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Sample records for vestibuloocular reflex evoked

  1. The vestibular implant: frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

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    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Nguyen, T A Khoa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Cavuscens, Samuel; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Stokroos, Robert; Kingma, Herman; Perez-Fornos, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR) elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency. Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in seven patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the "natural" VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies. A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the "natural" VOR. Other characteristics of the (e)VOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry) showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited) frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the "normal" vestibular system.

  2. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  3. Vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    Dieterich, M; Brandt, T

    1995-02-01

    Recent animal and clinical studies on the vestibulo-ocular reflex deal with a number of physiological and clinical aspects from which three were chosen for this review: (1) the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex and its disorders; (2) the otolith contribution to the vestibulo-ocular reflex; and (3) neurotransmitters, neuropharmacological aspects, and medical treatment. Disorders of the vestibulo-ocular reflex can be classified according to the three major planes of action, yaw plane, pitch plane, and roll plane, which equate with horizontal nystagmus, upbeat or downbeat nystagmus, and torsional nystagmus, respectively. The particular interest in the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex arises from new methods for measuring ocular torsion, especially the three-dimensional eye-movement recordings with scleral coils. These methods make it possible to do three-dimensional analysis of the differential effects of horizontal and vertical semicircular canal function and their individual disorders of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex. Otolith and semicircular canal inputs converge at the level of the vestibular nuclei to subserve static graviceptive and dynamic torsional and pitch function. The elaboration of the particular sensorial weight of the input from either the otoliths or the semicircular canal is currently a challenge for both physiologists and neurologists. Disorders of otolith function, still absent from the diagnostic repertoire of most neurologists, are increasingly being reported. The most promising developments in therapeutic measures may come from research on vestibular neurotransmitters, their agonists and antagonists. A number of pharmacological agents are effective suppressants of pathological eye movements. However, systematic prospective studies are needed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The conjugacy of the vestibulo-ocular reflex evoked by single labyrinth stimulation in awake monkeys.

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    Tang, Xuehui; Xu, Youguo; Simpson, Ivra; Jeffcoat, Ben; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is conjugate when measured in the dark with minimal vergence. But the neural basis of the VOR conjugacy remains to be identified. In the present study, we measured the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation to examine whether the VOR conjugacy depends on reciprocal stimulation of the two labyrinths. There are conflicting views on this issue. First, since the vestibular signals carried by the ascending tract of Deiters' are distributed exclusively to the motoneurons of the ipsilateral eye, the neural innervations after single labyrinth stimulation are not symmetrical for the two eyes. Thus, single labyrinth stimulation may generate disjunctive VOR responses. Second, the only published study on this issue was an electrooculography (EOG) study that reported disjunctive VOR responses during unilateral caloric irrigation (Wolfe in Ann Otol 88:79-85, 1979). Third, the VOR during unilateral caloric stimulation performed in clinical vestibular tests is routinely perceived to be conjugate. To resolve these conflicting views, the present study examined the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation by recording binocular eye position signals in awake monkeys with a search coil technique. In contradiction to the previous EOG study and the prediction based on the asymmetry of the unilateral brainstem VOR circuits, we found that the VOR during unilateral caloric irrigation was conjugate over a wide range of conditions. We conclude that the net neural innervations received by the two eyes are symmetrical after single labyrinth stimulation, despite the apparent asymmetry in the unilateral VOR pathways. A novel role for the ascending tract of Deiters' in the VOR conjugacy is proposed.

  5. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. IV. Responses after spectacle-induced adaptation

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    Clendaniel, R. A.; Lasker, D. M.; Minor, L. B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by sinusoidal rotations from 0.5 to 15 Hz and acceleration steps up to 3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s was studied in six squirrel monkeys following adaptation with x2.2 magnifying and x0.45 minimizing spectacles. For sinusoidal rotations with peak velocities of 20 degrees /s, there were significant changes in gain at all frequencies; however, the greatest gain changes occurred at the lower frequencies. The frequency- and velocity-dependent gain enhancement seen in normal monkeys was accentuated following adaptation to magnifying spectacles and diminished with adaptation to minimizing spectacles. A differential increase in gain for the steps of acceleration was noted after adaptation to the magnifying spectacles. The gain during the acceleration portion, G(A), of a step of acceleration (3,000 degrees /s(2) to 150 degrees /s) increased from preadaptation values of 1.05 +/- 0.08 to 1.96 +/- 0.16, while the gain during the velocity plateau, G(V), only increased from 0.93 +/- 0.04 to 1.36 +/- 0.08. Polynomial fits to the trajectory of the response during the acceleration step revealed a greater increase in the cubic than the linear term following adaptation with the magnifying lenses. Following adaptation to the minimizing lenses, the value of G(A) decreased to 0.61 +/- 0.08, and the value of G(V) decreased to 0.59 +/- 0.09 for the 3,000 degrees /s(2) steps of acceleration. Polynomial fits to the trajectory of the response during the acceleration step revealed that there was a significantly greater reduction in the cubic term than in the linear term following adaptation with the minimizing lenses. These findings indicate that there is greater modification of the nonlinear as compared with the linear component of the VOR with spectacle-induced adaptation. In addition, the latency to the onset of the adapted response varied with the dynamics of the stimulus. The findings were modeled with a bilateral model

  6. Disorders of gaze related to vertigo: physiological mechanisms of vestibuloocular and optokinetic reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Saborío Morales, Lachiner; Monge Rodríguez, Silvia Leticia; Ramírez Rojas, Ana Carolina; Tencio Araya, José Alfredo; Brenes García, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex are evoked by changes in head position or movement of the visual field, the result is a nystagmus, defined by a slow phase and subsequently a rapid phase. The objective of this work is to explain the physiological mechanism involved in these reflexes. The pathways explaining the generation of these responses include a complex integration system of the motor vestibular system, ocular system, many nucleus in the brainstem, cerebellum, somatosensory cortex...

  7. Ontogenetic Development of Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Amphibians.

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    Branoner, Francisco; Chagnaud, Boris P; Straka, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) ensure gaze stability during locomotion and passively induced head/body movements. In precocial vertebrates such as amphibians, vestibular reflexes are required very early at the onset of locomotor activity. While the formation of inner ears and the assembly of sensory-motor pathways is largely completed soon after hatching, angular and translational/tilt VOR display differential functional onsets and mature with different time courses. Otolith-derived eye movements appear immediately after hatching, whereas the appearance and progressive amelioration of semicircular canal-evoked eye movements is delayed and dependent on the acquisition of sufficiently large semicircular canal diameters. Moreover, semicircular canal functionality is also required to tune the initially omnidirectional otolith-derived VOR. The tuning is due to a reinforcement of those vestibulo-ocular connections that are co-activated by semicircular canal and otolith inputs during natural head/body motion. This suggests that molecular mechanisms initially guide the basic ontogenetic wiring, whereas semicircular canal-dependent activity is required to establish the spatio-temporal specificity of the reflex. While a robust VOR is activated during passive head/body movements, locomotor efference copies provide the major source for compensatory eye movements during tail- and limb-based swimming of larval and adult frogs. The integration of active/passive motion-related signals for gaze stabilization occurs in central vestibular neurons that are arranged as segmentally iterated functional groups along rhombomere 1-8. However, at variance with the topographic maps of most other sensory systems, the sensory-motor transformation of motion-related signals occurs in segmentally specific neuronal groups defined by the extraocular motor output targets.

  8. Hybrid model of the context dependent vestibulo-ocular reflex: implications for vergence-version interactions

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    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g., fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations. PMID:25709578

  9. Hybrid Model of the Context Dependent Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: Implications for Vergence-Version Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g. fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  10. Vergence-dependent adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

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    Lewis, Richard F.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) normally depends on the distance between the subject and the visual target, but it remains uncertain whether vergence angle can be linked to changes in VOR gain through a process of context-dependent adaptation. In this study, we examined this question with an adaptation paradigm that modified the normal relationship between vergence angle and retinal image motion. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally while they viewed an optokinetic (OKN) stimulus through either diverging or converging prisms. In three subjects the diverging prisms were worn while the OKN stimulus moved out of phase with the head, and the converging prisms were worn when the OKN stimulus moved in-phase with the head. The relationship between the vergence angle and OKN stimulus was reversed in the fourth subject. After 2 h of training, the VOR gain at the two vergence angles changed significantly in all of the subjects, evidenced by the two different VOR gains that could be immediately accessed by switching between the diverged and converged conditions. The results demonstrate that subjects can learn to use vergence angle as the contextual cue that retrieves adaptive changes in the angular VOR.

  11. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. IV. Changes after unilateral labyrinthectomy

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    Angelaki, D. E.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy on the properties of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient displacements. During small-amplitude, steady-state sinusoidal lateral oscillations, a small decrease in the horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance was observed during the first week after labyrinthectomy. These deficits gradually recovered over time. In addition, the vertical response component increased, causing a tilt of the eye velocity vector toward the lesioned side. During large, transient lateral displacements, the deficits were larger and longer lasting. Responses after labyrinthectomy were asymmetric, with eye velocity during movements toward the side of the lesion being more compromised. The most profound effect of the lesions was observed during fore-aft motion. Whereas responses were kinematically appropriate for fixation away from the side of the lesion (e.g., to the left after right labyrinthectomy), horizontal responses were anticompensatory during fixation at targets located ipsilateral to the side of the lesion (e.g., for targets to the right after right labyrinthectomy). This deficit showed little recovery during the 3-mo post-labyrinthectomy testing period. These results suggest that inputs from both labyrinths are important for the proper function of the trVORs, although the details of how bilateral signals are processed and integrated remain unknown.

  12. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

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    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  13. Spatial organization of linear vestibuloocular reflexes of the rat: responses during horizontal and vertical linear acceleration.

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    Hess, B J; Dieringer, N

    1991-12-01

    1. The spatial properties of linear vestibuloocular reflexes (LVOR) were studied in pigmented rats in response to sinusoidal linear acceleration on a sled. The orientation of the animal on the sled was altered in 15 degrees steps over the range of 360 degrees. Horizontal, vertical, and torsional components of eye movements were recorded with the magnetic field search coil technique in complete darkness. Conjugacy of the two eyes was studied in the horizontal movement plane. 2. Acceleration along the optic axis of one eye (approximately 50 degrees lateral) induced maximal vertical responses in the ipsilateral eye and, at the same time, maximal torsional responses in the contralateral eye. These vertical and torsional responses of the LVOR coincide with those obtained when the respective coplanar vertical semicircular canals are stimulated. Such a congruence suggests a common reference frame for LVOR and angular vestibuloocular reflexes (AVOR), with the result that direct combination of signals indicating apparent and real head tilt is facilitated. 3. Transformations of vertical and torsional responses into head coordinates (pitch and roll) show that these movements are compensatory in direction for any combination of apparent head tilt in pitch and roll planes. 4. Gain (rotation of the eye/apparent rotation of the gravity direction) was approximately 0.3 at 0.1 Hz and decreased to approximately 0.1 at 1.0 Hz. Vertical responses tended to have a larger gain than torsional responses. Phase lag relative to peak acceleration increased from about -9 degrees to about -47 degrees over the same frequency range. 5. Vertical linear acceleration evoked only vertical eye movements at a frequency of 1.0 Hz. 6. Horizontal responses of both eyes were symmetric or asymmetric in amplitude and in-phase (conjugate) or out-of-phase (disconjugate) with respect to each other, depending on the direction of linear acceleration. Translation in the transverse direction evoked conjugate

  14. Phase changes induced by ketamine in the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex in the rabbit.

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    Favilla, M; Ghelarducci, B; La Noce, A; Starita, A

    1981-11-09

    The effect of ketamine has been tested on the phase of the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex of rabbits sinusoidally oscillated at various frequencies. A significant phase lag, predominantly affecting the macular component of the reflex, was observed. This action resembles that induced by Nembutal in the same preparation. A specific action of ketamine on synaptic transmission is suggested. Erroneous phase relationship between natural stimuli responses can be obtained in experiments employing ketamine.

  15. Adaptation of the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex in cats during low-frequency vertical rotation.

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    Fushiki, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Motoyoshi; Shojaku, Hideo

    2017-04-27

    We examined plastic changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during low-frequency vertical head rotation, a condition under which otolith inputs from the vestibular system are essential for VOR generation. For adaptive conditioning of the vertical VOR, 0.02Hz sinusoidal pitch rotation for one hour about the earth's horizontal axis was synchronized with out-of-phase vertical visual stimulation from a random dot pattern. A vertical VOR was well evoked when the upright animal rotated around the earth-horizontal axis (EHA) at low frequency due to the changing gravity stimulus and dynamic stimulation of the otoliths. After adaptive conditioning, the amplitude of the vertical VOR increased by an average of 32.1%. Our observations showing plasticity in the otolithic contribution to the VOR may provide a new strategy for visual-vestibular mismatch training in patients with otolithic disorders. This low-frequency vertical head rotation protocol also provides a model for investigating the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of VORs mediated by otolith activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex

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    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-01-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles. PMID:22526888

  17. Vestibulo-ocular reflex modification after virtual environment exposure.

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    Di Girolamo, S; Picciotti, P; Sergi, B; Di Nardo, W; Paludetti, G; Ottaviani, F

    2001-01-01

    Immersion in an illusory world is possible by means of virtual reality (VR), where environmental perception is modified by artificial sensorial stimulation. The application of VR for the assessment and rehabilitation of pathologies affecting the vestibular system, in terms of both diagnosis and care, could represent an interesting new line of research. Our perception of reality is in fact based on static and dynamic spatial information perceived by our senses. During head movements in a virtual environment the images on the display and the labyrinthine information relative to the head angular accelerations differ and therefore a visuo-vestibular conflict is present. It is known that mismatches between visual and labyrinthine information may modify the vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (VOR) gain. We studied the post-immersion modifications in 20 healthy subjects (mean age 25 years) exposed to a virtual environment for 20 min by wearing a head-mounted display. VOR gain and phase were measured by means of harmonic sinusoidal stimulation in the dark before, at the end of and 30 min after VR exposure. A VOR gain reduction was observed in all subjects at the end of VR exposure which disappeared after 30 min. Our data show that exposure to a virtual environment can induce a temporary modification of the VOR gain. This finding can be employed to enable an artificial, instrumental modification of the VOR gain and therefore opens up new perspectives in the assessment and rehabilitation of vestibular diseases.

  18. Combined action of smooth pursuit eye movements, optokinetic reflex and vestibulo-ocular reflex in macaque monkey during transient stimulation.

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    Schweigart, G; Maurer, C; Mergner, T

    2003-04-17

    The interaction of smooth pursuit eye movements, vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) is still not well understood. We therefore measured in macaque monkeys horizontal eye movements using transient horizontal rotations of a visual target, of monkeys' heads and/or of an optokinetic background pattern (ten combinations; smoothed position ramps of 16 degrees ). With intermediate peak velocity of target motion (v(max)=12.8 degrees /s), pursuit held the eyes rather well on target, almost independent of concurrent vestibular or optokinetic stimuli (pursuit gain, 0.73-0.91). With v(max)=1.6 degrees /s, in contrast, pursuit gain became strongly modified by the optokinetic stimulus. With v(max)=51.2 degrees /s, pursuit gain became modified by vestibular stimulation. Although not intuitive, the experimental data can be explained by linear interaction (summation) of the neural driving signals for pursuit, VOR and OKR, as ascertained by simulations of a dynamic model.

  19. Adaptation of the macular vestibuloocular reflex to altered gravitational conditions in a fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus)

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    Horn, E.; Sebastian, C.

    Young fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) were exposed to microgravity (μg) for 9 to 10 days, or to hypergravity (hg) for 9 days. For several weeks after termination of μg and hg, the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) was recorded. In stage 11/12-fish, the rVOR amplitude (angle between the maximal up and down movement of an eye during a complete 360° lateral roll) of μg-animals increased significantly by 25% compared to 1g-controls during the first post-flight week but decreased to the control level during the second post-flight week. Microgravity had no effect in stage 14/16 fish on the rVOR amplitude. After 3g-exposure, the rVOR amplitude was significantly reduced for both groups compared to their 1g-controls. Readaptation to 1g-condition was completed during the second post-3g week. We postulate a critical period during which the development of the macular vestibuloocular reflex depends on gravitational input, and which is limited by the first appearence of the rVOR. At this period of early development, exposure to microgravity sensitizes the vestibular system while hypergravity desensitizes it.

  20. Ethanol consumption impairs vestibulo-ocular reflex function measured by the video head impulse test and dynamic visual acuity.

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    Roth, Thomas N; Weber, Konrad P; Wettstein, Vincent G; Marks, Guy B; Rosengren, Sally M; Hegemann, Stefan C A

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol affects many parts of the nervous system, from the periphery to higher cognitive functions. Due to the established effects of ethanol on vestibular and oculomotor function, we wished to examine its effect on two new tests of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): the video head impulse test (vHIT) and dynamic visual acuity (DVA). We tested eight healthy subjects with no history of vestibular disease after consumption of standardized drinks of 40% ethanol. We used a repeated measures design to track vestibular function over multiple rounds of ethanol consumption up to a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 1.38 per mil. All tests were normal at baseline. VOR gain measured by vHIT decreased by 25% at the highest BrAC level tested in each subject. Catch-up saccades were negligible at baseline and increased in number and size with increasing ethanol consumption (from 0.13° to 1.43° cumulative amplitude per trial). DVA scores increased by 86% indicating a deterioration of acuity, while static visual acuity (SVA) remained unchanged. Ethanol consumption systematically impaired the VOR evoked by high-acceleration head impulses and led to a functional loss of visual acuity during head movement.

  1. Ontogeny of mouse vestibulo-ocular reflex following genetic or environmental alteration of gravity sensing.

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    Mathieu Beraneck

    Full Text Available The vestibular organs consist of complementary sensors: the semicircular canals detect rotations while the otoliths detect linear accelerations, including the constant pull of gravity. Several fundamental questions remain on how the vestibular system would develop and/or adapt to prolonged changes in gravity such as during long-term space journey. How do vestibular reflexes develop if the appropriate assembly of otoliths and semi-circular canals is perturbed? The aim of present work was to evaluate the role of gravity sensing during ontogeny of the vestibular system. In otoconia-deficient mice (ied, gravity cannot be sensed and therefore maculo-ocular reflexes (MOR were absent. While canals-related reflexes were present, the ied deficit also led to the abnormal spatial tuning of the horizontal angular canal-related VOR. To identify putative otolith-related critical periods, normal C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to 2G hypergravity by chronic centrifugation during different periods of development or adulthood (Adult-HG and compared to non-centrifuged (control C57Bl/6J mice. Mice exposed to hypergravity during development had completely normal vestibulo-ocular reflexes 6 months after end of centrifugation. Adult-HG mice all displayed major abnormalities in maculo-ocular reflexe one month after return to normal gravity. During the next 5 months, adaptation to normal gravity occurred in half of the individuals. In summary, genetic suppression of gravity sensing indicated that otolith-related signals might be necessary to ensure proper functioning of canal-related vestibular reflexes. On the other hand, exposure to hypergravity during development was not sufficient to modify durably motor behaviour. Hence, 2G centrifugation during development revealed no otolith-specific critical period.

  2. Ontogeny of mouse vestibulo-ocular reflex following genetic or environmental alteration of gravity sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraneck, Mathieu; Bojados, Mickael; Le Séac'h, Anne; Jamon, Marc; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular organs consist of complementary sensors: the semicircular canals detect rotations while the otoliths detect linear accelerations, including the constant pull of gravity. Several fundamental questions remain on how the vestibular system would develop and/or adapt to prolonged changes in gravity such as during long-term space journey. How do vestibular reflexes develop if the appropriate assembly of otoliths and semi-circular canals is perturbed? The aim of present work was to evaluate the role of gravity sensing during ontogeny of the vestibular system. In otoconia-deficient mice (ied), gravity cannot be sensed and therefore maculo-ocular reflexes (MOR) were absent. While canals-related reflexes were present, the ied deficit also led to the abnormal spatial tuning of the horizontal angular canal-related VOR. To identify putative otolith-related critical periods, normal C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to 2G hypergravity by chronic centrifugation during different periods of development or adulthood (Adult-HG) and compared to non-centrifuged (control) C57Bl/6J mice. Mice exposed to hypergravity during development had completely normal vestibulo-ocular reflexes 6 months after end of centrifugation. Adult-HG mice all displayed major abnormalities in maculo-ocular reflexe one month after return to normal gravity. During the next 5 months, adaptation to normal gravity occurred in half of the individuals. In summary, genetic suppression of gravity sensing indicated that otolith-related signals might be necessary to ensure proper functioning of canal-related vestibular reflexes. On the other hand, exposure to hypergravity during development was not sufficient to modify durably motor behaviour. Hence, 2G centrifugation during development revealed no otolith-specific critical period.

  3. The horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex: a nonlinear mechanism for context-dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-11-01

    Studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have revealed that this type of involuntary eye movement is influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a bilateral model for the horizontal angular VOR in the dark based on realistic physiological mechanisms. It is shown that by assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model is capable of replicating target-distance-dependent VOR responses that are in agreement with geometrical requirements. Central premotor responses in the model are also shown to be consistent with experimental observations. Moreover, the model performance after simulated unilateral canal plugging also reproduces experimental observations, an emerging property. Such local nonlinear computations could similarly generate context-dependent behaviors in other more complex motor systems.

  4. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

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    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P < 0.001), with minimal phase changes, such that mean retinal image slip was held below 5 degrees/s. However, no corresponding modulation in vestibuloocular reflex gain occurred with increasing peak head velocity during a control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Interaction of smooth pursuit and the vestibuloocular reflex in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misslisch, H; Tweed, D; Fetter, M; Dichgans, J; Vilis, T

    1996-06-01

    1. What is the neural mechanism of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) cancellation when a subject fixates a target moving with the head? One theory is that the moving target evokes pursuit eye movements that add to and cancel the VOR. A recent finding with implications for this theory is that eye velocity vectors of both pursuit and the VOR vary with eye position, but in different ways, because pursuit follows Listing's law whereas the VOR obeys a "half-Listing" strategy. As a result, pursuit cannot exactly cancel the VOR in most eye positions, and so the pursuit superposition theory predicts an eye-position-dependent pattern of residual eye velocities during cancellation. To test these predictions, we measured eye velocity vectors in humans during VOR, pursuit, and cancellation in response to torsional, vertical, and horizontal stimuli with the eyes in different positions. 2. For example, if a subject is rolling clockwise (CW, frequency 0.3 Hz, maximum speed 37.5 deg/s) while looking 20 deg up, the VOR generates an eye velocity that is mainly counterclockwise (CCW), but also leftward. If we then turn on a small target light, located 20 deg up and moving with the subject, then pursuit superposition predicts that the CCW component of eye velocity will shrink and the horizontal component will reverse, from leftward to rightward. This pattern was seen in all subjects. 3. Velocities depended on eye position in the predicted way; e.g., when subjects looked 20 deg down, instead of 20 deg up, during CW roll, the reversal of horizontal eye velocity went the other way, from rightward to leftward. And when gaze was 20 deg right or left, analogous reversals occurred in the vertical eye velocity, again as predicted. 4. Analogous predictions for horizontal and vertical stimulation were also borne out by the data. For example, when subjects rotated rightward while looking 20 deg up, the VOR response was leftward and CCW. When the target light switched on, the torsional component of

  6. Inaccurate Saccades and Enhanced Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Suppression during Combined Eye–Head Movements in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: Possible Implications for Cervical Vertigo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Janine L; Daye, Pierre M; Thomson, Glen T. D

    2017-01-01

    .... The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is greatly reduced at the onset of large eye–head (gaze) saccades and resumes before the end of the saccades to stabilize eye-in-orbit and ensure accurate target acquisition...

  7. Features of vestibuloocular reflex modulations induced by altered gravitational forces in tadpoles ( Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, we studied the static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) in relation to modifications of the gravitational environment to find basic mechanisms of how altered gravitational forces (AGF) affect this reflex. Animals were exposed to microgravity during space flight or hypergravity (3g) for 4 to 12 days. Basic observations were that (1) the development of the rVOR is significantly affected by altered gravitational conditions, (2) the duration of 1g-readaptation depends on the strength of the test stimulus, (3) μg induces malformations of the body which are related to the rVOR depression. Future studies are based on the hypotheses (1) that the vestibular nuclei play a key roll in the adaptation to AGF conditions, (2) that the stimulus transducing systems in the sense organ are affected by AGF conditions, and (3) that fertilized eggs will be converted to normal adults guided by physiological and morphological set points representing the genetic programs. Developmental retardation or acceleration, or otherwise occurring deviations from standard development during embryonic and postembryonic life will activate genes that direct the developmental processes towards normality.

  8. Interaction of linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes of human subjects in response to transient motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, D; Gianna, C C; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    1996-08-01

    The possibility of synergistic interaction between the canal and otolith components of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was evaluated in human subjects by subtracting the response to pure angular rotation (AVOR) from the response to combined angular and translational motion (ALVOR) and comparing this difference with the VOR to isolated linear motion (LVOR). Assessments were made with target fixation at 60 cm and in darkness. Linear stimuli were acceleration steps attaining 0.25 g in less than 80 ms. To elicit responses to combined translational and angular head movements, the subjects were seated on a Barany chair with the head displaced forwards 40 cm from the axis of rotation. The chair was accelerated at approximately 300 deg/s2 to 127 deg/s peak angular velocity, the tangential acceleration of the head being comparable with that of isolated translation. Estimates of the contribution of smooth pursuit to responses in the light were made from comparisons of isolated pursuit of similar target trajectories. In the dark the slow phase eye movements evoked by combined canal-otolith stimuli were higher in magnitude by approximately a third than the sum of those produced by translation and rotation alone. In the light, the relative target displacement during isolated linear motion was similar to the difference in relative target displacements during eccentric and centred rotation. However, the gain of the translational component of compensatory eye movement during combined translational and angular motion was approximately unity, in contrast to the gain of the response to isolated linear motion, which was approximately a half. Pursuit performance was always poorer than target following during self-motion. The LVOR responses in the light were greater than the sum of the LVOR responses in the dark with pursuit eye movements. We conclude that, in response to transient motion, there is a synergistic enhancement of the translational VOR with concurrent canal

  9. DVA as a Diagnostic Test for Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Appelbaum, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes vision on earth-fixed targets by eliciting eyes movements in response to changes in head position. How well the eyes perform this task can be functionally measured by the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) test. We designed a passive, horizontal DVA test to specifically study the acuity and reaction time when looking in different target locations. Visual acuity was compared among 12 subjects using a standard Landolt C wall chart, a computerized static (no rotation) acuity test and dynamic acuity test while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (+/-60 deg/s). In addition, five trials with yaw oscillation randomly presented a visual target in one of nine different locations with the size and presentation duration of the visual target varying across trials. The results showed a significant difference between the static and dynamic threshold acuities as well as a significant difference between the visual targets presented in the horizontal plane versus those in the vertical plane when comparing accuracy of vision and reaction time of the response. Visual acuity increased proportional to the size of the visual target and increased between 150 and 300 msec duration. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of rotation. This DVA test could be used as a functional diagnostic test for visual-vestibular and neuro-cognitive impairments by assessing both accuracy and reaction time to acquire visual targets.

  10. Effect of vergence on the gain of the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, M.; Merfeld, D. M.; Mendoza, J. C.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We measured the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and vergence, using binocular search coils, in 3 humans. The subjects were accelerated sinusoidally at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration, in complete darkness, while performing three different tasks: i) mental arithmetic; ii) tracking a remembered target at either 0.34 m or 0.14 m distance; and iii) maintaining vergence at either of these distances by means of audio biofeedback based on vergence. Subjects could control vergence using the audio feedback; there was greater convergence with the near audio target. However, there was no significant difference in vergence between the near and far remembered target conditions. With audio feedback, the amplitude of smooth tracking was not consistently different for the near and the far conditions. However, the amplitude of tracking (saccades and smooth component) in the remembered target conditions was greater for near than for far targets. These results suggest that linear VOR amplitude is not determined by vergence alone.

  11. Latency of cross-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex induced by pursuit training in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Yokoyama, R; Fukushima, J; Fukushima, K

    1999-01-01

    To examine the latency of smooth pursuit induced, short-term modifications of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), Japanese monkeys were rewarded for tracking a vertically moving target spot synchronized with horizontal whole body rotation. Eye movements induced by equivalent rotation in complete darkness were examined before and after training. Before training, the horizontal trapezoidal rotation (peak acceleration approximately 78%/s2) resulted in a collinear VOR with a mean latency of 15.3 ms, and no orthogonal component in any of the three monkeys tested. After training, the collinear VOR remained unchanged but an orthogonal, cross-axis VOR developed. It had a mean latency of 42.4 ms with gain (eye/chair) of 0.19, followed by a decaying phase that had a mean time constant of 80 ms. These results suggest that the cross-axis VOR induced by pursuit-vestibular interaction is different from previously reported cross-axis VOR induced by optokinetic-vestibular interaction.

  12. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  13. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  14. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. III. Effects of bilateral labyrinthine electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Dickman, J. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of functional, reversible ablation and potential recruitment of the most irregular otolith afferents on the dynamics and sensitivity of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near and far targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient lateral head displacements. Short-duration (usually <2 s) anodal (inhibitory) and cathodal (excitatory) currents (50-100 microA) were delivered bilaterally during motion. In the presence of anodal labyrinthine stimulation, trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance were significantly decreased. In addition, anodal currents significantly increased phase lags. During transient motion, anodal stimulation resulted in significantly lower initial eye acceleration and more sluggish responses. Cathodal currents tended to have opposite effects. The main characteristics of these results were simulated by a simple model where both regularly and irregularly discharging afferents contribute to the trVORs. Anodal labyrinthine currents also were found to decrease eye velocity during long-duration, constant velocity rotations, although results were generally more variable compared with those during translational motion.

  15. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  16. The cerebellar nodulus/uvula integrates otolith signals for the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F Walker

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The otolith-driven translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR generates compensatory eye movements to linear head accelerations. Studies in humans indicate that the cerebellum plays a critical role in the neural control of the tVOR, but little is known about mechanisms of this control or the functions of specific cerebellar structures. Here, we chose to investigate the contribution of the nodulus and uvula, which have been shown by prior studies to be involved in the processing of otolith signals in other contexts.We recorded eye movements in two rhesus monkeys during steps of linear motion along the interaural axis before and after surgical lesions of the cerebellar uvula and nodulus. The lesions strikingly reduced eye velocity during constant-velocity motion but had only a small effect on the response to initial head acceleration. We fit eye velocity to a linear combination of head acceleration and velocity and to a dynamic mathematical model of the tVOR that incorporated a specific integrator of head acceleration. Based on parameter optimization, the lesion decreased the gain of the pathway containing this new integrator by 62%. The component of eye velocity that depended directly on head acceleration changed little (gain decrease of 13%. In a final set of simulations, we compared our data to the predictions of previous models of the tVOR, none of which could account for our experimental findings.Our results provide new and important information regarding the neural control of the tVOR. Specifically, they point to a key role for the cerebellar nodulus and uvula in the mathematical integration of afferent linear head acceleration signals. This function is likely to be critical not only for the tVOR but also for the otolith-mediated reflexes that control posture and balance.

  17. Epidemiology of vestibulo-ocular reflex function: data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Carol; Layman, Andrew J; Geary, Robert; Anson, Eric; Carey, John P; Ferrucci, Luigi; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-02-01

    To determine age-related changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) function in community-dwelling adults, and evaluate these for associations with demographic characteristics and cardiovascular risk factors. Cross-sectional analysis within the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), a longitudinal prospective cohort study. Vestibular testing laboratory within an acute care teaching hospital. Community-dwelling adults enrolled in the BLSA. Horizontal VOR gain measurement using video head-impulse testing and visual acuity testing. VOR gain was calculated as the ratio of eye velocity to head velocity. Demographic and cardiovascular risk factor data were collected through study questionnaires. One hundred nine subjects were analyzed with mean age (SD) 69.9 years (14.2), with a range from 26 to 92 years. VOR gain remained stable from age 26 to 79 after which it significantly declined at a rate of 0.012/year (p = 0.033) in adjusted analyses. Individuals aged 80 years or older had a nearly 8-fold increased odds of VOR gain less than 0.80 relative to those aged less than 80 years in multivariate models (prevalence of 13.2% vs. 2.8%; OR 7.79, 95% CI: 1.04-58.38). Otherwise, VOR gain did not differ significantly across demographic or cardiovascular risk groups. We report age-related decline in VOR function in individuals aged 80 years and older. Further analyses are in progress to establish the significance of these VOR abnormalities to functional and mobility outcomes in older individuals.

  18. Getting ahead of oneself: anticipation and the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, W M

    2013-04-16

    Compensatory counter-rotations of the eyes provoked by head turns are commonly attributed to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). A recent study in guinea pigs demonstrates, however, that this assumption is not always valid. During voluntary head turns, guinea pigs make highly accurate compensatory eye movements that occur with zero or even negative latencies with respect to the onset of the provoking head movements. Furthermore, the anticipatory eye movements occur in animals with bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions, thus confirming that they have an extra vestibular origin. This discovery suggests the possibility that anticipatory responses might also occur in other species including humans and non-human primates, but have been overlooked and mistakenly identified as being produced by the VOR. This review will compare primate and guinea pig vestibular physiology in light of these new findings. A unified model of vestibular and cerebellar pathways will be presented that is consistent with current data in primates and guinea pigs. The model is capable of accurately simulating compensatory eye movements to active head turns (anticipatory responses) and to passive head perturbations (VOR induced eye movements) in guinea pigs and in human subjects who use coordinated eye and head movements to shift gaze direction in space. Anticipatory responses provide new evidence and opportunities to study the role of extra vestibular signals in motor control and sensory-motor transformations. Exercises that employ voluntary head turns are frequently used to improve visual stability in patients with vestibular hypofunction. Thus, a deeper understanding of the origin and physiology of anticipatory responses could suggest new translational approaches to rehabilitative training of patients with bilateral vestibular loss. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Strength of baseline inter-trial correlations forecasts adaptive capacity in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H Beaton

    Full Text Available Individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability may permit customized training protocols for optimum learning. Here, we sought to forecast individual adaptive capabilities in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR. Subjects performed 400 head-rotation steps (400 trials during a baseline test, followed by 20 min of VOR gain adaptation. All subjects exhibited mean baseline VOR gain of approximately 1.0, variable from trial to trial, and showed desired reductions in gain following adaptation with variation in extent across individuals. The extent to which a given subject adapted was inversely proportional to a measure of the strength and duration of baseline inter-trial correlations (β. β is derived from the decay of the autocorrelation of the sequence of VOR gains, and describes how strongly correlated are past gain values; it thus indicates how much the VOR gain on any given trial is informed by performance on previous trials. To maximize the time that images are stabilized on the retina, the VOR should maintain a gain close to 1.0 that is adjusted predominantly according to the most recent error; hence, it is not surprising that individuals who exhibit smaller β (weaker inter-trial correlations also exhibited the best adaptation. Our finding suggests that the temporal structure of baseline behavioral data contains important information that may aid in forecasting adaptive capacities. This has significant implications for the development of personalized physical therapy protocols for patients, and for other cases when it is necessary to adjust motor programs to maintain movement accuracy in response to pathological and environmental changes.

  20. Readaptation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Relieves the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia eDai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS, a continuous feeling of swaying, rocking and/or bobbing, generally follows travel on the sea. The associated symptoms cause considerable distress. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown, and to date there have been no effective treatments for this condition. Results in monkeys and humans suggested that MdDS was caused by maladaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR to roll of the head during rotation. We studied twenty-four subjects with persistent MdDS (3 males, 21 females; 19.1 ± 33 months. Physical findings included body oscillation at 0.2Hz, oscillating vertical nystagmus when the head was rolled from side-to-side in darkness, and unilateral rotation during the Fukuda stepping test. We posited that the maladapted rocking and the physical symptoms could be diminished or extinguished by readapting the VOR. Subjects were treated by rolling the head from side-to-side while watching a rotating full-field visual stimulus. Seventeen of the twenty-four subjects had a complete or substantial recovery on average for approximately one year. Six were initially better, but the symptoms recurred. One subject did not respond to treatment. Thus, readaptation of the VOR has led to a cure or substantial improvement in 70% of the subjects with MdDS. We conclude that the adaptive processes associated with roll-while-rotating are responsible for producing MdDS, and that the symptoms can be reduced or resolved by readapting the VOR.

  1. Readaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex relieves the mal de debarquement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mingjia; Cohen, Bernard; Smouha, Eric; Cho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS), a continuous feeling of swaying, rocking, and/or bobbing, generally follows travel on the sea. The associated symptoms cause considerable distress. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown, and to date there have been no effective treatments for this condition. Results in monkeys and humans suggested that MdDS was caused by maladaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) to roll of the head during rotation. We studied 24 subjects with persistent MdDS (3 males, 21 females; 19.1 ± 33 months). Physical findings included body oscillation at 0.2 Hz, oscillating vertical nystagmus when the head was rolled from side-to-side in darkness, and unilateral rotation during the Fukuda stepping test. We posited that the maladapted rocking and the physical symptoms could be diminished or extinguished by readapting the VOR. Subjects were treated by rolling the head from side-to-side while watching a rotating full-field visual stimulus. Seventeen of the 24 subjects had a complete or substantial recovery on average for approximately 1 year. Six were initially better, but the symptoms recurred. One subject did not respond to treatment. Thus, readaptation of the VOR has led to a cure or substantial improvement in 70% of the subjects with MdDS. We conclude that the adaptive processes associated with roll-while-rotating are responsible for producing MdDS, and that the symptoms can be reduced or resolved by readapting the VOR.

  2. Intraurethral stimulation evokes bladder responses via 2 distinct reflex pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, John P; Yoo, Paul B; Grill, Warren M

    2009-07-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that selective activation of pudendal nerve branches can evoke bladder responses through 2 distinct reflex pathways. We examined intraurethral electrical stimulation as a minimally invasive means of selectively activating these pathways in the cat. Bladder responses evoked by intraurethral electrical stimulation were measured in alpha-chloralose anesthetized male cats at different stimulation frequencies, stimulation intensities and intraurethral locations. Intraurethral electrical stimulation evoked inhibitory and excitatory bladder reflexes depending on stimulation frequency and location. Stimulation in the penile urethra 0 to 3 cm from the urethral meatus at 33 Hz evoked bladder contraction and at 10 Hz it evoked bladder relaxation. These responses were abolished after bilateral transection of the dorsal penile nerves. Stimulation in the membranous urethra 5 to 7 cm from the urethral meatus at 2, 10 and 33 Hz evoked bladder contractions. These responses were abolished after bilateral transection of the cranial sensory nerves. Following acute spinal cord transection bladder contractions were still evoked by 33 Hz stimulation in the penile urethra but not by stimulation at any frequency in the membranous urethra. Intraurethral electrical stimulation selectively evoked bladder responses by activating 2 distinct pudendal afferent pathways. Responses depended on stimulation frequency and location. Intraurethral electrical stimulation is a valid means of determining the pathways involved in bladder responses evoked by pudendal nerve stimulation.

  3. Diagnostic Bedside Vestibuloocular Reflex Evaluation in the Setting of a False Negative Fistula Test in Cholesteatoma of the Middle Ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D’Albora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. False negative fistula testing in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media is a dilemma when proceeding to surgery. It is imperative to rule out a dead labyrinth or a mass effect secondary to the cholesteatoma in an otherwise normally functioning inner ear. We present a case series of three patients in whom a bedside vestibuloocular reflex (VOR evaluation using a head impulse test was used successfully for further evaluation prior to surgery. Results. In all three cases with a false negative fistula test we were able to further evaluate at the bedside and were not only able to register the abnormal VOR but also localize its deterioration to a particular semicircular canal eroded by the fistula. Conclusion. Vestibuloocular reflex evaluation is mandatory in patients with suspected labyrinthine fistula due to cholesteatoma of the middle ear before proceeding to surgery. We demonstrate successful use of a bedside head impulse test for further evaluation prior to surgery in patients with false negative fistula test.

