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Sample records for vesuvius module molten

  1. Development of the VESUVIUS module. Molten jet breakup modeling and model verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, K. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nagano, Katsuhiro; Araki, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    With the in-vessel vapor explosion issue ({alpha}-mode failure) now considered to pose an acceptably small risk to the safety of a light water reactor, ex-vessel vapor explosions are being given considerable attention. Attempts are being made to analytically model breakup of continuous-phase jets, however uncertainty exists regarding the basic phenomena. In addition, the conditions upon reactor vessel failure, which determine the starting point of the ex-vessel vapor explosion process, are difficult to quantify. Herein, molten jet ejection from the reactor pressure vessel is characterized. Next, the expected mode of jet breakup is determined and the current state of analytical modeling is reviewed. A jet breakup model for ex-vessel scenarios, with the primary breakup mechanism being the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is described. The model has been incorporated into the VESUVIUS module and comparisons of VESUVIUS calculations against FARO L-06 experimental data show differences, particularly in the pressure curve and amount of jet breakup. The need for additional development to resolve these differences is discussed. (author)

  2. Development of a Chemical Equilibrium Model for a Molten Core-Concrete Interaction Analysis Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Uk; Lee, Dae Young; Park, Chang Hwan [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This molten core could interact with the reactor cavity region which consists of concrete. In this process, components of molten core react with components of concrete through a lot of chemical reactions. As a result, many kinds of gas species are generated and those move up forming rising bubbles into the reactor containment atmosphere. These rising bubbles are the carrier of the many kinds of the aerosols coming from the MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interaction) layers. To evaluate the amount of the aerosols released from the MCCI layers, the amount of the gas species generated from those layers should be calculated. The chemical equilibrium state originally implies the final state of the multiple chemical reactions; therefore, investigating the equilibrium composition of molten core can be applicable to predict the gas generation status. The most common way for finding the chemical equilibrium state is a minimization of total Gibbs free energy of the system. In this paper, the method to make good guess of initial state is suggested and chemical reaction results are compared with results of CSSI report No 164. Total mass of system and the number of atoms of each element are conserved. The tendency of calculation results is similar with results presented in CSNI Report except a few species. These differences may be caused by absence of Gibbs energy data of the species such as Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, U(OH){sub 3}, UO(OH), UO{sub 2}(OH), U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, La, Ce.

  3. Space Radar Image of Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mt. Vesuvius, one of the best known volcanoes in the world primarily for the eruption that buried the Roman city of Pompeii, is shown in the center of this radar image. The central cone of Vesuvius is the dark purple feature in the center of the volcano. This cone is surrounded on the northern and eastern sides by the old crater rim, called Mt. Somma. Recent lava flows are the pale yellow areas on the southern and western sides of the cone. Vesuvius is part of a large volcanic zone which includes the Phalagrean Fields, the cluster of craters seen along the left side of the image. The Bay of Naples, on the left side of the image, is separated from the Gulf of Salerno, in the lower left, by the Sorrento Peninsula. Dense urban settlement can be seen around the volcano. The city of Naples is above and to the left of Vesuvius; the seaport of the city can be seen in the top of the bay. Pompeii is located just below the volcano on this image. The rapid eruption in 79 A.D. buried the victims and buildings of Pompeii under several meters of debris and killed more than 2,000 people. Due to the violent eruptive style and proximity to populated areas, Vesuvius has been named by the international scientific community as one of fifteen Decade Volcanoes which are being intensively studied during the 1990s. The image is centered at 40.83 degrees North latitude, 14.53 degrees East longitude. It shows an area 100 kilometers by 55 kilometers (62 miles by 34 miles.) This image was acquired on April 15, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  4. The seismic monitoring network of Mt. Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Orazi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Vesuvius (southern Italy is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the world. Its activity is currently characterized by moderate seismicity, with hypocenters located beneath the crater zone with depth rarely exceeding 5 km and magnitudes generally less than 3. The current configuration of the seismic monitoring network of Mt. Vesuvius consists of 18 seismic stations and 7 infrasound microphones. During the period 2006-2010 a seismic array with 48 channels was also operative. The station distribution provides appropriate coverage of the area around the volcanic edifice. The current development of the network and its geometry, under conditions of low seismic noise, allows locating seismic events with M<1. Remote instruments continuously transmit data to the main acquisition center in Naples. Data transmission is realized using different technological solutions based on UHF, Wi-Fi radio links, and TCP/IP client-server applications. Data are collected in the monitoring center of the Osservatorio Vesuviano (Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, Naples section, which is equipped with systems for displaying and analyzing signals, using both real-time automatic and manual procedures. 24-hour surveillance allows to immediately communicate any significant anomaly to the Civil Protection authorities.

  5. Volcanism offshore of Vesuvius Volcano in Naples Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, A.; Mirabile, L.; Torrente, M.M.; Dvorak, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection data are used to identify structural features in Naples Bay near Vesuvius Volcano. Several buried seismic units with reflection-free interiors are probably volcanic deposits erupted during and since the formation of the breached crater of Monte Somma Volcano, which preceded the growth of Vesuvius. The presumed undersea volcanic deposits are limited in extent; thus, stratigraphie relationships cannot be established among them. Other features revealed by our data include (a) the warping of lowstand marine deposits by undersea cryptodomes located approximately 10 km from the summit of Vesuvius, (b) a succession of normal step faults that record seaward collapse of the volcano, and (c) a small undersea slump in the uppermost marine deposits of Naples Bay, which may be the result of nue??e ardentes that entered the sea during a major eruption of Vesuvius in 1631. Detection of these undersea features illustrates some capabilities of making detailed seismic reflection profiles across undersea volcanoes.

  6. Impact of explosive eruption scenarios at Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, G.; Cacace, F.; Spence, R. J. S.; Baxter, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    In the paper the first attempt at the definition of a model to assess the impact of a range of different volcanic hazards on the building structures is presented. This theoretical approach has been achieved within the activities of the EXPLORIS Project supported by the EU. A time history for Sub-Plinian I eruptive scenario of the Vesuvius is assumed by taking advantage of interpretation of historical reports of volcanic crises of the past [Carafa, G. 1632. In opusculum de novissima Vesuvij conflagratione, epistola isagogica, 2 a ed. Napoli, Naples; Mascolo, G.B., 1634. De incendio Vesuvii excitato xvij. Kal. Ianuar. anno trigesimo primo sæculi Decimiseptimi libri X. Cum Chronologia superiorum incendiorum; & Ephemeride ultimi. Napoli; Varrone, S., 1634. Vesuviani incendii historiae libri tres. Napoli], numerical simulations [Neri, A., Esposti Ongaro, T., Macedonio, G., Gidaspow, D., 2003. Multiparticle simulation of collapsing volcanic columns and pyroclastic flows. J. Geophys. Res. Lett. 108, 2202. doi:10.1029/2001 JB000508; Macedonio, G., Costa, A., Longo, A., 2005. HAZMAP: a computer model for volcanic ash fallout and assessment of subsequent hazard. Comput. Geosci. 31,837-845; Costa, A., Macedonio, G., Folch, A., 2006. A three-dimensional Eulerian model for transport and deposition of volcanic ashes. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 241,634-647] and experts' elicitations [Aspinall, W.P., 2006. Structured elicitation of expert judgment for probabilistic hazard and risk assessment in volcanic eruptions. In: Mader, H.M. Coles, S.G. Connor, C.B. Connor, L.J. (Eds), Statistics in Volcanology. Geological Society of London on behalf of IAVCEI, pp.15-30; Woo, G., 1999. The Mathematics of Natural Catastrophes. Imperial College Press, London] from which the impact on the building structures is derived. This is achieved by an original definition of vulnerability functions for multi-hazard input and a dynamic cumulative damage model. Factors affecting the variability of the final

  7. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  8. Legendary Mount Vesuvius is subject of intensive volcanological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Frank

    The Roman population centers of Pompeii and Herculaneum (circa 15,000 inhabitants) were destroyed when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D. after centuries of repose. Many times since then its eruptions have claimed human lives; basaltic lava flows from an eruption in 1631 killed 3,000. Vesuvius' location, near the heart of the Roman empire—a center of learning in the ancient world—led it to become the site ofsome of the earliest volcanological studies on record.In letters to Tacitus, Pliny the Younger documented the sequence of events of the 79 A.D. plinian eruption. Geophysical studies of volcanoes were pioneered by Italian volcanologists who installed seismographs in an observatory on the flanks of Vesuvius to study volcano seismology and to forecast and monitor eruptions early this century. It is easy to understand why interest in Vesuvius has been so keen: it is accessible, persistently active, and a large population resides nearby. Today, around 1 million people live within the shadow of this potentially explosive and dangerous volcano.

  9. Fibrous minerals from Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Manuela; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ghiara, Maria R.; Capitelli, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    A survey on fibrous minerals coming from the densely populated area of Campania around the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Italy) was performed by means of a multi-methodological approach, based on morphological analyses, EMPA/WDS and SEM/EDS applications, and unit-cell determination through X-ray diffraction data. Such mineralogical investigation aims to provide suitable tools to the identification of fibrous natural phases, to improve the knowledge of both geochemical, petrogenetic and regional mineralogy of Somma-Vesuvius area, and to emphasize the presence of minerals with fibrous habit in all volcanic environments. The survey also fits well in the calls of health and environment of Horizon 2020 program of the European Commission (Climate Action, Environment, Resource Efficiency and Raw Materials).

  10. Hazard assessment of explosive volcanism at Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolorenzo, G.; Pappalardo, L.

    2010-12-01

    A probabilistic approach based on the available volcanological data on past Somma-Vesuvius eruptions has been developed to produce hazard-zone maps for fallout, pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), and secondary mass flows by using numerical simulations. The hazard maps have been incorporated in a GIS, making them accessible to casual and expert users for risk mitigation and education management. The results allowed us to explore the hazard related to different scenarios from all possible eruptions, ranked according to volcanic explosivity index (VEI) class, in the Vesuvius area and its surroundings including Naples. Particularly, eruptions with VEI ≤ 3 would produce a fallout hazard within about 10 km mostly east of the volcano and a PDC hazard within about 2 km from the crater. Large-scale events (4 ≤ VEI ≤ 5) would produce a fallout hazard up to 80 km from the vent and a PDC hazard at distances exceeding 15 km. Particularly, the territory northwest of Vesuvius, including metropolitan Naples, featuring a low hazard level for fallout accumulation, is exposed to PDCs also consistent with field evidence and archeological findings. Both volcano flanks and surrounding plains, hills, and mountains are exposed to a moderate-high level of hazard for the passage of secondary mass flows. With the present level of uncertainty in forecasting future eruption type and size on the basis of statistical analysis as well as precursory activity, our results indicate that the reference scenario in the emergency plan should carefully match the worst-case VEI 5 probabilistic scenario.

  11. Ground movement at Somma-Vesuvius from Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Fedele, Lorenzo; Morra, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Detailed micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from two boreholes drilled at the archaeological excavations of Herculaneum, ~ 7 km west of the Somma -Vesuvius crater, allowed reconstruction of the Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution of the site. The data provide clear evidence for ground uplift movements involving the studied area. The Holocenic sedimentary sequence on which the archaeological remains of Herculaneum rest has risen several meters at an average rate of ~ 4 mm/yr. The uplift has involved the western apron of the volcano and the Sebeto-Volla Plain, a populous area including the eastern suburbs of Naples. This is consistent with earlier evidence for similar uplift for the areas of Pompeii and Sarno valley (SE of the volcano) and the Somma -Vesuvius eastern apron. An axisimmetric deep source of strain is considered responsible for the long-term uplift affecting the whole Somma -Vesuvius edifice. The deformation pattern can be modeled as a single pressure source, sited in the lower crust and surrounded by a shell of Maxwell viscoelastic medium, which experienced a pressure pulse that began at the Last Glacial Maximum.

  12. The eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 and the death of Gaius Plinius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the volcanic eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79, which led inter alia to the death of Pliny the Elder, is reviewed. Pliny, the admiral of the Roman imperial fleet, wished as scientist to witness the event from close by and set sail in the direction of Vesuvius, but got trapped in Stabiae, a few kilometers from Pompeii, where ...

  13. Microemulsion of Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    then to an oil-rich, upper phase as salinity increases in a system of brine/octane/ TRS surfactant/tertiary amyl alcohol . Borkovec et al. (1988) have...11 4. Partial Pseudotemary Phase Diagram .................................. 12 5. Micrograph of Molten Salts/SDS/Pentanol/Decane System...negligible interfacial tension between microdomains. Theoretical work in ternary and pseudotemary systems has shown that the middle phase is a

  14. Analogue Models Of Volcanic Spreading At Mt. Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteo, Ada; Castaldo, Raffaele; D'Auria, Luca; James, Michael; Lane, Steve; Massa, Bruno; Pepe, Susi; Tizzani, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Somma-Vesuvius is a quiescent strato-volcano of the Neapolitan district, southern Italy, for which various geophysical and geological evidences (e.g. geodetic measurements, geological and structural data, seismic profiles interpretations and surface deformation analysis with Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR)) indicate ongoing spreading deformation. In this research we investigate the spreading deformation and associated surface deformation pattern by performing analogue experiments and comparing the results with actual ground deformation as measured using DInSAR data recorded between 1992 and 2010. Somma-Vesuvius consists of a volcanic cone (Gran Cono) lying within an asymmetric caldera (Somma). The Somma caldera is the result of at least 7 Plinian eruptions, the last of which was the 79 CE. Pompeii eruption. The current cone of Mt. Vesuvius grew within the caldera in the following centuries as the effect of continued explosive and effusive activity of the volcano. The volcano lies on a substratum consisting of a Mesozoic carbonatic basement, overlapped by Holocene clastic sediments and volcanic rocks. Our analogue models were built to simulate the shape of the Somma-Vesuvius top a scale of about 1:100000, emplaced on a sand layer (brittle behaviour) laid on a silicone layer (ductile behaviour). Models are based on the Fluid-dynamics Dimensionless Analysis (FDA), according to the Buckingham-Π theorem. In this context, we considered few dimensionless parameters that allowed the setting of a reliable scaled model. To represent the complex Somma-Vesuvius geometry, an asymmetric model was built by setting a truncated cone (mimicking the topography of Somma edifice) topped by another small cone (mimicking the Gran Cono) shifted off the axis of the main cone. Different experiments were carried out in which the thickness of the basal sand layer and of the silicone one were varied. To quantify the vertical and horizontal displacements the

  15. The stress field beneath Mt. Vesuvius (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Luca; Massa, Bruno; De Matteo, Ada

    2014-05-01

    The Somma-Vesuvius is the smallest and one of the youngest volcanoes of the Neapolitan district. Its origin is linked to a Late Pleistocene-Holocene extension occurred along the entire Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain. Nowadays, Mt. Vesuvius is a quiescent strato-volcano. Using different approaches and a comparison between observations and numerical models we have determined the spatial variations in the stress field beneath the volcano edifice. In order to achieve this target we have analyzed a focal mechanism dataset derived from 197 events recorded from Jan. 1999 to Jan. 2012. The main results highlight the presence of two seismogenic volumes characterized by markedly different stress patterns. The two volumes are separated by a layer where the seismic strain release shows a significant decrease. Previous studies postulated the existence, at about the same depth, of a ductile layer allowing the spreading of the Mt. Vesuvius edifice. We interpreted the difference in the stress pattern within the two volumes as the effect of a mechanical decoupling caused by the aforementioned ductile layer. The stress pattern in the top volume is dominated by a reverse faulting style, which agrees with the hypothesis of a seismicity driven by the spreading process. On the other hand, the stress field determined for the deep volume is consistent with a background regional field locally perturbed by the effects of the topography and of heterogeneities in the volcanic structure. Since the seismicity of the deep volume shows an intermittent behaviour and has shown to be linked to geochemical variations in the fumaroles of the volcano, we hypothesize that it results from the effect of fluid injection episodes, possibly of magmatic origin, perturbing the pore pressure within the hydrothermal system. The retrieved changes in the stress pattern could indicate variations in volcano dynamics potentially linked to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth.

  16. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of mafic magmas at Mt. Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, Luigi; Raffaello, Cioni; Chiara, Boschi; Claudia, D'oriano

    2010-05-01

    Pumice and scoria from different eruptive layers of Mt. Vesuvius volcanic products contain mafic minerals consisting of High-Fo olivine and Diopsidic Pyroxene. These phases were crystallized in unerupted trachibasaltic to tephritic magmas, and were brought to surface by large phonolitic/tephri-phonolitic (e.g. Avellino and Pompei) and/or of tephritic and phono-tephritic (Pollena) eruptions. A large set of these mm-sized crystals was accurately separated from selected juvenile material and measured for their chemical compositions (EPMA, Laser Ablation ICP-MS) and 18O/16O ratios (conventional laser fluorination) to constrain the nature and evolution of the primary magmas at Mt. Vesuvius. Uncontaminated mantle δ18O values are hardly recovered in Italian Quaternary magmas, mostly due to the widespread occurrence of crustal contamination of the primary melts during their ascent to the surface (e.g. Alban Hills, Ernici Mts., and Aeolian Islands). At Mt. Vesuvius, measured olivine and clinopyroxene share quite homogeneous chemical compositions (Olivine Fo 85-90 ; Diopside En 45-48, respectively), and represent phases crystallized in near primary mafic magmas. Trace element composition constrains the near primary nature of the phases. Published data on volatile content of melt inclusions hosted in these crystals reveal the coexistence of dissolved water and carbon dioxide, and a minimum trapping pressure around 200-300 MPa, suggesting that crystal growth occurred in a reservoir at about 8-10 km depth. Recently, experimental data have suggested massive carbonate assimilation (up to about 20%) to derive potassic alkali magmas from trachybasaltic melts. Accordingly, the δ18O variability and the trace element content of the studied minerals suggest possible contamination of primary melts by an O-isotope enriched, REE-poor contaminant like the limestone of Vesuvius basement. Low, nearly primitive δ18O values are observed for olivine from Pompeii eruption, although still

  17. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  18. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  19. Aeromagnetic survey of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rapolla

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present and discuss the results of a geophysical airborne survey carried out in the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic area, Southern Italy, in 1999. The helicopter-borne survey was aimed at giving new detailed insights into the distribution of the magnetization of the area and, therefore, into the volcanological characteristics of the region, enhancing the knowledge given by a previous low resolution survey carried out at a regional scale by Agip. The new survey was carried out by flying on a surface parallel to the topography of the area, along flight lines spaced 600 m apart. The obtained total field map is dominated by a large anomaly related to the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius complex itself and characterized by a roughly elliptical shape. High-frequency anomalies occur in the edifice and in the area east of it, partly produced by cultural noise due to the densely inhabited area. The compilation of the maps of the analytic signal and of the horizontal derivative of the field allowed the location of the lateral boundaries of the magnetic sources of the area and represents a first step toward the interpretation of the maps in terms of geological structures.

  20. Somma-Vesuvius ground deformation over the last glacial cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Vertical ground movements at Somma-Vesuvius during the last glacial cycle have been inferred from micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from boreholes drilled at the archaeological sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii as well as on the apron of the volcano and the adjacent Sebeto and Sarno Valleys. Opposing movements occurred during the periods preceding and following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The uplift began 20 ka ago with marine deposits rising several tens of metres up to 25 m a.s.l., recovering previous subsidence which occurred during the Late glacial period, suggesting a strict connection between volcano-tectonic and glacial cycles. Here we present the analysis of deposits predating the LGM, which confirms subsidence of the Campanian Plain where Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is located, shows variable surface loading effects and highlights the volcano-tectonic stages experienced by the volcano. The self-balancing mechanism of the volcanic system, evolving towards an explosive, subaerial activity 60 ka ago, is testified to by a large ground oscillation in phase with sea level change during the last glacial cycle.

  1. A metallogenic survey of alkalic rocks of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paone, A.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.

    2001-01-01

    Somma-Vesuvius is an alkaline volcano whose products (pumice, scoria and lava) have alkaline (Na2O+K2O) contents between 6 and 16 wt%, Mg number Somma-Vesuvius activity, except for the Ottaviano and Avellino plinian (0.8 wt%) events. Chlorine has a wider range, from 0.1 wt% to 1.6 wt%. Mt Somma-Vesuvius has some features similar to those of mineralized alkaline magmatic systems which coincide with the transition between subduction-related compression and extension-related to continental rifting. We infer that a prospective time for the formation of mineralization at Mt Somma-Vesuvius was during the 1631-1944 eruptive period.

  2. Study on the medieval eruptive activity of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano in the SW sector

    OpenAIRE

    Paolillo, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    The PhD project is divided in three parts: (i) a detailed mapping of the Southern-Western sector of the Vesuvius, integrating stratigraphic and petrologic data with archaeological and historical information; (ii) a study of the medieval eruptive activity of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano, an important period of the Vesuvius’ activity, which has been definitely under-researched, in which we focused on the correlations between inland and offshore tephra fallout deposits, integrating newly collected...

  3. The 3-D structure of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Italy) inferred from new and historic gravimetric data

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Niklas; Ricci, Tullio; Baron, Ludovic; Shakas, Alexis; Berrino, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Existing 3-D density models of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (SVVC), Italy, largely disagree. Despite the scientific and socioeconomic importance of Vesuvius, there is no reliable 3-D density model of the SVVC. A considerable uncertainty prevails concerning the presence (or absence) of a dense body underlying the Vesuvius crater (1944 eruption) that is implied from extensive seismic investigations. We have acquired relative gravity measurements at 297 stations, including measurements in...

  4. About the shallow resistivity structure of Vesuvius volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Siniscalchi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotelluric (MT soundings performed in the past in the volcanic area of Mt. Vesuvius by two independent research groups showed in the same places MT apparent resistivity curves with very similar shape, but statically shifted by one order of magnitude, at least. To try to resolve this ambiguity new controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT measurements have been carried out in the same MT sites. The interpretation of the CSAMT dataset, combined with that of two shallow dipole-dipole geoelectrical resistivity tomographies previously carried out in the area have allowed a reliable electrical structure to be recovered down to a few km of depth, which will next be used for a best constrained re-interpretation of the deep MT soundings.

  5. Subcircular conduits and dikes offshore the Somma-Vesuvius volcano revealed by magnetic and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, V.; Passaro, S.; Fedi, M.; Marino, C.; Tamburrino, S.; Ventura, G.

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed new magnetic, bathymetric, and seismic data acquired in the offshore sector of Somma-Vesuvius volcano (Italy). We detected a group of high-intensity, short wavelength magnetic anomalies corresponding to partly buried volcanic dome-like structures located by seismic data. The magnetic anomalies are aligned along a NW-SE strike that is the preferential orientation of an eruptive fracture of the pre-19 ka activity of Vesuvius. Three cones emplaced before the Last Glacial Maximum, whereas a fourth one emplaced after 19 ka suggesting a rejuvenation of the eruptive system offshore the volcano in historical times. We also identified a NE-SW elongated magnetic anomaly consistent with a dike-like body associated to an on-land tectonic structure that was active in recent times at Vesuvius. A delta-like area with diffuse low-intensity magnetic anomalies reflects the seaward fronts of lava flows that entered the sea mainly during the Middle Ages.

  6. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  7. Material development of molten metal bath hardware for continuous hot-dip processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Sherman A.

    Development of corrosion resistant materials to molten zinc attack for applications in galvanizing pots has long been desired, because better corrosion resistance could lead to a longer production campaign. The research objectives of this project were to develop new bulk materials and surface treatments/coatings for life improvement of molten metal bath hardware (bearings, sink roll, stabilizing rolls, corrector rolls, and also support roll arms and snout tip) in continuous hot-dip process used for coated steel strip. The ultimate goal of the project is to increase the molten Zn bath components life by an order of magnitude which results in large energy saving (estimated at 2 trillion BTU/year). Estimated cost saving would be approximately $46 million/year for the 57 lines operating in the United States of America. Extensive experimental studies were conducted on over 60 different samples of various materials (monolithic alloys with and without treatment, weld overlays, and ceramics) in molten Zn-0.16Al at 465°C. Test durations were 1h to over 9000h in the static condition, over 50h in the dynamic condition, and up to 24h in the wear condition. Data were recorded as weight change per unit area as a function of time and temperature. The reaction products were analyzed for phase composition and their distribution using SEM, EDS, XRD, and optical microscope. Corrosion rates for each selected alloys were calculated. The SS Type 316L results were used as a baseline. Comparisons between the corrosion behaviors of the stainless steel type 316L and the selected materials were made. Based on our static, dynamic, and wear immersion experimental data a mechanism for alloy corrosion in molten zinc was proposed. Alloys containing Fe, Cr, and Al as its major components results in the formation of (Fe, Cr, Al)XZnY intermetallic phases and oxides at the alloy/zinc interface when exposed to molten zinc in air. Most of the alloys studied in present investigation, corrosion

  8. A possible link between faulting, cryptodomes and lateral collapses at Vesuvius Volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Alfonsa; Torrente, Maurizio Maria; Bellucci, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    Vesuvius is an active volcano that has been affected by late Quaternary lateral collapses and tectonic faults. Cryptodomes and two debris avalanche, 18 ka-old DA1 and 3.5 ka-old DA2, were previously documented off Vesuvius and for the younger avalanche a link between onshore and offshore stratigraphy was reconstructed. The interpretation of seismic reflection profiles off Vesuvius, borehole stratigraphies, onshore and geomorphological data allowed to recognise the relationships among debris avalanches, criptodomes and faulting. Stratigraphic data reveal a remarkable difference between the architecture of the northern and southern volcano sectors that is compatible with the occurrence of the DA1 debris avalanche in the southern volcano sector. A contour map and a three-dimensional model of a surface merging the morphology of the top of the Somma lavas, in the northern volcano sector, with that of the top of the DA1 debris avalanche, in the southern volcano sector, were reconstructed. We present a new lateral collapse model of Vesuvius Volcano and document the relevance of inherited tectonic faults in guiding collapse geometry. It is possible that the SW-directed collapse (DA1) was driven towards the hangingwall blocks of NW-SE normal faults, while the propagation of the W-directed collapse (DA2) can be ascribed to the activity of the E-W strike-slip fault. Because of their distal location a minor role of cryptodome intrusion on collapses of Vesuvius can be postulated. The detailed analysis of substrate and edifice structure presented here establishes clear connexion between substrate tectonics and lateral collapse. This approach broadens the horizons of volcanic hazard assessment of Vesuvius.

  9. Catalysis in Molten Ionic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, Soghomon; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with catalysis in molten salts and ionic liquids, which are introduced and reviewed briefly, while an in-depth review of the oxidation catalyst used for the manufacturing of sulfuric acid and cleaning of flue gas from electrical power plants is the main topic of the chapter...

  10. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides. PMID:27553525

  11. Structure of molten iron chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hashimoto, Shinya; Moss, S.C. (Houston Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-11-01

    The structure of molten FeCl[sub 3] at 320[sup degrees]C has been measured with neutron diffraction at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Results indicate that melting in FeCl[sub 3]is accompanied by a change in local structure from the octahedral environment of the Fe[sup 3[plus

  12. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  13. Oxygen isotope composition of mafic magmas at Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, L.; Cioni, R.; Boschi, C.; D'Oriano, C.

    2009-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of olivine and clinopyroxene from four plinian (AD 79 Pompeii, 3960 BP Avellino), subplinian (AD 472 Pollena) and violent strombolian (Middle Age activity) eruptions were measured to constrain the nature and evolution of the primary magmas of the last 4000 years of Mt. Vesuvius activity. A large set of mm-sized crystals was accurately separated from selected juvenile material of the four eruptions. Crystals were analyzed for their major and trace element compositions (EPMA, Laser Ablation ICP-MS), and for 18O/16O ratios. As oxygen isotope composition of uncontaminated mantle rocks on world-wide scale is well constrained (δ18Oolivine = 5.2 ± 0.3; δ18Ocpx = 5.6 ± 0.3 ‰), the measured values can be conveniently used to monitor the effects of assimilation/contamination of crustal rocks in the evolution of the primary magmas. Instead, typically uncontaminated mantle values are hardly recovered in Italian Quaternary magmas, mostly due to the widespread occurrence of crustal contamination of the primary magmas during their ascent to the surface (e.g. Alban Hills, Ernici Mts., and Aeolian Islands). Low δ18O values have been measured in olivine from Pompeii eruption (δ18Oolivine = 5.54 ± 0.03‰), whereas higher O-compositions are recorded in mafic minerals from pumices or scoria of the other three eruptions. Measured olivine and clinopyroxene share quite homogeneous chemical compositions (Olivine Fo 85-90 ; Diopside En 45-48, respectively), and represent phases crystallized in near primary mafic magmas, as also constrained by their trace element compositions. Data on melt inclusions hosted in crystals of these compositions have been largely collected in the past demonstrating that they crystallized from mafic melt, basaltic to tephritic in composition. Published data on volatile content of these melt inclusions reveal the coexistence of dissolved water and carbon dioxide, and a minimum trapping pressure around 200-300 MPa, suggesting

  14. Somma-Vesuvius' activity: a mineral chemistry database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Daniele; Cannatelli, Claudia; Esposito, Rosario; Lima, Annamaria; Petrosino, Paola; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-02-01

    Clinopyroxene and olivine are ubiquitous phases in Somma-Vesuvius (SV) volcanics and for the first time they were systematically studied in several products younger than 40 ka. In this manuscript chemical compositions (major, trace and rare earth elements) of a large set of olivine and clinopyroxene crystals from selected rock samples are presented and discussed. Fourteen pumice samples from Plinian pyroclastic deposits as well as three scoriae and eight lava samples from inter-Plinian deposits were collected. A representative number of olivine and clinopyroxene crystals (n 50) were selected for each sample and analysed by electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, resulting in a large database, which is now available to the scientific community. All studied eruptive products contain olivine and clinopyroxene crystals spanning a wide range of compositions. Olivines show Fo content varying from 91 to 68, while clinopyroxenes display Mg# ranging from 93 to 71. In samples younger than A.D. 79, the more evolved (Mg#82-72) clinopyroxene crystals show clear Ca enrichment ( 23.5-24.5 wt% CaO) with respect to those from older samples (before-A.D.79, 23-21 wt% CaO). The results corroborate disequilibrium between olivine, clinopyroxene and the hosting melt, and an increasing role of carbonate assimilation in SV magma evolution in the last 2 ka. The database here produced is thought as a share product that makes available mineral data and can be used for further studies by researchers to investigate geochemical evolution of the SV system.

  15. MINERALS FROM CAMPANIA BEYOND VESUVIUS: CAMPI FLEGREI, ROCCAMONFINA, GYPSUM-SULPHUROUS AND SEDIMENTARY FORMATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, M.; Punzo, I.

    2011-01-01

    After the completion of the monography “I Minerali del Somma-Vesuvio” (Russo & Punzo, 2004), edited by the Associazione Micro-mineralogica Italiana (AMI), the authors are finishing a new book which deals with the mineralogy of the whole Campania area, excluding Vesuvius, again for the AMI....

  16. The Agro Pontino region, refuge after the Early Bronze Age Avellino eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Italy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakels, C.; Sevink, J.; Kuijper, W.; Kamermans, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was discovered that the Middle to Late Holocene infi ll of the Agro Pontino graben (Central Italy) held a tephra layer originating from the Avellino eruption of the Vesuvius volcano. The eruption is dated to 1995 ± 10 calBC and took therefore place during the Early Bronze Age.

  17. The Museum of Vesuvius Observatory and its public. Years 2005 - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Maddalena; Ottaiano, Mena; Limoncelli, Bianca; Parlato, Luigi; Scala, Omar; Siviglia, Vittoria

    2010-05-01

    The museum of Vesuvius Observatory was created through the enlargement and updating of a permanent exhibition called "Vesuvius: 2000 years of observations", set up in 2000 with the aim of make citizens aware of volcanic phenomena, volcanic hazard and surveillance of active volcanoes in high risk areas, such as Naples and surroundings. The museum is located in the nineteenth-century historical building of the Vesuvius Observatory, the first volcanological observatory in the world, currently part of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology. In the museum the dominant theme is the volcano Vesuvius: along the exhibition scientific issues are strictly interlaced with historical, archaeological and literary topics. The exhibition path begins with the presentation of eruptive phenomena, and related hazard for people and things. It traces the eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius pointing out the most famous eruptions, occurred in 79 AD and 1944, and the methodologies used by volcanologists to define the eruptive history of a volcano through the study of its products. In the octagonal room the products of effusive and explosive eruptions, and minerals formed in volcanic environments, are displayed. The path, consisting of panels and video on big screen, is enriched by the exhibition of historical documents as the geological map of Somma-Vesuvius by Henry James Johnston-Lavis and of copies of Ercolano and Pompeii casts. Also historical scientific instruments once used for surveillance are on display, including the first electromagnetic seismograph, built in 1856 by Luigi Palmieri, director of the Vesuvius Observatory from 1855 to 1896. The tour ends with a practical experience of simulation of an earthquake. Communication tools used in the museum are basically video and panels. The museum admission is free; visitors enter the museum by guided tours only. Since the year 2000 checking of visiting public was carried out, either through booking requests received by the

  18. Molten carbonate fuel cell matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wolfgang M.; Smith, Stanley W.

    1985-04-16

    A molten carbonate fuel cell including a cathode electrode of electrically conducting or semiconducting lanthanum containing material and an electrolyte containing matrix of an electrically insulating lanthanum perovskite. In addition, in an embodiment where the cathode electrode is LaMnO.sub.3, the matrix may include LaAlO.sub.3 or a lithium containing material such as LiAlO.sub.2 or Li.sub.2 TiO.sub.3.

  19. Isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion study of skarns from Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilg, H.A.; Lima, A.; Somma, R.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We present new mineral chemistry, fluid inclusion, stable carbon and oxygen, as well as Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data of Ca-Mg-silicate-rich ejecta (skarns) and associated cognate and xenolithic nodules from the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex, Italy. The typically zoned skarn ejecta consist mainly of diopsidic and hedenbergitic, sometimes "fassaitic" clinopyroxene, Mg-rich and Ti-poor phlogopite, F-bearing vesuvianite, wollastonite, gehlenite, meionite, forsterite, clinohumite, anorthite and Mg-poor calcite with accessory apatite, spinell, magnetite, perovskite, baddeleyite, and various REE-, U-, Th-, Zr- and Ti-rich minerals. Four major types of fluid inclusions were observed in wollastonite, vesuvianite, gehlenite, clinopyroxene and calcite: a) primary silicate melt inclusions (THOM = 1000-1050??C), b) CO2 ?? H2S-rich fluid inclusions (THOM = 20-31.3??C into the vapor phase), c) multiphase aqueous brine inclusions (THOM = 720-820??C) with mainly sylvite and halite daughter minerals, and d) complex chloride-carbonate-sulfate-fluoride-silicate-bearing saline-melt inclusions (THOM = 870-890??C). The last inclusion type shows evidence for immiscibility between several fluids (silicate melt - aqueous chloride-rich liquid - carbonate/sulfate melt?) during heating and cooling below 870??C. There is no evidence for fluid circulation below 700??C and participation of externally derived meteoric fluids in skarn formation. Skarns have considerably variable 206Pb/204Pb (19.047-19.202), 207Pb/204Pb (15.655-15.670), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.915-39.069) and relatively low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51211-0.51244) ratios. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of skarn calcites (??13CV-PDB = -5.4 to -1.1???; ??18OV-SMOW = 11.7 to 16.4???) indicate formation from a 18O- and 13C-enriched fluid. The isotope composition of skarns and the presence of silicate melt inclusion-bearing wollastonite nodules suggests assimilation of carbonate wall rocks by the alkaline magma at moderate depths (< 5

  20. Multidisciplinary investigation (ERT, CO2, SP and T) reveals fluid circulation at Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poret, Matthieu; Ricci, Tullio; Finizola, Anthony; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2016-04-01

    Somma-Vesuvius volcano, located near the city of Naples, threatens about 800,000 peoples producing one of the highest volcanic risk in the world. In the framework of the EC FP7 project "MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes" a multidisciplinary investigation was performed in March 2014. This survey aimed (1) at locating the present-day hydrothermal system of Somma-Vesuvius and (2) at identifying the preferential paths and fluid flows inside the volcano.
 The prospecting methods used were Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ABEM SAS 4000) with 64 electrodes at 40 m spacing (in Wenner alpha configuration), self-potential (SP), temperature (30 cm depth) and CO2 concentration in the soil at 20 m spacing. All the measurements were performed along a 7 km long profile completed with roll-along (North- West to South-East). The depth of investigation for ERT reached about 500 m. This method revealed an electrical conductive body (20-100 ohm.m) centered beneath the summit of the Vesuvius cone. This conductive body was interpreted as the present-day hydrothermal system of the volcanic complex. Regarding the shape of this structure we noticed a deeply different shape respect to the one observed on both Stromboli and Vulcano volcanoes. Indeed, the Vesuvius hydrothermal system appears to act as a body which is constrained up to 200-250 m below the surface and, moreover, also emphasized by the W-like shape of the SP signal. From ERT and SP results a diameter of around 1.7 km at the maximum depth of investigation is estimated for the hydrothermal system of Somma-Vesuvius.
 In addition, four weak thermal anomalies (6-13°C) are identified on the summit area. They can be explained as preferential paths of up-flowing fluids. It follows that the largest structure seen on both temperature signal and ERT tomography is related to the crater rim of the 1906 eruption. Furthermore, on both lower sides of Vesuvius cone a conductive body (300-600 ohm.m) is identified within a resistive

  1. Fluoroacidity evaluation in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieber, A.L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Massot, L., E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Gibilaro, M.; Cassayre, L.; Chamelot, P.; Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > Si(IV) ions are reduced into Si in a one-step process exchanging 4 electrons in molten fluorides. > Si(IV) ions stability in molten fluorides depends on the free F{sup -} ions. > Study of SiF{sub 4(g)} release kinetics allows qualitative fluoroacidity evaluation. > Several compositions of molten fluoride mixtures have been investigated. - Abstract: The fluoroacidity of several alkaline fluoride media was studied by monitoring the concentration of electroactive species which is decreasing vs. time due to a gas species release, such as silicon fluorides, as indicated by the reaction: SiF{sub 4+x}{sup x-} = SiF{sub 4(g)} + xF{sup -}. This article relates the Si(IV) reaction study to define a relative fluoroacidity scale by studying the silicon ions stability in different melts. Electrochemical techniques allow the measurement of SiF{sub 4+x}{sup x-} concentration evolution and thus the reaction rate constant to be calculated at different temperatures and for several fluoride media. The article shows that the free F{sup -} content depends on the fluoride mixture and that the rate values are correlated with the fluoroacidity allowing a qualitative estimation. Then a fluoride solvents fluoroacidity scale was proposed, scaling the different eutectic melts from basic melt to acidic one: NaF-KF < LiF-KF < NaF-MgF{sub 2} < NaF-CaF{sub 2} < LiF-NaF < LiF < LiF-CaF{sub 2}.

  2. Structure of molten iron chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hashimoto, Shinya; Moss, S.C. [Houston Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-11-01

    The structure of molten FeCl{sub 3} at 320{sup degrees}C has been measured with neutron diffraction at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Results indicate that melting in FeCl{sub 3}is accompanied by a change in local structure from the octahedral environment of the Fe{sup 3{plus}} in the solid to an Fe{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} molecular liquid. This behavior is similar to that observed in AlCl{sub 3} and in contrast to that of YCl{sub 3} where an octahedral coordination is preserved on melting. 3 figs, 1 tab, 12 refs.

  3. The molten glass sewing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  4. A detailed analysis of some local earthquakes at Somma-Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Troise

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze local earthquakes which occurred at Somma-Vesuvius during two episodes of intense seismic swarms, in 1989 and 1995 respectively. For the selected earthquakes we have computed accurate hypocentral locations, focal mechanisms and spectral parameters. We have also studied the ground acceleration produced by the largest events of the sequences (ML 3.0, at various digital stations installed in the area during the periods of higher seismic activity. The main result is that seismicity during the two swarm episodes presents similar features in both locations and focal mechanisms. Strong site dependent effects are evidenced in the seismic radiation and strong amplifications in the frequency band 10-15 Hz are evident at stations located on the younger Vesuvius structure, with respect to one located on the ancient Somma structure. Furthermore, seismic stations show peak accelerations for the same events of more than one order of magnitude apart.

  5. Origin of accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino deposits of Vesuvius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, M.F.; Wohletz, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino Plinian ash deposits of Vesuvius consist of centimeter-sized spheroids composed of glass, crystal, and lithic fragments of submillimeter size. The typical structure of the lapilli consists of a central massive core surrounded by concentric layers of fine ash with concentrations of larger clasts and vesicles and a thin outer layer of dust. Clasts within the lapilli larger than 125 ..mu..m are extremely rare. The median grain-size of the fine ash is about 50 ..mu..m and the size-distribution is well sorted. Most constituent particles of accretionary lapilli display blocky shapes characteristic of grains produced by phreatomagmatic hydroexplosions. We have used the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS) to investigate the textural and chemical variation along traverses from the core to the rim of lapilli from Vesuvius.

  6. Human responses to the 1906 eruption of Vesuvius, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, David; Duncan, Angus; Kilburn, Christopher; Sangster, Heather; Solana, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    Cultural and political contexts are important in determining the ways in which communities respond to volcanic eruptions. Understanding the manner in which communities and the State apparatus have coped with historic eruptions can provide insights into how responses have influenced vulnerability and resilience. The 1906 eruption of Vesuvius is well suited for such a study as it was one of the first major eruptions in which there was a significant element of State control, and this worked alongside more traditional pre-industrial responses. This eruption was extensively reported in the regional, national and international press and in archives which include still photography. One feature is the rich archive of material published in English language newspapers of record which are analysed fully in the paper for the first time. Many of these data sources are now accessible on-line. The eruption started on April 4th with mild explosive activity and the eruption of lava from 5th to 7th April. On the night of the 7th/8th, activity intensified when a vigorous lava fountain inclined obliquely to the north east, deposited a thick layer of tephra on the towns of Ottaviano and San Giuseppe. This led to roof collapse and a large number of fatalities. There was increased lava emission and a flow progressed south through the outskirts of Boscotrecase cutting the Circumvesuviana railway line and almost reaching Torre Annunziata. Following April 8th the eruption declined and ended on April 21st. In the initial responses to the eruption pre-industrial features were prominent, with the local communities showing social cohesion, self-reliance and little panic. A more negative aspect was the traditional religious response that involved the use of liturgies of divine appeasement and which included the use of saintly relics and images. There is interesting evidence, however, that this coping strategy was driven by the populace rather than by the clergy. The inhabitants of San Giuseppe

  7. A detailed analysis of some local earthquakes at Somma-Vesuvius

    OpenAIRE

    C. Troise; C. Godano; F. Di Sena; G. De Natale; U. Coppa; P. Capuano

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze local earthquakes which occurred at Somma-Vesuvius during two episodes of intense seismic swarms, in 1989 and 1995 respectively. For the selected earthquakes we have computed accurate hypocentral locations, focal mechanisms and spectral parameters. We have also studied the ground acceleration produced by the largest events of the sequences (ML 3.0), at various digital stations installed in the area during the periods of higher seismic activity. The main result is tha...

  8. The first Long Period earthquake detected in the background seismicity at Mt. Vesuvius

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Cusano; Simona Petrosino; Francesca Bianco; Edoardo Del Pezzo

    2013-01-01

    The typical earthquakes occurring at Mt. Vesuvius are Volcano-Tectonic. On July 20, 2003, an unusual earthquake with low and narrow frequency content was detected. The seismograms presented an emergent onset and a nearly monochromatic spectrum at all stations of the Osservatorio Vesuviano (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) seismic network. The event was located at about 4 km b.s.l. close to the crater axis and an equivalent duration magnitude of 0.6 was estimated. The nature of ...

  9. Electric and electromagnetic outline of the Mount Somma Vesuvius structural setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, R.; Mauriello, P.; Patella, D.; Petrillo, Z.; Piscitelli, S.; Siniscalchi, A.

    1998-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of an integrated electrical and electromagnetic survey in the active volcanic area of Mount Somma-Vesuvius (Naples, Italy). Dipolar geoelectrics (DG), self-potential (SP) and magnetotellurics (MT) were used to investigate the shallow and deep regions of the volcanic area. The DG apparent resistivity pseudosection along a N-S profile across the Vesuvius cone showed the existence of a largely extended conductive zone, closely in correspondence to the Somma caldera, including in the middle the top terminal part of the Vesuvius main plumbing system. The SP data, collected over the whole volcanic area, showed the existence of a W-E-directed wide band of weak positive anomalies, indicating again a conductive zone, not only including the whole Somma caldera but also extending towards the Tyrrhenian sea. A roughly N-S-trending narrow fracture system, cutting the lowest Mount Somma eastern slopes, was further evident from the SP data. A new SP tomographic inversion procedure allowed to detect a large positively charged nucleus in the depth range 600-2200 m b.g.l., located beneath the westernmost portion of a former caldera, related to the Avellino plinian eruption. The geophysical interpretation of this large positive anomaly was made using Onsager's theory of coupled electrokinetic and thermoelectric flows. The final interpretation was that the shallow, conductive central zone is very likely made up of an intensively altered and mineralised block of cemented volcanic breccia. Finally, the MT data, distributed along two perpendicular profiles, enabled us to obtain the first significant picture of the deep electrical structure of the volcano. The Bostick inversion revealed the existence of a conductive intracrustal layer, including a perched more conductive zone located roughly beneath the central-western sector of the Vesuvius apparatus.

  10. 120 years of Italian and Vesuvius history in the lava medals collection of the Osservatorio Vesuviano

    OpenAIRE

    De Lucia, M.; Russo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Lava medals constitute a unique example that links Vesuvian eruptions to history, politics and science. Medals coined in the Vesuvius lava date back to the period in which the state of the volcano was characterized by an open conduit, so that warm lava was still used. This state of activity lasted from 1631 to 1944, a period of time during which effusive or effusive-explosive eruptions frequently occurred, followed by very short periods of rest. The medals were realized thro...

  11. the eruption of vesuvius in ad 79 and the death of gaius plinius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    geological worry of Europe because of its potential explosivity: c. 1,5 million people live in the vicinity of the mountain. ... Bisel compares the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 with that of Mt. St. Helens, a similar but smaller volcano in the U.S.A. ... 6.20.16, own translation). The younger Pliny who did not accompany his uncle but ...

  12. Metal Production by Molten Salt Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.; Qingfeng, Li

    Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed.......Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed....

  13. Molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, J.; Bronstein, H. R.; Cantor, S.; Heatherly, D.; Vallet, C. E.

    1977-05-01

    The activities at ORNL during the period July 1976 to February 1977 on the molten carbonate fuel cell program, funded by the ERDA Division of Conservation Research and Technology, are summarized. This period marks the initiation of molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL, making use of the extensive background of expertise and facilities in molten salt research. The activities described include a literature survey on molten carbonates, design, acquisition and installation of apparatus for experimental studies of molten carbonates, initial experiments on materials compatibility with molten carbonates, electrolysis experiments for the determination of transference numbers, and theoretical studies of transport behavior and the coupling of mass flows in molten carbonate mixtures. Significant accomplishments were the theoretical prediction of a possibly appreciable change in the alkali ion ratio at molten carbonate fuel cell electrodes, operated at high current densities, as a result of mobility differences of the alkali ions; design, construction and assembly of an electrolysis cell, and initiation of measurements of composition profiles in mixed alkali carbonate electrolytes; initiation of differential scanning calorimetry of pure alkali carbonates for quantitative measurement of transition enthalpies, eventually leading to new, more reliable values of the enthalpies and free energies of formation of the pure and mixed carbonates.

  14. Evolution of the Vesuvius magmatic-hydrothermal system before the 16 December 1631 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Claudia; Marini, Luigi

    2008-04-01

    In a recently published manuscript [Guidoboni, E., Boschi, E., 2006. Vesuvius before the 1631 eruption, EOS, 87(40), 417 and 423]; [Guidoboni, E. (Ed.), 2006. Pirro Ligorio, Libro di diversi terremoti (1571), volume 28, codex Ja II 15, Archivio di Stato di Torino, Edizione Nazionale delle Opere di Pirro Ligorio, Roma, De Luca, 261 pp], Pirro Ligorio gives a detailed description of the phenomena occurring in the crater area of Vesuvius volcano, in 1570-1571 and previous years. Here, these phenomena are interpreted as the first clearly documented signals of unrest of this volcanic system caused by the shallow emplacement of a magma batch and leading to the 1631 eruption. Our interpretation is mainly based on the present understanding of the fluid geochemistry of magmatic-hydrothermal systems. In this way, it is possible to conclude that: (i) incandescent rocks were present at the surface, with temperatures > 500 °C approximately and (ii) either a magmatic-dominated or a magmatic-hydrothermal-type of conceptual geochemical model applies to Vesuvius in 1570-1571 and preceding years. The Ligorio's picture represents the first clear evidence that the magma involved in the 1631 eruption was present under the volcano more than sixty years before the eruption. Moreover, its emplacement produced a series of phenomena which were clearly observed although not understood at that time. A similar phenomenological pattern should be easily detected and correctly interpreted at present or in the future.

  15. The interplinian activity at Somma-Vesuvius in the last 3500 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandi, G.; Petrosino, P.; Mc, Geehin J.

    1998-01-01

    Between 1884 B.C. and A.D. 472, eruptive activity at Somma-Vesuvius was dominated by the three plinian eruptions of Avellino (3550 yr B.P.), Pompei (A.D. 79) and A.D. 472 and, as a result, little attention has been given to the intervening interplinian activity. The interplinian events are here reconstructed using new data from twenty stratigraphic sections around the lower flanks of the volcano. Three main eruptions have been identified fro the protohistoric period (3550 yr B.P.-A.D. 79). The first two occurred shortly after the Avellino event and both show a progression from magmatic to phreatomagmatic behaviour. The third eruption (2700 B.P.) consisted of five phreatomagmetic episodes separated by the emplacement of mud flows. Only one event, the explosive erupton of A.D. 203, has been identified for the ancient historic period (A.D. 79-472). In contrast, the A.D. 472 eruption was followed during the medievel period (A.D. 472-1631) by comparatively vigorous interplinian activity, including four strombolian-phreatomagmatic events and extensive lava effusion, which formed a summit cone (destroyed in A.D. 1631) similar to that on Vesuvius today. Such regular alternations of plinian and interplinian events are evident only since 3550 yr B.P. and provide important constraints for forecasting future behaviour at Somma-Vesuvius.

  16. Luigi Palmieri: first scientific bases for geophysical surveillance in Mt. Vesuvius area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nave

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Palmieri (Faicchio 1807 -Naples 1896, was appointed Director of the Vesuvius Observatory in 1855. He rea1ized the first model of electromagnetic seismograph and the uninterrupted use at the Observatory of this instrument represented the first step towards a geophysical sensu strictu surveillance of Mt. Vesuvius area. Already at the end of the 18th century, Ascanio Filomarino had built a mechanical seismograph which was ab1e to record the amplitude of the seismic waves, the incoming direction of the earthquake and its starting time. In 1862 Michele Baldacchini proposed to the Neapolitan scientific community a question about the possibility to use the study of precursory signs of the Vesuvian eruptions to inform in advance people living near the vo1cano. Palmieri answered Baldacchini's request, giving proof of extreme far-sightedness from the scientific point of view but, similarly, much concreteness from the practica1 point of view: he described, with modern ideas, the things to do in order to carry out the surveillance in the Mt. Vesuvius area, but concluded thus: "Till we have not the (economic and instrumental means we have spoken above, I think it is useless to entertain the Academy about the nature and the method of the observations and investigations to be performed".

  17. Molten carbonate fuel cell separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, R.C.

    1984-10-17

    In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

  18. Dynamic modeling of Badaling molten salt tower CSP pilot plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zijiang; Lu, Jiahui; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Li, Zhi; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-06-01

    Under the collaboration framework between EDF China R&D Centre and CAS-IEE, a preliminary numerical model of 1MWth molten salt tower solar power demonstration plant in Badaling, Beijing is presented in this paper. All key components in the plant are presented throughout detailed modules in the model according to its design specifications. Control strategies are also implemented to maintain the design system performance at transient scenario. By this model some key design figures of plant has been validated and it will be used to guide experiment set-up and plant commissioning.

