements and guidance for administering a VEPFS grant program.

  13. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the United...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United...

  15. Implementing and Evaluating a Telephone-Based Centralized Maternity Care Coordination Program for Pregnant Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Kuzdeba, Judy; Baldor, Rebecca; Casares, Jose; Lombardini, Lisa; Gerber, Megan R

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a comprehensive, telephonic maternity care coordination (MCC) program for all pregnant veterans enrolled for care at New England Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities that comprise the Veterans Integrated Service Network 1. Telephone interviews were conducted with postpartum women veterans who had participated in the MCC program during their pregnancies. The program evaluation instrument assessed satisfaction and use of MCC services, prenatal education classes, and infant and maternal outcomes (e.g., newborn birthweight, insurance status, maternal depression) using both closed-ended and open-ended questions. A substantial majority (95%) of women enrolled in the MCC program expressed satisfaction with the services they received in the program. Women were most satisfied with help understanding VA maternity benefits and acquiring VA services and equipment, such as breast pumps and pregnancy-related medications. More than one-third of women noted their infants had experienced health problems since delivery, including neonatal intensive care unit hospitalizations. A majority of women planned to return to VA care in the future. Our findings suggest that MCC services play an important role for women veterans as they navigate both VA and non-VA care systems. MCC staff members coordinated maternity, medical, and mental health care services for women veterans. Additionally, by maintaining contact with the veteran during the postpartum period, MCC staff were able to assess the health of the mother and the infant, and refer women and their infants to medical and psychosocial services in the community as needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reader should have an understanding of the subject matter based upon prior training or experience which... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reader service. 21.150... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered...

  17. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing personnel...

  18. Agent Orange exposure and attributed health effects in Vietnam veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alvin L; Cecil, Paul F

    2011-07-01

    Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aspects of environmental fate and low bioavailability of TCDD are consistent with few, if any, ground troop veterans being exposed to Agent Orange. That conclusion, however, is contrary to the presumption by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) that military service in Vietnam anytime from January 9, 1962 to May 7, 1975 is a proxy for exposure to Agent Orange. The DVA assumption is inconsistent with the scientific principles governing determinations of disease causation. The DVA has nonetheless awarded Agent Orange-related benefits and compensation to an increasing number of VN veterans based on the presumption of exposure and the published findings of the Institute of Medicine that there is sufficient evidence of a "statistical association" (a less stringent standard than "causal relationship") between exposure to tactical herbicides or TCDD and 15 different human diseases. A fairer and more valid approach for VN veterans would have been to enact a program of "Vietnam experience" benefits for those seriously ill, rather than benefits based on the dubious premise of injuries caused by Agent Orange.

  19. Women Veterans and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even make it worse. Return to top Military sexual trauma and women veterans Military sexual trauma (MST) is ... any lost self-esteem. Getting help for military sexual trauma If you've experience military sexual trauma (MST), ...

  20. VnpProcService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Common web service for VONAPP Finds all the vnp process information, find vnp process information by primary key, create vnp process information, update vnp process...