  4. Altered gravitational forces affect the development of the static vestibuloocular reflex in fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C; Esseling, K; Horn, E

    2001-01-01

    Young fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were exposed to microgravity (micro g) for 9 to 10 days during space missions STS-55 and STS-84, or to hypergravity (hg) for 9 days. Young animals (stages 11-12), which had not yet developed the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) at micro g- and hg-onset, and older ones (stages 14-16), which had already developed the rVOR, were used. For several weeks afterwards, the rVOR was recorded after termination of mug and hg. Here are the main results: (1) In the stage 11-12 fish, the rVOR gain (response angle/roll angle) measured for roll angles 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees was not affected by microgravity if animals were rolled from the horizontal to the inclined posture, but was increased significantly if animals were rolled in the opposite manner. The rVOR amplitude (maximal eye movement during a complete 360 degrees roll) of micro g animals increased significantly by 25% compared to 1g controls during the first postflight week, but decreased to the control level during the second postflight week. Microgravity had no effect in stage 14-16 fish on either rVOR gain or amplitude. (2) After 3g exposure, both rVOR gain and amplitude were significantly reduced for both stage 11-12 and stage 15 fish. One g readaptation was completed during the second post-3g week. Hypergravity at 2 or 2.5 g had no effect. (3) Hypergravity at all three levels tested (2g, 2.5g, and 3g) accelerated the morphological development as assessed by external morphological markers. Exposure to micro g- or 3g-periods during an early developmental period modifies the physiological properties of the neuronal network underlying the static rVOR; in susceptible developmental stages, these modifications include sensitization by microgravity and desensitization by hypergravity. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. The masseteric reflex evoked by tooth and denture tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, P; Fløystrand, F; Orstavik, J

    1991-07-01

    The characteristics of the masseter reflex evoked by tapping a maxillary incisor were compared with the reflex pattern evoked by tapping a corresponding denture tooth after insertion of an immediate denture. Up to three inhibitory phases (I-1, I-2 and I-3), followed by excitation, were found on an averaged EMG. The tapping force threshold for the early inhibitory phase was lower than for the late phases. The pattern of the reflex was generally the same before and after insertion of the denture, but the threshold values increased. After insertion of the denture, the threshold for I-1 increased from 1 +/- 0.3N to 2.2 +/- 0.4N, the threshold for I-2 increased from 2.4 +/- 0.8N to 3.8 +/- 0.9N, and the threshold for I-3 increased from 5.1 +/- 0.6N to 8.3 +/- 0.9N. The latency period for I-1 also increased from 12.3 +/- 0.5 ms to 13.1 +/- 0.3 ms after insertion of the denture. After relining, the threshold for evoking I-1 decreased from 2.7 +/- 1.2N to 1.2 +/- 0.6N. It was assumed that the mechanoreceptors situated in the mucosa under the denture base could take over the functional role of the periodontal mechanoreceptors for evoking the masseter reflex during tapping, and that these afferents probably had connections to the same interneurones.

  6. Signal processing related to the vestibulo-ocular reflex during combined angular rotation and linear translation of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, R. A.; Chen-Huang, C.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of vestibular nerve afferents and central vestibular pathways to the angular (AVOR) and linear (LVOR) vestibulo-ocular reflex were studied in squirrel monkeys during fixation of near and far targets. Irregular vestibular afferents did not appear to be necessary for the LVOR, since when they were selectively silenced with galvanic currents the LVOR was essentially unaffected during both far- and near-target viewing. The linear translation signals generated by secondary AVOR neurons in the vestibular nuclei were, on average, in phase with head velocity, inversely related to viewing distance, and were nearly as strong as AVOR-related signals. We suggest that spatial-temporal transformation of linear head translation signals to angular eye velocity commands is accomplished primarily by the addition of viewing distance multiplied, centrally integrated, otolith regular afferent signals to angular VOR pathways.

  7. A biophysical approach to the spatial function of eye movements, extraocular proprioception and the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunicht, W J

    1988-01-01

    The eyeball and the extraocular muscles are used as a paradigm to design a linear spatial model of a single joint with a redundant set of muscles. On the basis of this model relations are derived between orientation, torque, motor commands, and proprioceptive signals. These relations show that the tenet underlying the tensorial interpretation of neural signals in sensorimotor systems does not have general validity. A mechanism is proposed to show how proprioception may play a role in optimizing the coordination of muscles during spatial tasks. Further, a new concept is suggested that allows one to predict the neural connectivities mediating the redundant spatial vestibulo-ocular reflex. This concept has the advantage of minimizing both sensorial error and motor effort.

  8. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth H Sloot

    Full Text Available Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms. Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally

  9. Altered gravity affects ventral root activity during fictive swimming and the static vestibuloocular reflex in young tadpoles (Xenopus laevis).

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    Böser, S; Dournon, C; Gualandris-Parisot, L; Horn, E

    2008-03-01

    During early periods of life, modifications of the gravitational environment affect the development of sensory, neuronal and motor systems. The vestibular system exerts significant effects on motor networks that control eye and body posture as well as swimming. The objective of the present study was to study whether altered gravity (AG) affects vestibuloocular and spinal motor systems in a correlated manner. During the French Soyuz taxi flight Andromède to the International Space Station ISS (launch: October 21, 2001; landing: October 31, 2001) Xenopus laevis embryos were exposed for 10 days to microgravity (microg). In addition, a similar experiment with 3g-hypergravity (3g) was performed in the laboratory. At onset of AG, embryos had reached developmental stages 24 to 27. After exposure to AG, each tadpole was tested for its roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) and 3 hours later it was tested for the neuronal activity recorded from the ventral roots (VR) during fictive swimming. During the post-AG recording periods tadpoles had reached developmental stages 45 to 47. It was observed that microgravity affected VR activity during fictive swimming and rVOR. In particular, VR activity changes included a significant decrease of the rostrocaudal delay and a significant increase of episode duration. The rVOR-amplitude was transiently depressed. Hypergravity was less effective on the locomotor pattern; occurring effects on fictive swimming were the opposite of microg effects. As after microgravity, the rVOR was depressed after 3g-exposure. All modifications of the rVOR and VR-activity recovered to normal levels within 4 to 7 days after termination of AG. Significant correlations between the rVOR amplitude and VR activity of respective tadpoles during the recording period have been observed in both tadpoles with or without AG experience. The data are consistent with the assumptions that during this period of life which is characterized by a progressive development

  10. Adaptation of primate vestibuloocular reflex to altered peripheral vestibular inputs. I. Frequency-specific recovery of horizontal VOR after inactivation of the lateral semicircular canals

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    Angelaki, D. E.; Hess, B. J.; Arai, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The adaptive plasticity of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) following a selective lesion of the peripheral vestibular organs was investigated in rhesus monkeys whose lateral semicircular canals were inactivated by plugging of the canal lumen in both ears. Gain and phase of horizontal, vertical, and torsional slow-phase eye velocity were determined from three-dimensional eye movement recordings obtained acutely after the plugging operation, as well as in regular intervals up to 10 mo later. 2. Acutely after plugging, horizontal VOR was minimal during yaw rotation with gains of < 0.1 at all frequencies. Horizontal VOR gain gradually increased over time, reaching gains of 0.4-0.5 for yaw oscillations at 1.1 Hz approximately 5 mo after lateral canal inactivation. This response recovery was strongly frequency dependent: horizontal VOR gains were largest at the highest frequency tested and progressively decreased for lower frequencies. Below approximately 0.1 Hz, no consistent horizontal VOR could be elicited even 10 mo after plugging. 3. The frequency-dependent changes in gain paralleled changes in horizontal VOR phase. Below approximately 0.1-0.05 Hz large phase leads were present, similarly as in semicircular canal primary afferents. Smaller phase leads were also present at higher frequencies, particularly at 1.1 Hz (the highest frequency tested). 4. Consistent with the afferent-like dynamics of the adapted horizontal VOR, per- and postrotatory horizontal responses to constant-velocity yaw rotations were short lasting. Time constants of the slow-phase eye velocity envelope of the horizontal postrotatory nystagmus were approximately 2 s. Nonetheless, a consistent horizontal optokinetic afternystagmus was evoked in plugged animals. 5. A torsional component that was absent in intact animals was consistently present during yaw rotation acutely after lateral canal inactivation and remained approximately constant thereafter. The frequency response characteristics of this

  11. The first demonstration that a subset of women with hyperemesis gravidarum has abnormalities in the vestibuloocular reflex pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas Murphy; Nwankwo, Odinaka A.; Davis-O’Leary, Linda; O’Leary, Dennis; Romero, Roberto; Korst, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The vestibular system is a major pathway to nausea and vomiting, and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a central component; its function can be studied using the vestibular autorotation test (VAT). We hypothesize that women with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) may have VOR abnormalities. Study Design Women with HG were compared to women without HG using the VAT. Horizontal and vertical VOR gains and phases were evaluated at three frequency ranges: low (2.0–3.5 Hz), medium (>3.5 – 5.0 Hz), and high (>5.0 – 6.0 Hz) during pregnancy and postpartum. Results Twenty women with HG and 48 unaffected women were evaluated in early pregnancy. Women with HG had higher horizontal gains at all three frequency ranges. Horizontal phase differences were also observed at medium frequencies. No VAT differences were noted postpartum. Conclusions Women experiencing HG had a higher mean VOR horizontal gain and lower horizontal phase when compared to unaffected women. PMID:18928993

  12. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. I. High-frequency dynamics and three-dimensional properties during lateral motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Hess, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics and three-dimensional (3-D) properties of the primate translational vestibuloocular reflex (trVOR) for high-frequency (4-12 Hz, +/-0.3-0.4 g) lateral motion were investigated during near-target viewing at center and eccentric targets. Horizontal response gains increased with frequency and depended on target eccentricity. The larger the horizontal and vertical target eccentricity, the steeper the dependence of horizontal response gain on frequency. In addition to horizontal eye movements, robust torsional response components also were present at all frequencies. During center-target fixation, torsional response phase was opposite (anticompensatory) to that expected for an "apparent" tilt response. Instead torsional response components depended systematically on vertical-target eccentricity, increasing in amplitude when looking down and reversing phase when looking up. As a result the trVOR eye velocity vector systematically tilted away from a purely horizontal direction, through an angle that increased with vertical eccentricity with a slope of approximately 0.7. This systematic dependence of torsional eye velocity tilt on vertical eye position suggests that the trVOR might follow the 3-D kinematic requirements that have been shown to govern visually guided eye movements and near-target fixation.

  13. The vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex, and its interaction with vision during active head motion: effects of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J S; Sharpe, J A

    2001-01-01

    The effects of aging on the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and its interactions with vision during active head motion had not been investigated. We measured smooth pursuit, combined eye-head tracking, the VOR, and its visual enhancement and cancellation during active head motion in pitch using a magnetic search coil technique in 21 younger (age or = 65) subjects. With the head immobile, subjects pursued a target moving sinusoidally with a frequency range of 0.125 to 2.0 Hz, and with peak target accelerations (PTAs) ranging from 12 to 789 degrees /s(2). Combined eye-head tracking, the VOR in darkness, and its visual enhancement during fixation of an earth-fixed target (VVOR) were measured during active sinusoidal head motion with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 20 degrees at frequencies of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Hz. The efficacy of VOR cancellation was determined from VOR gains during combined eye-head tracking. VOR and VVOR gains were symmetrical in both directions and did not change with aging, except for reduced gains of the downward VOR and VVOR at low frequency (0.25 Hz). However, in the elderly, smooth pursuit, and combined eye-head tracking gains and the efficacy of cancellation of the VOR were significantly lower than in younger subjects. In both the young and elderly groups, VOR gain in darkness did not vary with the frequency of active head motion while the gains of smooth pursuit, combined eye-head tracking, and VVOR declined with increasing target frequency. VOR and VVOR performance in the elderly implicates relative preservation of neural structures subserving vertical vestibular smooth eye motion in senescence.

  14. Adaptation of primate vestibuloocular reflex to altered peripheral vestibular inputs. II Spatiotemporal properties of the adapted slow-phase eye velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Hess, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The ability of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) to undergo adaptive modification after selective changes in the peripheral vestibular system was investigated in rhesus monkeys by recording three-dimensional eye movements before and after inactivation of selective semicircular canals. In the preceding paper we showed that the horizontal VOR gain evoked by passive yaw oscillations after lateral semicircular canal inactivation recovers gradually over time in a frequency-specific manner. Here we present the spatial tuning of the adapted slow-phase eye velocity and describe its spatiotemporal properties as a function of time after canal inactivation. 2. The spatial organization of the VOR was investigated during oscillations at different head positions in the pitch, roll, and yaw planes, as well as in the right anterior/left posterior and left anterior/right posterior canal planes. Acutely after bilateral inactivation of the lateral semicircular canals, a small horizontal response could still be elicited that peaked during rotations in pitched head positions that would maximally stimulate vertical semicircular canals. In addition, the phase of horizontal slow-phase velocity abruptly reversed through 180 degrees at positions close to upright, similarly to torsional slow-phase velocity. These spatial response properties suggest that the small, residual horizontal response components that are present acutely after plugging of both lateral canals originate from vertical semicircular canal signals. 3. As the horizontal response amplitude increased over time, consistent changes were also observed in the spatiotemporal tuning of horizontal slow-phase velocity. 1) The spatiotemporal response properties of horizontal slow-phase velocity acquired noncosine tuning characteristics, primarily in the pitch plane, in the right anterior/left posterior and left anterior/right posterior canal planes. Accordingly, horizontal response amplitude was nonzero during rotation in any head

  15. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    the roll gain of the angular vestibuloocular reflex was modified during the initial period of the response, while pulley coefficient was maintained at 0.5. Hence a roll gain modification allows stabilization of the retinal image without requiring a change in the pulley effect. Our results therefore indicate that the eye position-dependent velocity axis tilts could arise due to the effects of the pulleys and that a roll gain modification in the central vestibular structures may be responsible for countering the pulley effect.

  16. The effect of vestibulo-ocular reflex deficits and covert saccades on dynamic vision in opioid-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaioli, Cecilia; Colagiorgio, Paolo; Sağlam, Murat; Heuser, Fabian; Schneider, Erich; Ramat, Stefano; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction cannot fully compensate passive head rotations with eye movements, and experience disturbing oscillopsia. To compensate for the deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), they have to rely on re-fixation saccades. Some can trigger "covert" saccades while the head still moves; others only initiate saccades afterwards. Due to their shorter latency, it has been hypothesized that covert saccades are particularly beneficial to improve dynamic visual acuity, reducing oscillopsia. Here, we investigate the combined effect of covert saccades and the VOR on clear vision, using the Head Impulse Testing Device-Functional Test (HITD-FT), which quantifies reading ability during passive high-acceleration head movements. To reversibly decrease VOR function, fourteen healthy men (median age 26 years, range 21-31) were continuously administrated the opioid remifentanil intravenously (0.15 µg/kg/min). VOR gain was assessed with the video head-impulse test, functional performance (i.e. reading) with the HITD-FT. Before opioid application, VOR and dynamic reading were intact (head-impulse gain: 0.87±0.08, mean±SD; HITD-FT rate of correct answers: 90±9%). Remifentanil induced impairment in dynamic reading (HITD-FT 26±15%) in 12/14 subjects, with transient bilateral vestibular dysfunction (head-impulse gain 0.63±0.19). HITD-FT score correlated with head-impulse gain (R = 0.63, p = 0.03) and with gain difference (before/with remifentanil, R = -0.64, p = 0.02). One subject had a non-pathological head-impulse gain (0.82±0.03) and a high HITD-FT score (92%). One subject triggered covert saccades in 60% of the head movements and could read during passive head movements (HITD-FT 93%) despite a pathological head-impulse gain (0.59±0.03) whereas none of the 12 subjects without covert saccades reached such high performance. In summary, early catch-up saccades may improve dynamic visual function. HITD-FT is an appropriate method

  17. The effect of vestibulo-ocular reflex deficits and covert saccades on dynamic vision in opioid-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ramaioli

    Full Text Available Patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction cannot fully compensate passive head rotations with eye movements, and experience disturbing oscillopsia. To compensate for the deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, they have to rely on re-fixation saccades. Some can trigger "covert" saccades while the head still moves; others only initiate saccades afterwards. Due to their shorter latency, it has been hypothesized that covert saccades are particularly beneficial to improve dynamic visual acuity, reducing oscillopsia. Here, we investigate the combined effect of covert saccades and the VOR on clear vision, using the Head Impulse Testing Device-Functional Test (HITD-FT, which quantifies reading ability during passive high-acceleration head movements. To reversibly decrease VOR function, fourteen healthy men (median age 26 years, range 21-31 were continuously administrated the opioid remifentanil intravenously (0.15 µg/kg/min. VOR gain was assessed with the video head-impulse test, functional performance (i.e. reading with the HITD-FT. Before opioid application, VOR and dynamic reading were intact (head-impulse gain: 0.87±0.08, mean±SD; HITD-FT rate of correct answers: 90±9%. Remifentanil induced impairment in dynamic reading (HITD-FT 26±15% in 12/14 subjects, with transient bilateral vestibular dysfunction (head-impulse gain 0.63±0.19. HITD-FT score correlated with head-impulse gain (R = 0.63, p = 0.03 and with gain difference (before/with remifentanil, R = -0.64, p = 0.02. One subject had a non-pathological head-impulse gain (0.82±0.03 and a high HITD-FT score (92%. One subject triggered covert saccades in 60% of the head movements and could read during passive head movements (HITD-FT 93% despite a pathological head-impulse gain (0.59±0.03 whereas none of the 12 subjects without covert saccades reached such high performance. In summary, early catch-up saccades may improve dynamic visual function. HITD-FT is an appropriate

  18. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Auditory evoked blink reflex in peripheral facial paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayta, Semih; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Uludüz, Derya; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Tütüncü, Melih; Akalin, Mehmet Ali; Kiziltan, Meral E

    2015-02-01

    The auditory blink reflex (ABR) is a teleceptive reflex consisting of an early brief muscle contraction of the orbicularis oculi in response to sound stimuli. Constriction of the orbicularis oculi in response to auditory stimulation is accepted as a part of the startle reaction. The blink reflex and ABR might share a final common pathway, consisting of facial nerve nuclei and the facial nerve and may have common premotor neurons. In this study, the authors evaluated the value of the ABR in patients with peripheral facial palsy (PFP), cross-checking the results with commonly used blink reflex changes. In total, 83 subjects with PFP and 34 age-matched healthy volunteers were included. Auditory blink reflex was elicited in all control subjects and in 36 PFP cases on the paralytic sides (43.3%), whereas it was asymmetric in 30.1% of the patients. Auditory blink reflex positivity was significantly lower in PFP cases with increasing severity. Blink reflex results were largely correlated with ABR positivity. Auditory blink reflex is a useful readily elicited and sensitive test in PFP cases, providing parallel results to blink reflex and being affected by disease severity.

  20. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, L.H.; van den Noort, J.C.; van der Krogt, M.M.; Bruijn, S.M.; Harlaar, J.

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles,

  1. Transmastoid galvanic stimulation does not affect the vergence-mediated gain increase of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Della Santina, Charles C; Carey, John P

    2013-02-01

    Vergence is one of several viewing contexts that require an increase in the angular vestibular-ocular reflex (aVOR) response. A previous monkey study found that the vergence-mediated gain (eye/head velocity) increase of the aVOR was attenuated by 64 % when anodic currents, which preferentially lower the activity of irregularly firing vestibular afferents, were delivered to both labyrinths. We sought to determine whether there was similar evidence implicating a role for irregular afferents in the vergence-mediated gain increase of the human aVOR. Our study is based upon analysis of the aVOR evoked by head rotations, delivered passively while subjects viewed a near (15 cm) or far (124 cm) target and applying galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) via surface electrodes. We tested 12 subjects during 2-3 sessions each. Vestibular stimuli consisted of passive whole-body rotations (sinusoids from 0.05-3 Hz and 12-25°/s, and transients with peak ~15°, 50°/s, 500°/s(2)) and head-on-body impulses (peak ~30°, 150°/s, 3,000°/s(2)). GVS was on for 10 s every 20 s. All polarity combinations were tested, with emphasis on uni- and bi-lateral anodic inhibition. The average stimulus current was 5.9 ± 1.6 mA (range: 3-9.5 mA), vergence angle (during near viewing) was 22.6 ± 2.8° and slow-phase eye velocity caused by left anodic current stimulation with head stationary was -3.4 ± 1.1°/s, -0.2 ± 0.6°/s and 2.5 ± 1.4°/s (torsion, vertical, horizontal). No statistically significant GVS effects were observed, suggesting that surface electrode GVS has no effect on the vergence-mediated gain increase of the aVOR at the current levels (~6 mA) tolerated by most humans. We conclude that clinically practical transmastoid GVS does not effectively silence irregular afferents and hypothesize that currents >10 mA are needed to reproduce the monkey results.

  2. Impairment of Long-Term Plasticity of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Eliminates the Effect of Anodal Direct Current Stimulation on Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Habituation

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    Suman Das

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anodal direct current stimulation (DCS of the cerebellum facilitates adaptation tasks, but the mechanism underlying this effect is poorly understood. We have evaluated whether the effects of DCS effects depend on plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs. Here, we have successfully developed a mouse model of cerebellar DCS, allowing us to present the first demonstration of cerebellar DCS driven behavioral changes in rodents. We have utilized a simple gain down vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR adaptation paradigm, that stabilizes a visual image on the retina during brief head movements, as behavioral tool. Our results provide evidence that anodal stimulation has an acute post-stimulation effect on baseline gain reduction of VOR (VOR gain in sham, anodal and cathodal groups are 0.75 ± 0.12, 0.68 ± 0.1, and 0.78 ± 0.05, respectively. Moreover, this anodal induced decrease in VOR gain is directly dependent on the PP2B medicated synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP and intrinsic plasticity pathways of PCs.

  3. Video Head Impulse Tests with a Remote Camera System: Normative Values of Semicircular Canal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Gain in Infants and Children

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    Sylvette R. Wiener-Vacher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The video head impulse test (VHIT is widely used to identify semicircular canal function impairments in adults. But classical VHIT testing systems attach goggles tightly to the head, which is not tolerated by infants. Remote video detection of head and eye movements resolves this issue and, here, we report VHIT protocols and normative values for children. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain was measured for all canals of 303 healthy subjects, including 274 children (aged 2.6 months–15 years and 26 adults (aged 16–67. We used the Synapsys® (Marseilles, France VHIT Ulmer system whose remote camera measures head and eye movements. HITs were performed at high velocities. Testing typically lasts 5–10 min. In infants as young as 3 months old, VHIT yielded good inter-measure replicability. VOR gain increases rapidly until about the age of 6 years (with variation among canals, then progresses more slowly to reach adult values by the age of 16. Values are more variable among very young children and for the vertical canals, but showed no difference for right versus left head rotations. Normative values of VOR gain are presented to help detect vestibular impairment in patients. VHIT testing prior to cochlear implants could help prevent total vestibular loss and the resulting grave impairments of motor and cognitive development in patients with residual unilateral vestibular function.

  4. Invariance of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain to head impulses in pitch at different initial eye-in-orbit elevations: implications for Alexander's law.

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    Anastasopoulos, Dimitri; Anagnostou, Evangelos

    2012-10-01

    These findings are in line with previous data on the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) from this laboratory and suggest that eye position signals do not modulate natural vestibular responses. Hence, the Alexander's law (AL) phenomenon cannot be interpreted simply as a consequence of vestibular or oculomotor nuclei activity modulation with desired gaze. AL states that the intensity of the spontaneous nystagmus of a patient with a unilateral vestibular lesion grows with increasing gaze in the direction of the fast phase. Some of the mechanisms proposed to account for the gaze effects assume a direct modification of the normal VOR by eye position signals. We tested the validity of these assumptions and investigated the effects of gaze direction on the normal vertical human VOR in the behaviorally relevant high frequency range. Head and eye movements were recorded with the search coil method during passive head impulses in pitch, while subjects were asked to hold gaze at various elevation angles in 8° steps within ± 16° from the straight ahead reference position. Upward and downward head rotations produced VOR gains of similar magnitude. Furthermore, the gain remained unaffected by eye-in-orbit position for both upward and downward head impulses.

  5. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-Condition in immature lower vertebrates ( Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.; Eβeling, K.; Neubert, J.

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity (μg) during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with ug- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days, (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  6. The Effect of Acoustic Reflex on Contralateral Suppression of Transient-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

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    Jalal Sameni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Contralateral suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs test evaluates the efferent auditory system. In this test, acoustic reflex is an important confounding variable. In recent years, application of this test is growing especially in children suspect to central auditory processing disorder. Therefore, the magnitude of influence of this confounding variable on the suppression of TEOAEs should be made clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of acoustic reflex on contralateral suppression of TEOAEs.Methods: This research was performed on 39 normal-hearing adults of both sexes and of 18-26 years of age. Tests were used for the determination of interaural attenuation (IA, acoustic reflex, TEOAEs and contralateral suppression of TEOAEs.Results: TEOAEs amplitudes and their contralateral suppression were significantly higher in females and males respectively (p=0.01. The amount of TEOAEs suppression before reflex activity ranged between 2000 to 3000 Hz. Activation of acoustic reflex significantly increased the magnitude of suppression in all frequency bands (p≤0.01 and maximum suppression occurred in 500 to 1000 Hz.Conclusion: For achieving accuracy of clinical findings, clinicians should always use suppressant levels lower than the acoustic reflex threshold. It is recommended that different norms for males and females be used in contralateral suppression of TEOAEs.

  7. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith endorgans can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular-deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of one week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2–5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans. PMID:21374081

  8. Adaptive modifications of post-saccadic smooth pursuit eye movements and their interaction with saccades and the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, S; Kitazawa, H

    1998-10-01

    Adaptation of the horizontal smooth pursuit eye movement was examined using step-ramp moving target paradigms in chronically prepared Macaca fuscata. Monkeys were trained to pursue a small target which moved in the horizontal plane in a 3 degrees step-10 degrees/s ramp or a 0 degrees step-10 degrees/s ramp mode for 300-400 ms. When the target moved from central fixation point in a step-ramp mode, the monkeys usually responded with an initial pursuit eye movement (latency, 100-120 ms) which reached to a nearly constant velocity of 4 degrees/s in 50 100 ms, followed by a 1-3.5 degrees catch-up saccade (latency, 170-230 ms). The catch-up saccade was followed by a 7-8 degrees/s post-saccadic pursuit. The post-saccadic pursuit velocity was measured 40-90 ms after the end of the catch-up saccade. When the target velocity was doubled (20 degrees/s) for 100-200 ms immediately after the onset of the catch-up saccade, the post-saccadic pursuit velocity increased by 40%. When the target velocity was decreased by half (5 degrees/s) immediately after the onset of the catch-up saccade for 150 ms, the post-saccadic pursuit velocity decreased by 30%. These increases or decreases of post-saccadic pursuit were observable within just 50-150 trials. The adaptation of post-saccadic pursuit occurred independent of the position of the target. The amplitude and latency of the catch-up saccade also increased correspondingly when the post-saccadic pursuit velocity was adaptively increased. Adaptation of smooth pursuit did not affect the dynamics of reflex eye movements, including the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) gain and phase measured by 0.33 Hz-10 degrees (peak-to-peak) turntable oscillations in darkness. Conversely, adaptation of the HVOR gain induced by a 2 h sustained oscillation of the turntable and screen in reversed direction at 0.33 Hz-10 degrees affected little the velocity of post-saccadic pursuit or the amplitude of the catch-up saccade. These results suggest that

  9. Inaccurate Saccades and Enhanced Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Suppression during Combined Eye-Head Movements in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: Possible Implications for Cervical Vertigo.

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    Johnston, Janine L; Daye, Pierre M; Thomson, Glen T D

    2017-01-01

    The primate ocular motor system is designed to acquire peripheral targets of interest by coordinating visual, vestibular, and neck muscle activation signals. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is greatly reduced at the onset of large eye-head (gaze) saccades and resumes before the end of the saccades to stabilize eye-in-orbit and ensure accurate target acquisition. Previous studies have relied on manipulating head movements in normal individuals to study VOR suppression and gaze kinematics. We sought to determine if reduced head-on-trunk movement alters VOR suppression and gaze accuracy similar to experiments involving normal subjects and if intentionally increasing head and neck movement affects these dynamics. We measured head and gaze movements using magnetic search coil oculography in eight patients with cervical soft tissue disorders and seven healthy subjects. All participants made horizontal head-free saccades to acquire a laser dot target that stepped pseudorandomly 30-65° to either side of orbital mid-position, first using typical head and eye movements and again after being instructed to increase head amplitudes as much as possible. Compared to healthy subjects, patients made smaller head movements that contributed only 6% to total gaze saccade amplitudes. Head movements were also slowed, prolonged, and delayed. VOR suppression was increased and prolonged. Gaze saccades were inaccurate and delayed with long durations and decreased peak velocities. In patients with chronic neck pain, the internal commands issued for combined eye-head movements have large enough amplitudes to create accurate gaze saccades; however, because of increased neck stiffness and viscosity, the head movements produced are smaller, slower, longer, and more delayed than they should be. VOR suppression is disproportionate to the size of the actual gaze saccades because sensory feedback signals from neck proprioceptors are non-veridical, likely due to prolonged coactivation of cervical

  10. An age-dependent sensitivity of the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex to hypergravity exposure of several days in an amphibian ( Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C. E.; Pfau, K.; Horn, E. R.

    In tadpoles of the Southern Clawed Toad ( Xenopus laevis), the effects of an exposure to hypergravity of several days duration on the development of the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were investigated. Special attention was given to the onset of the 9 or 12 days lasting 3G-period during early life. First recordings of the rVOR characteristics for complete 360 ° rolls of the tadpoles were performed 24 hrs after the end of the 3G-period. The rVOR peak-to-peak amplitudes as well as the VOR-gain for a roll angle of 15 ° from 3G-and 1G-samples recorded at the 2nd and 3rd day after 3G-termination agreed for the youngest group, but were reduced by approx. 30% in the older tadpoles. Long-term observations lasting up to 8 weeks after termination of the 3G-period, demonstrated (i) an early retardation of the development, and (ii) a developmental acceleration in all groups so that after 2 weeks in the stage 6/9- and 33/36-samples and after 8 weeks in the stage 45-tadpoles, the rVOR-amplitude as well as the rVOR-gain for a 15 ° roll were at the same level in both the 3G- and the 1G-samples. The results support the existence of a sensitive period for the rVOR development, and additionally demonstrate the importance of the period of the first appearance of the rVOR for the development of adaptive properties of the underlying neuronal network. They also demonstrate the dominant efficiency of genetic programs in the functional development of the vestibular system. Methodological approaches are discussed which will be useful in the further description of the critical period. They include studies on the neuronogenesis and synaptic maturation within the vestibular pathways as well as on the fundamentals of buoyancy control during swimming. A modular but closed mini-system for experimental use is described which allows survival periods lasting many weeks and multiple types of treatments of developing aquatic animals in orbit, controlled automatically.

  11. Failure in evoking the trigeminal cardiac reflex by mandibular stretching in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Innocentiis, Carlo; Caputi, Cristiano Giovannni; Pinto, Filomena; Quintiliani, Stefania; Meccariello, Armando; Renda, Giulia; Di Nicola, Marta; De Caterina, Raffaele; D'Attilio, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Stimulation of trigeminal sensory afferences has been reported to evoke hypotension and bradycardia, a phenomenon known as the trigeminal cardiac reflex. We attempted to evoke such a reflex through cycles of alternate mandibular stretching in healthy volunteers, as previously reported, for its possible therapeutic exploitation. In Phase 1 of the study, 10 healthy volunteers [5 male, 5 female, age (mean ± SD) 27±2 years)] underwent 2 randomized sessions of automated monitoring, every 6 minutes, of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic (D) BP, and heart rate (HR), with a one-week interval, either with mandibular stretching (12 minutes with a spring device fitted in the mouth), or nothing (control). Observation was prolonged for 180 minute after the end of the stretching. In Phase 2, 7 other volunteers (4 male and 3 female, age 24±1.3 years) repeated the protocol with a sampling interval of 2 minutes until the end of stretching. Baseline levels of SBP, DBP and HR were similar in the test and control sessions. There was a progressive fall of BP and HR as a function of time during the test session. With stretching: SBP changed from 119.2±10.1 to 118.1±10.1 to 115.8±10.5 mmHg, at baseline, end of stretching and 180 minutes after, respectively, pmeasurements, we could not detect significant BP or HR effects of repeated mandibular stretching.

  12. Contribution of M-waves and H-reflexes to contractions evoked by tetanic nerve stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klakowicz, Piotr M; Baldwin, Evan R L; Collins, David F

    2006-09-01

    Tetanic neuromuscular stimulation evokes contractions by depolarizing motor axons beneath the stimulating electrodes. However, we have shown that extra torque can develop due to the discharge of spinal neurons recruited by the evoked sensory volley. The present experiments investigated whether extra torque in the ankle plantar- and dorsiflexors was associated with enhanced H-reflexes. The tibial and common peroneal nerves were stimulated using 7-s trains (20 Hz for 2 s, 100 Hz for 2 s, 20 Hz for 3 s). Extra torque was defined as significantly more torque during 20-Hz stimulation after the 100-Hz burst (time2) than before it (time1). In 9 of 11 subjects, extra plantarflexion torque developed during stimulation just above motor threshold. In these nine subjects, torque increased from 8 to 13% MVC (time1 to time2), the soleus H-reflex increased from 13 to 19% Mmax and the M-wave of approximately 2% Mmax did not change significantly. To evoke extra dorsiflexion torque, greater stimulation intensities were required. In 6 of 13 subjects, extra torque developed at intensities that evoked an M-wave of 5-20% Mmax at time1. In these six subjects, torque doubled from 2 to 4% MVC (time1 to time2), whereas tibialis anterior (TA) H-reflexes and M-waves did not change significantly (H-reflex from 0.8 to 2% Mmax; M-wave from 12 to 14% Mmax). In 7 of 13 subjects, extra torque developed at higher stimulation intensities (35-65% Mmax). In these seven subjects, torque increased from 13 to 20% MVC, whereas TA H-reflexes and M-waves were not significantly different (H-reflex from 0.7 to 1% Mmax; M-wave from 49 to 54% Mmax). Thus enhanced H-reflexes contributed to extra plantarflexion, however, other factors generated extra dorsiflexion.

  13. [The vestibulocollic reflex: assessment and characteristics of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials analysed by age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, E; Piqueras-Del Rey, A; Martin-Alba, V; Parra-Escorihuela, S; Soler-Algarra, S; Chumillas, M J; Perez-Guillen, V; Perez-Garrigues, H; Morera-Perez, C

    Obtaining vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) by means of the vestibulocollic reflex is a readily available technique that provides an image of vestibular functioning and is useful for evaluating the pathologies that involve compromise of the anatomical pathway of the reflex. Although normal patterns do exist, responses vary at different ages. To obtain reference values of the vestibulocollic reflex according to different age groups. We studied 40 volunteers with no symptoms of auditory or vestibular compromise. Each ear was stimulated separately by a series of clicks (sounds lasting 0.1 s; 3 pps; intensities of 100 dB nHL and 85 dB nHL) and recordings were made in the sternocleidomastoid muscles by means of surface electrodes as patients who were lying on their backs contracted these muscles as they lifted their heads. We studied the latency of the initial p13-n23 positive-negative potential and the peak-to-peak amplitude. The existence of later n34-p44 potentials was evaluated. No statistically significant differences were found between genders or between the two ears. We did not find any differences between the latencies of the waves according to the intensity of the stimulus, but there is a relationship between the amplitude of the p13-n23 potential and the intensity of the stimulus. The latencies of the responses in children under 10 years of age differ from those of the other groups, but no differences were found among those over the age of 11. The VEMP display steady and easily identifiable latencies. We obtained different reference values for latency in children under the age of 10 and those over 11 years old. The amplitude decreases with the intensity of the stimulus.

  14. Ontogenetic development of vestibular reflexes in amphibians

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    Hans Straka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibulo-ocular reflexes ensure gaze stability during locomotion and passively induced head/body movements. In precocial vertebrates such as amphibians, vestibular reflexes are required very early at the onset of locomotor activity. While the formation of inner ears and the assembly of sensory-motor pathways is largely completed soon after hatching, angular and translational/tilt vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR display differential functional onsets and mature with different time courses. Otolith-derived eye movements appear immediately after hatching, whereas the appearance and progressive amelioration of semicircular canal-evoked eye movements is delayed and dependent on the acquisition of sufficiently large semicircular canal diameters. Moreover, semicircular canal functionality is also required to tune the initially omnidirectional otolith-derived VOR. The tuning is due to a reinforcement of those vestibulo-ocular connections that are co-activated by semicircular canal and otolith inputs during natural head/body motion. This suggests that molecular mechanisms initially guide the basic ontogenetic wiring, whereas semicircular canal-dependent activity is required to establish the spatio-temporal specificity of the reflex. While a robust VOR is activated during passive head/body movements, locomotor efference copies provide the major source for compensatory eye movements during tail- and limb-based swimming of larval and adult frogs. The integration of active/passive motion-related signals for gaze stabilization occurs in central vestibular neurons that are arranged as segmentally iterated functional groups along rhombomere 1-8. However, at variance with the topographic maps of most other sensory systems, the sensory-motor transformation of motion-related signals occurs in segmentally specific neuronal groups defined by the extraocular motor output targets.

  15. Low-frequency stimulation of group III and IV hind limb afferents evokes reflex pressor responses in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jonathan E; Copp, Steven W; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-10-01

    Contraction of freely perfused hind limb muscles in decerebrate rats evokes the exercise pressor reflex, resulting in sympathetic activation and increased blood pressure. This reflex is propagated along mechanically sensitive group III and metabolically sensitive group IV afferent nerve fibers. Recent research by our laboratory has focused on the exaggeration of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with simulated peripheral artery disease, which was induced by ligating the femoral artery for 72 h before the start of the experiment. Recently, we showed that ligating the femoral artery increased the responses of single fiber group III and IV triceps surae muscle afferents to static contraction. The objective of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation of group III and IV afferents at frequencies approximating those occurring during static contraction was capable of reflexively increasing arterial blood pressure. We directly stimulated muscle afferents in the absence of muscle contraction for both freely perfused and ligated rats. We established 0.25 Hz as the minimal stimulation frequency to observe a sustained blood pressure response. The blood pressure response increased in a graded fashion as both stimulus frequency and motor threshold were increased. Additionally, we observed similar blood pressure responses from both freely perfused and ligated rats, suggesting that spinal and medullary processing of group III and IV afferent input plays no role in augmenting the pressor response to contraction caused by femoral artery ligation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Comparison of the physiological properties of human periodontal-masseteric reflex evoked by incisor and canine stimulation

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    Hiroko eOhmori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was designed to clarify whether the bilateral cooperation in the human periodontal-masseteric reflex (PMR differs between central incisors and canines. Methods: Surface array electrodes were placed on the bilateral masseter muscles to simultaneously record the firing activities of single motor units from both sides in 7 healthy adults. During light clenching, mechanical stimulation was applied to the right maxillary central incisor and canine to evoke the PMR. Unitary activity was plotted with respect to the background activity and firing frequency. The slope of the regression line (sRL and the correlation coefficient (CC between the central incisor and canine and the lateral differences between these values were compared. Results: There were significant differences in the sRL and CC, as well as lateral differences, between the central incisor- and canine-driven PMR. Discussion: These results suggest that the PMR differs depending on both the tooth position and laterality.