  19. Investigation of molten salt fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Konomura, Mamoru; Ichimiya, Masakazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-06-01

    Phase I of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor System is being performed for two years from Japanese Fiscal Year 1999. In this report, results of the study on fluid fuel reactors (especially a molten salt fast breeder reactor concept) are described from the viewpoint of technical and economical concerns of the plant system design. In JFY1999, we have started to investigate the fluid fuel reactors as alternative concepts of sodium cooled FBR systems with MOX fuel, and selected the unique concept of a molten chloride fast breeder reactor, whose U-Pu fuel cycle can be related to both light water reactors and fast breeder reactors on the basis of present technical data and design experiences. We selected a preliminary composition of molten fuel and conceptual plant design through evaluation of technical and economical issues essential for the molten salt reactors and then compared them with reference design concepts of sodium cooled FBR systems under limited information on the molten chloride fast breeder reactors. The following results were obtained. (1) The molten chloride fast breeder reactors have inherent safety features in the core and plant performances, ad the fluid fuel is quite promising for cost reduction of the fuel fabrication and reprocessing. (2) On the other hand, the inventory of the molten chloride fuel becomes high and thermal conductivity of the coolant is inferior compared to those of sodium cooled FBR systems, then, the size of main components such as IHX's becomes larger and the amount of construction materials is seems to be increased. (3) Furthermore economical vessel and piping materials which contact with the molten chloride salts are required to be developed. From the results, it is concluded that further steps to investigate the molten chloride fast breeder reactor concepts are too early to be conducted. (author)

  20. Thermal conductivity of molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta-Martinez, Maria Vita

    2000-02-01

    A new instrument for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals has been designed, built and commissioned. The apparatus is based on the transient hot-wire technique and it is intended for operation over a wide range of temperatures, from ambient up to 1200 K, with an accuracy approaching 2%. In its present form the instrument operates up to 750 K. The construction of the apparatus involved four different stages, first, the design and construction of the sensor and second, the construction of an electronic system for the measurement and storage of data. The third stage was the design and instrumentation of the high temperature furnace for the melting and temperature control of the sample, and finally, an algorithm was developed for the extraction of the thermal conductivity from the raw measurement data. The sensor consists of a cylindrical platinum-wire symmetrically sandwiched between two rectangular plane sheets of alumina. The rectangular sensor is immersed in the molten metal of interest and a voltage step is applied to the ends of the platinum wire to induce heat dissipation and a consequent temperature rise which, is in part, determined by the thermal conductivity of the molten metal. The process is described by a set of partial differential equations and appropriate boundary conditions rather than an approximate analytical solution. An electronic bridge configuration was designed and constructed to perform the measurement of the resistance change of the platinum wire in the time range 20 {mu}s to 1 s. The resistance change is converted to temperature change by a suitable calibration. From these temperature measurements as a function of time the thermal conductivity of the molten metals has been deduced using the Finite Element Method for the solution of the working equations. This work has achieved its objective of improving the accuracy of the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals from {+-}20% to {+-}2%. Measurements

  1. Corrosion of metals in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossen, J.P.T.

    1991-05-15

    Part 1 of this report describes the results of a literature study on the corrosion behavior of metals in molten carbonates. The results form the basis for a doctorate study related to improving the durability of metal separator plates for molten carbonate fuel cells. To gain a better understanding also the literature on corrosion in molten sulfates has been reviewed, the results of which are summarized in Part 2 of this report. For each part a separate abstract has been prepared. 83 figs., 23 tabs., 1 app., 78 refs.

  2. Electricity generation using molten salt technology

    OpenAIRE

    Osarinmwian, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The anodic release of carbon dioxide gas in the molten salt Hall-Heroult process can be used to power a turbine for electricity generation. The application of this new concept in molten salt reprocessing in the nuclear industry is considered because it could facilitate the suitability of carbon dioxide cycles to certain types of nuclear reactor. The theoretical power of 27.8 MW generated by a molten salt Hall-Heroult reactor is comparable with a next-generation biomass plant that sources low-...

  3. Wettability between molten slag and dolomitic refractory

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Ping; Zhang, Lifeng; Wang, Yi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Wang, Qiangqiang

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the wettability between molten slag and dolomitic refractory materials used in the ladle during steel refining was investigated. The contact angle between molten slag and dolomitic substrate decreased with increasing temperature. The slag with lower basicity spread on the substrate more easily and penetrated deeper into the substrate. The penetration depth of slag into the refractory increased with the extension of holding time. The CaO in the refractory dissolved into s...

  4. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  5. Extracting information from the molten salt database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzuric, Slobodan; Suh, Changwon; Gaune-Escard, Marcelle; Rajan, Krishna

    2006-12-01

    Molten salt technology is a catchall phrase that includes some very diverse technologies; electrochemistry, heat transfer, chemical oxidation/reduction baths, and nuclear reactors. All of these technologies are linked by the general characteristics of molten salts that can function as solvents, have good heat-transfer characteristics, function like a fluid, can attain very high temperatures, can conduct electricity, and also may have chemical catalytic properties. The Janz molten salt database is the most comprehensive compilation of property data about molten salts available today and is widely used for both fundamental and applied purposes. Databases are traditionally viewed as “static” documents that are used in a “search and retrieval” mode. These static data can be transformed by informatics and data mining tools into a dynamic dataset for analysis of the properties of the, materials and for making predictions. While this approch has been successful in the chemical and biochemical sciences in searching for and establishing structure-property relationships, it is not widely used in the materials science community. Because the design of the original molten salt database was not oriented toward this informatics goal, it was essential to evaluate this dataset in terms of data mining standards. Two techniques were used—a projection (principal components analysis (PCA)) and a predictive method (partial least squares (PLS))—in conjunction with fundamental knowledge acquired from the long-term practice of molten salt chemistry.

  6. New proximal tephras at Somma-Vesuvius: evidences of a pre-caldera, large (?) explosive eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparice, Domenico; Scarpati, Claudio; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Petrosino, Paola; Arienzo, Ilenia; Gisbert, Guillem; Petrelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    A 5 m thick pyroclastic and volcaniclastic sequence, never reported before, comprising a pumice fall deposit has been recognized in a disused quarry near Pollena Trocchia, on the NW slope of Somma-Vesuvius. It is composed of three stratigraphic units: a pumice fall deposit that underlies a pyroclastic density current deposit; they are overlain by a volcaniclastic unit emplaced during a quiescent period of the volcano. The pyroclastic deposits are separated by a horizon of reworked material indicating the emplacement from two distinct eruptive events. The pumice fall deposit has been subject of a detailed investigation. It consists of an ash bed overlaid by a roughly stratified pumice fall layer. The presence of ballistic clasts indicates the proximal nature of this deposit and its stratigraphic position below the Pomici di Base (22 ka) Plinian deposit allows constraining its age to the pre-caldera period (22-39 ky) of activity of Somma-Vesuvius. Samples have been collected in order to perform sedimentological (grain size and componentry), geochemical and isotopic analyses. Samples range from moderately to poorly sorted and show a trachytic composition. The comparison with literature data of compatible deposits vented from Somma-Vesuvius (Schiava, Taurano and Codola eruptions as well as borehole data) allows excluding any correlation with already known Vesuvian products suggesting that the analysed products are ascribable to a new, pre-caldera, explosive eruption. We name this new event ;Carcavone eruption;. Based on thickness, maximum lithic clasts and orientation of impact sags, showing a provenance from SE, we envisage the emplacement from a Plinian style eruption vented in the northern sector of the current caldera.

  7. Pyroclastic flow hazard assessment at Somma-Vesuvius based on the geological record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, L.; Sulpizio, R.; Cioni, R.; Sbrana, A.; Santacroce, R.; Luperini, W.; Andronico, D.

    2010-11-01

    During the past 22 ka of activity at Somma-Vesuvius, catastrophic pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) have been generated repeatedly. Examples are those that destroyed the towns of Pompeii and Ercolano in AD 79, as well as Torre del Greco and several circum-Vesuvian villages in AD 1631. Using new field data and data available from the literature, we delineate the area impacted by PDCs at Somma-Vesuvius to improve the related hazard assessment. We mainly focus on the dispersal, thickness, and extent of the PDC deposits generated during seven plinian and sub-plinian eruptions, namely, the Pomici di Base, Greenish Pumice, Pomici di Mercato, Pomici di Avellino, Pompeii Pumice, AD 472 Pollena, and AD 1631 eruptions. We present maps of the total thickness of the PDC deposits for each eruption. Five out of seven eruptions dispersed PDCs radially, sometimes showing a preferred direction controlled by the position of the vent and the paleotopography. Only the PDCs from AD 1631 eruption were influenced by the presence of the Mt Somma caldera wall which stopped their advance in a northerly direction. Most PDC deposits are located downslope of the pronounced break-in slope that marks the base of the Somma-Vesuvius cone. PDCs from the Pomici di Avellino and Pompeii Pumice eruptions have the most dispersed deposits (extending more than 20 km from the inferred vent). These deposits are relatively thin, normally graded, and stratified. In contrast, thick, massive, lithic-rich deposits are only dispersed within 7 to 8 km of the vent. Isopach maps and the deposit features reveal that PDC dispersal was strongly controlled by the intensity of the eruption (in terms of magma discharge rate), the position of the vent area with respect to the Mt Somma caldera wall, and the pre-existing topography. Facies characteristics of the PDC deposits appear to correlate with dispersal; the stratified facies are consistently dispersed more widely than the massive facies.

  8. Are local communities prepared to face a future volcanic emergency at Vesuvius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, S.; Somma, R.; Mayberry, G. C.

    2009-04-01

    The Vesuvius represents, undoubtedly, the icon of volcanic threats, since more than 600,000 people live very close to the volcano. This image is strengthened by the presence of the archaeological ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried by the 79 A.D. plinian eruption, testifying nowadays the highly destructive impact on humans, buildings and environments. Nevertheless, many young people live in the Vesuvian area show an inadequate preparedness to face the next eruption. This is inferred by the results of a multiple choice questionnaire, distributed to 400 high-school students in three municipalities located close to the volcano during the 2007. The questionnaire was aimed to understand the level of risk perception and preparedness of at-risk communities during the current quiescent period. The interviewed students show high levels of fear, poor perceived ability to protect themselves from the effects of a future eruption, and insufficient knowledge of the National Emergency Plan for Vesuvian Area (NEPVA). This result suggests that, during a future eruption of Vesuvius, there may not be enough time to educate the large number of people living near the volcano about how to appropriately respond. The lack of knowledge about NEPVA is a sign of the absence of well-tested communication strategies and effective information dissemination in the study area. This lack of knowledge also means there is little interest in participating in risk-reduction activities. The inadequate risk education and preparedness of respondents implies that a strong effort is needed to improve communication strategies in order to facilitate successful evacuations. Therefore, it is important to take advantage of the present period of quiescence at Vesuvius to increase the risk perception of youth in local communities. In the absence of adequate preparedness measures, an evacuation could become "enforced" or even worse, a "failure."

  9. Somma Vesuvius volcano: ground deformations from CGPS observations (2001-2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Tammaro, U.; De Martino, P.; Obrizzo, F.; Brandi, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Dolce, M.; Malaspina, S.; Serio, C.; Pingue, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to the evaluation of ground deformations at Somma-Vesuvius volcano by means GPS measurements from 2001 to 2012. In this study we use a dataset from nine continuous GPS stations of the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS), which covers the Neapolitan volcanic area, and is operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The GPS data processing is performed by the Bernese software v. 5.0. The results of the data processing show that ...

  10. Volcanic Hazard Education through Virtual Field studies of Vesuvius and Laki Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose significant hazards to human populations and have the potential to cause significant economic impacts as shown by the recent ash-producing eruptions in Iceland. Demonstrating both the local and global impact of eruptions is important for developing an appreciation of the scale of hazards associated with volcanic activity. In order to address this need, Web-based virtual field exercises at Vesuvius volcano in Italy and Laki volcano in Iceland have been developed as curriculum enhancements for undergraduate geology classes. The exercises are built upon previous research by the authors dealing with the 79 AD explosive eruption of Vesuvius and the 1783 lava flow eruption of Laki. Quicktime virtual reality images (QTVR), video clips, user-controlled Flash animations and interactive measurement tools are used to allow students to explore archeological and geological sites, collect field data in an electronic field notebook, and construct hypotheses about the impacts of the eruptions on the local and global environment. The QTVR images provide 360o views of key sites where students can observe volcanic deposits and formations in the context of a defined field area. Video sequences from recent explosive and effusive eruptions of Carribean and Hawaiian volcanoes are used to illustrate specific styles of eruptive activity, such as ash fallout, pyroclastic flows and surges, lava flows and their effects on the surrounding environment. The exercises use an inquiry-based approach to build critical relationships between volcanic processes and the deposits that they produce in the geologic record. A primary objective of the exercises is to simulate the role of a field volcanologist who collects information from the field and reconstructs the sequence of eruptive processes based on specific features of the deposits. Testing of the Vesuvius and Laki exercises in undergraduate classes from a broad spectrum of educational institutions shows a preference for the

  11. The mystery of molten metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Sobczak

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in scientific understanding of high-temperature materials processing using novel experimental methodologies have shed light on the complex role of surface and interface phenomena. New in-situ studies on molten metal/solid ceramic interactions using a unique experimental complex at the Foundry Research Institute, Krakow, have revealed a number of unusual observations in materials processing at high temperatures. We present some such unusual observations and their explanation with reference to liquid metal processing of Al, Ni, and Ti, and their alloys in contact with oxide ceramics. In particular, we focus on the following aspects: primary oxidation of Al from residual water vapor or oxygen, capillary purification to remove surface oxide, substrate protection by CVD carbon, roughening due to spinel whisker formation, inclusions in castings due to mechanical detachment, floatation due to buoyancy forces, and segregation due to directional solidification, modification of the solid surface morphology by metal vapor ahead of the liquid, and the complication due to multi-component alloys melted in crucibles made from complex oxide-based ceramics. In the case of Ti, rapid reactions with oxides result in undesirable volumetric changes that create difficulty in casting high-quality Ti parts, particularly by investment casting. Nanoscale (e.g., colloidal coatings based on Y2O3 protect crucibles and hold ladles against such attack. Practical insights and recommendations for materials processing emerging from the fundamental studies on high-temperature interfacial phenomena have been described.

  12. The 3-D structure of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Italy) inferred from new and historic gravimetric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Niklas; Ricci, Tullio; Baron, Ludovic; Shakas, Alexis; Berrino, Giovanna

    2017-08-16

    Existing 3-D density models of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (SVVC), Italy, largely disagree. Despite the scientific and socioeconomic importance of Vesuvius, there is no reliable 3-D density model of the SVVC. A considerable uncertainty prevails concerning the presence (or absence) of a dense body underlying the Vesuvius crater (1944 eruption) that is implied from extensive seismic investigations. We have acquired relative gravity measurements at 297 stations, including measurements in difficult-to-access areas (e.g., the first-ever measurements in the crater). In agreement with seismic investigations, the simultaneous inversion of these and historic data resolves a high-density body that extends from the surface of the Vesuvius crater down to depths that exceed 2 km. A 1.5-km radius horseshoe-shaped dense feature (open in the southwestern sector) enforces the existing model of groundwater circulation within the SVVC. Based on its volcano-tectonic evolution, we interpret volcanic structures that have never been imaged before.

  13. The first Long Period earthquake detected in the background seismicity at Mt. Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cusano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The typical earthquakes occurring at Mt. Vesuvius are Volcano-Tectonic. On July 20, 2003, an unusual earthquake with low and narrow frequency content was detected. The seismograms presented an emergent onset and a nearly monochromatic spectrum at all stations of the Osservatorio Vesuviano (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia seismic network. The event was located at about 4 km b.s.l. close to the crater axis and an equivalent duration magnitude of 0.6 was estimated. The nature of this event was investigated by comparing its features with those of two typical Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes occurred inside the same source volume. We compared the spectral content calculating the spectrograms and the coda patterns using the Hilbert Transform. A Seismic Moment Tensor inversion was performed on the low frequency earthquake. The focal mechanisms for the two Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes were estimated with a classical technique and resulted compatible with the stress field acting on the volcano. Taking into account the clear differences with the typical Volcano-Tectonic events as well as the peculiarities retrieved from our analyses (monochromatic, low frequency spectral content, and sustained coda and also some geochemical observations, we classify the unusual low frequency seismic event detected at Mt. Vesuvius as Long Period earthquake and propose that its origin could be linked to a pressure drop in the deep hydrothermal system.

  14. Topography and structural heterogeneities in surface ground deformation: a simulation test for Somma-Vesuvius volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Umberto; Riccardi, Umberto; Romano, Vittorio; Meo, Michele; Capuano, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Through a 3D finite element code we simulate, the deformation of Somma-Vesuvius volcano caused by some overpressure sources. Under the assumption of linear elastic isotropic material behavior, the volcano deformation sources are located at various depths and their geometry (shape and lateral extension) is mainly constrained by the results of recent seismic tomography studies. These simulations have the objective to inquire about the influence of topography and structural heterogeneity on ground deformation. Structural heterogeneities have been modeled in terms of dynamical elastic parameters (Young's modulus) accounting for previous seismic tomography and gravity studies. Topography of Somma-Vesuvius is taken into account, using a digital terrain model. The main outcomes of this study is a strong deviation from axially symmetric pattern of the displacement field, which is quietly unaccounted by simplistic Mogi modeling in homogeneous medium with simplified topography. These results demonstrate that real topography and structural heterogeneities are key factors controlling the pattern of ground deformations, i.e. one of the most relevant problem in volcano monitoring. Moreover, an improved knowledge of deformation patterns can significantly help in the location of monitoring sensors as well as in the design of an efficient geodetic network.

  15. Somma Vesuvius volcano: ground deformations from CGPS observations (2001-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Tammaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a contribution to the evaluation of ground deformations at Somma-Vesuvius volcano by means GPS measurements from 2001 to 2012. In this study we use a dataset from nine continuous GPS stations of the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS, which covers the Neapolitan volcanic area, and is operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The GPS data processing is performed by the Bernese software v. 5.0. The results of the data processing show that the dynamics of the Somma-Vesuvio volcano, between 2001 and 2012, is characterized by a general subsidence, with maximum values on the Gran Cono at BKNO (−11.7 ± 0.65 mm/year and BKE1 (−4.92 ± 0.36 mm/year stations. The subsidence decrease from the crater down to the coast and the horizontal displacements are concentrated in Gran Cono area, the youngest part of the volcano. The parameters of the principal strain components indicate that Somma-Vesuvius is affected by a predominant contraction phase, which is concentrated in the areas with the greatest altitudes.

  16. Electric effects induced by artificial seismic sources at Somma-Vesuvius volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Di Maio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a series of self-potential measurements at Somma-Vesuvius volcanic area acquired in conjunction with an active seismic tomography survey. The aim of our study is both to provide further confirmation to the occurrence of seismo-electric coupling and to identify sites suitable for self-potential signal monitoring at Somma-Vesuvius district. The data, which were collected along two perpendicular dipoles, show significant changes on the natural electric field pattern. These variations, attributable to electrokinetic processes triggered by the artificial seismic waves, were observed after explosions occurred at a distance less than 5 km from the SP dipole arrays. In particular, we found that the NW-SE component of the natural electric field was more sensible to the shots than the NE-SW one, and the major effects did not correspond to the nearest shots. Such evidences were interpreted considering the underground electrical properties as deduced by previous detailed resistivity and self-potential surveys performed in the study area.

  17. Ash fallout scenarios at Vesuvius: Numerical simulations and implications for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonio, G.; Costa, A.; Folch, A.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic ash fallout subsequent to a possible renewal of the Vesuvius activity represents a serious threat to the highly urbanized area around the volcano. In order to assess the relative hazard we consider three different possible scenarios such as those following Plinian, Sub-Plinian, and violent Strombolian eruptions. Reference eruptions for each scenario are similar to the 79 AD (Pompeii), the 1631 AD (or 472 AD) and the 1944 AD Vesuvius events, respectively. Fallout deposits for the first two scenarios are modeled using HAZMAP, a model based on a semi-analytical solution of the 2D advection-diffusion-sedimentation equation. In contrast, fallout following a violent Strombolian event is modeled by means of FALL3D, a numerical model based on the solution of the full 3D advection-diffusion-sedimentation equation which is valid also within the atmospheric boundary layer. Inputs for models are total erupted mass, eruption column height, bulk grain-size, bulk component distribution, and a statistical set of wind profiles obtained by the NCEP/NCAR re-analysis. We computed ground load probability maps for different ash loadings. In the case of a Sub-Plinian scenario, the most representative tephra loading maps in 16 cardinal directions were also calculated. The probability maps obtained for the different scenarios are aimed to give support to the risk mitigation strategies.

  18. Holocene Coastal Environments near Pompeii before the A.D. 79 Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Tullio; Senatore, Maria Rosaria; Capretto, Giovanna; Lerro, Gaia

    2001-01-01

    Studies of some 70 bore holes around ancient Pompeii, on the southwestern slope of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano, allow the reconstruction of Holocene environments earlier than the A.D. 79 eruption. This eruption produced about 10 km3 of pyroclastic material that buried the Roman cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae and promoted a shoreline progradation of 1 km. The Sarno coastal plain, in a post-Miocene sedimentary basin, has been affected by Somma-Vesuvius volcanic activity since the late Pleistocene. At the Holocene transgressive maximum, the sea reached an area east of ancient Pompeii and formed a beach ridge (Messigno, 5600 and 4500 14C yr B.P.) more than 2 km inland from the present shore. Progradation of the plain due to high volcanic supply during the following highstand resulted in a new beach ridge (Bottaro-Pioppaino, 3600 14C yr B.P.) 0.5 km seaward of the Messigno ridge. Ancient Pompeii was built as the shoreline continued to prograde toward its present position. Deposits of the A.D. 79 eruption blanketed the natural levees of the Sarno River, marshes near the city and on the Sarno's floodplain, the morphological highs of Messigno and Bottaro-Pioppaino beach ridges, and the seashore. That shore was probably 1 km landward of the present one.

  19. Enduring Fluoride Health Hazard for the Vesuvius Area Population: The Case of AD 79 Herculaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Pierpaolo; Giordano, Michele; Giustino, Stefano; Guarino, Fabio M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The study of ancient skeletal pathologies can be adopted as a key tool in assessing and tracing several diseases from past to present times. Skeletal fluorosis, a chronic metabolic bone and joint disease causing excessive ossification and joint ankylosis, has been only rarely considered in differential diagnoses of palaeopathological lesions. Even today its early stages are misdiagnosed in endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings Endemic fluorosis induced by high concentrations of fluoride in water and soils is a major health problem in several countries, particularly in volcanic areas. Here we describe for the first time the features of endemic fluorosis in the Herculaneum victims of the 79 AD eruption, resulting from long-term exposure to high levels of environmental fluoride which still occur today. Conclusions/Significance Our observations on morphological, radiological, histological and chemical skeletal and dental features of this ancient population now suggest that in this area fluorosis was already endemic in Roman times. This evidence merged with currently available epidemiologic data reveal for the Vesuvius area population a permanent fluoride health hazard, whose public health and socio-economic impact is currently underestimated. The present guidelines for fluoridated tap water might be reconsidered accordingly, particularly around Mt Vesuvius and in other fluoride hazard areas with high natural fluoride levels. PMID:21698155

  20. Diagnosis of time of increased probability of volcanic earthquakes at Mt. Vesuvius zone

    CERN Document Server

    Rotwain, I; Kuznetsov, I V; Panza, G F; Peresan, A

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of intermediate-term earthquake prediction at Mt. Vesuvius by means of the algorithm CN is explored. CN was originally designed to identify the Times of Increased Probability (TIPs) for the occurrence of strong tectonic earthquakes, with magnitude M >= M sub 0 , within a region a priori delimited. Here the algorithm CN is applied, for the first time, to the analysis of volcanic seismicity. The earthquakes recorded at Mt. Vesuvius, during the period from February 1972 to October 2002, are considered and the magnitude threshold M sub 0 , selecting the events to be predicted, is varied within the range: 3.0 - 3.3. Satisfactory prediction results are obtained, by retrospective analysis, when a time scaling is introduced. In particular, when the length of the time windows is reduced by a factor 2.5 - 3, with respect to the standard version of CN algorithm, more than 90% of the events with M >= M sub 0 occur within the TIP intervals, with TIPs occupying about 30% of the total time considered. The co...

  1. Enduring fluoride health hazard for the Vesuvius area population: the case of AD 79 Herculaneum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Petrone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of ancient skeletal pathologies can be adopted as a key tool in assessing and tracing several diseases from past to present times. Skeletal fluorosis, a chronic metabolic bone and joint disease causing excessive ossification and joint ankylosis, has been only rarely considered in differential diagnoses of palaeopathological lesions. Even today its early stages are misdiagnosed in endemic areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endemic fluorosis induced by high concentrations of fluoride in water and soils is a major health problem in several countries, particularly in volcanic areas. Here we describe for the first time the features of endemic fluorosis in the Herculaneum victims of the 79 AD eruption, resulting from long-term exposure to high levels of environmental fluoride which still occur today. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations on morphological, radiological, histological and chemical skeletal and dental features of this ancient population now suggest that in this area fluorosis was already endemic in Roman times. This evidence merged with currently available epidemiologic data reveal for the Vesuvius area population a permanent fluoride health hazard, whose public health and socio-economic impact is currently underestimated. The present guidelines for fluoridated tap water might be reconsidered accordingly, particularly around Mt Vesuvius and in other fluoride hazard areas with high natural fluoride levels.

  2. Physical properties of molten carbonate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, T.; Yanagida, M.; Tanimoto, K. [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Recently many kinds of compositions of molten carbonate electrolyte have been applied to molten carbonate fuel cell in order to avoid the several problems such as corrosion of separator plate and NiO cathode dissolution. Many researchers recognize that the addition of alkaline earth (Ca, Sr, and Ba) carbonate to Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} eutectic electrolytes is effective to avoid these problems. On the other hand, one of the corrosion products, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion is found to dissolve into electrolyte and accumulated during the long-term MCFC operations. This would affect the performance of MCFC. There, however, are little known data of physical properties of molten carbonate containing alkaline earth carbonates and CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We report the measured and accumulated data for these molten carbonate of electrical conductivity and surface tension to select favorable composition of molten carbonate electrolytes.

  3. 19 years of tilt data on Mt. Vesuvius: state of the art and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Ricco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Vesuvius, located along the SW border of the Campania Plane graben, is one of the most studied volcanoes worldwide, from both the volcanological and the geophysical, geochemical and geodetic point of view. In order to better understand its dynamics, the deformation of the volcano has been already studied since the early ’70s by setting up levelling lines and, since a few years later, through trilateration networks, whereas ground tilt monitoring started in 1993. Tilt variations were recorded by an automatic surface station set up at the Osservatorio Vesuviano (O.V. bunker (OVO and data recorded were transmitted to the O.V. Surveillance Centre in Naples. Afterwards, in 1996 two more identical stations were set up close to Torre del Greco (CMD, and close to Trecase (TRC. In 2002 the data acquisition system was replaced, while at the end of 2011 a Lily borehole sensor was set up at 26 m depth, replacing the old TRC tilt station. The paper describes in details the tilt network of Mt. Vesuvius, its development over time and the data processing procedure; moreover, the ground deformation pattern is discussed, as inferred from the study of 19 years of data and its change during the seismic crises of 1995-1996 and 1999-2000. From the information obtained from the tiltmetric monitoring, a complex deformation pattern can be deduced, strongly dependent on the position of the sites in which the sensors were set up with respect to the morphology of the volcanic edifice and its structural outlines. If we consider the signals as they were recorded, although previously corrected for the influences of the thermo-elastic strain on the sensors, the tilting occurs mainly in the SW direction with rates of about 11 µradians/year on both the western and eastern flanks and of about 13 µradians/year on the southern one. Because tilt vectors point in the long term outward from the summit and towards the subsiding area, this supports the hypothesis of a southern

  4. Social and environmental impact of volcaniclastic flows related to 472 AD eruption at Vesuvius from stratigraphic and geoarcheological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Mauro A.; de Vita, Sandro; Rucco, Ilaria; Bini, Monica; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Aurino, Paola; Cesarano, Mario; Ebanista, Carlo; Rosi, Mauro; Ricciardi, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing number of evidences in the surrounding plain of Somma-Vesuvius volcano which indicate that along with primary volcanic processes (i.e. fallout, pyroclastic density currents) the syn-eruptive and post-eruptive volcaniclastic remobilization has severely impacted the ancient civilizations, which flourished in the area. This represents an important starting point for understanding the future hazard related to a potential (and not remote) renewal of volcanic activity of the Campaniana volcanoes. We present geoarcheological and stratigraphic data obtained from the analysis of more than 160 sections in the Campanian plain showing the widespread impact of volcaniclastic debris flows and floods originated from the rapid remobilization of the products of the AD 472 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, both on the environment and on the human landscape. This eruption was one of the two sub-Plinian historical events of Somma Vesuvius. This event largely impacted the northern and eastern territory surrounding the volcano with deposition of a complex sequence of pyroclastic-fallout and -current deposits. These sequences were variably affected by syn- and post-eruptive mobilization both along the Somma-Vesuvius slopes and the Apennine valleys with the emplacement of thick mud- and debris-flows which strongly modified the preexisting paleogeography of the Plain with irretrievable damages to the agricultural and urban landscape. The multidisciplinary approach to the study of the sequences permitted to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment before the eruption and the timing of the emplacement of both pyroclastic and volcanoclastic deposits. The preexisting landscape was characterized by intense human occupation, although showing strong evidences of degradation and abandonment due to the progressive decline of the Roman Empire. The impact of volcaniclastic flows continued for decades after the eruption as highlighted in the studied sequences by stratigraphic and archaeologic

  5. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Status of molten carbonate fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianowski, L. G.; Osullivan, J. B.

    A molten carbonate fuel cell integrated with a coal gasification power plant is one of the most promising coal-using technologies because of its high efficiency acceptable cost, and environmental acceptability. The high temperature heat available from the fuel cell may be used in a bottoming cycle and/or industrial cogeneration applications; however, for the molten carbonate system to achieve these goals, continued developmental work is required which must take account of the operating conditions of the application. The progress made in improving cell performance and life and in producing inexpensive cell components is discussed. The status, direction, and priority of future research and engineering efforts is also discussed.

  7. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  8. Somma-Vesuvius Plinian Eruptions fed by mafic magma: insights from bubbles in melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, R.; Redi, D.; Cannatelli, C.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Lima, A.; Bodnar, R. J.; De Vivo, B.

    2014-12-01

    Mt. Somma-Vesuvius Plinian eruptions were first described by Pliny the younger in 79 AD during the infamous eruption that destroyed Pompeii. Today, such eruptions are still a concern to the nearly 3 million people living in the Naples metropolitan area. Understanding the source for Mt. Somma-Vesuvius magma and the coexisting volatile phase is vital to better constrain the long-term eruptive behavior of this volcano. In the present study, ~ 50 olivine phenocrysts were selected from lavas and pumices produced during mild effusive events referred to as inter-Plinian eruptions, and from highly explosive Plinian eruptions that occurred at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius between 33000 ka and 1631 AD. Selected olivine phenocrysts containing MI were examined petrographically and analyzed for Fo content. Fo varies from 69 to 73 mole% for inter-Plinian olivine crystals and from 84 to 90 mole% with one zoned olivine containing 76-81 mole% Fo, for Plinian olivine crystals. Investigated MI vary from slightly crystallized to highly crystallized. Selected crystallized MI were reheated using the Vernadsky stage, and quenched to a homogeneous glass (Group 1) or glass plus a vapor bubble (Group 2). On one hand, MI of Group 1 are hosted in olivine ranging from Fo72 to Fo76 and were all erupted from the Pompeii eruption (white pumice deposit). On the other hand, MI of Group 2 are trapped in olivine ranging from Fo69 to Fo81 and from Fo84 to Fo90, and the hosts are representative of both Plinian and inter-Plinian events. The only eruption where Group-1 and Group-2 MI coexist is the Pompeii eruption. Group 2 MIs were further analyzed by Raman to test for the presence of volatiles (CO2 or H2O) in the vapor bubbles. CO2 was detected in all MI analyzed. CO2 density was determined using the distance between the two Fermi-diad peaks, and ranges between 0.14 and 0.55 g/cm3. Six MI also showed evidence for H2O in the vapor bubble. In addition, carbonates were detected at the glass-vapor interface of five

  9. Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR) System Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, Robert D [PPPL; Miller, Laurence F [PPPL

    2014-04-01

    Can the hybrid system combination of (1) a critical fission Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) having a thermal spectrum and a high Conversion Ratio (CR) with (2) an external source of high energy neutrons provide an attractive solution to the world's expanding demand for energy? The present study indicates the answer is an emphatic yes.

  10. Piezomagnetic effects induced by artificial sources at Mt. Vesuvius (Italy: preliminary results of an experimental survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Napoli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to put new constrains on magnetic effects associated with mechanical stresses, high frequency monitoring of the geomagnetic field was carried out during a seismic tomography experiment (TOMOVES'96 project at Mt. Vesuvius. Eight proton precession and one Cesium magnetometers were installed along a profile on the SW flank of the volcano to observe possible magnetic changes induced by explosions. Measurements were performed at different sampling frequencies (10 Hz, 0.5 Hz and 0.1 Hz. A remarkable change in the intensity of the magnetic field was observed in only one case. The magnetic transient lasted 12-13 min, reaching the maximum amplitude of slightly less than 15 nT.

  11. Volcanic hazard at Vesuvius: An analysis for the revision of the current emergency plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Mt Somma-Vesuvius is a composite volcano on the southern margin of the Campanian Plain which has been active since 39 ka BP and which poses a hazard and risk for the people living around its base. The volcano last erupted in 1944, and since this date has been in repose. As the level of volcanic risk perception is very high in the scientific community, in 1995 a hazard and risk evaluation, and evacuation plan, was published by the Italian Department of Civil Protection ( Dipartimento della Protezione Civile) . The plan considered the response to a worst-case scenario, taken to be a subplinian eruption on the scale of the 1631 AD eruption, and based on a volcanological reconstruction of this eruption, assumes that a future eruption will be preceded by about two weeks of ground uplift at the volcano's summit, and about one week of locally perceptible seismic activity. Moreover, by analogy with the 1631 events, the plan assumes that ash fall and pyroclastic flow should be recognized as the primary volcanic hazard. To design the response to this subplinian eruption, the emergency plan divided the Somma-Vesuvius region into three hazard zones affected by pyroclastic flows (Red Zone), tephra fall (Yellow and Green Zone), and floods (Blue Zone). The plan at present is the subject of much controversy, and, in our opinion, several assumptions need to be modified according to the following arguments: a) For the precursory unrest problem, recent scientific studies show that at present neither forecast capability is realistic, so that the assumption that a future eruption will be preceded by about two weeks of forecasts need to be modified; b) Regarding the exposure of the Vesuvius region to flow phenomena, the Red Zone presents much inconsistency near the outer border as it has been defined by the administrative limits of the eighteen municipality area lying on the volcano. As this outer limit shows no uniformity, a pressing need exists to define appropriately the flow hazard

  12. Chlorine as a geobarometer tool: Application to the large explosive eruptions of Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Cioni, Raffaello; Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    One of the current stakes in modern volcanology is the definition of magma storage conditions which has direct implications on the eruptive style and thus on the associated risks and the management of likely related crisis. In alkaline differentiated magmas, chlorine (Cl), contrary to H2O, occurs as a minor volatile species but may be used as a geobarometer. Numerous experimental studies on Cl solubility have highlighted its saturation conditions in alkaline silicate melts. The NaCl-H2O system is characterized by immiscibility under wide ranges of pressure, temperature and NaCl content (Somma-Vesuvius: We have analysed the products of 13 explosive eruptions of Monte Somma-Vesuvius, including four Plinian (Pomici di Base, Mercato, Avellino, Pompeii), five sub-Plinian (Verdoline, AP1, AP2, Pollena, 1631 AD) and four violent strombolian to ash emission events (AP3, 1822, 1906, 1944). We have focussed our research on the earliest emitted, most evolved products of each eruption, likely representing the shallower, H2O-saturated portion of the reservoir. We highlighted two magma ponding zones, at ~170-200 MPa and ~105-115 MPa. We have also estimated maximum pre-eruptive H2O content for the different magma compositions, varying between 3.5 and 7 wt%. The results, in large agreement with literature, are very promising. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the reservoir dynamics through time and provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, of outmost importance for the interpretation of the monitoring data and the identification of precursory signals.

  13. Magma evolution inside the 1631 Vesuvius magma chamber and eruption triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, Francesco; Principe, Claudia; Schiazza, Mariangela; Liu, Yu; Giosa, Paola; Crocetti, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Vesuvius is a high-risk volcano and the 1631 Plinian eruption is a reference event for the next episode of explosive unrest. A complete stratigraphic and petrographic description of 1631 pyroclastics is given in this study. During the 1631 eruption a phonolite was firstly erupted followed by a tephritic phonolite and finally a phonolitic tephrite, indicating a layered magma chamber. We suggest that phonolitic basanite is a good candidate to be the primitive parental-melt of the 1631 eruption. Composition of apatite from the 1631 pyroclastics is different from those of CO2-rich melts indicating negligible CO2 content during magma evolution. Cross checking calculations, using PETROGRAPH and PELE software, accounts for multistage evolution up to phonolite starting from a phonolitic basanite melt similar to the Vesuvius medieval lavas. The model implies crystal settling of clinopyroxene and olivine at 6 kbar and 1220°C, clinopyroxene plus leucite at a pressure ranging from 2.5 to 0.5 kbar and temperature ranging from 1140 to 940°C. Inside the phonolitic magma chamber K-feldspar and leucite would coexist at a temperature ranging from from 940 to 840°C and at a pressure ranging from 2.5 to0.5 kbar. Thus crystal fractionation is certainly a necessary and probably a sufficient condition to evolve the melt from phono tephritic to phonolitic in the 1631 magma chamber. We speculate that phonolitic tephrite magma refilling from deeper levels destabilised the chamber and triggered the eruption, as testified by the seismic precursor phenomena before 1631 unrest.

  14. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. The shape of Vesuvius before the 79 A.D. eruption according to a new finding from a Pompei fresco and Vesuvius central cone history in the last 2000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nazzaro

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The history of Vesuvius and its central cone or Great Cone (Gran Cono is important because it enables us to improve our understanding of the structural evolution of Somma-Vesuvius. Apart from geological and stratigraphic studies, investigations of the literary and artistic testimonies can also help to clarify some unresolved problems. Recently a detailed study of the consequences of the 1631 eruption on the volcano morphology as well as that of the following volcanic activity has shown that the present central cone was formed in the last few centuries after that eruption. With regard to the history of the central cone prior to the 1631 eruption, rare writings and iconographic records help clarify this question. In this short communication we announce the discovery of a new image representing Vesuvius before the 79 A.D. eruption identified in a fresco from Pompei excavations. This fresco could confirm the interpretation of a well-known Strabo quotation according to which there already existed a large caldera prior to the 79 A.D. eruption.

  16. The shape of Vesuvius before the 79 A.D. eruption according to a new finding from a Pompei fresco and Vesuvius central cone history in the las 2000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazzaro, A. [Osservatorio Vesuviano, Ercolano, NA (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    The history of Vesuvius and its central cone or Great Cone (Gran Cono) is important because it enables to improve our understanding of the structural evolution of Somma-Vesuvius. Apart of geological and stratigraphic studies, investigations of literary and artistic testimonies can also help to clarify some unresolved problems. Recently a detailed study of the consequences of the 1631 eruption on the volcano morphology as well as that of the following the volcanic activity has shown that the present central cone was formed in the last few centuries after that eruption. With regard to the history of the central cone prior to the 1631 eruption, rare writing and iconographic records help clarify this question. In this short communication we announce the discovery of a new image representing Vesuvius before the 79 A.D. eruption identified in a fresco from Pompei excavations. This fresco could confirm the interpretation of a well-known Strabo quotation according to which there already existed a large caldera prior to the 79 A.D. eruption.

  17. Remote sensing of volcanic terrains by terrestrial laser scanner: preliminary reflectance and RGB implications for studying Vesuvius crater (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ventura

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the use of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS in the characterization of volcanic environments. A TLS survey of the Vesuvius crater (Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy allows the construction of an accurate, georeferenced digital model of different sectors of the crater. In each sector, the intensity is computed for each point as the ratio between the emitted amplitude and the received one, normalized to the maximum signal, providing the radiometric information. Moreover, the RGB colours of the observed surfaces can be captured by means of a calibrated camera mounted on the TLS instrument. In this way, multi-band information is given, since a long range TLS operates in the near infrared band. The reflectance and RGB data are compared in order to verify if they are independent enough to be complementary for model analysis and inspection. Results show that the integration of RGB and intensity data can fully characterize this volcanic environment. The collected data are able to discriminate different volcanic deposits and to detect their stratigraphic features. In addition, our results shed light on the spatial extension of landslides and on the dimensions of rock fall/flow deposits affecting the inner walls of the crater. The remotely acquired TLS information from the Vesuvius crater is compared with that from a sedimentary terrain (coal-shale quarry to detect possible similarities/differences between these two geological environments.

  18. Some considerations on the state of Vesuvius in the Middle Ages and the precursors of the 1631 eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nazzaro

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The volcanologic literature concerning Vesuvius and its activity, since the great eruption of 1631, is particularly abundant and helpful in order to investigate topics of remarkable interest on the eruptive history of the Neapolitan volcano. One of these topics relates to the precursory phenomena of the eruption of 1631. This problem it is of great importance for a better knowledge of the eruptive trends of the volcano since the 1631 eruption is the reference for any Civil Defence plan regarding the Vesuvius volcano. In addition, knowledge of the medieval activity of Vesuvius is important because it furnishes useful data for research into some unfamiliar aspects of the volcano's history, e.g., the existence of a 1500 eruption and consequently the duration of the inactivity period before 1631. It is generally assumed that the precursors of this eruption occurred less than one month before its beginning. In particular, the earthquakes would have come about 10 days before the eruption. Moreover a soil uplift is reported about 20 days beforehand. On the basis of a careful analysis of some important sources, books and manuscripts, we will see that the outline of the phenomena was much more complex.

  19. Method and apparatus for spraying molten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Nelson, G.L.; Lee, Y.M.

    1996-06-25

    A metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  20. The viscosity measurement of molten rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybár Pavol

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the viscosity measurtement of molten rocks. The reason of such investigation was due to the solving of SC No. 95/135/059 LITHO-JET. Technology of thermic rock melting for trenching of tenous vertical works. One task in the scope of above investigation was to experimentally verify the properties of melts of various types of works. An important moment in the trenching of tenuous vertical works by rock melting is the ability of melt to penetrate into the rock cracks. From this point of view an important physical property of molten rock is its viscosity. There are various methods how to measure viscosity but for the continuous measurements just some of them are suitable. The most suitable is rotary viscosimeter because it is simple in its construction, it allows to measure the viscosity as a function of temperature, concentration of wide class of sub stances with different rheologic properties. Hence, it allows to measure structural viscosity of the chemical reaction systems. The viscosity of molten nefelitic basanite as the function of temperature is studied in this paper. Viscosity of the nefelinitic basanite taken at locality Konrádovce was measured using rotary viscosimeter HAAKE ROTOVISKO. Eperimental conditions shown, that rising of the temperature vs. viscosity is in reverse order. Measurement is realised in scale 1370-1550°C. Under 1370°C was sample very viscous and measurement was impossible. Viscosity is the function of the temperature, pressure and gas components of rock.Though the viscosity measurements was carried out at atmospheric pressure, what does not fully conform real condition during trenching, it is still possible to express the effect of pressure. Other conditions, which take effect of viscosityof molten rocks in nature conditions will be subject of future investigation.

  1. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 4 Rationale - Advantages • Feed: Safe, transportable, alternative supplies (sulphate and chloride routes), decoupled from TiCl4... and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 1 Electrowinning Molten Titanium from Titanium Dioxide DS van...

  2. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  3. The rheological evolution of alkaline Vesuvius magmas and comparison with alkaline series from the Phlegrean Fields, Etna, Stromboli and Teide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, D.; Ardia, P.; Romano, C.; Dingwell, D. B.; Di Muro, A.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mangiacapra, A.; Hess, K.-U.

    2009-11-01

    Somma-Vesuvius is considered one of the highest-risk volcanic systems in the world due to its high population density and record of highly destructive explosive activity. Eruptive style at Vesuvius varies greatly, alternating between effusive and explosive activities, and is likely strongly controlled by the evolution of the physical and chemical properties of the magma. Nevertheless, with the exception of the 1631 eruption, the rheological properties of Vesuvius magmas remain largely unconstrained. Here, we investigate the Newtonian shear viscosity ( η) of dry and hydrous melts from the Mercato (plinian) and 1906 (violent strombolian) eruptions. These eruptions differ in size, eruptive style and magma chemistry (from phonolite to phono-tephrite). To evaluate the dry liquid viscosity variation covered by the eruptive products of the recent activity at Vesuvius, we measured the melt viscosities of bulk rock compositions and, for highly crystalline samples, of the separated groundmasses of tephras from the Pollena and 1906 eruptions. Hydrated samples with up to 4.24 wt% dissolved water were synthesised in a piston cylinder apparatus at confining pressure up to 10 kbar. The dry high temperature and the dry and hydrous low-temperature viscosities were obtained by combining the concentric cylinder and micropenetration techniques. The measured viscosities were parameterized by a modified Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation, accounting for the effect of water content, and were compared with previous measurements and models. At magmatic temperatures, the viscosities of Mercato samples are about four orders of magnitude higher than that of the least viscous investigated products from the 1906 eruption. Complex numerical models to forecast eruptive scenarios and their environmental impact are extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the input parameters and constitutive equations of magma properties. As a consequence, the numerical expressions obtained here are of particular

  4. The automated infrared thermal imaging system for the continuous long-term monitoring of the surface temperature of the Vesuvius crater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Sansivero

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared remote sensing monitoring is a significant tool aimed to integrated surveillance system of active volcanic areas. In this paper we describe the realization and the technological evolution of the permanent image thermal infrared (TIR surveillance system of the Vesuvius volcano. The TIR monitoring station was installed on the Vesuvius crater rim on July 2004 in order to acquire scenes of the SW inner slope of Vesuvius crater that is characterized by a significant thermal emission. At that time, it represented the first achievement all over the world of a permanent surveillance thermal imaging system on a volcano. It has been working in its prototypal configuration till May 2007. The experience gained over years about the engineering, management and maintenance of TIR remote acquisition systems in extreme environmental conditions, allows us to design and realize a new release of the TIR monitoring station with improved functionalities and more flexibility for the IR image acquisition, management and storage, which became operational in June 2011. In order to characterize the thermal background of the Vesuvius crater at present state of volcanic quiescence, the time series of TIR images gathered between July 2004 and May 2012 were analyzed using a statistical approach. Results show no significant changes in the thermal radiation during the observation periods, so they can be assumed as representative of a background level to which refer for the interpretation of possible future anomalies related to a renewal of the volcanic dynamics of the Vesuvius volcano.

  5. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Ravindra [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ma, Yi Hua [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Yen, Pei-Shan [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Deveau, Nicholas [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Fishtik, Ilie [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Mardilovich, Ivan [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM. The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 °C has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and

  6. Dynamics of Mount Somma-Vesuvius edifice: from stress field inversion to analogue and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteo, Ada; Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Castaldo, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Geological processes are generally very complex and too slow to be directly observed in their completeness; modelling procedures overcome this limit. The state of stress in the upper lithosphere is the main responsible for driving geodynamical processes; in order to retrieve the active stress field in a rock volume, stress inversion techniques can be applied on both seismological and structural datasets. This approach has been successfully applied to active tectonics as well as volcanic areas. In this context the best approach in managing heterogeneous datasets in volcanic environments consists in the analysis of spatial variations of the stress field by applying robust techniques of inversion. The study of volcanic seismicity is an efficient tool to retrieve spatial and temporal pattern of the pre-, syn- and inter-eruptive stress field: magma migration as well as dynamics of magma chamber and hydrothermal system are directly connected to the volcanic seismicity. Additionally, analysis of the temporal variations of stress field pattern in volcanoes could be a useful monitoring tool. Recently the stress field acting on several active volcanoes has been investigated by using stress inversion techniques on seismological datasets (Massa et al., 2016). The Bayesian Right Trihedra Method (BRTM; D'Auria and Massa, 2015) is able to successfully manage heterogeneous datasets allowing the identification of regional fields locally overcame by the stress field due to volcano specific dynamics. In particular, the analysis of seismicity and stress field inversion at the Somma-Vesuvius highlighted the presence of two superposed volumes characterized by different behaviour and stress field pattern: a top volume dominated by an extensional stress field, in accordance with a gravitational spreading-style of deformation, and a bottom volume related to a regional extensional stress field. In addition, in order to evaluate the dynamics of deformation, both analogue and numerical

  7. A Burn Injury Due To 800 Degrees Molten Aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    TUNCEL, Umut

    2010-01-01

    Molten metal burn cases are preventable injuries. The burns are common among foundry workers. Our case was reported of a foundry worker who suffered from molten metal burn injury. The patient have received a foot injury especially on his dorsolateral foot. The burn wound was second degree and has been recovered only daily wound care in 4 weeks. We suggested that the molten metal burn injury could easily have been prevented by the use of protective footwear.

  8. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  9. If You Don't Have a Good Laboratory, Find a Good Volcano: Mount Vesuvius as a Natural Chemical Laboratory in Eighteenth-Century Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Corinna

    2015-08-01

    This essay that examines the role of the volcano as a chemical site in the late eighteenth century, as the "new chemistry" spread throughout the southern Italian Kingdom of Naples, resulting in lively debates. In Naples itself, these scientific debates were not confined to academies, courts, and urban spaces. In the absence of well-equipped chemical laboratories, Neapolitan scholars also carried out research on chemistry on the slopes of Mount Vesuvius, a natural site that furnished them with all the tools and substances necessary for practising chemistry. By examining various Neapolitan publications on Vesuvius and the chemical reactions and products associated with its periodic eruptions, I argue that the volcano's presence contributed to a distinctive, local approach to chemical theory and practice. Several case studies examine the ways in which proximity to Vesuvius was exploited by Neapolitan scholars as they engaged with the new chemistry, including Giuseppe Vairo, Michele Ferrara, Francesco Semmola, and Emanuele Scotti.

  10. New magnetotelluric soundings in the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzella, A.; Volpi, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Ist. Internazionale per le Ricerche Geotermiche; Zaja, A. [Padua Univ., Padua (Italy). Dipt. di Geologia, Paleontologia e Geofisica

    2000-04-01

    The work reports the preliminary results of ten magnetotelluric (MT) soundings recorded in single-site mode above the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic area in 1997. The quality of data decreases going further from the caldera and approaching the sources of electromagnetic incoherent noise such as villages, antennas and repeaters. After a very accurate data analysis, the apparent resistivity and phase curves were interpreted with a 1D modelling instead a 2D one as it seems a more appropriate interpretative approach looking at the morphology of the curves and taking into account the 3 D geological conditions of the area. The results show an extended conductive structure at a depth of 0.3-1.2 km. It could be connected with a change in the physico-chemical characteristics of the volcano-sedimentary define the response MT curves for sites above this particular volcanic structure. This approach seems to be very interesting in view of specific interpretative targets, such as dimension and position of the magma chamber, when planning future MT surveys.

  11. Fluid inclusion studies of ejected nodules from plinian eruptions of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.

    1993-01-01

    Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (Naples, Italy) has erupted potassium-rich and silica-undersaturated products during a complicated history of plinian and non-plinian events. Coarse-grained cognate nodules are commonly found in the pyroclastics and are upper crustal in origin. We examined cumulate and subeffusive nodules from the 3800 y.B.P. Avellino. A.D. 79 Pompei, and A.D. 472 Pollena eruptions. Silicate-melt and liquid-vapor fluid inclusion studies in clinopyroxene from both types of nodules have been used to assess the fluids attending crystallization and to place constraints on the pressure and temperature of nodule formation. Thermometric and volumetric data from primary and pseudosecondary CO2-H2O and CO2 and coeval silicate-melt fluid inclusions indicate that they were trapped at a pressure of ???1 to ???2.5 kbar at ???1200??C. This suggests a crystallization depth of ???4 to ???10 km. The H2O-bearing fluid inclusions are abundant from plinian eruptions in contrast to non-plinian eruptions where H2O-bearing fluid inclusions were rare. The presence of primary H2O-CO2 fluid inclusions indicates that an immiscible, supercritical H2O-CO2 fluid was in the nodule-forming environment. The H2O-bearing fluid inclusions in plinian nodules may record a higher pre-eruptive H2O content in the bulk magma that is dramatically reflected in the eruption dynamics. ?? 1993.