  17. Role played by interleukin-6 in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats: effect of femoral artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Steven W; Stone, Audrey J; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-07-01

    IL-6 signaling via the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6r) has been shown to increase primary afferent responsiveness to noxious stimuli. This finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that IL-6 and sIL-6r would increase the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We also tested the hypothesis that soluble glycoprotein (sgp)130, an inhibitor of IL-6/sIL-6r signaling, would decrease the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex that is found in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. In rats with freely perfused femoral arteries, coinjection of 50 ng of IL-6 and sIL-6r into the arterial supply of the hindlimb significantly increased the peak pressor response to static (control: 14 ± 3 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 17 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.03) and intermittent isometric (control: 10 ± 2 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 15 ± 4 mmHg, P = 0.03) hindlimb muscle contraction. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, injection of 50 ng of sgp130 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the peak pressor response to static (control: 24 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 16 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.01) and intermittent isometric (control: 16 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 13 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.04) hindlimb muscle contraction, whereas there was no effect of sgp130 on the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that coinjection of exogenous IL-6 and sIL-6r increased the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. More importantly, we also conclude that IL-6 and sIL-6r play an endogenous role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries but not in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. The Effect of Peripheral Vestibular Recovery on Improvements in Vestibulo-ocular Reflexes and Balance Control After Acute Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, John H J; Scheltinga, Alja; Honegger, Flurin

    2017-12-01

    Patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (aUPVD), presumed to be caused by vestibular neuritis, show asymmetrical vestibular ocular reflexes (VORs) that improve over time. Questions arise regarding how much of the VOR improvement is due to peripheral recovery or central compensation, and whether differences in peripheral recovery influence balance control outcomes. Thirty patients were examined at aUPVD onset and 3, 6, and 13 weeks later with four different VOR tests: caloric tests; rotating (ROT) chair tests performed in yaw with angular accelerations of 5 and 20 degrees/s; and video head impulse tests (vHIT) in the yaw plane. ROT and vHIT responses and balance control of 11 patients who had a caloric canal paresis (CP) more than 90% at aUPVD onset and no CP recovery (no-CPR) at 13 weeks in caloric tests were compared with those of 19 patients with CP recovery (CPR) to less than 30%, on average. Balance control was measured with a gyroscope system (SwayStar) recording trunk sway during stance and gait tasks. ROT and vHIT asymmetries of no-CPR and CPR patients reduced over time. The reduction was less at 13 weeks (36.2% vs. 83.5% on average) for the no-CPR patients. The no-CPR group asymmetries at 13 weeks were greater than those of CPR patients who had normal asymmetries. The greater asymmetries were caused by weaker deficit side responses which remained deficient in no-CPR patients at 13 weeks. Contra-deficit side vHIT and ROT responses remained normal. For all balance tests, sway was slightly greater for no-CPR compared with CPR patients at aUPVD onset and 3 weeks later. At 13 weeks, only sway during walking eyes closed was greater for the no-CPR group. A combination of 5 degrees/s ROT and balance tests could predict at onset (90% accuracy) which patients would have no-CPR at 13 weeks. These results indicate that for ROT and vHIT tests, central compensation is observed in CPR and no-CPR patients. It acts primarily by increasing deficit

  19. Development of Device to Evoke Stretch Reflexes by Use of Electromagnetic Force for the Rehabilitation of the Hemiplegic Upper Limb after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryota; Ishimine, Tomoyasu; Kawahira, Kazumi; Yu, Yong; Tsujio, Showzow

    In this research, we focus on the method of rehabilitation with stretch reflexes for the hemiplegic upper limb in stroke patients. We propose a new device which utilizes electromagnetic force to evoke stretch reflexes. The device can exert an assisting force safely, because the electromagnetic force is non contact force. In this paper, we develop a support system applying the proposed device for the functional recovery training of the hemiplegic upper limb. The results obtained from several clinical tests with and without our support system are compared. Then we discuss the validity of our support system.

  20. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  1. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Sasidharan, Chithra Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS) is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were above the damage risk criteria (DRC) compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01). Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  2. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs were above the damage risk criteria (DRC compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01. Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  3. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis evokes reflex tonic erections of the penile body and reflex ejaculatory responses in the spinal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatori, E S; Calabro, A; Artibani, W; Pagano, F; Triban, C; Italiano, G

    1993-03-01

    An animal model using the spinal rat was characterized. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis elicited reflex tonic erections of the penile body and reflex bulbospongiosus muscle activity, flips and ejaculations. The tonic erections of the penile body are independent from contractions of the bulbospongiosus muscle and appear to be the result of a neurovascular process. Our observations suggest that reflex bulbospongiosus muscle activity, flips and ejaculations are a single complex reflex response, which we define as reflex ejaculatory response. Two parameters predicted the occurrence and type of reflex response. The visualization of bulbospongiosus muscle activity during surgical isolation of the dorsal nerve of the penis was sufficient to anticipate the elicitability of reflex ejaculatory responses. The latter, together with a systemic systolic pressure > or = 73 mmHg., warranted the elicitability of reflex tonic erections. The similarities found in the physiology of rat tonic penile body erections and of human erections make this model promising for further elucidation of sexual function. Moreover, the present model may prove useful for the investigation of neurogenic erectile dysfunction, and of neurogenic ejaculatory disorders.

  4. Evolution of the vestibulo-ocular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.

    1998-01-01

    The evolutionary and developmental changes in the eye muscle innervation, the inner ear, and the vestibulo-ocular reflex are examined. Three eye muscle patterns, based on the innervation by distinct ocular motoneurons populations, can be identified: a lamprey, an elasmobranch, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Four distinct patterns of variation in the vestibular system are described: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, an elasmobranch pattern, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Developmental data suggest an influence of the hindbrain on ear pattern formation, thus potentially allowing a concomitant change of eye muscle innervation and ear variation. The connections between the ear and the vestibular nuclei and between the vestibular nuclei and ocular motoneurons are reviewed, and the role of neurotrophins for pattern specification is discussed. Three patterns are recognized in central projections: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, and a pattern for jawed vertebrates. Second-order connections show both similarities and differences between distantly related species such as lampreys and mammals. For example, elasmobranchs lack an internuclear system, which is at best poorly developed in lampreys. It is suggested that the vestibulo-ocular system shows only a limited degree of variation because of the pronounced functional constraints imposed on it.

  5. A Study of Relationship between the Acoustic Sensitivity of Vestibular System and the Ability to Trigger Sound-Evoked Muscle Reflex of the Middle Ear in Adults with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Emami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The vestibular system is sound sensitive and the sensitivity is related to the saccule. The vestibular afferents are projected to the middle ear muscles (such as the stapedius. The goal of this research was studying the relationship between the vestibular hearing and the sound-evoked muscle reflex of the middle ear to 500 HZ. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross sectional-comparison done in audiology department of Sheikholreis C‍‍linic (Hamadan, Iran. The study groups consisted of thirty healthy people and thirty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Inclusion criteria of the present study were to have normal hearing on pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, and speech discrimination scores. Based on ipsilateral acoustic reflex test at 500HZ, they were divided to normal and abnormal groups. Then they were evaluated by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and finally classified in three groups (N Normal ear , (CVUA Contra lateral vertiginous ear with unaffected saccular sensitivity to sound,(IVA Ipsilateral vertiginous ear with affected saccular sensitivity to sound. Results: Thirty affected ears (IVA with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by ab-normal cVEMPs, revealed abnormal findings of acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Whereas, both un-affected (CVUA and normal ears (N had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs (p13,n23 and acoustic reflex at500HZ among the three groups were sig-nificant. The correlation between acoustic reflex at 500HZ and p13 latencies was significant. The n23 latencies showed significant correlation with acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Conclusion: The vestibular sensitivity to sound retains the ability to trigger sound-evoked re-flex of the middle ear at 500 HZ. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:99-104

  6. On the use of information theory for the analysis of synchronous nociceptive withdrawal reflexes and somatosensory evoked potentials elicited by graded electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguissain, Federico G; Biurrun Manresa, José A; Mørch, Carsten D; Andersen, Ole K

    2015-01-30

    To date, few studies have combined the simultaneous acquisition of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). In fact, it is unknown whether the combination of these two signals acquired simultaneously could provide additional information on somatosensory processing at spinal and supraspinal level compared to individual NWR and SEP signals. By using the concept of mutual information (MI), it is possible to quantify the relation between electrical stimuli and simultaneous elicited electrophysiological responses in humans based on the estimated stimulus-response signal probability distributions. All selected features from NWR and SEPs were informative in regard to the stimulus when considered individually. Specifically, the information carried by NWR features was significantly higher than the information contained in the SEP features (pinformation carried by the combination of features showed an overall redundancy compared to the sum of the individual contributions. Comparison with existing methods MI can be used to quantify the information that single-trial NWR and SEP features convey, as well as the information carried jointly by NWR and SEPs. This is a model-free approach that considers linear and non-linear correlations at any order and is not constrained by parametric assumptions. The current study introduces a novel approach that allows the quantification of the individual and joint information content of single-trial NWR and SEP features. This methodology could be used to decode and interpret spinal and supraspinal interaction in studies modulating the responsiveness of the nociceptive system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Head movements evoked in alert rhesus monkey by vestibular prosthesis stimulation: implications for postural and gaze stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E Mitchell

    Full Text Available The vestibular system detects motion of the head in space and in turn generates reflexes that are vital for our daily activities. The eye movements produced by the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR play an essential role in stabilizing the visual axis (gaze, while vestibulo-spinal reflexes ensure the maintenance of head and body posture. The neuronal pathways from the vestibular periphery to the cervical spinal cord potentially serve a dual role, since they function to stabilize the head relative to inertial space and could thus contribute to gaze (eye-in-head + head-in-space and posture stabilization. To date, however, the functional significance of vestibular-neck pathways in alert primates remains a matter of debate. Here we used a vestibular prosthesis to 1 quantify vestibularly-driven head movements in primates, and 2 assess whether these evoked head movements make a significant contribution to gaze as well as postural stabilization. We stimulated electrodes implanted in the horizontal semicircular canal of alert rhesus monkeys, and measured the head and eye movements evoked during a 100 ms time period for which the contribution of longer latency voluntary inputs to the neck would be minimal. Our results show that prosthetic stimulation evoked significant head movements with latencies consistent with known vestibulo-spinal pathways. Furthermore, while the evoked head movements were substantially smaller than the coincidently evoked eye movements, they made a significant contribution to gaze stabilization, complementing the VOR to ensure that the appropriate gaze response is achieved. We speculate that analogous compensatory head movements will be evoked when implanted prosthetic devices are transitioned to human patients.

  8. Characteristics and clinical applications of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, C; Gürkov, R

    2012-12-01

    Recently, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) have been described and added to the neuro-otologic test battery as a new measure for the vestibulo-ocular reflex. oVEMPs represent extraocular muscle activity in response to otolith stimulation e.g. by air-conducted sound or bone-conducted vibration. In response to vestibular stimulation, electromyographic activity of the extraocular muscles can be recorded by means of surface electrodes placed beneath the contralateral eye. oVEMPs are likely to reflect predominantly utricular function, while the widely established cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) assess saccular function. Thus, measuring oVEMPs and cVEMPs in addition to caloric and head impulse testing provides further evaluation of the vestibular system and enables quick and cost-effective assessment of otolith function. This review summarizes the neurophysiological properties of oVEMPs, gives recommendations for recording conditions and discusses oVEMP alterations in various disorders of the vestibular system. With increasing insight into oVEMP characteristics in vestibular disorders, e.g. Menière's disease and superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome, oVEMPs are becoming a promising new diagnostic tool for evaluating utricular function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    children with hearing-impairment, VOR abnormalities appear to be an important predictor of impairment in motor performance (De Kegel et al., 2012...430. De Kegel , A., Maes, L., Baetens, T., Dhooge, I., and Van Waelvelde, H. (2012). The Influence of a Vestibular Dysfunction on the Motor Development

  10. The vestibulocollic reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, V J; Boyle, R; Fukushima, K; Rose, P K; Shinoda, Y; Sugiuchi, Y; Uchino, Y

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of the head is required not only for adequate motor performance, such as maintaining balance while standing or walking, but also for the adequate reception of sensory inputs such as visual and auditory information. The vestibular organs, which consist of three approximately orthogonal semicircular canals (anterior, horizontal, posterior) and two otolith organs (utriculus, sacculus), provide the most important input for the detection of head movement. Activation of afferents from these receptors evokes the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes head position in space. In this review, which is the outgrowth of a session of the vestibular symposium held in Hawaii in April, 1994, we discuss the neural substrate of this reflex and some aspects of the central processing involved in its production. Some topics are not considered, in particular the important interaction between the VCR and the cervicocollic reflex evoked by activation of neck afferents (70,119), and attempts to model the reflex (69).

  11. Three-dimensional vestibular eye and head reflexes of the chameleon: characteristics of gain and phase and effects of eye position on orientation of ocular rotation axes during stimulation in yaw direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, H; Misslisch, H; Ott, M; Frens, M A; Henn, V; Hess, K; Sándor, P S

    2003-07-01

    We investigated gaze-stabilizing reflexes in the chameleon using the three-dimensional search-coil technique. Animals were rotated sinusoidally around an earth-vertical axis under head-fixed and head-free conditions, in the dark and in the light. Gain, phase and the influence of eye position on vestibulo-ocular reflex rotation axes were studied. During head-restrained stimulation in the dark, vestibulo-ocular reflex gaze gains were low (0.1-0.3) and phase lead decreased with increasing frequencies (from 100 degrees at 0.04 Hz to < 30 degrees at 1 Hz). Gaze gains were larger during stimulation in the light (0.1-0.8) with a smaller phase lead (< 30 degrees) and were close to unity during the head-free conditions (around 0.6 in the dark, around 0.8 in the light) with small phase leads. These results confirm earlier findings that chameleons have a low vestibulo-ocular reflex gain during head-fixed conditions and stimulation in the dark and higher gains during head-free stimulation in the light. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye rotation axes were roughly aligned with the head's rotation axis and did not systematically tilt when the animals were looking eccentrically, up- or downward (as predicted by Listing's Law). Therefore, vestibulo-ocular reflex responses in the chameleon follow a strategy, which optimally stabilizes the entire retinal images, a result previously found in non-human primates.

  12. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  13. Tendon reflex asymmetry by voluntary mental effort in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; Speelman, H. D.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of voluntary mental influences on the tendon reflexes was examined in healthy subjects. The patellar reflexes were evoked by a method comparable with the clinical examination, and the reflexes were recorded by surface electrodes. Eighteen subjects were instructed to increase and then

  14. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential elicited from binaural air-conducted stimulations: clinical feasibility in patients with peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Egami, Naoya; Inoue, Aki; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimoto, Chisato; Murofushi, Toshihisa; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) to binaural air-conducted stimulation (ACS) may provide a convenient way of assessing the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with vestibular dysfunction as well as in healthy subjects. To investigate the clinical feasibility of using oVEMPs in response to binaural ACS to assess normal subjects and patients with vestibular dysfunction. The study investigated 24 normal subjects (14 men and 10 women, aged from 23 to 60 years) and 14 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Each subject underwent oVEMP testing in response to monaural ACS and binaural ACS (500 Hz tone burst, 135 dBSPL). In normal subjects, bilateral oVEMPs were elicited in 75% of subjects in response to monaural ACS and in 91% in response to binaural ACS. Asymmetry ratios (ARs) of the responses to binaural ACS were significantly smaller than those of the responses to monaural ACS (p binaural ACS. Approximately 30% of patients showed reduced ARs to binaural ACS relative to monaural ACS, primarily due to contamination by uncrossed responses elicited in healthy ears.

  15. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP is a promising test for the evaluation of the cholic descending vestibular system. This reflex depends of the integrity from the saccular macula, from the inferior vestibular nerve, the vestibular nuclei, the vestibule-spinal tract and effectors muscles. Objective: Perform a systematic review of the pertinent literature by means of database (COCHRANE, MEDLINE, LILACS, CAPES. Conclusion: The clinical application of the VEMP has expanded in the last years, as goal that this exam is used as complementary in the otoneurological evaluation currently used. But, methodological issues must be clarified. This way, this method when combined with the standard protocol, can provide a more widely evaluation from the vestibular system. The standardization of the methodology is fundamental criterion for the replicability and sensibility of the exam.

  16. Contribution of the otholiths to the human torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Graaf, J.E. de

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic contribution of the otoliths to the human ocular torsion response was examined during passive sinusoidal body roll about an earth-horizontal axis (varying otolith input) and about an earth-vertical axis (unvarying otolith input). At a fixed amplitude of 25°, the stimulus frequency was

  17. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. II. Version and vergence responses to fore-aft motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, M. Q.; Angelaki, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    To maintain binocular fixation on near targets during fore-aft translational disturbances, largely disjunctive eye movements are elicited the amplitude and direction of which should be tuned to the horizontal and vertical eccentricities of the target. The eye movements generated during this task have been investigated here as trained rhesus monkeys fixated isovergence targets at different horizontal and vertical eccentricities during 10 Hz fore-aft oscillations. The elicited eye movements complied with the geometric requirements for binocular fixation, although not ideally. First, the corresponding vergence angle for which the movement of each eye would be compensatory was consistently less than that dictated by the actual fixation parameters. Second, the eye position with zero sensitivity to translation was not straight ahead, as geometrically required, but rather exhibited a systematic dependence on viewing distance and vergence angle. Third, responses were asymmetric, with gains being larger for abducting and downward compared with adducting and upward gaze directions, respectively. As frequency was varied between 4 and 12 Hz, responses exhibited high-pass filter properties with significant differences between abduction and adduction responses. As a result of these differences, vergence sensitivity increased as a function of frequency with a steeper slope than that of version. Despite largely undercompensatory version responses, vergence sensitivity was closer to ideal. Moreover, the observed dependence of vergence sensitivity on vergence angle, which was varied between 2.5 and 10 MA, was largely linear rather than quadratic (as geometrically predicted). We conclude that the spatial tuning of eye velocity sensitivity as a function of gaze and viewing distance follows the general geometric dependencies required for the maintenance of foveal visual acuity. However, systematic deviations from ideal behavior exist that might reflect asymmetric processing of abduction/adduction responses perhaps because of different functional dependencies of version and vergence eye movement components during translation.

  18. The Adaptive Effects Of Virtual Interfaces: Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex and Simulator Sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-07

    adaptation achieved within the first 16 minutes only. A direction adaptation stimulus would be utilized per Khater , et al. (1990). This method of...the vestibular organs within each inner ear. video-oculography (VOG): a method of collecting eye movement data using video recording techniques. Often...Other methods for measuring the VOR also exist (Halmagyi, 1995; Sharpe & Barber, 1993; Shelhamer, Robinson, & Tan, 1992). Gain and phase are the

  19. Visual Influences on the Development and Recovery of the Vestibuloocular Reflex in the Chicken

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher T. Goode; Donna L. Maney; Edwin W Rubel; Albert F. Fuchs

    2001-01-01

    .... We ask here whether visual slip is necessary for the development of the chicken VOR (as in other species) and whether it is required for the recovery of the VOR after hair cell loss and regeneration...

  20. An Investigation and Analysis of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) in a Vibration Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    especially in the days when things seemed bleak. I would also like to thank several people that were instrumental in this research being accomplished. First...the dark-pupil method the camera was fit with an IR filter. To achieve this purpose a visibly opaque #87 Kodak Wratten 2 Optical Filter was used. A...eye is properly aligned and illuminated with the camera  Connect EOG leads using generous amounts of gel  Secure wires so not to obstruct or

  1. Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in Humans: a Matter of Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this thesis was to quantify three-dimensional ocular stability in response to head movements in healthy human subjects and in patients with various types of peripheral vestibular disorders. Despite a large increase in our knowledge from animal and human studies about the

  2. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...... is small compared to the number in the other shoulder structures. Proprioceptive information from numerous receptors in muscles and tendons is mediated via fast conducting nervefibers and probably contribute more to kinaestethic sensation than information from capsule and ligaments. Therefore it seems...... likely that the joint receptors have a more distinct role for the kinaestethic sense than muscle receptors. In cats a direct reflex from the afferents innervating the shoulder to the muscles around the shoulder has been presented. The reflex had an extremely short latency (2.7-3.1 ms). In man, a very...

  3. Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bridgett Wallace,1–4 Jonathan Lifshitz4–8 1360 Balance and Hearing, Department of Physical Therapy, Austin, TX, 2Concussion Health, Department of Clinical Education, Austin, TX, 3Conquering Concussions, Scottsdale, AZ, 4Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, 5Department of Child Health, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, 6The CACTIS Foundation, Scottsdale, 7Phoenix VA Healthcare System, Phoenix, AZ, 8Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA Abstract: Normal function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR coordinates eye movement with head movement, in order to provide clear vision during motion and maintain balance. VOR is generated within the semicircular canals of the inner ear to elicit compensatory eye movements, which maintain stability of images on the fovea during brief, rapid head motion, otherwise known as gaze stability. Normal VOR function is necessary in carrying out activities of daily living (eg, walking and riding in a car and is of particular importance in higher demand activities (eg, sports-related activities. Disruption or damage in the VOR can result in symptoms such as movement-related dizziness, blurry vision, difficulty maintaining balance with head movements, and even nausea. Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic brain injury (TBI and is considered a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Assessment of the vestibular system is of particular importance following TBI, in conjunction with oculomotor control, due to the intrinsic neural circuitry that exists between the ocular and vestibular systems. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of the VOR and the visual-vestibular symptoms associated with TBI and to discuss assessment and treatment guidelines for TBI. Current challenges and future prospects will also be addressed. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, concussion, vestibular, ocular

  4. Post-activation depression of soleus stretch reflexes in healthy and spastic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Klinge, Klaus; Crone, Clarissa

    2007-01-01

    delivered at different intervals. The magnitude of the stretch reflex and ankle torque response was assessed as a function of the time between perturbations. Soleus stretch reflexes were evoked with constant velocity (175 degrees /s) and amplitude (6 degrees ) plantar flexion perturbations. Soleus H...... of the soleus stretch reflex and H-reflex decreased as the interval between the stimulus/perturbation was decreased. Similarly, the stretch-evoked torque decreased. In the spastic participants, the post-activation depression of both reflexes and the stretch-evoked torque was significantly smaller than...... in healthy participants. These findings demonstrate that post-activation depression is an important factor in the evaluation of stretch reflex excitability and muscle stiffness in spasticity, and they strengthen the hypothesis that reduced post-activation depression plays a role in the pathophysiology...

  5. [The vegetative component of a conditioned reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordzhonikadze, Ts A; Pkhakadze, L D

    1975-01-01

    Defensive and alimentary conditioned reflexes were studied on normal cats and cats with neural isolation of the neocortex. The cardiac component of the conditioned reflexes is elaborated in decorticated animals at a similar rate and is as steady as in normal cats. Motor conditioned reactions in decorticated cats are difficult to elaborate. Both in normal and decorticated cats unconditioned pain stimulation evokes tachycardia, while a conditioned signal, paired with this unconditioned stimulus, produces bradicardia. Ban assumption has been made that the primary conditioned reaction consists in the appearance of a certain emotional state which changes the cardiac rhythm in a typical way.

  6. Evidence for sustained cortical involvement in peripheral stretch reflex during the full long latency reflex period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenboom, M J L; Van de Ruit, M; De Groot, J H; Schouten, A C; Meskers, C G M

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of reflexes to environment and task at hand is a key mechanism in optimal motor control, possibly regulated by the cortex. In order to locate the corticospinal integration, i.e. spinal or supraspinal, and to study the critical temporal window of reflex adaptation, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and upper extremity muscle stretch reflexes at high temporal precision. In twelve participants (age 49 ± 13 years, eight male), afferent signals were evoked by 40 ms ramp and subsequent hold stretches of the m. flexor carpi radialis (FCR). Motor conduction delays (TMS time of arrival at the muscle) and TMS-motor threshold were individually assessed. Subsequently TMS pulses at 96% of active motor threshold were applied with a resolution of 5-10 ms between 10 ms before and 120 ms after onset of series of FCR stretches. Controlled for the individually assessed motor conduction delay, subthreshold TMS was found to significantly augment EMG responses between 60 and 90 ms after stretch onset. This sensitive temporal window suggests a cortical integration consistent with a long latency reflex period rather than a spinal integration consistent with a short latency reflex period. The potential cortical role in reflex adaptation extends over the full long latency reflex period, suggesting adaptive mechanisms beyond reflex onset. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reflexives and reflexive constructions in Afrikaans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Oosthuizen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a non-formalistic description of the various reflexive pronouns in Afrikaans. In addition to the traditional class of reflexive pronouns, it is shown that possessive pronouns can also be used reflexively. The facts about (obligatory reflexivity involving these two types of pronoun are illustrated with reference to several types of construction in which they can occur. It is moreover shown that, besides the subject, the reflexive can take as its antecedent an expression functioning as the direct object, indirect object or as a prepositional object. Attention is also given to a number of non-reflexive constructions, that is, constructions containing inherently non-reflexive verbs and prepositions which disallow a coreferential relationship between the pronoun and some other expression in the sentence.

  8. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  9. Clinical Evaluation of the Vestibular Nerve Using Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Jamie M

    2018-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are currently the most clinically accessible method to evaluate the otolith reflex pathways. These responses provide unique information regarding the status of the utriculo-ocular and sacculo-collic reflex pathways, information that has previously been unavailable. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are recorded from tonically contracted target muscles known to be innervated by these respective otolith organs. Diagnosticians can use vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to better evaluate the overall integrity of the inner ear and neural pathways; however, there are specific considerations for each otolith reflex protocol. In addition, specific patient populations may require protocol variations to better evaluate atypical function of the inner ear organs, vestibular nerve transmission, or subsequent reflex pathways. This is a review of the clinical application and interpretation of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

  10. Vestibulo-Ocular Responses to Vertical Translation using a Hand-Operated Chair as a Field Measure of Otolith Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Campbell, D. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Prather, L.; Clement, G.

    2016-01-01

    The translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (tVOR) is an important otolith-mediated response to stabilize gaze during natural locomotion. One goal of this study was to develop a measure of the tVOR using a simple hand-operated chair that provided passive vertical motion. Binocular eye movements were recorded with a tight-fitting video mask in ten healthy subjects. Vertical motion was provided by a modified spring-powered chair (swopper.com) at approximately 2 Hz (+/- 2 cm displacement) to approximate the head motion during walking. Linear acceleration was measured with wireless inertial sensors (Xsens) mounted on the head and torso. Eye movements were recorded while subjects viewed near (0.5m) and far (approximately 4m) targets, and then imagined these targets in darkness. Subjects also provided perceptual estimates of target distances. Consistent with the kinematic properties shown in previous studies, the tVOR gain was greater with near targets, and greater with vision than in darkness. We conclude that this portable chair system can provide a field measure of otolith-ocular function at frequencies sufficient to elicit a robust tVOR.

  11. Age-related changes in ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials via galvanic vestibular stimulation and bone-conducted vibration modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ming; Young, Yi-Ho; Cheng, Po-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The age-related changes in ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) elicited by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) and bone-conducted vibration (BCV) might be attributed to the morphological degeneration of the vestibular system. This study employed GVS and BCV modes for eliciting oVEMPs in healthy subjects to explore the effect of aging on the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) pathway. Sixty-nine healthy subjects (aged 22-69 years) were divided into 5 groups of 12-19 subjects by decades of age. All subjects underwent oVEMPs using GVS and BCV modes. The prevalence and parameters of oVEMPs, including nI latency, pI latency, nI-pI interval, and nI-pI amplitude were measured and compared. The prevalences of GVS-oVEMPs had nonsignificant differences among all age groups, whereas that of BCV-oVEMPs in the over-60 group was significantly lower than those in the under-60 groups. In GVS-oVEMPs, the group over 60 years had significantly longer nI, pI latencies, and smaller amplitudes when compared with those under 60 years. In BCV-oVEMPs, the nI and pI latencies in the over-60 group were significantly longer than those of the under-60 groups, while the nI-pI amplitudes of groups over 50 years were significantly smaller than those of groups under 50 years. All oVEMP parameters exhibited significant differences between GVS- and BCV-oVEMPs in each age group.

  12. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF VESTIBULOOCULAR PROJECTION NEURONS IN THE DEVELOPING CHICKEN MEDIAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman-Davis, Adria; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2010-01-01

    Biocytin was injected into the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nucleus on one side using isolated chicken brainstem preparations or brain slices to identify the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to these targets. Oculomotor nucleus injections produced retrogradely labeled neurons in the contralateral ventrolateral MVN (MVNVL), with few labeled neurons in the ipsilateral MVNVL, and rarely in the dorsomedial MVN on either side. Labeled MVNVL neurons were identified as stellate (95%) and elongate cells (5%). Trochlear nucleus injections produced a similar pattern of MVN neuron labeling. Abducens nucleus injections resulted in retrogradely labeled stellate (87%) and elongate (13%) neurons in the MVNVL which had smaller cell bodies than those projecting to the oculomotor nucleus. Anteroposteriorly, labeled MVNVL neurons were coextensive with the tangential nucleus, with neurons projecting to the oculomotor nucleus distributed lateral to and intermixed with the more medially situated neurons projecting to the abducens nucleus. The fundamental pattern of vestibuloocular projecting neurons was similar at both embryonic ages studied, E16 and E13. In contrast to mammals, where most vestibuloocular projection neurons reside within the MVN, the majority of retrogradely labeled neurons in these chicken preparations were found within the ventrolateral vestibular, descending vestibular, and tangential nuclei. The morphological identification and mapping of vestibuloocular projection neurons in the chicken MVN described here represents the first step in a systematic evaluation of the relationship between avian vestibuloocular neuron structure and function. PMID:19705454

  14. Correlation of augmented startle reflex with brainstem electrophysiological responses in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sadao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Sugai, Kenji; Iso, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of an augmented startle reflex in Tay-Sachs disease and compare the temporal relationship between this reflex and brainstem evoked potentials. Clinical and electrophysiological data from 3 patients with Tay-Sachs disease were retrospectively collected. The augmented startle reflex appeared between the age of 3 and 17 months and disappeared between the age of 4 and 6 years. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potentials revealed that poor segregation of peak I, but not peak III, coincided with the disappearance of the augmented startle reflex. A blink reflex with markedly high amplitude was observed in a patient with an augmented startle reflex. The correlation between the augmented startle reflex and the preservation of peak I but not peak III supports the theory that the superior olivary nucleus is dispensable for this reflex. The blink reflex with high amplitudes may represent augmented excitability of reticular formation at the pontine tegmentum in Tay-Sachs disease, where the pattern generators for the augmented startle and blink reflexes may functionally overlap. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Systems analysis of the vestibulo-ocular system. [mathematical model of vestibularly driven head and eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular system is examined from the standpoint of system theory. The evolution of a mathematical model of the vestibulo-ocular system in an attempt to match more and more experimental data is followed step by step. The final model explains many characteristics of the eye movement in vestibularly induced nystagmus. The analysis of the dynamic behavior of the model at the different stages of its development is illustrated in time domain, mainly in a qualitative way.

  16. Control of reflexive saccades following hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; Herter, Troy M; Guitton, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable epilepsy offer a rare and valuable opportunity to examine the ability of a single cortical hemisphere to control oculomotor performance. We used peripheral auditory events to trigger saccades, thereby circumventing dense postsurgical hemianopia. In an antisaccade task, patients generated numerous unintended short-latency saccades toward contralesional auditory events, indicating pronounced limitations in the ability of a single hemicortex to exert normal inhibitory control over ipsilateral (i.e., contralesional) reflexive saccade generation. Despite reflexive errors, patients retained an ability to generate correct antisaccades in both directions. The prosaccade task revealed numerous contralesional express saccades, a robust contralesional gap effect, but the absence of both effects for ipsilesional saccades. These results indicate limits to the saccadic control capabilities following hemispherectomy: A single hemicortex can mediate antisaccades in both directions, but plasticity does not extend fully to the bilateral inhibition of reflexive saccades. We posit that these effects are due to altered control dynamics that reduce the responsivity of the superior colliculus on the intact side and facilitate the release of an auditory-evoked ocular grasp reflex into the blind hemifield that the intact hemicortex has difficulty suppressing.

  17. Reflexive intensification in Spanish: Toward a complex reflexive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Spanish, intensifier, intensification, reflexive pronouns, anaphor, reanalysis, grammaticalization, sí, mismo......Spanish, intensifier, intensification, reflexive pronouns, anaphor, reanalysis, grammaticalization, sí, mismo...

  18. Practicing reflexive regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Rutz (Suzanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractReflexive regulation has been developed to provide inspectors with strategies to deal with uncertain situations in which rules and roles are unclear, and inspecting involves multiple actors and learning how to deal with the situation is crucial. Reflexive regulation offers an alternative

  19. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was pulled, and tension in the ligament caused activity of the gamma motor neurones of the muscles around the knee. Impulses from the sensory nerves in ACL were activated during motion of the knee, in particular overstretching and combined extension and rotation. In humans......The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when...... in humans makes it unlikely that it is a directly protective reflex. Instead it may be involved in the updating of motor programs. Further research may characterize the reflex in details and map its pathways. The existence of this reflex indicate that the cruciate ligaments have an afferent function, which...

  20. Reflexivity in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Adam Brian; Nistrup, Anne; Henderson, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Kingdom. Reflexive practice in both studies was affected by researcher biographies and by study design. In Study 1, both researchers were reasonably detached from the study context, the theoretical framework was in place from the very beginning, and reflexive practice was embedded in the study design......There has been something of a “reflexive shift” in sociological research. Sociological researchers are increasingly encouraged to be “present” within their work, and to recognize their own role in structuring the entire research process. One way to achieve this is through engagement in reflexive...... practice, that is, to reflect on our own values, beliefs, and biographies. It can be difficult to know exactly how a researcher should engage in these practices, however. Here, we discuss our reflexive practice in two case studies, both which utilized the same figurational theoretical framework...

  1. Evoked cavernous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Uğur; Soylu, Ahmet; Ozcan, Cemal; Kutlu, Ramazan; Güneş, Ali

    2002-01-01

    Corpus cavernosum electromyography has been widely done to evaluate autonomic dysfunction in patients with erectile dysfunction. We assessed the value of corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin responses for their accuracy in determining autonomic involvement in cases of erectile dysfunction. We evaluated 75 men with erectile dysfunction by corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin response tests at our neurourology laboratory. The etiology of dysfunction was vascular, neurogenic, psychogenic or mixed based on a detailed medical and sexual history, physical examination, electrophysiological and laboratory studies, penile color Doppler ultrasonography, and cavernosography and/or cavernosometry. Autonomic involvement was clinically assessed by systemic findings, such as orthostatic hypotension, impaired gastrointestinal motility, sinus dysrhythmia and secretomotor changes. A concentric electromyography needle placed in the right cavernous body was used to record corpus cavernosum electromyography and evoked cavernous activity. The right median nerve was stimulated electrically with 13 to 16 mA. to determine evoked cavernous activity and the penile sympathetic skin response. The latter response was recorded with silver disc electrodes placed on the left cavernous body. All tests were performed using an electromyography/evoked potential machine. We determined the relationships among corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin response tests in respect to etiological factors. The 56 patients with normal corpus cavernosum electromyography activity had also evoked cavernous activity and a penile sympathetic skin response except for 1 with no penile sympathetic skin response but evoked cavernous activity. None of these patients had autonomic neuropathy. Of the 19 patients without corpus cavernosum electromyography activity 11 had

  2. The reliability and response stability of dynamic testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Maha T; Whitney, Susan L; Marchetti, Gregory F; Sparto, Patrick J; Ward, Bryan K; Furman, Joseph M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the test-retest reliability and response stability of the Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and Gaze Stabilization Test (GST) in patients with vestibular disorders. Twenty-nine patients with vestibular disease (16-78 years) participated. Subjects performed the GST and DVA in pitch and yaw planes, twice in one session and once after 7-10 days. The GST output is the maximum head velocity at which the patient was able to identify orientation of the letter E. The DVA output is the change in visual acuity when moving the head compared to static acuity. Subjects indicated their level of dizziness and visual blurring using a visual analog scale. Within- and between-sessions intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0-0.5 for the DVA and GST measures, with better correlations for within-session assessments. Response stability (standard error of measurement / mean) of the GST ranged between 21-32% and the DVA ranged between 25-69% with vertical DVA being most influenced by measurement error. Subjects' symptoms did not correlate with performance on either test. The current test protocol needs refinement to enhance reliability and stability in persons with vestibular disorders.

  3. Tonic and phasic contributions to the pathways mediating compensation and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Lloyd B; Lasker, David M

    2009-01-01

    Processes of vestibular compensation mediate recovery of many aspects of vestibular dysfunction following unilateral vestibular injury. The VOR in response to high-frequency, high-acceleration head movements, however, retains an enduring asymmetry. Head movements that are inhibitory with respect to semicircular canals on the intact side lead to a diminished VOR whereas head movements that are excitatory for semicircular canals on the intact side lead to a VOR that returns close to normal. We review our work directed toward understanding the processes of VOR compensation to high-frequency, high-acceleration head movements and the related topic of adaptation to changes in the visual requirements for a compensatory VOR. Our work has shown that the processes of both compensation and adaptation to these stimuli can be described by a mathematical model with inputs from tonic and phasic components. We have further shown that the dynamics of regular afferents have close resemblance to the tonic pathway whereas the dynamics of irregular afferents match those of the phasic pathway.

  4. Tonic and Phasic Contributions to the Pathways Mediating Compensation and Adaptation of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Minor, Lloyd B.; Lasker, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Processes of vestibular compensation mediate recovery of many aspects of vestibular dysfunction following unilateral vestibular injury. The VOR in response to high-frequency, high-acceleration head movements, however, retains an enduring asymmetry. Head movements that are inhibitory with respect to semicircular canals on the intact side lead to a diminished VOR whereas head movements that are excitatory for semicircular canals on the intact side lead to a VOR that returns close to normal. We ...

  5. Eye Position Feedback in a Model of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex for Spino-Cerebellar Ataxia 6

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, J

    2001-01-01

    ..., incoordination, ocular motor dysfunction, and dysarthria due to degeneration of cerebellar and brainstem neurons. Recent studies have established that there are more than 16 genetically distinct subtypes...

  6. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised

  7. Etnography and Reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cardano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with a relevant and controversial topic – objectivity in ethnographic research. More specifically, I would like to examine how reflexive procedures, more precisely “reflexive account”, can increase the robustness of results gained through an ethnographic research. The essay is organized in five parts. I will start by giving a preliminary definition of the two key concepts which are at the center of the analysis – objectivity and reflexivity. I will then give a brief description of the epistemological framework in which the proposed conceptions of objectivity and reflexivity are located. Thirdly, I move on to consider the epistemic status of ethnographic research, and will emphasize that ethnographies are not just “theory-laden”, as many writers have stated, but also “praxis” or “procedure laden”. In other words, I will stress that it is not only theories which are inevitably embedded in research, influencing how observations can be made; much the same can also be said of the concrete research practices which contribute to determine the experience of the ethnographer and its representation in a text. Fourthly, I will discuss why it is useful to employ reflexive practices, and then immediately afterwards will illustrate the ways in which reflexive descriptions can contribute to greater objectivity of ethnographic accounts. In conclusion, I will discuss a number of objections which have been raised against this use of reflexivity.

  8. On Reflexive Data Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  9. The Gateway Reflex, a Novel Neuro-Immune Interaction for the Regulation of Regional Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuki; Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Murakami, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The gateway reflex is a new phenomenon that explains how immune cells bypass the blood-brain barrier to infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS) and trigger neuroinflammation. To date, four examples of gateway reflexes have been discovered, each described by the stimulus that evokes the reflex. Gravity, electricity, pain, and stress have all been found to create gateways at specific regions of the CNS. The gateway reflex, the most recently discovered of the four, has also been shown to upset the homeostasis of organs in the periphery through its action on the CNS. These reflexes provide novel therapeutic targets for the control of local neuroinflammation and organ function. Each gateway reflex is activated by different neural activations and induces inflmammation at different regions in the CNS. Therefore, it is theoretically possible to manipulate each independently, providing a novel therapeutic strategy to control local neuroinflammation and peripheral organ homeostasis.

  10. The plantar reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rui; Firmino-Machado, João; Correia, Pedro; Leitão-Marques, Mariana; Carvalho, João; Silva, Marta; Nogueira, Ana; Nunes, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Summary The utility of the plantar reflex in modern neurology is controversial. We studied the Babinski, Chaddock, and Oppenheim reflexes in terms of intraobserver, interobserver, and intertest agreement; sensitivity; positive predictive value (PPV); and observer bias. Sixty-two patients and 1,984 reflexes were analyzed. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were weak (median κ Babinski/Chaddock (0.30) (p Babinski, 55.3% for the Chaddock, and 30.0% for the Oppenheim. PPV was 70.3% for the Babinski, 66.5% for the Chaddock, and 61.3% for the Oppenheim. Our results show consistently low observer agreement for the plantar reflex. The Babinski and the Chaddock demonstrated comparable sensitivity and PPV. PMID:29443235

  11. Jaw-opening reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability changes during quiet sleep in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Dongyuan; Lavigne, Gilles J.; Lee, Jye-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that the reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles is reduced during sleep. Design: Polysomnographic recordings in the electrophysiological study. Setting: University sleep research laboratories. Participants and Interventions: The reflex...... and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles was determined during the quiet awake state (QW) and quiet sleep (QS) in monkeys (n = 4). Measurements and Results: During QS sleep, compared to QW periods, both tongue stimulation-evoked jaw-opening reflex peak and root mean square amplitudes were significantly......-evoked activity in the jaw motor system is depressed during QS....

  12. An experimental study of artificial murine bladder reflex arc established by abdominal reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Wu; Zhao, Yu-Wu; Hou, Chun-Lin; Ni, Wei-Feng; Rui, Bi-Yu; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zheng, Xian-You; Dai, Ke-Rong

    2011-02-01

    The neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury is difficult to treat clinically. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in rats through abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury, reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore bladder micturition. The outcome was achieved by intradural microanastomosis of the right T13 ventral root to S2 ventral root with autogenous nerve grafting, leaving the right T13 dorsal root intact. Long-term function of the reflex arc was assessed from nerve electrophysiological data and intravesical pressure tests during 8 months postoperation. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing was performed to observe the effectiveness of the artificial reflex. Single stimulus (3 mA, 0.3 ms pulses, 20 Hz, 5-second duration) on the right T13 dorsal root resulted in evoked action potentials, raised intravesical pressures and bladder smooth muscle, compound action potential recorded from the right vesical plexus before and after the spinal cord transaction injury between L5 and S4 segmental in 12 Sprague-Dawley rats. There were HRP labelled cells in T13 ventral horn on the experimental side and in the intermediolateral nucleus on both sides of the L6-S4 segments after HRP injection. There was no HRP labelled cell in T13 ventral horn on the control side. Using the surviving somatic reflex above the level of spinal cord injury to reconstruct the bladder autonomous reflex arc by intradural microanastomosis of ventral root with a segment of autologous nerve grafting is practical in rats and may have clinical applications for humans.

  13. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...... contralateral to stimulus side and additionally an unexpected 20 Hz activity was observed slightly lateralized in the frontal central region. The gamma phase locking may be a manifestation of early somatosensory feature integration. The analyses suggest that the high frequency activity consists of two distinct...

  14. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  15. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  16. Turtle Flexion Reflex Motor Patterns Show Windup, Mediated Partly by L-type Calcium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith P. Johnson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Windup is a form of multisecond temporal summation in which identical stimuli, delivered seconds apart, trigger increasingly strong neuronal responses. L-type Ca2+ channels have been shown to play an important role in the production of windup of spinal cord neuronal responses, initially in studies of turtle spinal cord and later in studies of mammalian spinal cord. L-type Ca2+ channels have also been shown to contribute to windup of limb withdrawal reflex (flexion reflex in rats, but flexion reflex windup has not previously been described in turtles and its cellular mechanisms have not been studied. We studied windup of flexion reflex motor patterns, evoked with weak mechanical and electrical stimulation of the dorsal hindlimb foot skin and assessed via a hip flexor (HF nerve recording, in spinal cord-transected and immobilized turtles in vivo. We found that an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist, nifedipine, applied at concentrations of 50 μM or 100 μM to the hindlimb enlargement spinal cord, significantly reduced windup of flexion reflex motor patterns, while lower concentrations of nifedipine had no such effect. Nifedipine similarly reduced the amplitude of an individual flexion reflex motor pattern evoked by a stronger mechanical stimulus, in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that L-type Ca2+ channels contribute to each flexion reflex as well as to multisecond summation of flexion reflex responses in turtles. We also found that we could elicit flexion reflex windup consistently using a 4-g von Frey filament, which is not usually considered a nociceptive stimulus. Thus, it may be that windup can be evoked by a wide range of tactile stimuli and that L-type calcium channels contribute to multisecond temporal summation of diverse tactile stimuli across vertebrates.

  17. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  18. BAER - brainstem auditory evoked response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... auditory potentials; Brainstem auditory evoked potentials; Evoked response audiometry; Auditory brainstem response; ABR; BAEP ... Normal results vary. Results will depend on the person and the instruments used to perform the test.

  19. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Pistacchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment.

  20. Too Busy for Reflexivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene

    addresses relevant epistemological matters of concern, it has nevertheless been absorbed by an “empirical impulse” to describe everyday lives and practices (Maurer 2005:6). This paper explores some of the difficulties and frustrations related to imagining and realizing the epistemological ideals...... of reflexivity. However, instead of revisiting these somewhat tired epistemological debates, it explores Danish managers’ of primary schools analogous difficulties with realizing a prevailing ideal of reflexivity. The paper draws on ethnography in two Danish schools. The idea that the world is constructed...

  1. Role of the cerebellum and the vestibular apparatus in regulation of orthostatic reflexes in the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doba, N.; Reis, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The contribution of the fastigial nucleus and the vestibular nerves (eighth cranial nerves) to the orthostatic reflexes in anesthetized, paralyzed cats was studied. Bilateral lesions of the rostral fastigial nucleus resulted in impairment of the reflex changes in blood pressure, femoral arterial flow, and resistance evoked by head-up tilting to 30 deg or 60 deg. The rostral fastigial nucleus, which might be triggered by the vestibular apparatus, appears to participate in concert with the baroreceptors in the initiation and possibly the maintenance of the orthostatic reflexes.

  2. Reflexivity of Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Yutaka; Hiramoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    This study reconsiders the meaning and implications of reflexivity for the theory of routines. Due to their mundane nature, routines tend to be considered unambiguous phenomena that everyone can readily understand. The performative theory of routines has challenged this view by suggesting there i...

  3. New perspectives on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Sally M; Kingma, Herman

    2013-02-01

    Although the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) measured from the cervical muscles (cVEMP, cervical VEMP) is well described and has documented clinical utility, its analogue recorded from the extraocular muscles (oVEMP, ocular VEMP) has been described only recently and is currently emerging as an additional test of otolith function. This review will, therefore, summarize recent developments in VEMP research with a focus on the oVEMP. Recent studies suggest that the oVEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior vestibular nerve division, whereas the cVEMP evoked by sound is thought to be an inferior vestibular nerve reflex. Correspondingly, the oVEMP correlates better with caloric and subjective visual vertical tests than sound-cVEMPs. cVEMPs are more complicated than often thought, as shown by the presence of crossed responses and conflicting results of recent vibration studies. Altered inner ear mechanics produced by the vestibular diseases superior semicircular canal dehiscence and Ménière's disease lead to changes in the preferred frequency of the oVEMP and cVEMP. The oVEMP provides complementary diagnostic information to the cVEMP and is likely to be a useful addition to the diagnostic test battery in neuro-otology.

  4. Implementation of a smartphone as a wireless gyroscope application for the quantification of reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex constitutes a fundamental aspect of the conventional neurological evaluation. Dysfunctional characteristics of the reflex response can augment the diagnostic acuity of a clinician for subsequent referral to more advanced medical resources. The capacity to quantify the reflex response while alleviating the growing strain on specialized medical resources is a topic of interest. The quantification of the tendon reflex response has been successfully demonstrated with considerable accuracy and consistency through using a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer for evoking the tendon reflex with a smartphone, such as an iPhone, application representing a wireless accelerometer platform to quantify reflex response. Another sensor integrated into the smartphone, such as an iPhone, is the gyroscope, which measures rate of angular rotation. A smartphone application enables wireless transmission through Internet connectivity of the gyroscope signal recording of the reflex response as an email attachment. The smartphone wireless gyroscope application demonstrates considerable accuracy and consistency for the quantification of the tendon reflex response.

  5. Reflexive sig is an argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jóhannes Gísli Jónsson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the simple reflexive pronoun sig is unambiguously a thematic argument in Icelandic. This is shown to be true not only of sig with naturally reflexive verbs but also of inherently reflexive sig. This view is mainly supported by two sets of facts: (i that sig is impossible with verbs that fail to theta-mark their object (middles and anticausatives, and (ii that case assignment works the same way for sig as for non- reflexive DP arguments. Potential counterarguments against my view involving focalization and reflexive passives are argued not to be valid.

  6. The mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical and metabolic stimuli from contracting muscles evoke reflex increases in blood pressure, heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity. Little is known, however, about the nature of the mechano-gated channels on the thin fibre muscle afferents that contribute to evoke this reflex, termed the exercise pressor reflex. We determined the effect of GsMTx4, an inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, on the exercise pressor reflex evoked by intermittent contraction of the triceps surae muscles in decerebrated, unanaesthetized rats. GsMTx4 reduced the pressor, cardioaccelerator and renal sympathetic nerve responses to intermittent contraction but did not reduce the pressor responses to femoral arterial injection of compounds that stimulate the metabolically-sensitive thin fibre muscle afferents. Expression levels of Piezo2 channels were greater than Piezo1 channels in rat dorsal root ganglia. Our findings suggest that mechanically-sensitive Piezo proteins contribute to the generation of the mechanical component of the exercise pressor reflex in rats. Mechanical and metabolic stimuli within contracting skeletal muscles evoke reflex autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. In cats and rats, gadolinium has been used to investigate the role played by the mechanical component of this reflex, termed the exercise pressor reflex. Gadolinium, however, has poor selectivity for mechano-gated channels and exerts multiple off-target effects. We tested the hypothesis that GsMTX4, a more selective mechano-gated channel inhibitor than gadolinium and a particularly potent inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, reduced the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the peak pressor (control: 24 ± 5, GsMTx4: 12 ± 5 mmHg, P decerebrate rats and that the reduction was attributable, at least in part, to its effect on mechano-gated Piezo channels. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology

  7. Blink reflexes and lateral spreading in patients with synkinesia after Bell's palsy and in hemifacial spasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhof, J. L.; Aramideh, M.; Speelman, J. D.; Devriese, P. P.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    We compared various electrodiagnostical tests in patients with hemifacial spasm and in patients who developed synkinesia after Bell's palsy. We examined the evoked blink reflexes in the orbicularis oculi (o. oculi) and orbicularis oris (o. oris) muscles in 23 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS), in

  8. Reflex epilepsy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting phenomena of reflex epileptic syndromes are characterized by epileptic seizures each one induced by specific stimulus with a variety of types. Simple triggers, which lead to seizures within seconds, are of sensory type (most commonly visual, most rarely tactile or proprioceptive stimuli. Complex triggers, which are mostly of cognitive type such as praxis, reading, talking, and music, usually induce the epileptic event within minutes. It should differ from what most epileptic patients report as provocative precipitants for seizures (such as emotional stress, fatigue, fever, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. The identification of a specific trigger is not only important for patients or their parents to avoid seizures, but also it might help neurologists to choose the most effective antiepileptic drug for each case. In addition, research in this area may possibly reveal some underlying pathophysiology of epileptic phenomena in the brain.In this review, we briefly introduce reported reflex epileptic seizures, their clinical features and management.

  9. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring...... to theories of learning we try to explain how our way of working with selection and evoking of innovators has contributed to this positive result and how our approach to user-driven innovation can be regarded as a way to combine democracy and creativity in design....

  10. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates.

  11. Activation and inhibition of the micturition reflex by penile afferents in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, John P; Yoo, Paul B; Grill, Warren M

    2008-06-01

    Coordination of the urinary bladder and the external urethral sphincter is controlled by descending projections from the pons and is also subject to modulation by segmental afferents. We quantified the effects on the micturition reflex of sensory inputs from genital afferents traveling in the penile component of the somatic pudendal nerve by electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in alpha-chloralose anesthetized male cats. Depending on the frequency of stimulation (range, 1-40 Hz), activation of penile afferents either inhibited contractions of the bladder and promoted urine storage or activated the bladder and produced micturition. Stimulation of the DNP at 5-10 Hz inhibited distension-evoked contractions and increased the maximum bladder capacity before incontinence. Conversely, stimulation at 33 and 40 Hz augmented distension-evoked contractions. When the bladder was filled above a threshold volume (70% of the volume necessary for distension-evoked contractions), stimulation at 20-40 Hz activated de novo the micturition reflex and elicited detrusor contractions that increased voiding efficiency compared with distension-evoked voiding. Electrical stimulation of the DNP with a cuff electrode or percutaneous wire electrode produced similar results. The ability to evoke detrusor contractions by activation of the DNP was preserved following acute spinal cord transection. These results demonstrate a clear role of genital afferents in modulating the micturition reflex and suggest the DNP as a potential target for functional restoration of bladder control using electrical stimulation.

  12. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  13. Blink reflexes in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; List, Thomas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Leijon, Göran; Svensson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To use the human blink reflex (BR) to explore possible neuropathic pain mechanisms in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO). In 13 AO patients, the BR was elicited using a concentric electrode and recorded bilaterally with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes on both orbicularis oculi muscles. Electrical stimuli were applied to the skin above branches of the V1, V2, and V3 nerves and to the V branch contralateral to the painful branch. Sensory and pain thresholds were determined. The BR examination of the painful V branch was repeated during a capsaicin pain-provocation test. The data were analyzed with nonparametric statistics. The BR responses (R2 and R3) evoked by stimulation of V3 were significantly smaller than the BR responses evoked by stimulation of V1 and V2 (P .569), and the BR (R2 and R3) was not significantly modulated by experimental pain (P > .080). The sensory thresholds were significantly lower on the painful side compared to the nonpainful side (P = .014). The pain thresholds were not different between sides (P > .910). No major differences between the V nociceptive pathways on the right and left sides were found in a relatively small group of AO patients. Future studies that compare BRs in AO patients and healthy volunteers are needed to provide further knowledge on the pain mechanisms in AO.

  14. Rhythmic arm cycling differentially modulates stretch and H-reflex amplitudes in soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Andres F; Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2011-10-01

    During rhythmic arm cycling, soleus H-reflex amplitudes are reduced by modulation of group Ia presynaptic inhibition. This suppression of reflex amplitude is graded to the frequency of arm cycling with a threshold of 0.8 Hz. Despite the data on modulation of the soleus H-reflex amplitude induced by rhythmic arm cycling, comparatively little is known about the modulation of stretch reflexes due to remote limb movement. Therefore, the present study was intended to explore the effect of arm cycling on stretch and H-reflex amplitudes in the soleus muscle. In so doing, additional information on the mechanism of action during rhythmic arm cycling would be revealed. Although both reflexes share the same afferent pathway, we hypothesized that stretch reflex amplitudes would be less suppressed by arm cycling because they are less inhibited by presynaptic inhibition. Failure to reject this hypothesis would add additional strength to the argument that Ia presynaptic inhibition is the mechanism modulating soleus H-reflex amplitude during rhythmic arm cycling. Participants were seated in a customized chair with feet strapped to footplates. Three motor tasks were performed: static control trials and arm cycling at 1 and 2 Hz. Soleus H-reflexes were evoked using single 1 ms pulses of electrical stimulation delivered to the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. A constant M-wave and ~6% MVC activation of soleus were maintained across conditions. Stretch reflexes were evoked using a single sinusoidal pulse at 100 Hz given by a vibratory shaker placed over the triceps surae tendon and controlled by a custom-written LabView program. Results demonstrated that rhythmic arm cycling that was effective for conditioning soleus H-reflexes did not show a suppressive effect on the amplitude of the soleus stretch reflex. We suggest this indicates that stretch reflexes are less sensitive to conditioning by rhythmic arm movement, as compared to H-reflexes, due to the relative insensitivity to

  15. Effect of Maturation of the Magnitude of Mechanosensitive and Chemosensitive Reflexes in the Premature Human Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan Rao; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of esophageal mechanosensitive and chemosensitive stimulation on the magnitude and recruitment of peristaltic reflexes and upper esophageal sphincter (UES)-contractile reflex in premature infants. Study design Esophageal manometry and provocation testing were performed in the same 18 neonates at 33 and 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Mechanoreceptor and chemoreceptor stimulation were performed using graded volumes of air, water, and apple juice (pH 3.7), respectively. The frequency and magnitude of the resulting esophago-deglutition response (EDR) or secondary peristalsis (SP), and esophago-UES-contractile reflex (EUCR) were quantified. Results Threshold volumes to evoke EDR, SP, or EUCR were similar. The recruitment and magnitude of SP and EUCR increased with volume increments of air and water in either study (P < .05). However, apple juice infusions resulted in increased recruitment of EDR in the 33 weeks group (P < .05), and SP in the 36 weeks group (P < .05). The magnitude of EUCR was also volume responsive (all media, P < .05), and significant differences between media were noted (P < .05). At maximal stimulation (1 mL, all media), sensory-motor characteristics of peristaltic and EUCR reflexes were different (P < .05) between media and groups. Conclusions Mechano- and chemosensitive stimuli evoke volume-dependent specific peristaltic and UES reflexes at 33 and 36 weeks PMA. The recruitment and magnitude of these reflexes are dependent on the physicochemical properties of the stimuli in healthy premature infants. PMID:16860132

  16. Human auditory evoked potentials. I - Evaluation of components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, T. W.; Hillyard, S. A.; Krausz, H. I.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen distinct components can be identified in the scalp recorded average evoked potential to an abrupt auditory stimulus. The early components occurring in the first 8 msec after a stimulus represent the activation of the cochlea and the auditory nuclei of the brainstem. The middle latency components occurring between 8 and 50 msec after the stimulus probably represent activation of both auditory thalamus and cortex but can be seriously contaminated by concurrent scalp muscle reflex potentials. The longer latency components occurring between 50 and 300 msec after the stimulus are maximally recorded over fronto-central scalp regions and seem to represent widespread activation of frontal cortex.

  17. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    in the complexity of causes of social injustice in their own environment – i.e. how these are perpetuated in the design and implementation of national and organisational policies and how they influence counselling relationships. A generic challenge in career guidance is, for instance, to help individuals follow......Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded...

  18. Depression and recovery of reflex amplitude during electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair-Auger, J M; Lagerquist, O; Collins, D F

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify, for the first time, H-reflexes evoked during prolonged trains of wide-pulse neuromuscular electrical stimulation (WP-NMES) in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesised that after the first H-reflex, reflex amplitudes would be depressed (due to post-activation depression), but would recover and this recovery would be enhanced after a "burst" of 100 Hz WP-NMES. Soleus M-waves and H-reflexes evoked during WP-NMES (1 ms pulse width) of the tibial nerve were quantified in nine individuals with SCI. WP-NMES was delivered in two patterns: "constant-frequency" (15 or 20 Hz for 12 s) and "burst-like" (15-100-15 Hz or 20-100-20 Hz; 4 s each phase) at an intensity that evoked an M-wave between 10% and 15% of the maximal M-wave (M(max)). During constant frequency stimulation, after the initial depression from the first to the second H-reflex (1st: 57% M(max); 2nd: 25% M(max)), H-reflexes did not recover significantly and were 37% M(max) at the end of the stimulus train. During the burst-like pattern, after the initial depression (1st: 62% M(max); 2nd: 30%), reflexes recovered completely by the end of the stimulation (to 55% M(max)) as they were not significantly different from the first H-reflex. M-waves were initially depressed (1st: 12% M(max); 2nd: 7% M(max)) then did not change throughout the stimulation and were not significantly different between stimulation patterns. An analysis of covariance indicated that the depression in M-wave amplitude did not account for the depression in H-reflex amplitude. Relatively large H-reflexes were recorded during both patterns of NMES. The brief burst of 100 Hz stimulation restored H-reflexes to their initial amplitudes, effectively reversing the effects of post-activation depression. For individuals with chronic SCI, generating contractions through central pathways may help reduce muscle atrophy and produce contractions that are more fatigue-resistant for rehabilitation

  19. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  20. Buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease and blink reflex study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2013-07-01

    To define a new primitive reflex named the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and to investigate this reflex clinically and neurophysiologically in patients with Parkinson disease. This prospectively designed study included 17 patients, 9 BPR positive patients, and 8 BPR negative patients in Ankara Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, and was carried out between January and December 2008. All patients had Parkinson disease without any medication. Using the blink reflex technique, 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve were stimulated. Additionally, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr Score (HYS), the blink frequency, and the duration of Parkinson disease was also matched between the 2 groups. In patients with positive BPR, 5 had tremor and the remaining 4 had bradykinesia as a dominant symptom, while all other patients with negative BPR had only tremor. When blink reflex findings were compared between the 2 groups, R2 and contralateral R2 latencies that were taken by supraorbital stimulus were significantly shorter in the BPR positive patients. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of MMSE, UPDRS, HYS, and frequency of blinking, and duration of illness between the 2 groups. This reflex may be an indicator of sensitivity or decrease of threshold level such as Myerson`s sign, in which there is no inhibition in glabella reflex. The blink reflex findings support this hypothesis.

  1. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maki; Utsumi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1) adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2) although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3) negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  2. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1 adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2 although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3 negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  3. Recovery of the vestibulocolic reflex after aminoglycoside ototoxicity in domestic chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, C T; Carey, J P; Fuchs, A F; Rubel, E W

    1999-03-01

    Avian auditory and vestibular hair cells regenerate after damage by ototoxic drugs, but until recently there was little evidence that regenerated vestibular hair cells function normally. In an earlier study we showed that the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) is eliminated with aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment and recovers as hair cells regenerate. The VOR, which stabilizes the eye in the head, is an open-loop system that is thought to depend largely on regularly firing afferents. Recovery of the VOR is highly correlated with the regeneration of type I hair cells. In contrast, the vestibulocolic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes the head in space, is a closed-loop, negative-feedback system that seems to depend more on irregularly firing afferent input and is thought to be subserved by different circuitry than the VOR. We examined whether this different reflex also of vestibular origin would show similar recovery after hair cell regeneration. Lesions of the vestibular hair cells of 10-day-old chicks were created by a 5-day course of streptomycin sulfate. One day after completion of streptomycin treatment there was no measurable VCR gain, and total hair cell density was approximately 35% of that in untreated, age-matched controls. At 2 wk postlesion there was significant recovery of the VCR; at this time two subjects showed VCR gains within the range of control chicks. At 3 wk postlesion all subjects showed VCR gains and phase shifts within the normal range. These data show that the VCR recovers before the VOR. Unlike VOR gain, recovering VCR gain correlates equally well with the density of regenerating type I and type II vestibular hair cells, except at high frequencies. Several factors other than hair cell regeneration, such as length of stereocilia, reafferentation of hair cells, and compensation involving central neural pathways, may be involved in behavioral recovery. Our data suggest that one or more of these factors differentially affect the recovery of these two

  4. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state.

  5. Demand functions and reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyrakis, Ioannis A.

    2008-02-01

    In the theory of ordered spaces and in microeconomic theory two important notions, the notion of the base for a cone which is defined by a continuous linear functional and the notion of the budget set are equivalent. In economic theory the maximization of the preference relation of a consumer on any budget set defines the demand correspondence which at any price vector indicates the preferred vectors of goods and this is one of the fundamental notions of this theory. Contrary to the finite-dimensional economies, in the infinite-dimensional ones, the existence of the demand correspondence is not ensured. In this article we show that in reflexive spaces (and in some other classes of Banach spaces), there are only two classes of closed cones, i.e. cones whose any budget set is bounded and cones whose any budget set is unbounded. Based on this dichotomy result, we prove that in the first category of these cones the demand correspondence exists and that it is upper hemicontinuous. We prove also a characterization of reflexive spaces based on the existence of the demand correspondences.

  6. One minute static stretch of plantar flexors transiently increases H reflex excitability and exerts no effect on corticospinal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Francesco; Gallasch, Eugen; Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Rauscher, Andreas Benedikt; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? What mediates neural responses following static stretching, and how long do these influences last? What is the main finding and its importance? This study shows that 1 min of static stretching inhibits the tendon tap reflex and facilitates the H reflex without influencing motor-evoked potentials. The results indicate that at least two different mechanisms mediate neural responses after static stretching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the neural responses observed after static stretching are mediated by sensitivity of muscle spindles, spinal excitability or cortical excitability and how long these influences last. Nineteen volunteers (25.7 ± 5.6 years old) were tested for the tendon tap reflex (T-reflex), H reflex and motor-evoked potentials on ankle flexors and extensors immediately, 5 and 10 min after 1 min static stretching applied at individual maximal ankle dorsiflexion, as well as immediately, 5 and 10 min after a control period of the same duration. Comparison of measurements collected immediately after stretching or control conditions revealed that the T-reflex was weaker after stretching than after control (-59.2% P = 0.000). The T-reflex showed a slow recovery rate within the first 150 s after stretching, but 5 min after the inhibition had disappeared. The H reflex increased immediately after stretching (+18.3%, P = 0.036), showed a quick tendency to recover and returned to control values within 5 min from stretching. Motor-evoked potentials were not affected by the procedure. These results suggest that 1 min of static stretching primarily decreases muscle spindle sensitivity and facilitates the H reflex, whereas effects on the motor cortex can be excluded. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  7. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  8. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  9. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  10. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  11. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  12. Neural effects of muscle stretching on the spinal reflexes in multiple lower-limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi, Yohei; Obata, Hiroki; Inoue, Daisuke; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that muscle stretching suppresses monosynaptic spinal reflex excitability in stretched muscles, its effects on non-stretched muscles is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of muscle stretching on monosynaptic spinal reflex in non-stretched muscles. Ten healthy male subjects participated in this study. Muscle stretching of the right triceps surae muscle was performed using a motor torque device for 1 minute. Three different dorsiflexion torques (at approximately 5, 10, and 15 Nm) were applied during muscle stretching. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded in both the lower-limb muscles before, during, and at 0 and 5 min following muscle stretching. The amplitudes of the spinal reflexes in both the stretched and non-stretched muscles in the right (ipsilateral) leg were smaller during stretching compared to before, and at 0 and 5 min after stretching. Furthermore, the degree of reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes in the right (ipsilateral) leg muscles increased significantly as the dorsiflexion torque (i.e., stretching of the right triceps surae muscles) increased. In contrast, reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes with increasing dorsiflexion torque was not seen in the left (contralateral) leg muscles. Our results clearly indicate that muscle stretching has inhibitory effects on monosynaptic spinal reflexes, not only in stretched muscles, but also in non-stretched muscles of the ipsilateral leg.

  13. Assessing TMS-induced D- and I-waves with spinal H-reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Niclas; Wiegel, Patrick; Kurz, Alexander; Rothwell, John C; Leukel, Christian

    2017-11-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of motor cortex produces a series of descending volleys known as D- (direct) and I- (indirect) waves. In the present study, we questioned whether spinal H-reflexes can be used to dissect D-waves, early and late I-waves from TMS. We therefore probed H-reflex facilitation at arrival times of D- and I-waves at the spinal level and thereby changed TMS parameters that have previously been shown to have selective effects on evoked D- and different I-waves. We changed TMS intensity and current direction, and applied a double-pulse paradigm known as short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Experiments were conducted in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) in the arm and soleus (SOL) in the leg. There were two major findings: I) In FCR, H-reflex facilitation showed characteristic modulations with altered TMS-parameters that correspond to the changes of evoked D- and I-waves. II) H-reflexes in SOL did not, possibly because of increased interference from other spinal circuits. Therefore, the most significant outcome of this study is that in FCR, H-reflexes combined with TMS seem to be a useful technique to dissect TMS-induced D- and I-waves.

  14. Increase in H-reflex gain following 1 week of immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Sørensen, Mie; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    . Abductor Pollicis Brevis (APB). Motor evoked potentials (MEPS) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation and H-reflexes were obtained at rest and during tonic contraction (10% of MVC) in both muscles. Maximal voluntary flexion torque decreased significantly following immobilization without any changes...... in the flexion torque elicited by supramaximal stimulation of the median nerve. Both at rest and during tonic contraction the H-reflex increased significantly following immobilization without significant changes in Mmax. MEP amplitudes did not change significantly following immobilization. One week after cast...

  15. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  16. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  17. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  18. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, M J; Pierce, C W; Milner, T E; Sinkjaer, T

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions during the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle and background soleus EMG as recorded during the power phase of active pedaling. The magnitude of the stretch reflex was not statistically different from that during the static condition throughout the power phase of the movement. The results of this study indicate that the stretch reflex is not depressed during active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms.

  19. Effect of electromyostimulation training on soleus and gastrocnemii H- and T-reflex properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Pensini, Manuela; Scaglioni, Gil; Ferri, Alessandra; Ballay, Yves; Martin, Alain

    2003-11-01

    When muscle is artificially activated, as with electromyostimulation (EMS), action potentials are evoked in both intramuscular nerve branches and cutaneous receptors, therefore activating spinal motoneurons reflexively. Maximal soleus and gastrocnemii H- and T-reflex and the respective mechanical output were thus quantified to examine possible neural adaptations induced at the spinal level by EMS resistance training. Eight subjects completed 16 sessions of isometric EMS (75 Hz) over a 4-week period. Maximal soleus and gastrocnemii M wave (M(max)), H reflex (H(max)) and T reflex (T(max)) were compared between before and after training, together with the corresponding plantar flexor peak twitch torque. No significant changes were observed for electromechanical properties of H(max) reflex following EMS. On the other hand, peak twitch torque produced by T(max), but not by equal-amplitude H reflex, significantly increased as a result of training (+21%, P<0.05). These changes were associated with a trend towards a significant increase for normalized gastrocnemii (+21%, P=0.07) but not soleus T(max) reflex. It is concluded that, contrary to results previously obtained after voluntary physical training, EMS training of the plantar flexor muscles did not affect alpha motoneuron excitability and/or presynaptic inhibition, as indicated by H-reflex results. On the other hand, in the absence of change in a control group, T(max) electromechanical findings indicated that: (1). equal-amplitude H- and T-reflex adapted differently to EMS resistance training; and (2). EMS had an effect on gastrocnemii but not on soleus muscle, perhaps because of the differences in respective motor unit characteristics (e.g., axon diameter).

  20. Masseter length determines muscle spindle reflex excitability during jaw-closing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser-Ud-Din, Shazia; Sowman, Paul F; Sampson, Wayne J; Dreyer, Craig W; Türker, Kemal Sitki

    2011-04-01

    The masticatory muscles are considered to be important determinants of facial form, but little is known of the muscle spindle reflex characteristics and their relationship, if any, to face height. The aim of this study was to determine whether spindle reflexes, evoked by mechanical stimulation of an incisor and recorded on the masseter muscle, correlated with different facial patterns. Twenty-eight adult volunteers (16 women; ages, 19-38 years) underwent 2-N tap stimuli to their maxillary left central incisor during simulated mastication. Reflexes were recorded during local anesthesia of the stimulated tooth to eliminate the contribution from periodontal mechanoreceptors. Surface electromyograms of the reflex responses of the jaw muscles to these taps were recorded via bipolar electrodes on the masseter muscle and interpreted by using spike-triggered averaging of the surface electromyograms. Lateral cephalometric analysis was carried out with software (version 10.5, Dolphin, Los Angeles, Calif; and Mona Lisa, Canberra, Australia). Two-newton tooth taps produced principally excitatory reflex responses beginning at 17 ms poststimulus. Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between these muscle spindle reflexes and facial heights: specifically, shorter face heights were associated with stronger spindle reflexes. This correlation was strongest between the derived measure of masseter length and the spindle reflex strength during jaw closure (r = -0.49, P = 0.008). These results suggest that a similar muscle spindle stimulus will generate a stronger reflex activation in the jaw muscles of patients with shorter faces compared with those with longer faces. This finding might help to explain the higher incidence of clenching or bruxism in those with short faces and also might, in the future, influence the design of orthodontic appliances and dental prostheses. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  1. Frequency response of human vestibular reflexes characterized by stochastic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Christopher J; Son, Gregory M Lee; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2007-09-15

    Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) can be used to study the postural responses to unpredictable vestibular perturbations. The present study seeks to determine if stochastic vestibular stimulation elicits lower limb muscular responses and to estimate the frequency characteristics of these vestibulo-motor responses in humans. Fourteen healthy subjects were exposed to unpredictable galvanic currents applied on their mastoid processes while quietly standing (+/-3 mA, 0-50 Hz). The current amplitude and stimulation configuration as well as the subject's head position relative to their feet were manipulated in order to determine that: (1) the muscle responses evoked by stochastic currents are dependent on the amplitude of the current, (2) the muscle responses evoked by stochastic currents are specific to the percutaneous stimulation of vestibular afferents and (3) the lower limb muscle responses exhibit polarity changes with different head positions as previously described for square-wave galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) pulses. Our results revealed significant coherence (between 0 and 20 Hz) and cumulant density functions (peak responses at 65 and 103 ms) between SVS and the lower limbs' postural muscle activity. The polarity of the cumulant density functions corresponded to that of the reflexes elicited by square-wave GVS pulses. The SVS-muscle activity coherence and time cumulant functions were modulated by current amplitude, electrode position and head orientation with respect to the subject's feet. These findings strongly support the vestibular origin of the lower limb muscles evoked by SVS. In addition, specific frequency bandwidths in the stochastic vestibular signal contributed to the early (12-20 Hz) and late components (2-10 Hz) of the SVS-evoked muscular responses. These frequency-dependent SVS-evoked muscle responses support the view that the biphasic muscle response is conveyed by two distinct physiological processes.

  2. Learned control over spinal nociception reduces supraspinal nociception as quantified by late somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Bäumler, Maximilian; Feller, Moritz; Krafft, Stefanie; Sommer, Jens; Straube, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that subjects can learn to use cognitive-emotional strategies to suppress their spinal nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) under visual RIII feedback and proposed that this reflects learned activation of descending pain inhibition. Here, we investigated whether learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception and whether previous relaxation training increases success. Subjects were trained over 3 sessions to reduce their RIII size by self-selected cognitive-emotional strategies. Two groups received true RIII feedback (with or without previous relaxation training) and a sham group received false feedback (15 subjects per group). RIII reflexes, late somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), and F-waves were recorded and pain intensity ratings collected. Both true feedback groups achieved significant (P nociception as quantified by SEPs, although effects on pain ratings were less clear. Lower motor neuron excitability as quantified by F-waves was not affected. Previous relaxation training did not significantly improve RIII feedback training success.

  3. Effect of betel nut chewing on the otolithic reflex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Yi; Young, Yi-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of betel nut chewing on the otolithic reflex system. Seventeen healthy volunteers without any experience of chewing betel nut (fresh chewers) and 17 habitual chewers underwent vital sign measurements, ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests prior to the study. Each subject then chewed two pieces of betel nut for 2min (dosing). The same paradigm was repeated immediately, 10min, and 20min after chewing. On a different day, 10 fresh chewers masticated chewing gum as control. Fresh chewers exhibited significantly decreased response rates of oVEMP (53%) and cVEMP (71%) after dosing compared with those from the predosing period. These abnormal VEMPs returned to normal 20min after dosing. In contrast, 100% response rates of oVEMP and cVEMP were observed before and after masticating chewing gum. In habitual chewers, the response rates of oVEMP and cVEMP were 32% and 29%, respectively, 20min after dosing. Chewing betel nuts induced a transient loss of the otolithic reflexes in fresh chewers but may cause permanent loss in habitual chewers. Chewing betel nuts can cause a loss of otholitic reflex function. This creates a risk for disturbed balance and malfunction, for instance, during driving. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trait dominance promotes reflexive staring at masked angry body postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud Hortensius

    Full Text Available It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So far few studies have investigated the interplay of body postures with personality traits and behavior, despite the biological relevance and ecological validity of these postures. Here we investigate whether non-conscious exposure to bodily expressions of anger evokes reflex-like dominance behavior. In an interactive eye-tracking experiment thirty-two participants completed three social dominance tasks with angry, happy and neutral facial, bodily and face and body compound expressions that were masked from consciousness. We confirmed our predictions of slower gaze-aversion from both non-conscious bodily and compound expressions of anger compared to happiness in high dominant individuals. Results from a follow-up experiment suggest that the dominance behavior triggered by exposure to bodily anger occurs with basic detection of the category, but not recognition of the emotional content. Together these results suggest that dominant staring behavior is reflexively driven by non-conscious perception of the emotional content and triggered by not only facial but also bodily expression of anger.

  5. Facilitation of soleus but not tibialis anterior motor evoked potentials before onset of antagonist contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Zuur, Abraham Theodore; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    as evidenced by a depression of the soleus H-reflex. The objective of this study was to investigate if motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) show a similar depression prior to and at the onset of contraction of muscles that are antagonists to the muscle in which......Objective: It is well documented that corticospinal projections to motoneurons of one muscle inhibit antagonist motoneurons through collaterals to reciprocally organized spinal inhibitory interneurons. During and just prior to dorsiflexion of the ankle, soleus motoneurons are thus inhibited...... the MEP is evoked. Methods: Seated subjects (n=11) were instructed to react to an auditory cue by contracting either the tibialis anterior (TA) or soleus muscle of the left ankle to 30% of their maximal dorsiflexion voluntary contraction (MVC) or plantar flexion MVC, respectively. Focal TMS at 1.2 x motor...

  6. [The oculocardiac reflex in blepharoplasties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippmann, V; Scholz, T; Hellmann, S; Amini, P; Spilker, G

    2008-08-01

    The oculocardiac reflex (OCR) is a well-known phenomenon in ophthalmic surgery, but is rarely described in aesthetic blepharoplasty surgery. It was first mentioned in 1908 by Ascher and Dagnini. Since then, ophthalmologists and anaesthesiologists have regarded the onset of the oculocardiac reflex as a significant intraoperative problem, which is undermined by several case reports that describe dysrhythmias which have haved caused morbidity and death. Per definition the OCR is caused by ocular manipulation and involves intraoperative bradycardia by a change of 20 beats/minute compared to the preoperative heart rate or any dysrhythmia during the manipulation via a trigeminal-vagal-mediated reflex arc. Having operated on a 48-year-old, healthy woman in our clinic, who underwent a cardiac arrest during the blepharoplasty procedure, followed by a successful resuscitation, we investigated the onset of the OCR in our blepharoplasty patients within the last 3 years. The onset of the OCR was noted in 22 of 110 (20 %) blepharoplasty patients, mainly affecting younger, low-weighted patients operated under local anaesthesia. Awareness and treatment of this potentially life-threatening oculocardiac reflex are necessary. In most cases the onset of the reflex may be avoided by a gentle operation technique and by refraining from severe traction to the muscle or fat pad. The best treatment of a profound bradycardia caused by the OCR is to release tension to the muscle or fat pad in order to permit the heart rate to return to normal. Intraoperative monitoring is of utmost importance.

  7. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments.

  8. Reflex penile erection in anesthetized mice: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, J; Edmunds, N J

    2008-07-31

    Ejaculatory-like rhythmic contractions of the bulbospongiosus (BS) muscle and penile erection can be elicited in the urethane-anesthetized rat, following spinal cord transection, upon electrical stimulation (ES) of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN). The aim of this work was to investigate this reflex in anesthetized mice. Adult C57BL6 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane. The BS muscle and corpus cavernosum were instrumented to allow quantification of the BS muscle electromyographic activity (BS EMG) and intracavernosal pressure respectively. The femoral artery and jugular vein were catheterized to allow measurement of blood pressure and compound administration. ES of the DPN, via bipolar silver electrodes, reliably evoked erectile responses in mice with intact spinal cords. The overall amplitude of the erectile response was frequency- and pulse duration-dependent. Erectile responses were abolished by bilateral cut of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve. Transection of the spinal cord potentiated the erectile responses and increased the area under the curve of the BS EMG when compared with those animals with intact spinal cords. However, no coordinated rhythmic contractions of the BS muscle during or after the ES could be observed, with or without spinal transection. Melanotan-II failed to enhance the erectile response induced by ES of the DPN, in mice with intact spinal cords. ES of the DPN in isoflurane-anesthetized mice could be a useful model in which to study the interplay between brain and spinal cord in the control of reflex penile erection, and could take advantage of knockout mice models. However, the lack of efficacy of Melanotan-II suggests that further experiments are necessary to confirm the future utility of this model. In contrast to rats, the expulsion reflex could not be reliably elicited in mice with or without spinal transection. This latter finding suggests the existence of fundamental differences in the organization of the spinal network

  9. Reversal of functional disorders by aspiration, expiration and cough reflexes and their voluntary counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan eTomori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Agonal gasping provoked by asphyxia can save ~15% of mammals even from untreated ventricular fibrillation, but it fails to revive infants with sudden infant death syndrome. Our systematic study of airway reflexes in cats and other animals indicated that in addition to cough, there are 2 distinct airway reflexes that may contribute to auto-resuscitation. Gasp- and sniff-like spasmodic inspirations can be elicited by nasopharyngeal stimulation, strongly activating the brainstem generator for inspiration, which is also involved in the control of gasping. This aspiration reflex (AspR is characterized by spasmodic inspiration without subsequent active expiration and can be elicited during agonal gasping, caused by brainstem trans-sections in cats. Stimulation of the larynx can activate the generator for expiration to evoke the expiration reflex, manifesting with prompt expiration without preceding inspiration. Stimulation of the oro-pharynx and lower airways provokes the cough reflex which results from activating of both generators. The powerful potential of the AspR resembling auto-resuscitation by gasping can influence the control mechanisms of vital functions, mediating reversal of various functional disorders.The AspR in cats interrupted hypoxic apnea, laryngo- and bronchospasm, apneusis and even transient asphyxic coma, and can normalize various hypo- and hyper-functional disorders. Introduction of a nasogastric catheter evoked similar spasmodic inspirations in premature infants and interrupted hiccough attacks in adults. Coughing on demand can prevent anaphylactic shock and resuscitate the pertinent subject. Sniff representing nasal inspiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures are voluntary counterparts of airway reflexes, and are useful for diagnosis and therapy of various cardio-respiratory and neuromuscular disorders.