  12. Petrology of parasitic and eccentric cones on the flanks and base of Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ray; Bagiński, Bogusław; Rolandi, Giuseppe; De Vivo, Benedetto; Kopczyńska, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic and eccentric cones on the flanks and at the base of Somma-Vesuvius potentially provide information on the plumbing system of the complex. We present geochemical data for minerals, glasses and rocks from the Pollena and Cercola cones. The rocks are phonotephrites and a basaltic trachyandesite. A volumetrically dominant type contains phenocrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene, leucite, plagioclase ± apatite ± Fe-Ti-oxides. A second type is phlogopite-phyric. Low magnesium-numbers (62-49) and Ni abundances (≤32 ppm) indicate that the primary magmas underwent crustal-level fractionation but the cores of olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts carry records of the parental magmas. Geochemical data indicate that the rocks form more than one magmatic lineage. Matrix glasses point to low-pressure fractionation trends towards decreasing melt silica-undersaturation. The phlogopite-phyric rocks were derived from more hydrous magmas than those lacking phlogopite phenocrysts, perhaps at higher pressures. Phenocryst assemblages are difficult to reconcile with published experimental work and it is likely that they are far from equilibrium assemblages. The cone magmas were probably derived from high levels within the main plumbing system via lateral transport.

  13. Evidence for Late Pleistocene uplift at the Somma-Vesuvius apron near Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana

    2011-05-01

    Detailed stratigraphic and micropalaeontological analyses of samples from boreholes at the Somma-Vesuvius apron, between Pompeii and the sea, allowed reconstruction of Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution of the Sarno coastal plain. In all, 116 samples were recovered from seven boreholes drilled from 2-10 m a.s.l. to 16.5-26 m b.s.l. Microfossil assemblages, with special regard to benthic foraminifers and ostracods, were used to reconstruct the depositional palaeoenvironment. Fossil remains show that all the pre-79 AD fossiliferous sediments from 2 to - 24 m a.s.l. were deposited in shallow marine waters for a long time despite an appreciable sea level rise. The data indicate alternation of both shallow marine and subaerial conditions during the last ~ 15 kyr, evidencing ground uplift of the area of about 75 m at a rate of ~ 5 mm/year. Marine sediment accumulation (~ 6 m/kyr) and tectonic uplift long offset the sea level rise, and as a consequence, submerged areas remained the same as well.

  14. Petrological and seismic precursors of the paroxysmal phase of the last Vesuvius eruption on March 1944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; D'Auria, Luca; Cavallo, Andrea; Fiore, Stefano

    2014-09-09

    Abrupt transitions in style and intensity are common during volcanic eruptions, with an immediate impact on the surrounding territory and its population. Defining the factors trigger such sudden shifts in the eruptive behavior as well as developing methods to predict such changes during volcanic crises are crucial goals in volcanology. In our research, the combined investigation of both petrological and seismic indicators has been applied for the first time to a Vesuvius eruption, that of March 1944 that caused the present dormant state of the volcano. Our results contribute to elucidate the evolution of the conduit dynamics that generated a drastic increase in the Volcanic Explosivity Index, associated to the ejection of huge amount of volcanic ash. Remarkably, our study shows that the main paroxysm was announced by robust changes in petrology consistent with seismology, thus suggesting that the development of monitoring methods to assess the nature of ejected juvenile material combined with conventional geophysical techniques can represent a powerful tool for forecasting the evolution of an eruption towards violent behavior. This in turn is a major goal in volcanology because this evidence can help decision-makers to implement an efficient safety strategy during the emergency (scale and pace of evacuation).

  15. Petrological and seismic precursors of the paroxysmal phase of the last Vesuvius eruption on March 1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; D'Auria, Luca; Cavallo, Andrea; Fiore, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Abrupt transitions in style and intensity are common during volcanic eruptions, with an immediate impact on the surrounding territory and its population. Defining the factors trigger such sudden shifts in the eruptive behavior as well as developing methods to predict such changes during volcanic crises are crucial goals in volcanology. In our research, the combined investigation of both petrological and seismic indicators has been applied for the first time to a Vesuvius eruption, that of March 1944 that caused the present dormant state of the volcano. Our results contribute to elucidate the evolution of the conduit dynamics that generated a drastic increase in the Volcanic Explosivity Index, associated to the ejection of huge amount of volcanic ash. Remarkably, our study shows that the main paroxysm was announced by robust changes in petrology consistent with seismology, thus suggesting that the development of monitoring methods to assess the nature of ejected juvenile material combined with conventional geophysical techniques can represent a powerful tool for forecasting the evolution of an eruption towards violent behavior. This in turn is a major goal in volcanology because this evidence can help decision-makers to implement an efficient safety strategy during the emergency (scale and pace of evacuation).

  16. Neural analysis of seismic data: applications to the monitoring of Mt. Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta M. Esposito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The computing techniques currently available for the seismic monitoring allow advanced analysis. However, the correct event classification remains a critical aspect for the reliability of real time automatic analysis. Among the existing methods, neural networks may be considered efficient tools for detection and discrimination, and may be integrated into intelligent systems for the automatic classification of seismic events. In this work we apply an unsupervised technique for analysis and classification of seismic signals recorded in the Mt. Vesuvius area in order to improve the automatic event detection. The examined dataset contains about 1500 records divided into four typologies of events: earthquakes, landslides, artificial explosions, and “other” (any other signals not included in the previous classes. First, the Linear Predictive Coding (LPC and a waveform parametrization have been applied to achieve a significant and compact data encoding. Then, the clustering is obtained using a Self-Organizing Map (SOM neural network which does not require an a-priori classification of the seismic signals, groups those with similar structures, providing a simple framework for understanding the relationships between them. The resulting SOM map is separated into different areas, each one containing the events of a defined type. This means that the SOM discriminates well the four classes of seismic signals. Moreover, the system will classify a new input pattern depending on its position on the SOM map. The proposed approach can be an efficient instrument for the real time automatic analysis of seismic data, especially in the case of possible volcanic unrest.

  17. Molten nitrate salt technology development status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

    1981-03-01

    Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

  18. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  19. Advancing Molten Salts and Fuels at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-26

    SNL has a combination of experimental facilities, nuclear engineering, nuclear security, severe nuclear accidents, and nuclear safeguards expertise that can enable significant progress towards molten salts and fuels for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs). The following areas and opportunities are discussed in more detail in this white paper.

  20. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  1. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith using Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Tripathy, Prabhat; Melendez, Orlando; Standish, Evan; Dominquez, Jesus A.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Poizeau, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible use of molten oxide electrolysis to extract oxygen from the Lunar Regolith. The presentation asserts that molten regolith electrolysis has advanced to be a useful method for production of oxygen and metals in situ on the Moon. The work has demonstrated an 8 hour batch of electrolysis at 5 amps using Iridium inert anodes.

  2. Conceptual design of Indian molten salt breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-28

    Aug 28, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Conceptual design of Indian molten salt breeder ... India has recently started carrying out fundamental studies so as to arrive at a conceptual design of Indian molten salt breeder reactor (IMSBR). Presently, various design options and ...

  3. Short residence times for alkaline Vesuvius magmas in a multi-depth supply system: Evidence from geochemical and textural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2010-07-01

    It is crucial to understand magma chamber chemico-physical conditions and residence times for high-risk volcanoes because these factors control the occurrence and size of future eruptions. In order to define magmatic pressure-temperature conditions and residence times at the Somma-Vesuvius volcano, we studied the geochemistry and texture of selected past eruptions that are representative of the entire volcanic history. Our petrological model indicates a multi-depth magma chamber composed of a deeper tephritic (350-400 Mpa) magma layer, which fed Strombolian and effusive eruptions during open-conduit activity, and an upper (200-250 Mpa) phonolitic level, which supplied the high explosive events that followed closed-conduit repose time. This upper reservoir matches the inferred transition between sedimentary sequences and metamorphic basement. At this level, the presence of a structural and lithological discontinuity favors magma storage during closed-conduit periods. The prevalent differentiation process was fractional crystallization during the magma cooling associated with upward migration of less dense, evolved liquids. Our results indicate that major steam exolution occurred during the late crystallization stage of phonolites, which accounts for the high Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of eruptions supplied by these melts. Moreover, our phenocryst CSD data reveal the rapid crystallization and differentiation (decades to centuries) of alkaline Somma-Vesuvius magmas. This implies that the 400 km 2 partial melting zone detected by tomography studies at 8-10 km depth beneath Vesuvius should consist of differentiated magma that is already capable of generating a large-scale (plinian) explosive event if renewed activity develops out of the present closed-conduit state. Additionally, because our microlite CSD data indicate rapid magma migration from the chamber toward the surface, precursory activity could appear only short time before a major eruption.

  4. Flood hazard of the Somma-Vesuvius region based on historical (19-20th century and geomorphological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Alessio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary susceptibility map of the flood hazard for the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic district, worked out by means of multi-disciplinary historical, geological, geomorphological and rainfall data processing. It is well known that the Somma-Vesuvius volcano, due to its explosive volcanism and the dense urbanization of the surrounding area, with a population exceeding 650,000 is one of the most dangerous active volcanoes of the world. Although this area has been extensively studied from the volcanological point of view with regards to its volcanic hazard, there are currently not many detailed studies about its flood hazard factors, despite the fact that, in the last century, many intense rainfall events in this area have produced several floods that invaded the surrounding plains affecting towns and roads, and causing much damages and loss of lives. Accordingly, in this paper high-resolution DEM (5×5 m pixel and detailed geomorphological maps of the whole area have been analyzed and processed in GIS environment, carrying out a comparative study of the present-day morphology and the morphology of the 1900’s volcanic edifice, including changes of infrastructures and buildings throughout the last century. These results, together with historical chronicles data and the rainfall accurate data for all flood events, have been processed in this paper for highlighting the drainage basins areas of Somma-Vesuvius where the flood phenomena could be more probable in the future, working out a preliminary zoning map, also suggesting in which sectors interventions useful for mitigation of flood risk should be implemented.

  5. Transient simulation of molten salt central receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupis, Dimitri; Wang, Chuan; Carcorze-Soto, Jorge; Chen, Yen-Ming; Maggi, Andrea; Losito, Matteo; Clark, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Alstom is developing concentrated solar power (CSP) utilizing 60/40wt% NaNO3-KNO3 molten salt as the working fluid in a tower receiver for the global renewable energy market. In the CSP power generation cycle, receivers undergo a daily cyclic operation due to the transient nature of solar energy. Development of robust and efficient start-up and shut-down procedures is critical to avoiding component failures due to mechanical fatigue resulting from thermal transients, thus maintaining the performance and availability of the CSP plant. The Molten Salt Central Receiver (MSCR) is subject to thermal transients during normal daily operation, a cycle that includes warmup, filling, operation, draining, and shutdown. This paper describes a study to leverage dynamic simulation and finite element analysis (FEA) in development of start-up, shutdown, and transient operation concepts for the MSCR. The results of the FEA also verify the robustness of the MSCR design to the thermal transients anticipated during the operation of the plant.

  6. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-01

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute-solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute-solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  7. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute-solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute-solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  8. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  9. New magnetotelluric soundings in the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaja

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available During 1997 ten magnetotelluric (MT soundings were recorded in single-site mode above the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic area. A first campaign of MT measurements was carried out, during spring, by the researchers of the University of Padua with their MSPM acquisition system. During autumn, the researchers of the International Institute of Geothermal Research (CNR Pisa with their Phoenix equipment performed a second campaign. A teach site, the horizontal components of the electrical and magnetic fields were recorded in the frequency band between 300-0.003 Hz. The MSPM system could record signals up to the frequency of 800 Hz. Data were recorded at one common site with both the different equipments to verify the compatibility of the two different acquisition systems. The soundings over the area of the volcano's caldera show a continuous morphology of the apparent resistivity and phase curves with small error bars: it means a good correlation between the orthogonal electrical and magnetic fields. The quality of data decreases going further from the caldera and approaching the sources of electromagnetic incoherent noise such as villages, antennas and repeaters. After a very accurate data analysis, the apparent resistivity and phase curves were interpreted with a 1D modelling instead a 2D one as it seems a more appropriate interpretative approach looking at the morphology of the curves and taking into account the 3D geological conditions of the area. The results show an extended conductive structure at a depth of 0.3-1.2 km. It could be connected with a change in the physico-chemical characteristics of the volcano-sedimentary cover (alteration paragenesis and possible hydrothermalism. A 3D MT forward modelling was then used to define the response MT curves for sites above this particular volcanic structure. This approach seems to be very interesting in view of specific interpretative targets, such as dimension and position of the magma chamber, when

  10. Vesuvianite from the Somma-Vesuvius Complex: New Data and Revised Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras L. Panikorovskii

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, the vesuvianite group of minerals consists of eight members, six of which are distinguished by the dominant cation in the Y1(A,B five-coordinated site. We investigated two vesuvianite samples from the type locality by electron microprobe analysis, Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy, TGA/DSC, MAS NMR, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of these samples (# 27844 and 51062 from the Vesuvius collection, Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Moscow have been refined to R1 = 0.027 and R1 = 0.035, respectively. Both samples have the space group P4/nnc; a = 15.5720(3 and 15.5459(3, c = 11.8158(5 and 11.7988(4, respectively. In both samples low-occupied T1 and T2 sites are populated by minor B and Al, which agrees with their high-temperature origin. According to our experimental results, the general revised crystal-chemical formula of vesuvianite can be written as VII−IXX19VY1VIY12(Z2O74(ZO410(W10, where X are seven- to nine-coordinated sites of Ca with minor Na, K, Fe2+ and REE impurities; VY has a square pyramidal coordination and is occupied predominantly by Fe3+ with subordinate Mg, Al, Fe2+ and Cu2+; VIY has octahedral coordination and is predominantly occupied by Al with subordinate Mg, Fe2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, Mn3+, Ti, Cr and Zn; ZO4 = SiO4, sometimes with subordinate AlO4 and/or (OH4, and W = OH, F, with minor O and Cl. The idealized charge-balanced formula of the vesuvianite end-member without subordinate cations is Ca19Fe3+(Al10Me2+2(Si2O74(SiO410O(OH9, where Ме = Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+.

  11. Landslide and alluvial hazard high-resolution mapping of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano by means of DTM, remote sensing, geophysical and geomorphological data GIS-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alessio, G.; De Falco, M.; Di Crescenzo, G.; Nappi, R.; Santo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to recognize and map the Somma-Vesuvius volcano landslide-prone areas by means of multi-disciplinary terrain analysis and classification; in detail, high-resolution DTM of landslides areas occurred over long time periods, remote sensing, and geophysical and geomorphological data are presented for assessing hydrogeological hazard parameters of this volcanic district.

  12. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: Anas@uniten.edu.my [Centre of Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector [School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering (MACE), University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  13. Dynamic modeling of molten salt power towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Högemann, Daniel; Hackmann, Jonas; Uhlig, Ralf; Schwarzbözl, Peter; Augsburger, Germain; Clark, Michael

    2017-06-01

    A detailed understanding of the transient behavior of a receiver using molten salt as heat transfer fluid is of great importance for an efficient and safe operation. To analyze the transient operation a dynamic model for the flow in the receiver is currently under development, which will be capable to analyze the one-phase flow during normal operation and the two-phase flow during filling and draining. The model can be coupled to raytracing simulation in order to use a realistic flux density distribution as input for the model. In the paper the modelling approach for the receiver model is described shortly and validation results are discussed. This includes a detailed discussion of the heat transfer during the filling procedure, where an interesting phenomenon was discovered. Finally, the results for a parameter variation of the filling procedure and the simulation results for the impact of certain cloud events on the operation of the receiver are presented.

  14. Electrocrystallisation of tantalum in molten fluoride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)]. E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Palau, P. [Pechiney CRV-UR GP, Parc Economique Centr' Alp, BP27, 38340 Voreppe (France); Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2005-09-20

    The electrochemical nucleation of tantalum in molten alkaline fluoride media is investigated using chronoamperometry in the 670-750 deg C temperature range to optimize the operating conditions for preparing tantalum coatings for anode materials. Chronoamperometric results show that the electrodeposition process involves progressive nucleation with diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the temperature and the overpotential on the nucleation site densities is considered. Once the deposit has been obtained, plotting the roughness of the tantalum coatings as a function of the current densities reveals a minimum at about 80 mA/cm{sup 2}. This minimum is considered by the authors as a consequence of the progressive nucleation.

  15. Hydrogen production from molten metal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eatwell-Hall, R.E.A.; Sharifi, V.N.; Swithenbank, J. [Energy and Environmental Engineering Research Group (EEERG), Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    As fossil fuel reserves are depleted, more innovative technologies are needed to facilitate fuel production, such as molten media gasification. This technique uses a liquid metal bath in a two-stage process: Stage 1) superheated steam is injected into the melt, with metal oxides formed, and H{sub 2} released; Stage 2) carbon is injected, the oxide is reduced, and CO and CO{sub 2} are released. The main study objective was to develop and test the first stage of this process. The results showed that hydrogen production peaked 100 s into the test, and then levelled off, with a maximum output of 13.6% hydrogen. XRD analysis of the metal samples showed that no tin oxides or magnetite were formed during the process, only a form of wustite (FeO). The syngas produced was very clean, and would need little gas cleaning for use as a feedstock in industrial processes or fuel cells. (author)

  16. Carbonate-derived CO 2 purging magma at depth: Influence on the eruptive activity of Somma-Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, Luigi; Cioni, Raffaello; Boschi, Chiara; D'Oriano, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    Mafic phenocrysts from selected products of the last 4 ka volcanic activity at Mt. Vesuvius were investigated for their chemical and O-isotope composition, as a proxy for primary magmas feeding the system. 18O/ 16O ratios of studied Mg-rich olivines suggest that near-primary shoshonitic to tephritic melts experienced a flux of sedimentary carbonate-derived CO 2, representing the early process of magma contamination in the roots of the volcanic structure. Bulk carbonate assimilation (physical digestion) mainly occurred in the shallow crust, strongly influencing magma chamber evolution. On a petrological and geochemical basis the effects of bulk sedimentary carbonate digestion on the chemical composition of the near-primary melts are resolved from those of carbonate-released CO 2 fluxed into magma. An important outcome of this process lies in the effect of external CO 2 in changing the overall volatile solubility of the magma, enhancing the ability of Vesuvius mafic magmas to rapidly rise and explosively erupt at the surface.

  17. Spatial and temporal distribution of vertical ground movements at Mt. Vesuvius in the period 1973-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folco Pingue

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the early ’70s vertical ground movements at Mount Vesuvius area have been investigated and monitored by the Osservatorio Vesuviano (Isti-tuto Nazionale di Geofisica Vulcanologia - Osservatorio Vesuviano since 2001. This monitoring began with the installation of a high-precision leveling line in the region at medium-high elevations on the volcano. The deformation pattern and expected strain field assessment methods in the volcanic structure induced by inner sources has demanded in subsequent years the expansion of the leveling network up to cover the whole volcanic area, enclosing part of leveling lines of other institutions. As a result of this expansion, the Mt. Vesuvius Area Leveling Network (VALN has today reached a length of about 270 km and consists of 359 benchmarks. It is configured in 21 circuits and is connected, westward, to the Campi Flegrei leveling network and, northward, to the Campania Plain leveling network. The data collected have been carefully re-analyzed for random and systematic errors and for error propagation along the leveling lines to identify the areas affected by significant ground movements. For each survey, the data were rigorously adjusted and vertical ground movements were evaluated by differentiating the heights calculated by the various measurements conducted by the Osservatorio Vesuviano from 1973 to 2009.

  18. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  19. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  20. Trioctahedral micas in xenolithic ejecta from recent volcanism of the Somma-Vesuvius (Italy): Crystal chemistry and genetic inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balassone, Giuseppina; Scordari, Fernando; Lacalamita, Maria; Schingaro, Emanuela; Mormone, Angela; Piochi, Monica; Petti, Carmela; Mondillo, Nicola

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the first crystal chemical database resulting from a detailed structural investigation of trioctahedral micas found in xenolithic ejecta produced during the AD 1631, 1872 and 1944 eruptions, three explosive episodes of recent volcanic period of Vesuvius volcano (Southern Italy). Three xenolith types were selected: metamorphic/metasomatic skarns, pyrometamorphic/hydrothermally altered nodules and mafic cumulates. They are related to different magma chemistry and effusive styles: from sub-plinian and most evolved (AD 1631 eruption) to violent strombolian with medium evolution degree (AD 1872 eruption) to vulcanian-effusive, least evolved (AD 1944 eruption) event, respectively. Both xenoliths and micas were investigated employing multiple techniques: the xenoliths were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and quantitative energy-dispersive microanalysis; the micas were studied by electron probe microanalysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The mica-bearing xenoliths show variable texture and mineralogical assemblage, clearly related to their different origin. Based on the major oxide chemistry, only one xenolithic sample falls in the skarn compositional field from the Somma-Vesuvius literature, some fall close to the skarns and cumulate fields, others plot close to the syenite/foidolite/essexite field. A subgroup of the selected ejecta does not fall or approach any of the compositional fields. Trace and rare earth element patterns show some petrological affinity between studied xenoliths and erupted magmas with typical Eu, Ta and Nb negative anomalies. Strongly depleted patterns were detected for the 1631 metamorphic/metasomatic skarns xenoliths. Three distinct mica groups were distinguished: 1) Mg-, Al-rich, low Ti-bearing, low to moderate F-bearing varieties (1631 xenolith), 2) Al-moderate, F- and Mg-rich, Ti-, Fe-poor varieties (1872 xenolith), and 3

  1. Apparatus and method for stripping tritium from molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E.; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-02-07

    A method of stripping tritium from flowing stream of molten salt includes providing a tritium-separating membrane structure having a porous support, a nanoporous structural metal-ion diffusion barrier layer, and a gas-tight, nonporous palladium-bearing separative layer, directing the flowing stream of molten salt into contact with the palladium-bearing layer so that tritium contained within the molten salt is transported through the tritium-separating membrane structure, and contacting a sweep gas with the porous support for collecting the tritium.

  2. High Surface Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith...

  3. Advanced Instrumentation for Molten Salt Flow Measurements at NEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyishimire, Olive

    2017-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy eXperiment Testing (NEXT) Lab at Abilene Christian University is building a Molten Salt Loop to help advance the technology of molten salt reactors (MSR). NEXT Lab's aim is to be part of the solution for the world's top challenges by providing safe, clean, and inexpensive energy, clean water and medical Isotopes. Measuring the flow rate of the molten salt in the loop is essential to the operation of a MSR. Unfortunately, there is no flow meter that can operate in the high temperature and corrosive environment of a molten salt. The ultrasonic transit time method is proposed as one way to measure the flow rate of high temperature fluids. Ultrasonic flow meter uses transducers that send and receive acoustic waves and convert them into electrical signals. Initial work presented here focuses on the setup of ultrasonic transducers. This presentation is the characterization of the pipe-fluid system with water as a baseline for future work.

  4. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingyou; Xu, Hanbing; Meek, Thomas T.

    2010-03-23

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  5. Dynamics and control of molten-salt breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing, Vikram; Lish, Matthew R.; Chvala, Ondrej; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Preliminary results of the dynamic analysis of a two-fluid molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR) system are presented. Based on an earlier work on the preliminary dynamic model of the concept, the model presented here is nonlinear and has been revised to accurately reflect the design exemplified in ORNL-4528. A brief overview of the model followed by results from simulations performed to validate the model is presented. Simulations illustrate stable behavior of the reactor dynamics and temperature feedback effects to reactivity excursions. Stable and smooth changes at various nodal temperatures are also observed. Control strategies for molten-salt reactor operation are discussed, followed by an illustration of the open-loop load-following capability of the molten-salt breeder reactor system. It is observed that the molten-salt breeder reactor system exhibits “self-regulating” behavior, minimizing the need for external controller action for load-following maneuvers.

  6. Large Scale Inert Anode for Molten Oxide Electrolysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Molten oxide electrolysis is a demonstrated laboratory-scale process for producing oxygen from the JSC-1a lunar simulant; however, critical subsystems necessary for...

  7. The Twentieth International Symposium on Molten Salts and Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Heterocyclic Carbene Involved?" by Hyung Kim "Carbon Dioxide Absorption Behavior and Cabronate Ion Transport of Lithium Orthosilicate/Molten Carbonate...Electrodeposition of Metals" by Remana Reddy "In Situ TEM Observations of Lithium Electrodeposition/Stripping Process in Ionic Liquid" by Tetsuya Tsuda "Green... America . iii Preface The 20th International Symposium on Molten Salts and Ionic Liquids Symposium was held on October 2 - 7, 2016, in Honolulu, Hawaii as

  8. 2D seismic tomography of Somma- Vesuvius. Description of the experiment and preliminary results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Milano

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary project for the investigation of Mt. Vesuvius Structure was started in 1993. The core of the project is represented by a high resolution seismic tomography study by using controlled and natura1 sources. The main research objective is to investigate the feeding system of the vo1cano and to retrieve details of the upper crustal structure in the area. A first 2D using seismic experiment was performed in May 1994, with the aim of studing the feasibility of lIsing tomographic techniques for exploring the vo1cano interiors. Particularly, this experiment was designed to obtain information on the optimal sources-receivers configuration and on the depth extension of the volume sampled by shot-generated seismic waves. 66 three-component seismic stations and 16 single-component analogue instruments were installed by several Italian and French groups to record signals generated by three on-land, underground explosions. Sources and geophones were deployed along a 30-km NW-SE profile passing through the volcano crater. Receivers were placed at an average spacing of 250 m in the middle of the recording line and at 500 m outside. The arrival time data base was complemented by first P and S readings of micro earthquakes which occurred in the recent past within the volcano. The first arrival data set was preliminary used to determine the shallow structure of the volcano by applying Thurber's (1983 tomographic inversion technique. This analysis shows evidence for a high-velocity body which extends vertically from about 400 m below the crater down to at least 3000 m and for a shallow 300-500 m thick low-velocity cover which borders the edifice. Data from the distant shot show evidence for arrivals of deep reflected/converted phases and provide information on the deeper structure under the volcano. The results from the interpretation of 2D data are used for planning a 3D tomographic survey which will be cauied out in 1996.

  9. Rheological control on the AD 472 Pollena eruption dynamics (Somma-Vesuvius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, Alessandro; Romano, Claudia; Giordano, Guido; Sulpizio, Roberto; Campagnola, Silvia; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The 472 AD Pollena sub-Plinian eruption of Vesuvius was characterized by three main eruptive phases. Pulsatory eruptive dynamics were driven by magmatic fragmentation of a phonolitic (L1) to tephri-phonolitic magma (L8) during Phases I and II, whereas phreatomagmatic fragmentation dominated Phase III. In order to investigate magma dynamics, we integrated field data on the physical properties (column height, mass discharge rate) with a detailed chemico-textural analysis of the fall-out products (L1-L8), and with laboratory measurements of the phonolite (L1) and tephriphonolite (L8) multiphase rheology. The fall deposits mainly consist of crystal-bearing pumice (L1) or scoria (L2 to L8) lapilli. Gaussian Vesicle Volume Distributions (VVDs) indicate a single and rapid event of bubble nucleation and growth (Vesicle Number Density, VND = 107-109 cm-3). Cristallinity is constituted by dominant leucite and clinopyroxene and increases with stratigraphic height. The amount of H2O initially dissolved in the magma (1.7-3.6 wt% by Raman spectroscopy on Cpx-hosted melt inclusions) decreases from L1 to L8 layer. Anhydrous melt viscosity of the two end-member compositions was measured at high T (1000° C < T < 1500 ° C) and low T (680 ° C < T < 760 ° C) by concentric cylinder and micropenetration viscometry. Despite their chemical difference the non-Arrhenian behaviour of the viscosity-temperature curves yields very similar values at the inferred eruptive temperature (T =850° C). Liquid+crystals rheology of tephriphonolites (L8) was determined by isothermal (T= 1150 - 1190 ° C) crystallization experiments in a concentric cylinder set-up. The measured effect of crystals is in good agreement with literature models and the results can be extended to estimate natural magma rheology. During the first part of the eruption (L1 - L3), despite a decrease in H2O, the column height increases from 12 to 17 km, possibly related to a change of conduit/vent geometry. The following phases

  10. Isotopic composition of Pb and Th in interplinian volcanics from Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, M.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Holden, P.; Somma, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed isotopic study of volcanic rocks emitted from Somma-Vesuvius volcano during three periods of interplinian activity: "Protohistoric" (3550 y B.P. to 79 A.D.), "Ancient Historic" (79 to 472 A.D.) and "Medieval" (472 to 1631 A.D.). Pb isotopic compositions of two acid leached fractions and whole rock residues of 37 whole rock samples (determined by Somma et al., 2001) show that each of the three interplinian periods is distinguished by small, systematic, and unique uranogenic and thorogenic Pb isotopic trends. This key and novel feature is compatible with the notion that the Pb isotopic data reflect small-scale source heterogeneity operating over relatively short periods of time. From this representative group of samples, a selected set of nine whole rocks were analysed for Th isotopes. 232Th/238U ratios in the source can be obtained independently from Pb and from Th isotopes. Those obtained from Pb isotopes represent source ratios, time-integrated over the whole age of the Earth; they range from 3.9 to 4.1. 232Th/238U obtained from Th isotopes are those of the present source. They are lower, and cluster around 3.5; this difference probably indicates recent U enrichment of the present source. The behaviour of Pb, as inferred by its isotopic ratios, is quite distinct from that of Sr and Nd isotopes: Pb isotope variations are not correlated to Sr or Nd isotope variations. The isotopic contrast is compatible with the idea that the isotopes were decoupled during magmatic production, evolution, and ascent through the crust. Thus, the Pb isotopes do not reflect the effects of the same processes as in the case of the Sr and Nd isotopes, or, as we also favor, they do not necessarily reflect the same source contributions into the magmas. Moreover, the Pb isotopic evolution of the interplinian rocks chiefly reflects mixing, driven by processes that are superimposed on, and independent of, other source contributions that determine the isotopic compositions

  11. Textural and geochemical constraints on eruptive style of the 79AD eruption at Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Villemant, Benoît.

    2010-05-01

    The 79AD eruption of Vesuvius, also known as the "Pompeii eruption", is the reference for one of the explosive eruptive styles, the plinian-type eruption. The eruption involved H2O-rich phonolitic magmas and is commonly divided into three phases: an initial phreatomagmatic phase, followed by a plinian event which produced a thick pumice fallout deposit and a final phase that was dominated by numerous column-collapse events. During the plinian phase, a first white pumice fallout was produced from a high steady eruptive column, followed by a grey pumice fallout originated by an oscillatory eruptive column with several partial column collapse events. This study focuses on the pumice fallout deposits, sampled in a proximal thick section, at the Terzigno quarry, 6 km southeast of the present crater. In order to constrain the degassing processes and the eruptive dynamics, major element compositions, residual volatile contents (H2O, Cl) and textural characteristics (vesicularity and microcrystallinity) were studied. A previous study that we performed on the pre-eruptive Cl content has shown that Cl may be used as an indicator of magma saturation with Cl-rich fluids and of pre-eruptive pressures. Cl contents measured in melt inclusions show that only the white pumice and the upper part of the grey pumice magma were H2O saturated prior eruption. Large variations in residual volatile contents exist between the different eruptive units and textural features strongly differ between white and grey pumice clasts but also within the grey pumice clasts. The degassing processes were thus highly heterogeneous: the white pumice eruptive units represent a typical closed-system degassing evolution whereas the first grey pumice one, stored in the same pre-eruptive saturation conditions, follows a particular open-system degassing evolution. Here we propose a new model of the 79AD eruption where pre-eruptive conditions (H2O saturation, magma temperature and viscosity) are the critical

  12. Hydrogen permeation through Flinabe fluoride molten salts for blanket candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiumi, Ryosuke, E-mail: r.nishiumi@aees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fukada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Akira; Katayama, Kazunari

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2} diffusivity, solubility and permeability in Flinabe as T breeder are determined. • Effects in composition differences among Flibe, Fnabe and Flinabe are compared. • Changes of pressure dependence of Flinabe permeation rate are clarified. - Abstract: Fluoride molten salt Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for the liquid blanket of a nuclear fusion reactor, because of its large advantages of tritium breeding ratio and heat-transfer fluid. Since its melting point is higher than other liquid candidates, another new fluoride molten salt Flinabe (LiF + NaF + BeF{sub 2}) is recently focused on because of its lower melting point while holding proper breeding properties. In this experiment, hydrogen permeation behavior through the three molten salts of Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}), Fnabe (NaF + BeF{sub 2}) and Flinabe are investigated in order to clarify the effects of their compositions on hydrogen transfer properties. After making up any of the three molten salts and purifying it using HF, hydrogen permeability, diffusivity and solubility of the molten salts are determined experimentally by using a system composed of tertiary cylindrical tubes. Close agreement is obtained between experimental data and analytical solutions. H{sub 2} permeability, diffusivity and solubility are correlated as a function of temperature and are compared among the three molten salts.

  13. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  14. Investigation of C-O-H-S fluids directly exsolved from melts associated with the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. E.; Esposito, R.; Lamadrid, H. M.; Redi, D.; Steele-MacInnis, M. J.; Bodnar, R. J.; De Vivo, B.; Cannatelli, C.; Lima, A.

    2016-12-01

    Undegassed deep melts can be trapped as melt inclusions (MI) hosted in phenocrysts growing in magma reservoirs. The host crystal acts as a pressure capsule, ideally preventing the melt from degassing. Sometimes, MI often contain a vapor bubble when observed at ambient conditions. Bubble-bearing MI represent a natural sample with which to investigate magmatic fluids that directly exsolve from a silicate melt. Some recent studies reported that most of the CO2 in bubble-bearing MI hosted in mafic minerals is stored in the vapor bubble. However, despite the detection of CO2 in bubbles, the expected accompanying H2O has not been found in mafic MI hosted in olivine. In this presentation, we describe the discovery of H2O in MI hosted in olivine associated with the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (Italy) magmas. We reheated crystallized (or partially crystallized) olivine-hosted MI from various eruptions at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius. We quenched bubble-bearing MI from high T (1143-1238°C) to produce a bubble-bearing glass at room T. Using Raman spectroscopy, we detected liquid H2O at room T, vapor H2O at 150°C in the vapor bubbles of reheated MI, and native S and gypsum, in addition to CO2. In most MI, the H2O is hosted in sub-micron scale hydrous phases at the interface between the bubble and the glass and would not be detected during routine analysis. During MI heating experiments, the H2O is redissolved into the melt and then exsolves from the melt into the vapor bubble, where it remains after quenching, at least on the relatively short time scales of our observations. Our results suggest that a significant amount of H2O may be stored in vapor bubbles of bubble-bearing MI, especially for MI with (1) relatively low H2O content in the originally trapped melt, (2) relatively high proportion of H2O in the exsolved fluid, (3) relatively large volume % vapor bubble. In addition, we calculated that the composition of magmatic fluids directly exsolving from mafic melts associated with Mt. Somma-Vesuvius

  15. Next-Generation Electrochemical Energy Materials for Intermediate Temperature Molten Oxide Fuel Cells and Ion Transport Molten Oxide Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Valery V

    2017-02-21

    High temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and oxygen separators based on ceramic materials are used for efficient energy conversion. These devices generally operate in the temperature range of 800-1000 °C. The high operating temperatures lead to accelerated degradation of the SOFC and oxygen separator materials. To solve this problem, the operating temperatures of these electrochemical devices must be lowered. However, lowering the temperature is accompanied by decreasing the ionic conductivity of fuel cell electrolyte and oxygen separator membrane. Therefore, there is a need to search for alternative electrolyte and membrane materials that have high ionic conductivity at lower temperatures. A great many opportunities exist for molten oxides as electrochemical energy materials. Because of their unique electrochemical properties, the molten oxide innovations can offer significant benefits for improving energy efficiency. In particular, the newly developed electrochemical molten oxide materials show high ionic conductivities at intermediate temperatures (600-800 °C) and could be used in molten oxide fuel cells (MOFCs) and molten oxide membranes (MOMs). The molten oxide materials containing both solid grains and liquid channels at the grain boundaries have advantages compared to the ceramic materials. For example, the molten oxide materials are ductile, which solves a problem of thermal incompatibility (difference in coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE). Besides, the outstanding oxygen selectivity of MOM materials allows us to separate ultrahigh purity oxygen from air. For their part, the MOFC electrolytes show the highest ionic conductivity at intermediate temperatures. To evaluate the potential of molten oxide materials for technological applications, the relationship between the microstructure of these materials and their transport and mechanical properties must be revealed. This Account summarizes the latest results on

  16. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  17. Remote monitoring of molten radioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Li, Kang-Wen K. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Schneider, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1991-12-31

    An on-line method is described for the near-continuous monitoring of the composition of a molten radioactive waste glass or, alternatively, for signaling a deviation from the target composition of a waste glass. The principle of this method, proposed by A. Schneider in 1986, is founded on the relation between two specific physical properties and composition in a ternary system. Most glasses currently considered as waste forms can be represented as pseudo-ternary system. The pairs of properties especially suited for this purpose are viscosity/density and viscosity/electrical conductivity. A novel viscometry method was developed which uses the remotely determined rise velocity of carefully metered gas bubbles. The monitoring method was tested successfully with simulated Savannah River waste glasses. An integrated probe was conceived for a Joule-heated melter for the on-line determination of viscosity, temperature, density, and liquid level. A computer program calculates the glass composition from the measured data, using information from a previously developed data base.

  18. Molten Salt Breeder Reactor Analysis Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinsu; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Utilizing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle shows considerable potential for the possibility of MSR. The concept of MSBR should be revised because of molten salt reactor's advantage such as outstanding neutron economy, possibility of continuous online reprocessing and refueling, a high level of inherent safety, and economic benefit by keeping off the fuel fabrication process. For the development of MSR research, this paper provides the MSBR single-cell, two-cell and whole core model for computer code input, and several calculation results including depletion calculation of each models. The calculations are carried out by using MCNP6, a Monte Carlo computer code, which has CINDER90 for depletion calculation using ENDF-VII nuclear data. From the calculation results of various reactor design parameters, the temperature coefficients are all negative at the initial state and MTC becomes positive at the equilibrium state. From the results of core rod worth, the graphite control rod alone cannot makes the core subcritical at initial state. But the equilibrium state, the core can be made subcritical state only by graphite control rods. Through the comparison of the results of each models, the two-cell method can represent the MSBR core model more accurately with a little more computational resources than the single-cell method. Many of the thermal spectrum MSR have adopted a multi-region single-fluid strategy.

  19. Nephelines from the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Southern Italy): crystal-chemical, structural and genetic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balassone, Giuseppina; Kahlenberg, Volker; Altomare, Angela; Mormone, Angela; Rizzi, Rosanna; Saviano, Michele; Mondillo, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Sixteen nephelines from different geological occurrences were sampled at the type-locality, the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (southern Italy), and investigated for their chemistry and crystal structure obtained by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Nepheline-bearing samples are metamorphic or from magmatic ejecta and pumice deposits. The lower K contents characterize the pumice- and some metamorphic-derived nephelines, whereas the higher ones are found in some samples from magmatic nodules. The amount of the anorthite molecule, quite low on average, can be more variable in the metamorphic nephelines. The crystal-structure investigations on Somma-Vesuvius samples compare well with previous studies of natural nephelines. All 16 nepheline samples adopt space group P63. The observed lattice parameters vary between 9.9768-9.9946 Å (for a) and 8.3614-8.3777 Å (for c), respectively. Furthermore, chemical analysis revealed that all specimens exhibit an excess of Si relative the ideal Si:Al ratio of 1:1. The analysis of the T-O distances in our samples clearly indicates a distinct ordering process of aluminium and silicon on the tetrahedral sites which is an agreement with Loewenstein's rule. A linear correlation between the distance of symmetry equivalent split atoms O(1)-O(1)' and the T(1)-O(1)- T(2) tilt angle was observed. The average ( B = Na) distances of all crystals are very similar which is consistent with the outcome of the site population refinement indicating full occupancy with sodium. Oriented precession-type sections of reciprocal space indicated the presence of at least the most intense family of satellite peaks, demonstrating that this group of satellite reflections can occur not only in nephelines from pegmatites and ijolites but also in rocks from completely different petrological settings.

  20. Understanding Vesuvius magmatic processes: Evidence from primitive silicate-melt inclusions in medieval scoria clinopyroxenes (Terzigno formation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A.; Belkin, H.E.; Torok, K.

    1999-01-01

    Microthermometric investigations of silicate-melt inclusions and electron microprobe analyses were conducted on experimentally homogenized silicate-melt inclusions and on the host clinopyroxenes from 4 scoria samples of different layers from the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius medieval eruption (Formazione di Terzigno, 893 A.D.). The temperature of homogenization, considered the minimum trapping temperature, ranges from 1190 to 1260??5 ??C for all clinopyroxene-hosted silicate melt inclusions. The major and minor-element compositional trends shown by Terzigno scoria and matrix glass chemical analysis are largely compatible with fractional crystallization of clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides. Sulfur contents of the homogenized silicate-melt inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts compared with that in the host scoria show that S has been significantly degassed in the erupted products; whereas, Cl has about the same abundance in the inclusions and in host scoria. Fluorine is low (infrequently up to 800 ppm) in the silicate-melt inclusions compared to 2400 ppm in the bulk scoria. Electron microprobe analyses of silicate-melt inclusions show that they have primitive magma compositions (Mg# = 75-91). The composition of the host clinopyroxene phenocrysts varies from typical plinian-related (Mg#???85) to non-plinian related (Mg#???85). The mixed source of the host clinopyroxenes and primitive nature of the silicate-melt inclusions implies that these phenocrysts, in part, may be residual and/or have a polygenetic origin. The similar variation trends of major and minor-elements between homogenized silicate-melt inclusions from the Terzigno scoria, and silicate-melt inclusions in olivine and diopside phenocrysts from plinian eruptions (Marianelli et al., 1995) suggest that the trapped inclusions represent melts similar to those that supplied the plinian and sub-plinian magma chambers. These geochemical characteristics suggest that the Vesuvius magmatic system retained a vestige of the most

  1. Suitability of energy cone for probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment: validation tests at Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierz, Pablo; Sandri, Laura; Costa, Antonio; Zaccarelli, Lucia; Di Vito, Mauro Antonio; Sulpizio, Roberto; Marzocchi, Warner

    2016-11-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are gravity-driven hot mixtures of gas and volcanic particles which can propagate at high speed and cover distances up to several tens of kilometers around a given volcano. Therefore, they pose a severe hazard to the surroundings of explosive volcanoes able to produce such phenomena. Despite this threat, probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA) of PDCs is still in an early stage of development. PVHA is rooted in the quantification of the large uncertainties (aleatory and epistemic) which characterize volcanic hazard analyses. This quantification typically requires a big dataset of hazard footprints obtained from numerical simulations of the physical process. For PDCs, numerical models range from very sophisticated (not useful for PVHA because of their very long runtimes) to very simple models (criticized because of their highly simplified physics). We present here a systematic and robust validation testing of a simple PDC model, the energy cone (EC), to unravel whether it can be applied to PVHA of PDCs. Using past PDC deposits at Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei (Italy), we assess the ability of EC to capture the values and variability in some relevant variables for hazard assessment, i.e., area of PDC invasion and maximum runout. In terms of area of invasion, the highest Jaccard coefficients range from 0.33 to 0.86 which indicates an equal or better performance compared to other volcanic mass-flow models. The p values for the observed maximum runouts vary from 0.003 to 0.44. Finally, the frequencies of PDC arrival computed from the EC are similar to those determined from the spatial distribution of past PDC deposits, with high PDC-arrival frequencies over an ˜8-km radius from the crater area at Somma-Vesuvius and around the Astroni crater at Campi Flegrei. The insights derived from our validation tests seem to indicate that the EC is a suitable candidate to compute PVHA of PDCs.

  2. Supported Molten Metal Catalysis. A New Class of Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindra Datta; Ajeet Singh; Manuela Serban; Istvan Halasz

    2006-06-02

    We describe a new class of heterogeneous catalysts called supported molten metal catalysis (SMMC), in which molten metal catalysts are dispersed as nanodroplets on the surface of porous supports, allowing much larger active surface area than is possible in conventional contacting techniques for catalytic metals that are molten under reaction conditions, thus greatly enhancing their activity and potential utility. Specific examples of different types of reactions are provided to demonstrate the broad applicability of the technique in designing active, selective, and stable new catalysts. It is shown that dispersing the molten metal on a support in the suggested manner can enhance the rate of a reaction by three to four orders of magnitude as a result of the concomitant increase in the active surface area. New reaction examples include {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported molten Te (melting point 450 C) and Ga (MP 30 C) catalysts for bifunctional methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation. These catalysts provide activity similar to conventional Pt-based catalysts for this with better resistance to coking. In addition, results are described for a controlled pore glass supported molten In (MP 157 C) catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ethanol in the presence of water, demonstrating activities superior to conventional catalysts for this reaction. A discussion is also provided on the characterization of the active surface area and dispersion of these novel supported catalysts. It is clear based on the results described that the development of new active and selective supported molten metal catalysts for practical applications is entirely plausible.

  3. The stratigraphic sequence of Scafati (Italy) - An archive of 10,000 years of volcanism, soil formation and land use in the shade of Mount Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerker, Michael; Vogel, Sebastian; Hoelzmann, Phillip; Rellini, Ivano

    2014-05-01

    In this study we carried out a detailed lithostratigraphic, pedological and micromorphological analysis at a stratigraphic sequence close to Scafati, about 3 km east of ancient Pompeii. It consists of a multilayered succession of repeated volcanic deposition and pedogenesis caused by several phases of volcanic activity of Somma-Vesuvius and volcanic quiescence. This comprises, at least, the last 10,000 years of sedimentation history, on one hand, reflecting the entire spectrum of eruption types of Somma-Vesuvius from Plinian, sub-Plinian, rather small eruptions to effusive volcanic events and, on the other hand, soil formations of different durations, intensities and soil-forming environments. Furthermore, the paleosols repeatedly reveal clear evidence of anthropogenic activity by means of agriculture. Hence, a landscape evolution model was developed trying to reconstruct the last 10,000 years of volcanic activity, soil formation and land use in the hinterland of Pompeii.

  4. LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

    2008-12-11

    The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

  5. Volcanic risk perception of young people in the urban areas of Vesuvius: Comparisons with other volcanic areas and implications for emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, S.; Somma, R.; Mayberry, G.C.

    2008-01-01

    More than 600 000 people are exposed to volcanic risk in the urban areas near the volcano, Vesuvius, and may need to be evacuated if there is renewed volcanic activity. The success of a future evacuation will strongly depend on the level of risk perception and preparedness of the at-risk communities during the current period of quiescence. The volcanic risk perception and preparedness of young people is of particular importance because hazard education programs in schools have been shown to increase the clarity of risk perception and students often share their knowledge with their parents. In order to evaluate young people's risk perception and preparedness for a volcanic crisis, a multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to 400 high-school students in three municipalities located close to the volcano. The overall results suggest that despite a 60-year period of quiescence at Vesuvius, the interviewed students have an accurate perception of the level of volcanic risk. On the other hand, the respondents demonstrate a clear lack of understanding of volcanic processes and their related hazards. Also, the interviewed students show high levels of fear, poor perceived ability to protect themselves from the effects of a future eruption, and insufficient knowledge of the National Emergency Plan for Vesuvian Area (NEPVA). The latter result suggests that in comparison with volcanic crises in other regions, during a future eruption of Vesuvius, there may not be enough time to educate the large number of people living near the volcano about how to appropriately respond. The inadequate risk education and preparedness of respondents implies that a strong effort is needed to improve communication strategies in order to facilitate successful evacuations. Therefore, it is important to take advantage of the present period of quiescence at Vesuvius to improve the accuracy of risk perception of youth in local communities. ?? 2008.

  6. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xu, Yu-Ping [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Mao, Hong-Min [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  7. Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

  8. Molten Triazolium Chloride Systems as New Aluminum Battery Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, B.; Bjerrum, Niels; Petrushina, Irina

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of using molten mixtures of 1,4-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazolium chloride (DMTC) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) as secondary battery electrolytes was studied, in some cases extended by the copresence of sodium chloride. DMTC-AlCl, mixtures demonstrated high specific conductivity in a wide...... of milliamperes per square centimeter) was observed at 0.344 V on the acidic sodium tetrachloroaluminate background, involving a free triazolium radical mechanism. Molten DMTC-AlCl3 electrolytes are acceptable for battery performance and both the aluminum anode and the triazolium electrolyte can be used as active...

  9. Renewing Liquid Fueled Molten Salt Reactor Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Rusty; NEXT Lab Team

    2016-09-01

    Globally there is a desperate need for affordable, safe, and clean energy on demand. More than anything else, this would raise the living conditions of those in poverty around the world. An advanced reactor that utilizes liquid fuel and molten salts is capable of meeting these needs. Although, this technology was demonstrated in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL in the 60's, little progress has been made since the program was cancelled over 40 years ago. A new research effort has been initiated to advance the technical readiness level of key reactor components. This presentation will explain the motivation and initial steps for this new research initiative.

  10. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of

  11. Major, trace element and isotope geochemistry (Sr-Nd-Pb) of interplinian magmas from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, R.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Rolandi, G.

    2001-01-01

    Major, trace element and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) data are reported for representative samples of interplinian (Protohistoric, Ancient Historic and Medieval Formations) activity of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano during the last 3500 years. Tephra and lavas exhibit significant major, trace element and isotopic variations. Integration of these data with those obtained by previous studies on the older Somma suites and on the latest activity, allows to better trace a complete petrological and geochemical evolution of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius magmatism. Three main groups of rocks are recognized. A first group is older than 12.000 yrs, and includes effusive-explosive activity of Mt. Somma. The second group (8000-2700 yrs B.P.) includes the products emitted by the Ottaviano (8000 yrs. B.P.) and Avellino (3550 yrs B.P.) plinian eruptions and the interplinian activity associated with the Protohistoric Formation. Ancient Historic Formation (79-472 A.D.), Medieval Formation (472-1139 A.D.) and Recent interplinian activity (1631-1944 A.D.) belong to the third group of activity (79-1944 A.D.). The three groups of rocks display distinct positive trends of alkalis vs. silica, which become increasingly steeper with age. In the first group there is an increase in silica and alkalis with time, whereas an opposite tendency is observed in the two younger groups. Systematic variations are also evident among the incompatible (Pb, Zr, Hf, Ta, Th, U, Nb, Rb, Cs, Ba) and compatible elements (Sr, Co, Cr). REE document variable degrees of fractionation, with recent activity displaying higher La/Yb ratios than Medieval and Ancient Historic products with the same degree of evolution. N-MORB normalized multi-element diagrams for interplinian rocks show enrichment in Rb, Th, Nb, Zr and Sm (> *10 N-MORB). Sr isotope ratios are variable, with Protohistoric rocks displaying 87Sr/86Sr= 0.70711-0.70810, Ancient Historic 87Sr/86Sr=0.70665-0.70729, and Medieval 87Sr/86Sr=0.70685-0.70803. Neodymium isotopic

  12. Geochemical and isotopic (Nd-Pb-Sr-O) variations bearing on the genesis of volcanic rocks from Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Rolandi, G.; Seal, R.R.; Paone, A.

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline volcanism produced by Monte Somma-Vesuvius volcano includes explosive plinian and subplinian activity in addition to effusive lava flows. Pumice, scoria, and lava (150 samples) exhibit major- and trace-element gradients as a function of SiO2 (58.9-47.2 wt%) and MgO (0-7.8 wt%); Mg value are ???50. Internally gradational chemical groups or cycles are distinguished by age: (1) 25 000 to 14 000 yr B.P.; (2) 8000 yr B.P. to A.D. 79; and (3) A.D. 79 to 1944. A small number of lavas, dikes and scora were also analysed from the Somma formation (~ 35 000 to 25 000 yr B.P.). Within each group, contents of Na2O + K2O increas with decreasing MgO along distinct rocks. Nb/Y values are variable from 0.66 to 3.14 (at SiO2 ??? 50 wt%) generally in the range of alkaline and ultra-alkaline rocks. Variations in contents of some majro elements (e.g., P and Ti), and trace elements (e.g., Th, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Pb, La, and Sc), as well as contrasting trends in ratios of various elements (e.g., Ta/Yb, Hf/U, Th/Ta, Th/Hf, Th/Yb, etc.) are also generally consistent with the group subdivisions. For example, Th/Hf increases from ??? 5 to ??? 10 with decreasing age for the Vesuvius system as a whole, yielding similar compositions in the least evolved rocks (low-silica, high-MgO, imcompatible element-poor) erupted at the end of each cycle. Internal variations within individual eruptions also systematically changed generally towards a common mafic composition at the end of each cycle, thus reflecting the dominanit volume in the magma chamber. At the start of a new eruptive cycle, the rocks are relatively enriched in incompatible elements; younger groups also contain higher abundances than other groups. N-MORB-normalized multielement diagrams exhibit selective enrichments of Sr, K, Rb, Th, and the light rare-earth elements; deep Nb and Ta negative anomalies commonly seen in rocks generated at orogenic margins are absent in the light rare-earth elements; deep Nb and Ta netgative anomalies

  13. Pre-eruptive volatile content, melt-inclusion chemistry, and microthermometry of interplinian Vesuvius lavas (pre-AD 1631)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Torok, K.; Webster, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Silicate-melt inclusions from lavas and pyroclastics from a selected suite of pre-A.D. 1631 interplinian Mt. Somma-Vesuvius lavas and scoria have been experimentally homogeneized and studied by microthermometry, electron microprobe (EMPA) and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to examine pre-eruptive volatile content and magma evolution. The melt inclusions have a bubble about 0.06% their volume, uncommonly contain non-condensable gas but do not contain any dense fluid phases. Clinopyroxene-hosted inclusions yield homogenization temperatures (Th) from 1170 to 1260??C, most between 1220 and 1240??C; plagiclase-hosted inclusions have Th from 1210 to 1230??C; these values are typical for the Vesuvius environment. The dominant factor controlling major element variability in the inclusions is clinopyroxene fractionation; MgO varies from 5 to 3 wt%, SiO2 varies from 60 to 48 wt%. total alkalis vary from 15 to 4 wt%, and CaO varies from 13 to 5 wt%. H2O varies from 2.7 to 0.6 wt% and is decoupled from incompatible element evolution suggesting vapor saturation during trapping. Chlorine and F vary from 1.- wt% to 0 and 0.63 to 0 wt%, respectively. Bulk rock and limited matrix glass analyses show that the lavas lost about half of their F and Cl content except for the A.D. 472-1631 lava which contains similar Cl abundances as the bulk rock. SO3 varies from 0.5 to 0 wt% and compared with matrix glass and bulk rock demonstrate that the lavas have lost essentially all sulfur. The samples can be classified into three age groups, ??? 25 000 yr B.P., 25 000-17 000 yr B.P., and A.D. 472-1631. There is a systematic increase in some components, e.g., total alkalis, SO3, Cl, Li, B, and Sr with the youth of the sample and a decrease in others, e.g., Zr and Y. However, on average these samples seem less evolved than later A.D. 1631-1944 lavas.

  14. The extimated presence of differentiated higly explosive magmas beneath Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei: evidence from geochemical and textural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Highly catastrophic explosive eruptions are supplied by Si-rich magmas, generated at shallower level in crust by the evolution of mantle liquids. The timescale of these evolution processes is a crucial factor, because of its control on the length of volcano repose interval leading to high explosive events. Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius alkaline volcanic systems, located respectively at few kilometers west and east of Neapolitan metropolitan area, produced a variety of eruptions ranging from not explosive lava flows and domes to highly destructive eruptions. Both these high risk volcanoes are in repose time since the last eruption occurred in the 1538 and 1944 BP, respectively. Since that time, the volcanoes experienced fumarolic activity, low level of seismicity with rare earthquakes swarms, as well as two bradyseismic crisis (1969-1972 and 1982-1984) localized in the center of Campi Flegrei caldera, that generated a net uplift of 3.5 m around the town of Pozzuoli. A wide low velocity layer interpreted as an extended magmatic body has been detected at 8-10 km depth beneath these volcanoes by seismic data. The capability of this reservoir to erupt explosively again strongly depends on magma differentiation degree, therefore the knowledge of the time lapse necessary at not explosive mafic liquids to differentiate toward explosive magmas is very crucial to predict the size of a possible short-term future eruption in Campanian area. Our petrologic data indicate that a multi-depth supply system was active under the Campanian Plain since 39 ka. Fractional crystallization during magma cooling associated with upward migration of less dense evolved liquids appears to be the prevalent differentiation process. Our results indicate that huge steam exolution occurred during the late stage of trachyte and phonolite crystallization thus accounting for the high Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of eruptions supplied by these melts. Moreover our CSD data on phenocrysts reveal

  15. Research and development issues for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes issues pertaining to the development of molten carbonate fuel cells. In particular, the corrosion resistance and service life of nickel oxide cathodes is described. The resistivity of lithium oxide/iron oxides and improvement with doping is addressed.

  16. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  17. Sulfur tolerant molten carbonate fuel cell anode and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cell anodes incorporating a sulfur tolerant carbon monoxide to hydrogen water-gas-shift catalyst provide in situ conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen for improved fuel cell operation using fuel gas mixtures of over about 10 volume percent carbon monoxide and up to about 10 ppm hydrogen sulfide.

  18. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a

  19. Nonmetal-metal transition in metal–molten-salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to study the nonmetal-metal transition in two different metal–molten-salt solutions, Kx(KCl)1-x and Nax(NaBr)1-x. As the excess metal concentration is increased the electronic density becomes

  20. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  1. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials Storage...

  2. Nickel catalysts for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R.J.; Berger, R.J.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas may be used instead of hydrogen as fuel for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by steam reforming the natural gas inside the MCFC, using a nickel catalyst (internal reforming). The severe conditions inside the MCFC, however, require that the catalyst has a very high stability. In

  3. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  4. Transfer characteristics of a lithium chloride–potassium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Mullen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing is an alternative method of reprocessing spent fuel, usually involving the dissolving spent fuel in a molten salt media. The National Nuclear Laboratory designed, built, and commissioned a molten salt dynamics rig to investigate the transfer characteristics of molten lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic salt. The efficacy and flow characteristics of a high-temperature centrifugal pump and argon gas lift were obtained for pumping the molten salt at temperatures up to 500°C. The rig design proved suitable on an industrial scale and transfer methods appropriate for use in future molten salt systems. Corrosion within the rig was managed, and melting techniques were optimized to reduce stresses on the rig. The results obtained improve the understanding of molten salt transport dynamics, materials, and engineering design issues and support the industrialization of molten salts pyroprocessing.

  5. Chlorine as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas: Evidence from a systematic study of the eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Cioni, R.; Webster, J. D.; Zdanowicz, G.; Orsi, G.; Civetta, L.

    2016-02-01

    Defining the magma storage conditions of a volcanic system is a major goal in modern volcanology due to its direct implications for the style of a possible eruption, and thus on the associated risk of any crisis and the necessary management and mitigation strategies. Below 200 MPa and at equivalent depths, the strongly non-ideal behaviour of the H-C-O-S-Cl-F system in the silicate melt causes unmixing of the fluid phase to form an H2O-rich vapour and a hydrosaline phase in equilibrium with the silicate melt, both responsible for buffering the chlorine (Cl) concentration. Following this equilibrium, the Cl concentration in melts may be used as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas. Systematic application of this method to the main explosive eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius highlights two main magma ponding zones, at ~180-200 and ~100 MPa. At these pressures, the maximum pre-eruptive H2O contents for the different magma compositions can be estimated; the results obtained, largely in agreement with the current literature, therefore confirm the validity of the method. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the variation of the magmatic reservoir location through time and thus provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, which are of utmost importance for volcanic crisis management.

  6. Pyroclastic deposits as a guide for reconstructing the multi-stage evolution of the Somma-Vesuvius Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, Raffaello; Santacroce, Roberto; Sbrana, Alessandro

    The evolution of the Somma-Vesuvius caldera has been reconstructed based on geomorphic observations, detailed stratigraphic studies, and the distribution and facies variations of pyroclastic and epiclastic deposits produced by the past 20,000years of volcanic activity. The present caldera is a multicyclic, nested structure related to the emptying of large, shallow reservoirs during Plinian eruptions. The caldera cuts a stratovolcano whose original summit was at 1600-1900m elevation, approximately 500m north of the present crater. Four caldera-forming events have been recognized, each occurring during major Plinian eruptions (18,300 BP "Pomici di Base", 8000 BP "Mercato Pumice", 3400 BP "Avellino Pumice" and AD 79 "Pompeii Pumice"). The timing of each caldera collapse is defined by peculiar "collapse-marking" deposits, characterized by large amounts of lithic clasts from the outer margins of the magma chamber and its apophysis as well as from the shallow volcanic and sedimentary units. In proximal sites the deposits consist of coarse breccias resulting from emplacement of either dense pyroclastic flows (Pomici di Base and Pompeii eruptions) or fall layers (Avellino eruption). During each caldera collapse, the destabilization of the shallow magmatic system induced decompression of hydrothermal-magmatic and hydrothermal fluids hosted in the wall rocks. This process, and the magma-ground water interaction triggered by the fracturing of the thick Mesozoic carbonate basement hosting the aquifer system, strongly enhanced the explosivity of the eruptions.

  7. Comment on: ‘‘The dark nature of Somma-Vesuvius volcano:Evidence from the 3.5 ka BP Avellino eruption’’ by Milia A.Raspini A., Torrente M.M.,

    OpenAIRE

    Sulpizio, R.; Cioni, R.; Di Vito, M. A.; Santacroce, R.; Sbrana, A.; Zanchetta, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present here some criticism to the scientific content of the paper of Milia et al. [2007. The dark nature of Somma-Vesuvius volcano: evidence from the 3.5 ka B.P. Avellino eruption. Quaternary International, 173–174, 57–66] published in Quaternary International. Milia et al. (2007) interpreted seismic lines in the Gulf of Naples (southern Italy), and inferred the presence of deposits from a large debris avalanche which occurred just before the Avellino eruption of Somma-Vesuvius ...

  8. The Pomici di Avellino eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (3.9 ka bp). Part I: stratigraphy, compositional variability and eruptive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.; Cioni, R.; di Vito, M. A.; Mele, D.; Bonasia, R.; Dellino, P.

    2010-07-01

    The stratigraphic succession of the Pomici di Avellino Plinian eruption from Somma-Vesuvius has been studied through field and laboratory data in order to reconstruct the eruption dynamics. This eruption is particularly important in the Somma-Vesuvius eruptive history because (1) its vent was offset with respect to the present day Vesuvius cone; (2) it was characterised by a distinct opening phase; (3) breccia-like very proximal fall deposits are preserved close to the vent and (4) the pyroclastic density currents generated during the final phreatomagmatic phase are among the most widespread and voluminous in the entire history of the volcano. The stratigraphic succession is, here, divided into deposits of three main eruptive phases (opening, magmatic Plinian and phreatomagmatic), which contain five eruption units. Short-lived sustained columns occurred twice during the opening phase (Ht of 13 and 21.5 km, respectively) and dispersed thin fall deposits and small pyroclastic density currents onto the volcano slopes. The magmatic Plinian phase produced the main volume of erupted deposits, emplacing white and grey fall deposits which were dispersed to the northeast. Peak column heights reached 23 and 31 km during the withdrawal of the white and the grey magmas, respectively. Only one small pyroclastic density current was emplaced during the main Plinian phase. In contrast, the final phreatomagmatic phase was characterised by extensive generation of pyroclastic density currents, with fallout deposits very subordinate and limited to the volcano slopes. Assessed bulk erupted volumes are 21 × 106 m3 for the opening phase, 1.3-1.5 km3 for the main Plinian phase and about 1 km3 for the final phreatomagmatic phase, yielding a total volume of about 2.5 km3. Pumice fragments are porphyritic with sanidine and clinopyroxene as the main mineral phases but also contain peculiar mineral phases like scapolite, nepheline and garnet. Bulk composition varies from phonolite (white

  9. Contrasting styles of Mount Vesuvius activity in the period between the Avellino and Pompeii Plinian eruptions, and some implications for assessment of future hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronico, Daniele; Cioni, Raffaello

    2002-09-01

    Intense explosive activity occurred repeatedly at Vesuvius during the nearly 1,600-year period between the two Plinian eruptions of Avellino (3.5 ka) and Pompeii (79 A.D.). By correlating stratigraphic sections from more than 40 sites around the volcano, we identify the deposits of six main eruptions (AP1-AP6) and of some minor intervening events. Several deposits can be traced up to 20 km from the vent. Their stratigraphic and dispersal features suggest the prevalence of two main contrasting eruptive styles, each involving a complex relationship between magmatic and phreatomagmatic phases. The two main eruption styles are (1) sub-Plinian to phreato-Plinian events (AP1 and AP2 members), where deposits consist of pumice and scoria fall layers alternating with fine-grained, vesiculated, accretionary lapilli-bearing ashes; and (2) mixed, violent Strombolian to Vulcanian events (AP3-AP6 members), which deposited a complex sequence of fallout, massive to thinly stratified, scoria-bearing lapilli layers and fine ash beds. Morphology and density variations of the juvenile fragments confirm the important role played by magma-water interaction in the eruptive dynamics. The mean composition of the ejected material changes with time, and shows a strong correlation with vent position and eruption style. The ranges of intensity and magnitude of these events, derived by estimations of peak column height and volume of the ejecta, are significantly smaller than the values for the better known Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions of Vesuvius, enlarging the spectrum of the possible eruptive scenarios at Vesuvius, useful in the assessment of its potential hazard.

  10. Coupled optical and thermal detailed simulations for the accurate evaluation and performance improvement of molten salts solar towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barberena, Javier; Mutuberria, Amaia; Palacin, Luis G.; Sanz, Javier L.; Pereira, Daniel; Bernardos, Ana; Sanchez, Marcelino; Rocha, Alberto R.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain, CENER, and the Technology & Innovation area of ACS Cobra, as a result of their long term expertise in the CSP field, have developed a high-quality and high level of detail optical and thermal simulation software for the accurate evaluation of Molten Salts Solar Towers. The main purpose of this software is to make a step forward in the state-of-the-art of the Solar Towers simulation programs. Generally, these programs deal with the most critical systems of such plants, i.e. the solar field and the receiver, on an independent basis. Therefore, these programs typically neglect relevant aspects in the operation of the plant as heliostat aiming strategies, solar flux shapes onto the receiver, material physical and operational limitations, transient processes as preheating and secure cloud passing operating modes, and more. The modelling approach implemented in the developed program consists on effectively coupling detailed optical simulations of the heliostat field with also detailed and full-transient thermal simulations of the molten salts tube-based external receiver. The optical model is based on an accurate Monte Carlo ray-tracing method which solves the complete solar field by simulating each of the heliostats at once according to their specific layout in the field. In the thermal side, the tube-based cylindrical external receiver of a Molten Salts Solar Tower is modelled assuming one representative tube per panel, and implementing the specific connection layout of the panels as well as the internal receiver pipes. Each tube is longitudinally discretized and the transient energy and mass balances in the temperature dependent molten salts and steel tube models are solved. For this, a one dimensional radial heat transfer model based is used. The thermal model is completed with a detailed control and operation strategy module, able to represent the appropriate operation of the plant. An integration framework has been

  11. Stratigraphy and eruptive dynamics of a pulsating Plinian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius: the Pomici di Mercato (8900 years B.P.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Daniela; Sulpizio, Roberto; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; La Volpe, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    New volcanological studies allow reconstruction of the eruption dynamics of the Pomici di Mercato eruption (ca 8,900 cal. yr B.P.) of Somma-Vesuvius. Three main Eruptive Phases are distinguished based on two distinct erosion surfaces that interrupt stratigraphic continuity of the deposits, indicating that time breaks occurred during the eruption. Absence of reworked volcaniclastic deposits on top of the erosion surfaces suggests that quiescent periods between eruptive phases were short perhaps lasting only days to weeks. Each of the Eruptive Phases was characterised by deposition of alternating fall and pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits. The fallout deposits blanketed a wide area toward the east, while the more restricted PDC deposits inundated the volcano slopes. Eruptive dynamics were driven by brittle magmatic fragmentation of a phonolitic magma, which, because of its mechanical fragility, produced a significant amount of fine ash. External water did not significantly contribute either to fragmentation dynamics or to mechanical energy release during the eruption. Column heights were between 18 and 22 km, corresponding to mass discharge rates between 1.4 and 6 × 107 kg s-1. The estimated on land volume of fall deposits ranges from a minimum of 2.3 km3 to a maximum of 7.4 km3. Calculation of physical parameters of the dilute pyroclastic density currents indicates speeds of a few tens of m s-1 and densities of a few kg m-3 (average of the lowermost 10 m of the currents), resulting in dynamic pressures lower than 3 kPa. These data suggest that the potential impact of pyroclastic density currents of the Pomici di Mercato eruption was smaller than those of other Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius, especially those of 1631 AD and 472 AD (4-14 kPa), which represent reference values for the Vesuvian emergency plan. The pulsating and long-lasting behaviour of the Pomici di Mercato eruption is unique in the history of large explosive eruptions of

  12. Electrodeposition of alloys or compounds in molten salts and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taxil P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the different modes of preparation of alloys or intermetallic compounds using the electrodeposition in molten salts, more particularly molten alkali fluorides. The interest in this process is to obtain new materials for high technology, particularly the compounds of reactive components such as actinides, rare earth and refractory metals. Two ways of preparation are considered: (i electrocoating of the more reactive metal on a cathode made of the noble one and reaction between the two metals in contact, and (ii electrocoating on an inert cathode of the intermetallic compound by coreduction of the ions of each elements. The kinetic is controlled by the reaction at the electrolyte interface. A wide bibliographic survey on the preparation of various compounds (intermetallic compounds, borides, carbides… is given and a special attention is paid to the own experience of the authors in the preparation of these compounds and interpretation of their results.

  13. MAG-GATE System for Molten metal Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Nathenson, P.E.

    2004-05-15

    The need for improved active flow control has been recognized as part of the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap. Under TRP 9808 for the American Iron and Steel Institute and the Department of Energy, Concept Engineering Group Inc. has developed MAG-GATE{trademark}, an electromagnetic system for active molten metal flow control. Two hot steel tests were successfully conducted in 2003 at the Whemco Foundry Division, Midland, PA. Approximately 110,000 pounds of 0.2% carbon steel were poured through the device subject to electromagnetic flow control. Excellent agreement between predicted and actual flow control was found. A survey of the molten metal flow control practices at 100 continuous casters in North America was also conducted in 2003. This report summarizes the results of the development program to date. Preliminary designs are described for the next step of a beta test at an operating billet/bloom or slab caster.

  14. Electrochemical Synthesis of Magnesium Hexaboride by Molten Salt Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angappan, S.; Kalaiselvi, N.; Sudha, R.; Visuvasam, A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports electrochemical synthesis of MgB6 from molten salts using the precursor consists of LiF–B2O3–MgCl2. An attempt has been made to synthesize metastable phase MgB6 crystal by electrolysis method. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 900°C. The electrolysis was performed at 900°C under argon atmosphere, at current density of 1.5 A/cm2. The electrodeposited crystals were examined using XRD, SEM, and XPS. From the above studies, the electrochemical synthesis method for hypothetical MgB6 from chloro-oxy-fluoride molten salt system is provided. Mechanism for the formation of magnesium hexaboride is discussed. PMID:27350961

  15. Fluorescence dynamics in supercooled (acetamide + calcium nitrate) molten mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Guchhait, Biswajit; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Biswas, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence dynamics of a polar solute probe in molten (CH3CONH2 + Ca(NO3)2·4.37H2O) mixtures have been measured in order to probe the solute-medium interactions in such complex systems. Steady state and time-resolved measurements bear no signatures of mega-value of the static dielectric constant, strong heterogeneity and extremely slow relaxation times reported in dielectric relaxation experiments for these molten mixtures. Subsequent applications of a semi-molecular theory reveal both the solute-medium dipole-dipole and ion-dipole interactions contribute significantly to the measured Stokes' shifts. Calculated average solvation times in the underdamped and overdamped limits of frictional solvent response agree semi-quantitatively with those from time-resolved measurements.

  16. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  17. Lithium-ferrate-based cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanagan, M.T.; Wolfenstine, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Bloom, I.; Kaun, T.D.; Krumpelt, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1996-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) at approximately 650 degrees Centigrade. These cathodes are based on lithium ferrate (LiFeO[sub 2]) which is attractive because of its very low solubility in the molten (Li,K)[sub 2]CO[sub 3] electrolyte. Because of its high resistivity, LiFeO[sub 2] cannot be used as a direct substitute for NiO. Cation substitution is, therefore, necessary to decrease resistivity. The effect of cation substitution on the resistivity and deformation of LiFeO[sub 2] was determined. The substitutes were chosen because their respective oxides as well as LiFeO[sub 2] crystallize with the rock-salt structure.

  18. Wetting and Spreading of Molten Volcanic Ash in Jet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-04-20

    A major hazard to jet engines posed by volcanic ash is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Here, using the sessile drop method, we study the evolution of the wettability and spreading of volcanic ash. We employ rapid temperature changes up to 1040-1450 °C, to replicate the heating conditions experienced by volcanic ash entering an operating jet engine. In this scenario, samples densify as particles coalesce under surface tension until they form a large system-sized droplet (containing remnant gas bubbles and crystals), which subsequently spreads on the surface. The data exhibit a transition from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous wetting regime above 1315 °C as crystals in the drops are dissolved in the melt. We infer that both viscosity and microstructural evolution are key controls on the attainment of equilibrium in the wetting of molten volcanic ash droplets.

  19. Theoretical Study of a Thermophysical Property of Molten Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Aqra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with theoretical approach to surface tension of molten silicon and germanium, and contributes to this field, which is very important. A theoretical calculation for determining the surface tension of high-temperature semiconductor melts, such as molten silicon and germanium, in the temperature range 1687–1825 K and 1211–1400 K, respectively, is described. The calculated temperature-dependence surface tension data for both Si and Ge are expressed as =876−0.32(− and =571−0.074(− (mJ m−2, respectively. These values are in consistence with the reported experimental data (720–875 for Si and 560–632 mJ m−2 for Ge. The calculated surface tension for both elements decreases linearly with temperature.

  20. Cracking of crude oil in the molten metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat A. Glikin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is investigated the process of crude oil and its individual fractions cracking in the molten metals medium to produce light petroleum products. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the possibility of using lead and tin including alloys thereof as the melt. The cracking of West Siberian crude oil is studied at temperatures 400-600 °C. It is detected that as the temperature increases there is increase of aromatic hydrocarbons and olefins content in gasoline while naphthenes, n- and i-paraffins content reduces. Optimal temperature for cracking in molten metals is ~500 °C. The use of a submerged nozzle increases the yield of light petroleum products by ~2%. The research octane number of gasoline produced is 82-87 points. It is determined that the yield of light petroleum products depending on the experimental conditions is increased from 46.9 to 55.1-61.3% wt.   

  1. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell power plant, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    The technical results of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant evelopment program are presented which establish the necessary technology base and demonstrate readiness to proceed with the fabrication and test of full size prototype stacks for coal fueled molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. The effort covered power plant systems studies, fuel cell component technology development, fuel cell stack design and analysis, manufacturing process definition, and an extensive experimental program. The reported results include: the definition and projected costs for a reference coal fueled power plant system based on user requirements, state-of-the-art advances in anode and electrolyte matrix technology, the detailed description of an internally manifolded stack design concept offering a number of attractive advantages, and the specification of the fabrication processes and methods necessary to produce and assemble this design. Results from the experimental program are documented.

  2. Renewable energy and the role of molten salts and carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fray D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molten carbonate fuel cells have been under development for a number of years and reliable units are successfully working at 250kW scale and demonstration units have produced up to 2 MW. Although these cells cannot be considered as renewable as the fuel, hydrogen or carbon monoxide is consumed and not regenerated, the excellent reliability of such a cell can act as a stimulus to innovative development of similar cells with different outcomes. Molten salt electrolytes based upon LiCl - Li2O can be used to convert carbon dioxide, either drawn from the output of a conventional thermal power station or from the atmosphere, to carbon monoxide or carbon. Recently, dimensionally stable anodes have been developed for molten salt electrolytes, based upon alkali or alkaline ruthenates which are highly electronically conducting and these may allow the concept of high temperature batteries to be developed in which an alkali or alkaline earth element reacts with air to form oxides when the battery is discharging and the oxide decomposes when the battery is being recharged. Batteries using these concepts may be based upon the Hall-Heroult cell, which is used worldwide for the production of aluminium on an industrial scale, and could be used for load levelling. Lithium ion batteries are, at present, the preferred energy source for cars in 2050 as there are sufficient lithium reserves to satisfy the world’s energy needs for this particular application. Graphite is used in lithium ion batteries as the anode but the capacity is relatively low. Silicon and tin have much higher capacities and the use of these materials, encapsulated in carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles will be described. This paper will review these interesting developments and demonstrate that a combination of carbon and molten salts can offer novel ways of storing energy and converting carbon dioxide into useful products.

  3. Development of large scale internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, A.; Shinoki, T.; Matsumura, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Hyogo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Internal Reforming (IR) is a prominent scheme for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) power generating systems in order to get high efficiency i.e. 55-60% as based on the Higher Heating Value (HHV) and compact configuration. The Advanced Internal Reforming (AIR) technology has been developed based on two types of the IR-MCFC technology i.e. Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) and Indirect Internal Reforming (DIR).

  4. Design of a helium-cooled molten salt fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; DeVan, J.H.

    1985-02-01

    A new conceptual blanket design for a fusion reactor produces fissile material for fission power plants. Fission is suppressed by using beryllium, rather than uranium, to multiply neutrons and also by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding media (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + TghF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and on to the online processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket including the steel pipes containing the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion rate by molten salt. We estimate the breeder, having 3000 MW of fusion power, produces 6400 kg of /sup 233/U per year, which is enough to provide make up for 20 GWe of LWR per year (or 14 LWR plants of 4440 MWt) or twice that many HTGRs or CANDUs. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and the blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times an LWR of the same power. The estimated present value cost of the /sup 2/anumber/sup 3/U produced is $40/g if utility financed or $16/g if government financed.

  5. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  6. P-wave velocity and density structure beneath Mt. Vesuvius: a magma body in the upper edifice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Capuano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution image of the compressional wave velocity and density structure in the shallow edifice of Mount Vesuvius has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes and from gravity inversion. The robustness of the tomography solution has been improved by adding to the earthquake data a set of land based shots, used for constraining the travel time residuals. The results give a high resolution image of the P-wave velocity structure with details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km depth below the central crater, distributed into two clusters, and separated by an anomalously high Vp region positioned at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs ratio in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation alternatively to the interpretation in terms of a small magma chamber inferred by petrologic studies. In this shallower zone the seismicity has the minimum energy, whilst most of the high-energy quakes (up to Magnitude 3.6 occur in the cluster located at greater depth. The seismicity appears to be located along almost vertical cracks, delimited by a high velocity body located along past intrusive body, corresponding to remnants of Mt. Somma. In this framework a gravity data inversion has been performed to study the shallower part of the volcano. Gravity data have been inverted using a method suitable for the application to scattered data in presence of relevant topography based on a discretization of the investigated medium performed by establishing an approximation of the topography by a triangular mesh. The tomography results, the retrieved density distribution, and the pattern of relocated seismicity exclude the presence of significant shallow magma reservoirs close to the central conduit. These should be located at depth higher than that of the base of the hypocenter volume, as evidenced by

  7. Interferometric investigations with the S1 constellation: an application to the Vesuvius/Campi Flegrei volcanic test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstrom, Sven; Del Gaudio, Carlo; De Martino, Prospero; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Prats-Iraola, Pau; Nannini, Matteo; Yague-Martinez, Nestor; Pinheiro, Muriel; Kim, Jun-Su; Vecchioli, Francesco; Minati, Federico; Costantini, Mario; Foumelis, Michael; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2017-04-01

    The contribution focuses on the current status of the ESA study entitled "INSARAP Sentinel-1 Constellation Study" and investigates the interferometric performance of the S1A/S1B units. In particular, we refer to the Vesuvius/Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy) volcanic test site, where the continuous inflation (about 35 cm from 2011 to date) and the huge availability of ground-based geodetic data (continuous GPS - cGPS - leveling, tiltmetric, gravimetric, etc.) from the INGV-Osservatorio Vesuviano monitoring networks have allowed to get a clear deformation signal, besides the comparison between S1A/S1B and geodetic data. In this regard, the integration between InSAR and geodetic measurements is crucial for a continuous and extended monitoring of such an active volcanic area, as InSAR investigations allow to get an information on wide areas, whereas permanent networks (e.g., cGPS), allow to provide a continuous information complementing InSAR, which is limited by its revisiting time. Comparisons between S1 constellation data and geodetic measurements, with a particular focus on cGPS, will be presented, exploiting both LOS and inverted (E-W and vertical inversion) InSAR data starting from October, 2014. In addition, as a next step we are planning to model the deformation source of the area by exploiting the S1 time series results. Ultimately, very encouraging results suggest for a continuation of this activity also for the future, showing the great potential of S1 constellation data for monitoring active volcanic areas and, in general, to retrieve a very high quality deformation signal.

  8. A study on the corrosion-control test of material for molten salt handling (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Joon; Zhang, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Cho, S. H.; Park, H. S.; Do, J. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    On this technical report, corrosion behaviors of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 600 and Hastelloy C-276 in molten salts were investigated in the temperature range of 650 - 850 deg C. Due to Li{sub 2}O-induced basic fluxing mechanism, the corrosion rates of the alloys in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O were significantly higher than those in molten salt of LiCl. In the mixed molten salt, Fe-base alloys showed higher corrosion resistance than the Ni-base alloys, and C-276 with high Mo and W contents exhibited the highest corrosion rate among the examined alloys. the single layer of LiCrO{sub 2} was formed in molten salt of LiCl and two phase structure of a scale consisted of oxides and Ni was formed in the mixed molten salt. 48 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and

  10. Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen Syngas Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David [Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2017-05-23

    The techno-economic analyses of the hybrid molten bed gasification technology and laboratory testing of the HMB process were carried out in this project by the Gas Technology Institute and partner Nexant, Inc. under contract with the US Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report includes the results of two complete IGCC and Fischer-Tropsch TEA analyses comparing HMB gasification with the Shell slagging gasification process as a base case. Also included are the results of the laboratory simulation tests of the HMB process using Illinois #6 coal fed along with natural gas, two different syngases, and steam. Work in this 18-month project was carried out in three main Tasks. Task 2 was completed first and involved modeling, mass and energy balances, and gasification process design. The results of this work were provided to Nexant as input to the TEA IGCC and FT configurations studied in detail in Task 3. The results of Task 2 were also used to guide the design of the laboratory-scale testing of the HMB concept in the submerged combustion melting test facility in GTI’s industrial combustion laboratory. All project work was completed on time and budget. A project close-out meeting reviewing project results was conducted on April 1, 2015 at GTI in Des Plaines, IL. The hybrid molten bed gasification process techno-economic analyses found that the HMB process is both technically and economically attractive compared with the Shell entrained flow gasification process. In IGCC configuration, HMB gasification provides both efficiency and cost benefits. In Fischer-Tropsch configuration, HMB shows small benefits, primarily because even at current low natural gas prices, natural gas is more expensive than coal on an energy cost basis. HMB gasification was found in the TEA to improve the overall IGCC economics as compared to the coal only Shell gasification process. Operationally, the HMB process proved to be robust and easy to operate. The burner

  11. Molten pool-lower head integrity. Heat transfer models including advanced numerical simulations (DNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M.; Bonnet, J.M.; Bernaz, L. [CEA Grenoble (France)

    2001-07-01

    Extensive studies have been performed to investigate the heat transfer within a molten corium pool (homogeneous, stratified and with miscibility gap): Synthesis of heat transfer correlations in molten pool (homogeneous and stratified), Focusing effect in stratified metal layer, DNS analysis of Rayleigh Benard instabilities at the top boundary; interpretation of the different convection regimes and exponents affecting the Rayleigh number in the heat transfer correlations, Molten pool model for corium presenting a miscibility gap. Condition for de-stratification. (authors)

  12. Molten salt oxidation of organic hazardous waste with high salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengqian; Chi, Yong; Jin, Yuqi; Jiang, Xuguang; Buekens, Alfons; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Jian

    2018-02-01

    Organic hazardous waste often contains some salt, owing to the widespread use of alkali salts during industrial manufacturing processes. These salts cause complications during the treatment of this type of waste. Molten salt oxidation is a flameless, robust thermal process, with inherent capability of destroying the organic constituents of wastes, while retaining the inorganic ingredients in the molten salt. In the present study, molten salt oxidation is employed for treating a typical organic hazardous waste with a high content of alkali salts. The hazardous waste derives from the production of thiotriazinone. Molten salt oxidation experiments have been conducted using a lab-scale molten salt oxidation reactor, and the emissions of CO, NO, SO2, HCl and dioxins are studied. Impacts are investigated from the composition of the molten salts, the types of feeding tube, the temperature of molten carbonates and the air factor. Results show that the waste can be oxidised effectively in a molten salt bath. Temperature of molten carbonates plays the most important role. With the temperature rising from 600 °C to 750 °C, the oxidation efficiency increases from 91.1% to 98.3%. Compared with the temperature, air factor has but a minor effect, as well as the composition of the molten salts and the type of feeding tube. The molten carbonates retain chlorine with an efficiency higher than 99.9% and the emissions of dioxins are below 8 pg TEQ g-1 sample. The present study shows that molten salt oxidation is a promising alternative for the disposal of organic hazardous wastes containing a high salt content.

  13. Seismic activity and thermal regime of low temperature fumaroles at Mt. Vesuvius in 2004-2011: distinguishing among seismic, volcanic and hydrological signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cusano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Seismological, soil temperature and hydrological data from Mt. Vesuvius are collected to characterize the present-day activity of the volcanic/hydrothermal system and to detect possible unrest-related phenomena. We present patterns of seismicity and soil temperature in the crater area during the period February 2004-December 2011. The temporal distribution of number and depth of Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes and the energy release are considered. Hourly data of soil temperature have been acquired since January 2004 in different locations along the rim and within the crater. The observed changes of temperature are studied to establish a temporal-based correlation with the volcanic activity and/or with external forcing, as variations of the regional and local stress field acting on the volcano or meteorological phenomena. The comparison between seismic activity and temperature data highlights significant variations possibly related to changes in fluid circulation in the hydrothermal system of the volcano. The common continuous observations start just before a very shallow earthquake occurred in August 2005, which was preceded by a thermal anomaly. This coincidence has been interpreted as related to fluid-driven rock fracturing, as observed in other volcanoes. For the successive temporal patterns, the seismicity rate and energy release are characterized by slight variations accompanied by changes in temperature. This evidence of reactivity of the fumarole thermal field to seismic strain can be used to discriminate between tectonic and volcanic signals at Mt. Vesuvius.

  14. Evaluating long-range volcanic ash hazard using supercomputing facilities: application to Somma-Vesuvius (Italy), and consequences for civil aviation over the Central Mediterranean Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Sulpizio, R.

    2010-11-01

    Volcanic ash causes multiple hazards. One hazard of increasing importance is the threat posed to civil aviation, which occurs over proximal to long-range distances. Ash fallout disrupts airport operations, while the presence of airborne ash at low altitudes near airports affects visibility and the safety of landing and take-off operations. Low concentrations of ash at airplane cruise levels are sufficient to force re-routing of in-flight aircrafts. Volcanic fallout deposits spanning large distances have been recognized from the Somma-Vesuvius volcano for several Holocene explosive eruptions. Here we develop hazard and isochron maps for distal ash fallout from the Somma-Vesuvius, as well as hazard maps for critical ash concentrations at relevant flight levels. Maps are computed by coupling a meteorological model with a fully numeric tephra dispersal model that can account for ash aggregation processes, which are relevant to the dispersion dynamics of fine ash. The simulations were carried out using supercomputing facilities, spanning on entire meteorological year that is statistically representative of the local meteorology during the last few decades. Seasonal influences are also analyzed. The eruptive scenario is based on a Subplinian I-type eruption, which is within the range of the maximum expected event for this volcano. Results allow us to quantify the impact that an event of this magnitude and intensity would have on the main airports and aerial corridors of the Central Mediterranean Area.

  15. The Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera: New chronological data of several eruptions of the Copper-Middle Bronze Age period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passariello, Isabella; Lubritto, Carmine; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Guan, Yongjing; Terrasi, Filippo

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating of short-lived sample materials is a useful tool applied to date deposits of volcanic eruptions. Several archaeological sites discovered and excavated in Campania witnessed important volcanic eruptions, which occurred in the Copper and Middle Bronze Ages. These eruptions come from the Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera. At least four Plinian eruptions have been identified in the eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius, interspersed by interplinian events, called protohistoric, which occurred between Avellino and Pompeii. At S. Paolo Belsito a stratigraphic sequence below Avellino and above the first two protohistoric events after Avellino were highlighted; while Nola (Naples) gives new information on the chronology of Avellino. Sites like Caivano and Gricignano D'Aversa, involved by the Agnano 3, Paleoastroni 2 and Agnano Monte Spina eruptions were highlighted and investigated. In this work, we want to clarify the chronology of some eruptions by comparing our results with previous data. Charcoal, bone and seed samples were collected, treated and measured at the CIRCE laboratory in Caserta.

  16. The Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera: New chronological data of several eruptions of the Copper-Middle Bronze Age period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passariello, Isabella, E-mail: isabella.passariello@unina2.i [CIRCE - Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli and INNOVA, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); Lubritto, Carmine; D' Onofrio, Antonio [CIRCE - Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli and INNOVA, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); Guan, Yongjing [CIRCE - Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli and INNOVA, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Terrasi, Filippo [CIRCE - Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli and INNOVA, via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Radiocarbon dating of short-lived sample materials is a useful tool applied to date deposits of volcanic eruptions. Several archaeological sites discovered and excavated in Campania witnessed important volcanic eruptions, which occurred in the Copper and Middle Bronze Ages. These eruptions come from the Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera. At least four Plinian eruptions have been identified in the eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius, interspersed by interplinian events, called protohistoric, which occurred between Avellino and Pompeii. At S. Paolo Belsito a stratigraphic sequence below Avellino and above the first two protohistoric events after Avellino were highlighted; while Nola (Naples) gives new information on the chronology of Avellino. Sites like Caivano and Gricignano D'Aversa, involved by the Agnano 3, Paleoastroni 2 and Agnano Monte Spina eruptions were highlighted and investigated. In this work, we want to clarify the chronology of some eruptions by comparing our results with previous data. Charcoal, bone and seed samples were collected, treated and measured at the CIRCE laboratory in Caserta.

  17. Rheological behavior and constitutive equations of heterogeneous titanium-bearing molten slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Liao, De-ming; Zhou, Mi; Zhang, Qiao-yi; Yue, Hong-rui; Yang, Song-tao; Duan, Pei-ning; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on the rheological properties of a CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-TiO2-(TiC) blast furnace (BF) slag system were conducted using a high-temperature rheometer to reveal the non-Newtonian behavior of heterogeneous titanium-bearing molten slag. By measuring the relationships among the viscosity, the shear stress and the shear rate of molten slags with different TiC contents at different temperatures, the rheological constitutive equations were established along with the rheological parameters; in addition, the non-Newtonian fluid types of the molten slags were determined. The results indicated that, with increasing TiC content, the viscosity of the molten slag tended to increase. If the TiC content was less than 2wt%, the molten slag exhibited the Newtonian fluid behavior when the temperature was higher than the critical viscosity temperature of the molten slag. In contrast, the molten slag exhibited the non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluid characteristic and the shear thinning behavior when the temperature was less than the critical viscosity temperature. However, if the TiC content exceeded 4wt%, the molten slag produced the yield stress and exhibited the Bingham and plastic pseudoplastic fluid behaviors when the temperature was higher and lower than the critical viscosity temperature, respectively. When the TiC content increased further, the yield stress of the molten slag increased and the shear thinning phenomenon became more obvious.

  18. Helium-cooled molten-salt fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; Devan, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    We present a new conceptual design for a fusion reactor blanket that is intended to produce fissile material for fission power plants. Fast fission is suppressed by using beryllium instead of uranium to multiply neutrons. Thermal fission is suppressed by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding medium (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + ThF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and to the on-line processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket and the austenitic steel tubes that contain the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion by molten salt. We estimate that a breeder having 3000 MW of fusion power will produce 6500 kg of /sup 233/U per year. This amount is enough to provide makeup for 20 GWe of light-water reactors per year or twice that many high-temperature gas-cooled reactors or Canadian heavy-water reactors. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times a light-water reactor of the same power. The estimated cost of the /sup 233/U produced is $40/g for fusion plants costing 2.35 times that of a light-water reactor if utility owned or $16/g if government owned.

  19. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia

    2012-05-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C

  20. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

    2012-09-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 °C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700

  1. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  2. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  3. CAPTURING EXHAUST CO2 GAS USING MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Dhawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide is considered as one of the major contenders when the question of greenhouse effect arises. So for any industry or power plant it is of utmost importance to follow certain increasingly stringent environment protection rules and laws. So it is significant to keep eye on any possible methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in an efficient way. This paper reviews the available literature so as to try to provide an insight of the possibility of using Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs as the carbon capturing and segregating devices and the various factors that affect the performance of MCFCs during the process of CO2 capture.

  4. Direct electroreduction of indium and tin oxides in molten salts

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Bo; Cui, Peng; Martinez, Ana Maria; Aune, Elizabeth Ragnhild; Haarberg, Geir Martin

    2014-01-01

    Indium is a rare metal. The largest end use for indium is in thinfilm coatings as indium oxide combined with 10 percent tin oxide (ITO). However, indium has recycling rates less than 1%. Indium and tin are especially well suited for fused salt electrolysis because of their low melting points. The electrochemical behaviour of indium and tin oxides was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in molten LiCl-KCl. The direct deoxidation of indium and tin oxides were investigated. A new design of direct...

  5. Precipitation of lamellar gold nanocrystals in molten polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomba, M.; Carotenuto, G., E-mail: giancaro@unina.it [Institute for Polymer, Composites, and Biomaterials. National Research Council. Piazzale E. Fermi, 1 – 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    Non-aggregated lamellar gold crystals with regular shape (triangles, squares, pentagons, etc.) have been produced by thermal decomposition of gold chloride (AuCl) molecules in molten amorphous polymers (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)). Such covalent inorganic gold salt is high soluble into non-polar polymers and it thermally decomposes at temperatures compatible with the polymer thermal stability, producing gold atoms and chlorine radicals. At the end of the gold precipitation process, the polymer matrix resulted chemically modified because of the partial cross-linking process due to the gold atom formation reaction.

  6. Numerical study of cold filling and tube deformation in the molten salt receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Gongchen; Peniguel, Christophe; Liao, Zhirong; Li, Xin; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-06-01

    Molten salt tube cold filling is one way to accelerate the startup of molten salt Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plant. This practical operation may induce salt solidification and large thermal stress due to tube's large temperature difference. This paper presents the cold filling study and the induced thermal stress quantitatively through simulation approaches. Physical mechanisms and safe working criteria are identified under certain conditions.

  7. Chemical Reactions of Simulated Producer Gas with Molten Tin-Bismuth Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith J. Bourne

    2012-01-01

    A pyrolysis and gasification system utilizing molten metal as an energy carrier has been proposed and the initial stages of its design have been completed. However, there are several fundamental questions that need to be answered before the design of this system can be completed. These questions include: How will the molten metal interact with the products of biomass...

  8. Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Yun, H. C.; Lee, D. G

    2005-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation, MSO for short, is a robust technology that can effectively treat mixed waste (radioactive waste including hazardous metals or organics). It can safely and economically treat the difficult wastes such as not-easily destroyable toxic organic waste, medical waste, chemical warfare and energetic materials such as propellant and explosives, all of which are not easily treated by an incinerator or other currently existing thermal treatment system. Therefore, molten salt oxidation technology should be developed and utilized to treat a lot of niche waste stored in the nuclear and environmental industries. So, if we put the MSO technology to practical use by Korea-Vietnam joint research, we can reduce R and D fund for MSO technology by ourselves and we can expect an export of the outcome of nuclear R and D in Korea. For Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research concerning molten salt oxidation technology between KOREA and VIETNAM, in this research, We invited two Vietnamese researchers and we introduced our experimental scale molten salt oxidation system in order to let them understand molten salt oxidation technology. We also visited Viet man and we consulted about molten salt oxidation process. We held seminar on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology, discussed on the joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology and finally we wrote MOU for joint research.

  9. Hazard assessment of far-range volcanic ash dispersal from a violent Strombolian eruption at Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Naples, Italy: implications on civil aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, Roberto; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Scaini, Chiara; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2012-11-01

    Long-range dispersal of volcanic ash can disrupt civil aviation over large areas, as occurred during the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland. Here we assess the hazard for civil aviation posed by volcanic ash from a potential violent Strombolian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, the most likely scenario if eruptive activity resumed at this volcano. A Somma-Vesuvius eruption is of concern for two main reasons: (1) there is a high probability (38 %) that the eruption will be violent Strombolian, as this activity has been common in the most recent period of activity (between AD 1631 and 1944); and (2) violent Strombolian eruptions typically last longer than higher-magnitude events (from 3 to 7 days for the climactic phases) and, consequently, are likely to cause prolonged air traffic disruption (even at large distances if a substantial amount of fine ash is produced such as is typical during Vesuvius eruptions). We compute probabilistic hazard maps for airborne ash concentration at relevant flight levels using the FALL3D ash dispersal model and a statistically representative set of meteorological conditions. Probabilistic hazard maps are computed for two different ash concentration thresholds, 2 and 0.2 mg/m3, which correspond, respectively, to the no-fly and enhanced procedure conditions defined in Europe during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The seasonal influence of ash dispersal is also analysed by computing seasonal maps. We define the persistence of ash in the atmosphere as the time that a concentration threshold is exceeded divided by the total duration of the eruption (here the eruption phase producing a sustained eruption column). The maps of averaged persistence give additional information on the expected duration of the conditions leading to flight disruption at a given location. We assess the impact that a violent Strombolian eruption would have on the main airports and aerial corridors of the Central Mediterranean area, and this assessment

  10. Time spans of soil formation and late Pleistocene-Holocene climate changes in the Somma-Vesuvius volcano area, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarciglia, Fabio; Zumpano, Veronica; Sulpizio, Roberto; Terribile, Fabio; Pulice, Iolanda; La Russa, Mauro F.

    2013-04-01

    Time spans of soil formation and climate changes occurred during the late Pleistocene to the middle Holocene are investigated in a pedostratigraphic succession located in the piedmont of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano (Campania region, southern Italy) using a multidisciplinary approach. We focused on five well-known and well-dated primary tephra and four interlayered volcanic soils developed on and/or buried by them. The pyroclastic layers give detailed chronological constraints to the stratigraphy. From bottom to top the following tephra were identified in the field: Pomici di Base (22 ka BP), Pomici Verdoline (19 ka BP), Agnano Pomici Principali (12.26 ka BP), Mercato (8.9 ka BP) and Avellino (3.9 ka BP), all of them representing volcanic products of explosive eruptions of the Somma-Vesuvius, except the third one, sourced from the westerly Phlegrean Fields. The four pedons were characterized in terms of morphological, physical, chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological features. Special attention was given to reconstruct the main soil-forming processes, paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic conditions, degree of soil development and associated time ranges. Moreover, further tephra were identified in the field within some of above pedons. One of them was easily recognized and referred to the Agnano Monte Spina eruption (4.2-4.3 ka BP, Phlegrean Fields provenance), whereas the others were not previously known in the Somma-Vesuvius stratigraphy. On the basis of SEM-EDS analyses (chemical composition and morphoscopic observations), coupled with their stratigraphic position and literature compositional databases, they were related to the Soccavo 4-5 and the Tufi Biancastri eruptions from the Phlegrean Fields. This interpretation permitted to fix further age constrains for more detailed assessment of rates of soil formation and climatic interpretation. Major late Quaternary climatic phases are suggested by changes in the extent of development of andic properties, iron

  11. Molten-salt fuel cells-Technical and economic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, J. Robert

    This paper presents a personal view of the status and research needs of the MCFC and other molten-salt fuel cells. After an overview of current MCFC performance, compared with performance and cost of other fuel cells, improvements in power density and lifetime as well as cost reduction are identified as key priorities to accelerate the commercialization of the MCFC. In spite of its unfavorable public image (compared to, in particular, PEMFC and planar SOFC) MCFC technology has progressed steadily and cost reduction has been significant. Large-scale commercialization, especially in the distributed generation and cogeneration market, remains a possibility but its chances are highly dependent on a forceful and consistent energy policy, for example taking into account the externalities associated with various modes of electric power production from fossil fuels. In spite of steady improvements in performance, important defects in fundamental knowledge remain about wetting properties, oxygen reduction kinetics, corrosion paths and control mechanisms. These must be addressed to stimulate further simplification of design and find solutions to lifetime issues. Recently, alternative concepts of molten-salt fuel cells have been capturing attention. The direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC), reviving an old concept, has caught the attention of energy system analysts and some important advances have been made in this technology. Direct CO and CH 4 oxidation have also been a focus of study. Finally, the potential of nanotechnology for high-temperature fuel cells should not be a priori excluded.

  12. Development of a safety analysis code for molten salt reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dalin [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China); Qiu Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China); Su Guanghui [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 West Road Xian Ning Street, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The molten salt reactor (MSR) well suited to fulfill the criteria defined by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is presently revisited all around the world because of different attractive features of current renewed relevance. The MSRs are characterized by using the fluid-fuel, so that their technologies are fundamentally different from those used in the conventional solid-fuel reactors. In this work, in particular, the attention is focused on the safety characteristic analysis of the MSRs, in which a point kinetic model considering the flow effects of the fuel salt is established for the MSRs and calculated by developing a microcomputer code coupling with a simplified heat transfer model in the core. The founded models and developed code are applied to analyze the safety characteristics of the molten salt actinide recycler and transmuter system (MOSART) by simulating three types of basic transient conditions including the unprotected loss of flow, unprotected overcooling accident and unprotected transient overpower. Some reasonable results are obtained for the MOSART, which show that the MOSART conceptual design is an inherently stable reactor design. The present study provides some valuable information for the research and design of the new generation MSRs.

  13. Progress in modeling solidification in molten salt coolants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Mauricio; Rubiolo, Pablo; Doche, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    Molten salts have been proposed as heat carrier media in the nuclear and concentrating solar power plants. Due to their high melting temperature, solidification of the salts is expected to occur during routine and accidental scenarios. Furthermore, passive safety systems based on the solidification of these salts are being studied. The following article presents new developments in the modeling of eutectic molten salts by means of a multiphase, multicomponent, phase-field model. Besides, an application of this methodology for the eutectic solidification process of the ternary system LiF-KF-NaF is presented. The model predictions are compared with a newly developed semi-analytical solution for directional eutectic solidification at stable growth rate. A good qualitative agreement is obtained between the two approaches. The results obtained with the phase-field model are then used for calculating the homogenized properties of the solid phase distribution. These properties can then be included in a mixture macroscale model, more suitable for industrial applications.

  14. Coal derived fuel gases for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Product streams from state-of-the-art and future coal gasification systems are characterized to guide fuel cell program planners and researchers in establishing performance goals and developing materials for molten carbonate fuel cells that will be compatible with gasifier product gases. Results are presented on: (1) the range of gasifier raw-gas compositions available from the major classes of coal gasifiers; (2) the degree of gas clean-up achievable with state-of-the-art and future gas clean-up systems; and (3) the energy penalties associated with gas clean-up. The study encompasses fixed-bed, fluid-bed, entrained-bed, and molten salt gasifiers operating with Eastern bituminous and Western subbituminous coals. Gasifiers operating with air and oxygen blowing are evaluated, and the coal gasification product streams are characterized with respect to: (1) major gas stream constituents, e.g., CO, H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O; (2) major gas stream contaminants, e.g., H/sub 2/S, COS, particulates, tars, etc.; and (3) trace element contaminants, e.g., Na, K, V, Cl, Hg, etc.

  15. An SPH Study of Molten Matte-Slag Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsui, Shungo; Nashimoto, Ryota; Kumagai, Takehiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-06-01

    The transient behaviors of two immiscible liquids, namely, molten matte and molten slag, with a high interfacial tension were investigated using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics model. Numerical simulations were performed using a discrete-element-type method that could track the movement of both the continuous liquid phase and the dispersed one directly. Numerical simulations were also performed for conditions corresponding to different interfacial tension and density values. Further, the predicted topological changes as well as the relationship between the physical properties and the droplet size distribution were investigated. It was found that, with an increase in the interfacial tension, the large droplets formed aggregate quickly with the bulk phase, owing to the buoyancy force. It was also found that the absolute value of the interfacial tension determines the interfacial area, suggesting that it also affects the droplet settling time. As such, we can conclude that the nonlinearly changed interface shape can easily become unstable as a result of only a slight change in the curvature.