  10. Effects of teeth clenching on the soleus H reflex during lower limb muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuyama, Akihiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Ueno, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    We assessed whether the soleus H reflex was depressed or facilitated in association with voluntary teeth clenching during muscle fatigue. A total of 13 and 9 healthy adult subjects were instructed to perform right-side tiptoe standing for 5 (TS1) and 10min (TS2) to induce the soleus muscle fatigue. Electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the bilateral masseter as well as the right-side soleus muscles. H reflex was evoked using a surface electrode. The isometric muscle strength during plantar flexion was measured. We tested two dental occlusal conditions (1) with maximal voluntary teeth clenching (MVTC) and (2) at mandibular rest position (RP). H reflex was evoked before and after TS1 and TS2. The isometric muscle strength during plantar flexion was measured before and after TS1 and TS2. Mean amplitudes of H reflex with MVTC before and after TS1 were significantly larger than that with RP before and after TS1. The mean peak torque (PT) during isometric plantar flexion was observed significant differences in all subjects. The mean amplitude of H reflex with MVTC before TS2 was significantly larger than that with RP before TS2. No significant difference between RP after TS2 and MVTC after TS2. The mean PT with MVTC before TS2 was significantly larger than that with RP before TS2. There was no significant difference between RP and MVTC after TS2. The present study demonstrated that teeth clenching could facilitate H reflex regardless of the degree of muscle fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Outside home. Notes on reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Clemente

    2017-01-01

    The paper proffers the idea in which a “reflexive process” on subjectivity can involve and/or hopefully involve the entire experience of the researcher, going beyond the borders of a single research. In the process, unexpected elements of subjectivity can come into play; in other cases the meaning attributed to them can change in time or can have a role different from what had been expected. Some elements, objects of epistemological analyses, as imposed by a reflexive approach, can become objects of attention also on the phenomenological level.

  12. The mechano‐gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joyce S.; Ruiz‐Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Mechanical and metabolic stimuli from contracting muscles evoke reflex increases in blood pressure, heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity. Little is known, however, about the nature of the mechano‐gated channels on the thin fibre muscle afferents that contribute to evoke this reflex, termed the exercise pressor reflex.We determined the effect of GsMTx4, an inhibitor of mechano‐gated Piezo channels, on the exercise pressor reflex evoked by intermittent contraction of the triceps surae muscles in decerebrated, unanaesthetized rats.GsMTx4 reduced the pressor, cardioaccelerator and renal sympathetic nerve responses to intermittent contraction but did not reduce the pressor responses to femoral arterial injection of compounds that stimulate the metabolically‐sensitive thin fibre muscle afferents.Expression levels of Piezo2 channels were greater than Piezo1 channels in rat dorsal root ganglia.Our findings suggest that mechanically‐sensitive Piezo proteins contribute to the generation of the mechanical component of the exercise pressor reflex in rats. Abstract Mechanical and metabolic stimuli within contracting skeletal muscles evoke reflex autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. In cats and rats, gadolinium has been used to investigate the role played by the mechanical component of this reflex, termed the exercise pressor reflex. Gadolinium, however, has poor selectivity for mechano‐gated channels and exerts multiple off‐target effects. We tested the hypothesis that GsMTX4, a more selective mechano‐gated channel inhibitor than gadolinium and a particularly potent inhibitor of mechano‐gated Piezo channels, reduced the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the peak pressor (control: 24  ±  5, GsMTx4: 12 ± 5 mmHg, P decerebrate rats and that the reduction was attributable, at least in part, to its effect on mechano‐gated Piezo channels. PMID

  13. Educating the Reflexive Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Neveu

    2012-09-01

    wearing any clothes.Notwithstanding such issues, I do believe the studio holds the potentialto be an empowering learning experience. The intention of this article is to question the mode of instruction in an architectural studio. I’ve structured the paper in three parts. First, I will briefly describe the findingsof the study made by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancementof Teaching known as the Boyer Report.2 To develop and support the findings of the Boyer Report, I introduce the work of the educator Donald Schön. Though I see much merit in the Boyer Report, and Schön’sproposals, I argue that a more nuanced approach is required. I will recommend, therefore, in the second section of this paper that a meansof architectural education as based on the Socratic method may be amore productive approach. My reading of the Socratic method is basedprimarily on early Socratic dialogues and I will specifically use Charmidesto illustrate the issues that I believe are relevant to studio pedagogy.3 From my analysis of Charmides I will, in the third section of the essay,describe how the Socratic method is beneficial to studio pedagogy threeways: reflexive, non-propositional, and finally how Socrates’ approachmay indeed be practical. This last section will be illustrated with a studentproject. It is my conjecture that the Socratic method offers insight intocurrent discussions of educational theory, namely student-centered,project-based learning.

  14. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  15. Two ways to support reflexivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Knudsen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    ’. This requires participants to conduct experiments in their own organization, to reflect on and analyse their experiences with concepts from the curriculum. While the new language and the experimental teaching format are difficult, the participants learn a reflexive practice that can enable them to life up...

  16. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  17. The reflexive case study method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnationa...

  18. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms or to the superficial radial (SR nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms. While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a

  19. Against the unaccusative analysis of reflexives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.; Siloni, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the unaccusative analysis of reflexive verbs must be discarded, as reflexives systematically fail syntactic tests of unaccusativity. They are unergative entries, whose subject is an external argument, unlike the subject of unaccusatives. We adopt the view that reflexives

  20. Effects of acute and chronic systemic methamphetamine on respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic function, and cardiorespiratory reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sarah F; Wearne, Travis A; Cornish, Jennifer L; Goodchild, Ann K

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is escalating worldwide, with the most common cause of death resulting from cardiovascular failure and hyperthermia; however, the underlying physiological mechanisms are poorly understood. Systemic administration of METH in anaesthetised rats reduced the effectiveness of some protective cardiorespiratory reflexes, increased central respiratory activity independently of metabolic function, and increased heart rate, metabolism and respiration in a pattern indicating that non-shivering thermogenesis contributes to the well-described hyperthermia. In animals that showed METH-induced behavioural sensitisation following chronic METH treatment, no changes were evident in baseline cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic measures and the METH-evoked effects in these parameters were similar to those seen in saline-treated or drug naïve animals. Physiological effects evoked by METH were retained but were neither facilitated nor depressed following chronic treatment with METH. These data highlight and identify potential mechanisms for targeted intervention in patients vulnerable to METH overdose. Methamphetamine (METH) is known to promote cardiovascular failure or life-threatening hyperthermia; however, there is still limited understanding of the mechanisms responsible for evoking the physiological changes. In this study, we systematically determined the effects on both autonomic and respiratory outflows, as well as reflex function, following acute and repeated administration of METH, which enhances behavioural responses. Arterial pressure, heart rate, phrenic nerve discharge amplitude and frequency, lumbar and splanchnic sympathetic nerve discharge, interscapular brown adipose tissue and core temperatures, and expired CO2 were measured in urethane-anaesthetised male Sprague-Dawley rats. Novel findings include potent increases in central inspiratory drive and frequency that are not dependent on METH-evoked increases in expired CO2 levels

  1. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushlendra Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise affects one′s hearing as well as balance mechanism. The hearing mechanism of the noise-exposed individuals has been extensively studied. However, in view of the poor research focus on the sacculo-collic reflexes, especially in this study area, the present study was undertaken to examine the vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. A total of 30 subjects (55 ears with NIHL participated in the present study within the age range of 30-40 years. VEMP recordings were done at 99 dBnHL using IHS instrument. The results indicated that as the average pure tone hearing threshold increased, the VEMP latencies were prolonged and peak to peak amplitude was reduced in NIHL subjects. Out of the 55 ears, VEMP was absent in 16 (29.0% ears. The latency was prolonged and the peak to peak amplitude was reduced in 19 (34.6% ears. VEMP results were normal in 20 (36.4% ears. Therefore, VEMP was abnormal or absent in 67% of NIHL subjects in the present study. Hence it can be concluded that the possibility of vestibular dysfunction, specially the saccular pathway, is high in individuals with NIHL. VEMP, a non-invasive and user friendly procedure, can be employed in these individuals to assess sacculo-collic reflex.

  2. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Swetlana Gutjar; Gert J Ter Horst; Kees de Graaf; Renken, Remco J.; Gerry Jager

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well ...

  3. EVOKED CAVERNOUS ACTIVITY: NEUROANATOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Vicars, Brenda; Yang, Claire C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited 7 males with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction and 6 males who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS subjects, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into t...

  4. Model of evoked rabbit phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ping Jiang; French, Lesley C; Ohno, Tsunehisa; Zealear, David L; Rousseau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for eliciting phonation in an in vivo rabbit preparation using low-frequency, bipolar pulsed stimulation of the cricothyroid muscles with airflow delivered to the glottis. Ten New Zealand White breeder rabbits weighing 3 to 5 kg were used in this study. The cricothyroid muscles were isolated bilaterally, and separate pairs of anode-cathode hooked-wire electrodes were inserted into each muscle. A Grass S-88 stimulator and 2 constant-current PSIU6 isolation units were used to deliver bipolar square wave pulses to each cricothyroid muscle, with airflow delivered to the glottis through a cuffed endotracheal tube. Phonation was evoked with a 50-Hz, 4-mA stimulus train of 1-ms pulses delivered to each cricothyroid muscle. The pulse trains were on for 2 seconds and were repeated every 5 seconds over a period of 180 minutes. Airflow was delivered at 143 cm3/s, producing phonation measuring 71 to 85 dB sound pressure level. Evoked phonation is feasible in rabbits by use of bipolar stimulation of the cricothyroid muscles with airflow delivered to the glottis. The in vivo rabbit preparation described may provide a useful small animal option for studies of evoked phonation. From the level and consistency of the adduction observed, we hypothesize that current spreading to the underlying adductor muscles and nerves resulted in neural pathway involvement beyond discrete activation of the cricothyroid muscle, providing sufficient approximation of the vocal folds for phonation.

  5. The contribution of transcortical pathways to long-latency stretch and tactile reflexes in human hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, V G; Rothwell, J C; Day, B L

    1996-02-01

    Long-latency electromyographic (EMG) responses can be evoked in the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) by unexpected slips of an object (skin stretch) held between the index and thumb, or by forcible adduction of the metacarpophalangeal joint (muscle stretch). The former type of response is due to stimulation of tactile afferents in the skin of the digits, whereas the latter also activates muscle receptors. Previous studies have provided good evidence that long-latency reflex responses to stretch of distal muscles involve activity in a transcortical reflex pathway. The present experiments examined whether cutaneous reflexes also utilise a transcortical route. Transcranial magnetic or electrical stimuli were given over the motor cortex to evoke EMG activity during the period of the long-latency reflex response. When evoked by muscle stretch the responses to magnetic stimulation were facilitated more than those to electric stimulation. In contrast, facilitation was equal during the long-latency reflex elicited by cutaneous stimulation. Because of the different ways in which electrical and magnetic stimuli are believed to activate the motor cortex, we interpret these results to mean that the long-latency response to skin stretch is not mediated by a transcortical mechanism in the majority of subjects, whereas that following muscle stretch is. However, these are average data. In a few individual subjects, the opposite results were obtained. We suggest that there may be differences between subjects in the transcortical contribution to long-latency reflex responses. The implication is that, under normal circumstances, several pathways may contribute to these responses. If so, the relative roles of the pathways may change during different tasks, and in pathological states lesions in one system may well be accompanied by compensatory changes in other systems.

  6. Carbachol injection into the pontine reticular formation depresses laryngeal muscle activities and airway reflexes in decerebrate cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masaaki; Nonaka, Satoshi; Katada, Akihiro; Arakawa, Takuya; Ota, Ryo; Harada, Hirofumi; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2010-05-01

    To understand the role of cholinoceptive, medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) neurons in the control of upper airway, pharyngolaryngeal reflexes, we measured activities of intrinsic laryngeal muscles (posterior cricoarytenoid, PCA; thyroarytenoid, TA), diaphragm (DIA), genioglossus (GG) and a neck muscle (trapezius) in unanesthetized, decerebrated, spontaneously breathing cats with and without mPRF carbachol injections. The ethimoidal nerve was electrically stimulated to evoke sneezing, and the superior laryngeal nerve to evoke the laryngeal reflex, swallowing, and coughing. Carbachol reduced the amplitudes of the spontaneous electromyographic activities in the neck, TA, PCA, GG, and DIA to 7%, 30%, 54%, 45% and 71% of control, respectively, reduced the respiratory rate to 53% without changes in expiratory CO(2) concentration; the magnitude of the laryngeal reflex in the TA muscle to 56%; increased its latency by 13%; and reduced the probability of stimulus-induced sneezing, swallowing, and coughing to less than 40%. These changes lasted more than 1h. These data demonstrate that important upper airway reflexes are suppressed by increasing cholinergic neurotransmission in the mPRF. Because acetylcholine release in the mPRF changes in accordance with sleep-wake cycles, the present findings are relevant to the control of upper airway reflexes during various vigilance states. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Reflex epilepsies: experience in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, N

    1994-06-01

    Reflex epilepsy (RE) is characterised by seizures that are regularly elicited by some specific stimulus or event mediated by neural pathways. In a prospective study of 1287 epileptic patients seen at Peradeniya, 223 (17.3%) were found to have RE, eating being the commonest stimulus (191 patients, 85.7%). Photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) was relatively rare. Intermittent photic stimulation on 874 unselected epileptic patients produced a positive photoconvulsive response in 60 (6.9%). None had photosensitive seizures, but 3 had a higher frequency of seizures while watching television. Eating epilepsy (EE) had the highest prevalence at Peradeniya (148/1000 epileptic patients). This group was male predominant, and the onset of epilepsy in most cases was in the second decade. The majority experienced partial complex seizures. Repetitive and chronic stimulation of the amygdala during eating is suggested as the mechanism underlying EE. Twenty-one patients had seizures evoked by calculation, problem solving or spatial tasks. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy was the commonest form of seizure disorder in them. Although PSE itself is rare, self-induced epilepsy (SIE) was common. There were 8 patients who self-induced seizures. The majority were photosensitive and they induced seizures by gazing at the sun and waving a hand in front of the eyes. In the management of REs, clobazam produced impressive results. As for possible seizure-inhibitory mechanisms, our studies on a "Sathi" mediator showed definite EEG changes during mediation. Can mediation increase the seizure-threshold and abort or prevent the propagation of the epileptic discharge? The answer, apart from its possible therapeutic applications, may provide insight into the mechanisms of seizure generation.

  8. Blink reflex studies in postparalytic facial syndrome and blepharospasm: trigeminal and extratrigeminal somatosensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbir, Gulcin; Kiziltan, Meral E

    2014-12-01

    The somatosensory-evoked blink reflex (SBR) is one of the release phenomena of blink reflex, possibly resulting from increased excitability of brainstem reticular formation. The authors investigated trigeminal blink responses and SBR in 26 patients with postparalytic facial syndrome (PFS) with synkinesia, 18 patients with essential blepharospasm, and 36 healthy volunteers (control participants). Trigeminal blink reflex responses were elicited in all participants, whereas SBRs were elicited in 44.4% of control participants, 38.9% of patients with essential blepharospasm, and 65.4% of patients with PFS. The mean R2 amplitude and duration and the mean amplitude and duration of SBR were highest in patients with essential blepharospasm. The mean latency of SBR was shorter on the symptomatic side of patients with PFS when compared with the asymptomatic side. The mean R2 duration on the symptomatic side of the patients with PFS was longer than the control participants. These results showed that somatosensory stimulation could be used as an alternative method to demonstrate increased excitability in facial motor neuron in patients with PFS and essential blepharospasm. Disease states relating to different peripheral and/or suprasegmental structures could also influence blink reflex and change its basal excitability and manner in which the reflex responds to modulatory factors.

  9. Reflex anuria following acute cardiac event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevagan, Vijayabala; Navinan, Mitrakrishnan; Munasinghe, Arunie; Nazar, Abdul; Wijewardena, Anura; Constantine, Godwin

    2013-05-20

    Reflex anuria is an uncommon cause for acute renal failure, which occurs almost always after manipulation or irritation to kidneys, ureter, bladder or other pelvic organs. Here we describe a case of acute renal failure due to reflex anuria following acute cardiac event. This patient had background history of urolithiasis. In the absence of other pre renal, renal or post- renal causes for acute kidney injury, we believe reflex anuria is the causative entity for acute renal failure in our patient. Acute renal failure due to reflex anuria is related to a reflex mechanism involving arteriolar vasoconstriction and urethral spasm. Patients with reflex anuria can be successfully managed with medical or surgical interventions. Our case suggests that reflex anuria should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure following acute cardiac event, especially in patients with background urological problem.

  10. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  11. Being reflexive in qualitative grounded theory: discussion and application of a model of reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engward, Hilary; Davis, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    A discussion of the meaning of reflexivity in research with the presentation of examples of how a model of reflexivity was used in a grounded theory research project. Reflexivity requires the researcher to make transparent the decisions they make in the research process and is therefore important in developing quality in nursing research. The importance of being reflexive is highlighted in the literature in relation to nursing research, however, practical guidance as to how to go about doing research reflexively is not always clearly articulated. This is a discussion paper. The concept of reflexivity in research is explored using the Alvesson and Skoldberg model of reflexivity and practical examples of how a researcher developed reflexivity in a grounded theory project are presented. Nurse researchers are encouraged to explore and apply the concept of reflexivity in their research practices to develop transparency in the research process and to increase robustness in their research. The Alvesson and Skoldberg model is of value in applying reflexivity in qualitative nursing research, particularly in grounded theory research. Being reflexive requires the researcher to be completely open about decisions that are made in the research process. The Alvesson and Skolberg model of reflexivity is a useful model that can enhance reflexivity in the research process. It can be a useful practical tool to develop reflexivity in grounded theory research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods research...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions....

  13. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, C; Cohen, A.; Perkins, T.; Davidson, J; Sills, J

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once d...

  14. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    a dialogic conception of practice as they entail a conceptual reframing of key elements in practice. In addition, the narratives expose a situational and relational, rather than normative, focus which allows for reflections on emotional and bodily experiences. In conclusion, we argue that practice narratives...... have the potential to bring about productive learning in organizational contexts since they appear to stimulate participants’ relational engagement and reflexivity....

  15. Reflexive fatherhood in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at fathering practices in Denmark, using the findings from a research project on everyday family life in Denmark. It takes a social psychological perspective and employs discursive psychology and theories about reflexive modernisation. It shows how fathers orient towards intimacy...... this analysis and discussion, the article offers a way to understand the complexities of fathering in everyday life from the perspective of fathers....

  16. Reflex syncope: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of reflex syncope, diligent history-building with the patient and a witness is required. In the Emergency Department (ED, the assessment of syncope is a challenge which may be addressed by an ED Observation Unit or by a referral to a Syncope Unit. Hospital admission is necessary for those with life-threatening cardiac conditions although risk stratification remains an unsolved problem. Other patients may be investigated with less urgency by carotid sinus massage (>40 years, tilt testing, and electrocardiogram loop recorder insertion resulting in a clear cause for syncope. Management includes, in general terms, patient education, avoidance of circumstances in which syncope is likely, increase in fluid and salt consumption, and physical counter-pressure maneuvers. In older patients, those that will benefit from cardiac pacing are now well defined. In all patients, the benefit of drug therapy is often disappointing and there remains no ideal drug. A role for catheter ablation may emerge for the highly symptomatic reflex syncope patient. Keywords: Cardiac pacing, Catheter ablation, Diagnosis, Drugs, Management, Reflex syncope

  17. Cough reflex sensitivity in adolescents with diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciljakova M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus which can involve one or more organ systems. DAN without apparent symptoms is more often in childhood and adolescence. While heart rate variability (HRV and Ewing's battery of cardiovascular tests are regarded as a gold standard for the diagnosis of DAN, the examination of cough reflex sensitivity (CRS is another possibility. The aim of this study was to compare HRV and CRS in children with diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods Sixty one patients (37 girls, 24 boys aged 15-19 suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1 completed the study. Based on HRV, patients were divided into 2 groups - with DAN (n = 25 and without DAN (n = 32, 4 patients were excluded because of ambiguous results. CRS was studied in each patient by inhalation of gradually increasing concentration of capsaicin. Results Subjects with DAN required a significantly higher concentration of capsaicin needed to evoke 2 coughs (median 625 μmol/l, IQR 68.4-625.0 μmol/l vs. median 29.3 μmol/l, IQR 9.8-156.3 μmol/l, P Conclusion Diabetes mellitus lowers the cough response. Cough reflex sensitivity appears to be another sensitive method for the evaluation of DAN in diabetes.

  18. The palmo-mental reflex in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, M S; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD), is a multisystemic nosological entity, caused by occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. The most common neurological finding in patients with VAD is the palmomental reflex (PMR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of this primitive reflex in a population of VAD patients. Sixty individuals, occupationally exposed to LPALF noise underwent a neurological examination. In each one, unilateral contraction of the chin muscles was triggered through the stimulation of the thenar eminence. When a response habituation was observed, or when there was no response except previously existing skin retraction and small dimples, an EMG was performed. All these subjects also received brain MRI and measurement of endogenous evoked potentials. Thirty individuals presented unilateral or bilateral PMR; 26 of these presented changes in the brain MRI. EMG measurement evidenced continuous contraction of the chin muscles, without visible PMR, triggered by the stimulation of the thenar eminence. PMR is present in 50% of the patients with VAD. In the VAD patients, the frequency of abnormal chin muscle activity is higher than the frequency of PMR and represents a loss of the cortical control over the brainstem structures.

  19. The interactions between different tastes on initiation of reflex swallow elicited by electrical stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Masanori; Kurose, Masayuki; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Mana; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Saito, Isao; Yamamura, Kensuke

    2016-09-01

    The act of eating is a source of pleasure for people and is a major factor in maintaining a good quality of life. Several types of products for dysphagia patients are available to decrease aspiration of food that often accompanies daily food intake. The final goal of these products is to improve the ease of forming a food bolus and/or the safety of the swallowing process; however, tastes of products are not a major concern with initiation of swallowing. In the present study, we investigated the effect of bitter taste stimuli (quinine) and the combination of quinine and umami (monosodium glutamate: MSG) applied to the oropharynx on reflex swallows evoked by electrical stimulation to the oropharyngeal mucosa. Each of the distilled water (DW), quinine and quinine-MSG mixture solution (volume of each solutions, 100 µl) was applied 1 s prior to electrical stimulation. No swallow was evoked when each of the solutions was applied without electrical stimulation. The application of DW and lower concentration of quinine (<100 µM) did not affect the latency of reflex swallow, but 100 µM quinine application increased the latency of the reflex swallow. In addition, application of quinine-MSG mixture solution counteracted the increase in latency induced by quinine application alone. These findings suggest that MSG enhances the initiation of swallowing along with its well-known increase in appetite stimulation. Adding MSG might be effective when creating food to promote swallowing.

  20. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jayesh S.; Schmidt, Colin; Richir, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The sense of “Presence” (evolving from “telepresence”) has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it’s an experience of an “Evoked Reality (ER)” (illusion of reality) that triggers an “Evoked Presence (EP)” (sense of presence) in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical) Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between ER and EP, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of ER and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call “reality.” PMID:23550234

  1. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  2. Reflex anuria following acute cardiac event

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevagan, Vijayabala; Navinan, Mitrakrishnan; Munasinghe, Arunie; Nazar, Abdul; Wijewardena, Anura; Constantine, Godwin

    2013-01-01

    Background Reflex anuria is an uncommon cause for acute renal failure, which occurs almost always after manipulation or irritation to kidneys, ureter, bladder or other pelvic organs. Case presentation Here we describe a case of acute renal failure due to reflex anuria following acute cardiac event. This patient had background history of urolithiasis. In the absence of other pre renal, renal or post- renal causes for acute kidney injury, we believe reflex anuria is the causative entity for acu...

  3. Hand muscle reflexes following air puff stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, G; Feifel, E; Guschlbauer, B; Lücking, C H

    1995-01-01

    Hand muscle reflexes following muscle stretch and electrical nerve stimulation show a typical pattern consisting of short- and long-latency reflexes. The present investigation was designed to test reflexes following pure cutaneous stimulation. Air puffs were delivered to the palmar tip and the nail bed of the first, second and fifth fingers during isotonic contraction of hand muscles. The EMGs from the thenar muscles, the first dorsal interosseous muscle and the hypothenar muscles were recorded. Reflexes were obtained in all muscles, with a typical configuration consisting of a short-latency excitatory component (cutaneous long-latency reflex I, cLLR I) and a second excitatory component (cutaneous long-latency reflex II, cLLR II), with an inhibitory component between them. The size of cLLR II differed depending on the area stimulated and the muscle recorded. We found the largest responses always in the muscle acting on the stimulated finger. The reflex size depended on the strength of air puff stimulation. Allowing small displacements of the fingers led to an additional increase in the size of the reflex. The pattern of reflexes was identical independent of whether the finger tip or the nail bed was stimulated, but the size of the reflexes was smaller following nail bed stimulation. Following blockade of the cutaneous nerve branches of the thumb with local anaesthetics, air puff stimulation of the thumb no longer elicited this reflex pattern. Hence, under our experimental conditions, cutaneous receptors were the only source of afferent input for these reflexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  5. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    .... Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals...

  6. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural cure for reflex syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulke, Neil; Eysenck, William; Badiani, Sveeta; Furniss, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    The ROX Coupler is a device that allows creation of a central arteriovenous anastomosis at the iliac level. The device has been shown to improve exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is CE marked for the treatment of resistant and uncontrolled hypertension. Reflex syncope is a challenging clinical condition with limited proven therapeutic options. We describe the resolution of symptoms and tilt table response of a patient who underwent insertion of a ROX Coupler to treat hypertension, and also incidentally had pre-existing vasodepressor syncope. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Temperature differentially facilitates spontaneous but not evoked glutamate release from cranial visceral primary afferents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Fawley

    Full Text Available Temperature is fundamentally important to all biological functions including synaptic glutamate release. Vagal afferents from the solitary tract (ST synapse on second order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and glutamate release at this first central synapse controls autonomic reflex function. Expression of the temperature-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 receptor separates ST afferents into C-fibers (TRPV1+ and A-fibers (TRPV1-. Action potential-evoked glutamate release is similar between C- and A-fiber afferents, but TRPV1 expression facilitates a second form of synaptic glutamate release in C-fibers by promoting substantially more spontaneous glutamate release. The influence of temperature on different forms of glutamate release is not well understood. Here we tested how temperature impacts the generation of evoked and spontaneous release of glutamate and its relation to TRPV1 expression. In horizontal brainstem slices of rats, activation of ST primary afferents generated synchronous evoked glutamate release (ST-eEPSCs at constant latency whose amplitude reflects the probability of evoked glutamate release. The frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in these same neurons measured the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. We measured both forms of glutamate from each neuron during ramp changes in bath temperature of 4-5 °C. Spontaneous glutamate release from TRPV1+ closely tracked with these thermal changes indicating changes in the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. In the same neurons, temperature changed axon conduction registered as latency shifts but ST-eEPSC amplitudes were constant and independent of TRPV1 expression. These data indicate that TRPV1-operated glutamate release is independent of action potential-evoked glutamate release in the same neurons. Together, these support the hypothesis that evoked and spontaneous glutamate release originate from two pools of vesicles that are

  9. Topography of spinal neurons active during hindlimb withdrawal reflexes in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, K J; Moffitt, M A; Wang, X; Sun, J; Snyder, S; Grill, W M

    2006-09-15

    There exists a spatial organization of receptive fields and a modular organization of the flexion withdrawal reflex system. However, the three dimensional location and organization of interneurons interposed in flexion reflex pathways has not been systematically examined. We determined the anatomical locations of spinal neurons involved in the hindlimb flexion withdrawal reflex using expression of the immediate early gene c-fos and the corresponding FOS protein. The flexion withdrawal reflex was evoked in decerebrate cats via stimulation of the tibial or superficial peroneal nerve. Animals that received stimulation had significantly larger numbers of cells expressing FOS-like immunoreactivity (42.7+/-2.3 cells/section, mean+/-standard error of the mean) than operated unstimulated controls (18.6+/-1.4 cells/section). Compared with controls, cells expressing FOS-like immunoreactivity were located predominantly on the ipsilateral side, in laminae IV-VI, at L6 and rostral L7 segments, and between 20% and 60% of the distance from the midline to the lateral border of the ventral gray matter. Labeled neurons resulting from tibial nerve stimulation were medial to neurons labeled following superficial peroneal nerve stimulation in laminae I-VI, but not VII. The mean mediolateral positions of labeled neurons from both nerves shifted medially as the transverse plane in which they were viewed was moved from rostral to caudal and as the coronal plane in which they were viewed was moved from dorsal to ventral. The mediolateral separation between populations of labeled cells was consistent with primary afferent projections and the location of reflex encoders. This topographical segregation corresponding to different afferent inputs is a possible anatomical substrate for a modular organization of the flexion withdrawal reflex system.

  10. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key pointsThe spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activityThe motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrumReflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass.

  11. Variable impact of tizanidine on the medium latency reflex of upper and lower limbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Bouyer, Laurent J.; Bouffard, J.

    2018-01-01

    Sudden limb displacement evokes a complex sequence of compensatory muscle activity. Following the short-latency reflex and preceding voluntary reactions is an epoch termed the medium-latency reflex (MLR) that could reflect spinal processing of group II muscle afferents. One way to test...... this possibility is oral ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist that inhibits the interneurons transmitting group II signals onto spinal motor neurons. We examined whether group II afferents contribute to MLR activity throughout the major muscles that span the elbow and shoulder. MLRs of ankle...... muscles were also tested during walking on the same day, in the same participants as well as during sitting in a different group of subjects. In contrast to previous reports, the ingestion of tizanidine had minimal impact on MLRs of arm or leg muscles during motor actions. A significant decrease...

  12. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-05-01

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine somatosensory reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults ( n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied 2 min of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii was significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory-evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed 1 ) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with vibration; 2 ) responses did not habituate over 2 min of exposure; and importantly, 3 ) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize somatosensory reflexes during standing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We applied noisy (10-115 Hz) vibration to the Achilles tendon to examine the frequency characteristics of lower limb somatosensory reflexes during standing. Ongoing muscle activity was coherent with the noisy vibration (peak coherence ~40 Hz), and

  13. Nociceptive afferents selectively modulate the cardiac component of the peripheral chemoreceptor reflex via actions within the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscan, P; Paton, J F R

    2002-01-01

    Our previous findings showed that the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) mediated part of the tachycardia evoked during somatic noxious stimulation. Here, we investigated the interaction between somatic nociceptor- and peripheral chemoreceptor-evoked cardiac changes. We sought to determine whether this interaction occurred within the NTS, the primary site of termination of chemoreceptor afferents. In a working heart-brainstem preparation of rat, mechanical noxious activation of a forelimb evoked a tachycardia of 17.5+/-3 (mean+/-S.E.M.) b.p.m., whereas sodium cyanide (7-30 microg) stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors produced a sub-maximal bradycardia of -140+/-15 b.p.m. During nociceptor stimulation the sodium cyanide-evoked bradycardia was attenuated to -42.6+/-12 b.p.m. but could be prevented by a multiple bilateral NTS microinjection of bicuculline (i.e. -173+/-18 b.p.m.). Furthermore, the activity of NTS neurones responding to peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation increased from 2.8+/-1.3 to 9.4+/-1.9 Hz during sodium cyanide injection (n=7; Pchemoreceptor-evoked excitatory synaptic response. We conclude that somatic noxious stimulation attenuates the chemoreceptor reflex-evoked bradycardia via a GABA(A)ergic mechanism in the NTS.

  14. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    custom controller that enables a biomimetic reflex to improve the speed and ability to perform fragile grasping tasks for amputees. This hand would reduce...sensors and biomimetic reflexes have been demonstrated to improve the speed and accuracy of bimanual, fragile grasping tasks when compared to the same

  15. Cardiovascular regulation by skeletal muscle reflexes in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Megan N; Mizuno, Masaki; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    .... These neurally mediated cardiovascular adjustments to physical activity are regulated, in part, by a peripheral reflex originating in contracting skeletal muscle termed the exercise pressor reflex...

  16. Reflexive criteria of sociological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaydullaeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the sociological criteria of explaining the way of thinking and actions of subjects, their spiritual and moral positions and intellectual forces that form the laws of social life. The author seeks to adapt such categories as ‘meaning of life’, ‘human dignity’, ‘rationality’ etc. for the purposes of sociological analysis by methodological construction of some real life dichotomies such as ‘subjective meaning and social function’, ‘the real and the ideal’, ‘the demanded and the excluded’. Thus, the author studies economic, political and technical processes in terms of both positivity and negativity of social interaction and states that given the increasing differentiation of the society and the contradictory trends of social development the reflexive criteria that take into account the socio-cultural nature of the man help to find one’s own model of development.

  17. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C S; Cohen, A; Perkins, T; Davidson, J E; Sills, J A

    2000-03-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once diagnosis was made, treatment followed with physiotherapy and analgesics. Median time to recovery was seven weeks (range 1-140), with 27.5% relapsing. Nine children required assessment by the child and adolescent psychiatry team. This disease, though rare, has significant morbidity and it is therefore important to raise clinicians' awareness of RSD in childhood. Children with the condition may then be recognised and referred for appropriate management earlier, and spared unnecessary investigations and treatments which may exacerbate the condition.

  18. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekgül, Hasan; Serdaroglu, Guil; Uyar, Meltem; Tütüncüoglu, Sarenur

    2002-04-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is characterized by constant burning pain and hyperesthesia in an extremity. Lower extremities are usually affected. Pain is accompanied by swelling, sweating, vasomotor instability and sometimes trophic changes. There may be a history of minor injury or not. Muscle spasms, myoclonus or focal dystonia may occur. Diffuse pain, loss of function and autonomic dysfunction are three main criteria suggested for diagnosis. Symptoms can last a few days to as long as a year. In this report we present a girl with multiple limb involvement of stage I RSD. The sympathetic skin responses were tested during a remission period. She had milder attacks with a recurrence rate of 4 per year in the following three years from onset.

  19. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  20. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  1. Evoked cavernous activity: neuroanatomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Vicars, B; Yang, C C

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited seven men with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction, and six men who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS patients, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into the right and left cavernous bodies. We simultaneously recorded hand and foot sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) as controls. In the SCI group, all but one patient had reproducible hand SSRs. None of these patients had ECA or foot SSRs. All the PS patients had reproducible ECA and SSRs, both preoperatively and postoperatively. There was no difference in the latency and amplitude measurements of ECA and SSRs in the postoperative compared with that of the pre-operative period (P>0.05). In conclusion, ECA is absent in men with SCI above the sympathetic outflow to the genitalia. In men, after radical pelvic surgery, ECA is preserved, indicating the preservation of sympathetic fibers.

  2. Decrease of Horizontal Canal Vestibulo-Oculomotor Reflex Gain in the Elderly with Dysequilibrium without Lifetime Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, Roberto; Trimarchi, Matteo; Gatti, Omar; Fornasari, Francesco; Bussi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Unsteadiness in the elderly is a frequent complaint and a strong predictor of falls and psychological distress. Although there is a general consensus that it is a multifactorial condition, recent studies have focused on the role of aging of the vestibular system as a possible cofactor. The aim of our work was to assess horizontal canal function in the elderly. We evaluated the gain of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with a video head impulse test on a sample of 58 subjects aged >70 years without lifetime episodes of vertigo and correlated the value with different clinical conditions (hypertension, diabetes, prior cardiovascular and vascular disorders of the central nervous system, and falls). The mean value of the gain was 0.86 ± 0.12, and people aged between 70 and 80 years presented higher values (0.90 ± 0.1) compared to those >80 years (0.81 ± 0.13; p = 0.025). Previous vascular disorders of the central nervous system were a predictor of decreased VOR gain (p = 0.0003). A nonparametric analysis demonstrated that sex, age, and VOR gain (p ˂ 0.0001) were predictive of falls. Our data support the hypothesis of a decrease of VOR gain in the elderly. The decrease of canal function may therefore play a role in the risk of falls in the elderly. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lee, Daniel J; Wall, Conrad; Merfeld, Daniel M; Lewis, Richard F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly integrative behaviors, such as the perception of head orientation and posture have remained unclear. We tested a one-dimensional, unilateral prosthesis in a rhesus monkey with bilateral vestibular loss and found that chronic electrical stimulation partially restored the compensatory VOR and also that percepts of head orientation relative to gravity were improved. However, the one-dimensional prosthetic stimulation had no clear effect on postural stability during quiet stance, but sway evoked by head-turns was modestly reduced. These results suggest that not only can the implementation of a vestibular prosthesis provide partial restitution of VOR but may also improve perception and posture in the presence of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH). In this review, we provide an overview of our previous and current work directed towards the eventual clinical implementation of an implantable vestibular prosthesis.

  6. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  7. A near catastrophe from trigeminocardiac reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmod K Bithal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminocardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex that results from stimulation of any branch of the trigeminal nerve along its course. It produces a constellation of signs and symptoms decrease in blood pressure (BP and heart rate, dysrhythmias, apnoea and increased gastric motility. We present a case of 80-year-old female patient who developed alarming hypotension and bradycardia during craniotomy for meningioma excision resulting from this reflex. In the face of refractory hypotension despite administering ephedrine and phenylephrine, we had to resort to adrenaline to restore her normal BP.

  8. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  9. Evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Komantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the neurophysiological study in which 95 children with viral encephalitis and 30 children with meningitis (age from 2 up to 17 years undergo evoked potentials investigation. Some specific features of evoked potentials in neuroinfections have been shown to correlate with the course of disease and the age of the patients. We give a description of a logistic model of predicting outcomes in such patients by complex diagnostic method. We have found that evoked potentials may be successfully implemented in correcting the therapeutic strategies. Study of evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children can define the severity and extent of lesions and help to identify subclinical dysfunction and monitor the recovery processes under the therapy.

  10. Visual Evoked Potentials in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Boston Children's Hospital recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice and in 34 girls with Rett syndrome (RTT.