  16. The Ribosome Restrains Molten Globule Formation in Stalled Nascent Flavodoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwman, Joseline A; André, Estelle; Westphal, Adrie H; van Berkel, Willem J H; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2016-12-09

    Folding of proteins usually involves intermediates, of which an important type is the molten globule (MG). MGs are ensembles of interconverting conformers that contain (non-)native secondary structure and lack the tightly packed tertiary structure of natively folded globular proteins. Whereas MGs of various purified proteins have been probed to date, no data are available on their presence and/or effect during protein synthesis. To study whether MGs arise during translation, we use ribosome-nascent chain (RNC) complexes of the electron transfer protein flavodoxin. Full-length isolated flavodoxin, which contains a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor, acquires its native α/β parallel topology via a folding mechanism that contains an off-pathway intermediate with molten globular characteristics. Extensive population of this MG state occurs at physiological ionic strength for apoflavodoxin variant F44Y, in which a phenylalanine at position 44 is changed to a tyrosine. Here, we show for the first time that ascertaining the binding rate of FMN as a function of ionic strength can be used as a tool to determine the presence of the off-pathway MG on the ribosome. Application of this methodology to F44Y apoflavodoxin RNCs shows that at physiological ionic strength the ribosome influences formation of the off-pathway MG and forces the nascent chain toward the native state. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The Ribosome Restrains Molten Globule Formation in Stalled Nascent Flavodoxin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwman, Joseline A.; André, Estelle; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Folding of proteins usually involves intermediates, of which an important type is the molten globule (MG). MGs are ensembles of interconverting conformers that contain (non-)native secondary structure and lack the tightly packed tertiary structure of natively folded globular proteins. Whereas MGs of various purified proteins have been probed to date, no data are available on their presence and/or effect during protein synthesis. To study whether MGs arise during translation, we use ribosome-nascent chain (RNC) complexes of the electron transfer protein flavodoxin. Full-length isolated flavodoxin, which contains a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor, acquires its native α/β parallel topology via a folding mechanism that contains an off-pathway intermediate with molten globular characteristics. Extensive population of this MG state occurs at physiological ionic strength for apoflavodoxin variant F44Y, in which a phenylalanine at position 44 is changed to a tyrosine. Here, we show for the first time that ascertaining the binding rate of FMN as a function of ionic strength can be used as a tool to determine the presence of the off-pathway MG on the ribosome. Application of this methodology to F44Y apoflavodoxin RNCs shows that at physiological ionic strength the ribosome influences formation of the off-pathway MG and forces the nascent chain toward the native state. PMID:27784783

  18. Concentration Effects of Silver Ions on Ionic Conductivities of Molten Silver Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada T.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionic conductivities of molten (RbXc(AgX1-c (X = Cl and I mixtures were measured to clarify the concentration effects of silver ions on ionic conductivities of molten silver halides. It is found that the addition of RbX to molten AgX rapidly reduces the ionic conductivity with 0 ≤ c ≤ 0.4. It suggests that strong Ag-Ag correlation is necessary to fast conduction of Ag ions in molten state. The absolute values of ionic conductivity for (RbClc(AgCl1-c are larger than those for (RbIc(AgI1-c mixtures at all compositions. These differences might relate to difference of diffusion constant between Cl- and I- and difference of effective charge carried by an ion between molten AgCl and AgI

  19. A basic study on fluoride-based molten salt electrolysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Kwang Bum [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Byung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this project is to study on the physicochemical properties of fluoride molten salt, to develop numerical model for simulation of molten salt electrolysis, and to establish experimental technique of fluoride molten salt. Physicochemical data of fluoride molten salt are investigated and summarized. The numerical model, designated as REFIN is developed with diffusion-layer theory and electrochemical reaction kinetics. REFIN is benchmarked with published experimental data. REFIN has a capability to simulate multicomponent electrochemical system at transient conditions. Experimental device is developed to measure electrochemical properties of structural material for fluoride molten salt. Ni electrode is measured with cyclic voltammogram in the conditions of 600 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2} and 700 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2}. 74 refs., 23 figs., 57 tabs. (Author)

  20. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., cutting, or working with molten metal. 56.15007 Section 56.15007 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH..., cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields, or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. ...

  1. First European fuel cell installation with anaerobic digester gas in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbeck, M.; Klinge, T.; Döding, B.

    The City of Ahlen in North Rhine Westphalia, Germany and RWE Fuel Cells GmbH, Essen, cooperate in order to install a molten carbonate fuel cell in the municipal sewage works of Ahlen in May/June 2005. The MCFC unit, a so-called HotModule made by MTU CFC Solutions, Ottobrunn operates on anaerobic digester gas and provides power and heat for the sewage works. This is the first project of its kind in Europe. This article outlines the experiences of RWE Fuel Cells with planning, installation and operation of MCFC systems and is focussing on the use of digester gas. The engineering and installation phase is described regarding to the special features of digester gas, for example variation in gas composition and impurities as well as different flow rates. The results of the first months of operation are interpreted and influences to the performance of the fuel cell on digester gas composition are compared. One focus of the recent RWE Fuel Cells projects is the use of MCFC systems using different biofuels. With the results from planning, installation and operation of the MCFC in Ahlen a system design for the application of different fuels can be validated and tested.

  2. Burial of Emperor Augustus' villa at Somma Vesuviana (Italy) by post-79 AD Vesuvius eruptions and reworked (lahars and stream flow) deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Luongo, Giuseppe; Aoyagi, Masanori

    2006-11-01

    A new archaeological site of Roman Age has been recently found engulfed in the products of Vesuvius activity at Somma Vesuviana, on the northern flank of the Somma-Vesuvius, 5 km from the vent. A 9 m deep, 30 by 35 m trench has revealed a monumental edifice tentatively attributed to the Emperor Augustus. Different than Pompeii and Herculaneum sites which were completely buried in the catastrophic eruption of 79 AD, this huge roman villa survived the effects of the 79 AD plinian eruption as suggested by stratigraphic and geochronologic data. It was later completely engulfed in the products of numerous explosive volcanic eruptions ranging from 472 AD to 1631 AD, which were separated by reworked material and paleosols. The exposed burial sequence is comprised of seven stratigraphic units. Four units are composed exclusively of pyroclastic products each emplaced during a unique explosive event. Two units are composed of volcaniclastic material (stream flow and lahars) emplaced during quiescent periods of the volcano. Finally, one unit is composed of both pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits. One of the more relevant volcanological results of this study is the detailed reconstruction of the destructive events that buried the Emperor Augustus' villa. Stratigraphic evidence shows the absence of any deposit associated with the 79 AD eruption at this site and that the building was extensively damaged (sacked) before it was engulfed by the products of subsequent volcanic eruptions and lahars. The products of the 472 AD eruption lie directly on the roman structures. They consist of scoria fall layers intercalated with massive and stratified pyroclastic density current deposits that caused limited damage to the structure. The impact on the building of penecontemporaneous lahars was more important; these caused the collapse of some structures. The remaining part of the building was subsequently entombed by the products of explosive eruptions (e.g. 512/536 eruption, 1631

  3. Composition and origin of nodules from the ≈20 ka Pomici di Base (PB)-Sarno eruption of Mt. Somma — Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klébesz, Rita; Bodnar, Robert; Vivo, Benedetto; Török, Kálmán; Lima, Annamaria; Petrosino, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Nodules (coarse-grain "plutonic" rocks) were collected from the ca. 20 ka Pomici di Base (PB)-Sarno eruption of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius, Italy. The nodules are classified as monzonite-monzogabbro based on their modal composition. The nodules have porphyrogranular texture, and consist of An-rich plagioclase, K-feldspar, clinopyroxene (ferroan-diopside), mica (phlogopite-biotite) ± olivine and amphibole. Aggregates of irregular intergrowths of mostly alkali feldspar and plagioclase, along with mica, Fe-Ti-oxides and clinopyroxene, in the nodules are interpreted as crystallized melt pockets. Crystallized silicate melt inclusions (MI) are common in the nodules, especially in clinopyroxenes. Two types of MI have been identified. Type I consists of mica, Fe-Ti-oxides and/or dark green spinel, clinopyroxene, feldspar and a vapor bubble. Volatiles (CO2, H2O) could not be detected in the vapor bubbles by Raman spectroscopy. Type II inclusions are generally lighter in color and contain subhedral feldspar and/or glass and several opaque phases, most of which are confirmed to be oxide minerals by SEM analysis. Some of the opaque-appearing phases that are below the surface may be tiny vapor bubbles. The two types of MI have different chemical compositions. Type I MI are classified as phono-tephrite — tephri-phonolite — basaltic trachy-andesite, while Type II MI have basaltic composition. The petrography and MI geochemistry led us to conclude that the nodules represent samples of the crystal mush zone in the active plumbing system of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius that were entrained into the upwelling magma during the PB-Sarno eruption.

  4. Chlorine as a geobarometer tool: Application to the explosive eruptions of the Volcanic Campanian District (Mount Somma-Vesuvius, Phlegrean Fields, Ischia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia; Webster, Jim D.; Cioni, Raffaello; D'Antonio, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    One of the current stakes in modern volcanology is the definition of magma storage conditions which has direct implications on the eruptive style and thus on the associated risks and the management of likely related crisis. In alkaline differentiated magmas, chlorine (Cl), contrary to H2O, occurs as a minor volatile species but may be used as a geobarometer. Numerous experimental studies on Cl solubility have highlighted its saturation conditions in silicate melts. The NaCl-H2O system is characterized by immiscibility under wide ranges of pressure, temperature and NaCl content (Somma-Vesuvius, Phlegrean Fields and Ischia. We have analysed the products of the representative explosive eruptions of each volcano, including Plinian, sub-Plinian and strombolian events. We have focussed our research on the earliest emitted, most evolved products of each eruption, likely representing the shallower, fluid-saturated portion of the reservoir. As the studied eruptions cover the entire eruptive history of each volcanic system, the results allow better constraining the evolution through time of the shallow plumbing system. We highlighted for Mount Somma - Vesuvius two magma ponding zones, at ~170-200 MPa and ~105-115 MPa, alternatively active in time. For Phlegrean Fields, we evidence a progressive deepening of the shallow reservoirs, from the Campanian Ignimbrite (30-50 MPa) to the Monte Nuovo eruption (115 MPa). Only one eruption was studied for Ischia, the Cretaio eruption, that shows a reservoir at 140 MPa. The results on pressure are in large agreement with literature. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the reservoir dynamics through time and provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, of utmost importance for the interpretation of the monitoring data and the identification of precursory signals.

  5. Age and whole rock glass compositions of proximal pyroclastics from the major explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius: A review as a tool for distal tephrostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacroce, Roberto; Cioni, Raffaello; Marianelli, Paola; Sbrana, Alessandro; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Donahue, Douglas J.; Joron, Jean Louis

    2008-10-01

    A review of compositional data of the major explosive eruptions of Vesuvius is presented, comparing compositions (major elements) of whole rock with glass shards from the proximal deposits, hopefully useful for long-distance correlation. A critical review of published and new geochronological data is also provided. All available 14C ages are calibrated to give calendar ages useful for the reconstruction of the volcanological evolution of the volcanic complex. The pyroclastic deposits of the four major Plinian eruptions (22,000 yr cal BP "Pomici di Base", 8900 yr cal BP "Mercato Pumice", 4300 yr cal BP "Avellino Pumice", and A.D. 79 "Pompeii Pumice") are widely dispersed and allow a four-folded, Plinian to Plinian, stratigraphic division: 1. B-M (between Pomici di Base and Mercato); 2. M-A (between Mercato and Avellino); 3. A-P (between Avellino and Pompeii); 4. P-XX (from the Pompeii Pumice to the last erupted products of the XXth century). Within each interval, the age, lithologic and compositional features of pyroclastic deposits of major eruptions, potentially useful for tephrostratigraphic purposes on distal areas, are briefly discussed. The Vesuvius rocks are mostly high Potassic products, widely variable in terms of their silica saturation. They form three groups, different for both composition and age: 1. slightly undersaturated, older than Mercato eruption; 2. mildly undersaturated, from Mercato to Pompeii eruptions; 3. highly undersaturated, younger than Pompeii eruption. For whole rock analyses, the peculiar variations in contents of some major and trace elements as well as different trends in element/element ratios, allow a clear, unequivocal, easy diagnosis of the group they belong. Glass analyses show large compositional overlap between different groups, but selected element vs. element plots are distinctive for the three groups. The comparative analysis of glass and whole rock major element compositions provides reliable geochemical criteria helping

  6. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System: Molten Salt Energy Storage (Summer Report 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); mckellar, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Effective energy use is a main focus and concern in the world today because of the growing demand for energy. The nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) is a valuable technical concept that can potentially diversify and leverage existing energy technologies. This report considers a particular NHES design that combines multiple energy systems including a nuclear reactor, energy storage system (ESS), variable renewable generator (VRG), and additional process heat applications. Energy storage is an essential component of this particular NHES because its design allows the system to produce peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant power output. Many energy storage options are available, but this study mainly focuses on a molten salt ESS. The primary purpose of the molten salt ESS is to enable the nuclear reactor to be a purely constant heat source by acting as a heat storage component for the reactor during times of low demand, and providing additional capacity for thermo-electric power generation during times of peak electricity demand. This report will describe the rationale behind using a molten salt ESS and identify an efficient molten salt ESS configuration that may be used in load following power applications. Several criteria are considered for effective energy storage and are used to identify the most effective ESS within the NHES. Different types of energy storage are briefly described with their advantages and disadvantages. The general analysis to determine the most efficient molten salt ESS involves two parts: thermodynamic, in which energetic and exergetic efficiencies are considered; and economic. Within the molten salt ESS, the two-part analysis covers three major system elements: molten salt ESS designs (two tank direct and thermocline), the molten salt choice, and the different power cycles coupled with the molten salt ESS. Analysis models are formulated and analyzed to determine the most effective ESS. The results show that the most

  7. Study on Utilization of Super Grade Plutonium in Molten Salt Reactor FUJI-U3 using CITATION Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, Cici; Waris, Abdul; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Asril, Pramutadi AM; Novitrian

    2017-07-01

    FUJI-U3 type of Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has a unique design since it consists of three core regions in order to avoid the replacement of graphite as moderator. MSR uses floride as a nuclear fuel salt with the most popular chemical composition is LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4. ThF4 and 233UF4 are the fertile and fissile materials, respectively. On the other hand, LiF and BeF2 working as both fuel and heat transfer medium. In this study, the super grade plutonium will be utilized as substitution of 233U since plutonium is easier to be obtained compared to 233U as main fuel. Neutronics calculation was performed by using PIJ and CITATION modules of SRAC 2002 code with JENDL 3.2 as nuclear data library.

  8. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this

  9. REAKTOR INNOVATIVE MOLTEN SALT (IMSR DENGAN SISTEM KESELAMATAN PASIF MENYELURUH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andang Widiharto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengembangan Teknologi Reaktor Nuklir pada masa mendatang mengarah pada peningkatan aspek keselamatan, peningkatan pendayagunaan bahan bakar, reduksi limbah radioaktif, ketahanan terhadap proliferasi bahan-bakar nuklir dan peningkatan aspek ekonomi. reaktor Innovative Molten Salt (IMSR adalah reaktor nuklir yang menggunakan bahan bakar cair berupa garam lebur fluoride (7LiF-ThF4-UF4-MaFx. Reaktor IMSR didesain sebagai reaktor pembiak termal, yaitu membiakkan U-233 dari Th-232. Hal ini untuk menjawab permasalahan sustainabilitas ketersedian sumber daya bahan bakar nuklir dan reduksi limbah radioaktif. Dalam aspek keselamatan, desain reaktor IMSR memiliki sifat inherent safe, yaitu koefisien umpan balik daya yang negatif serta memiliki fitur-fitur keselamatan pasif. Fitur-fitur keselamatan pasif terdiri dari sistem shutdown pasif, sistem pendinginan pasif pasca shutdown serta sistem pendinginan pasif untuk produk fisi. Kecelakaan yang berpotensi terjadi pada IMSR, yaitu kecelakaan kehilangan aliran bahan bakar, kecelakaan kehilangan aliran pendingin, kecelakaan kehilangan kemampuan pengambilan kalor serta kecelakaan kerusakan integritas sistem reaktor, dapat ditangani sepenuhnya secara pasif hingga mencapai kondisi shutdown selamat. Kata kunci: keselamatan pasif, inherent safe, IMSR   The next Nuclear Reactor Technology developments are directed to the increasing of the aspects of safety, fuel utility, radioactive waste reduction, proliferation retention and economy. Innovative Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR is a nuclear reactor design that uses fluoride molten salt (7LiF-ThF4-UF4-MaFx. IMSR is designed as a thermal breeder reactor, i.e. to produce U-233 from Th-232. This is the answer of natural nuclear fuel sustainability and radioactive waste problems. In term of safety aspect, IMSR design has inherent safe characteristics, i.e. negative power feedback coefficient, and passive safety features. The passive safety features are passive shutdown

  10. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process for the extraction of oxygen for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements for use in fabrication on the Moon. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis is ideal for extraction, since the electron is the only practical reducing agent. MOE has several advantages over other extraction methods. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. Alternatively, MOE requires no import of consumable reagents (e.g. fluorine and carbon) as other processes do, and does not rely on interfacing multiple processes to obtain refined products. Electrolytic processing has the advantage of selectivity of reaction in the presence of a multi-component feed. Products from lunar regolith can be extracted in sequence according to the stabilities of their oxides as expressed by the values of the free energy of oxide formation (e.g. chromium, manganese, Fe, Si, Ti, Al, magnesium, and calcium). Previous work has demonstrated the viability of producing Fe and oxygen from oxide mixtures similar in composition to lunar regolith by molten oxide electrolysis (electrowinning), also called magma electrolysis having shown electrolytic extraction of Si from regolith simulant. This paper describes recent advances in demonstrating the MOE process by a joint project with participation by NASA KSC and

  11. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  12. Analysis of Bubble Flow in the Deep-Penetration Molten Pool of Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Wan, Rui; Zhu, Yang; Xie, Xiaojian

    2015-03-01

    Based on the vacuum electron beam welding with deep-penetration process, the convection phenomenon of the bubble flow in partially penetrated and fully penetrated molten pool of AZ91D magnesium alloy was simulated under the unsteady-state conditions. At the same time, the distributions of the cavity-type defects in deep-penetration weld were studied. The results showed that the cavity-type defects are more prone to distribute at the bottom of the weld and accumulate along the axis of the weld for the partially penetrated weld seam; there is a high incidence of cavity-type defects in the middle of the weld for the fully penetrated weld seam. As a smooth escape channel for the gas phase is formed in the fully penetrated molten pool, the possibility of gas escaping is much higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. A high liquid convection velocity is more conducive to the escape of the gas in molten pool. The liquid convection velocity in the fully penetrated molten pool is higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. So, the final gas fraction in the fully penetrated molten pool is low. Therefore, the appearance of cavity-type defects in the fully penetrated weld seam is less than that in the partially penetrated weld seam.

  13. Behavior of Po-210 in molten Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H.; Oschinski, J.; Horn, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Hauptabt. Ingenieurtechnik)

    1992-09-01

    The behavior of Po-210 in molten Pb-17Li was investigated in evaporation experiments. It was found that polonium evaporates in form of an intermetallic compound PbPo. Because of the low vapor pressure of this polonide, evaporation rates are small. The activity coefficient for Po in Pb-17Li is given by 1n [gamma] = -4.77-(1329/T). Under conditions of a fusion reactor blanket with helium as cover gas, the evaporating fraction will be 10[sup 6] times smaller than that estimated assuming ideal solution and vacuum. In agreement with observations at a Bi-inpile loop, only a very small fraction of the total polonium will be found in cover gas spaces. (orig.).

  14. Electrochemical extraction of europium from molten fluoride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibilaro, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); Massot, L., E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.f [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); Chamelot, P.; Cassayre, L.; Taxil, P. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France)

    2009-12-15

    This work concerns the extraction of europium from molten fluoride media. Two electrochemical ways have been examined: (i) the use of a reactive cathode made of copper and (ii) the co-deposition with aluminium on inert electrode, leading to the formation of europium-copper and europium-aluminium alloys, respectively, as identified by SEM-EDS analysis. Cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry were used to identify the reduction pathway and to characterise the step of Cu-Eu and Al-Eu alloys formation. Then, electrochemical extractions using the two methodologies have been performed with extraction efficiency around 92% for copper electrode and 99.7% for co-reduction with aluminium ions.

  15. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Wiley Davidson, J.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-01-20

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt, accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m{sup 3} per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics. {copyright}American Institute of Physcis 1995

  16. Development of molten carbonate fuel cells for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    The broad and comprehensive program included elements of system definition, cell and system modeling, cell component development, cell testing in pure and contaminated environments, and the first stages of technology scale up. Single cells, with active areas of 45 sq cm and 582 sq cm, were operated at 650 C and improved to state of the art levels through the development of cell design concepts and improved electrolyte and electrode components. Performance was shown to degrade by the presence of fuel contaminants, such as sulfur and chlorine, and due to changes in electrode structure. Using conventional hot press fabrication techniques, electrolyte structures up to 20" x 20" were fabricated. Promising approaches were developed for nonhot pressed electrolyte structure fabrication and a promising electrolyte matrix material was identified. This program formed the basis for a long range effort to realize the benefits of molten carbonate fuel cell power plants.

  17. Thermal behaviour of a spherical addition to molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehmen, E.

    1995-05-01

    This thesis presents a numerical model for describing the thermal behaviour of a spherical alloy addition when added to a melt. It is assumed that: no significant heat of solution between the alloy addition and the melt is involved, the dissolution rate is dominated by heat transfer from the melt, the heat flow into the addition is spherically symmetric, the additions have a well defined melting point, there are no solid phase transformations, heat conduction can be represented by Fourier`s law, and the heat transfer from the melt can be described by an average heat transfer coefficient. The model is validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from immersion experiments on: (1) a 4.88 cm diameter Al sphere chilled in liquid nitrogen to -196 {sup o}C and then immersed in water of 3.8 {sup o}C and 18.1 {sup o}C, (2) 4.90 cm diameter Al spheres at room temperatures immersed in molten Al of 720 {sup o}C, and (3) 3.72 cm diameter 75 wt% FeSi spheres at 150 {sup o}C immersed in molten steel of 1600 {sup o}C. The shell thickness and temperatures at the sphere centre and surface were recorded as functions of time. For model and experiment to agree, it was found that the density, specific heat and thermal conductivity of the alloy addition must depend on temperature, and an inner heat transfer resistance across the sphere-shell interphase must be included. The sensible heat of the melt that solidifies should be included in the heat balance only when the shell is expanding. The inner heat transfer resistance is shown to be very important in determining the melting/dissolution time for alloy additions that react strongly with the melt. 70 refs., 60 figs., 36 tabs.

  18. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  19. On purpose simulation model for molten salt CSP parabolic trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranese, Carlo; Matino, Francesca; Maccari, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of computer codes and simulation software is one of the fundamental aspects for the development of any kind of technology and, in particular, in CSP sector for researchers, energy institutions, EPC and others stakeholders. In that extent, several models for the simulation of CSP plant have been developed with different main objectives (dynamic simulation, productivity analysis, techno economic optimization, etc.), each of which has shown its own validity and suitability. Some of those models have been designed to study several plant configurations taking into account different CSP plant technologies (Parabolic trough, Linear Fresnel, Solar Tower or Dish) and different settings for the heat transfer fluid, the thermal storage systems and for the overall plant operating logic. Due to a lack of direct experience of Molten Salt Parabolic Trough (MSPT) commercial plant operation, most of the simulation tools do not foresee a suitable management of the thermal energy storage logic and of the solar field freeze protection system, but follow standard schemes. ASSALT, Ase Software for SALT csp plants, has been developed to improve MSPT plant's simulations, by exploiting the most correct operational strategies in order to provide more accurate technical and economical results. In particular, ASSALT applies MSPT specific control logics for the electric energy production and delivery strategy as well as the operation modes of the Solar Field in off-normal sunshine condition. With this approach, the estimated plant efficiency is increased and the electricity consumptions required for the plant operation and management is drastically reduced. Here we present a first comparative study on a real case 55 MWe Molten Salt Parabolic Trough CSP plant placed in the Tibetan highlands, using ASSALT and SAM (System Advisor Model), which is a commercially available simulation tool.

  20. Structural Analysis of Molten NaNO3 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahara Shuta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MD simulation for molten NaNO3 has been performed by using the Born-Mayer-Huggins-type potentials. The new structural features of molten NaNO3 are investigated by several analytical methods. The coordination-number and bond-angle distributions are similar to those of simple molten salts such as NaCl except for the variation caused by the different size of the anion and cation. Na+ ions are attracted toward O− ions, and get separated from N+ ions by Coulomb interactions. The distribution of the dihedral angle between NO3 − plannar ionic molecules has also been investigated.

  1. Structural Analysis of Molten NaNO3 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Shuta; Toyama, Hiroshi; Shimakura, Hironori; Fukami, Takanori

    2017-08-01

    MD simulation for molten NaNO3 has been performed by using the Born-Mayer-Huggins-type potentials. The new structural features of molten NaNO3 are investigated by several analytical methods. The coordination-number and bond-angle distributions are similar to those of simple molten salts such as NaCl except for the variation caused by the different size of the anion and cation. Na+ ions are attracted toward O- ions, and get separated from N+ ions by Coulomb interactions. The distribution of the dihedral angle between NO3 - plannar ionic molecules has also been investigated.

  2. The erosion behavior of Inconel 718 in molten A380 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, M.; Fan, Z.; Bevis, M.J. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-05-07

    The erosion of materials in molten metals and alloys is of considerable importance in engineering applications such as liquid metal handling and containment in the metallurgical industry. So far, available results on the interaction of nickel and aluminum, including solid nickel/solid aluminum and solid nickel/liquid aluminum systems, are all from the diffusion couple tests, i.e., under static conditions. There has been no report on the interaction of solid nickel, or nickel-base alloys in molten aluminum under dynamic conditions. In this paper the authors report their experimental results on the erosion behavior of Inconel 718 alloy in molten A380 alloy under dynamic conditions.

  3. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  4. Molten-salt reactor program. Semiannual progress report for period ending February 29, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, L.E.

    1976-08-01

    Separate abstracts and indexing were prepared for sections dealing with MSBR design and development; chemistry of fuel-salt and coolant-salt systems and analytical methods; materials development; fuel processing for molten-salt reactors; and salt production. (DG)

  5. High Surface Area Iridium Anodes and Melt Containers for Molten Oxide Electrolysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is the most attractive method of oxygen production on the lunar surface, because no additional chemical reagents...

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on molten salts technology and computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Minato, Kazuo (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    Applications of molten salts technology to separation and synthesis of materials have been studied eagerly, which would develop new fields of materials science. Research Group for Actinides Science, Department of Materials Science, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), together with Reprocessing and Recycle Technology Division, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, organized the Workshop on Molten Salts Technology and Computer Simulation at Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI on July 18, 2001. In the workshop eleven lectures were made and lively discussions were there on the fundamentals and applications of the molten salts technology that covered the structure and basic properties of molten salts, the pyrochemical reprocessing technology and the relevant computer simulation. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. High-temperature molten-carbonate fuel cells. Technical progress report, January-March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    Progress on the design, development, fabrication, performance testing, and modeling of molten carbonate fuel cells is reported. Component development including electrode structures, electrolyte powder, electrolyte tiles, and cell frame and current collectors is described. (WHK)

  8. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  9. Performance Testing of Molten Regolith Electrolysis with Transfer of Molten Material for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald; Tripathy, Prabhat; Standish, Evan; Sirk, Aislinn; Melendez, Orlando; Stefanescu, Doru

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated the production of oxygen by electrolysis of molten regolith simulants at temperatures near 1600 C. Using an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in the production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Initial direct measurements of current efficiency have confirmed that the process offer potential advantages of high oxygen production rates in a smaller footprint facility landed on the moon, with a minimum of consumables brought from Earth. We now report the results of a scale-up effort toward the goal of achieving production rates equivalent to 1 metric ton O2/year, a benchmark established for the support of a lunar base. We previously reported on the electrochemical behavior of the molten electrolyte as dependent on anode material, sweep rate and electrolyte composition in batches of 20-200g and at currents of less than 0.5 A. In this paper, we present the results of experiments performed at currents up to 10 Amperes) and in larger volumes of regolith simulant (500 g - 1 kg) for longer durations of electrolysis. The technical development of critical design components is described, including: inert anodes capable of passing continuous currents of several Amperes, container materials selection, direct gas analysis capability to determine the gas components co-evolving with oxygen. To allow a continuous process, a system has been designed and tested to enable the withdrawal of cathodically-reduced molten metals and spent molten oxide electrolyte. The performance of the withdrawal system is presented and critiqued. The design of the electrolytic cell and the configuration of the furnace were supported by modeling the thermal environment of the system in an effort to realize a balance between external heating and internal joule heating. We will discuss the impact these simulations and experimental findings have

  10. Lanthanides extraction processes in molten fluoride media. Application to nuclear spent fuel reprocessing

    OpenAIRE

    Taxil, Pierre; Massot, Laurent; Nourry, Christophe; Gibilaro, Mathieu; Chamelot, Pierre; Cassayre, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes four techniques of extraction of lanthanides elements (Ln) from molten salts in the general frame of reprocessing nuclear wastes; One of them is chemical: the precipitation of Ln ions in insoluble compounds (oxides or oxifluorides); the others use electrochemical methodology in molten fluorides for extraction and measurement of the progress of the processes: first electrodeposition of pure Ln metals on an inert cathode material was proved to be incomplete and cause probl...

  11. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  12. Removal of H2S using molten carbonate at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Makoto; Otaka, Maromu

    2013-12-01

    Gasification is considered to be an effective process for energy conversion from various sources such as coal, biomass, and waste. Cleanup of the hot syngas produced by such a process may improve the thermal efficiency of the overall gasification system. Therefore, the cleanup of hot syngas from biomass gasification using molten carbonate is investigated in bench-scale tests. Molten carbonate acts as an absorbent during desulfurization and dechlorination and as a thermal catalyst for tar cracking. In this study, the performance of molten carbonate for removing H2S was evaluated. The temperature of the molten carbonate was set within the range from 800 to 1000 °C. It is found that the removal of H2S is significantly affected by the concentration of CO2 in the syngas. When only a small percentage of CO2 is present, desulfurization using molten carbonate is inadequate. However, when carbon elements, such as char and tar, are continuously supplied, H2S removal can be maintained at a high level. To confirm the performance of the molten carbonate gas-cleaning system, purified biogas was used as a fuel in power generation tests with a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The fuel cell is a high-performance sensor for detecting gaseous impurities. When purified gas from a gas-cleaning reactor was continuously supplied to the fuel cell, the cell voltage remained stable. Thus, the molten carbonate gas-cleaning reactor was found to afford good gas-cleaning performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Degassing Treatment on the Interfacial Reaction of Molten Aluminum and Solid Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Triyono T.; Muhayat N.; Supriyanto A.; Lutiyatmi L.

    2017-01-01

    The gas porosity is one of the most serious problems in the casting of aluminum. There are several degassing methods that have been studied. During smelting of aluminum, the intermetallic compound (IMC) may be formed at the interface between molten aluminum and solid steel of crucible furnace lining. In this study, the effect of degassing treatment on the formations of IMC has been investigated. The rectangular substrate specimens were immersed in a molten aluminum bath. The holding times of ...

  14. Molten Salt: Concept Definition and Capital Cost Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddard, Larry [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Andrew, Daniel [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Adams, Shannon [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Galluzzo, Geoff [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Renewable Power (ORP) has been tasked to provide effective program management and strategic direction for all of the DOE’s Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) renewable power programs. The ORP’s efforts to accomplish this mission are aligned with national energy policies, DOE strategic planning, EERE’s strategic planning, Congressional appropriation, and stakeholder advice. ORP is supported by three renewable energy offices, of which one is the Solar Energy Technology Office (SETO) whose SunShot Initiative has a mission to accelerate research, development and large scale deployment of solar technologies in the United States. SETO has a goal of reducing the cost of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) by 75 percent of 2010 costs by 2020 to reach parity with base-load energy rates, and to reduce costs 30 percent further by 2030. The SunShot Initiative is promoting the implementation of high temperature CSP with thermal energy storage allowing generation during high demand hours. The SunShot Initiative has funded significant research and development work on component testing, with attention to high temperature molten salts, heliostats, receiver designs, and high efficiency high temperature supercritical CO2 (sCO2) cycles. DOE retained Black & Veatch to support SETO’s SunShot Initiative for CSP solar power tower technology in the following areas: 1. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of a flexible test facility to be used to test and prove components in part to support financing. 2. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of an integrated high temperature molten salt (MS) facility with thermal energy storage and with a supercritical CO2 cycle generating approximately 10MWe. 3. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of an integrated high temperature falling particle facility with thermal energy storage and with a supercritical CO2

  15. Proton conducting ceramics for potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, H.; Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis and chemical characterization of proton conductor ceramics. • Qualification of ceramics for hydrogen sensors in molten lithium–lead. • Ceramics have well-defined grains with a wide distribution of sizes. • Good agreement with predictions obtained with BaZrY, BaCeZrY and SrFeCo ceramics. -- Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic (Pb–15.7Li) is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. Also, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. Potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten lithium–lead eutectic have been designed at the Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) at Barcelona and are under development and qualification. The probes are based on the use of solid state electrolytes and works as proton exchange membranes (PEM). In this work the following compounds: BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α}, Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}-Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized in order to be tested as PEM H-probes. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements at 500 °C have been performed at a fixed hydrogen concentration. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor elements BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 7−δ} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation (deviation around 60 mV). In contrast, the sensor constructed using the proton conductor element Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}–Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} showed a deviation higher than 100 mV between experimental an theoretical data.

  16. Mechanism to remove oxide inclusions from molten aluminum by solid fluxes refining method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel flux charging method and a crucible quenching method were employed to study the mechanism of solid fluxes refining method regarding the removal of oxide inclusions (Al2O3 from molten aluminum. Electrochemical polishing method was adopted to prepare surfaces of the samples. Through experiments, the morphology of the residual solidified flux in the solidified samples as well as the wetting action of the molten flux during refining were observed for the first time. Three wetting regimes denoted by absorbing regime, engulfing regime and penetration regime correlating with the removal of oxide films (the most typical and common oxide inclusions in molten aluminum were proposed in terms of different types and distributions of oxide films and different size ratios of the molten flux to oxide films. Particularly, from a thermodynamic point of view, for the first time, the penetration regime provided concrete evidence that the practical oxide inclusions can be wet by molten flux under ambient fluid of molten aluminum. A spreading model was proposed, according to which ingredients and size parameters of practical solid fluxes can be optimized.

  17. Comparison of molten chloride and fluoride salts potentialities for An/Ln separation by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, A.; Peron, F.; Marrot, F.; Lacquement, J. [DRCP/SCPS/LPP - CEA/CEN Valrho - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is the comparison of molten fluoride and chloride salts potentialities for Am/Nd separation by electrodeposition on inert cathode, on a purely thermodynamic point of view. The molten LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic (77-23 mol.%, at 780 deg. C) was considered for this study. Cyclic voltammetry showed a one step Am(III)/Am reduction at a potential of {approx_equal}+0.5 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. A potential difference of 290 mV between Am and Nd metallic deposition was estimated by square-wave voltammetry. This Am/Nd potential difference is more important than in molten chlorides (220 mV in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 500 deg. C). Moreover in molten fluoride salt, the americium and neodymium (+II) oxidation state is not stable contrary to the molten chloride one where corrosion of deposited Am would be potential. However this larger potential difference in molten fluorides is quite balanced by the higher working temperature. (authors)

  18. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  19. Durability and robustness of tubular molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Makoto

    2017-12-01

    One anticipated system for high-efficiency power generation is the combination of syngas from gasification and high temperature fuel cells. The system uses a pressurization system, and it takes into account poisoning by impurities in the syngas. The durability and robustness of the fuel cells used in this system are an important issue for commercial applications. This study focuses on tubular molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs), which seem to be relatively durable compared with conventional planar-type MCFCs. Various power generation tests were performed in order to evaluate the durability and robustness of the tubular MCFCs. After continuous generation tests at 0.3 MPa, the cell voltage decay rate was found to be 0.8 mV/1000 h at 0.2 A/cm2. Moreover, it was found to be possible to generate power stably with fuel gas containing 20 ppm H2S. When the differential pressure between the anode and cathode was set to 0.1 MPa, the power generation tests were performed without gas leakage. In addition, starting (heating) and stopping (cooling) could be done in a short period, meaning that the cold start/stop characteristics are favorable. Therefore, the tubular MCFC was confirmed to have the durability necessary for a power generation system.

  20. Probabilistic hazard analysis of dense Pyroclastic Density Currents at Vesuvius (Italy) via parametric uncertainty characterization of TITAN2D numerical simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierz, Pablo; Ramona Stefanescu, Elena; Sandri, Laura; Patra, Abani; Marzocchi, Warner; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments of Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) are of great interest for decision-making purposes. However, there is a limited number of published works available on this topic. Recent advances in computation and statistical methods are offering new opportunities beyond the classical Monte Carlo (MC) sampling which is known as a simple and robust method but it usually turns out to be slow and computationally intractable. In this work, Titan2D numerical simulator has been coupled to Polynomial Chaos Quadrature (PCQ) to propagate the simulator parametric uncertainty and compute VEI-based probabilistic hazard maps of dense PDCs formed as a result of column collapse at Vesuvius volcano, Italy. Due to the lack of knowledge about the exact conditions under which these PDCs will form, Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) are assigned to the simulator input parameters (Bed Friction Angle and Volume) according to three VEI sizes. Uniform distributions were used for both parameters since there is insufficient information to assume that any value in the range is more likely that any other value. Reasonable (and compatible) ranges for both variables were constrained according to past eruptions at Vesuvius volcanic system. On the basis of reasoning above a number of quadrature points were taken within those ranges, which resulted in one execution of the TITAN2D code at each quadrature point. With a computational cost several orders of magnitude smaller than MC, exceedance probabilities for a given threshold of flow depth (and conditional to the occurrence of VEI3, VEI4 and VEI5 eruptions) were calculated using PCQ. Moreover, PCQ can be run at different threshold values of the same output variable (flow depth, speed, kinetic energy, …) and, therefore, it can serve to compute Exceedance Probability curves (aka hazard curves) at singular points inside the hazard domain, representing the most important and useful scientific input to quantitative risk

  1. The Pomici di Avellino eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (3.9 ka BP). Part II: sedimentology and physical volcanology of pyroclastic density current deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.; Bonasia, R.; Dellino, P.; Mele, D.; di Vito, M. A.; La Volpe, L.

    2010-07-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) generated during the Plinian eruption of the Pomici di Avellino (PdA) of Somma-Vesuvius were investigated through field and laboratory studies, which allowed the detailed reconstruction of their eruptive and transportation dynamics and the calculation of key physical parameters of the currents. PDCs were generated during all the three phases that characterised the eruption, with eruptive dynamics driven by both magmatic and phreatomagmatic fragmentation. Flows generated during phases 1 and 2 (EU1 and EU3pf, magmatic fragmentation) have small dispersal areas and affected only part of the volcano slopes. Lithofacies analysis demonstrates that the flow-boundary zones were dominated by granular-flow regimes, which sometimes show transitions to traction regimes. PDCs generated during eruptive phase 3 (EU5, phreatomagmatic fragmentation) were the most voluminous and widespread in the whole of Somma-Vesuvius’ eruptive history, and affected a wide area around the volcano with deposit thicknesses of a few centimetres up to more than 25 km from source. Lithofacies analysis shows that the flow-boundary zones of EU5 PDCs were dominated by granular flows and traction regimes. Deposits of EU5 PDC show strong lithofacies variation northwards, from proximally thick, massive to stratified beds towards dominantly alternating beds of coarse and fine ash in distal reaches. The EU5 lithofacies also show strong lateral variability in proximal areas, passing from the western and northern to the eastern and southern volcano slopes, where the deposits are stacked beds of massive, accretionary lapilli-bearing fine ash. The sedimentological model developed for the PDCs of the PdA eruption explains these strong lithofacies variations in the light of the volcano’s morphology at the time of the eruption. In particular, the EU5 PDCs survived to pass over the break in slope between the volcano sides and the surrounding volcaniclastic apron-alluvial plain

  2. Crustal contamination and crystal entrapment during polybaric magma evolution at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy: Geochemical and Sr isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochi, M.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Somma, R.

    2006-01-01

    New major and trace element analyses and Sr-isotope determinations of rocks from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano produced from 25 ky BP to 1944 AD are part of an extensive database documenting the geochemical evolution of this classic region. Volcanic rocks include silica undersaturated, potassic and ultrapotassic lavas and tephras characterized by variable mineralogy and different crystal abundance, as well as by wide ranges of trace element contents and a wide span of initial Sr-isotopic compositions. Both the degree of undersaturation in silica and the crystal content increase through time, being higher in rocks produced after the eruption at 472 AD (Pollena eruption). Compositional variations have been generally thought to reflect contributions from diverse types of mantle and crust. Magma mixing is commonly invoked as a fundamental process affecting the magmas, in addition to crystal fractionation. Our assessment of geochemical and Sr-isotopic data indicates that compositional variability also reflects the influence of crustal contamination during magma evolution during upward migration to shallow crustal levels and/or by entrapment of crystal mush generated during previous magma storage in the crust. Using a variant of the assimilation fractional crystallization model (Energy Conservation-Assimilation Fractional Crystallization; [Spera and Bohrson, 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes I: General model and energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) formulation. J. Petrol. 999-1018]; [Bohrson, W.A. and Spera, F.J., 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic process II: application of energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model to magmatic systems. J. Petrol. 1019-1041]) we estimated the contributions from the crust and suggest that contamination by carbonate rocks that underlie the volcano (2 km down to 9-10 km) is a fundamental process controlling magma compositions at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius

  3. The dynamics of a double-cell hydrothermal system in triggering seismicity at Somma-Vesuvius: results from a high-resolution radon survey (revisited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigolini, Corrado

    2010-08-01

    Data collected at Somma-Vesuvius during the 1998-1999 radon surveys have been revisited and reinterpreted in light of recent geophysical and geochemical information. The duration of selected radon anomalies, together with the decay properties of radon, have been used to estimate the permeability and porosity of rocks of the deep hydrothermal system. The current local cyclic seismicity is explained by means of a double convective-cell model. Convective cells are separated by a low-permeability horizon located at about 2-2.5 km below sea level. Fluids convecting within the upper cells show temperatures ranging 300-350°C. Rock permeabilities in this sector are estimated on the order of 10-12 m2, for porosities ( ϕ) of about 10-5 typical of a brittle environment where fluid velocities may reach ˜800 m/day. Fluid temperatures within the lower cells may be as high as 400-450°C, consistent with supercritical regimes. The hydrodynamic parameters for these cells are lower, with permeability k ˜ 10-15 m2, and porosity ranging from 10-6 to 10-7. Here, fluid motion toward the surface is controlled by the fracture network within a porous medium approaching brittle-ductile behaviour, and fluid velocities may reach ˜1,800 m/day. The low-permeability horizon is a layer where upper and lower convecting cells converge. In this region, fluids (convecting both at upper and lower levels) percolate through the wallrock and release their brines. Due to self-sealing processes, permeability within this horizon reaches critical values to keep the fluid pressure near lithostatic pressure (for k ˜ 10-18 m2). Deep fluid pressure buildups precede the onset of hydrothermally induced earthquakes. Permeability distribution and rock strength do not exclude that the next eruption at Somma-Vesuvius could be preceded by a seismic crisis, eventually leading to a precursory phreatic explosion. The coupling of these mechanisms has the potential of inducing pervasive failure within rocks of the

  4. Application of Thermodynamic Databases to the Evaluation of Surface Tensions of Molten Alloys, Salt Mixtures and Oxide Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Iida, Takamichi; Hack, Klaus; Hara, Shigeta

    1996-01-01

    The authors discuss the application of thermodynamic solution databases, which have been constructed so far to calculate thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams, to the evaluation of surface tensions of molten alloys, salt mixtures and oxide mixtures. In particular, the relationship between the excess Gibbs energy in the bulk phase and that in the "surface phase" which are used in Butler's equation for surface tension was derived for molten ionic solutions as well as molten alloys. In thi...

  5. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  6. Cellular automaton simulations of the temporal pattern of activity of a volcano with an application to Vesuvius activity between 1631 and 1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.; Scandone, R.

    2012-04-01

    We simulate the volcanic activity of a basaltic stratovolcano by using a cellular automaton model where magma is allowed to rise through self-organized crack networks. Magma rises toward the surface by filling connected paths of fractures until the magma's density is less than, or equal to that of the surrounding rocks. If magma enters a less dense rock layer, it cools and thus solidifies; as a result, the local density profile is modified, and solid filled dikes are formed. We simulate the temporal evolution of such high density pathway of dikes which magma may eventually utilize to reach the surface with the occurrence of an eruption. Magma degassing is also taken into account by means of the relationship between the pressure-controlled water solubility and the lithostatic pressure. We study the statistical properties of the automaton by varying the model parameters and, in particular, the thickness of the uppermost rock layer, which controls the buoyancy rate of magma rise because of its low value of density. We show that, if the initial rock density profile is restored after each eruption because, for example, piecemeal or chaotic collapses, a characteristic timescale appears in the inter-event repose time distribution, which represents the average time that magma takes to form an high density pathway through the less dense rock layer. An application of the model to the statistics of the eruptive activity of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano for the 1631-1944 period is discussed.

  7. the sub-Plinian Greenish Pumice eruption (19,065±105 yr cal BP) of Mount Somma - Vesuvius. Geochemical and textural constrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Cioni, Raffaello; Mundula, Filippo; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Researches are currently focused on large intensity and stable eruptive columns as for Plinian event. But the large variability in deposits issued from sub-Plinian eruptions needs more observations, theoretical and experimental investigations to be better described and enhances criteria of classification and the knowledge on processes at the origin of this unsteadiness of various timescales. Here, we focus on the well-known example of sub-Plinian eruption exhibiting by Mount Somma-Vesuvius: the Greenish Pumice eruption (GP). On the basis of coupled geochemical and textural analyses we investigate the volatile behavior (H2O, CO2 and halogen (F, Cl)) to better constrain (1) the magma reservoir location and pre-eruptive state and (2) the sub-Plinian eruptive style through a detailed study of the degassing processes in relation with the dynamic of the eruptive column. Results evidence that Cl act as a geobarometer for the trachytic-phonolitic melt involved during the eruption indicating that magma reservoir was at 100 MPa (Cl buffer value: 5300 ±130 ppm) and wholly H2O-saturated (pre-eruptive H2O content between 3.8 and 5.2 wt%). The eruption dynamic is clearly explained by open-system degassing processes responsible of the eruptive column instability, correlated to textural heterogeneities of the eruptive products reflecting conduit heterogeneity (smaller diameter and higher horizontal gradient in magma ascent velocity).

  8. Modeling the spatial distribution of AD 79 pumice fallout and pyroclastic density current and derived deposits of Somma-Vesuvius (Campania, Italy) integrating primary deposition and secondary redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sebastian; Märker, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The spatial distributions of primary deposits and related reworked ones from Plinian fallout and from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) of the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius were independently modeled for the Sarno River plain (Campania, Italy). The simulation takes into consideration both primary deposition of the volcanic products and their secondary redistribution by geomorphic processes of erosion, transport, and redeposition. We hypothesize that the pre-eruption topography controlled both the intial volcanic deposition of PDCs and the subsequent processes redistributing material of the pumice fallout and PDC deposits, and thus significantly controlled the thickness of the final volcaniclastic deposits. The methodology applied is based on a reconstructed pre-AD 79 digital elevation model of the Sarno River plain, an extensive tephrostratigraphic dataset from about 1,200 core drillings and a predictive modeling technique. The two models produce contrasting spatial distribution patterns for both the AD 79 deposits from fallout plus their derivates, versus from PDCs and their derivatives. The contrast allows determination of the most important factors controlling the thickness of the AD 79 volcaniclastic deposits. This provides new insights into the process dynamics during and immediately after the AD 79 Plinian eruption including primary deposition, erosion, and redistribution.

  9. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  10. Electrochemical studies of calcium chloride-based molten salt systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jr., Thomas P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Conductance and EMF studies of CaCl2-based melts were performed in the temperature range 790--990 C. Conductivity data collected using magnesia tubes and capillaries showed deviations from the data recommended by the National Bureau of Standards. These deviations are attributed to the slow dissolution of magnesia by the CaCl2-CaO melt. Conductivity data for molten CaCl2 using a pyrolytic boron nitride capillary were in reasonable agreement with the recommended data; however, undissolved CaO in CaCl2 may have caused blockage of the pyrolytic boron nitride capillary, resulting in fluctuations in the measured resistance. The utility of the AgCl/Ag reference electrode in CaCl2-AgCl and CaCl2-CaO-AgCl melts, using asbestos diaphragms and Vycor glass as reference half-cell membranes, was also investigated. Nernstian behavior was observed using both types of reference half-cell membranes in CaCl2-AgCl melts. The AgCl/Ag reference electrode also exhibited Nernstian behavior in CaCl2-CaO-AgCl melts using a Vycor reference half-cell membrane and a magnesia crucible. The use of CaCl2 as a solvent is of interest since it is used in plutonium metal purification, as well as various other commercial applications. 97 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Carbon particle induced foaming of molten sucrose for the preparation of carbon foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimman, R.; Vijayan, Sujith; Prabhakaran, K., E-mail: kp2952002@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An easy method for the preparation of carbon foam from sucrose is presented. • Wood derived activated carbon particles are used to stabilize the molten sucrose foam. • The carbon foams show relatively good mechanical strength. • The carbon foams show excellent CO{sub 2} adsorption and oil absorption properties. • The process could be scaled up for the preparation of large foam bodies. - Abstract: Activated carbon powder was used as a foaming and foam setting agent for the preparation of carbon foams with a hierarchical pore structure from molten sucrose. The rheological measurements revealed the interruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in molten sucrose by the carbon particles. The carbon particles stabilized the bubbles in molten sucrose by adsorbing on the molten sucrose–gas interface. The carbon foams obtained at the activated carbon powder to sucrose weight ratios in the range of 0–0.25 had a compressive strength in the range of 1.35–0.31 MPa. The produced carbon foams adsorb 2.59–3.04 mmol/g of CO{sub 2} at 760 mmHg at 273 K and absorb oil from oil–water mixtures and surfactant stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with very good selectivity and recyclability.

  12. The effect of conditioning agents on the corrosive properties of molten urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, D E; Nguyen, D T; Norton, M M; Parker, B R; Daniels, L E

    1991-01-01

    From the process case histories of the failure of several heat exchanger tube bundles, it was revealed that molten urea containing lignosulfonate as a granulation conditioning-hardening agent (Urea LS[trademark]) is corrosive to Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The results of field and laboratory immersion corrosion tests indicated that the corrosivity of molten urea is strongly dependent on the process temperature rather than the conditioner composition. At temperatures below 295F, molten Urea LS[trademark] is not aggressive to these stainless steels. However, at temperatures above 300F, the corrosion of these stainless steels is extremely severe. The corrosion rate of Types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L is as high as hundreds of mils per year. The corrosion mechanism tends to be more general than localized. The results of the laboratory corrosion test also revealed that among alloying elements, copper is detrimental to corrosion resistance of stainless steel exposed to molten Urea LS[trademark], chromium is the most beneficial, and nickel has only a minor effect. Thus, copper-free and chromium stainless steels have superior corrosion resistance to the molten Urea LS[trademark] at a wide range of temperatures up to 345F.

  13. Preparation of Al-Sc Master Alloy by Aluminothermic Reaction with Special Molten Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cong; Liu, Xinxin; Ma, Fengmei; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Wenhong; Ma, Chaoli

    Al-Sc master alloy is prepared by aluminothermic reaction with a kind of special molten salt under the normal atmospheric condition. To achieve larger Sc recovery rate, the composition and pretreatment of the molten salt are studied. The optimum molten salt is obtained by melting together Sc2O3, NaF, KCl, NaCl, ScF3 and Na3AlF6 mixture under a mass ratio of 3:5:10:10:2:30, followed by solidifying and crushing. The pretreated salt is added to the Aluminum melt with a mass ratio of 60:100 to prepare Al-Sc master alloy. When the residue of molten salt is reused for three times, the Sc recovery rate can reach 91%. The structure and composition of the residue are examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyzer. Based on the analysis of the residue, mechanism of the aluminothermic reaction to achieve larger Sc recovery rate with this special molten salt is discussed.

  14. Molten metal-related ocular thermal burn: report on two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyhun Arici

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We report two cases of severe thermal burns on the ocular surface and its adnexal appendages that developed secondary to exposure to molten heavy metal with a melting temperature of near-thousand degree Celsius. Despite aggressive intervention and strict monitoring, the profound inflammation caused significant damage to the ocular surface, ending up in an intractable infection with an unfavorable outcome. The heat of the molten metal at impact, the heat-retaining capacity of the heavy metal, the total area of the ocular surface exposed to the molten metal, and the duration of exposure determined the severity of the injury. The unfavorable outcome, despite an intensive treatment, in terms of visual acuity and cosmetic appearance, should be explicitly explained to the patient, and a psychiatrist consultation should be considered if necessary.

  15. Assessment of deposition for power-plant molten-carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenglarz, R. A.