  11. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  12. Sympathetic outflow enhances the stretch reflex response in the relaxed soleus muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortskov, Nis; Skotte, Jørgen; Hye-Knudsen, Christian; Fallentin, Nils

    2005-04-01

    Animal experiments suggest that an increase in sympathetic outflow can depress muscle spindle sensitivity and thus modulate the stretch reflex response. The results are, however, controversial, and human studies have failed to demonstrate a direct influence of the sympathetic nervous system on the sensitivity of muscle spindles. We studied the effect of increased sympathetic outflow on the short-latency stretch reflex in the soleus muscle evoked by tapping the Achilles tendon. Nine subjects performed three maneuvers causing a sustained activation of sympathetic outflow to the leg: 3 min of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, followed by 3 min of posthandgrip ischemia, and finally during a 3-min mental arithmetic task. Electromyography was measured from the soleus muscle with bipolar surface electrodes during the Achilles tendon tapping, and beat-to-beat changes in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were monitored continuously. Mean arterial pressure was significantly elevated during all three maneuvers, whereas heart rate was significantly elevated during static handgrip exercise and mental arithmetic but not during posthandgrip ischemia. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the short-latency stretch reflex was significantly increased during mental arithmetic (P < 0.05), static handgrip exercise (P < 0.001), and posthandgrip ischemia (P < 0.005). When expressed in percent change from rest, the mean peak-to-peak amplitude increased by 111 (SD 100)% during mental arithmetic, by 160 (SD 103)% during static handgrip exercise, and by 90 (SD 67)% during posthandgrip ischemia. The study clearly indicates a facilitation of the short-latency stretch reflex during increased sympathetic outflow. We note that the enhanced stretch reflex responses observed in relaxed muscles in the absence of skeletomotor activity support the idea that the sympathetic nervous system can exert a direct influence on the human muscle spindles.

  13. Effect of caffeine on cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Almeida de Sousa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Caffeine is the most common psychoactive drug in use around the world and is found at different concentrations in a variety of common food items. Clinically, a strong association between caffeine consumption and diseases of the vestibular system has been established. Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP is an electrophysiological test that is used to assess the sacculocollic pathway by measuring changes in the vestialibulocollic reflex. AIM: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acute dose of caffeine on the vestibulocollic reflex by using cVEMP. METHOD: A prospective experimental study was performed in which healthy volunteers were submitted to the test before and after the intake of 420 mg of caffeine. The following parameters were compared: p13 and n23 latencies and p13-n23 amplitude. RESULT: No statistically significant difference was found in the test results before and after caffeine use. CONCLUSION: The vestibulocollic reflex is not altered by caffeine intake.

  14. Reflecting on Reflexivity: Reflexive Textual Practices in Organization and Management Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Alvesson, M.; Hardy, C; B. Harley

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies four sets of textual practices that researchers in the field of organization and management theory (OMT) have used in their attempts to be reflexive. We characterize them as multi-perspective, multi-voicing, positioning and destabilizing. We show how each set of practices can help to produce reflexive research, but also how each embodies limitations and paradoxes. Finally, we consider the interplay among these sets of practices to develop ideas for new avenues for reflex...

  15. Measurement of tendon reflexes by surface electromyography in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the tendon reflexes was developed. A manually operated, electronic reflex hammer was applied that enabled measurement of the strength of tendon taps. Reflex responses were recorded by surface electromyography. Stimulus-response relations and latencies of tendon reflexes

  16. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Entrepreneurship Teaching Conducted as Strategic Reflexive Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    The paper intends exploring and ascertaining whether the concept of strategic reflexive conversation can profitably be applied to entrepreneurship. As a start, a process of conceptualisation is undertaken, which is instrumental in placing the notion of strategic reflexive conversation...... into a knowledge management perspective. Strategic reflexive conversation is presented in an enhanced and updated version, which is contrasted to entrepreneurship through reflection. The findings indicate and it can be concluded that, with some important reservations, strategic reflexive conversation can...... advantageously, and on a pilot basis, be applied to entrepreneurship in practical environments and within the framework of entrepreneurship-centred teaching. The present theoretical investigation is solely of an introductory nature and steps are considered that can lead to the planning of additional exploratory...

  18. Somatosensory and acoustic brain stem reflex myoclonus.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibasaki, H; Kakigi, R; Oda, K; Masukawa, S

    1988-01-01

    A patient with brain stem reflex myoclonus due to a massive midbrain infarct was studied electrophysiologically. Myoclonic jerks were elicited at variable latencies by tapping anywhere on the body or by acoustic stimuli, and mainly involved flexor muscles of upper extremities. The existence of convergence of somatosensory and acoustic inputs in the brain stem was suggested. This myoclonus seemed to be mediated by a mechanism similar to the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex.

  19. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  20. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  1. On the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish Reflexive Passives and Reflexive Impersonals by French- and English-Speaking Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and…

  2. On the second language acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and English speakers instantiates a potential ...

  3. Reflex response and convergence of pharyngoesophageal and peripheral chemoreceptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, J F; Li, Y W; Kasparov, S

    1999-01-01

    The pharynx is a common conduit for the passage of both ingested material and respiratory gases and may receive a dual control from medullary structures regulating deglutition and respiration. We sought both to compare the pattern of reflex response following stimulation of pharyngoesophageal and peripheral chemoreceptors and to assess whether these afferents converge in the nucleus of the solitary tract. In an arterially perfused working heart-brainstem preparation of mature rat, pharyngoesophageal receptors were stimulated by distension of the pharyngeal-oesophageal junction, whereas chemoreceptors were activated by sodium cyanide solution. In peripheral studies we recorded electromyographic activity from genioglossus, mylohyoideus and the lower thoracic oesophagus as well as hypoglossal, laryngeal and phrenic motor discharge. Sub-glottal pressure was also measured at constant airflow. In central studies, nucleus of the solitary tract neurons were recorded with blind whole-cell techniques. In peripheral studies spontaneous irregular electromyographic discharges (cycle length 99+/-26 s) occurred sequentially in genioglossus and mylohyoideus muscles (during the inter-phrenic nerve activity interval) and subsequently the oesophagus; these were accompanied by post-inspiratory discharges in both hypoglossal and laryngeal motor nerves and an atropine-sensitive bradycardia (-39+/-5 beats/min). Components of the reflex response elicited following stimulation of both pharyngoesophageal receptors and chemoreceptors were qualitatively similar and included: (i) expiratory-related increases in laryngeal pressure; (ii) sequential electromyographic discharge in genioglossus, mylohyoideus muscles and oesophagus; (iii) post-inspiratory burst discharge in hypoglossal, recurrent and superior laryngeal motor nerves; and (iv) an atropine-sensitive bradycardia (-38 to -95 beats/min). The chemoreceptor reflex-evoked responses were abolished after sinoaortic denervation. Of 135 whole

  4. An investigation of cardiovascular reflexes during a trimix saturation dive to 450 msw (GUSI 17).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser-Riley, F; Cornish, M J; Hainsworth, R; Kidd, C; Lyons, R C

    1992-07-01

    The study examines the hypothesis that the carotid sinus heart rate baroreflex responses are changed in human subjects on exposure to 450 msw. Baroreceptor reflex changes in heart rate (expressed as ms/mmHg applied pressure) were evoked by application of negative or positive pressure to a cuff surrounding the neck. At 450 msw using trimix, the mean resting heart rate of divers slowed significantly from 64 +/- 1.3 beats/min at surface to 55 +/- 1.4 beats/min at 450 msw, respiratory rate decreased from 15 +/- 1.4 at surface to 11 +/- 2 at 450 msw, and sinus arrhythmia increased. There was no change in arterial blood pressure. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity to an increased carotid sinus transmural pressure was reduced from 5.6 +/- 2.9 (mean +/- SEM) at surface to 2.4 +/- 0.8 ms.mmHg-1 at 450 msw; sensitivity to decreased carotid sinus transmural pressure increased from 2.2 +/- 0.4 ms.mmHg-1 at surface to 5.1 +/- 0.2 ms.mmHg-1 at 450 msw. A progressive shortening of cardiac interval during breath hold in expiration was also noted. When this shortening of interval was incorporated into the analysis of baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, no significant change in sensitivity was observed but the overall baroreflex stimulus-response relationship shifted downward.

  5. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  6. Characterization of music-evoked autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Tomic, Stefan T; Rakowski, Sonja K

    2007-11-01

    Despite music's prominence in Western society and its importance to individuals in their daily lives, very little is known about the memories and emotions that are often evoked when hearing a piece of music from one's past. We examined the content of music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) using a novel approach for selecting stimuli from a large corpus of popular music, in both laboratory and online settings. A set of questionnaires probed the cognitive and affective properties of the evoked memories. On average, 30% of the song presentations evoked autobiographical memories, and the majority of songs also evoked various emotions, primarily positive, that were felt strongly. The third most common emotion was nostalgia. Analyses of written memory reports found both general and specific levels of autobiographical knowledge to be represented, and several social and situational contexts for memory formation were common across many memories. The findings indicate that excerpts of popular music serve as potent stimuli for studying the structure of autobiographical memories.

  7. Jaw-opening reflex after CO2 laser stimulation of the perioral region in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruccu, G; Romaniello, A

    1998-02-01

    CO2 laser pulses selectively excite A-delta and C mechano-thermal nociceptors in the superficial layers of the skin. To study the jaw-opening reflex elicited by a purely nociceptive input, we delivered laser pulses to the perioral region in 15 subjects. Sensory threshold was very low (9 mJ/mm2). High-intensity noxious laser pulses (more than 4 x sensory threshold) evoked a single phase of electromyogram suppression (laser silent period, LSP) at an onset latency of 70 ms in the contracted masseter and temporal muscles, bilaterally. Even maximum-intensity laser pulses failed to activate the suprahyoid muscles. The recovery curves to paired laser stimuli showed that at short interstimulus intervals the test LSP was strongly suppressed. At about 380 ms it recovered to 50%, i.e. its recovery curve resembled that of the masseter late silent period after electrical mental nerve stimulation (SP2). In experiments studying the interaction with heterotopic stimuli and non-nociceptive responses, chin-taps or electrical shocks delivered to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerves before laser stimulation strongly suppressed the LSP. A preceding perioral laser pulse strongly suppressed the masseter SP evoked by supraorbital stimulation and the SP2 evoked by mental stimulation, but left SPI unaffected. We conclude that the perioral A-delta fibre input elicits a jaw-opening reflex simply by inhibiting the jaw-closers. The LSP response is mediated by a multisynaptic chain of brainstem interneurons and shares with the masseter SP2 part of the central circuit in the ponto-medullary region. We also propose that a common centre processes the various inputs for jaw opening.

  8. Reflex and Non-Reflex Torque Responses to Stretch of the Human Knee Extensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mrachacz-Kersting, N

    2001-01-01

    .... The quadriceps muscles were stretched at various background torques, produced either voluntarily or electrically and thus the purely reflex-mediated torque could be calculated. The contribution of the reflex mediated stiffness initially low, increased with increasing background torques for the range of torques investigated.

  9. Evidence for sustained cortical involvement in peripheral stretch reflex during the full long latency reflex period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perenboom, M.J.L.; Van de Ruit, M.; de Groot, J.H.; Schouten, A.C.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of reflexes to environment and task at hand is a key mechanism in optimal motor control, possibly regulated by the cortex. In order to locate the corticospinal integration, i.e. spinal or supraspinal, and to study the critical temporal window of reflex adaptation, we combined transcranial

  10. Soleus H-Reflex Operant Conditioning Changes The H-Reflex Recruitment Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiko K.; Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Operant conditioning can gradually change the human soleus H-reflex. The protocol conditions the reflex near M-wave threshold. This study examined its impact on the reflexes at other stimulus strengths. Methods H-reflex recruitment curves were obtained before and after a 24-session exposure to an up-conditioning (HRup) or down-conditioning (HRdown) protocol and were compared. Results In both HRup and HRdown subjects, conditioning affected the entire H-reflex recruitment curve. In 5 of 6 HRup and 3 of 6 HRdown subjects, conditioning elevated (HRup) or depressed (HRdown), respectively, the entire curve. In the other HRup subject or the other 3 HRdown subjects, the curve was shifted to the left or to the right, respectively. Discussion H-reflex conditioning does not simply change the H-reflex to a stimulus of particular strength; it also changes the H-reflexes to stimuli of different strengths. Thus, it is likely to affect many actions in which this pathway participates. PMID:23281107

  11. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantson, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Intensive Care, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neuroradiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Nassogne, Marie-Cecile [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Guerit, Jean-Michel [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 {mu}mol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  12. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  13. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  14. The vestibular evoked-potential profile of Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael L; Wijewardene, Ayanthi A; Gibson, William P R; Black, Deborah A; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2011-06-01

    To define the ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP and cVEMP) profile in Ménière's Disease (MD), we studied air-conducted (AC) sound and bone-conducted vibration (BCV)-evoked responses in 77 patients and 35 controls. oVEMPs were recorded from unrectified infra-orbital surface electromyography (EMG) during upward gaze. cVEMPs were recorded from rectified and unrectified sternocleidomastoid EMG during head elevation against gravity. Responses to AC clicks delivered via headphones and BC forehead taps delivered with a mini-shaker (bone-conduction vibrator) and a triggered tendon-hammer were recorded. In clinically definite unilateral MD (n=60), the prevalence of unilateral VEMP abnormalities was 50.0%, 10.2% and 11.9% for click, minitap and tendon-hammer evoked oVEMPs, 40.0%, 22.8% and 10.7% for click, minitap and tendon-hammer evoked cVEMPs. The most commonly observed profile was abnormality to AC stimulation alone (33.3%), followed by abnormalities to both AC and BCV stimuli (26.7%). Isolated abnormalities to BCV stimuli were rare (5%) and limited to the minitap cVEMP. The prevalence of abnormalities for each of the AC VEMPs was significantly higher than for any one BCV VEMP. For click cVEMP, click oVEMP and minitap cVEMP, average Reflex Asymmetry Ratios (AR) were significantly higher in MD compared with controls. Test results for AC cVEMP, AC oVEMP, minitap cVEMP and caloric asymmetry were significantly correlated with hearing loss. Predominance of abnormalities in oVEMP and cVEMP responses to AC sound is characteristic of MD and indicative of saccular involvement. This pattern of VEMP abnormalities may enable separation of Ménière's disease from other peripheral vestibulopathies. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  15. Adaptability of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1cm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Eckert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The nociceptive withdrawal reflex is a protective mechanism to mediate interactions within a potentially dangerous environment. The reflex is formed by action-based sensory encoding during the early post-natal developmental period, and it is unknown if the protective motor function of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in the human upper-limb is adaptable based on the configuration of the arm or if it can be modified by short-term practice of a similar or opposing motor action. In the present study, nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were evoked by a brief train of electrical stimuli applied to digit II, 1 in five different static arm positions and, 2 before and after motor practice that was opposite (EXT or similar (FLEX to the stereotyped withdrawal response, in 10 individuals. Withdrawal responses were quantified by the electromyography (EMG reflex response in several upper limb muscles, and by the forces and moments recorded at the wrist. EMG onset latencies and response amplitudes were not significantly different across the arm positions or between the EXT and FLEX practice conditions, and the general direction of the withdrawal response was similar across arm positions. In addition, the force vectors were not different after practice in either the practice condition or between EXT and FLEX conditions. We conclude the withdrawal response is insensitive to changes in elbow or shoulder joint angles as well as remaining resistant to short-term adaptations from the practice of motor actions, resulting in a generalized limb withdrawal in each case. It is further hypothesized that the multisensory feedback is weighted differently in each arm position, but integrated to achieve a similar withdrawal response to safeguard against erroneous motor responses that could cause further harm. The results remain consistent with the concept that nociceptive withdrawal reflexes are shaped through long-term and not short-term action based sensory encoding.

  16. The nociceptive withdrawal reflex does not adapt to joint position change and short-term motor practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Nathan; Riley, Zachary A

    2013-01-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex is a protective mechanism to mediate interactions within a potentially dangerous environment. The reflex is formed by action-based sensory encoding during the early post-natal developmental period, and it is unknown if the protective motor function of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in the human upper-limb is adaptable based on the configuration of the arm or if it can be modified by short-term practice of a similar or opposing motor action. In the present study, nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were evoked by a brief train of electrical stimuli applied to digit II, 1) in five different static arm positions and, 2) before and after motor practice that was opposite (EXT) or similar (FLEX) to the stereotyped withdrawal response, in 10 individuals. Withdrawal responses were quantified by the electromyography (EMG) reflex response in several upper limb muscles, and by the forces and moments recorded at the wrist. EMG onset latencies and response amplitudes were not significantly different across the arm positions or between the EXT and FLEX practice conditions, and the general direction of the withdrawal response was similar across arm positions. In addition, the force vectors were not different after practice in either the practice condition or between EXT and FLEX conditions. We conclude the withdrawal response is insensitive to changes in elbow or shoulder joint angles as well as remaining resistant to short-term adaptations from the practice of motor actions, resulting in a generalized limb withdrawal in each case. It is further hypothesized that the multisensory feedback is weighted differently in each arm position, but integrated to achieve a similar withdrawal response to safeguard against erroneous motor responses that could cause further harm. The results remain consistent with the concept that nociceptive withdrawal reflexes are shaped through long-term and not short-term action based sensory encoding.

  17. Sudden infant death triggered by dive reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturri, L; Ottaviani, G; Lavezzi, A M

    2005-01-01

    The dive reflex is the reflex mechanism most frequently considered in the aetiopathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). This seems to persist in human beings as an inheritance from diver birds and amphibians. It has been reported that washing the face with cold water or plunging into cold water can provoke cardiac deceleration through the intervention of the ambiguus and the vagal dorsal nuclei. This report describes a case of SIDS that offers a unique insight into the role of the dive reflex in determining a lethal outcome. Examination of the brainstem on serial sections revealed severe bilateral hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus and gliosis of the other cardiorespiratory medullary nuclei. The coronary and cardiac conduction arteries presented early atherosclerotic lesions. The possible role of parental cigarette smoking in the pathogenesis of arcuate nucleus hypoplasia and early coronary atherosclerotic lesions is also discussed. PMID:15623488

  18. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    . The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed......During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise...... of an increase in BP during exercise with paralysed legs manifests, although electrical stimulation of muscles enhances lactate release and reduces muscle glycogen. Thus, the exercise pressor reflex enhances sympathetic activity and maintains perfusion pressure by restraining abdominal blood flow, while brain...

  19. Spinal nociceptive reflexes are sensitized in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S; Dobson, K L; Harris, J

    2013-09-01

    Evidence suggests that osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with altered central pain processing. We assessed the effects of experimentally induced OA on the excitability of spinal nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWRs), and their supraspinal control in a preclinical OA model. Experimental OA was induced in rats with knee injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) and pain behaviour was assessed. 14/28 days post-MIA or saline injection, rats were anaesthetised for spinal NWR recording from tibialis anterior (TA) and biceps femoris (BF) hind limb muscles during plantar hind paw stimulation. Thresholds, receptive field sizes and wind up (incremental increase to repetitive stimulation) were measured in intact (d14/28) and spinalised (severed spinal cord; d28) MIA- and saline-injected rats. MIA reduced BF mechanical thresholds at day 28. Spinalisation of MIA rats did not prevent this hyperexcitability, and failed to produce the reduction in reflex receptive field (RRF) size observed in saline rats. These data indicate that MIA induces a hyperexcitability of BF NWR circuits that is maintained at the spinal level. In contrast, MIA appeared to have no effect on NWRs evoked by mechanical stimuli in the ankle flexor TA in intact rats, however spinalisation revealed hyperexcitability. Thus, 28 days following MIA-treatment, descending supraspinal inhibition normalised TA NWRs and was only overcome following repetitive noxious stimulation during wind up. We demonstrate that spinal nociceptive reflex pathways are sensitized following the development of OA, suggesting the presence of central sensitization. Further, our data reflect OA-induced alterations in the descending control of reflex responses. Our findings contribute to a mechanism-based understanding of OA pain. © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does patterned afferent stimulation of sacral dermatomes suppress urethral sphincter reflexes in individuals with spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoin, Jaime L; Bhadra, Narendra; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J

    2015-03-01

    Dyssynergic contractions of the external urethral sphincter prevent efficient bladder voiding and lead to numerous health concerns. Patterned electrical stimulation of the sacral dermatomes reduces urethral sphincter spasms and allows functional bladder emptying in cats after chronic SCI. Reflex suppression in animals is strongly dependent on stimulus location and pattern. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the stimulation patterns and locations effective in animals suppress urethral sphincter spasms in humans with SCI. Ten subjects with chronic SCI underwent bladder filling to elicit distention-evoked contractions. During reflex contractions patterned electrical stimulation was applied to the S2 or S3 dermatome in random 25-sec intervals. Bladder and sphincter pressures were simultaneously recorded and compared between control and afferent stimulation periods. Six of the 10 subjects demonstrated both reflex bladder and sphincter contractions with bladder filling. No significant reduction in urethral pressure was observed during stimulation for any stimulus locations and patterns tested. Stimulation parameters and locations effective in SCI animals did not suppress reflex sphincter activity in these human subjects. It is likely that a broader set of stimulus patterns and dermatome locations will need to be tested to find the effective combination in humans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of pelvic floor muscle contraction on vesical and rectal function with identification of puborectalis-rectovesical inhibitory reflex and levator-rectovesical excitatory reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-08-01

    changes. Repetition of the test using saline instead of xylocaine resulted in rectal and vesical pressure responses similar to those without the use of saline. In conclusion, the decline in rectal and vesical responses upon PR muscle contraction indicates a reflex relationship which we term 'puborectalis rectovesical inhibitory reflex'. This reflex is suggested to abort the urge to defecate or urinate. In contrast, LA muscle contraction produced rectal and vesical pressure elevation which is suggested to be mediated through the 'levator rectovesical excitatory reflex'. 'This reflex is probably evoked to promote rectal and vesical evacuation.

  2. Descending Influences on Vestibulospinal and Vestibulosympathetic Reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Andrew A.; Miller, Derek M.; Yates, Bill J.

    2017-01-01

    This review considers the integration of vestibular and other signals by the central nervous system pathways that participate in balance control and blood pressure regulation, with an emphasis on how this integration may modify posture-related responses in accordance with behavioral context. Two pathways convey vestibular signals to limb motoneurons: the lateral vestibulospinal tract and reticulospinal projections. Both pathways receive direct inputs from the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, and also integrate vestibular, spinal, and other inputs. Decerebration in animals or strokes that interrupt corticobulbar projections in humans alter the gain of vestibulospinal reflexes and the responses of vestibular nucleus neurons to particular stimuli. This evidence shows that supratentorial regions modify the activity of the vestibular system, but the functional importance of descending influences on vestibulospinal reflexes acting on the limbs is currently unknown. It is often overlooked that the vestibulospinal and reticulospinal systems mainly terminate on spinal interneurons, and not directly on motoneurons, yet little is known about the transformation of vestibular signals that occurs in the spinal cord. Unexpected changes in body position that elicit vestibulospinal reflexes can also produce vestibulosympathetic responses that serve to maintain stable blood pressure. Vestibulosympathetic reflexes are mediated, at least in part, through a specialized group of reticulospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla that project to sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord. However, other pathways may also contribute to these responses, including those that dually participate in motor control and regulation of sympathetic nervous system activity. Vestibulosympathetic reflexes differ in conscious and decerebrate animals, indicating that supratentorial regions alter these responses. However, as with vestibular reflexes acting on the limbs, little is known

  3. Transient Evoked aotacoustic emissions otologically normal adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUTH

    Objective: To examine the effects of aging on the existence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in normal adult. Material and methods 40 ... wax or any middle ear pathology which might affect the recording at TEOAEs. After that, ... related to decreased hearing sensitivity and are independent of aging, Previous studies.

  4. Neural correlates of evoked phantom limb sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, J; Diers, M; Milde, C; Frobel, C; Kleinböhl, D; Flor, H

    2017-05-01

    Previous work showed the existence of changes in the topographic organization within the somatosensory cortex (SI) in amputees with phantom limb pain, however, the link between nonpainful phantom sensations such as cramping or tingling or the percept of the limb and cortical changes is less clear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a highly selective group of limb amputees who experienced inducible and reproducible nonpainful phantom sensations. A standardized procedure was used to locate body sites eliciting phantom sensations in each amputee. Selected body sites that could systematically evoke phantom sensations were stimulated using electrical pulses in order to induce phasic phantom sensations. Homologous body parts were also stimulated in a group of matched controls. Activations related to evoked phantom sensations were found bilaterally in SI and the intraparietal sulci (IPS), which significantly correlated with the intensity of evoked phantom sensations. In addition, we found differences in intra- and interhemispheric interaction between amputees and controls during evoked phantom sensations. We assume that phantom sensations might be associated with a functional decoupling between bilateral SI and IPS, possibly resulting from transcallosal reorganization mechanisms following amputation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail , and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  6. The effect of elbow position on biceps tendon reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Isik; Nilufer, Balci; Mehmet, Beyazova

    2004-09-01

    Testing of tendon (T) reflex is the basic method used in the diagnostic procedure of clinical neurology. Measurement of T reflexes precisely can be a valuable adjunct to clinical examination. Quantification of T reflexes may provide more accurate results. To analyze the effect of elbow position on biceps T reflex. A self-controlled clinical trial of biceps T reflex testing at the Electrophysiology Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Biceps T reflex was obtained utilizing a hand-held electronic reflex hammer in 50 extremities of 25 healthy volunteers and the effect of elbow position (at 90 degrees , 120 degrees and 150 degrees ) on reflex response was evaluated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance by the General Linear Model and Pearson correlation test procedures. Onset latency was significantly shorter at 120 degrees of elbow position. The maximum amplitude value of biceps T reflex was obtained at 90 degrees of elbow position. Onset latency of the reflex correlated significantly with the height and arm length but not with age. The electrophysiological measurement of T reflexes is an easy and useful method in the quantification of reflexes, supplying more objective data. However, when performing T reflex studies, the position of the extremity should be taken into consideration to achieve more reliable results.

  7. Nonlinear stretch reflex interaction during cocontraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R R; Crago, P E; Gorman, P H

    1993-03-01

    1. We investigated the role of stretch reflexes in controlling two antagonist muscles acting at the interphalangeal joint in the normal human thumb. Reflex action was compared when either muscle contracted alone and during cocontraction. 2. The total torque of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and extensor pollicis longus (EPL) muscles was measured in response to an externally imposed extension of the interphalangeal joint. The initial joint angle and the amplitude of the extension were constant in all experiments, and the preload of the active muscle(s) was varied. Joint torque was measured at the peak of short-latency stretch reflex action during contraction of the FPL alone, contraction of the EPL alone, and during cocontraction. Incremental joint stiffness was calculated as the change in torque divided by the change in angle. 3. Incremental stiffness increased in proportion to the preload torque during single muscle contractions of either the FPL (lengthening disturbances) or the EPL (shortening disturbances). Thus stiffness was not regulated to a constant value in the face of varying loads for either single muscle stretch or release. 4. Incremental stiffness varied across the range of cocontraction levels while the net torque was maintained at approximately 0. Thus net torque alone did not determine the stiffness during cocontraction. 5. The contributions of each muscle to the net intrinsic torque during cocontraction were estimated by scaling the individual muscles' responses so that their sum gave the best fit (in a least-squares sense) to the cocontraction torque before reflex action. The solution is unique because the individual torques have opposite signs, but the stiffnesses add. This gave estimates of the initial torques of both muscles during cocontraction. 6. The contributions of the two muscles during cocontraction were used to estimate the active joint stiffness that would be expected if the two muscles were activated independently to the same levels

  8. Comparison of Stretch Reflex Torques in Ankle Dorsiflexors and Plantarflexors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tung, J

    2001-01-01

    ...) ankle muscles, Pulse, step, and a combination of random perturbation and step inputs were used to identify the reflex and intrinsic contributions to the measured torque, TA reflex torques were very...

  9. How many theta roles in a reflexive verb?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitriadis, Alexis|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304366455; Everaert, Martin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071746080

    2014-01-01

    While purely syntactic approaches to reflexivization have characterized reflexive verbs in terms of detransitivization, we show that there is a discrepancy between syntactic and semantic arity. Reflexive verbs are syntactically intransitive, but semantically they are two-place predicates: both

  10. Observations on the genesis of the stretch reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, F W; MacDermott, N; Matthews, P B; Richardson, H C

    1986-04-01

    Using surface electromyography the reflex response of flexor carpi radialis elicited by forcibly dorsiflexing the wrist was compared with that elicited by applying vibration percutaneously to its tendon. This was done both in patients with Parkinson's disease and in normal subjects. The reflexes were elicited on top of a pre-existing voluntary contraction of the muscle of about 20 per cent maximum. The responses in parkinsonism were qualitatively similar to the normal, but differed quantitatively in certain respects. The response to 'stretch' of the muscle by wrist dorsiflexion normally continued at a high level up to at least 80 ms from the beginning of the movement, commonly with an apparent separation into 'short' and 'long' latency responses. On average, the later components of the response were enhanced in parkinsonian patients in comparison with the normals, confirming other workers' findings; they were also prolonged. The short-latency responses were unchanged. Vibration, in contrast, elicited solely a short-latency response with the initial reflexly-evoked augmentation of EMG activity coming to an end 40 to 50 ms from the beginning of the stimulation, even though the vibration was continuing. Such an absence of the later components that were so prominent with stretch was found whatever the size of the initial short-latency response evoked by vibration, including when it was comparable to that evoked by stretch in the same subject. This purely short-latency vibration response was on average unchanged in parkinsonism. The findings support the hypothesis, already advanced for the long flexor of the thumb, that the long-latency components of response are largely attributable to a spinal excitatory action of the spindle group II afferents with the delay arising from the slowness of their conduction. They are not readily compatible with either of the two major alternative hypotheses, namely the 'long-loop' (or transcortical) hypothesis and the 'resonance

  11. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K; Darokhan, Ziauddin

    2016-01-01

    attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization...

  12. Assessment of Primitive Reflexes in High-risk Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Min; Ahn, Youngmee; Lee, Sangmi

    2011-12-01

    Assessment of primitive reflexes is one of the earliest, simplest, and most frequently used assessment tools among health care providers for newborns and young infants. However, very few data exist for high-risk infants in this topic. Among the various primitive reflexes, this study was undertaken particularly to describe the sucking, Babinski and Moro reflexes in high-risk newborns and to explore their relationships with clinical variables. This study is a cross-sectional descriptive study. Sixty seven high-risk newborns including full-term infants required intensive care as well as premature infants were recruited in a neonatal intensive care unit using convenient sampling method. The sucking, Babinski and Moro reflexes were assessed and classified by normal, abnormal and absence. To explore their relationships with clinical variables, birth-related variables, brain sonogram results, and behavioral state (the Anderson Behavioral State Scale, ABSS) and mental status (the Infant Coma Scale, ICS) were assessed. The sucking reflex presented a normal response most frequently (63.5%), followed by Babinski reflex (58.7%) and Moro reflex (42.9%). Newborns who presented normal sucking and Babinski reflex responses were more likely to have older gestational age, heavier birth and current weight, higher Apgar scores, shorter length of hospitalization, better respiratory conditions, and better mental status assessed by ICS, but not with Moro reflex. High risk newborns presented more frequent abnormal and absence responses of primitive reflex and the proportions of the responses varied by reflex. Further researches are necessary in exploring diverse aspects of primitive reflexes and revealing their clinical implication in the high-risk newborns that are unique and different to normal healthy newborns. Primitive reflex; High risk infants; Korean; Moro reflex; Sucking reflex; Babinski reflex; The Anderson Behavioral State Scale; Infant Coma Scale.

  13. The role of prostaglandins in spinal transmission of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Audrey J.; Copp, Steven W.; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies found that prostaglandins in skeletal muscle play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex; however the role played by prostaglandins in the spinal transmission of the reflex is not known. We determined, therefore, whether or not spinal blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and/or spinal blockade of endoperoxide receptor (EP) 2 or EP4 receptors attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats. We first established that intrathecal doses of a non-specific COX inhibitor Ketorolac (100ug in 10ul), a COX-2 specific inhibitor Celecoxib (100μg in 10μl), an EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 (10μg in 10μl), and an EP4 antagonist L-161,982 (4μg in 10μl) effectively attenuated the pressor responses to intrathecal injections of Arachidonic Acid (100μg in 10μl), EP2 agonist Butaprost (4ng in 10 μl), and EP4 agonist TCS 2510 (6.25μg in 2.5 μl), respectively. Once effective doses were established, we statically contracted the hindlimb before and after intrathecal injections of Ketorolac, Celecoxib, the EP2 antagonist and the EP4 antagonist. We found that Ketorolac significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before Ketorolac: 23±5 mmHg, after Ketorolac 14±5 mmHg; p<0.05) whereas Celecoxib had no effect. We also found that 8μg of L-161,982, but not 4 μg of L-161,982, significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before L-161,982: 21±4 mmHg, after L-161,982 12±3 mmHg; p<0.05), whereas PF-04418948 (10μg) had no effect. We conclude that spinal COX-1, but not COX-2, plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex, and that the spinal prostaglandins produced by this enzyme are most likely activating spinal EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors. PMID:25003710

  14. Reflex anuria after renal tumor embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervancioglu, Selim; Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  15. Madonna as a symbol of reflexive modernisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.; ter Hoeven, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The communication of social and cultural tensions embodied in the symbol Madonna explain the unparalleled public and scientific fascination for this cultural phenomenon. These tensions can be seen as communications of reflexive modernisation, in which modernisation has produced its own counterforce.

  16. Reflex epilepsy: triggers and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudan ZV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeynep Vildan Okudan,1 Çiğdem Özkara2 1Department of Neurology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Reflex epilepsies (REs are identified as epileptic seizures that are consistently induced by identifiable and objective-specific triggers, which may be an afferent stimulus or by the patient’s own activity. RE may have different subtypes depending on the stimulus characteristic. There are significant clinical and electrophysiologic differences between different RE types. Visual stimuli-sensitive or photosensitive epilepsies constitute a large proportion of the RE and are mainly related to genetic causes. Reflex epilepsies may present with focal or generalized seizures due to specific triggers, and sometimes seizures may occur spontaneously. The stimuli can be external (light flashes, hot water, internal (emotion, thinking, or both and should be distinguished from triggering precipitants, which most epileptic patients could report such as emotional stress, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. Different genetic and acquired factors may play a role in etiology of RE. This review will provide a current overview of the triggering factors and management of reflex seizures. Keywords: seizure, reflex epilepsy, photosensitivity, hot water, reading, thinking

  17. Blink reflex in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkholy, Saly H; Hosny, Hanan M; Shalaby, Nevein M; El-Hadidy, Reem A; Abd El-Rahim, Noha T; Mohamed, Manal M

    2014-12-01

    An evaluation of the extent of damage of the central nervous system in diabetes mellitus is of high value in current research. Electrophysiological abnormalities are frequently present in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic cranial neuropathy is one of the complications of the disease. Blink reflex is used to diagnose subclinical cranial neuropathy. The objective is to test the utility of blink reflex in detecting subclinical cranial nerve involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged from 30 to 60 years examined clinically and neurologically. Blink reflex and nerve conduction studies for the upper and lower limbs were performed and compared with 20 matched normal controls. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy showed significant prolonged distal latency and reduced amplitudes of the R2C response compared with the control, patients without peripheral neuropathy showed insignificant changes. Alteration of R2 correlated with the type of treatment and the duration of the disease. In patients without peripheral neuropathy, ulnar sensory distal latencies showed significant positive correlation with R2I latency, whereas its Conduction Velocity (CV) showed significant positive correlation with R2C amplitudes and negative correlation with R2C latency. R2C is the most sensitive parameter in the blink reflex, which can help in the diagnosis of subclinical diabetic cranial neuropathy.

  18. The Doyle-Saleh blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, P W; Beegun, I; Saleh, H A

    2017-04-01

    When performing septoplasty or septorhinoplasty, we have observed that patients blink on injection of local anaesthetic (lidocaine 1 per cent with adrenaline 1:80 000) into the nasal mucosa of the anterior septum or vestibular skin, despite appropriate general anaesthesia. This study sought to quantify this phenomenon by conducting a prospective audit of all patients undergoing septoplasty or septorhinoplasty. Patients were observed for a blink reflex at the time of local anaesthetic infiltration into the nasal vestibule. Also measured at this point were propofol target-controlled infusion levels, remifentanil rate, bispectral index, blood pressure, heart rate, pupil size and position, and patient movement. There were 15 blink reflexes in the 30 patients observed. The average bispectral index value was 32.75 (range, 22-50) in the blink group and 26.77 (range, 18-49) in the non-blink group. No patients moved on local anaesthetic injection. The blink reflex appears to occur in 50 per cent of patients, despite a deep level of anaesthesia. Without an understanding and appreciation of the blink reflex, this event may result in a request to deepen anaesthesia, but this is not necessary and surgery can proceed safely.

  19. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  20. Reflexivity on Banach Spaces of Analytic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yousefi and J. Doroodgar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available . Let X be a Banach space of functions analytic on a plane domain Ω such that for every λ in Ω the functional of evaluation at λ is bounded. Assume further that X contains the constants and admits multiplication by the independent variable z, Mz, as a bounded operator. We give sufficient conditions for Mz to be reflexive.

  1. Scrutinising the reflexive ethnography of Urban Outcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Troels Schultz

    2016-01-01

    The core of Bourdieu and Wacquant’s ‘epistemic reflexivity’ demands an embodied reflexivity which takes up the point of view of the practice and the social problems under study via a reflection and reconstruction of the point of view of the ethnographer as an agent embedded in a scientific practi...

  2. Trigeminal laser-evoked potentials: a neurophysiological tool to detect post-surgical outcome in trigeminovascular contact neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squintani, G; Turri, M; Donato, F; Tinazzi, M; Masotto, B; Tramontano, V; Talacchi, A; Sala, F; Moretto, G; Valeriani, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the nociceptive system of patients affected by trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to documented vascular contact who underwent microvascular decompression. For that purpose, we used the classical trigeminal reflexes and the trigeminal laser-evoked potentials (tLEPs) before and after surgery, in order to verify any possible change after decompression and determine if there was any correlation between the neurophysiological parameters and the clinical outcome. Eleven patients affected by TN caused by trigeminovascular contact and 10 age-matched controls underwent conventional trigeminal reflexes (bilateral Blink Reflex/BR and Masseter Inhibitory Reflex stimulating infraorbital and mental nerves/MIR V2 and V3) and tLEPs. Patients repeated neurophysiological tests one week after surgery. Short-latency BR and MIR were normal in all patients before surgery and there was no statistical difference before and after surgery. Conversely, in patients before surgery, tLEPs' amplitudes were significantly lower in the affected than in the healthy side (p = 0.017 for V2 and 0.037 for V3 branches). After surgery, on the affected side, tLEP amplitude increased and the pre/post-operative difference was significant (p = 0.017 for V2 and 0.028 for V3 divisions). Nine patients referred satisfactory pain relief and the favourable clinical outcome correlated with the neurophysiological recovery. This study demonstrates that TN caused by trigeminovascular compression may be related to Aδ fibres impairment, and tLEPs are more sensitive than conventional trigeminal reflexes to reveal small fibre dysfunction and to monitor the post-surgical outcome in these patients. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  3. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  4. Reliability of the clinical and electromyographic examination of tendon reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1990-01-01

    The reliability of clinical examination of the tendon reflexes was examined by studying inter-observer agreement. Twenty patients were examined by three neurologists. The briskness of the tendon reflexes in arms and legs was scored on a nine-point scale. In 28% of the 160 examined reflexes the

  5. Modulation of spinal reflexes by aversive and sexually appetitive stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Stephanie; Everaerd, Walter; Laan, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    In this study, modulation of spinal tendinous (T) reflexes by sexual stimulation was investigated. T reflexes are augmented in states of appetitive and defensive action and modified by differences in arousal intensity. Reflexes were expected to be facilitated by both pleasant (sexual) and unpleasant

  6. Consistency of the Babinski reflex and its variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singerman, J; Lee, L

    2008-09-01

    The Babinski Reflex, first described in 1896, is still an integral part of the neurological examination. Many have studied the consistency of this reflex, but none have compared the inter- and intra-observer consistency of the Babinski reflex and its variants. Thirty-four subjects were examined by six neurologists. The Babinski, Gordon, Chaddock, and Oppenheim reflexes were tested, and each neurologist concluded if the plantar response was flexor or extensor. Six subjects were re-tested 1 week later to determine intra-observer consistency. The Babinski reflex had the highest interobserver consistency with a kappa value of 0.5491. The Chaddock, Oppenheim, and Gordon reflexes had kappa values of 0.4065, 0.3739, and 0.3515, respectively. For intra-observer consistency, Gordon was the most consistent with a kappa value of 0.6731. When reflexes were combined in pairs, the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes together were the most reliable. The Babinski reflex was shown to be the most consistent between examiners. The Gordon reflex had the highest intra-observer consistency; however, the small sample size should limit conclusions drawn from this calculation. Clinicians often utilize more than one reflex to examine the plantar response; the combination of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes was the most reliable.

  7. Rapid shallow breathing evoked by selective stimulation of airway C fibres in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Roberts, A M

    1983-07-01

    1. We have examined the reflex changes in breathing evoked in anaesthetized dogs by stimulation of the afferent vagal C fibres that supply the intrapulmonary and lower extrapulmonary airways. We stimulated bronchial (intrapulmonary) C fibres selectively by injecting bradykinin into the right bronchial artery (the chest had been opened briefly for insertion of a bronchial arterial catheter).2. Bronchial arterial injection of bradykinin (0.15-1.5 mug in 3-6 sec) usually caused a brief bout of rapid shallow breathing, which was sometimes preceded by apnoea. Infusion of bradykinin (0.2-2.0 mug min(-1) for 2-12 min) caused prolonged rapid shallow breathing, the breathing frequency (f) increasing by 19-102% and tidal volume (V(T)) decreasing by 13-87%; end-tidal P(CO2) decreased by 2-9 mmHg in several experiments. Rapid shallow breathing was also evoked by administration of bradykinin aerosol through a lower tracheal cannula.3. Cutting the vagus nerves or cooling them to 0 degrees C abolished the prolonged rapid shallow breathing evoked by bradykinin, but intermittent disturbances of breathing could still be elicited in some dogs. These residual effects often consisted of irregular spasmodic inspirations, which were abolished by avulsion of the right upper thoracic sympathetic chain.4. Rapid shallow breathing was accompanied by contraction of airway smooth muscle in an innervated segment of the upper trachea; contraction was abolished by cutting or cooling the vagus nerves.5. Arterial blood pressure often decreased briefly when bradykinin was injected into the bronchial artery; changes in pressure were smaller and less frequent when bradykinin was infused slowly, and pressure was usually unaltered when bradykinin was administered as an aerosol. Rapid shallow breathing occurred whether pressure decreased, increased or was unchanged. A number of other observations indicated that the changes in breathing were independent of the changes in blood pressure. Changes in heart

  8. New Molecular Knowledge Towards the Trigemino-Cardiac Reflex as a Cerebral Oxygen-Conserving Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called “oxygen-conserving reflexes”. Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF, with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc. Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  9. Wiener kernel analysis of a noise-evoked otoacoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P; Maat, A; Wit, H P

    1997-01-01

    In one specimen of the frog species, Rana esculenta, the following were measured: (1) a spontaneous otoacoustic emission; (2) a click-evoked otoacoustic emissions; and (3) a noise evoked otoacoustic emission. From the noise evoked emission response, a first-and a second-order Wiener kernel and the

  10. Does spasticity result from hyperactive stretch reflexes? Preliminary findings from a stretch reflex characterization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Torres, J De J; Pandyan, A D; Price, C I M; Davidson, R I; Barnes, M P; Johnson, G R

    2004-06-17

    To characterize the stretch reflex response of the biceps brachii in stroke patients with elbow spasticity (prior to or within 15 min of treatment with botulinum toxin) and non-impaired volunteers with the aim of quantifying the stretch reflex excitability and observe the differences between the groups. A cross-sectional study. Stretch reflexes from the biceps brachii were elicited following a controlled elbow extension. The amplitude, latency, rise time and duration, calculated from surface EMG recordings from the biceps brachii, were used to characterize the stretch reflex response. Seventeen non-impaired and 14 stroke patients participated. The amplitude was significantly lower in stroke patients than in non-impaired volunteers (p0.10). Reduction in the amplitude in stroke patients was unexpected suggesting the stretch reflex is not necessarily hyper-excitable in people with clinically diagnosed spasticity. Latency differences suggest decreased presynaptic inhibition and/or increased motor neurone excitability can occur following a stroke. However, carry over effects from previous botulinum toxin treatment may have confounded amplitude measurements. Further work evaluating the excitability of the stretch reflex independent of Botulinum toxin and its contribution to resistance to passive stretching is being conducted.

  11. Thought-evoking approaches in engineering problems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In creating the value-added product in not distant future, it is necessary and inevitable to establish a holistic and though-evoking approach to the engineering problem, which should be at least associated with the inter-disciplinary knowledge and thought processes across the whole engineering spheres. It is furthermore desirable to integrate it with trans-disciplinary aspects ranging from manufacturing culture, through liberal-arts engineering, and industrial sociology.   The thought-evoking approach can be exemplified and typified by representative engineering problems: unveiling essential features in ‘Tangential Force Ratio and Interface Pressure’, prototype development for ‘Bio-mimetic Needle’ and application of ‘Water-jet Machining to Artificial Hip Joint’, product innovation in ‘Heat Sink for Computer’, application of ‘Graph Theory’ to similarity evaluation of production systems, leverage among reciprocity attributes in ‘Industrial and Engineering Designs for Machine Enclosure’,...

  12. Relation Between the Frequency of Short-Pulse Electrical Stimulation of Afferent Nerve Fibers and Evoked Muscle Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob; Leerskov, Kasper; Czyzewska, Magdalena; Rasmussen, Rune

    Objective: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is conventionally performed by the stimulation of motor axons causing the muscle fibers innervated by these axons to contract. An alternative strategy that may evoke contractions with more natural motor unit behavior is to stimulate afferent fibers (primarily type Ia) to excite the motor neurons at the spinal level. The aim of the study was to investigate the range of forces that can be evoked in this way and the degree to which the torque can be controlled. Methods: We stimulated the tibial nerve of ten healthy participants at amplitudes at which the highest H-reflex with minimal M-wave was present. The evoked plantar flexion torque was recorded following short stimulation pulses (0.4 ms) with frequencies ranging from 20 to 200 Hz. Results: Across all subjects, the median highest evocable torque was 38.3% (quartiles: 16.9-51.0) of the maximum voluntary contraction torque (MVC). The average torque variability (standard deviation) was 1.7 +/- 0.7% MVC. For most subjects, the relation between stimulation frequency and evoked torque was well characterized by sigmoidal curves (median root mean square error: 6.4% MVC). The plateau of this sigmoid curve (indicating the range of frequencies over which torque amplitude could be modulated) was reached at 56.0 (quartiles: 29.4-81.9) Hz. Conclusion: Using the proposed method for FES, substantial evoked torques that could be controlled by stimulation frequency were achieved. Significance: Stimulation of afferent fibers could be a useful and fatigue-resistant strategy for several applications of FES.Objective: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is conventionally performed by the stimulation of motor axons causing the muscle fibers innervated by these axons to contract. An alternative strategy that may evoke contractions with more natural motor unit behavior is to stimulate afferent fibers (primarily type Ia) to excite the motor neurons at the spinal level. The aim of the

  13. Innervation of reconstructed bladder above the level of spinal cord injury for inducing micturition by contractions of the abdomen-to-bladder reflex arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    To establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in dogs via an abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury to reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore controllable micturition. Ten beagles were used in the experiment. We anastomosed the proximal end of the right T12 ventral root and distal end of the right S2 ventral root by performing autogenous nerve grafting to build an abdomen-to-bladder reflex, whereas the right T12 dorsal root was kept intact. The early function of the reflex arc was evaluated by performing electrophysiological studies as well as by the measurement of intravesicular pressure and histological examination. Single focal stimulation of the right T12 intercostal nerves elicited evoked action potentials at the right vesicular plexus before and after horizontal spinal cord transaction between the L4 and S3 levels. Bladder contraction was successfully initiated by trains of stimuli targeting the right T12 intercostal nerves. The bladder pressures and amplitude of the complex action potentials at the bladder smooth muscles were unchanged after paraplegia was induced; they were comparable to those of the control. Prominent axonal sprouting was observed in the distal part of the nerve graft. Our data showed the effectiveness of bladder innervation above the level of spinal cord injury in inducing micturition by abdomen-to-bladder reflex contractions and, therefore, might provide a new clinical approach for restoring bladder function in individuals with paraplegia.

  14. Music-Evoked Emotions-Current Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt

    2017-01-01

    The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG), event-related brain potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), skin conductance response (SCR), finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection) can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields.

  15. Role of ionotropic GABA, glutamate and glycine receptors in the tonic and reflex control of cardiac vagal outflow in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodchild Ann K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac vagal preganglionic neurons (CVPN are responsible for the tonic, reflex and respiratory modulation of heart rate (HR. Although CVPN receive GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs, likely involved in respiratory and reflex modulation of HR respectively, little else is known regarding the functions controlled by ionotropic inputs. Activation of g-protein coupled receptors (GPCR alters these inputs, but the functional consequence is largely unknown. The present study aimed to delineate how ionotropic GABAergic, glycinergic and glutamatergic inputs contribute to the tonic and reflex control of HR and in particular determine which receptor subtypes were involved. Furthermore, we wished to establish how activation of the 5-HT1A GPCR affects tonic and reflex control of HR and what ionotropic interactions this might involve. Results Microinjection of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin into CVPN decreased HR but did not affect baroreflex bradycardia. The glycine antagonist strychnine did not alter HR or baroreflex bradycardia. Combined microinjection of the NMDA antagonist, MK801, and AMPA antagonist, CNQX, into CVPN evoked a small bradycardia and abolished baroreflex bradycardia. MK801 attenuated whereas CNQX abolished baroreceptor bradycardia. Control intravenous injections of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT evoked a small bradycardia and potentiated baroreflex bradycardia. These effects were still observed following microinjection of picrotoxin but not strychnine into CVPN. Conclusions We conclude that activation of GABAA receptors set the level of HR whereas AMPA to a greater extent than NMDA receptors elicit baroreflex changes in HR. Furthermore, activation of 5-HT1A receptors evokes bradycardia and enhances baroreflex changes in HR due to interactions with glycinergic neurons involving strychnine receptors. This study provides reference for future studies investigating how diseases alter neurochemical inputs to CVPN.

  16. The Interrater Reliability of Subjective Assessments of the Babinski Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Kerr, Samantha; Veliotes, Demetri; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick

    2016-01-01

    The Babinski reflex is a clinical diagnostic tool; however, the interrater reliability of this tool is currently greatly contested. A comparison between rater groups with objective measurements of the Babinski reflex was therefore conducted. Fifteen recorded Babinski reflexes were assessed by 12 neurologists and 12 medical students as being either pathological or nonpathological. Kinematic and electromyographic variables were collected and used to assess which aspects of the Babinski reflex predict classification. Substantial interrater agreement within the neurologist and student groups (κ = .72 and .67, respectively) was shown; however, there were some differing aspects between what neurologists and students used to assess the reflex as determined by objective kinematic measurements.

  17. Peripheral electrical stimulation triggered by self-paced detection of motor intention enhances motor evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Imran Khan; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Jiang, Ning; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2012-07-01

    This paper proposes the development and experimental tests of a self-paced asynchronous brain-computer interfacing (BCI) system that detects movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) produced during motor imagination of ankle dorsiflexion and triggers peripheral electrical stimulations timed with the occurrence of MRCPs to induce corticospinal plasticity. MRCPs were detected online from EEG signals in eight healthy subjects with a true positive rate (TPR) of 67.15 ± 7.87% and false positive rate (FPR) of 22.05 ±9.07%. The excitability of the cortical projection to the target muscle (tibialis anterior) was assessed before and after the intervention through motor evoked potentials (MEP) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The peak of the evoked potential significantly (P=0.02) increased after the BCI intervention by 53 ± 43% (relative to preintervention measure), although the spinal excitability (tested by stretch reflexes) did not change. These results demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to alter the corticospinal projections to the tibialis anterior muscle by using an asynchronous BCI system based on online motor imagination that triggered peripheral stimulation. This type of repetitive proprioceptive feedback training based on self-generated brain signal decoding may be a requirement for purposeful skill acquisition in intact humans and in the rehabilitation of persons with brain damage.

  18. Cortical Evoked Potentials and Hearing Aids in Individuals with Auditory Dys-Synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraj, Pradeep; Mannarukrishnaiah, Jayaram

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between cortical processing of speech and benefit from hearing aids in individuals with auditory dys-synchrony. Data were collected from 38 individuals with auditory dys-synchrony. Participants were selected based on hearing thresholds, middle ear reflexes, otoacoustic emissions, and auditory brain stem responses. Cortical-evoked potentials were recorded for click and speech. Participants with auditory dys-synchrony were fitted with bilateral multichannel wide dynamic range compression hearing aids. Aided and unaided speech identification scores for 40 words were obtained for each participant. Hierarchical cluster analysis using Ward's method clearly showed four subgroups of participants with auditory dys-synchrony based on the hearing aid benefit score (aided minus unaided speech identification score). The difference in the mean aided and unaided speech identification scores was significantly different in participants with auditory dys-synchrony. However, the mean unaided speech identification scores were not significantly different between the four subgroups. The N2 amplitude and P1 latency of the speech-evoked cortical potentials were significantly different between the four subgroups formed based on hearing aid benefit scores. The results indicated that subgroups of individuals with auditory dys-synchrony who benefit from hearing aids exist. Individuals who benefitted from hearing aids showed decreased N2 amplitudes compared with those who did not. N2 amplitude is associated with greater suppression of background noise while processing speech.

  19. Blink perturbation effects on saccades evoked by microstimulation of the superior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnani, Husam A; Van Opstal, A J; Gandhi, Neeraj J

    2012-01-01

    Current knowledge of saccade-blink interactions suggests that blinks have paradoxical effects on saccade generation. Blinks suppress saccade generation by attenuating the oculomotor drive command in structures like the superior colliculus (SC), but they also disinhibit the saccadic system by removing the potent inhibition of pontine omnipause neurons (OPNs). To better characterize these effects, we evoked the trigeminal blink reflex by delivering an air puff to one eye as saccades were evoked by sub-optimal stimulation of the SC. For every stimulation site, the peak and average velocities of stimulation with blink movements (SwBMs) were lower than stimulation-only saccades (SoMs), supporting the notion that the oculomotor drive is weakened in the presence of a blink. In contrast, the duration of the SwBMs was longer, consistent with the hypothesis that the blink-induced inhibition of the OPNs could prolong the window of time available for oculomotor commands to drive an eye movement. The amplitude of the SwBM could also be larger than the SoM amplitude obtained from the same site, particularly for cases in which blink-associated eye movements exhibited the slowest kinematics. The results are interpreted in terms of neural signatures of saccade-blink interactions.

  20. Conditioning stimulus can influence an external urethral sphincter contraction evoked by a magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Bjoern; Reitz, André; Knapp, Peter A; Bannowsky, Andreas; Juenemann, Klaus-Peter; Schurch, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of a conditioning stimulus on an external urethral sphincter (EUS)contraction evoked by a magnetic stimulation at different time intervals. Seven healthy male volunteers underwent EUS pressure measurement. At baseline, magnetic stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord above the motor threshold was performed and evoked EUS pressure responses were recorded. The lumbosacral magnetic stimulation was repeated with same intensity, while a selective electrical dorsal penile nerve stimulation below the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) threshold was preceding at five different intervals (10, 20, 30, 50, 100 msec). The protocol was performed with empty and full bladder (BLA), and baseline responses were statistically compared to those with combined stimulation. When the dorsal penile nerve electrical stimulation preceded the lumbosacral magnetic stimulation by 20 msec (P=0.0048), 50 msec (P=0.0039), or 100 msec (P=0.0002), the amplitudes of the EUS pressure response with empty BLA were significantly reduced compared to lumbosacral magnetic stimulation alone. With a filled BLA, the amplitudes of the EUS were significantly reduced only at an interval of 50 msec (Pstimulation seems to have the capacity to inhibit the external urethral sphincter contraction induced by a magnetic stimulation. The inhibitory effect seems to depend on the latency between the peripheral and lumbosacral stimulation as well as on the degree of BLA filling. It remains to be proved if the neuromodulative effect of the conditional stimulus occurs at a spinal or supraspinal level. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Desensitization of the cough reflex by exercise and voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni A; Chellini, Elisa; Magni, Chiara; Duranti, Roberto; Widdicombe, John

    2010-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of exercise on the sensory and cognitive aspects of coughing evoked by inhalation of tussigenic agents. The threshold for the cough reflex induced by inhalation of increasing nebulizer outputs of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (fog), an index of cough reflex sensitivity, was assessed in twelve healthy humans in control conditions, during exercise and during voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea (VIH) at the same ventilatory level as the exercise. The intensity of the urge to cough (UTC), a cognitive component of coughing, was recorded throughout the trials on a linear scale. The relationships between inhaled fog nebulizer outputs and the correspondingly evoked UTC values, an index of the perceptual magnitude of the UTC sensitivity, were also calculated. Cough appearance was always assessed audiovisually. At an exercise level of 80% of anaerobic threshold, the median cough threshold was increased from a control value of 0.73 to 2.22 ml/min (PVIH, the threshold increased from 0.73 to 2.22 ml/min (PVIH compared with control, mean UTC values at cough threshold were unchanged, i.e., control, 3.83 cm; exercise, 3.12 cm; VIH, 4.08 cm. The relationship of the fog nebulizer output/UTC value was linear in control conditions and logarithmic during both exercise and VIH. The perception of the magnitude of the UTC seems to be influenced by signals or sensations arising from exercising limb and thoracic muscles and/or by higher nervous (cortical) mechanisms. The results indicate that the adjustments brought into action by exercise-induced or voluntary hyperpnea exert inhibitory influences on the sensory and cognitive components of fog-induced cough.

  2. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Micarelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20 and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances.

  3. Reflexive cartography a new perspective in mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Casti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Reflexive Cartography addresses the adaptation of cartography, including its digital forms (GIS, WebGIS, PPGIS), to the changing needs of society, and outlines the experimental context aimed at mapping a topological space. Using rigorous scientific analysis based on statement consistency, relevance of the proposals, and model accessibility, it charts the transition from topographical maps created by state agencies to open mapping produced by citizens. Adopting semiotic theory to uncover the complex communicative mechanisms of maps and to investigate their ability to produce their own messages and new perspectives, Reflexive Cartography outlines a shift in our way of conceptualizing maps: from a plastic metaphor of reality, as they are generally considered, to solid tools that play the role of agents, assisting citizens as they think and plan their own living place and make sense of the current world. Applies a range of technologies to theoretical perspectives on mapping to innovatively map the world's geogr...

  4. The Reflexive Principle of Sociological Theorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaidullayeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to describe the reflexive principle in theory-making, which integrates the basic modern methodological paradigms and lays the foundation for the development of sociology. On the basis of the theoretical ideas of P. Bourdieu, A. Giddens and P. Ricoeur the author defines the concept of social reflexion and reveals its peculiarities in sociology as compared to reflexion in philosophy. According to the author, the fulfillment of reflexive functions in sociology is connected with the task of analyzing the complex structure of the polysemantic object, considering the specific quality of the subjects and their various trends of development. The presence of the poles — objectivity-subjectivity, rationality-irrationality, consciousness-unconsciousness etc, requires a reproduction of the dichotomies engendering them in social life and development of cognitive methods for their study in sociology.

  5. Acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Andrea; Albera, Roberto; Lacilla, Michelangelo; Canosa, Antonio; Albera, Andrea; Sacco, Francesca; Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate acoustic reflex testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Amplitude, latency, and rise time of stapedial reflex were recorded for 500 and 1000 Hz contralateral stimulus. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test and the level of significance was set at 5 %. Fifty-one amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied. Patients were further divided in two groups: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar (38 cases, with bulbar signs at evaluation) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal (13 cases, without bulbar signs at evaluation). Stapedial reflex was present in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean amplitude, latency, and rise time between the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as compared with the controls. Amplitude was lower in both the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients than in the controls (p amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with bulbar signs and, moreover, suggesting a possible subclinical involvement of the stapedial motor neuron even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients. Amplitude and rise time seem to be good sensitive parameters for investigating subclinical bulbar involvement.

  6. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of heart activity during withdrawal reflexes in the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherill, Daniel; Chase, Ronald

    2005-04-01

    The beating activity of the molluscan heart is myogenic, but it is influenced by nervous signals of central origin. Previous studies have demonstrated changes in cardiac output during feeding and other behaviors. Here, we describe a short latency, transient cardiac response that accompanies withdrawal reflexes. When evoked by electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, the response was detected within one or two heartbeats. Beat amplitudes increased on average 11.6%, and inter-beat intervals decreased on average 2.1%. The mean duration of the response was 28.1 s. A transient inhibitory phase often preceded the excitatory response. Results from testing various nerves and tissues show that the cardiac responses invariably occur whenever contractions of the tentacle retractor muscle are elicited. Even stimulation of the ovotestis and the kidney elicit responses despite their protected locations within the mantle cavity. Three excitatory cardioactive neurons are identified in the central nervous system of Helix aspersa, and their involvement in the reflex response is documented. The results suggest that the heart output is initially inhibited to relax the hydroskeleton and thereby aid withdrawal movements. A delayed increase in cardiac output then facilitates the re-inflation, hence eversion, of the withdrawn body parts.

  8. Laser Doppler Assessment of Vasomotor Axon Reflex Responsiveness to Evaluate Neurovascular Function

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    Marie Luise Kubasch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The vasomotor axon reflex can be evoked in peripheral epidermal nociceptive C-fibers to induce local vasodilation. This neurogenic flare response is a measure of C-fiber functional integrity and therefore shows impairment in patients with small fiber neuropathy. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF and laser Doppler imaging (LDI are both techniques to analyze vasomotor small fiber function by quantifying the integrity of the vasomotor-mediated axon reflex. While LDF assesses the flare response following acetylcholine iontophoresis with temporal resolution at a single defined skin point, LDI records flare responses with spatial and temporal resolution, generating a two-dimensional map of superficial blood flow. LDF is characterized by a high intra- and interindividual measurement variability, which is smaller in LDI due to its spatial resolution. Nevertheless, LDI still lacks standardized methods for image analysis. Consequently, use of the technique currently remains on an experimental level. Here, we sought to review the current literature on laser Doppler assessment of vasomotor function and discuss potential future applications of established techniques as well as those that are still experimental.

  9. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants’ judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information

  10. Primitive reflexes distinguish vascular parkinsonism from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Bungo; Kawabata, Keita; Tachibana, Hisao; Kamogawa, Kenji; Okamoto, Kensho

    2008-06-01

    Although vascular parkinsonism (VP) occurs frequently in the elderly, its clinical features have not been investigated in detail, particularly in comparison with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study is to clarify the diagnostic value of pathological reflexes in differentiating between VP and PD. In 132 patients with PD and 55 with VP, pathological reflexes, including snout reflex (SR), palmomental reflex (PMR), corneomandibular reflex (CMR), jaw reflex (JR), Hoffmann reflex (HR), and extensor plantar response (EPR), were evaluated. The percentage of each pathological reflex elicited in two groups (VP:PD) was as follows: SR (78:30), PMR (53:26), CMR (9:6), JR (33:12), HR (29:11), and EPR (25:8). The prevalence of pathological reflexes, except for CMR, was significantly higher in the VP patients than in the PD patients. In particular, SR and PMR were more frequent than upper motor neuron signs in the VP patients. The sensitivity and specificity of either SR or PMR for VP were 84% and 82%. Snout and palmomental reflexes are useful tools in the differentiation between VP and PD.

  11. Music-Evoked Emotions—Current Studies

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    Hans-Eckhardt Schaefer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET, which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG, event-related brain potentials (ERP, magnetoencephalography (MEG, skin conductance response (SCR, finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields.

  12. Music-Evoked Emotions—Current Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt

    2017-01-01

    The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG), event-related brain potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), skin conductance response (SCR), finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection) can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields. PMID:29225563

  13. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983 basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles / bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the skin conductance response and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles / bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  14. Polyfunctionality and distribution of reflexive verbs in Latvian

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    Andra Kalnača

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current paper is to analyze Latvian reflexive verbs from the point of view of their polyfunctionality and distributon.The polysemy of the reflexive verbs is not usually disucussed in the connection with its distribution pattern in the sentence either. This can be partly explianed by the fact that the reflexive verb can have some non-standard language meanings, which following the established practice of the traditional grammars and sometimes even dictionaries,  were not depicted in the language system description either. So the current paper is an attempt to analyze the polyfunctionality of reflexive verbs in connection with their semantic and syntactic functions, without judging the language use from the normative point of view.The classification of Latvian reflexive verbs is based on the relationship between semantic roles and syntactic structure according to the principles devised by Palmer (1994 and Saeed (1997.One and the same reflexive verb may have different lexical meanings with a different distribution for each of the meanings. One and the same verb can belong to different subclasses of the subject and object (or impersonal verbs.Some reflexive verbs have evaluative or aspectual (iterative meanings. The evaluative meanings usually are manifested by a positive or negative assessment of the event (the context can be enhanced by the adverbs good or bad and the consequences while the aspectual meaning is manifested by the intensity of the action, that is – iterativity.The study confirms the assumption that reflexive verbs are independent lexemes as opposed to non-reflexive verb forms. Each reflexive verb has its distinct semantic system and distribution which is different from polysemy of non-reflexive verbs and their distribution. The system of reflexive verbs in Latvian is open where new meanings and even new reflexive verbs arise particularly in colloquial use.

  15. Somatosensory evoked response: application in neurology

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    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available One technique used for short-latency somatosensory evoked response (SER is described. SER following nerve stimulation is a unique non-invasive, clinical test used to evaluate the somatosensory pathways. It tests the physiological function of the median nerve, the brachial plexus, the C6-7 cervical roots, cervical spinal cord, the cuneate nuclei, the medial lemniscus, the thalamus, and the contralateral sensory cortex. It has been shown to be a reliable and useful clinical test partiicularly in multiple sclerosis and comatose patients. The promising technique of SER following peroneal nerve stimulation is mentioned.

  16. Effects and Mechanisms of Tastants on the Gustatory-Salivary Reflex in Human Minor Salivary Glands

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    Shizuko Satoh-Kuriwada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects and mechanisms of tastes on labial minor salivary gland (LMSG secretion were investigated in 59 healthy individuals. Stimulation with each of the five basic tastes (i.e., sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and umami onto the tongue induced LMSG secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Umami and sour tastes evoked greater secretion than did the other tastes. A synergistic effect of umami on LMSG secretion was recognized: a much greater increase in secretion was observed by a mixed solution of monosodium glutamate and inosine 5′-monophosphate than by each separate stimulation. Blood flow (BF in the nearby labial mucosa also increased following stimulation by each taste except bitter. The BF change and LMSG secretion in each participant showed a significant positive correlation with all tastes, including bitter. Administration of cevimeline hydrochloride hydrate to the labial mucosa evoked a significant increase in both LMSG secretion and BF, while adrenaline, atropine, and pirenzepine decreased LMSG secretion and BF. The change in LMSG secretion and BF induced by each autonomic agent was significantly correlated in each participant. These results indicate that basic tastes can induce the gustatory-salivary reflex in human LMSGs and that parasympathetic regulation is involved in this mechanism.

  17. The swallowing reflex and its significance as an airway defensive reflex

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    Takashi eNishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing function, in humans, is very complex. Swallowing plays, not only an important role in food digestion, but also a major role in preventing the entrance of food and/or other materials into the lower respiratory tract. To achieve this, precise coordination is necessary between breathing and swallowing since the pharynx serves as a common pathway for both respiration and digestion. The swallowing reflex consists of afferent pathways, central integration, and efferent pathways. Any defect or disorder along reflex arc can cause a potential delay or impairment in swallow function. The swallowing reflex can be modulated not only by pathological factors but also by physiological factors. Among these, timing of swallows in relation to the phase of respiration may be the most important factor that determines the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration, since phases of inspiration and the expiration-inspiration transition are the most vulnerable for pulmonary aspiration.

  18. On the long-latency reflex responses of the human flexor digitorum profundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, P B; Miles, T S

    1988-10-01

    1. Electromyography (surface and intramuscular) has been used to study the reflex responses of the human flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) to angular rotation of the distal interphalangeal joint of the 4th finger. This has been done with the hand in three separate positions which, owing to the arrangement of the various tendons, allow the movement to be transmitted to (a) both the flexor and extensor muscles, (b) FDP alone (extensors disengaged) and (c) neither flexor nor extensor muscles (all muscles disengaged, but cutaneous and joint receptors still potentially activated). The stimuli were applied while the subject was voluntarily contracting FDP to produce a constant level of EMG activity; this remained possible when the muscle was disengaged from the joint. 2. With all muscles connected, FDP behaved similarly to the analogous long flexor of the thumb. 'Stretch' elicited a prolonged complex response starting with a short-latency component corresponding to the tendon jerk. Unloading of the contracting muscle caused a pronounced reduction of its on-going EMG activity. The latency of this latter effect was approximately 20 ms greater than that of the initial stretch-evoked response, thereby demonstrating that it was not due to a disfacilitation via the short-latency pathway (on reduction of the tonic spindle afferent firing from FDP as it shortened). 3. With all muscles disengaged, movement of the joint in either direction evoked simply a weak, variable excitatory response, with a latency somewhat greater than that of the normal unloading response. This was attributed to the activation of cutaneous and/or joint receptors. The effectiveness of the disengagement of the flexor was demonstrated by the abolition of its normal stretch-evoked short-latency response. 4. With the flexor engaged and the extensors disengaged both stretch and release evoked their normal types of response. In control experiments, surface EMG recordings from the interosseus muscles confirmed

  19. Control over spinal nociception as quantified by the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) can be achieved under feedback of the RIII reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, R; Weinges, F; Schiffer, M; Bäumler, M; Feller, M; Krafft, S; Straube, A; Sommer, J; Marziniak, M

    2015-04-01

    Descending pain modulatory systems control transmission of nociceptive information at the spinal level, and their activity can be modified by cognitive and emotional processes. Thus, it may be possible to learn using cognitive-emotional strategies to specifically target descending pathways in order to achieve pain reduction. The present study used visual feedback of the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to train healthy subjects over three sessions to reduce their spinal nociception (RIII reflex size) by self-selected cognitive-emotional strategies. The study included two feedback groups (fixed vs. random stimulation intervals) and a control group without feedback (15 subjects each). While all three groups successfully reduced their RIII reflexes (p nociception under feedback of their RIII reflex size. However, future studies will have to include a sham feedback group to differentiate true learning effects from expectancy effects induced by the feedback procedure. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  20. Evoked potentials in pediatric cerebral malaria

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    Minal Bhanushali

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical evoked potentials (EP provide localized data regarding brain function and may offer prognostic information and insights into the pathologic mechanisms of malariamediated cerebral injury. As part of a prospective cohort study, we obtained somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs and brainstem auditory EPs (AEPs within 24 hours of admission on 27 consecutive children admitted with cerebral malaria (CM. Children underwent follow-up for 12 months to determine if they had any long term neurologic sequelae. EPs were obtained in 27 pediatric CM admissions. Two children died. Among survivors followed an average of 514 days, 7/25 (28.0% had at least one adverse neurologic outcome. Only a single subject had absent cortical EPs on admission and this child had a good neurologic outcome. Among pediatric CM survivors, cortical EPs are generally intact and do not predict adverse neurologic outcomes. Further study is needed to determine if alterations in cortical EPs can be used to predict a fatal outcome in CM.

  1. [Personality dimensions and cerebral evoked potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposano, S; Alvarez, C; Lolas, F

    1994-12-01

    Eysenck's personality theory postulates 3 orthogonal dimensions of personality: extraversion (E), neuroticism (N) and psychoticism (P), predicting conductual and physiological predispositions to suffer mental illness. Biological bases of Eysenck's personality traits have been documented electrophysiologically. Psychoticism, the latest described dimension, is controverted, since there is some evidence of common factors with the other two. In order to assess the relation between Eysenck's dimensions and sensorial reactivity and information encoding processes we studied 20 healthy young subjects (mean age 28.5 years) with flash visual cortical evoked potentials (VEP, 3 intensities, peak to peak amplitude of III, IV-V-VI, VII components), and auditory cognitive evoked potentials (odd ball paradigm, P300 latency). There was a positive correlation between N and P dimensions (Spearman, r = 0.52), between N and VEP amplitude at high intensity (r = 0.58) and a negative correlation between E and P300 latency (r = 0.58). In short we found that P is not an independent dimension, but is related to sensorial reactivity. E dimension was related to encoding processes supporting Eysenck's observations about memory and learning differences.

  2. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials during Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Deepeshwar, Singh; Naveen, Kalkuni Visweswaraiah; Pailoor, Subramanya

    2015-10-01

    The auditory sensory pathway has been studied in meditators, using midlatency and short latency auditory evoked potentials. The present study evaluated long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) during meditation. Sixty male participants, aged between 18 and 31 years (group mean±SD, 20.5±3.8 years), were assessed in 4 mental states based on descriptions in the traditional texts. They were (a) random thinking, (b) nonmeditative focusing, (c) meditative focusing, and (d) meditation. The order of the sessions was randomly assigned. The LLAEP components studied were P1 (40-60 ms), N1 (75-115 ms), P2 (120-180 ms), and N2 (180-280 ms). For each component, the peak amplitude and peak latency were measured from the prestimulus baseline. There was significant decrease in the peak latency of the P2 component during and after meditation (Pmeditation facilitates the processing of information in the auditory association cortex, whereas the number of neurons recruited was smaller in random thinking and non-meditative focused thinking, at the level of the secondary auditory cortex, auditory association cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  3. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

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    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  4. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

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    Dali Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr, contraction rate (Rc, and reflex loop time delay (td. It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P<0.05. This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings.

  5. A syntactic and lexical approach to French reflexive verbs

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    Corina Petersilka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This Construction grammar approach to French refl exive verbs describes the formal and semantic constraints at work in the different refl exive constructions, points out at their different branches of inheritance and shows cases of fusion with other argument structures. The article suggests a family tree of French reflexive constructions which appear to be derived from different transitive constructions. It also deals with how the reflexive argument structure modifies the semantics of the transitive verb used in reflexive construction.

  6. The legacy of care as reflexive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-06-14

    to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. analisar se o uso de estratégias reflexivas por parte da tutora de estágio clínico estimula a reflexão nos estudantes. A intenção é descobrir qual tipo de estratégias podem ajudar a fazê-lo e como as tutoras e os estudantes se comportam no contexto prático. foi adotado um enfoque qualitativo de cunho etnográfico em que participaram 27 estudantes e 15 tutores de três centros de saúde que haviam recebido formação específica sobre tutoria clínica reflexiva. A análise foi realizada por meio de comparações constantes das categorias. os resultados demonstram que o uso de estratégias reflexivas como a interrogação didática, a empatia didática e o silêncio pedagógico por parte das tutoras, contribui para fomentar a reflexão do estudante e sua aprendizagem significativa. a prática reflexiva é a chave para a formação dos tutores e para a aprendizagem dos estudantes. analizar si el uso de estrategias reflexivas por parte de la tutora de prácticas clínicas fomenta la reflexión en los estudiantes. Se trata de conocer qué tipo de estrategias pueden ayudar a hacerlo y cómo se comportan tutoras y estudiantes en el contexto práctico. se ha utilizado un enfoque

  7. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, H S; Hawthorne, K B; Jackson, W T

    1988-05-01

    Although the cause of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) remains unknown, hyperactivity of the sympathetic nerves and secondary vasospasm may be pathogenic in this syndrome. A retrospective epidemiologic study of RSD was done on 53 in-patients from 1978-1985. Cigarette smoking was strikingly increased in patient frequency in RSD (68% versus 37% of hospitalized controls, p less than 0.0001). Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a history of trauma or surgery, and 38% had other associated diseases. Cigarette smoking is statistically linked to RSD and may be involved in its pathogenesis by enhancing sympathetic activity, vasoconstriction, or by some other unknown mechanism.

  9. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... in understanding the mechanisms by which public authorities seek to influence firm’s behaviour through CSR in order to promote public policy objectives. The analysis indicates that to be effective, reflexive regulatory approaches to public-private regulation should pay careful attention to procedural design...

  10. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... in understanding the mechanisms by which public authorities seek to influence firm’s behaviour through CSR in order to promote public policy objectives. The analysis indicates that to be effective, reflexive regulatory approaches to public-private regulation should pay careful attention to procedural design...

  11. Leveraging Researcher Reflexivity to Consider a Classroom Event over Time: Reflexive Discourse Analysis of "What Counts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kate T.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a reflexive and critical discourse analysis of classroom events that grew out of a cross-cultural partnership with a secondary school teacher in Singapore. I aim to illuminate how differences between researcher and teacher assumptions about what participation in classroom activities should look like came into high relief when…

  12. Reflexivity in the Interstices: A Tale of Reflexivity at Work in, during, and behind the Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Corrine M.; Cohen, James A.; Walther, Carol S.

    2017-01-01

    This article is a story of how the authors came to make sense of the significance of those words in relation to gender, race/ethnicity, and citizenship in writing a manuscript about L[subscript 1]L[subscript 2] acquisition. It is a tale about how Reflexivity wove itself into the conversations, into the writing, into the in-between spaces, the…

  13. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  14. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  15. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  16. Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion. PMID:24910621

  17. The 'late' reflex responses to muscle stretch: the 'resonance hypothesis' versus the 'long-loop hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, G; Hagbarth, K E; Hägglund, J V; Wallin, E U

    1982-05-01

    1. Experiments were performed to check the validity of previous claims concerning the ;long-loop' aetiology of ;late' reflex electromyogram (e.m.g.) responses to muscle stretch in man. The primary aim was to investigate whether observations previously presented in favour of the ;long-loop hypothesis' are explicable also in terms of the ;resonance hypothesis', according to which the ;late' reflex components represent spinal, short-latency responses to intramuscular oscillations initiated by the impact.2. The contracting wrist flexors of healthy subjects were exposed to trains of recurrent 25-50 Hz stretch stimuli (wrist torque pulses). Each of the initial two or three pulses in the train was followed by e.m.g. peaks with a latency of 20-25 msec. The e.m.g. peaks driven in this way had the following characteristics in common with the successive two or three e.m.g. peaks which were induced by single ramp stretches or tendon taps. (a) Changes in stimulus parameters which altered the strength of the initial e.m.g. peak often had an opposite effect on the strength of the succeeding peak(s). Muscle vibration which attenuated the initial peak often enchanced the succeeding one(s). (b) The initial e.m.g. peak was less affected than the succeeding peak(s) by the subjects' attempts to respond with rapid ;resist' or ;let go' reactions.3. Intramuscular oscillations (monitored by a needle accelerometer) and e.m.g. responses evoked by single ramp stretches and/or tendon taps were also studied in the long thumb flexor, the calf muscles and the masseter muscle. In the thumb flexor, the initial accelerometer deflexion was only rarely succeeded by a short latency e.m.g. peak, but the succeeding wave in the needle accelerogram was followed by such a peak, appearing about 40 msec after stimulus application. By contrast, the calf muscles and the jaw elevators exhibited a high amplitude, short-latency e.m.g. response to the first but only rarely to the second intramuscular oscillation

  18. Slope walking causes short-term changes in soleus H-reflex excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Manning J; Wedewer, Wesley; Barton, Ben; Henderson, Eric; Murphy, John T; Ou, Kar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that downslope treadmill walking decreases spinal excitability. Soleus H-reflexes were measured in sixteen adults on 3 days. Measurements were taken before and twice after 20 min of treadmill walking at 2.5 mph (starting at 10 and 45 min post). Participants walked on a different slope each day [level (Lv), upslope (Us) or downslope (Ds)]. The tibial nerve was electrically stimulated with a range of intensities to construct the M-response and H-reflex curves. Maximum evoked responses (Hmax and Mmax) and slopes of the ascending limbs (Hslp and Mslp) of the curves were evaluated. Rate-dependent depression (RDD) was measured as the % depression of the H-reflex when measured at a rate of 1.0 Hz versus 0.1 Hz. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during walking. Ds and Lv walking reduced the Hmax/Mmax ratio (P = 0.001 & P = 0.02), although the reduction was larger for Ds walking (29.3 ± 6.2% vs. 6.8 ± 5.2%, P = 0.02). The reduction associated with Ds walking was correlated with physical activity level as measured via questionnaire (r = −0.52, P = 0.04). Us walking caused an increase in the Hslp/Mslp ratio (P = 0.03) and a decrease in RDD (P = 0.04). These changes recovered by 45 min. Exercise HR and BP were highest during Us walking. RPE was greater during Ds and Us walking compared to Lv walking, but did not exceed “Fairly light” for Ds walking. In conclusion, in healthy adults treadmill walking has a short-term effect on soleus H-reflex excitability that is determined by the slope of the treadmill surface. PMID:25742955

  19. RECORDING OF VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sazgar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that loud clicks evoke myogenic potentials in the tonically contracting sternocleidomastoid muscles. Studies have suggested that these potentials are of vestibular origin, especially of the saccule and inferior vestibular nerve. A pilot study was undertaken in our hospital to record vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP for the first time in Iran. Eighteen healthy volunteers (32 ears without history of otologic or vestibular disorders were subjected to the VEMP test. Twenty-one patients (26 ears with unilateral (6 patients and bilateral (5 patients high frequency sensorineural hearing loss with unknown etiology, acoustic neuroma (1 patient, Meniere’s disease (4 patients and unilateral low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint (5 patients were also enrolled in this study. VEMP response to clicks was obtained from 84.4% of ears of healthy subjects. These subjects demonstrated short latency waves to click stimuli during tonic neck flexor activation. Mean latencies of first positive (p13 and first negative (n23 potentials in healthy subjects were 12.45 ± 1.9 ms and 20.8 ± 3.5 ms, respectively. Median latencies of these two potentials were 12.1 and 19.3 ms, respectively. We could record VEMP in 5 patients with unilateral and all patients with high and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint. In the patient with acoustic neuroma VEMP was absent on the affected side. This technique may offer a new method to evaluate otolith and sacculocollic pathways in human.