    1982-03-01

    Particulate deposition in molten carbonate fuel cell anodes is addressed for operation with future coal gasification power plants. Power plant systems factors affecting deposition are explored such as gas cleanup requirements for particulate removal and gasifier product gas composition differences for various gasifier types and operational modes (air blown versus oxygen blown). Effects of fuel cell characteristics (including average cell current density and fuel utilization) on anode deposition are also quantified. Particulate effects on molten carbonate fuel cell anode performance may not be as detrimental as perhaps perceived in the past. Gas cleanup to remove virtually all particles larger than one micron in diameter is expected to prevent or at least greatly reduce anode deposition. However, cathode deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells should be evaluated in the future since cathodes are likely more prone to deposition than anodes even though cathode channel particle concentrations are much lower.

  16. Catalytic molten metals for the direct conversion of methane to hydrogen and separable carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upham, D Chester; Agarwal, Vishal; Khechfe, Alexander; Snodgrass, Zachary R; Gordon, Michael J; Metiu, Horia; McFarland, Eric W

    2017-11-17

    Metals that are active catalysts for methane (Ni, Pt, Pd), when dissolved in inactive low-melting temperature metals (In, Ga, Sn, Pb), produce stable molten metal alloy catalysts for pyrolysis of methane into hydrogen and carbon. All solid catalysts previously used for this reaction have been deactivated by carbon deposition. In the molten alloy system, the insoluble carbon floats to the surface where it can be skimmed off. A 27% Ni-73% Bi alloy achieved 95% methane conversion at 1065°C in a 1.1-meter bubble column and produced pure hydrogen without CO 2 or other by-products. Calculations show that the active metals in the molten alloys are atomically dispersed and negatively charged. There is a correlation between the amount of charge on the atoms and their catalytic activity. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  18. A Feasibility Study of Steelmaking by Molten Oxide Electrolysis (TRP9956)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Sadoway; Gerbrand Ceder

    2009-12-31

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is an extreme form of molten salt electrolysis, a technology that has been used to produce tonnage metals for over 100 years - aluminum, magnesium, lithium, sodium and the rare earth metals specifically. The use of carbon-free anodes is the distinguishing factor in MOE compared to other molten salt electrolysis techniques. MOE is totally carbon-free and produces no CO or CO2 - only O2 gas at the anode. This project is directed at assessing the technical feasibility of MOE at the bench scale while determining optimum values of MOE operating parameters. An inert anode will be identified and its ability to sustain oxygen evalution will be demonstrated.

  19. Thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4: Temperature dependence of Raman spectra and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Christian B.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    intensities with the stoichiometric coefficients, the equilibrium constant, and the thermodynamics of the reaction equilibrium is derived. The method is used-along with the temperature-dependent features of the Raman spectra-to show that the studied equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g) is the only......Raman spectroscopy is used to study the thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4 at temperatures of 240-450 degrees C under static equilibrium conditions. Raman spectra obtained at 10 different temperatures for the molten phase and for the vapors thereof exhibit vibrational wavenumbers and relative...... band intensities inferring the occurrence of the temperature-dependent dissociation equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g). The Raman data are adequate for determining the partial pressures of H2O in the gas phase above the molten mixtures. A formalism for correlating relative Raman band...

  20. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex chemistry...

  1. Model of Infiltration of Spent Automotive Catalysts by Molten Metal in Process of Platinum Metals Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Fornalczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model for the washing-out process of precious metals from spent catalysts by the use of molten lead in which the metal flow is caused by the rotating electromagnetic field and the Lorentz force. The model includes the coupling of the electromagnetic field with the hydrodynamic field, the flow of metal through anisotropic and porous structure of the catalyst, and the movement of the phase boundary (air-metal during infiltration of the catalyst carrier by the molten metal. The developed model enabled analysis of the impact of spacing between the catalysts and the supply current on the degree of catalyst infiltration by the molten metal. The results of calculations carried out on the basis of the model were verified experimentally.

  2. Advances in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for the Production of Oxygen and Metals from Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Sibille, Laurent; Melendez, Orlando; Lueck, Dale; Curreri, Peter; Dominquez, Jesus; Whitlow, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure to sustain long term-human presence on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by electrolysis of lunar regolith has been the subject of major scrutiny. There is a reasonably large body of literature characterizing the candidate solvent electrolytes, including ionic liquids, molten salts, fluxed oxides, and pure molten regolith itself. In the light of this information and in consideration of available electrolytic technologies, the authors have determined that direct molten oxide electrolysis at temperatures of approx 1600 C is the most promising avenue for further development. Results from ongoing studies as well as those of previous workers will be presented. Topics include materials selection and testing, electrode stability, gas capture and analysis, and cell operation during feeding and tapping.

  3. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  4. Preparation of biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics using molten salt synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwchem@126.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecology in Arid Areas, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, 126# Yanta Road, Xi' an 710054, Shaanxi (China); Hou, Guangya [College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Wang, Boya; Deng, Shunxi [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecology in Arid Areas, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, 126# Yanta Road, Xi' an 710054, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-09-15

    Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics were prepared from beech wood using liquid Si infiltration and molten salts synthesis. The resulting mullite whiskers coating, as well as the growth mechanism in molten Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} environment, have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from the beech wood template have coarse pore walls consisting of β-SiC grains with diameters ranging from 5 μm to 20 μm. After the molten salts reactions between biomorphic SiC substrate and mixture molten salts (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), porous Silicon carbide–mullite ceramics with cilia-like microstructure were obtained. This unique structure has potential application in hot gases filters. An oxidation–dissolution cycle was proposed to explain the mullite whiskers growth in molten salts environment. - Graphical abstract: Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics with cilia-like microstructure prepared from beech wood using liquid Si infiltration (LSI) and molten salts reactions (MSR) processes. Mullite whiskers with nanometer-sized diameters and micrometer-sized lengths grow on the surface of SiC substrate, and the biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics inherit the porous microstructure originated from biomorphic SiC ceramics and beech wood. The mullite whiskers grow on the pores' surface of biomorphic SiC to form cilia-like surface, and this special structure can be used for hot gases filter. - Highlights: • Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics were prepared. • An oxidation–dissolution mechanism was proposed to explain the coating formation. • The unique structure has potential application in hot gases filter.

  5. Method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell, a fuel cell, a fuel cell stack and an apparatus provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    A method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and in between a matrix comprising molten carbonate. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the matrix at a distance from the cathode. This greatly reduces the cathode's deterioration and in the system design increases the

  6. Method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell, a fuel cell, a fuel cell stack and an apparatus provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    A method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and in between a matrix comprising molten carbonate. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the matrix at a distance from the cathode. This greatly reduces the cathode's deterioration and in the system design increases the

  7. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing low reluctance rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and rollers including low reluctance rim structures. The magnetic field and the rollers help contain the molten metal from leaking out of the containment structure.

  8. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V in molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrl, W. H.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V has been studied in several molten salt environments. Extensive data are reported for the alloy in highly pure LiCl-KCl. The influence of the metallurgical heat treatment and texture, and the mechanical microstructure show similarities with aqueous solutions at lower temperature. The fracture path and cracking modes are also similar to that found in other environments. The influence of H2O and H(-) in molten LiCl-KCl lead to the conclusion that hydrogen does not play a major role in crack extension in this environment.

  10. Recent development in electrolytic formation of carbon nanotubes in molten salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the recent research development in the electrolytic production of carbon nano-tubes in molten salts. The experimental procedure and product morphologies of the electrolytic method are described in details. Different hypotheses of the carbon nano-tube formation mechanism in molten salts, particularly it relation with the erosion of the cathode, are compared and discussed. It is anticipated that the electrolytic method can potentially become a cheap and continuous process for the production of curved carbon nano-tubes, carbon sheathed metal nanowires and other carbon based nano-structures.

  11. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  12. Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop applied for a fusion reactor Flibe blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Saburo; Chiba, Shinya E-mail: schiba@karma.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Omae, Masahiro; Sagara, Akio

    2002-12-01

    Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop (MSL) is described in this paper. The MSL was designed to be able to use Flibe as a coolant, however, a simulant, heat transfer salt (HTS) has to be used alternatively since Flibe is difficult to operate under avoiding a biohazard of Be. Experiment on heat-transfer enhancement, that is required for applying to cool the high heat flux components of fusion reactors, is ongoing. Preliminary experimental results showed that an internal structure of a mixing chamber in the MSL was important to obtain accurate bulk temperatures under severe thermal conditions. For operating the loop, careful handling are needed to proceed how to melt the salt and to circulate it in starting the operation of the MSL. It is concluded that several improvements proposed from the present experiences should be applied for the future Flibe operation.

  13. Probabilistic Volcanic Multi-Hazard Assessment at Somma-Vesuvius (Italy): coupling Bayesian Belief Networks with a physical model for lahar propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierz, Pablo; Woodhouse, Mark; Phillips, Jeremy; Sandri, Laura; Selva, Jacopo; Marzocchi, Warner; Odbert, Henry

    2017-04-01

    and, finally, assess the probability of occurrence of lahars of different volumes. The information utilized to parametrize the BBNs includes: (1) datasets of lahar observations; (2) numerical modelling of tephra fallout and PDCs; and (3) literature data. The BBN framework provides an opportunity to quantitatively combine these different types of evidence and use them to derive a rational approach to lahar forecasting. Lastly, we couple the BBN assessments with a shallow-water physical model for lahar propagation in order to attach probabilities to the simulated hazard footprints. We develop our methodology at Somma-Vesuvius (Italy), an explosive volcano prone to rain-triggered lahars or debris flows whether right after an eruption or during inter-eruptive periods. Accounting for the variability in tephra-fallout and dense-PDC propagation and the main geomorphological features of the catchments around Somma-Vesuvius, the areas most likely of forming medium-large lahars are the flanks of the volcano and the Sarno mountains towards the east.

  14. Reconstructing the paleo-topography and paleo-environmental features of the Sarno River plain (Italy) before the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sebastian; Märker, Michael

    2010-05-01

    SSP1.4 Understanding mixed siliciclastic-volcaniclastic depositional systems and their relationships with geodynamics or GD2.3/CL4.14/GM5.8/MPRG22/SSP3.5 Reconstruction of ancient continents: Dating and characterization of paleosurfaces Reconstructing the paleo-topography and paleo-environmental features of the Sarno River plain (Italy) before the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex Sebastian Vogel[1] & Michael Märker[1] [1] Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities c/o University of Tübingen, Rümelinstraße 19-23, D-72070 Tübingen, Germany. Within the geoarchaeological research project "Reconstruction of the Ancient Cultural Landscape of the Sarno River Plain" undertaken by the German Archaeological Institute in cooperation with the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities/University of Tübingen a methodology was developed to model the spatial dispersion of volcanic deposits of Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex since its Plinian eruption AD 79. Eventually, this was done to reconstruct the paleo-topography and paleo-environment of the Sarno River plain before the eruption AD 79. We collected, localized and digitized more than 1,800 core drillings to gain a representative network of stratigraphical information covering the entire plain. Besides other stratigraphical data including the characteristics of the pre-AD 79 stratum, the depth to the pre-AD 79 paleo-surface was identified from the available drilling documentation. Instead of applying a simple interpolation of the drilling data, we reconstructed the pre-AD 79 paleo-surface with a sophisticated geostatistical methodology using a machine based learning approach based on classification and regression trees. We hypothesize that the present-day topography reflects the ancient topography, because the eruption of AD 79 coated the ancient topography, leaving ancient physiographic elements of the Sarno River plain still recognizable in the present-day topography. Therefore, a high resolution

  15. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  16. Reconstructing the Roman topography and environmental features of the Sarno River Plain (Italy) before the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sebastian; Märker, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A methodology was developed to reconstruct the Roman topography and environmental features of the Sarno River plain, Italy, before the AD 79 eruption of the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex. We collected, localized and digitized more than 1800 core drilling data to gain a representative network of stratigraphical information covering the entire plain. Besides other stratigraphical data including the characteristics of the pre-AD 79 stratum, the depth to the pre-AD 79 surface was identified from the available drilling documentations. Instead of a simple interpolation method, we used a machine based learning approach based on classification and regression trees to reconstruct the pre-AD 79 topography. We hypothesize that the present-day topography reflects the ancient topography and related surface processes, because volcanic deposits from the AD 79 eruption coated the ancient landscape. Thus, ancient physiographic elements of the Sarno River plain are still recognizable in the present-day topography. Therefore, a high-resolution, present-day digital elevation model (DEM) was generated. A detailed terrain analysis yielded 15 different primary and secondary topographic indices. Subsequently, a classification and regression model was applied to predict the depth of the pre-AD 79 surface combining present-day topographic indices with other physiographic data. This model was calibrated with the measured depth of the pre-AD 79 surface. The resulting pre-AD 79 DEM was compared with the classified characteristic of the pre-AD 79 stratum, identified from the drilling documentations. This allowed the reconstruction of pre-AD 79 environmental features of the Sarno River plain such as the ancient coastline, the paleo-course of the Sarno River and its floodplain. To the knowledge of the authors, it is the first time that the pre-AD 79 topography of the Sarno River plain was systematically reconstructed using a detailed database and sophisticated data mining technologies.

  17. Automatized near-real-time short-term Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment of tephra dispersion before eruptions: BET_VHst for Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei during recent exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Jacopo; Costa, Antonio; Sandri, Laura; Rouwet, Dmtri; Tonini, Roberto; Macedonio, Giovanni; Marzocchi, Warner

    2015-04-01

    Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) represents the most complete scientific contribution for planning rational strategies aimed at mitigating the risk posed by volcanic activity at different time scales. The definition of the space-time window for PVHA is related to the kind of risk mitigation actions that are under consideration. Short temporal intervals (days to weeks) are important for short-term risk mitigation actions like the evacuation of a volcanic area. During volcanic unrest episodes or eruptions, it is of primary importance to produce short-term tephra fallout forecast, and frequently update it to account for the rapidly evolving situation. This information is obviously crucial for crisis management, since tephra may heavily affect building stability, public health, transportations and evacuation routes (airports, trains, road traffic) and lifelines (electric power supply). In this study, we propose a methodology named BET_VHst (Selva et al. 2014) for short-term PVHA of volcanic tephra dispersal based on automatic interpretation of measures from the monitoring system and physical models of tephra dispersal from all possible vent positions and eruptive sizes based on frequently updated meteorological forecasts. The large uncertainty at all the steps required for the analysis, both aleatory and epistemic, is treated by means of Bayesian inference and statistical mixing of long- and short-term analyses. The BET_VHst model is here presented through its implementation during two exercises organized for volcanoes in the Neapolitan area: MESIMEX for Mt. Vesuvius, and VUELCO for Campi Flegrei. References Selva J., Costa A., Sandri L., Macedonio G., Marzocchi W. (2014) Probabilistic short-term volcanic hazard in phases of unrest: a case study for tephra fallout, J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi: 10.1002/2014JB011252

  18. A comparison of conventional and prototype nondestructive measurements on molten salt extraction residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmire, V.L.; Hurd, J.R.; Sedlacek, W.E.; Scarborough, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Fourteen molten salt extraction residues were assayed by conventional and prototype nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques to be compared with destructive chemical analysis in an effort to identify acceptable NDA measurement methods for this matrix. NDA results on seven samples and destructive results on four samples are presented.

  19. Behaviour of molten pools and fuel particle beds during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barleon, L.; Feuerstein, H.; Perinic, D.; Kuhn, D.; Werle, H.

    1983-01-01

    The recent work on core meltdown discussed herein concentrates on cooling within the tank and the retention of molten fuel masses, regarding in particular large LMFBR-type reactors. The article presents studies on the following problem complexes: transfer of fuel from the core area, behaviour of spent-fuel pools and particle beds, and material interaction and fission product behaviour.

  20. High Power Molten Targets for Radioactive Ion Beam Production: from Particle Physics to Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    De Melo Mendonca, T M

    2014-01-01

    Megawatt-class molten targets, combining high material densities and good heat transfer properties are being considered for neutron spallation sources, neutrino physics facilities and radioactive ion beam production. For this last category of facilities, in order to cope with the limitation of long diffusion times affecting the extraction of short-lived isotopes, a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target loop equipped with a diffusion chamber has been proposed and tested offline during the EURISOL design study. To validate the concept, a molten LBE loop is now in the design phase and will be prototyped and tested on-line at CERN-ISOLDE. This concept was further extended to an alternative route to produce 1013 18Ne/s for the Beta Beams, where a molten salt loop would be irradiated with 7 mA, 160 MeV proton beam. Some elements of the concept have been tested by using a molten fluoride salt static unit at CERNISOLDE. The investigation of the release and production of neon isotopes allowed the measurement of the diffu...

  1. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600?C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form? process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  2. Form Four Students' Misconceptions in Electrolysis of Molten Compounds and Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Anita Yung Li; Lee, Tien Tien

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the Form Four students' misconceptions in the electrolysis of molten compounds and aqueous solutions. The respondents were 60 Form Four students from two secondary schools in Sibu, Sarawak. The two instruments used in this study were an open-ended electrochemistry assessment and interview protocol. This…

  3. Development of Component Materials for 100kW Class Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.C.; Lee, C.G. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This Report is a component development schedule f or the progressing project ''Development of a 100kW class Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell''. In This report, development direction for the electrodes, electrolyte and matricse as well as their production specification and schedule are described. (author) 68 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. The structure of molten ZnCl2: A new analysis of some old data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a recently derived method, based on empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR), the structure of molten zinc chloride (ZnCl2) is re-analysed. Contrary to the picture given in some early analyses, the results indicate that there are significant uncertainties in the extracted site–site radial distribution functions, ...

  5. Thermodynamic study of the molten salt binary system KHSO4-NaHSO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Hatem, G

    2002-01-01

    The partial molar enthalpies of mixing of NaHSO4 and KHSO4 have been measured at 528 K by dropping samples of pure compounds into molten mixtures of NaHSO4 and KHSO4 in Calvet calorimeter. From these values the molar enthalpy of mixing has been deduced.The same method has been used for the determ...

  6. Ethanol steam reforming heated up by molten salt CSP: Reactor assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Falco, Marcello; Gallucci, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper hydrogen production via reforming of ethanol has been studied in a novel hybrid plant consisting in a ethanol reformer and a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant using molten salt as heat carrier fluid. The heat needed for the reforming of ethanol has been supplied to the system by

  7. A Parametric Sizing Model for Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactors to Produce Oxygen from Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Samuel S.; Dominguez, Jesus A.; Sibille, Laurent; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a parametric sizing model for a Molten Electrolysis Reactor that produces oxygen and molten metals from lunar regolith. The model has a foundation of regolith material properties validated using data from Apollo samples and simulants. A multiphysics simulation of an MRE reactor is developed and leveraged to generate a vast database of reactor performance and design trends. A novel design methodology is created which utilizes this database to parametrically design an MRE reactor that 1) can sustain the required mass of molten regolith, current, and operating temperature to meet the desired oxygen production level, 2) can operate for long durations via joule heated, cold wall operation in which molten regolith does not touch the reactor side walls, 3) can support a range of electrode separations to enable operational flexibility. Mass, power, and performance estimates for an MRE reactor are presented for a range of oxygen production levels. The effects of several design variables are explored, including operating temperature, regolith type/composition, batch time, and the degree of operational flexibility.

  8. The measurement of hydrogen activities in molten copper using an oxide protonic conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Noriaki; Fukatsu, Norihiko; Ohashi, Teruo; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Fumiaki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Irie, Kazuhiko

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a hydrogen sensor for in situ measurements of hydrogen activities in molten copper. The sensor consists of a concentration cell utilizing a proton conductor, CaZr0.9In0.1O3-δ, as the solid electrolyte. The electromotive force (emf) of the cell was generated by both hydrogen and oxygen activity gradients across the cell in a high-temperature region simulating the fire refining processes of copper. However, accurate hydrogen activity in molten copper could be evaluated from the emf if oxygen activity in molten copper was determined simultaneously by another concentration cell and if the hydrogen and the oxygen activities at the reference electrode were known. The performance of the sensor was studied under various conditions. The observed good response and reliability of the sensor show that it should be a powerful tool for improvement of the fire refining process of the molten copper. Theoretical treatment of the calculation of the emf of the concentration cells using a mixed ionic conductor, i.e., protonic and oxide ionic conductor, as solid electrolytes is also discussed briefly.

  9. Effect of Ni-Co Ternary Molten Salt Catalysts on Coal Catalytic Pyrolysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin; Qi, Cong; Li, Liang; Li, Yimin; Li, Song

    2017-08-01

    In order to facilitate efficient and clean utilization of coal, a series of Ni-Co ternary molten salt crystals are explored and the catalytic pyrolysis mechanism of Datong coal is investigated. The reaction mechanisms of coal are achieved by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA), and a reactive kinetic model is constructed. The microcosmic structure and macerals are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The catalytic effects of ternary molten salt crystals at different stages of pyrolysis are analyzed. The experimental results show that Ni-Co ternary molten salt catalysts have the capability to bring down activation energy required by pyrolytic reactions at its initial phase. Also, the catalysts exert a preferable catalytic action on macromolecular structure decomposition and free radical polycondensation reactions. Furthermore, the high-temperature condensation polymerization is driven to decompose further with a faster reaction rate by the additions of Ni-Co ternary molten salt crystal catalysts. According to pyrolysis kinetic research, the addition of catalysts can effectively decrease the activation energy needed in each phase of pyrolysis reaction.

  10. Electrical conductivity of molten ZnCl{sub 2} at temperature as high as 1421 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M. [RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg. (Russian Federation) Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten ZnCl{sub 2} was measured in a wide temperature range (ΔT=863 K) to a temperature as high as 1421 K that is 417 degrees above the boiling point of the salt. At the temperature maximum of the own vapor pressure of the salt reached several megapascals.

  11. Electrical conductivity of molten SnCl{sub 2} at temperature as high as 1314 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M. [Ural Branch of RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten SnCl{sub 2} was measured in a wide temperature range (ΔT=763 K), from 551 K to temperature as high as 1314 K, that is, 391 above the boiling point of the salt. The specific electrical conductance was found to reach its maximum at 1143 K, after that it decreases with the temperature rising.

  12. Wall heat transfer coefficient in a molten salt bubble column: testing the experimental setup

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available reactors that are highly exothermic or endothermic. This paper presents the design and operation of experimental setup used for measurement of the heat transfer coefficient in molten salt media. The experimental setup was operated with tap water, heat...

  13. Variation of diffusivity with the cation radii in molten salts of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Variation of diffusivity with the cation radii in molten salts of superionic conductors containing iodine anion: A molecular dynamics study. Srinivasa R Varanasi S Yashonath. Volume 124 Issue 1 January 2012 pp 159-166 ...

  14. Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride To Purify Molten Salt Reactor Coolant and Heat Transfer Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2017-05-02

    Abstract: The molten salt cooled nuclear reactor is included as one of the Generation IV reactor types. One of the challenges with the implementation of this reactor is purifying and maintaining the purity of the various molten fluoride salts that will be used as coolants. The method used for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s molten salt experimental test reactor was to treat the coolant with a mixture of H2 and HF at 600°C. In this article we evaluate thermal NF3 treatment for purifying molten fluoride salt coolant candidates based on NF3’s 1) past use to purify fluoride salts, 2) other industrial uses, 3) commercial availability, 4) operational, chemical, and health hazards, 5) environmental effects and environmental risk management methods, 6) corrosive properties, and 7) thermodynamic potential to eliminate impurities that could arise due to exposure to water and oxygen. Our evaluation indicates that nitrogen trifluoride is a viable and safer alternative to the previous method.

  15. A Novel Modeling of Molten-Salt Heat Storage Systems in Thermal Solar Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Peón Menéndez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many thermal solar power plants use thermal oil as heat transfer fluid, and molten salts as thermal energy storage. Oil absorbs energy from sun light, and transfers it to a water-steam cycle across heat exchangers, to be converted into electric energy by means of a turbogenerator, or to be stored in a thermal energy storage system so that it can be later transferred to the water-steam cycle. The complexity of these thermal solar plants is rather high, as they combine traditional engineering used in power stations (water-steam cycle or petrochemical (oil piping, with the new solar (parabolic trough collector and heat storage (molten salts technologies. With the engineering of these plants being relatively new, regulation of the thermal energy storage system is currently achieved in manual or semiautomatic ways, controlling its variables with proportional-integral-derivative (PID regulators. This makes the overall performance of these plants non optimal. This work focuses on energy storage systems based on molten salt, and defines a complete model of the process. By defining such a model, the ground for future research into optimal control methods will be established. The accuracy of the model will be determined by comparing the results it provides and those measured in the molten-salt heat storage system of an actual power plant.

  16. Thermal Stress and Heat Transfer Coefficient for Ceramics Stalk Having Protuberance Dipping into Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Hendra; Li, Wenbin; Takase, Yasushi; Ogura, Hiroki; Higashi, Yusuke

    Low pressure die casting is defined as a net shape casting technology in which the molten metal is injected at high speeds and pressure into a metallic die. The low pressure die casting process plays an increasingly important role in the foundry industry as a low-cost and high-efficiency precision forming technique. In the low pressure die casting process is that the permanent die and filling systems are placed over the furnace containing the molten alloy. The filling of the cavity is obtained by forcing the molten metal, by means of a pressurized gas, to rise into a ceramic tube having protuberance, which connects the die to the furnace. The ceramics tube, called stalk, has high temperature resistance and high corrosion resistance. However, attention should be paid to the thermal stress when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the molten aluminum. It is important to reduce the risk of fracture that may happen due to the thermal stresses. In this paper, thermo-fluid analysis is performed to calculate surface heat transfer coefficient. The finite element method is applied to calculate the thermal stresses when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the crucible with varying dipping speeds. It is found that the stalk with or without protuberance should be dipped into the crucible slowly to reduce the thermal stress.

  17. Opening Electrical Contacts: The Transition from the Molten Metal Bridge to the Electric Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Paul G.

    This paper presents a comprehensive explanation of the formation of the electric arc between opening contacts in a current carrying electric circuit. As the contacts begin to open a molten metal bridge forms between them. The rupture of this bridge and the initial formation of the electric arc are studied in both atmospheric air and vacuum using experiments to determine the direction of metal transfer between the contacts as a function of time after the rupture of the molten metal bridge. High speed streak photography is also used to show the rupture of the molten metal bridge and the initial formation of the electric arc. Analysis of these data show that a very high-pressure, high-temperature metal vapor zone exists between the contacts after the rupture of the molten metal bridge. Under this condition a pseudo-arc forms where current is carried by metal ions and an anomalous, high net transfer of metal to the cathodic contact occurs. The pressure in this region decreases rapidly and there is a transition to the usual electric arc, which still operates in the metal vapor. In this arc the current is now mostly carried by electrons. The data shows that there is still a net transfer of metal to the cathode, but now its volume is a function of the arcing time.

  18. Electrodeposition of antimony, tellurium and their alloys from molten acetamide mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Peng, X.; Murugan, G.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the electrodeposition of antimony (Sb), tellurium (Te) and their alloys from molten mixtures of acetamide - antimony chloride and tellurium chloride. The binary mixtures of acetamide with SbCl3 and TeCl 4 exhibit eutectic formation with large depressions of freezing points to below room

  19. Electrochemical Behavior of La on Liquid Bi electrode in LiCl-KCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom Kyu; Han, Hwa Jeong; Park, Byung Gi [Soonchunyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Pyroprocessing technology aims to achieve a grouped and efficiently separation of all actinide for recycling with a sufficient decontamination of fission products generating the minimum. The main steps of the pyroprocess is electrowinning process, where the remaining elements in a molten salt after electrorifinning process. That process is U, MAs are concurrently recovered at the liquid metal. Recently, a study of the liquid metal and molten salt using an electrochemical is carried out in a variety of fields. However, there is deficient information about the electrode reaction of lanthanide and actinide on the liquid bismuth metal electrodes. In this paper, the electrochemical behavior of La(III), with liquid bismuth was investigated by the electrochemical method. The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of lanthanum or neodymium among lanthanides in molten LiCl-KCl salt at liquid metal bismuth electrode cyclic voltammetry and derive the thermochemical properties. The electrochemical behavior of La was studied in LiCl-KCl-LaCl{sub 3} molten salts using electrochemical techniques Cyclic Voltammetry on liquid Bi electrodes at 773K. During the process of cyclic voltammetry electrolysis, intermetallic compound were observed of La, Lax-Biy, Li-Bi. The diffusion coefficient of La was measured by cyclic voltemmetry and was found to be 8.18x10{sup -5}cm{sup 2}/s.

  20. Test Plans for Investigating Molten Fuel Behavior in Coolant Channel during SFR Core Melting Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Soo Dong; Hahn, Doo Hee; Lee, Yong Bum

    2006-09-15

    The metal-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor system is expected to accommodate all credible malfunctions or accident initiators passively without damage to the core. However, the evaluation of the safety performance and the containment requirements for this system will most likely require consideration of postulated low-probability accident sequences that result in partial or whole core melting. For these sequences, some phenomenological uncertainties exist and experimental data are needed for modeling purposes. One such data need is concerned with the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above-and below-core structures and possibly in inter subassembly spaces. The first basic data need is the properties for metallic fuel/steel mixtures such as liquidus/solidus and mobilization temperatures, as part of measurement of phenomenological data describing the relocation and freezing behavior of molten metallic fuel. Accordingly, plans for two different tests, one for determination of the liquidus/solidus temperature and another for determination of the mobilization temperature, are described in this report. Test plans are then described in the report for the investigations of the relocation and freezing behavior of molten metallic fuel in coolant channels, including possible chemical interactions of molten fuel with the channel steel structure.

  1. The Solubility of metal oxides in molten carbonates - why the acid-basic chemistry fails?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Niels; Qingfeng, Li; Borup, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    Solubilities of various metal oxides in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650°C under carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubility of NiO and PbO decreases with increasing lithium mole fraction and decreasing CO2 partial pressure. On the other hand, the emf measurement...

  2. Numerical Evaluation of Cyclone Application for Impurities Removal from Molten Aluminum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turchin, A.N.; Eskin, D.G.; Katgerman, L.

    2008-01-01

    The purification of gaseous and liquid media by means of a cyclone concept is well known and has been successfully applied in different industries. While the impurities removal from molten metal has been an important issue for many years, to the best of our knowledge, the application of a cyclone

  3. Production of Synthetic Rutile from Molten Titanium Slag with the Addition of B2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Helin; Duan, Huamei; Tan, Kai; Li, Yuankun; Chen, Dengfu; Long, Mujun; Liu, Tao

    2017-10-01

    A new process of producing synthetic rutile from molten titanium slag with the addition B2O3 is proposed. The process includes a molten modification process and a leaching process. The molten modification process was conducted by adding B2O3 into molten slag. The leaching process was conducted by adding hydrochloric acid and subsequent NaOH. The results show that CaO and MgO are leached out by hydrochloric acid and that synthetic rutile is further improved by NaOH. The optimized conditions are 2% B2O3 amount, 5% hydrochloric concentration, 80°C leaching temperature, and 30 min leaching time. The synthetic rutile with 86.77% TiO2 and 1.23% (CaO + MgO) was prepared. From x-ray diffraction results, thermodynamic calculation and the theory of bond parameter function, with the addition of B2O3, calcium silicate is transformed into calcium borate and anosovite is transformed into magnesium borate. Calcium borate and magnesium borate are leached out by hydrochloric acid, leading to the enrichment of rutile.

  4. Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R W; Shaw, H F; Caro, A; Kaufman, L; Latkowski, J F; Powers, J; Turchi, P A

    2008-10-24

    Molten salt with dissolved uranium is being considered for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) fission blanket as a backup in case a solid-fuel version cannot meet the performance objectives, for example because of radiation damage of the solid materials. Molten salt is not damaged by radiation and therefore could likely achieve the desired high burnup (>99%) of heavy atoms of {sup 238}U. A perceived disadvantage is the possibility that the circulating molten salt could lend itself to misuse (proliferation) by making separation of fissile material easier than for the solid-fuel case. The molten salt composition being considered is the eutectic mixture of 73 mol% LiF and 27 mol% UF{sub 4}, whose melting point is 490 C. The use of {sup 232}Th as a fuel is also being studied. ({sup 232}Th does not produce Pu under neutron irradiation.) The temperature of the molten salt would be {approx}550 C at the inlet (60 C above the solidus temperature) and {approx}650 C at the outlet. Mixtures of U and Th are being considered. To minimize corrosion of structural materials, the molten salt would also contain a small amount ({approx}1 mol%) of UF{sub 3}. The same beryllium neutron multiplier could be used as in the solid fuel case; alternatively, a liquid lithium or liquid lead multiplier could be used. Insuring that the solubility of Pu{sup 3+} in the melt is not exceeded is a design criterion. To mitigate corrosion of the steel, a refractory coating such as tungsten similar to the first wall facing the fusion source is suggested in the high-neutron-flux regions; and in low-neutron-flux regions, including the piping and heat exchangers, a nickel alloy, Hastelloy, would be used. These material choices parallel those made for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. The nuclear performance is better than the solid fuel case. At the beginning of life, the tritium breeding ratio is unity and the plutonium plus {sup 233}U production rate is {approx}0

  5. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  6. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Ramana G. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2013-10-23

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222ºC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the

  7. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Simpson, Mike [Idaho National Lab., (United States)

    2012-11-30

    This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.

  8. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  9. Mechanism of formation of a productive molten globule form of barstar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Bhadresh R; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2002-02-12

    Structural analysis of the initial steps in protein folding is difficult because of the swiftness with which these steps occur. Hence, the link between initial polypeptide chain collapse and formation of secondary and other specific structures remains poorly understood. Here, an equilibrium model has been developed for characterizing the initial steps of folding of the small protein barstar, which lead to the formation of a productive molten globule in the folding pathway. In this model, the high-pH-unfolded form (D form) of barstar, which is shown to be as unstructured as the urea-denatured form, is transformed progressively into a molten globule B form by incremental addition of the salt Na(2)SO(4) at pH 12. At very low concentrations of Na(2)SO(4), the D form collapses into a pre-molten globule (P) form, whose volume exceeds that of the native (N) state by only 20%, and which lacks any specific structure as determined by far- and near-UV circular dichroism. At higher concentrations of Na(2)SO(4), the P form transforms into the molten globule (B) form in a highly noncooperative transition populated by an ensemble of at least two intermediates. The B form is a dry molten globule in which water is excluded from the core, and in which secondary structure develops to 65% and tertiary contacts develop to 40%, relative to that of the native protein. Kinetic refolding experiments carried out at pH 7 and at high Na(2)SO(4) concentrations, in which the rate of folding of the D form to the N state is compared to that of the B form to the N state, indicate conclusively that the B form is a productive intermediate that forms on the direct pathway of folding from the D form to the N state.

  10. Transient analysis of a molten salt central receiver (MSCR) in a solar power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, A.; Wang, C.; Akinjiola, O.; Lou, X.; Neuschaefer, C.; Quinn, J.

    2016-05-01

    Alstom is developing solar power tower plants utilizing molten salt as the working fluid. In solar power tower, the molten salt central receiver (MSCR) atop of the tower is constructed of banks of tubes arranged in panels creating a heat transfer surface exposed to the solar irradiation from the heliostat field. The molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF), in this case 60/40%wt NaNO3-KNO3, flows in serpentine flow through the surface collecting sensible heat thus raising the HTF temperature from 290°C to 565°C. The hot molten salt is stored and dispatched to produce superheated steam in a steam generator, which in turn produces electricity in the steam turbine generator. The MSCR based power plant with a thermal energy storage system (TESS) is a fully dispatchable renewable power plant with a number of opportunities for operational and economic optimization. This paper presents operation and controls challenges to the MSCR and the overall power plant, and the use of dynamic model computer simulation based transient analyses applied to molten salt based solar thermal power plant. This study presents the evaluation of the current MSCR design, using a dynamic model, with emphasis on severe events affecting critical process response, such as MS temperature deviations, and recommend MSCR control design improvements based on the results. Cloud events are the scope of the transient analysis presented in this paper. The paper presents results from a comparative study to examine impacts or effects on key process variables related to controls and operation of the MSCR plant.

  11. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  12. Magma degassing and eruption dynamics of the Avellino pumice Plinian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (Italy). Comparison with the Pompeii eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Ucciani, G.; Villemant, B.; Cioni, R.; Civetta, L.; Orsi, G.

    2012-05-01

    The eruptive history of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is characterised by large explosive events: Pomici di Base eruption (22,030 ± 175 yr cal BP), Mercato (8890 ± 90 yr cal BP), Avellino (3945 ± 10 yr cal BP) and Pompeii (79 AD). Pre-eruptive conditions and sin-eruptive degassing processes of the Avellino eruption, the highest-magnitude Plinian event, have been investigated, using volatile contents (F, Cl, H2O) in melt inclusions and residual glass, and textural characteristics of pumice clasts of the 9 fallout layers sampled in detail in a representative sequence. The sequence displays an up-section sharp colour change from white to grey, corresponding to variations in both magma composition and textural characteristics. The pre-eruptive conditions have been constrained by systematic measurements of Cl content in both melt inclusions and matrix glass of pumice clasts. The pumice glass composition varies from Na-rich phonolite (white pumice) to K-rich phonolite (grey pumice). The measured Cl values constantly cluster at 5200 ± 400 ppm (buffer value), whatever the composition of the melt, suggesting that the entire magma body was saturated with sub-critical fluids. This Cl saturation constrains the pre-eruptive pressures and maximum H2O contents at 200 ± 10 MPa and 6.3 ± 0.2 wt.% H2O for the white pumice melt and 195 ± 15 MPa and 5.2 ± 0.2 wt.% H2O for the grey pumice melt. The fluid phase, mainly composed of a H2O-rich vapour phase and brine, probably accumulated at the top of the reservoir and generated an overpressure able to trigger the onset of the eruption. Magma degassing was rather homogeneous for the white and grey eruptive units, mostly occurring through closed-system processes, leading to a typical Plinian eruptive style. A steady-state withdrawal of an H2O-saturated magma may explain the establishment of a sustained Plinian column. Variation from white to grey pumice is accompanied by decrease of mean vesicularity and increase of mean microcrystallinity

  13. Deterministic estimation of hydrological thresholds for shallow landslide initiation and slope stability models: case study from the Somma-Vesuvius area of southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.; De Vita, P.; Napolitano, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall-induced debris flows involving ash-fall pyroclastic deposits that cover steep mountain slopes surrounding the Somma-Vesuvius volcano are natural events and a source of risk for urban settlements located at footslopes in the area. This paper describes experimental methods and modelling results of shallow landslides that occurred on 5–6 May 1998 in selected areas of the Sarno Mountain Range. Stratigraphical surveys carried out in initiation areas show that ash-fall pyroclastic deposits are discontinuously distributed along slopes, with total thicknesses that vary from a maximum value on slopes inclined less than 30° to near zero thickness on slopes inclined greater than 50°. This distribution of cover thickness influences the stratigraphical setting and leads to downward thinning and the pinching out of pyroclastic horizons. Three engineering geological settings were identified, in which most of the initial landslides that triggered debris flows occurred in May 1998 can be classified as (1) knickpoints, characterised by a downward progressive thinning of the pyroclastic mantle; (2) rocky scarps that abruptly interrupt the pyroclastic mantle; and (3) road cuts in the pyroclastic mantle that occur in a critical range of slope angle. Detailed topographic and stratigraphical surveys coupled with field and laboratory tests were conducted to define geometric, hydraulic and mechanical features of pyroclastic soil horizons in the source areas and to carry out hydrological numerical modelling of hillslopes under different rainfall conditions. The slope stability for three representative cases was calculated considering the real sliding surface of the initial landslides and the pore pressures during the infiltration process. The hydrological modelling of hillslopes demonstrated localised increase of pore pressure, up to saturation, where pyroclastic horizons with higher hydraulic conductivity pinch out and the thickness of pyroclastic mantle reduces or is

  14. The Afragola settlement near Vesuvius, Italy: The destruction and abandonment of a Bronze Age village revealed by archaeology, volcanology and rock-magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Mauro A.; Zanella, Elena; Gurioli, Lucia; Lanza, Roberto; Sulpizio, Roberto; Bishop, Jim; Tema, Evdokia; Boenzi, Giuliana; Laforgia, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Public works in progress in the Campanian plain north of Somma-Vesuvius recently encountered the remains of a prehistoric settlement close to the town of Afragola. Rescue excavations brought to light a Bronze Age village partially destroyed and buried by pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) of the Vesuvian Pomici di Avellino eruption (3.8 14C ka BP) and subsequently sealed by alluvial deposits. Volcanological and rock-magnetic investigations supplemented the excavations. Careful comparison between volcanological and archaeological stratigraphies led to an understanding of the timing of the damage the buildings suffered when they were struck by a series of PDCs. The first engulfed the village, located some 14 km to the north of the inferred vent, and penetrated into the dwellings without causing major damage. The buildings were able to withstand the weak dynamic pressure of the currents and deviate their path, as shown by the magnetic fabric analyses. Some later collapsed under the load of the deposits piled up by successive currents. Stepwise demagnetization of the thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) carried by potsherds embedded in the deposits yields deposition temperatures in the order of 260-320 °C, fully consistent with those derived from pottery and lithic fragments from other distal and proximal sites. The fairly uniform temperature of the deposits is here ascribed to the lack of pervasive air entrainment into the currents. This, in turn, resulted from the lack of major topographical obstacles along the flat plain. The coupling of structural damage and sedimentological analyses indicates that the currents were not destructive in the Afragola area, but TRM data indicate they were still hot enough to cause death or severe injury to humans and animals. The successful escape of the entire population is apparent from the lack of human remains and from thousands of human footprints on the surface of the deposits left by the first PDCs. People were thus able to

  15. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  16. Computational Analysis of Nanoparticles-Molten Salt Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrated Solar Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vinod [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2017-05-05

    High fidelity computational models of thermocline-based thermal energy storage (TES) were developed. The research goal was to advance the understanding of a single tank nanofludized molten salt based thermocline TES system under various concentration and sizes of the particles suspension. Our objectives were to utilize sensible-heat that operates with least irreversibility by using nanoscale physics. This was achieved by performing computational analysis of several storage designs, analyzing storage efficiency and estimating cost effectiveness for the TES systems under a concentrating solar power (CSP) scheme using molten salt as the storage medium. Since TES is one of the most costly but important components of a CSP plant, an efficient TES system has potential to make the electricity generated from solar technologies cost competitive with conventional sources of electricity.

  17. Production and release of ISOL beams from molten fluoride salt targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, T.M., E-mail: taniamel@mail.cern.ch [IFIMUP and IN – Institut of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hodak, R. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F1, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ghetta, V.; Allibert, M.; Heuer, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie – LPSC, 53 Rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Noah, E. [Section de Physique, Université de Genève, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Cimmino, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Delonca, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IRTES-M3M, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbeliard, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); IRTES-LERMPS, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbeliard, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Gottberg, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, E28006 Madrid (Spain); Kronberger, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Survontie 9, Jyväskylä FI-40014 (Finland); Ramos, J.P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); and others

    2014-06-01

    In the framework of the Beta Beams project, a molten fluoride target has been proposed for the production of the required 10{sup 1318}Ne/s. The production and extraction of such rates are predicted to be possible on a circulating molten salt with 160 MeV proton beams at close to 1 MW power. As a most important step to validate the concept, a prototype has been designed and investigated at CERN-ISOLDE using a static target unit. The target material consisted of a binary fluoride system, NaF:LiF (39:61 mol.%), with melting point at 649 °C. The production of Ne beams has been monitored as a function of the target temperature and proton beam intensity. The prototype development and the results of the first online tests with 1.4 GeV proton beam are presented in this paper.

  18. PERFORMANCE SIMULATION OF PARABOLIC TROUGH SOLAR COLLECTOR USING TWO FLUIDS (THERMIC OIL AND MOLTEN SALT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Boukelia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Parabolic trough solar collector is considered as one of the most proven, mature and commercial concentrating solar systems implemented in arid and semi-arid regions for energy production. It focuses sunlight onto a solar receiver by using mirrors and is finally converted to a useful thermal energy by means of a heat transfer fluid. The aims of this study are (i to develop a new methodology for simulation and performance evaluation of parabolic trough solar collector, in addition (i to compare the efficiencies of this system using two different fluids; thermic oil and molten solar salt. The validation of obtained results using this methodology shows a good agreement with those obtained by the experimental tests. Furthermore, this study favors the using of thermic oil as heat transfer fluid in the receiver instead of molten salt due to the high efficiency of the concentrator based on the first fluid in comparison to the second one.

  19. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  20. Electrochemical Deoxidation of Titanium and Its Alloy Using Molten Magnesium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Hamanaka, Yuki; Okabe, Toru H.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen was directly removed from pure titanium and a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by electrolysis in molten MgCl2 at 1173 K (900 °C), where the metal being refined was the cathode and a graphite rod was used as the anode. By applying a voltage of approximately 3 V between the electrodes, commercially pure titanium, containing 1200 mass ppm oxygen, and the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, containing 1400 mass ppm oxygen, were deoxidized to 500 mass ppm or less. Under certain conditions, extra-low-oxygen titanium (as low as 80 mass ppm oxygen) was obtained using this electrochemical technique. The results obtained in this study indicate that the electrochemical deoxidation of titanium in molten MgCl2 is feasible and applicable not only to the refinement of primary metals, but also for upgrading machined titanium products and recycling metal scraps.

  1. Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-09-01

    The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

  2. Electrorefining of High Carbon Ferromanganese in Molten Salts to Produce Pure Ferromanganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao S. J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High carbon ferromanganese is used as a starting material to prepare pure ferromanganese by electrorefining in molten salts. High carbon ferromanganese was applied as the anode, molybdenum was the cathode and Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. The anodic dissolution was investigated by linear polarization in molten NaCl-KCl system. Then potentiostatic electrolysis was carried out to produce pure ferromanganese from high carbon ferromanganese. The cathodic product was determined to be a mixture of manganese and iron by x-ray diffraction (XRD. The content of carbon in the product was analyzed by carbon and sulfur analyzer. The post-electrolysis anode was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The mechanism of the anode dissolution and the distribution of the main impurity of carbon and silicon after electrolysis were discussed.

  3. Device for equalizing molten electrolyte content in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1985-12-23

    A device for equalizing the molten electrolyte content throughout the height of a fuel cell stack is disclosed. The device includes a passageway for electrolyte return with electrolyte wettable wicking material in the opposite end portions of the passageway. One end portion is disposed near the upper, negative end of the stack where electrolyte flooding occurs. The second end portion is placed near the lower, positive end of the stack where electrolyte is depleted. Heating means are provided at the upper portion of the passageway to increase electrolyte vapor pressure in the upper wicking material. The vapor is condensed in the lower passageway portion and conducted as molten electrolyte in the lower wick to the positive end face of the stack. An inlet is provided to inject a modifying gas into the passageway and thereby control the rate of electrolyte return.

  4. Demixing and effective volatility of molten alkali carbonate melts in MCFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenscheidt, T.; Wendt, H. [Institut fuer Chemische Technologie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Since the early investigation of A. Klemm, the demixing of the cations of molten binary salt mixtures with a common anion due to the different mobilities of two different cations had been investigated in numerous experiments and the respective results interpreted in terms of structural features of the melts. 1-1 electrolytes had been preferentially investigated. Okada also reported investigations on lithium carbonate/potassium carbonate mixtures in the temperature range from 980 to 1070 K. From this investigation it is known that the heavier potassium cation is faster than lithium in mixtures which are more concentrated in potassium than x{sub K2CO3} = 0,32 (Chemla effect) whereas below this isotachic concentration lithium is faster. This paper investigates demixing in molten carbonate fuel cells.

  5. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L.

    2007-09-11

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  6. Nitrogen evolution as anodic reaction in molten LiF-CaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massot, L., E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Chamelot, P.; Gibilaro, M.; Cassayre, L.; Taxil, P. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > We evaluate thermodynamically the anodic materials on which it is possible the produce nitrogen. > We confirm experimentally that nitrogen evolution can occur in molten fluorides. > We perform the complete electrochemical study concerning nitride ions oxidation. > We propose several anodic materials as good candidates for nitrogen evolution. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of nitride ions has been studied in fluoride melts (eutectic LiF-CaF{sub 2}) by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry. The purpose of this work is to propose an alternative way for anodic reaction in molten fluorides processes. Thermodynamical analysis can be used for the evaluation of the anodic material regarding to its oxidation potential and reactivity with nitrogen. Then electrochemical investigations confirm the oxidation of nitride ions into nitrogen in a one-step process exchanging 3 electrons, and let propose several materials usable for nitrogen evolving.

  7. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  8. Selection of crucible oxides in molten titanium and titanium aluminum alloys by thermo-chemistry calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostov A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and its alloys interstitially dissolve a large amount of impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen, which degrade the mechanical and physical properties of alloys. On the other hand crucible oxides based on CaO, ZrO2 Y2O3, etc., and their spinels (combination of two or more oxides can be used for melting titanium and its alloys. However, the thermodynamic behavior of calcium, zirconium, yttrium on the one side, and oxygen on the other side, in molten Ti and Ti-Al alloys have not been made clear and because of that, it is very interesting for research. Owing of literature data, as well as these crucibles are cheaper than standard crucibles for melting titanium and titanium alloys, in this paper will be presented the results of selection of thermo-chemistry analysis with the aim to determine the crucible oxide stability in contact with molten titanium and titanium-aluminum alloys.

  9. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Smirnov, M.V.; Moskalenko, N.I. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii)

    1984-08-01

    The coefficient of HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl/sub 4/+HfCl/sub 4/). HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl.

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cells: A high temperature fuel cell on the edge to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) technology has been developed in USA, Japan, Korea and Europe for many years. What has started about 30 years ago as an interesting laboratory object has now matured to a potential alternative to conventional power generation systems. Especially the combined heat and power (CHP) generation is an area, where MCFC power plants can be applied with great advantage, due to the high efficiencies which can be achieved. It was demonstrated by several manufacturers that in the sub-MW region MCFC power plants can reach electrical efficiencies of 47%. By making use of the heat generated by the system, total efficiencies of more than 80% can be achieved. The present paper will discuss some aspects of the development work going on with a focus on the role of the molten carbonate contained in the cells. An outlook will be given for the future prospects of this young technology in a changing energy market.

  11. The Formation of Gaseous Atmosphere in a Molten Cast Iron/Moulding Sand Contact System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocek J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drops of molten cast iron were placed on moulding sand substrates. The composition of the forming gaseous atmosphere was examined. It was found that as a result of the cast iron contact with water vapour released from the sand, a significant amount of hydrogen was evolved. In all the examined moulding sands, including sands without carbon, a large amount of CO was formed. The source of carbon monoxide was carbon present in cast iron. In the case of bentonite moulding sand with seacoal and sand bonded with furan resin, in the composition of the gases, the trace amounts of hydrocarbons, i.e. benzene, toluene, styrene and naphthalene (BTX, appeared. As the formed studies indicate much higher content of BTX at lower temperature it was concluded that the hydrocarbons are unstable in contact with molten iron.

  12. Production and Release of ISOL Beams from Molten Fluoride Salt Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonca, T M; Ghetta, V; Alibert, M; Heuer, D; Noah, E; Cimmino, S; Delonca, M; Gottberg, A; Kronberger, M; Ramos, J; Seiffert, C; Stora, T; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the Beta Beams study, a molten fluoride target has been proposed for the production of the required 1013 18Ne/s. The production and extraction of such rates are obtained on a circulating molten salt with proton beam energy beams at close to 1 MW power. As a most important step to validate the concept, a prototype has been designed and investigated at CERN-ISOLDE using a static target unit. The target material consisted of a binary fluoride system, NaF:LiF (39:61 % mol.), with melting point at 649ºC. The production of Ne beams has been monitored as a function of the target temperature and proton beam intensity. The prototype development and the results of the first online tests with 1.4 GeV proton beam are presented in this paper.

  13. Lead cooled heterogeneous accelerator driven molten-fluoride blanket for incineration of long-lived radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopatkin, A.V.; Matyushechkin, V.M.; Tretyakov, I.T. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Blagovolin, P.P.; Kazaritsky, V.D. [State Scientific Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics; Kostenkov, V.I.; Chuvilin, D.Yu. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    This paper presents a tentative design description and evaluation of the basic parameters of a lead cooled heterogeneous accelerator driven molten fluoride blanket. The proton beam of a 1 GeV accelerator strikes the blanket from below and generates spallation neutrons in the flow of lead, which serves as a target. These neutrons leave the target zone and get into a heterogeneous blanket with separated volumes of molten salts and lead. Fissile materials are dissolved in the salt. On getting into the molten salt volume the neutrons cause fission (transmutation) of the actinides, the produced heat being removed by circulation of molten lead. Two versions of the blanket design are examined. The first version: molten salt circulates in the fuel channels, while lead cools the channels flowing through the interchannel space (the salt channel design). The second version: it is lead that circulates in the channels, while molten salt takes up the interchannel space (the lead channel design). A preliminary blanket design study showed that both blanket designs possess a potential for improving performance. At present time the blanket design, mentioned above as the salt channel design, seems to be more promising. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Best practices for making high integrity lightweight metal castings - molten metal composition and cleanliness control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qigui Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To make high integrity lightweight metal castings, best practices are required in various stages of casting and heat treatment processes, including liquid metal composition and quality control, casting and gating/riser system design, and process optimization. This paper presents best practices for liquid metal processing and quality assurance of molten metal in both melting and mold filling. Best practices for other aspects of lightweight metal casting will be published separately.

  15. Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Molten Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Shaymus W.; Craparo, Joseph; De Saro, Robert; Apelian, Diran

    2017-10-01

    In order for metals to meet the demand for critical applications in the automotive, aerospace, and defense industries, tight control over the composition and cleanliness of the metal must be achieved. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for applications in metal processing has generated significant interest for its ability to perform quick analyses in situ. The fundamentals of LIBS, current techniques for deployment on molten metal, demonstrated capabilities, and possible avenues for development are reviewed and discussed.

  16. In Situ Solid-Gas Reactivity of Nanoscaled Metal Borides from Molten Salt Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gouget, Guillaume; Debecker, Damien P.; Kim, Ara; Olivieri, Giorgia; Gallet, Jean-Jacques; Bournel, Fabrice; Thomas, Cyril; Ersen, Ovidiu; Moldovan, Simona; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco , Sophie; Portehault, David

    2017-01-01

    Metal borides have mostly been studied as bulk materials. The nanoscale provides new opportunities to investigate the properties of these materials, e.g., nanoscale hardening and surface reactivity. Metal borides are often considered stable solids because of their covalent character, but little is known on their behavior under a reactive atmosphere, especially reductive gases. We use molten salt synthesis at 750 °C to provide cobalt monoboride (CoB) nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous layer...

  17. Recovery of Nickel from Nickel-Based Superalloy Scraps by Utilizing Molten Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Ryohei; Okabe, Toru H.

    2017-02-01

    With the purpose of developing a new process for recycling nickel (Ni) directly from superalloy scraps, a fundamental study on the extraction and separation of Ni was carried out using molten zinc (Zn) as the extraction medium. In order to examine the reaction between molten Zn and the Ni-based superalloy, superalloy samples and Zn shots were heated at 1173 K (900 °C) for 6 hours. After heating, the superalloy samples fully reacted with Zn and dissolved in molten Zn. The Zn-alloyed sample obtained by slow cooling consisted of two separated upper and lower phases. In the upper part of the sample, only Zn and the Zn-Ni alloys were found; in the lower part, an intermetallic alloy consisting of refractory metals such as rhenium (Re) and tantalum (Ta) was found. This result shows that Ni and refractory metals contained in the scrap can be separated by utilizing the density differences between the Zn-Ni alloy and the refractory metals in molten Zn. Vacuum treatment of the upper part of the Zn-alloyed sample at 1173 K (900 °C) reduced the concentration of Zn in the sample from 97.0 to 0.4 mass pct. After Zn removal, a Ni alloy containing Ni with a purity of 85.3 to 86.1 mass pct and negligible quantities (<0.1 mass pct) of Re and Ta was obtained. Moreover, recovered Zn metal after distillation had a purity of more than 99.9 mass pct. Therefore, this process could be an environmentally sound recycling process that can recover Ni from superalloy scraps without the consumption of Zn or the generation of toxic wastes solutions.

  18. Metals recovering from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flandinet, L. [LEPMI, UMR 5279, CNRS - Grenoble INP-Universite de Savoie, Universite Joseph Fourier, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Tedjar, F. [LEPMI, UMR 5279, CNRS - Grenoble INP-Universite de Savoie, Universite Joseph Fourier, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); RECUPYL SA, Rue de la metallurgie 38420 Domene (France); Ghetta, V. [LPSC, UJF Grenoble 1 - CNRS/IN2P3 - INPG, 53 rue des Martyrs 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Fouletier, J., E-mail: Jacques.Fouletier@lepmi.grenoble-inp.fr [LEPMI, UMR 5279, CNRS - Grenoble INP-Universite de Savoie, Universite Joseph Fourier, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovering of valuable metals from WPCBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature treatment, i.e., 300 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper, and precious metals are recovered, without dissolution or melting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many hazardous gases are dissolved and trapped in the molten salt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under operation without oxygen the flue gas contains large quantities of hydrogen. - Abstract: Recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE) has been taken into consideration in the literature due to the large quantity of concerned wastes and their hazardous contents. The situation is so critical that EU published European Directives imposing collection and recycling with a minimum of material recovery . Moreover, WEEEs contain precious metals, making the recycling of these wastes economically interesting, but also some critical metals and their recycling leads to resource conservation. This paper reports on a new approach for recycling waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Molten salts and specifically molten KOH-NaOH eutectic is used to dissolve glasses, oxides and to destruct plastics present in wastes without oxidizing the most valuable metals. This method is efficient for recovering a copper-rich metallic fraction, which is, moreover, cleared of plastics and glasses. In addition, analyses of gaseous emission show that this method is environmentally friendly since most of the process gases, such as carbon monoxide and dioxide and halogens, are trapped in the highly basic molten salt. In other respects, under operation without oxygen, a large quantity of hydrogen is produced and might be used as fuel gas or as synthesis gas, leading to a favourable energy balance for this new process.

  19. Electrical conductivity of molten CdCl{sub 2} at temperatures as high as 1474 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2016-11-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten CdCl{sub 2} was measured across a wide temperature range (ΔT=628 K), from 846 K to as high as 1474 K, i.e. 241 above the normal boiling point of the salt. In previous studies, a maximum temperature of 1201 K was reached, this being 273 lower than in the present work. The activation energy of electrical conductivity was calculated.

  20. Maximum on the electrical conductivity polytherm of molten TeCl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2017-09-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten TeCl{sub 4} was measured up to 761 K, i.e. 106 degrees above the normal boiling point of the salt. For the first time it was found that TeCl{sub 4} electrical conductivity polytherm has a maximum. It was recorded at 705 K (Κ{sub max}=0.245 Sm/cm), whereupon the conductivity decreases as the temperature rises. The activation energy of electrical conductivity was calculated.

  1. Self-organizing carbon nitride coatings on steel from molten lead–magnesium eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Orlova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of calculation and experimental studies zirconium saturated eutectic Pb–Mg alloy is recommended as liquid metal coolant in fuel elements loaded with nitride fuel. Test stand was developed and manufactured for carrying out studies of deposition of nitride and/or carbide protective coatings from molten eutectic Pb–Mg within narrow gap between coaxially arranged tubes. Pilot testing has been performed.

  2. Molten salt concentrating solar plants. Their potential contribute to a better grid integration of solar power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falchetta, Massimo [ENEA - Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Rome (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Solar energy is becoming of increasing importance in Power Systems. Among solar technologies, use of molten salt heat storage in Concentrating Solar Power plants (CSP) is a cost effective way to improve the value for the grid operator of a non controllable energy source as solar power is. In such type of plants, a high temperature fluid is stored on tanks using solar input; the heat is then released when needed to feed a steam turbine and produce electricity on demand. Depending on tank size, technical solutions are commercially available with storage sizes ranging from 6 hours to 15 hours of nominal output, or even more. Options actually commercially available are the central receiver (Tower) with molten salt direct storage and linear parabolic through field with oil as Heat Transfer Fluid and molten salt as indirect storage; parabolic trough field with molten salt as HTF and as direct storage. The paper concentrates more on the last solution, developed by ENEA since 2001 and firstly introduced in the demonstrative 5 MW unit at Archimede ENEL's Power station. The papers present a simplified dynamic simulation approach, able to show the advantages from the point of view of dispatchability of power output and load following ability of this type of plant from a typical year worth of data of DNI and electricity prices on the Italian market. The model includes the main features affecting plant power output, namely optical efficiency as related to ANI (Aperture Normal Irradiation), solar field main dynamics, storage dynamics and typical operating procedures. (orig.)

  3. A new form of MgTa 2 O 6 obtained by the molten salt method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using molten salt route (with NaCl/KCl as the salt) we have been able to synthesize a new form of magnesium tantalate at 850°C. Powder X-ray diffraction data could be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with lattice parameters, `' = 15.36(1) Å, '' = 13.38(1) Å and '' = 12.10(1) Å. High resolution transmission electron ...

  4. Measurements of thermophysical properties of molten silicon by a high-temperature electrostatic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, W. K.; Chung, S. K.; Rulison, A. J.; Spjut, R. E.

    1997-03-01

    Several thermophysical properties of molten silicon measured by the high-temperature electrostatic levitator at JPL are presented. They are density, constant-pressure specific heat capacity, hemispherical total emissivity, and surface tension. Over the temperature range investigated (1350< T m<1825 K), the measured liquid density (in g·cm-3) can be expressed by a quadratic function, p(T)= p m-1.69×10-4( T-T m)-1.75×10-7( T-T m)2 with T m and p m being 1687 K and 2.56 g·cm-3, respectively. The hemispherical total emissivity of molten silicon at the melting temperature was determined to be 0.18, and the constant-pressure specific heat was evaluated as a function of temperature. The surface tension (in 10-3 N·m-1) of molten silicon over a similar temperature range can be expressed by σ( T)=875-0.22( T-T m).

  5. The study of integrated coal-gasifier molten carbonate fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    A novel integration concept for a coal-fueled coal gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell power plant was studied. Effort focused on determining the efficiency potential of the concept, design, and development requirements of the processes in order to achieve the efficiency. The concept incorporates a methane producing catalytic gasifier of the type previously under development by Exxon Research and Development Corp., a reforming molten carbonate fuel cell power section of the type currently under development by United Technologies Corp., and a gasifier-fuel cell recycle loop. The concept utilizes the fuel cell waste heat, in the form of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, to generate additional fuel in the coal gasifier, thereby eliminating the use of both an O2 plant and a stream bottoming cycle from the power plant. The concept has the potential for achieving coal-pile-to-busbar efficiencies of 50-59%, depending on the process configuration and degree of process configuration and degree of process development requirements. This is significantly higher than any previously reported gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell system.

  6. An evaluation of possible next-generation high temperature molten-salt power towers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Gregory J.

    2011-12-01

    Since completion of the Solar Two molten-salt power tower demonstration in 1999, the solar industry has been developing initial commercial-scale projects that are 3 to 14 times larger. Like Solar Two, these initial plants will power subcritical steam-Rankine cycles using molten salt with a temperature of 565 C. The main question explored in this study is whether there is significant economic benefit to develop future molten-salt plants that operate at a higher receiver outlet temperature. Higher temperatures would allow the use of supercritical steam cycles that achieve an improved efficiency relative to today's subcritical cycle ({approx}50% versus {approx}42%). The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of a 565 C subcritical baseline plant was compared with possible future-generation plants that operate at 600 or 650 C. The analysis suggests that {approx}8% reduction in LCOE can be expected by raising salt temperature to 650 C. However, most of that benefit can be achieved by raising the temperature to only 600 C. Several other important insights regarding possible next-generation power towers were also drawn: (1) the evaluation of receiver-tube materials that are capable of higher fluxes and temperatures, (2) suggested plant reliability improvements based on a detailed evaluation of the Solar Two experience, and (3) a thorough evaluation of analysis uncertainties.

  7. Diagnosis of sources of current inefficiency in industrial molten salt electrolysis cells by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-07-29

    The purpose of this project was to employ Raman spectroscopy in the study of industrial molten salt electrolysis cells. The objective was to improve the understanding of the chemistry and electrochemistry of the relevant melt systems and, in turn, of energy loss mechanisms in the industrial processes. On this basis new ways to improve the energy efficiency of these industrial reactors might be identified. The research plan has several principal elements. First, there was the design and construction of laboratory scale representations of industrial molten salt electrolysis cells that would at the same time serve a spectrocells. Secondly, there was the mastery of the preparation of the molten salt electrolytes, what in industry is called the ''front end.'' Thirdly, there was the adaptation of commercially available Raman instrumentation in order to facilitate the proposed studies. It is the nature of the specimens that so dramatically distinguished this work from conventional Raman studies for which commercial instrumentation is designed: first, the laboratory scale electrolysis cells are large compared to typical spectrocells; and secondly, the cells operate at, what for Raman studies are, extremely high temperatures. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Review on the current status of molten chloride reactor and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Shin, Yukyung; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper has summarized and reviewed the current status of MCR as an online pyroprocessing reactor, and introduced the related works in UNIST. As the developments of the next generation nuclear energy systems require the fuel sustainability, passive operation safety, nuclear proliferation, and reduction of highly radioactive waste, only several types of nuclear reactor systems survive to the last. Among these, molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising concepts of next generation nuclear reactor system that deliver on these requirements. MSR have great advantages in the fuel cycle and reduction of nuclear waste, since MSR can serve the online reprocessing system for the reprocessing of spent fuel. Especially, MSR utilizing chloride-based fuel, called molten chloride reactor (MCR) has been recently highlighted in USA under the DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) program. Recently, the interests in the molten chloride salt have arisen. The use of chloride-based salt gives great advantages to the reactor operating in a fast spectrum. Then MCR can serve waste management functions or fuel cycle sustainability functions, which can solve the current issues in nuclear field. Thus, research plan was established in UNIST which includes the investigation of thermal-hydraulic characteristics of chloride salt and optimization of heat transport system of MCR, using both numerical method and experimental method.

  9. Silica and alumina nano-enhanced molten salts for thermal energy storage: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Belén; Nieto-Maestre, Javier; Iparraguirre-Torres, Iñigo; Julià, José Enrique; García-Romero, Ana

    2017-06-01

    The study of more efficient materials for thermal energy storage at high temperatures is a broad field of research. The use of the nanotechnology is a strategy recently considered to enhance the thermal properties of these materials. The nano-enhanced Molten Salts (neMS) are constituted by an inorganic salt where tiny quantities of nanoparticles (NPs) are dispersed. These nanomaterials possess a specific heat higher than that of the salt or the isolated NPs. This phenomenon is not still well understood and great research efforts are needed to describe the interactions on the material at a molecular level. The existence of a nanolayer at the interface between the NPs surface and the molten salt with superior thermal properties is the main mechanism proposed up to now. A high available surface of the NPs promotes the formation of higher quantities of these nanostructures. The available surface depends on the NPs size and shape and is strongly reduced if NPs are agglomerated. We have studied and compared the effect on the specific heat of embedding two different ceramic NPs on molten Solar Salt.

  10. Metals recovering from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandinet, L; Tedjar, F; Ghetta, V; Fouletier, J

    2012-04-30

    Recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE) has been taken into consideration in the literature due to the large quantity of concerned wastes and their hazardous contents. The situation is so critical that EU published European Directives imposing collection and recycling with a minimum of material recovery [1]. Moreover, WEEEs contain precious metals, making the recycling of these wastes economically interesting, but also some critical metals and their recycling leads to resource conservation. This paper reports on a new approach for recycling waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Molten salts and specifically molten KOH-NaOH eutectic is used to dissolve glasses, oxides and to destruct plastics present in wastes without oxidizing the most valuable metals. This method is efficient for recovering a copper-rich metallic fraction, which is, moreover, cleared of plastics and glasses. In addition, analyses of gaseous emission show that this method is environmentally friendly since most of the process gases, such as carbon monoxide and dioxide and halogens, are trapped in the highly basic molten salt. In other respects, under operation without oxygen, a large quantity of hydrogen is produced and might be used as fuel gas or as synthesis gas, leading to a favourable energy balance for this new process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation of niobium carbide powder by electrochemical reduction in molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Qiushi [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Xu, Qian, E-mail: qianxu201@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Meng, Jingchun; Lou, Taiping; Ning, Zhiqiang [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qi, Yang [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yu, Kai [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-10-25

    The niobium carbide powder was prepared via electrochemical reduction of the mixture of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and carbon in molten CaCl{sub 2}–NaCl. The reaction pathway from the sintered precursor to the final product has been investigated. The effect of the working temperature on the reduction of the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C composite precursor was considered. The role of carbon during the electrochemical reduction of the composite pellet was discussed. The samples were analysed by XRD and SEM. The results indicated that the NbC powder was approximately 200 nm after the reduction. Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was gradually reduced to Nb, and NbC was subsequently obtained by the reaction of carbon with Nb metal. In addition, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} could spontaneously react with CaO in the melt to form a serious of calcium niobates. The participation of carbon was available for the efficiency of electro-reduction of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. - Graphical abstract: Niobium carbide powder was electrochemically prepared in molten salt, and the reduction pathway was illustrated schematically. - Highlights: • NbC powder was prepared electrochemically in molten salt. • The working temperature was lower than that of carbothermic reduction. • The reduction pathway was discussed compared to direct electro-deoxidation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  12. Deformation of partially molten granite: a review and comparison of experimental and natural case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental and natural investigations of partially molten granite are compared and reviewed. Experiments suggest that deformation of partially molten granite with low-viscosity melt (104 Pa s) exhibits a rheological critical melt percentage (RCMP). In case of high viscosity melts (108 Pa s), however, the relationship between melt fraction and log viscosity of the partially molten granite may be linear. Considerations about viscosity, rheological thresholds, and segregation of natural melts suggest that low-viscosity melt experiments simulate natural conditions more realistically. Therefore, an RCMP is to be expected under natural conditions. Both diffusion creep and dislocation creep may occur under natural conditions, whereas cataclastic flow is only observed under experimental conditions. A melt-induced transition from dislocation creep to diffusion creep occurs under experimental and natural conditions. Melt topology is controlled by the magnitude of differential stress under experimental conditions. If differential stress is higher than ~100-150 MPa, melt pockets are elongate and oriented at a low angle to the maximum compressive stress. In contrast, in nature, melt pockets tend to be oriented subparallel to the foliation plane, i.e., presumably at a high angle to the maximum compressive stress.

  13. Compatibility of potential containment materials with molten lithium hydride at 800°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawel, S. J.

    1993-12-01

    A series of compatibility experiments has been performed for several stainless steels, carbon steels, and a nickel-base alloy in molten lithium hydride at 800°C for comparison with previous experiments on type 304L stainless steel. The results indicate that the mechanism of corrosion is the same for each of 304L, 304, 316L, and 309 stainless steel and that very similar corrosion in molten LiH is expected for each stainless alloy. Deviation from parabolic kinetics at extended exposure time for each stainless alloy is attributed in part to weight gains associated with lithium penetration. Stabilized (Nb and Ti) low carbon (steels are observed to be essentially inert in LiH at 800°C with stable carbides and no grain growth. Mild steel (type 1020) is decarburized rapidly and exhibits extensive grain growth in LiH at 800°C. Both steels exhibit weight gains during exposure to molten LiH that are also related in part to lithium penetration. Alloy X (UNS N06002) exhibits extreme corrosion with essentially linear kinetics and dissolution of nickel sufficient to form subsurface voids.

  14. Determination of Stoichiometry of Solutes in Molten Salt Solvents by Correlations of Relative Raman Band Intensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, Soghomon; Berg, Rolf W.

    1999-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to determine the stoichiometry of solute complexes in molten salts at high temperatures under static equilibrium conditions, A simple formalism is derived for correlating relative Raman band intensities with stoichiometric coefficients. The experimental procedures...... and sets of experiments required for establishing the stoichiometry are described, The proposed method was applied for studying the dissolution reactions of V2O5 in molten Cs2S2O7 and of Nb2O5 or MoO3 in molten K2S2O7 at temperatures in the range 430-700 degrees C: (1) V2O5 + nS(2)O(7)(2-) (1) --> X-2n- (1......); (2) Nb2O5 + nS(2)O(7)(2-) (1) --> Y2n- (1); (3) MoO3 + nS(2)O(7)(2-) (1) --> Z(2n)- (1). It is shown that the solute complex species formed in the studied reactions have, respectively, the following stoichiometries: (1) n = 2, (VO)(2)O(SO4)(4)(4-); (2) n = 3, NbO(SO4)(3)(3-); (3) n = 1, MoO(SO4)(2)(2-)....

  15. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

  16. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery with molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuzhi; Han, Wei; Cui, Baochen; Liu, Xianjun; Zhao, Fulin; Stuart, Jessica; Licht, Stuart

    2017-02-01

    Zinc-air batteries have been proposed for EV applications and large-scale electricity storage such as wind and solar power. Although zinc-air batteries are very promising, there are numerous technological barriers to overcome. We demonstrate for the first time, a new rechargeable zinc-air battery that utilizes a molten Li0.87Na0.63K0.50CO3 eutectic electrolyte with added NaOH. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that a reversible deposition/dissolution of zinc occurs in the molten Li0.87Na0.63K0.50CO3 eutectic. At 550 °C, this zinc-air battery performs with a coulombic efficiency of 96.9% over 110 cycles, having an average charging potential of ∼1.43 V and discharge potential of ∼1.04 V. The zinc-air battery uses cost effective steel and nickel electrodes without the need for any precious metal catalysts. Moreover, the molten salt electrolyte offers advantages over aqueous electrolytes, avoiding the common aqueous alkaline electrolyte issues of hydrogen evolution, Zn dendrite formation, "drying out", and carbonate precipitation.

  17. Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

  18. Effect of Degassing Treatment on the Interfacial Reaction of Molten Aluminum and Solid Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The gas porosity is one of the most serious problems in the casting of aluminum. There are several degassing methods that have been studied. During smelting of aluminum, the intermetallic compound (IMC may be formed at the interface between molten aluminum and solid steel of crucible furnace lining. In this study, the effect of degassing treatment on the formations of IMC has been investigated. The rectangular substrate specimens were immersed in a molten aluminum bath. The holding times of the substrate immersions were in the range from 300 s to 1500 s. Two degassing treatments, argon degassing and hexachloroethane tablet degassing, were conducted to investigate their effect on the IMC formation. The IMC was examined under scanning electron microscope with EDX attachment. The thickness of the IMC layer increased with increasing immersion time for all treatments. Due to the high content of hydrogen, substrate specimens immersed in molten aluminum without degasser had IMC layer which was thicker than others. Argon degassing treatment was more effective than tablet degassing to reduce the IMC growth. Furthermore, the hard and brittle phase of IMC, FeAl3, was formed dominantly in specimens immersed for 900 s without degasser while in argon and tablet degasser specimens, it was formed partially.

  19. Effect of Using Thorium Molten Salts on the Neutronic Performance of PACER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acır, Adem; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2010-04-01

    Utilization of nuclear explosives can produce a significant amount of energy which can be converted into electricity via a nuclear fusion power plant. An important fusion reactor concept using peaceful nuclear explosives is called as PACER which has an underground containment vessel to handle the nuclear explosives safely. In this reactor, Flibe has been considered as a working coolant for both tritium breeding and heat transferring. However, the rich neutron source supplied from the peaceful nuclear explosives can be used also for fissile fuel production. In this study, the effect of using thorium molten salts on the neutronic performance of the PACER was investigated. The computations were performed for various coolants bearing thorium and/or uranium-233 with respect to the molten salt zone thickness in the blanket. Results pointed out that an increase in the fissile content of the salt increased the neutronic performance of the reactor remarkably. In addition, higher energy production was obtained with thorium molten salts compared to the pure mode of the reactor. Moreover, a large quantity of 233U was produced in the blanket in all cases.

  20. Non-linear model reduction and control of molten carbonate fuel cell systems with internal reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Min

    2007-10-12

    Currently, the process design of fuel cells and the development of control strategies is mainly based on heuristic methods. Fuel cell models are often too complex for control purposes, or they are developed for a specific type of fuel cell and valid only in a small range of operation conditions. The application of fuel cell models to controller design is still limited. Furthermore, suitable and simple-to-implement design strategies for fuel cell control remain an open area. There is thus a motivation for simplifying dynamic models for process control applications and for designing suitable control strategies for fuel cells. This is the main objective of this work. As an application example, the 250 kW industrial molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system HotModule by MTU CFC Solutions, Germany is considered. A detailed dynamic two-dimensional spatially distributed cross-flow model of a MCFC from literature is taken as a starting point for the investigation. In Chapter 2, two simplified model versions are derived by incorporating additional physical assumptions. One of the simplified models is extended to a three-dimensional stack model to deal with physical and chemical phenomena in the stack. Simulations of the stack model are performed in Chapter 3 in order to calculate the mass and temperature distributions in the direction perpendicular to the electrode area. The other simplified model forms the basis for a low order reduced model that is derived in Chapter 4. The reduced-order model is constructed by application of the Karhunen-Loeve Galerkin method. The spatial temperature, concentration and potential profiles are approximated by a set of orthogonal time independent spatial basis functions. Problem specific basis functions are generated numerically from simulation data of the detailed reference model. The advantage of this approach is that a small number of basis functions suffices in order to approximate the solution of the detailed model very well. The

  1. REVALUACIÓN DE LA CRONOLOGÍA DE ERUPCIONES DEL VOLCÁN VESUBIO (ITALIA A PARTIR DE 79 A. D. (Reassessment of the Eruptive Chronology of Italy’s Vesuvius Volcano from AD 79 to 1906

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Urrutia-Fucugauchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El volcán Vesubio se caracteriza por numerosas erupciones, separadas por periodos de baja actividad, en un área densamente poblada que incluye los centros de Pompeya y Herculano y, actualmente, Nápoles. Los estudios vulcanológicos y arqueológicos han requerido, entre otros datos y observaciones, determinar la frecuencia y la naturaleza efusiva o explosiva de las erupciones empleando técnicas de datación y la construcción de una cronología de alta resolución. En este estudio se analizan 14 flujos de eventos eruptivos en el periodo de 79 a 1906 A. D., para los cuales presentamos nuevas dataciones arqueomagnéticas usando el modelo geomagnético SHA.DIF.14k. Las direcciones paleomagnéticas de los flujos se correlacionan con la curva de variación secular, permitiendo revaluar la cronología eruptiva del Vesubio. ENGLISH: Vesuvius Volcano, located in a densely populated area including the cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum and now Naples, is characterized by numerous eruptions separated by periods of quiescence. Information on the frequency and nature of this activity is critical for both volcanological and archaeological studies. Dating techniques in tandem with historical records can provide a high resolution chronology for Vesuvius’ eruption history. In this study, we analyze paleomagnetic data from 14 lava flows dating between AD 79 to 1906 using the recently developed SHA.DIF.14k geomagnetic model. We correlate the paleomagnetic directions of the flows with a new secular variation curve, resulting in a reassessment of the eruptive chronology of Vesuvius.

  2. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  3. Molten salt based nanofluids based on solar salt and alumina nanoparticles: An industrial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Belén; Nieto-Maestre, Javier; Guerreiro, Luis; Julia, José Enrique; Collares-Pereira, Manuel; García-Romero, Ana

    2017-06-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and its associated dispatchability is extremely important in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants since it represents the main advantage of CSP technology in relation to other renewable energy sources like photovoltaic (PV). Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 600°C. Their main problems are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve the thermal properties of molten salts is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. Additionally, the use of molten salt based nanofluids as TES materials and Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) has been attracting great interest in recent years. The addition of tiny amounts of nanoparticles to the base salt can improve its specific heat as shown by different authors1-3. The application of these nano-enhanced materials can lead to important savings on the investment costs in new TES systems for CSP plants. However, there is still a long way to go in order to achieve a commercial product. In this sense, the improvement of the stability of the nanofluids is a key factor. The stability of nanofluids will depend on the nature and size of the nanoparticles, the base salt and the interactions between them. In this work, Solar Salt (SS) commonly used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3 wt.) was doped with alumina nanoparticles (ANPs) at a solid mass concentration of 1% wt. at laboratory scale. The tendency of nanoparticles to agglomeration and sedimentation is tested in the molten state by analyzing their size and concentration through the time. The specific heat of the nanofluid at 396 °C (molten state) is measured at different times (30 min, 1 h, 5 h). Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms of agglomeration. A good understanding of the interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the ionic media would provide

  4. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary

  5. Validation of the TRACE code for the system dynamic simulations of the molten salt reactor experiment and the preliminary study on the dual fluid molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xun

    2016-06-14

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), which was confirmed as one of the six Generation IV reactor types by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum in 2008), recently draws a lot of attention all around the world. Due to the application of liquid fuels the MSR can be regarded as the most special one among those six GEN-IV reactor types in a sense. A unique advantage of using liquid nuclear fuel lies in that the core melting accident can be thoroughly eliminated. Besides, a molten salt reactor can have several fuel options, for instance, the fuel can be based on {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th-{sup 233}U, {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle or even the spent nuclear fuel (SNF), so the reactor can be operated as a breeder or as an actinides burner both with fast, thermal or epi-thermal neutron spectrum and hence, it has excellent features of the fuel sustainability and for the non-proliferation. Furthermore, the lower operating pressure not only means a lower risk of the explosion as well as the radioactive leakage but also implies that the reactor vessel and its components can be lightweight, thus lowering the cost of equipments. So far there is no commercial MSR being operated. However, the MSR concept and its technical validation dates back to the 1960s to 1970s, when the scientists and engineers from ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the United States managed to build and run the world's first civilian molten salt reactor called MSRE (Molten Salt Reactor Experiment). The MSRE was an experimental liquid-fueled reactor with 10 MW thermal output using {sup 4}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-UF{sub 4} as the fuel also as the coolant itself. The MSRE is usually taken as a very important reference case for many current researches to validate their codes and simulations. Without exception it works also as a benchmark for this thesis. The current thesis actually consists of two main parts. The first part is about the validation of the current code for the old MSRE concept, while the second

  6. Evolution of the magma feeding system during a Plinian eruption: The case of Pomici di Avellino eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, S.; Costa, A.; Sulpizio, R.

    2018-01-01

    The current paradigm for volcanic eruptions is that magma erupts from a deep magma reservoir through a volcanic conduit, typically modelled with fixed rigid geometries such as cylinders. This simplistic view of a volcanic eruption does not account for the complex dynamics that usually characterise a large explosive event. Numerical simulations of magma flow in a conduit combined with volcanological and geological data, allow for the first description of a physics-based model of the feeding system evolution during a sustained phase of an explosive eruption. The method was applied to the Plinian phase of the Pomici di Avellino eruption (PdA, 3945 ±10 cal yr BP) from Somma-Vesuvius (Italy). Information available from volcanology, petrology, and lithology studies was used as input data and as constraints for the model. In particular, Mass Discharge Rates (MDRs) assessed from volcanological methods were used as target values for numerical simulations. The model solutions, which are non-unique, were constrained using geological and volcanological data, such as volume estimates and types of lithic components in the fall deposits. Three stable geometric configurations of the feeding system (described assuming elliptical cross-section of variable dimensions) were assessed for the Eruptive Units 2 and 3 (EU2, EU3), which form the magmatic Plinian phase of PdA eruption. They describe the conduit system geometry at time of deposition of EU2 base, EU2 top, and EU3. A 7-km deep dyke (length 2 a = 200-4 00 m, width 2 b = 10- 12 m), connecting the magma chamber to the surface, characterised the feeding system at the onset of the Plinian phase (EU2 base). The feeding system rapidly evolved into hybrid geometric configuration, with a deeper dyke (length 2 a = 600- 800 m, width 2 b = 50 m) and a shallower cylindrical conduit (diameter D = 50 m, dyke-to-cylinder transition depth ∼2100 m), during the eruption of the EU2 top. The deeper dyke reached the dimensions of 2 a = 2000 m and

  7. Effect of Rice Husk Ash Insulation Powder on the Reoxidation Behavior of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Tundish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Yongsug; Holappa, Lauri; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) has been widely used as an insulation powder in steel casting tundish. Its effect on the reoxidation of molten steel in tundish as well as on the corrosion of magnesia refractory was investigated. The reoxidation of the steel, indicated by an oxygen pickup, was progressed by increasing the ratio of RHA to the sum of RHA and carryover ladle slag ( R ratio) greater than about 0.2. The increase of the silica activity in the slag layer promoted the self-dissociation of SiO2 from the slag layer into the molten steel, resulting in the silicon and oxygen pickup as the R ratio increased. The total number of reoxidation inclusions dramatically increased and the relative fraction of Al2O3-rich inclusions increased by increasing the R ratio. Hence, the reoxidation of molten steel in tundish might become more serious due to the formation of alumina-rich inclusions as the casting sequence increases. MgO in the refractory directly dissolved into the molten slag layer without forming any intermediate compound layer ( e.g., spinel), which is a completely different situation from the general slag-refractory interfacial reaction. A flow was possibly induced by the bursting of gas bubbles at the ash-slag (-refractory) interface, since the silica in the RHA powder continuously dissolved into the molten slag pool. Thus, the RHA insulation powder has a negative effect on the corrosion of MgO refractory.

  8. Effect of Substrate Temperature and Ambient Pressure on Heat Transfer at Interface Between Molten Droplet and Substrate Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, M.; Yang, K.; Tanaka, K.; Usami, T.; Yasui, T.; Yamada, M.

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter-sized molten Cu droplets were deposited on AISI304 substrate surface by free falling experiment. The roles of substrate temperature and ambient pressure on heat transfer at interface between molten droplet and substrate surface were systematically investigated. The splat characteristics were evaluated in detail. Temperature history of molten droplet was measured at splat-substrate interface. Cooling rate of the flattening droplet was calculated as well. Furthermore, the spreading behavior of molten droplet on substrate surface was captured by high speed camera. The heat transfer from splat to substrate was enhanced both by substrate heating and by ambient pressure reduction, which can be attributed to the good contact at splat bottom surface. The splats in free falling experiment showed similar changing tendency as thermal-sprayed particles. Consequently, substrate temperature and ambient pressure have an equivalent effect to contact condition at interface between droplet and substrate surface. Substrate heating and pressure reduction may enhance the wetting during splat flattening, and then affect the flattening and solidification behavior of the molten droplet.

  9. Rotating disk electrode study of borohydride oxidation in a molten eutectic electrolyte and advancements in the intermediate temperature borohydride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2017-08-01

    The electrode kinetics of the NaBH4 oxidation reaction (BOR) in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic mixture is investigated by rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry on electrochemically oxidized Ni at temperatures between 458 K and 503 K. The BH4- diffusion coefficient in the molten alkali eutectic together with the BOR activation energy, exchange current density, transfer coefficient and number of electrons exchanged, are determined. Electrochemically oxidized Ni shows excellent BOR electrocatalytic activity with a maximum of seven electrons exchanged and a transfer coefficient up to one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the formation of NiO as the catalytically active species. The high faradaic efficiency and BOR rate on oxidized Ni anode in the molten electrolyte compared to aqueous alkaline electrolytes is advantageous for power sources. A novel molten electrolyte battery design is investigated using dissolved NaBH4 at the anode and immobilized KIO4 at the cathode. This battery produces a stable open-circuit cell potential of 1.04 V, and a peak power density of 130 mW cm-2 corresponding to a superficial current density of 160 mA cm-2 at 458 K. With further improvements and scale-up borohydride molten electrolyte batteries and fuel cells could be integrated with thermal energy storage systems.

  10. Degradation of organochloride pesticides by molten salt oxidation at IPEN: spin-off nuclear activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O., E-mail: lainetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear spin-off has at least two dimensions. It may provide benefits to the society such as enlarge knowledge base, strengthen infrastructure and benefit technology development. Besides this, to emphasize that some useful technologies elapsed from nuclear activities can affect favorably the public opinion about nuclear energy. In this paper is described a technology developed initially by the Rockwell Int. company in the USA more than thirty years ago to solve some problems of nuclear fuel cycle wastes. For different reasons the technology was not employed. In the last years the interest in the technology was renewed and IPEN has developed his version of the method applicable mainly to the safe degradation of hazardous wastes. This study was motivated by the world interest in the development of advanced processes of waste decomposition, due to the need of safer decomposition processes, particularly for the POPs - persistent organic pollutants and particularly for the organ chlorides. A tendency observed at several countries is the adoption of progressively more demanding legislation for the atmospheric emissions, resultants of the waste decomposition processes. The suitable final disposal of hazardous organic wastes such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), pesticides, herbicides and hospital residues constitutes a serious problem. In some point of their life cycles, these wastes should be destroyed, in reason of the risk that they represent for the human being, animals and plants. The process involves using a chemical reactor containing molten salts, sodium carbonate or some alkaline carbonates mixtures to decompose the organic waste. The decomposition is performed by submerged oxidation and the residue is injected below the surface of a turbulent salt bath along with the oxidizing agent. Decomposition of halogenated compounds, among which some pesticides, is particularly effective in molten salts. The process presents properties such as intrinsically safe

  11. Lava Flow Interactions with Topographic Obstacles: Morphologic Analysis, Analogue Modeling, and Molten Basalt Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Lev, E.; Dietrich, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Underlying topography controls lava flow emplacement by influencing flow paths, lengths, and advance rates. The morphology of the pre-eruptive surface provides input into lava flow models and the design of artificial diversion barriers, although the dynamics of interactions between topographic obstacles and lava flows are not well known. We investigate these factors by combining morphologic analysis of Hawaiian lava flows with scaling derived from analogue and molten basalt experiments. A comparison of pre- and post-eruptive topographic data shows that flows thicken on the upslope side of topographic barriers, a feature that has been employed to calculate flow velocities from simple energy conversion. Observations also document effects of flow branching and confinement on flow advance rate, with confined flows in Hawai'i traveling further and faster than those that branch. To explain these observations we perform laboratory experiments using Newtonian and Bingham analogue fluids, as well as molten basalt. Conditions of flow splitting and subsequent advance are defined using experiments with both V-shaped and cylindrical obstacles that divide an unconfined flow. Oblique linear obstacles are used to explore flow confinement and diversion. We find that the degree of thickening, which determines the height of an obstacle capable of holding back the flow, is controlled by both initial flow velocity and obstacle geometry. Key is the ability of the flow to pass around the obstacle, such that larger and wider obstacles cause greater thickening than smaller and narrower obstacles. Flow advance rate is largely unaffected by branching in the Newtonian analogue experiments, but decreases after splitting in the molten basalt experiments because of surface cooling. Interestingly, flows into oblique obstacles are diverted but travel faster. Together these data provide the basis for a theoretical description of the interaction dynamics of viscous (and cooling) lava flows with

  12. Direct Electrolysis of Molten Lunar Regolith for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirk, Aislinn H. C.; Sadoway, Donald R.; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    When considering the construction of a lunar base, the high cost ($ 100,000 a kilogram) of transporting materials to the surface of the moon is a significant barrier. Therefore in-situ resource utilization will be a key component of any lunar mission. Oxygen gas is a key resource, abundant on earth and absent on the moon. If oxygen could be produced on the moon, this provides a dual benefit. Not only does it no longer need to be transported to the surface for breathing purposes; it can also be used as a fuel oxidizer to support transportation of crew and other materials more cheaply between the surface of the moon, and lower earth orbit (approximately $20,000/kg). To this end a stable, robust (lightly manned) system is required to produce oxygen from lunar resources. Herein, we investigate the feasibility of producing oxygen, which makes up almost half of the weight of the moon by direct electrolysis of the molten lunar regolith thus achieving the generation of usable oxygen gas while producing primarily iron and silicon at the cathode from the tightly bound oxides. The silicate mixture (with compositions and mechanical properties corresponding to that of lunar regolith) is melted at temperatures near 1600 C. With an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. The effect of anode material, sweep rate, and electrolyte composition on the electrochemical behavior was investigated and implications for scale-up are considered. The activity and stability of the candidate anode materials as well as the effect of the electrolyte composition were determined. Additionally, ex-situ capture and analysis of the anode gas to calculate the current efficiency under different voltages, currents and melt chemistries was carried out.

  13. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of BaB6 from molten melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose T.P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium hexaboride (BaB6 crystals were electrochemically synthesized using molten salt technique. Barium carbonate (BaCO3 and boron trioxide (B2O3 was used as reactants. Lithium fluoride (LiF was used as the supporting electrolyte. The molten electrolyte consisted of 50 wt % BaCO3 and B2O3 with different stiochiometric ratios of Ba and B and 50 wt % lithium fluoride. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 821oC. The electrolytic cell had a high purity graphite crucible, which served as the electrolyte holding vessel and also as the anode for the electrolysis. An electro-polished molybdenum rod was employed as the cathode. The electrolysis was performed at 870ºC under argon atmosphere, at current densities ranging from 0.2-0.5 A/cm2. The electrodeposited crystals were examined for the phase identification using X-ray diffraction technique. The AAS and the chemical analysis were made for the determination of chemical composition of the synthesized crystals. The purity of the crystals was also assessed using ICP-MS, XRF and EDX, which reveal that the crystals were associated with trace amount of impurities like oxygen, carbon and iron. The compound is found to be more than 99 % pure. The morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. From the above studies, it is concluded that the molten salt process is a simple preparative procedure for the synthesis of sub-micron size barium hexaboride crystals.

  14. Understanding fluxes as media for directed synthesis: in situ local structure of molten potassium polysulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Daniel P; Chung, Duck Young; Mitchell, J F; Bray, Travis H; Soderholm, L; Chupas, Peter J; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-06-06

    Rational exploratory synthesis of new materials requires routes to discover novel phases and systematic methods to tailor their structures and properties. Synthetic reactions in molten fluxes have proven to be an excellent route to new inorganic materials because they promote diffusion and can serve as an additional reactant, but little is known about the mechanisms of compound formation, crystal precipitation, or behavior of fluxes themselves at conditions relevant to synthesis. In this study we examine the properties of a salt flux system that has proven extremely fertile for growth of new materials: the potassium polysulfides spanning K(2)S(3) and K(2)S(5), which melt between 302 and 206 °C. We present in situ Raman spectroscopy of melts between K(2)S(3) and K(2)S(5) and find strong coupling between n in K(2)S(n) and the molten local structure, implying that the S(n)(2-) chains in the crystalline state are mirrored in the melt. In any reactive flux system, K(2)S(n) included, a signature of changing species in the melt implies that their evolution during a reaction can be characterized and eventually controlled for selective formation of compounds. We use in situ X-ray total scattering to obtain the pair distribution function of molten K(2)S(5) and model the length of S(n)(2-) chains in the melt using reverse Monte Carlo simulations. Combining in situ Raman and total scattering provides a path to understanding the behavior of reactive media and should be broadly applied for more informed, targeted synthesis of compounds in a wide variety of inorganic fluxes.

  15. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wishau, R.

    1998-05-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a {sup 238}Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of {sup 238}Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of {sup 238}Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious {sup 238}Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further {sup 238}Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious {sup 238}Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose {sup 238}Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment.

  16. Simulation of process for electrical energy production based on molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simon, G.; Parodi, F.; Fermeglia, M.; Taccani, R.

    A global molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) power plant steady-state simulation is presented. A performance fuel cell numerical model is developed and integrated as a custom block in Aspen plus™for the whole process simulation. The burner/reformer compact unit is built assembling existing Aspen plus™internal blocks. A simulation is obtained with the preliminary input specification to get to the base case and a sensitivity analysis is conducted, in order to find the process parameters whose change improves the global efficiency.

  17. A New Approach to Blending and Loading Problem of Molten Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianhua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The problems of blending electrolyzer and multi-constraint optimization of electrolytic aluminum scheduling in the electrolytic aluminum production process were addressed. Based on a mathematical model analysis, a novel hybrid optimization algorithm is proposed for optimization of blending together the molten aluminum in different electrolytic cells. An affinity degree function was designed to represent the path of aluminum scheduling. The mutation operators were designed to implement the transformation of electrolyzer combination and change the route of loading. A typical optimization example from an aluminum plant in northwest China is given in this paper, the results of which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Transport of deuterium and rare gases by flowing molten Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Horn, S.; Oschinski, J. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.))

    In thermal convection loops the transport of deuterium and rare gases by molten Pb-17Li was investigated in the temperature range of 300 to 700deg C. Dissolution and desorption of the gases are controlled by diffusion through a LM boundary layer. No chemical effects could be detected. The solubility of deuterium was found one order of magnitude lower than values from the literature. Transport rates and solubilities of helium are 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} times smaller compared to deuterium, for all other rare gases smaller than those of helium. (orig.).

  19. Effects of thermal shocks on the release of radioisotopes and on molten metal target vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques; Benedikt, Michael; Catherall, R; Cyvoct, G; Fabich, A; Georg, U; Gilardoni, S S; Jonsson, O; Ravn, H L; Sgobba, Stefano; Bauer, G; Bruchertseifer, H; Graber, T; Gudermann, C; Ni, L; Rastani, R

    2003-01-01

    The ISOLDE pulsed proton beam peak power amounts to 500 MW during the 2.4 ms proton pulse. The fraction of the proton pulse energy deposited in the target material is at the origin of severe thermal shocks. Quantitative measurement of their effect on the release of radioelements from ISOLDE targets was obtained by comparison of release profiles measured under different proton beam settings. The thermal shock induced in liquids (Pb, Sn, La) lead to mechanical failure of ISOLDE molten metal target vessels. Failure analysis is presented and discussed in the light of the response of mercury samples submitted to the ISOLDE beam and monitored by high-speed optical systems.

  20. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  1. Molten Boron Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage: Containment and Applicability to Microsatellites (Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    likely since molybdenum borides become unstable below the desired experimental temperatures.42 Sample contamination through the reaction of molten...3643 0.134 0.0804 0.284 Rhenium 3453 0.15 0.09 0.325 Boron Nitride 3273 1.99 1.194 --- BeO 3010 2.43 1.458 3.41 Molybdenum 2890 0.255 0.153 0.391...Ruthenium 2607 381 117 Iridium 2739 213 147 Niobium 2750 323 53.7 Molybdenum 2896 390 138 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

  2. Surface tension and viscosity of molten vanadium measured with an electrostatic levitation furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junpei T., E-mail: okada.junpei@jaxa.j [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Ishikawa, Takehiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Watanabe, Yuki [Advanced Engineering Service Co., Ltd., 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Paradis, Paul-Francois [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Surface tension and viscosity of molten vanadium were measured over a wide temperature range by the oscillating drop method in an electrostatic levitation furnace. Over the (2023 to 2517) K temperature range, the surface tension can be expressed as gamma(T)/(10{sup -3} N/m) = 1935 - 0.27 left brace(T - T{sub m})/Kright brace with T{sub m} = 2183 K. Over the same temperature span, the viscosity can be expressed as eta(T)/(10{sup -3} Pa . s) = 1.23exp[2.27 . 10{sup 4}/(RTK{sup -1})], where R is the gas constant.

  3. Luminescent Properties of Y2O3:Eu3+ Nanocrystals Prepared by Molten Salt Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of red phosphors Y2O3:Eu3+ were prepared by the molten salt method with different surfactants. Their structures, morphologies, and the photoluminescent properties were investigated at room temperature. The particles size of Y2O3:Eu3+ can be controlled by adjusting the kinds of surfactants. The phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ prepared with NP-10 [polyoxyethylene (10 nonyl phenyl ether] shows regular morphology and higher crystallinity, and its average particle size is about 200 nm. Bright red light can be observed by naked eyes from the red phosphor under 254 nm excitation.

  4. Thermophysical, hydrodynamic and mechanical aspects of molten core relocation to lower plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Huh, Chang Wook [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the current state of knowledge on molten material relocation into the lower plenum. Consequences of movement of material to the lower head are considered with regard to the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure from both thermal hydraulic and mechanical standpoints. The models are applied to evaluating various in-vessel retention strategies for the Korean Standard Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The results are summarized in terms of thermal response of the reactor vessel from the very relevant severe accident management perspective. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (Author)

  5. Trigger - and heat-transfer times measured during experimental molten-fuel-interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Spitznagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A modified setup featuring high speed high resolution data and video recording was developed to obtain detailed information on trigger and heat transfer times during explosive molten fuel-coolant-interaction (MFCI. MFCI occurs predominantly in configurations where water is entrapped by hot melt. The setup was modified to allow direct observation of the trigger and explosion onset. In addition the influences of experimental control and data acquisition can now be more clearly distinguished from the pure phenomena. More precise experimental studies will facilitate the description of MFCI thermodynamics.

  6. Multi physics modeling of a molten-salt electrolytic process for nuclear waste treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. R.; Choi, S. Y.; Kim, J. G.; Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kwon, S. W.; Shim, J. B.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Park, B. G.; Yi, K. W.; Hwang, I. S.

    2010-03-01

    Multi physics electrochemical modeling in a framework of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was proposed and dealt with in detail to simulate the electro-transport behaviour that appears in a molten-salt electrolytic system. The modeling approach in this study is focused on the mass transport and current arising due to the concentration and the surface overpotential based on a cell configuration and electrolyte turbulence. This comprehensive modelling approach was applied and compared to electroplating model in a prepared rotating cylinder Hull (RCH) cell system.

  7. On-line reprocessing of a molten salt reactor: a simulation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Nicole; Gastaldi, Olivier; Penit, Thomas; Cohin, Olivier; Campion, Pierre-Yves [DEN/CADDTN/STPA/LPC-CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the concepts studied in the frame of GEN IV road-map. Due to the specific features of its liquid fuel, the reprocessing unit may be directly connected to the reactor. A modelling of this unit is presented. The final objective is to create a flexible computer reprocessing code which can use data from neutron calculations and can be coupled to a neutron code. Such a code allows the description of the whole behaviour of MSR, including, in a coupled manner, both the design of the core and the optimised reprocessing scheme effects. (authors)

  8. Migrational polarization in high-current density molten salt electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, J.; Vallet, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical flux equations based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been derived in terms of experimental transport coefficients for binary molten salt mixtures analogous to those proposed for high temperature batteries and fuel cells. The equations and some numerical solutions indicate steady state composition gradients of significant magnitude. The effects of migrational separation must be considered along with other melt properties in the characterization of electrode behavior, melt composition, operating temperatures and differences of phase stability, wettability and other physicochemical properties at positive and negative electrodes of high current density devices with mixed electrolytes.

  9. Magnetic forces acting on molten drops in gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. A.; Eagar, T. W.; Lang, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    In gas metal arc welding, magnetic forces arising from the interaction of the welding current with its own magnetic field play an important role in the detachment of drops from the molten welding electrode. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of the axial magnetic force from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces when a drop detaches from the electrode.

  10. Water-molten uranium hazard analysis. Final report. LATA report No. 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.; Donham, B.J.

    1979-08-21

    The hazard potential of cooling water leakage into the crucible of molten uranium in the MARS laser isotope separation experiment was investigated. A vapor-phase explosion is highly unlikely in any of the scenarios defined for MARS. For the operating basis accident, the gas pressure transient experienced by the vessel wall is 544 psia peak with a duration of 200 ..mu..s, and the peak hoop stress is about 20,000 psi in a 0.5-in. wall. Design and procedural recommendations are given for reducing the hazard. (DLC)

  11. Borohydride electro-oxidation in a molten alkali hydroxide eutectic mixture and a novel borohydride-periodate battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of BH4- in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic mixture (0.515:0.485 mole fractions), is investigated for the first time by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Anodically oxidized Ni is electrocatalytically more active than Pt for BH4- oxidation in the molten alkali electrolyte as shown by the more than three times higher exchange current density (i.e. 15.8 mA cm-2 vs. 4.6 mA cm-2 at 185 °C). Next the proof-of-concept for a novel BH4-/IO4- molten alkali electrolyte battery is presented. Using oxidized Ni mesh anode and Pt mesh cathode a maximum power density of 63 mW cm-2 is achieved at 185 °C.

  12. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  13. Heavy metal: Can molten metal technology turn toxic dross into gold? A study in alchemy, controversy, and green tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, S.

    1995-12-31

    In a Massachusetts industrial park, inside a renovated helicopter factory, stands a giant, Rube Goldbergesque machine of metal boxes and pipes. Technicians in blue uniforms, hard hats, and safety glasses attend this contraption, watching over the fire at its heart: a cauldron of molten metal, usually iron, heated to some 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Hazardous wastes are injected into this molten bath. There, according to its inventor, the metal acts as a catalyst for a chemical reaction that instantly reduces compound molecules to their elemental components. A considerable portion for the wastes thus digested are spit out again in the form of industrial-grade materials, ready for reuse or resale. This article describes both the processing of hazardous wastes by using molten metal to drive reactions that would recover useful materials from hazardous waste and the future possibilities for its use.

  14. In Situ Production of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in a Binary Molten Salt for Concentrated Solar Power Plant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lasfargues

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Seeding nanoparticles in molten salts has been shown recently as a promising way to improve their thermo-physical properties. The prospect of such technology is of interest to both academic and industrial sectors in order to enhance the specific heat capacity of molten salt. The latter is used in concentrated solar power plants as both heat transfer fluid and sensible storage. This work explores the feasibility of producing and dispersing nanoparticles with a novel one pot synthesis method. Using such a method, CuO nanoparticles were produced in situ via the decomposition of copper sulphate pentahydrate in a KNO3-NaNO3 binary salt. Analyses of the results suggested preferential disposition of atoms around produced nanoparticles in the molten salt. Thermal characterization of the produced nano-salt suspension indicated the dependence of the specific heat enhancement on particle morphology and distribution within the salts.

  15. In Situ Production of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in a Binary Molten Salt for Concentrated Solar Power Plant Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasfargues, Mathieu; Stead, Graham; Amjad, Muhammad; Ding, Yulong; Wen, Dongsheng

    2017-05-19

    Seeding nanoparticles in molten salts has been shown recently as a promising way to improve their thermo-physical properties. The prospect of such technology is of interest to both academic and industrial sectors in order to enhance the specific heat capacity of molten salt. The latter is used in concentrated solar power plants as both heat transfer fluid and sensible storage. This work explores the feasibility of producing and dispersing nanoparticles with a novel one pot synthesis method. Using such a method, CuO nanoparticles were produced in situ via the decomposition of copper sulphate pentahydrate in a KNO₃-NaNO₃ binary salt. Analyses of the results suggested preferential disposition of atoms around produced nanoparticles in the molten salt. Thermal characterization of the produced nano-salt suspension indicated the dependence of the specific heat enhancement on particle morphology and distribution within the salts.

  16. Neutronic Analysis of the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine Using Various Thorium Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acır, Adem

    2013-08-01

    In this study, a neutronic performance of the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) molten salt blanket is investigated. Neutronic calculations are performed by using XSDRNPM/SCALE5 codes in S8-P3 approximation. The thorium molten salt composition considered in this calculation is 75 % LiF—25 % ThF4, 75 % LiF—24 % ThF4—1 % 233UF4, 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. Also, effects of the 6Li enrichment in molten salt are performed for all heavy metal salt. The radiation damage behaviors of SS-304 structural material with respect to higher fissionable fuel content and 6Li enrichment are computed. By higher fissionable fuel content in molten salt and with 6Li enrichment (20 and 50 %) in the coolant in form of 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4, an initial TBR >1.05 can be realized. On the other hand, the 75 % LiF—25 % ThF4 or 75 % LiF—24 % ThF4—1 % 233UF4 molten salt fuel as regards maintained tritium self-sufficiency is not suitable as regards improving neutronic performance of LIFE engine. A high quality fissile fuel with a rate of ~2,850 kg/year of 233U can be produced with 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. The energy multiplication factor is increased with high rate fission reactions of 233U occurring in the molten salt zone. Major damage mechanisms in SS-304 first wall stell have been computed as DPA = 48 and He = 132 appm per year with 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. This implies a replacement of the SS-304 first wall stell of every between 3 and 4 years.

  17. Study on electrolytic reduction with controlled oxygen flow for iron from molten oxide slag containing FeO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A ZrO2-based solid membrane electrolytic cell with controlled oxygen flow was constructed: graphite rod /[O]Fe+C saturated / ZrO2(MgO/(FeO slag/iron crucible. The feasibility of extraction of iron from molten oxide slag containing FeO at an applied voltage was investigated by means of the electrolytic cell. The effects of some important process factors on the FeO electrolytic reduction with the controlled oxygen flow were discussed. The results show that: solid iron can be extracted from molten oxide slag containing FeO at 1450ºC and an applied potential of 4V. These factors, such as precipitation and growth of solid iron dendrites, change of the cathode active area on the inner wall of the iron crucible and ion diffusion flux in the molten slag may affect the electrochemical reaction rate. The reduction for Fe2+ ions mainly appears on new iron dendrites of the iron crucible cathode, and a very small amount of iron are also formed on the MSZ (2.18% MgO partially stabilized zirconia tube/slag interface due to electronic conductance of MSZ tube. Internal electronic current through MSZ tube may change direction at earlier and later electrolytic reduction stage. It has a role of promoting electrolytic reduction for FeO in the molten slag at the earlier stage, but will lower the current efficiency at the later stage. The final reduction ratio of FeO in the molten slag can achieve 99%. A novel electrolytic method with controlled oxygen flow for iron from the molten oxide slag containing FeO was proposed. The theory of electrolytic reduction with the controlled oxygen flow was developed.

  18. Physical properties of core-concrete systems: Al2O3-ZrO2 molten materials measured by aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kargl, F.; Nakamori, F.; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    During a molten core-concrete interaction, molten oxides consisting of molten core materials (UO2 and ZrO2) and concrete (Al2O3, SiO2, CaO) are formed. Reliable data on the physical properties of the molten oxides will allow us to accurately predict the progression of a nuclear reactor core meltdown accident. In this study, the viscosities and densities of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x (x = 0.356 and 0.172) were measured using an aerodynamic levitation technique. The densities of two small samples were estimated from their masses and their volumes (calculated from recorded images of the molten samples). The droplets were forced to oscillate using speakers, and their viscosities were evaluated from the damping behaviors of their oscillations. The results showed that the viscosity of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x compared to that of pure molten Al2O3 is 25% lower for x = 0.172, while it is unexpectedly 20% higher for x = 0.356.

  19. Molten salt-directed synthesis method for LiMn2O4 nanorods as a cathode material for a lithium-ion battery with superior cyclability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kebede, Mesfin A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A molten salt synthesis technique has been used to prepare nanorods of Mn2O3 and single-crystal LiMn2O4 nanorods cathode material with superior capacity retention. The molten salt-directed synthesis involved the use of NaCl as the eutectic melt...

  20. Study on the Preparation Process and Influential Factors of Large Area Environment-friendly Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyun; Xu, Shisen; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Hongjian; Ren, Yongqiang

    2017-07-01

    Low-cost and high-performance matrix materials used in mass production of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) were prepared by automatic casting machine with α-LiAlO2 powder material synthesized by gel-solid method, and distilled water as solvent. The single cell was assembled for generating test, and the good performance of the matrix was verified. The paper analyzed the factors affecting aqueous tape casting matrix preparation, such as solvent content, dispersant content, milling time, blade height and casting machine running speed, providing a solid basis for the mass production of large area environment-friendly matrix used in molten carbonate fuel cell.

  1. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  2. A new general and rapid method for investigating hot corrosion: preliminary tests on electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, T.R. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Volkovich, V.A. [Dept. of Rare Metals, Ural State Technical Univ. - UPI, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    With the increase and improvement in corrosion resistant alloys, coatings and surface treatments, the ability to test and predict their long-term behaviour to oxidation under hot corrosion conditions, within a reasonable time period, becomes diminished. Peroxide and superoxide ions are the most active oxidisers and we have established a means for generating them in significant concentrations in molten carbonates. This thus has the potential for enabling accelerated hot corrosion studies and we here describe the technique and report preliminary studies on the nickel and nickel oxide electrodes used in molten carbonate fuel cells. Further applications are expected to follow. (orig.)

  3. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing; Xie, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  4. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing, E-mail: heqing@ise.neu.edu.cn; Xie, Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-03-15

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  5. Performance and properties of anodes reinforced with metal oxide nanoparticles for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Grazia; Frattini, Domenico; Yoon, Sung Pil; Ham, Hyung Chul; Nam, Suk Woo

    2017-12-01

    Development of electrode materials for molten carbonate fuel cells is a fundamental issue as a balance between mechanical and electrochemical properties is required due to the particular operating environments of these cells. As concern the anode, a viable strategy is to use nano-reinforced particles during electrodes' fabrication. Candidate nanomaterials comprise, but are not limited to, ZrO2, CeO2, TiO2, Ti, Mg, Al, etc. This work deals with the characterization and test of two different types of hard oxide nanoparticles as reinforce for NiAl-based anodes in molten carbonate fuel cells. Nano ceria and nano zirconia are compared each other and single cell test performances are presented. Compared to literature, the use of hard metal oxide nanoparticles allows good performance and promising perspectives with respect to the use a third alloying metal. However, nano zirconia performed slightly better than nano ceria as polarization and power curves are higher even if nano ceria has the highest mechanical properties. This means that the choice of nanoparticles to obtain improved anodes performance and properties is not trivial and a trade-off between relevant properties plays a key role.

  6. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  7. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  8. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in the latent heat of molten salts as a means of conserving fossil fuels and lowering the cost of electric power was evaluated. Public utility systems provided electric power on demand. This demand is generally maximum during late weekday afternoons, with considerably lower overnight and weekend loads. Typically, the average demand is only 60% to 80% of peak load. As peak load increases, the present practice is to purchase power from other grid facilities or to bring older less efficient fossil-fuel plants on line which increase the cost of electric power. The widespread use of oil-fired boilers, gas turbine and diesel equipment to meet peaking loads depletes our oil-based energy resources. Heat exchangers utilizing molten salts can be used to level the energy consumption curve. The study begins with a demand analysis and the consideration of several existing modern fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants for use as models. Salts are evaluated for thermodynamic, economic, corrosive, and safety characteristics. Heat exchanger concepts are explored and heat exchanger designs are conceived. Finally, the economics of TES conversions in existing plants and new construction is analyzed. The study concluded that TES is feasible in electric power generation. Substantial data are presented for TES design, and reference material for further investigation of techniques is included.

  9. Development status and potential program for development of proliferation-resistant molten-salt reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J.R.; Bauman, H.F.; Dearing, J.F.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Preliminary studies of existing and conceptual molten-salt reactor (MSR) designs have led to the identification of conceptual systems that are technologically attractive when operated with denatured uranium as the principal fissile fuel. These denatured MSRs would also have favorable resource-utilization characteristics and substantial resistance to proliferation of weapons-usable nuclear materials. The report presents a summary of the current status of technology and a discussion of the major technical areas of a possible base program to develop commercial denatured MSRs. The general areas treated are (1) reactor design and development, (2) safety and safety related technology, (3) fuel-coolant behavior and fuel processing, and (4) reactor materials. A substantial development effort could lead to authorization for construction of a molten-salt test reactor about 5 years after the start of the program and operation of the unit about 10 years later. A prototype commercial denatured MSR could be expected to begin operating 25 years from the start of the program. The postulated base program would extend over 32 years and would cost about $700 million (1978 dollars, unescalated). Additional costs to construct the MSTR, $600 million, and the prototype commercial plant, $1470 million, would bring the total program cost to about $2.8 billion. Additional allowances probably should be made to cover contingencies and incidental technology areas not explicitly treated in this preliminary review.

  10. Development of a steady state analysis code for a molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D.L. [State Key Laboratory of Multi Phase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Department of Nuclear and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, S.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Multi Phase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Department of Nuclear and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)], E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Su, G.H. [State Key Laboratory of Multi Phase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Department of Nuclear and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Liu, C.L. [Department of Nuclear and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The molten salt reactor (MSR), which is one of the 'Generation IV' concepts, can be used for transmutation, and production of electricity, hydrogen and fissile fuels. In this study, a single-liquid-fueled MSR is designed for conceptual research, in which no solid material is present in the core as moderator, except for the external reflector. The fuel salt flow makes the MSR neutronics different from that of conventional reactors using solid fuels, and couples the flow and heat transfer strongly. Therefore, it is necessary to study the core characteristics with due attention to the coupling among flow, heat transfer and neutronics. The standard turbulent model is adopted to establish the flow and heat transfer model, while the diffusion theory is used for the neutronics model, which consists of two-group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, and balance equations for six groups of delayed neutron precursors. These two models which are coupled through the temperature and heat source are coded in a microcomputer program. The distributions of the velocity, temperature, neutron fluxes, and delayed neutron precursors under the rated condition are obtained. In addition, the effects of the inflow temperature, inflow velocity, and the fuel salt residence time out of the core are discussed in detail. The results provide some valuable information for the research and design of the new generation molten salt reactors.

  11. Effect of mold designs on molten metal behaviour in high-pressure die casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M. D.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Khan, A. A.; Mohamad, M. R.; Suffian, M. S. Z. M.; Yunos, Y. S.; Wong, L. K.; Mohtar, M. Z.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a research study conducted in a local automotive component manufacturer that produces aluminium alloy steering housing local and global markets. This study is to investigate the effect of design modification of mold in die casting as to improve the production rate. Design modification is carried out on the casting shot of the mold. Computer flow simulation was carried out to study the flow of molten metal in the mold with respect to the mold design modification. The design parameters of injection speed, die temperature and clamping force has been included in the study. The result of the simulation showed that modifications of casting shot give significant impact towards the molten flow behaviour in casting process. The capabilities and limitations of die casting process simulation to conduct defect analysis had been optimized. This research will enhance the efficiency of the mass production of the industry of die casting with the understanding of defect analysis, which lies on the modification of the mold design, a way early in its stages of production.

  12. Industrial Tests to Modify Molten Copper Slag for Improvement of Copper Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Congcong

    2017-11-01

    In this article, to improve the recovery of copper from copper slag by flotation process, industrial tests of the modification process involving addition of a composite additive into molten copper slag were conducted, and the modified slag was subjected to the flotation process to confirm the modification effect. The phase evolution of the slag in the modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that more copper was transformed and enriched in copper sulfide phases. The magnetite content in the modified slag decreased, and that of "FeO" increased correspondingly, leading to a better fluidity of the molten slag, which improved the aggregation and growth of fine particles of the copper sulfide minerals. Closed-circuit flotation tests of the original and modified slags were conducted, and the results show that the copper recovery increased obviously from 69.15% to 73.38%, and the copper grade of concentrates was elevated slightly from 20.24% to 21.69%, further confirming that the industrial tests of the modification process were successful. Hence, the modification process has a bright future in industrial applications for enhancing the recovery of copper from the copper slag.

  13. Assessment of the Neutronic and Fuel Cycle Performance of the Transatomic Power Molten Salt Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Sean [Transatomic Power Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States); Dewan, Leslie [Transatomic Power Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States); Massie, Mark [Transatomic Power Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States); Davidson, Eva E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report presents results from a collaboration between Transatomic Power Corporation (TAP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide neutronic and fuel cycle analysis of the TAP core design through the Department of Energy Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) Nuclear Energy Voucher program. The TAP concept is a molten salt reactor using configurable zirconium hydride moderator rod assemblies to shift the neutron spectrum in the core from mostly epithermal at beginning of life to thermal at end of life. Additional developments in the ChemTriton modeling and simulation tool provide the critical moderator-to-fuel ratio searches and time-dependent parameters necessary to simulate the continuously changing physics in this complex system. The implementation of continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport and depletion tools in ChemTriton provide for full-core three-dimensional modeling and simulation. Results from simulations with these tools show agreement with TAP-calculated performance metrics for core lifetime, discharge burnup, and salt volume fraction, verifying the viability of reducing actinide waste production with this concept. Additional analyses of mass feed rates and enrichments, isotopic removals, tritium generation, core power distribution, core vessel helium generation, moderator rod heat deposition, and reactivity coeffcients provide additional information to make informed design decisions. This work demonstrates capabilities of ORNL modeling and simulation tools for neutronic and fuel cycle analysis of molten salt reactor concepts.

  14. Two-Dimensional Neutronic and Fuel Cycle Analysis of the Transatomic Power Molten Salt Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Robertson, Sean [Transatomic Power Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States); Dewan, Leslie [Transatomic Power Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massie, Mark [Transatomic Power Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    This status report presents the results from the first phase of the collaboration between Transatomic Power Corporation (TAP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide neutronic and fuel cycle analysis of the TAP core design through the Department of Energy Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear, Nuclear Energy Voucher program. The TAP design is a molten salt reactor using movable moderator rods to shift the neutron spectrum in the core from mostly epithermal at beginning of life to thermal at end of life. Additional developments in the ChemTriton modeling and simulation tool provide the critical moderator-to-fuel ratio searches and time-dependent parameters necessary to simulate the continuously changing physics in this complex system. Results from simulations with these tools show agreement with TAP-calculated performance metrics for core lifetime, discharge burnup, and salt volume fraction, verifying the viability of reducing actinide waste production with this design. Additional analyses of time step sizes, mass feed rates and enrichments, and isotopic removals provide additional information to make informed design decisions. This work further demonstrates capabilities of ORNL modeling and simulation tools for analysis of molten salt reactor designs and strongly positions this effort for the upcoming three-dimensional core analysis.

  15. A final report on the Phase 1 testing of a molten-salt cavity receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, J M [ed.; Smith, D C [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States). Nuclear Equipment Div.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of a solar central receiver using molten nitrate salt as a heat exchange fluid. Design studies for large commercial plants (30--100 MWe) have shown molten salt to be an excellent fluid for solar thermal plants as it allows for efficient thermal storage. Plant design studies concluded that an advanced receiver test was required to address uncertainties not covered in prior receiver tests. This recommendation led to the current test program managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The 4.5 MWt receiver is installed at Sandia National Laboratories' Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The receiver incorporates features of large commercial receiver designs. This report describes the receiver's configuration, heat absorption surface (design and sizing), the structure and supporting systems, and the methods for control. The receiver was solar tested during a six-month period at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of the testing was to characterize the operational capabilities of the receiver under a number of solar operating and stand-by conditions. This testing consisted of initial check-out of the systems, followed by steady-state performance, transient receiver operation, receiver operation in clouds, receiver thermal loss testing, receiver start-up operation, and overnight thermal conditioning tests. This report describes the design, fabrication, and results of testing of the receiver.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of the oxidation state of Eu in molten LiCl-KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung; Yun, Jong-Il [KAIST, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopy can provide high reliability for the quantitative analysis of such system. The molar absorptivity of Eu(II) at 325 nm is reported as about 1645 M{sup -1}cm{sup -1}, which is too high to apply to higher concentration. A high-temperature Raman spectroscopy has been set and employed for analyzing the molecular structure and coordination complex and investigating the oxidation state of europium in molten LiCl-KCl. Europium can be present in divalent state while many other lanthanides exist in trivalent state. The thermodynamic properties of europium ions have been studied using electrochemical methods, spectroscopic methods, and EPR technique. Although there has been discrepancy of the reduced amount of europium in previous works, the majority of Eu(III) is thought to be reduced to Eu(II) in molten LiCl-KCl spontaneously at relatively low concentration (< 7.5 × 10{sup -4} M). Raman spectroscopy was employed to investigate the oxidation state of EuClx in LiCl-KCl at 500 .deg. C. The Raman scattering results suggest the majority of trivalent europium is reduced to divalent state with the composition change by vaporization. The Raman bands show highly asymmetric structure, quite different from regular octahedral structure.

  17. In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

    2007-12-16

    Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

  18. Formation of CuxS Layers on Polypropylene Sulfurized by Molten Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa ALABURDAITĖ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of formation of electrically conductive layers of copper sulfides CuxS by the sorption-diffusion method on polypropylene (PP using molten sulfur as sulfurizing agent was investigated. The amount of sorbed sulfur increased with the increase of the duration of treatment. Copper sulfide layers were formed on the surface of polypropylene after the treatment of sulfurized polymer with Cu(II/I salt solution. The amount of copper sulfide in layer increased with the increase of treatment duration in copper salt solution. XRD spectra of PP films treated for 3 min with molten sulfur and then with Cu(II/I salt solution for the different time showed that the copper sulfide phases, mostly digenite, Cu2-xS and a-chalcocite, Cu2S were formed in the layers. Electromotive force measurement results confirmed the composition of formed CuxS layers on PP. The phase composition of layers also changed after the annealing. The value of electrical resistance of copper sulfide layers on PP varied from 20 W/cm2 to 80 W/cm2 and after annealing at 80 °C - in the interval of 10 W/cm2 - 60 W/cm2.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.776

  19. Determinations of equilibrium segregation, effective segregation and diffusion coefficients for Nd+3 doped in molten YAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadian, M.; Saeedi, H.; Yadegari, M.; Shojaee, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a new mathematical model has been presented to determine the equilibrium segregation (k0) and effective segregation (keff) coefficients for neodymium (Nd) in YAG crystal grown by Czochralski (CZ) method. Determination of diffusion coefficient (DL) of Nd impurity in molten YAG is also investigated. In this model, utilizing Lambert W-function is a new idea to solve the Scheil equation for calculation of effective segregation coefficient. The Nd concentration in the crystal has been measured by optical absorption method to calculate keff. The analyses show that the keff is related to the growth parameters such as crystal growth rate (ug) and crystal rotation rate (ω), ( ug/√{ω}) but it is independent of the Nd concentration in the initial melt (C0). Based on obtained keff and experimental growth data, k0 and DL of Nd in molten YAG have been calculated. For all experiments, the average value of k0=0.216 and DL=1.4×10-6 (cm2/s) are obtained. Our results are corroborated by the theoretical and experimental data from the literature.

  20. Thermal and ignition type steam explosions of single drops of molten aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, L.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Seventeen steam explosion experiments were performed with 2 to 10 g drops of molten, high-purity Al. Seven were successfully initiated with underwater exploding bridgewires. At melt release temperatures up to 1400{degrees}C (1673 K) only moderate thermal-type explosions occurred that produced bubbles with volumes up to approximately 1 L. Bubble growth intensified in the melt temperature range 1400-1525{degrees}C (1673--1798 K) as threshold ignition of Al set in. In this range, one of the explosions emitted a flash of light and generated a bubble that grew very rapidly to approximately 14 L, broke through the water surface, and destroyed the test chamber. We attribute the behavior of this latter bubble, which grew as fast as one produced by the underwater firing of a 0.6 g explosive detonator, to an ignition-type steam explosion. Aluminum oxides could not be detected visually in the debris recovered from either typical thermal-type or the ignition-type explosions, and only traces could be detected by X-ray diffraction. In the ignition-type explosion, it is possible however that some oxidic material, probably the smaller particles, was lost during the flooding that occurred as the chamber failed. Both bubble analyses and the absence of appreciable oxide in the debris suggest that the ignition-type steam explosion was not very efficient, probably involving the combustion of only a small fraction of the original molten aluminum globule.

  1. A computational study of the impact of molten drops onto textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raessi, Mehdi; Sendha, Rajkamal

    2011-11-01

    We used an in-house, three-dimensional computational tool to study the impact and spreading of molten drops onto substrates with various surface patterns. The computational tool is GPU-accelerated and solves the mass, momentum and energy equations in the liquid phase and the conduction equation in the substrate. The drop, 40 μm in diameter, is molten alumina, which is widely used in the thermal spray coatings. The surface patterns are created by positioning cuboid obstacles that their side dimension is at least 3 μm . We investigated the effects of obstacle height, aspect ratio and spacing as well the impact velocity on the spreading dynamics and the final geometry of the drop. In our study, the impact velocity was varied from 40 to 90 m / s , the obstacle height from 1 to 5 μm , and the obstacle spacing from 2 to 26 μm . The results show that the flattened drop has a disk-shape geometry when the obstacle spacing is either smallest or largest, and that significant deformations and fingering occur at the intermediate spacings. A quantitative relation was developed between the obstacle spacing and the final spread diameter of the drop. The results show the collapse of the final spread diameter normalized by the obstacle spacing when plotted against the spacing at different impact velocity and obstacle height.

  2. Decomposition of diverse solid inorganic matrices with molten ammonium bifluoride salt for constituent elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, Matthew J.; Kellogg, Cyndi M.; Parker, Cyrena M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Grate, Jay W.

    2017-09-01

    Ammonium bifluoride (ABF, NH4F·HF) is a well-known reagent for converting metal oxides to fluorides and for its applications in breaking down minerals and ores in order to extract useful components. It has been more recently applied to the decomposition of inorganic matrices prior to elemental analysis. Herein, a sample decomposition method that employs molten ABF sample treatment in the initial step is systematically evaluated across a range of inorganic sample types: glass, quartz, zircon, soil, and pitchblende ore. Method performance is evaluated across the two variables: duration of molten ABF treatment and ABF reagent mass to sample mass ratio. The degree of solubilization of these sample classes are compared to the fluoride stoichiometry that is theoretically necessary to enact complete fluorination of the sample types. Finally, the sample decomposition method is performed on several soil and pitchblende ore standard reference materials, after which elemental constituent analysis is performed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Elemental recoveries are compared to the certified values; results indicate good to excellent recoveries across a range of alkaline earth, rare earth, transition metal, and actinide elements.

  3. Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

    2008-11-25

    Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

  4. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-15

    The sodium–nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250–350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. Finally, the cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  5. Life of refractories in service in a furnace for melting in a molten bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovikovskii, V.V.; Birkle, G.V.B.; Eroshkina, V.I.; Nechistykh, G.A.; Tarasov, A.V.; Yakushev, V.K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the development of a lining wearing uniformly in service, providing a long service life, and promoting the occurrence of autogeneous processes. The lining design developed is proposed for use in the furnaces for melting in a molten bath at a copper melting plant. The refractories investigated were MP dense periclase, MPM fused periclase-based magnesite, KhM chrome-magnesite, PKhS periclase-chromite roof, PShS periclase-spinellide, PKhPP fused periclase-chromite-base periclase-chromite, KhPT heat resistant chromite-periclase, VG high alumina, and ShM chamotte. The properties of the refractories are presented. It was established that the periclase-chromite refractories produced from fused material show the greatest life in the lining of furnaces for melting in a molten bath. A method of production of fused chromite-periclase was developed and a designed combined lining of a furnace with the use of highly resistanct refractories was presented.

  6. The inverse problem for definition of the shape of a molten contact bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharin, Stanislav N.; Sarsengeldin, Merey M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of bridging phenomenon occurring at opening of electrical contacts. The mathematical model describing the dynamics of metal molten bridge takes into account the Thomson effect. It is based on the system of partial differential equations for temperature and electrical fields of the bridge in the domain containing two moving unknown boundaries. One of them is an interface between liquid and solid zones of the bridge and should be found by the solution of the corresponding Stefan problem. The second free boundary corresponds to the shape of the visible part of a bridge. Its definition is an inverse problem, for which solution it is necessary to find minimum of the energy consuming for the formation of the shape of a quasi-stationary bridge. Three components of this energy, namely surface tension, pinch effect and gravitation, are defined by the functional which minimum gives the required shape of the bridge. The solution of corresponding variation problem is found by the reduction of the problem to the solution of the system of ordinary differential equations. Calculated values of the voltage of the bridge rupture for various metals are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The criteria responsible for the mechanism of molten bridge rupture are introduced in the paper.

  7. Main Experimental Results of ISTC-1606 for Recycling and Transmutation in Molten Salt Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Feynberg, Olga; Merzlyakov, Aleksandr; Surenkov, Aleksandr [Russian Research Center - Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov sq. 1, Moscow, RF, 123182 (Russian Federation); Subbotin, Vladimir; Zakirov, Raul; Toropov, Andrey; Panov, Aleksandr [Russian Federal Nuclear Center - Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Afonichkin, Valery [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    To examine and demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactors (MSR) to reduce long lived waste toxicity and to produce efficiently electricity in closed fuel cycle, some national and international studies were initiated last years. In this paper main focus is placed on experimental evaluation of single stream Molten Salt Actinide Recycler and Transmuter (MOSART) system fuelled with different compositions of plutonium plus minor actinide trifluoride (AnF{sub 3}) from LWR spent nuclear fuel without U-Th support. This paper summarizes main experimental results of ISTC-1606 related to physical and chemical properties of fuel salt, container materials for fuel circuit, and fuel salt clean up of MOSART system. As result of ISTC-1606 studies claim is made, that the {sup 7}Li,Na,Be/F and {sup 7}Li,Be/F solvents selected for primary system appear to resolve main reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, materials compatibility, fuel salt clean up and safety problems as applied to the MOSART concept development. The created experimental facilities and the database on properties of fuel salt mixtures and container materials are used for a choice and improvement fuel salts and coolants for new applications of this high temperature technology for sustainable nuclear power development. (authors)

  8. Electrochemical Dissolution of Tungsten Carbide in NaCl-KCl-Na2WO4 Molten Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwen; Nie, Zuoren; Xi, Xiaoli; Ma, Liwen; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Ming

    2017-11-01

    Tungsten carbide was utilized as anode to extract tungsten in a NaCl-KCl-Na2WO4 molten salt, and the electrochemical dissolution was investigated. Although the molten salt electrochemical method is a short process method of tungsten extraction from tungsten carbide in one step, the dissolution efficiency and current efficiency are quite low. In order to improve the dissolution rate and current efficiency, the sodium tungstate was added as the active substance. The dissolution rate, the anode current efficiency, and the cathode current efficiency were calculated with different contents of sodium tungstate addition. The anodes prior to and following the reaction, as well as the product, were analyzed through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. The results demonstrated that the sodium tungstate could improve the dissolution rate and the current efficiency, due to the addition of sodium tungstate decreasing the charge transfer resistance in the electrolysis system. Due to the fact that the addition of sodium tungstate could remove the carbon during electrolysis, pure tungsten powders with 100 nm diameter were obtained when the content of sodium tungstate was 1.0 pct.

  9. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  10. Interactions at the mould – modifying coating – molten nickel alloy interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michalska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study describes thermal-chemical interactions that take place in the molten nickel alloy-ceramic mould system, where the mould is either coated with a modifying coating („blue” mould or is not („white” mould. The ceramic mould based on zirconium silicate was made by investment process at the WSK Rzeszów Foundry. The main component of the modifying coating was cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 added in an amount of 10%. Thermodynamic calculations indicated the possibility of chemical reactions taking place between the chemically active nickel alloy constituents (Al, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb and the components of a ceramic mould and modifying coating. The result of such interactions is the risk of the formation of cracks on the surface of mould and molten metal penetration into these cracks, combined with the formation of casting defects, like burns-on, pitting, etc., as proved by extensive X-ray microanalysis. Changes of chemical composition in the surface layer of castings were also reported.

  11. Chapter 9 The magma feeding system of Somma-Vesuvius (Italy) strato-volcano: new inferences from a review of geochemical and Sr, Nd, Pb and O isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochi, M.; de Vivo, B.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    A large database of major, trace and isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, O) data exists for rocks produced by the volcanic activity of Somma-Vesuvius volcano. Variation diagrams strongly suggest a major role for evolutionary processes such as fractional crystallization, contamination, crystal trapping and magma maxing, occurring after magma genesis in the mantle. Most mafic magmas are enriched in LILE (Light Ion Lithophile Elements; K. Rb, Ba), REE (Ce, Sm) and Y, show small Nb-Ta negative anomalies, and have values of Nb/Zr at about 0.15. Enrichments in LILE, REE, Nb and Ta do not correlate with Sr isotope values or degree of both K enrichment and silica undersaturation. The results indicate mantle source heterogeneity produced by slab-derived components beneath the volcano. However, the Sr isotope values of Somma-Vesuvius increase from 0.7071 up to 0.7081 with transport through the uppermost 11-12 km of the crust. The Sr isotope variation suggests that the crustal component affected the magmas during ascent through the lithosphere to the surface. Our new geochemical assessment based on chemical, isotopic and fluid inclusion data points to the existence of three main levels of magma storage. Two of the levels are deep and may represent long-lived reservoirs; the uppermost crustal level probably coincides with the volcanic conduit. The deeper level of magma storage is deeper than 12 km and fed the 1944 AD eruption. The intermediate level coincides with the seismic discontinuity detected by Zollo et al. (1996) at about 8 km. This intermediate level supplies magmas with 87Sr/86Sr values between 0.7071 and 0.7074, and ??O18<8% that typically erupted both during interplinian (i.e. 1906 AD) and sub-plinian (472 AD, 1631 AD) events. The shallowest level of magma storage at about 5 km was the site of magma chambers for the Pompei and Avellino plinian eruptions. New investigations are necessary to verify the proposed magma feeding system. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  13. Thermionic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  14. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. 57.15007 Section 57.15007 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS...

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cell product design & improvement - 2nd quarter, 1996. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The main objective of this project is to establish the commercial readiness of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant for distributed power generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. This effort includes marketing, systems design and analysis, packaging and assembly, test facility development, and technology development, improvement, and verification.

  16. Feasibility of the electrochemical way in molten fluorides for separating thorium and lanthanides and extracting lanthanides from the solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamelot, P.; Massot, L.; Hamel, C.; Nourry, C.; Taxil, P.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative way of reprocessing nuclear fuel by hydrometallurgy could be using treatment with molten salts, particularly fluoride melts. Moreover, one of the six concepts chosen for GEN IV nuclear reactors (Technology Roadmap - http://gif.inel.gov/roadmap/) is the molten salt reactor (MSR). The originality of the concept is the use of molten salts as liquid fuel and coolant. During the running of the reactor, fission products, particularly lanthanides, accumulate in the melt and have to be eliminated to optimise reactor operation. This study concerns the feasibility of the separation actinides-lanthanides-solvent by selectively electrodepositing the elements to be separated on an inert (Mo, Ta) or a reactive (Ni) cathodic substrate in molten fluoride media. The main results of this work lead to the conclusions that: The solvents to be used for efficient separation must be fluoride media containing lithium as cation. Inert substrates are suitable for actinide/lanthanide separation; nickel substrate is more suitable for the extraction of lanthanides from the solvent, owing to the depolarisation occurring in the cathodic process through alloy formation.

  17. Thermodynamic evaluation of the solidification phase of molten core-concrete under estimated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Ogino, Hideki; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    The solidification phases of molten core-concrete under the estimated molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) conditions in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 were predicted using the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool, FactSage 6.2, and the NUCLEA database in order to contribute toward the 1F decommissioning work and to understand the accident progression via the analytical results for the 1F MCCI products. We showed that most of the U and Zr in the molten core-concrete forms (U,Zr)O2 and (Zr,U)SiO4, and the formation of other phases with these elements is limited. However, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 requires a relatively long time because it involves a change in the crystal structure from fcc-(U,Zr)O2 to tet-(U,Zr)O2, followed by the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 by reaction with SiO2. Therefore, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 is limited under quenching conditions. Other common phases are the oxide phases, CaAl2Si2O8, SiO2, and CaSiO3, and the metallic phases of the Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys. The solidification phenomenon of the crust under quenching conditions and that of the molten pool under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the 1F MCCI progression are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of gasification and gas-cleanup processes for use in molten-carbonate fuel-cell power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    A choice of the gasifier/cleanup system combinations most suitable for molten carbonate fuel cell based power plant application is discussed. Included are hot gas cleanup, air blown, oxygen blown and molten salt based coal gas supply systems. An assessment of deposition for power plant size molten carbonate fuel cells is given and mechanisms affecting particle transfer in fuel cells are described. Gas cleanup to remove virtually all particles larger than one micron in diameter is expected to prevent, or at least minimize to a negligibly low level, deposition of particulate material on the anode. However, cathode particulate deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells should be evaluated in the future, since cathodes are more likely to experience deposition even though cathode channel particle concentrations can be much lower than anode channel concentrations. Cathodes are more susceptible to deposition than anodes due to a net mass flow of gases into cathode pores compared to a net mass flow of gases out from anode pores.

  19. Normal Spectral Emissivity Measurement of Molten Cu-Co Alloy Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shoya; Nakamura, Yuki; Sugioka, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy with different compositions was measured in the wavelength range of 780 nm to 920 nm and in the temperature range of 1430 K to 1770 K including the undercooled condition by an electromagnetic levitator superimposed with a static magnetic field. The emissivity was determined as the ratio of the radiance from a levitated molten Cu-Co droplet measured by a spectrometer to the radiance from a blackbody calculated by Planck's law at a given temperature, where a static magnetic field of 2.5 T to 4.5 T was applied to the levitated droplet to suppress the surface oscillation and translational motion of the sample. We found little temperature dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy. Concerning the composition dependence, the emissivity decreased markedly above 80 at%Cu and reached that of pure Cu, although its dependence was low between 20 at%Cu and 80 at%Cu. In addition, this composition dependence of the emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy can be explained well by the Drude free-electron model.

  20. Effect of chromium, aluminum, and titanium on the corrosion resistance of nickel in molten sodium sulfate and chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryshich, I. V.

    1985-03-01

    On alloying nickel with chromium, resistance to sulfide corrosion increases, but with aluminum and titanium it is reduced. The maximum resistance in molten sodium sulfate is exhibited by nickel-chromium solid solutions containing more than 16-17% chromium, and the minimum is exhibited by intermetallics Ni3Al and Ni3Ti.

  1. Aluminide slurry coatings for protection of ferritic steel in molten nitrate corrosion for concentrated solar power technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigié, Pauline; Bizien, Nicolas; Baráibar, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pastor, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Agüero, Alina

    2017-06-01

    Molten nitrates can be employed as heat storage fluids in solar concentration power plants. However molten nitrates are corrosive and if operating temperatures are raised to increase efficiencies, the corrosion rates will also increase. High temperature corrosion resistant coatings based on Al have demonstrated excellent results in other sectors such as gas turbines. Aluminide slurry coated and uncoated P92 steel specimens were exposed to the so called Solar Salt (industrial grade), a binary eutectic mixture of 60 % NaNO3 - 40 % KNO3, in air for 2000 hours at 550°C and 580°C in order to analyze their behavior as candidates to be used in future solar concentration power plants employing molten nitrates as heat transfer fluids. Coated ferritic steels constitute a lower cost technology than Ni based alloy. Two different coating morphologies resulting from two heat treatment performed at 700 and 1050°C after slurry application were tested. The coated systems exhibited excellent corrosion resistance at both temperatures, whereas uncoated P92 showed significant mass loss from the beginning of the test. The coatings showed very slow reaction with the molten Solar Salt. In contrast, uncoated P92 developed a stratified, unprotected Fe, Cr oxide with low adherence which shows oscillating Cr content as a function of coating depth. NaFeO2 was also found at the oxide surface as well as within the Fe, Cr oxide.

  2. Effect of preparation temperature and cycling voltage range on molten salt method prepared SnO2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, MV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepared nano-sized tin (IV) oxide (SnO(sub2)) via molten-salt technique: heating a mixture of tin tetrachloride, lithium nitrate and lithium chloride at 280 °C in air. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission scanning...

  3. RETRACTED ARTICLE: The Evaluation of Reactor Performance by using Flibe and Flinabe Molten Salts in the APEX Hybrid Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Turgay; Hançerlioğulları, Aybaba

    2012-04-01

    The modeling of APEX hybrid reactor, produced by using ARIES-RS hybrid reactor technology, has been performed by using the MCNP-4B computer code and ENDF/B-V-VI nuclear data. Around the fusion chamber, molten salts Flibe (Li2BeF4) and Flinabe (LiNaBeF4) were used as cooling materials. APEX reactor was modeled in the torus form by adding nuclear materials of low significance in the specified percentages between percent 0-12 to the molten salts. The result of the study indicated that fissile material production, UF4 and ThF4 heavy metal salt increased nearly at the same percentage and it was observed that the percentage of it was practically the same in both materials. In order for the hybrid reactor to work itself in terms of tritium, TBR (tritium breeding ratio) should be lower than 1.05. When flibe molten salt was utilized in the APEX hybrid reactor, TBR was calculated as >1, 22 and when flinabe molten salt was used, TBR was calculated as >1.06.

  4. Full Article: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Modes and Structure of Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7 Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Borup, F.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    The dissolution reaction of Nb205 in pure molten K2S207 has been studied and high temperature Raman spectroscopy has been used for determining the vibrational and structural properties of the Nb(V) complex(es) formed according to the reaction Nb205 + n S207(2-) -> complex. By means of a recently ...

  5. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive

  6. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...

  7. Characterization and Thermal Properties of Nitrate Based Molten Salt for Heat Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal Tukimon, Mohd; Muhammad, Wan Nur Azrina Wan; Nor Annuar Mohamad, Md; Yusof, Farazila

    2017-10-01

    Molten salt can acts like a storage medium or heat transfer fluid in heat recovery system. Heat transfer fluid is a fluid that has the capability to deliver heat this one side to another while heat recovery system is a system that transfers heat to produce energy. This studies shows about determining the new formulation of different molten nitrate/nitrite salts consisting of LiNO3, KNO2, KNO3 and NaNO2 that give a low temperature of melting point and high average specific heat capacity. Mixed alkaline molten nitrate/nitrite salt can act as a heat transfer fluid due to their advantageous in terms of its properties that feasible in heat recovery system such as high specific heat capacity, low vapour pressure, low cost and wide range of temperature in its application. The mixing of these primary substances will form a new line of quaternary nitrate salt (LiNO3 - KNO2 - KNO3 - NaNO2). The quaternary mixture was heated inside the box furnace at 150°C for four hours and rose up the temperature to 400°C for eight hours to homogenize the mixture. Through heating process, the elements of nitrate/nitrite base were mixed completely. The temperature was then reduced to 115°C for several hours before removing the mixture from the furnace. The melting point of each sample were testified by using thermal gravimetric analysis, TGA/DTA and experiment of determining the specific heat capacity were conducted by using Differential Scanning Calorimeter, DSC. From the result, it is found that the melting point Sample 1 with percentage of weightage (25.4wt% of LiNO3, 33.8wt% of KNO2, 20.7wt% of KNO3 and 20.1wt% of NaNO2) is 94.4°C whereas the average specific heat capacity was 1.0484/g°C while for Sample 3 with percentages of weightage (30.0wt% of LiNO3, 50.2wt% of KNO2, 3.1wt% of KNO3 and 16.7wt% of NaNO2), the melting point is 86.1°C with average specific heat capacity of 0.7274 J/g°C. In the nut shell, the quaternary mixture salts had been a good mixture with good thermal

  8. The mechanics of pressed-pellet separators in molten salt batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Christine Cardinal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Scott Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present a phenomenological constitutive model that describes the macroscopic behavior of pressed-pellet materials used in molten salt batteries. Such materials include separators, cathodes, and anodes. The purpose of this model is to describe the inelastic deformation associated with the melting of a key constituent, the electrolyte. At room temperature, all constituents of these materials are solid and do not transport cations so that the battery is inert. As the battery is heated, the electrolyte, a constituent typically present in the separator and cathode, melts and conducts charge by flowing through the solid skeletons of the anode, cathode, and separator. The electrochemical circuit is closed in this hot state of the battery. The focus of this report is on the thermal-mechanical behavior of the separator, which typically exhibits the most deformation of the three pellets during the process of activating a molten salt battery. Separator materials are composed of a compressed mixture of a powdered electrolyte, an inert binder phase, and void space. When the electrolyte melts, macroscopically one observes both a change in volume and shape of the separator that depends on the applied boundary conditions during the melt transition. Although porous flow plays a critical role in the battery mechanics and electrochemistry, the focus of this report is on separator behavior under flow-free conditions in which the total mass of electrolyte is static within the pellet. Specific poromechanics effects such as capillary pressure, pressure-saturation, and electrolyte transport between layers are not considered. Instead, a phenomenological model is presented to describe all such behaviors including the melting transition of the electrolyte, loss of void space, and isochoric plasticity associated with the binder phase rearrangement. The model is appropriate for use finite element analysis under finite deformation and finite temperature change conditions. The model

  9. Analysis of the activity pattern of volcanoes through self-organized crack networks: The effect of density barriers—An application to Vesuvius activity in the period 1631-1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.; Scandone, R.

    2013-06-01

    We simulated the pattern of activity of a strato-volcano by using a cellular automaton model where magma is allowed to ascend to the surface through self-organized crack networks. Magma rises toward the surface by filling connected paths of fractures until the magma's density is less than that of surrounding rocks. If magma enters a region with negative or neutral buoyancy, it cools and solidifies; as a result, the local density profile is modified, and magmatic dikes are formed. We simulated the temporal evolution of high-density pathways of dikes that magma may eventually utilize to reach the surface. We showed that if a shallow neutral-negative buoyancy zone is restored after eruptions, due to, for example, piecemeal or chaotic collapses, a characteristic timescale appears in the inter-event repose time distribution. Such characteristic repose time represents the average time that magma takes to form a high-density pathway through the less dense rock layer, and it may give a hint to predict possible eruptive scenarios. Even if the model includes many simplifying assumptions in the definition of magma-rock interaction, the results obtained from simulations are consistent with the eruptive behavior of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano for the 1631-1944 period.

  10. Study on the mechanism of deoxidization and purification for Li2BeF4 molten salt via graphite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Meng-ya; Li, Li; Ding, Ya-ping; Zhang, Guo-xin

    2017-04-01

    Graphite nanoparticles originated from high purity graphite crucible were used for deoxidization and purification of Li2BeF4 molten salt containing a bit of (NH4)2BeF4 under high temperature vacuum condition. And the mechanism of deoxidization and purification via graphite nanoparticles was put forward based on analysis of sample characterization and chemical reaction Gibbs free energy calculation. The morphology, particle size, chemical composition and crystal structure of graphite nanoparticles in Li2BeF4 molten salt were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, SAED and EDS). Phase analysis, total oxygen content, full elemental and anion concentration for as-prepared Li2BeF4 products were studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), LECO nitrogen-oxygen analyzer, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Ion Chromatography (IC), respectively. The results of sample characterization showed that graphite nanoparticles in Li2BeF4 molten salt were the poly-crystal round sheet shape with an average diameter of <100 nm. The concentration of total oxygen, sulfur and nickel in as-prepared Li2BeF4 molten salt after treatment were 548 ppm, <0.6 ppm and <0.4 ppm, respectively. Experiment and calculation all showed that SO42- and NO3- could react with carbon at 700 °C. And vacuum degassing play an excellent role in deoxidization and purification for Li2BeF4 molten salt via graphite nanoparticles.

  11. Study of translational dynamics in molten polymer by variation of gradient pulse-width of PGSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Zupančič, Ivan; Mohorič, Aleš

    2013-11-01

    Pulsed gradient spin echo is a method of measuring molecular translation. Changing Δ makes it sensitive to diffusion spectrum. Spin translation effects the buildup of phase structure during the application of gradient pulses as well. The time scale of the self-diffusion measurement shortens if this is taken into account. The method of diffusion spectrometry with variable δ is also less sensitive to artifacts caused by spin relaxation and internal gradient fields. Here the method is demonstrated in the case of diffusion spectrometry of molten polyethylene. The results confirm a model of constraint release in a system of entangled polymer chains as a sort of tube Rouse motion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Magnetohydrodynamics Effects in Molten Metals and Study of Homogeneity of Radioactive Mercury Amalgams

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, A

    2002-01-01

    The high neutrino output demanded for a neutri no factory requests a high power proton beam interacting with a static target. The additional circumstances of limited space and long term stability ask for development of novel concepts for such types of targets. In our working group, part of the Neutri no Factory Working Group (NFWG) of CERN, we are investigating on the proton interaction with the mercury target. This is called the study of proton induced shocks in molten metal. In the US scheme for a neutrino factory the interaction between proton beam and the mercury jet target takes place inside a 20 Tesla solenoidal magnetic field, which serv es as a focusing device for the produced particles. This field of study is refe rred to as Magneto Hydrodynamics (MHD). The high power proton beam deposits a large amount of energy in the small volume of the target, which results in disruption. The aim is to establi...

  13. Numerical Modelling of Induction Heating for a Molten Salts Pyrochemical Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Xuan-Tuyen; Feraud, Jean-Pierre; Ode, Denis [CEA Marcoule: DTEC/SGCS/LGCI Bat. 57 B17171, 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France); Du Terrail Couvat, Yves [SIMaP, Grenoble INP, CNRS: ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Technological developments in the pyro-chemistry program are required to allow choices for a reprocessing experiment on 100 g of spent nuclear fuel. In this context, a special device must be designed for the solid/gas reaction phases followed by actinide extraction and stripping in molten salt. This paper discusses a modelling approach for designing an induction furnace. Using this numerical approach is a good way to improve thermal performance of the device in terms of magnetic/thermal coupling phenomena. The influence of current frequency is also studied to give another view of the possibilities of an induction furnace. Electromagnetic forces are taken into account in a computational fluid dynamics code derived from a specifically developed exchange library. Induction heating systems are an example of a typical multi-physics problem involving numerically coupled equations. (authors)

  14. Molten salt rolling bubble column, reactors utilizing same and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D.; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Klinger, Kerry M.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-11-17

    Reactors for carrying out a chemical reaction, as well as related components, systems and methods are provided. In accordance with one embodiment, a reactor is provided that includes a furnace and a crucible positioned for heating by the furnace. The crucible may contain a molten salt bath. A downtube is disposed at least partially within the interior crucible along an axis. The downtube includes a conduit having a first end in communication with a carbon source and an outlet at a second end of the conduit for introducing the carbon material into the crucible. At least one opening is formed in the conduit between the first end and the second end to enable circulation of reaction components contained within the crucible through the conduit. An oxidizing material may be introduced through a bottom portion of the crucible in the form of gas bubbles to react with the other materials.

  15. Depolarized SnO2-based gas anodes for electrowinning of silver in molten chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available SnO2-based porous anodes were prepared and the behavior of gas bubbles on the porous anodes with different original coarse grain size, immersed in ethanol to simulate molten chlorides, was primarily investigated. SnO2-based porous anodes were used as gas anodes for the electrowinning of silver in CaCl2-NaCl-CaO-AgCl melts at 680°C. Hydrogen was introduced to the anode/electrolyte interface through the gas anode. Carbon was used as the cathode. Obvious depolarization of the anode potential was observed after the introduction of hydrogen comparing with no reducing gas introduced, indicating the involvement of hydrogen in the anode reaction. Metallic silver was deposited on the cathode.

  16. Safety evaluation of molten steel carrier by using instrument indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ki; Kim, Yi Gon; Yoo, Dae Wha; Kim, Chung Youb [School of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Ho [Frontics Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyeong Ro [Dept. of Automotive Management, Joongbu University, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Because a molten steel carrier is used in high-temperature and corrosive environments, erosion and corrosion decrease the thickness of the structure and expand the vent hole for emitting gas generated from refractory bricks. This increases the stress throughout the structure and introduces a significant stress concentration around the vent hole. In addition, the high-temperature environment degrades mechanical properties such as the yield and tensile strengths. These problems seriously affect the safety of the structure. In this study, the safety of a 10-year-old structure was evaluated by analyzing the stress distribution and measuring the mechanical properties of the structure. The mechanical properties were directly measured on the structure surface using the instrument indentation technique.

  17. Evaporation of lead and lithium from molten Pb-17Li - transport of aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Oschinski, J.; Horn, S.; Bender, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

    1991-12-01

    Evaporation of Pb and Li from molten Pb-17Li was investigated between 350 and 800deg C in vacuum, argon and helium covergas. Results were also obtained from other experimental facilities. Similarities were found to observations from sodium cooled reactors. The results show that Pb and Li evaporate independent on each other. The two elements show different behavior along the transport pathway. Deposits of the evaporated metals contained between 0.2 and 98 at% Li. As in the reactor RAPSODIE for sodium, evaporation rates for lithium were smaller in helium than in argon, however evaporation rates of lead were the same in both gases. No aerosol problems will exist with normal blanket operation. Under experimental conditions, aerosol concentrations were in the range of 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -6} g/m{sup 3}. Aerosols can easily be trapped with sintered metal filters. (orig.).

  18. Effect of Metallic Li on the Behavior of Metals in Molten Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambaram, Dev [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Phillips, William [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Merwin, Augustus [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Singh, Vickram [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Unger, Aaron [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Moon, Jeremy [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-12-29

    The deleterious effect of Li0 on the reactor container materials has not been studied. Exposure to liquid Li0 results in material degradation primarily through lithium intercalation, leaching of specific alloying elements, and decarburization. The objective of this research is to understand how the presence of Li0 in molten LiCl-Li2O affects the degradation of two classes of alloys by correlating their accelerated and long term electrochemical behavior to the surface chemistry of the alloys and the chemistry of the electrolyte. This study has completed all the proposed tasks. The project led to the design and development of unique experimental setups and protocols. Several groundbreaking findings resulted from this study. The project had several products in terms of student education, thesis and dissertation, publications and presentations.

  19. Molten metal ocular burn: long-term outcome using simple limbal epithelial transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shilpa; Basu, Sayan; Sangwan, Virender

    2015-01-01

    One day after molten aluminium had fallen into his right eye, a young man presented to our clinic with a vision of counting fingers at 1 m, conjunctival and corneal epithelial defects, and limbal involvement. He was diagnosed with grade 4 thermal burn and managed medically. Subsequently, the inflammation resolved, however, he developed pannus with conjunctivalisation and scarring of cornea suggestive of partial unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. He was treated surgically with autologous simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET). Postoperatively, his vision improved along with corneal clarity. He achieved a best corrected vision of 20/50 at the last follow-up 27 months postsurgery, with maintenance of a healthy corneal epithelium. This case describes the different management strategies employed in two different stages of an ocular burn. It highlights the long-term success of SLET in a case of ocular surface thermal burn. PMID:26150624

  20. Effect of a direct magnetic field on the interfacial microstructure between molten aluminium and solid iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Yi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of a direct magnetic field on the interfacial microstructure between molten aluminium and solid iron was studied. The intermetallic phases formed in the intermetallic layers were investigated by means of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and X-ray diffraction (XRD. It was found that the DC magnetic field can reduce the average thickness of the intermetallic layer and the average aluminium content in the intermetallic layer. Moreover, the intermetallic phases formed in the intermetallic layers are identified as Al3Fe and Al5Fe2 in the absence of the DC magnetic field, while only Al5Fe2 phase present in the presence of the DC magnetic field.