  20. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure.

  1. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrazier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1, where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. 1. Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence?Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1, differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3 or finite (2 and 4, and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2 or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4.The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Exp. 3 and 4, wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure.

  2. Cough reflex changes in local tracheitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanácek, J; Porubanová, M; Korec, L; Beseda, O

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe changes in the cough reflex in unanaesthetized cats with experimental local tracheitis. Inflammation was produced by a silk suture fixed in the trachea and cough was elicited by mechanical stimulation of different parts of the respiratory tract mucosa. The resultant cough values (the number of efforts, the intensity of the maximum effort and the intensity of the attack) were compared with the corresponding values in healthy cats. In animals with a tracheal suture, inflammation was confined to the trachea. The intensity of cough elicited by stimulation of this region increased significantly compared with normal (on the 15th to 17th day of inflammation), whereas cough elicited from the laryngopharyngeal and tracheobronchial region did not. On about the 20th day of inflammation the authors found a decrease in the intensity of the maximum effort of cough elicited from the inflamed part of the trachea and a decrease in the intensity of the maximum effort and the intensity of the coughing attack elicited from the laryngopharyngeal and tracheobronchial region. They assume that the decrease could have been due to the development of protective inhibition in central structures participating in integration of the cough reflex.

  3. Somatoautonomic reflexes in acupuncture therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Sato-Suzuki, Ikuko

    2017-03-01

    Oriental therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, or Anma, have been used to treat visceral disorders since ancient times. In each of these therapies, stimulation of the skin or underlying muscles leads to excitation of afferent nerves. The sensory information is carried to the central nervous system, where it is transferred to autonomic efferents, thus affecting visceral functions. This neuronal pathway, known as the "somatoautonomic reflex", has been systematically studied by Sato and his colleagues for over a half century. Nearly all their studies were conducted in anesthetized animals, whereas human patients are conscious. Responses in patients or the events following therapeutic somatic stimulation may differ from those observed in anesthetized animals. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the responses in patients and animals are not always coincident, and the differences have been difficult for clinicians to reconcile. We review the mechanism of the "somatoautonomic reflex" as described in anesthetized animals and then discuss how it can be applied clinically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reflexivity and adjustment strategies at the interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Teomiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I argue in this work that Reinhart & Reuland’s (1993 conditions A and B hold for Spanish. I provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that this language makes use of both SE and SELF-anaphors. Inherent reflexive verbs undergo an internal argument reduction operation in the lexicon. However, the syntax always requires two arguments. Therefore certain clitics, which are SE-anaphors, are inserted in these derivations. This is a last-resort mechanism that makes an adjustment between the valence of the lexical entry of the verb and the requirements of the syntax in order for the derivation to converge at the C-I interface. These clitics are syntactic arguments. Nevertheless, they are not interpreted as semantic arguments since they violate the double chain condition, which forces nominal elements to share both a tense and thematic features with the verb and the tense heads. Non- inherent reflexive verbs require the presence of a SELF-anaphor, which is formed out of a SE-anaphor along with a protector SELF element. Therefore, both syntactic elements are interpreted as two distinguishable semantic elements at C-I despite the fact that there is binding between them both. The interpretation of both syntactic elements as just one semantic element is a pragmatic epiphenomenon.

  5. A sigmoid function is the best fit for the ascending limb of the Hoffmann reflex recruitment curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimstra, Marc; Zehr, E Paul

    2008-03-01

    The Hoffmann (H)-reflex has been studied extensively as a measure of spinal excitability. Often, researchers compare the H-reflex between experimental conditions with values determined from a recruitment curve (RC). An RC is obtained experimentally by varying the stimulus intensity to a nerve and recording the peak-to-peak amplitudes of the evoked H-reflex and direct motor (M)-wave. The values taken from an RC may provide different information with respect to a change in reflex excitability. Therefore, it is important to obtain a number of RC parameters for comparison. RCs can be obtained with a measure of current (HCRC) or without current (HMRC). The ascending limb of the RC is then fit with a mathematical analysis technique in order to determine parameters of interest such as the threshold of activation and the slope of the function. The purpose of this study was to determine an unbiased estimate of the specific parameters of interest in an RC through mathematical analysis. We hypothesized that a standardized analysis technique could be used to ascertain important points on an RC, regardless of data presentation methodology (HCRC or HMRC). For both HCRC and HMRC produced using 40 randomly delivered stimuli, six different methods of mathematical analysis [linear regression, polynomial, smoothing spline, general least squares model with custom logistic (sigmoid) equation, power, and logarithmic] were compared using goodness of fit statistics (r-square, RMSE). Behaviour and robustness of selected curve fits were examined in various applications including RCs generated during movement and somatosensory conditioning from published data. Results show that a sigmoid function is the most reliable estimate of the ascending limb of an H-reflex recruitment curve for both HCRC and HMRC. Further, the parameters of interest change differentially with respect to the presentation methodology and the analysis technique. In conclusion, the sigmoid function is a reliable analysis

  6. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  7. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  8. (Re)constructing Reflexivity: A Relational Constructionist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.; Pluut, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article distinguishes three discourses of reflexivity in relation to human inquiry. One of these arises from a post-modern, relational constructionist perspective which radically re-conceptualizes reflexivity: (a) as a local and co-constructed process oriented towards the question (b) how are

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex

  10. Low Incidence Of Extensor Plantar Reflex In Newborns In An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The plantar reflex has been reported to be predominantly flexor in African infants and in African subjects with lesions of the corticospinal tracts. This study was done to determine the incidence of extensor plantar reflex in healthy full-term newborns in an indigenous African population. Methods Healthy term ...

  11. Modulation of spinal reflexes by sexual films of increasing intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Stephanie; Boxtel, Geert; Stekelenburg, Jeroen; Everaerd, Walter; Laan, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Sexual arousal can be viewed as an emotional state generating sex-specific autonomic and general somatic motor system responses that prepare for sexual action. In the present study modulation of spinal tendious (T) reflexes by sexual films of varying intensity was investigated. T reflexes were

  12. On the Property of Reflexivity for Multiplication Operators on Banach ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    21

    operator Mz are reflexive on a Banach space of functions analytic on a plane domain. AMS Subject Classification: 47B37; 46A25. Keywords: Banach spaces of analytic functions, multiplication operators, reflexive oper- ator, multipliers, Caratheodory hull, bounded point evaluation, spectral set. Introduction. For any set E and ...

  13. Reflexive Pronouns in Dagbani | Issah | Legon Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I argue that reflexives are formed by suffixing the reflexivizer, ma.a, meaning eselff, to the possessive pronominal. The pronominal varies in form depending on the singularity or plurality of the antecedent. I minimally compare reflexive pronouns with pronouns within the Binding Theory and observe that whilst pronouns are ...

  14. The Role of Transformational Leadership in Enhancing Team Reflexivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla); D.N. den Hartog (Deanne); P.L. Koopman (Paul); D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTeam reflexivity, or the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning, has been identified as a key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. As yet, however, little is known about the factors that play a role in enhancing team reflexivity, and it is thus important to

  15. Space charge equation calculations for the reflex triode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1976-09-01

    The Poisson equation solution of the space charge problem for the reflex triode is reviewed and illustrated with a number of examples. The numerical calculation technique for obtaining these results is briefly described. The results show that the characteristics of the triode are strong functions of the reflex-electron kinetic-energy spectrum, especially of the high-energy electrons.

  16. Voluntary Control of the Near Reflex: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Akar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spasm of the near reflex is a rare disorder that involves intermittent and variable episodes of esotropia, pseudomyopia, and pupillary myosis. It is usually functional in origin and is seen mainly in young patients. Treatment options for spasm of the near reflex have had variable success. In instances where the etiology of spasm of the near reflex was suspected to be hysteria, psychotherapy has proven beneficial. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who had functional spasm of the near reflex. The symptoms persisted for two years. Symptomatic relief was achieved by cycloplegia and spectacle correction (added plus lenses at near. The patient also underwent psychological counseling. In our case, the functional spasm of the near reflex spontaneously resolved after 2 years. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 161-3

  17. Prevalence of family history in patients with reflex syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Benn, Marianne; Kaijer, Michelle Nymann

    2013-01-01

    Reflex syncope is defined by a rapid transient loss of consciousness caused by global cerebral hypoperfusion resulting from vasodilatation and/or bradycardia attributable to inappropriate cardiovascular reflexes. A hereditary component has been suggested, but prevalence of family history may differ...... among subtypes of reflex syncope, as these have different autonomic responses and pathogeneses may be diverse. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of a positive family history of syncope and cardiovascular characteristics in patients with cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor reflex syncope....... Patients (n=74) were classified into subtypes of reflex syncope - cardioinhibition/asystole (Vasovagal Syncope International Study subtypes II-B [VASIS II-B], n=38) or vasodepressor (VASIS III, n=36) - using the head-up tilt test. Family history was obtained by questionnaires supplemented by interview...

  18. Evidence for a contribution of the motor cortex to the long-latency stretch reflex of the human thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaday, C; Forget, R; Fraser, R; Lamarre, Y

    1991-01-01

    1. In normal subjects, transcranial magnetic stimulation of the hand region of the motor cortex evokes motor responses only in contralateral hand muscles at a latency of about 19-24 ms. In contrast, stimulation of the motor cortex of three mirror movement subjects evoked, nearly simultaneously, motor responses in hand muscles on both sides of the body at latencies similar to those of normal subjects. In these subjects no other neuroanatomical pathways appear to be abnormally directed across the mid-line. Thus, their mirror movements are probably due to a projection of the corticospinal tract to homologous motoneurone pools on each side of the body. 2. We reasoned that if the motor cortex contributes to the generation of long-latency stretch reflex responses then in these mirror movement subjects stretching a muscle on one side of the body should produce long-latency reflex responses in the ipsilateral and the homologous contralateral muscle. 3. To test this idea experiments were done on normal human subjects and on the subjects with mirror movements. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor pollicis longus muscle (FPL) on each side of the body was recorded. Stretch of the distal phalanx of the thumb of one hand produced a series of distinct reflex EMG responses in the ipsilateral FPL. The earliest response, when present, began at 25 ms (S.D. = 3.5 ms) and was followed by responses at 40 (S.D. = 3.9 ms) and 56 ms (S.D. = 4.3 ms). There was no difference, either in timing or intensity, between the ipsilateral FPL EMG responses of normal subjects and those of the mirror movement subjects. 4. No response of any kind was observed in the contralateral (unstretched) FPL of normal subjects. In contrast, we observed in all three mirror movement subjects EMG responses in the contralateral (unstretched) FPL beginning at 45-50 ms. The latency of this response is considerably shorter than the fastest voluntary kinaesthetic reaction time, which was on average 130 ms (S

  19. Sex differences in pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccioni, G; Piloni, V; Sabbatini, D; Fioravanti, P; Scarpino, O

    2014-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) of the pudendal nerve are a well-established diagnostic tool for the evaluation of pelvic floor disorders. However, the possible influence of sex differences on response latencies has not been established yet. The aim of this study was to standardize the procedures and to evaluate possible effects of gender differences on anal and penile/clitoral SEPs. The anal and dorsal penile/clitoral SEPs were recorded in 84 healthy subjects (40 males and 44 females; mean age 47.9 ± 16.6 years, range 16-81 years; mean height 168.3 ± 20.3 cm, range 155-187 cm). Pudendal SEPs were evoked with a bipolar surface electrode stimulating the clitoris or the base of the penis and the anal orifice and recorded using scalp electrodes. The latency of the first positive component (P1) was measured. The effect and possible interaction of (a) stimulation site and (b) gender on the two variables was explored by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The examination was well tolerated and a reproducible waveform of sufficient quality was obtained in all the subjects examined. In the female subjects, a mean cortical P1 latency of 37.0 ± 2.6 and 36.4 ± 3.2 ms for anal and clitoral stimulation, respectively, was found. In the male subjects, the cortical latencies were 38.0 ± 3.5 ms for the anal stimulation and 40.2 ± 3.7 ms for the penile stimulation. At MANOVA, a statistically significant main effect of stimulation site and gender as well as a significant interaction between the two variables was found. Anal and dorsal penile/clitoral SEPs represent a well-tolerated and reproducible method to assess the functional integrity of the sensory pathways in male and female subjects. Obtaining sex-specific reference data, by individual electrophysiological testing, is highly recommended because of significant latency differences between males and females, at least as far as penile/clitoral responses are concerned.

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Goris, R J

    1996-06-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a disease that can appear after minor trauma or operation to an extremity. The injury may vary from a simple contusion to a fracture. The prevalence of burns as a cause of RSD, within a population of 829 patients with RSD, was studied retrospectively. Prospectively, we documented the medical history, signs and symptoms of all patients with RSD, seen by our department during the period from January 1984 to 31 December 1994. Four patients had developed RSD after a burn injury, resulting in a prevalence of 0.5 per cent. Though the clinical signs of early RSD are similar to those of a (thermal) burn, alertness to recognize inflammatory signs, in combination with the increase in complaints after exercise, is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment of the complicating RSD.

  1. Cocaine-induced reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, D; Singh, A

    2000-11-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) usually follows traumatic injuries or neurologic disorders. The authors report a rare case of RSD that followed intraarterial administration of cocaine in a patient with a history of intravenous drug abuse. The cocaine was self-administered inadvertently into the femoral artery rather than the femoral vein. Despite the intense pain, swelling, and dermatologic changes that followed, the diagnosis of RSD was not considered until scintigraphic studies suggested it. A combination of normal radiographs, a normal leukocyte study, and an abnormal bone scan in the region of tenderness and swelling excluded other possibilities and suggested RSD. In our patient, RSD was likely caused by an ischemic autonomic injury from the vasoconstrictor action of cocaine. Clinical follow-up and relief using phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocker and vasodilator, made the diagnosis of RSD most likely.

  2. The Disappearing Audience and Reflexive Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Girginova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular opinion and some academic writing that celebrates the renewed visibility of new media audiences, this essay argues that they are increasingly going into retreat. To understand how new media audiences “disappear” from view of one another, I borrow from Brighenti’s typology of visibility and develop the idea of “reflexive visibility.” The latter describes the ability to socially orient ourselves in a digital environment through the textual and contextual cues of others—an activity that is of utmost importance not only to researchers wishing to “see” various audiences but also for audiences writ large, wishing to know themselves.

  3. Leukocoria and the red reflex test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Yae Yassuda Tamura

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the ophthalmologic examination of newborns in maternity hospitals was not a priority; even today, few hospitals perform this examination adequately. Consequences may be disastrous, because by the time eye alterations are found, the child may have developed permanent loss of visual acuity. The ophthalmologic examination in nurseries, carried out by neonatologists, permits an early diagnosis and referral for effective therapy and adequate development of vision. This study underlines the importance of the red reflex test in newborns and presents the main causes of leukocoria (cataract, retinoblastoma, and retinal and vitreous diseases to alert pediatricians and neonatologists about this condition. Special emphasis is given to retinoblastoma, a condition affecting 1/14,000 to 1/20,000 live newborns; genetic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects are presented. Early diagnosis of retinoblastoma is essential for reducing morbidity and mortality.

  4. Reflexivity and vulnerability in collaborative knowledge production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    -reports of positive learning outcomes and fails to illuminate how power is always at play leaving certain participants exposed and potentially vulnerable (Fenwick, 2008). As such, it remains unclear how power relations unfold in moment-by-moment interactions including how the researcher’s position matters...... because their voices are subjugated and they appear to be vulnerable. The extent of this development in the peer interactions and the reproductive nature of the knowledge produced were unexpected. In other words we – the researchers – became struck in the analytical process. In the final part of the paper......, we discuss how the reproduction of power relations invokes ethical concerns and raises critical perspectives on the undeniable common good of collaborative research in which participants’ vulnerability may be overlooked in potentially reflexive moments (Nordentoft and Kappel, 2011). Still, we find...

  5. Vestibulospinal reflexes as a function of microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Anderson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from previous manned space flights suggest that an exposure to microgravity produces significant alterations in vestibular, neuromuscular, and related sensory system functions. It is possible that the observed changes are a function of adaptation induced by altered otolith input. An experiment in Spacelab 1 was conducted with the aim to study this adaptation as it occurred in flight and after flight, and to relate the observed changes to mechanisms underlying space motion sickness. The concept was explored by making use of the anatomic pathway which links the otolith organs and spinal motoneurons. The overall sensitivity of the spinal motoneurons was tested by two related methods. One method involves the electrical excitation of neural tissue and the recording of vestibulospinal reflexes in conjunction with a brief linear acceleration. The second method is concerned with measurements of dynamic postural ataxia. Results suggest that more than a single time constant may be involved in man's ability to return to baseline values.

  6. Somatosensory imprinting in spinal reflex modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouenborg, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Understanding how sensory information is used by motor systems for motor commands requires detailed knowledge about how the body shape and biomechanics are represented in the motor circuits. We have used the withdrawal reflex system as a model for studies of sensorimotor transformation. This system has a modular organisation in the adult. Each module performs a detailed and functionally adapted sensorimotor transformation related to the withdrawal efficacy of its output muscle(s). The weight distribution of the cutaneous input to a module is determined by the pattern of withdrawal efficacy of the muscle. Recently, we found that the somatotopic organisation and weight of the cutaneous input to the dorsal horn of the lower lumbar cord is related to this modular organisation. The dorsal horn in the lower lumbar cord thus appears to be organised in a column-like fashion, where each column performs a basic sensorimotor transformation related to the movement caused by a single muscle and the body shape. Since the withdrawal reflex system encodes error signals to the cerebellum through some of the spino-olivo cerebellar pathways, the modular concept is, in fact, a key to understanding sensory processing in higher order motor systems as well. Developmental studies indicate that each module is a self-organising circuitry that uses sensory feedback on muscle contractions to adjust its synaptic organisation. Furthermore, these studies suggest that the spontaneous movements during development, by providing structured sensory information related to movement pattern of single muscles and body shape, are instrumental in shaping the sensorimotor transformation in the spinal cord. These findings and their implications for the understanding of higher motor functions and their clinical aspects will be discussed.

  7. Different Effects of Cold Stimulation on Reflex and Non-Reflex Components of Poststroke Spastic Hypertonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo use an established biomechanical approach to quantify reflex and non-reflex responses from spastic–paretic elbow flexors in response to controlled cold and heat stimulation.MethodsThirteen spastic–hemiplegic stroke subjects were tested in the experiment. The spastic elbow joint was stretched into extension for 50° at two speeds (5°/s and 100°/s in a customized apparatus. Thermal stimulation (HEAT at heat pain threshold, COLD at 0°C, or BASELINE at room temperature was applied to the thenar eminence of the contralateral hand immediately prior to stretching for at least 30 s.ResultsTotal torque was greater at 100°/s than at 5°/s. Total torque was significantly increased after COLD, but not HEAT as compared to BASELINE. When normalized to total torque at baseline, HEAT decreased total torque by 6.3%, while COLD increased total torque by 11.0%. There was no significant difference in the reflex torque among three thermal conditions.ConclusionThe findings demonstrate differentiated effects of cold stimulation on the total resistance from spastic muscles. They provide objective evidence for anecdotal clinical observations of increased muscle spasticity by cold exposure.

  8. Visually evoked spiking evolves while spontaneous ongoing dynamics persist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul eHuys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix. The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2-3.

  9. Evoked otoacoustic emissions behaviour in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C; Cagini, C; Menduno, P; Toniassoni, I; Desantis, A; Pennacchi, A; Ricci, G; Molini, E

    1994-01-01

    The hearing function was studied in 26 patients affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and in their relatives. Sixteen patients showed bilateral normal hearing when examined with traditional audiometric methods. In these normoacusic patients evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOE) have been studied. The EOE offer a unique opportunity to measure objectively the function of outer hair cells: they record the amplitude of the energy produced by the outer hair cells of the coclea following an acoustic stimulation. The data have been statistically compared, using the Student's t-test, with those obtained in a homogeneous control-group of normal subjects. In normoacusic subjects with RP the average values of EOE intensity are statistically lower than those of normal subjects in 64 of the 127 frequency bands examined. Moreover, the distribution of the EOE in patients with retinitis pigmentosa proved to be more discontinous than that observed in the normal subjects. The EOE recorded in 14 normoacusic relatives show in some cases small anomalies but the data, on account of the limited sample group, cannot be statistically evaluated. Therefore a subclinical alteration of the Organ of Corti is found in 100% of the patients affected by RP, although they appear to be normoacusic to usual audiometric tests.

  10. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  11. Visual evoked potential study in slow learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Farah; Anjana, Yumnam; Vaney, Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Slow learners are individuals with low achievement and comparably low IQ scores. It may be a symptom reflecting a larger underlying problem in them. Sensory neural processing of visual information can be one of the contributory factors for their underachievement. The present study was undertaken to examine the integrity and function of visual pathway by means of Visual Evoked Potential (VEP). Pattern reversal VEP was performed on seventeen slow learners. Fifteen age and sex matched children with good school performance and normal IQ were taken as controls. There was significant prolongation of N75 component of VEP in slow learners. The latencies of P100 and N145 were also increased but could not reach the level of significance. Our findings are suggestive of the presence of a weaker VEP response in slow learners indicative of a deficit early in the visual processing. There is some abnormality in the geniculate afferents to V1 which is consistent with a defect in the magnocellular pathway at the level of Visual Area 1 or earlier.

  12. Functional reorganization of soleus H-reflex modulation during stepping after robotic-assisted step training in people with complete and incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knikou, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Body weight-supported (BWS) robotic-assisted step training on a motorized treadmill is utilized with the aim to improve walking ability in people after damage to the spinal cord. However, the potential for reorganization of the injured human spinal neuronal circuitry with this intervention is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine changes in the soleus H-reflex modulation pattern and activation profiles of leg muscles during stepping after BWS robotic-assisted step training in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Fourteen people who had chronic clinically complete, motor complete, and motor incomplete SCI received an average of 45 training sessions, 5 days per week, 1 h per day. The soleus H-reflex was evoked and recorded via conventional methods at similar BWS levels and treadmill speeds before and after training. After BWS robotic-assisted step training, the soleus H-reflex was depressed at late stance, stance-to-swing transition, and swing phase initiation, allowing a smooth transition from stance to swing. The soleus H-reflex remained depressed at early and mid-swing phases of the step cycle promoting a reciprocal activation of ankle flexors and extensors. The spinal reflex circuitry reorganization was, however, more complex, with the soleus H-reflex from the right leg being modulated either in a similar or in an opposite manner to that observed in the left leg at a given phase of the step cycle after training. Last, BWS robotic-assisted step training changed the amplitude and onset of muscle activity during stepping, decreased the step duration, and improved the gait speed. BWS robotic-assisted step training reorganized spinal locomotor neuronal networks promoting a functional amplitude modulation of the soleus H-reflex and thus step progression. These findings support that spinal neuronal networks of persons with clinically complete, motor complete, or motor incomplete SCI have the potential to undergo an endogenous

  13. Intact thumb reflex in areflexic Guillain Barré syndrome: A novel phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Mahajan, Manik

    2014-04-01

    Areflexia is one of the cardinal clinical features for the diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome. However, some patients may have sluggish proximal muscle stretch reflexes. Presence of thumb reflex, a distal stretch muscle reflex has not been documented in Guillain Barré syndrome. We prospectively evaluated thumb reflex in Guillain Barré syndrome patients and age matched controls from April to September 2013. There were 31 patients with Guillain Barré syndrome in whom thumb reflex could be elicited in all (24 brisk, 7 sluggish), whereas all the other muscle stretch reflexes were absent in 29 patients at presentation and the remaining two had sluggish biceps and quadriceps reflexes (P = 0.001). Serial examination revealed gradual diminution of the thumb reflex (P thumb reflex. Thumb reflex, a distal stretch reflex is preserved in the early phase of Guillain Barré syndrome.

  14. Emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing reflex in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurozumi, Chiharu; Yamagata, Ryuzo; Himi, Naoyuki; Koga, Tomoshige

    2008-06-01

    The effects of emetic stimulation on the swallowing reflex were investigated in decerebrated rats. Hypoxia, gastric distension and LiCl administration were used as emetic stimulations. The swallowing reflex was elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, 20 Hz, 3-5 V, 0.3 ms duration) for 20 s. To examine the effect of hypoxia, nitrogen gas was inhaled under artificial ventilation. There were significantly fewer swallows during a decrease in PO(2) than under air ventilation (p<0.05). The number of swallows during 3-ml stomach distension was significantly lower than that before distension (p<0.05). Intravenous administration of LiCl (100 mg/kg) also significantly reduced the number of swallows (p<0.05). The combination of SLN stimulation and emetic stimuli occasionally produced burst activity of abdominal muscles, which might be associated with the gag reflex. Both the gag and swallowing reflexes are well known to be mediated by the nucleus of the solitary tract. The physiological roles of the gag reflex and the swallowing reflex are considered to be reciprocal. Taken together, these results suggest that emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing pattern generator via the nucleus of the solitary tract, which in turn facilitates the gag reflex.

  15. Reflex anuria: an old concept with new evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weibin; Wen, Jin; Ji, Zhigang; Chen, Jian; Li, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Reflex anuria (RA) was defined by Hull as cessation of urine output from both kidneys due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or its ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other organs. This is not a common concept among urologists or nephrologists even though it has been proposed for more than half a century. The phenomenon has not been thoroughly understood. But intrarenal arteriolar spasm and ureteral spasm have gained wide acceptance as the mechanisms of RA. The present review summarized papers published up to now on RA, in order to depict the general profile of the disease and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of RA. A classification system of RA was proposed as neurovascular reflex, ureterorenal reflex, radiated renovascular reflex, renoureteral reflex, ureteroureteral reflex and radiated ureteral reflex, based on the two assumed mechanisms and the stimulus' origins. All these types except renoureteral reflex had gained supporting evidence from animal experiments and/or clinical case reports. RA is a diagnosis of exclusion, only being considered after ruling out common and tangible etiologies such as ureteral calculi, acute tubular necrosis, renal vascular occlusion, hypovolemia, infection, etc. If the diagnosis has been established, treatment plan should be directed toward the mechanisms more than the causative factors. Abnormalities of the autonomic nerve system and congenital urogenital malformations incline people to RA. In summary, RA is a cessation of urine production caused by stimuli on kidney, ureter or other organs, through a mechanism of reflex spasm of intrarenal arterioles or ureters, leading to acute renal failure. It is a functional rather than parenchymal disease.

  16. Evoked potentials and head injury. 1. Rating of evoked potential abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, H K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes a method for rating the degree of abnormality of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potential patterns in head injury (HI) patients. Criteria for judging degree of EP abnormality are presented that allow assessment of the extent and severity of subcortical and cortical dysfunction associated with traumatic brain damage. Interrater reliability data based upon blind ratings of normal and HI patients are presented and shown to be highly significant. Tables of normative values of peak latencies and amplitudes are given and illustrations of EP patterns of different degrees of abnormality are presented.

  17. Blink reflexes in patients with atypical odontalgia and matched healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; List, Thomas; Kaube, Holger; Jensen, Troels S; Svensson, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is an orofacial pain condition which has been suggested to involve neuropathic pain mechanisms. The aim of this study was to use a brain stem reflex to investigate craniofacial nociceptive mechanisms in AO. In 38 AO patients and 27 matched healthy controls, the R2 component of the blink reflex (BR) was elicited using a "nociceptive-specific" electrode and recorded with surface electromyography electrodes on both orbicularis oculi muscles. The BR was tested by stimulation of both sides of the face of the participants before, during, and after an intraoral pain provocation test with capsaicin. The data were analyzed with three- and four-way mixed-model analyses of variance. The root mean square value of the ipsilateral R2 (R2i) was significantly reduced in patients compared with controls (P=0.046). No differences in R2 between stimulation sides were detected in either group (P>0.757). In all participants, R2 responses and the intensity of the pain evoked by the electrical stimulus were decreased during and after application of capsaicin compared with baseline (P<0.001). In patients, R2i onset latencies were significantly prolonged compared with controls (P=0.031). The present data show disturbances in the central processing of craniofacial information and that endogenous pain inhibitory systems in AO patients and healthy controls were activated to a similar degree by an acute intraoral nociceptive input. Additional clinical research with AO patients will be needed to determine to what extent neuropathic pain mechanisms are involved in this pain condition.

  18. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, Samuel; Dhakarwal, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries.

  19. The Effects of Attention on the Trigeminal Blink Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicatano, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    During top-down processing, higher cognitive processes modulate lower sensory processing. The present experiment tested the effects of directed attention on trigeminal reflex blinks in humans (n = 8). In separate sessions, participants either attended to blink-eliciting stimuli or were given no attentional instructions during stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve. Attention to blink-eliciting stimuli significantly increased reflex blink amplitude and duration and shortened blink latency compared with the no attention condition. These results suggested that higher processes such as attention can modify the trigeminal blink reflex circuit. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  1. Involvement of SMAp in the intention-related long latency stretch reflex modulation: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieser, L; Aubert, S; Bonnard, M

    2013-08-29

    When our movement is perturbed by environmental forces, the Long Latency Stretch Reflex (LLSR), generated by a transcortical loop through the primary motor cortex (M1), is the fastest reaction adapted according to our prior intent. We investigated the involvement of the caudal part of the Supplementary Motor Area (SMAp) in this intention-related LLSR modulation. Subjects were instructed either to not react (i.e. to 'let-go') or to resist a mechanical perturbation extending the wrist and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was used to transiently inactivate SMAp, either at the time of the LLSR generation (TMS was applied 50 ms before the perturbation), or at the end of the preparation period (TMS was applied 150 ms before the perturbation). The effect of SMAp transient inactivation on the LLSR modulation was compared to the effect of transient inactivation of M1 or of a Control area. Compared to the Control condition, the intention-related LLSR modulation decreased when TMS was applied either over SMAp or over M1 50 ms before perturbation occurrence, suggesting that SMAp, as M1, is involved in the LLSR modulation. Moreover, the LLSR modulation also decreased when TMS was applied over SMAp 150 ms before the perturbation, indicating that anticipatory processes taking place in SMAp participate to the LLSR modulation. In addition, TMS applied over SMAp elicited Motor-Evoked Potentials (MEPs) whose latency and shape were similar to MEPs evoked by TMS over M1, suggesting that they are due to direct corticospinal projections from SMAp. Interestingly, the SMAp MEPs amplitude was modulated depending on the subject's intention to resist or to let-go. Taken together these results strongly favor the idea that, during the expectation of a perturbation, SMAp is the seat of anticipatory processes that are specific to the subject's intent and that preset M1 in order to adapt the LLSR to this intention. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  3. Towards a neural basis of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Music is capable of evoking exceptionally strong emotions and of reliably affecting the mood of individuals. Functional neuroimaging and lesion studies show that music-evoked emotions can modulate activity in virtually all limbic and paralimbic brain structures. These structures are crucially involved in the initiation, generation, detection, maintenance, regulation and termination of emotions that have survival value for the individual and the species. Therefore, at least some music-evoked emotions involve the very core of evolutionarily adaptive neuroaffective mechanisms. Because dysfunctions in these structures are related to emotional disorders, a better understanding of music-evoked emotions and their neural correlates can lead to a more systematic and effective use of music in therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distraction Reduces Both Early and Late Electrocutaneous Stimulus Evoked Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.H.G.; Wiering, Caro H.; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Previous electroencephalography studies revealed mixed effects of sustained distraction on early negative and later positive event-related potential components evoked by electrocutaneous stimuli. In our study we further examined the influence of sustained distraction to clarify these discrepancies.

  5. Click-evoked responses in vestibular afferents in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xuehui; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Xu, Youguo; Zhou, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Sound activates not only the cochlea but also the vestibular end organs. Research on this phenomenon led to the discovery of the sound-evoked vestibular myogenic potentials recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscles...

  6. Central estrogenic pathways protect against the depressant action of acute nicotine on reflex tachycardia in female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M., E-mail: mahelm@hotmail.com; Fouda, Mohamed A.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Saad, Evan I.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously shown that acute exposure of male rats to nicotine preferentially attenuates baroreceptor-mediated control of reflex tachycardia in contrast to no effect on reflex bradycardia. Here, we investigated whether female rats are as sensitive as their male counterparts to the baroreflex depressant effect of nicotine and whether this interaction is modulated by estrogen. Baroreflex curves relating reflex chronotropic responses evoked by i.v. doses (1–16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were constructed in conscious freely moving proestrus, ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen (50 μg/kg/day s.c., 5 days)-replaced OVX (OVXE{sub 2}) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS{sub PE} and BRS{sub SNP}). Nicotine (100 μg/kg i.v.) reduced BRS{sub SNP} in OVX rats but not in proestrus or OVXE{sub 2} rats. The attenuation of reflex tachycardia by nicotine was also evident in diestrus rats, which exhibited plasma estrogen levels similar to those of OVX rats. BRS{sub PE} was not affected by nicotine in all rat preparations. Experiments were then extended to determine whether central estrogenic receptors modulate the nicotine–BRS{sub SNP} interaction. Intracisteral (i.c.) treatment of OVX rats with estrogen sulfate (0.2 μg/rat) abolished the BRS{sub SNP} attenuating effect of i.v. nicotine. This protective effect of estrogen disappeared when OVX rats were pretreated with i.c. ICI 182,780 (50 μg/rat, selective estrogen receptor antagonist). Together, these findings suggest that central neural pools of estrogen receptors underlie the protection offered by E{sub 2} against nicotine-induced baroreceptor dysfunction in female rats. -- Highlights: ► Estrogen protects against the depressant effect of nicotine on reflex tachycardia. ► The baroreflex response and estrogen status affect the nicotine–BRS interaction. ► The protection offered by estrogen is mediated via central estrogen receptors.

  7. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  8. Stretch reflex regulation in healthy subjects and patients with spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Petersen, Nicolas; Crone, Clarissa

    2005-01-01

    during voluntary muscle contraction in part because of depression of the inhibitory mechanisms that are affected in spasticity. In spastic patients, these inhibitory mechanisms are already depressed at rest and cannot be depressed further in connection with a contraction. In relation to most normal......In recent years, part of the muscle resistance in spastic patients has been explained by changes in the elastic properties of muscles. However, the adaptive spinal mechanisms responsible for the exaggeration of stretch reflex activity also contribute to muscle stiffness. The available data suggest...... of the spastic symptoms. A recent finding also shows no sign of exaggerated stretch reflexes in muscles voluntarily activated by the spastic patient in general. This is easily explained by the control of stretch reflex activity in healthy subjects. In healthy subjects, the stretch reflex activity is increased...

  9. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal

  10. Romantic relationships and their transformation in the reflexive society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lavinia Alexe

    2010-01-01

    .... Following Anthony Giddens (1992), who observed that increased autonomy and reflexivity were both elements that have shaken the romantic love, Jean-Claude Kaufmann notices the deep changes occurring in the way in which romantic...

  11. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, T

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether or not sub......Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether...... was greater for the S group. The hip joint moment was similar for the groups. The EMG activity in the vastus lateralis and anterior tibial muscles was greater prior to heel strike for the S group. These data indicate that human walking exhibits at least two different motor patterns as evaluated by gating...

  12. A tapetal-like fundus reflex in a healthy male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Bregnhøj, Jesper; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2012-01-01

    To report on the retinal function and structure in a 37-year-old male who presented with a tapetal-like reflex (TLR) indistinguishable from that seen in female carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP)....

  13. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholyaf Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA and acute renal failure (ARF. Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruc-tion. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and elec-trolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum crea-tinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  14. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholyaf, Mahmoud; Afzali, Saeed; Babolhavaegi, Hoshang; Rahimi, Abolfazl; Wagharseyedayn, Seyed A

    2009-01-01

    In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruction. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and electrolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum creatinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  15. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: changing concepts and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Hicks, M; Jänig, W; Hassenbusch, S; Haddox, J D; Boas, R; Wilson, P

    1995-10-01

    We present a revised taxonomic system for disorders previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and causalgia. The system resulted from a special consensus conference that was convened on this topic and is based upon the patient's history, presenting symptoms, and findings at the time of diagnosis. The disorders are grouped under the umbrella term CRPS: complex regional pain syndrome. This overall term, CRPS, requires the presence of regional pain and sensory changes following a noxious event. Further, the pain is associated with findings such as abnormal skin color, temperature change, abnormal sudomotor activity, or edema. The combination of these findings exceeds their expected magnitude in response to known physical damage during and following the inciting event. Two types of CRPS have been recognized: type I, corresponds to RSD and occurs without a definable nerve lesion, and type II, formerly called causalgia refers to cases where a definable nerve lesion is present. The term sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) was also evaluated and considered to be a variable phenomenon associated with a variety of disorders, including CRPS types I and II. These revised categories have been included in the 2nd edition of the IASP Classification of Chronic Pain Syndromes.

  16. Long-latency spinal reflexes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, K; Lippold, O C; Shahani, M; Shahani, U

    1985-06-01

    Stretching human muscles with a mechanical device gave rise to multiple peaks in the rectified and averaged electromyogram. In the first dorsal interosseous the latency of the first peak (M1) was 32.4 +/- 2.4 ms (SD) and the latency of the second peak (M2) was 55.1 +/- 11.3 ms, in both cases measured from the time of the stimulus to the take-off point of the peak. Often a third peak (M3) was seen, having a considerably longer latency. The origin of peak M1 was considered to be in the stretch reflex arc because of its latency and its invariable association with muscle movement. Peak M2 was due to stimulation of afferent terminals in the skin and/or subcutaneous tissues by the mechanical device producing the muscle stretch. The conduction velocity of the pathway involved in the generation of the M1 component is the same as that for M2. This implies that central processing in the spinal cord delays the M2 response. The M2 mechanism does not involve a transcortical (long-loop) pathway because in foot muscles the M1-M2 delay remains the same as is found for hand muscles, although M1 latency is prolonged (to 39.4 +/- 6.2 ms for extensor digitorum longus). This indicates that there is not time for M2 impulses to traverse a pathway any longer than that passing to and from the spinal cord.

  17. Cough reflex hypersensitivity: A role for neurotrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Jaffal, Sahar M

    2017-03-01

    Cough is one of the most common complaints for which sufferers seek medical assistance. However, currently available drugs are not very effective in treating cough, particularly that which follows an upper respiratory tract infection. Nonetheless, there has been a significant increase in our understanding of the mechanisms and pathways of the defensive cough as well as the hypersensitive/pathophysiological cough, both at airway and central nervous system (CNS) levels. Numerous molecules and signaling pathways have been identified as potential targets for antitussive drugs, including neurotrophins (NTs). NTs belong to a family of trophic factors and are critical for the development and maintenance of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system including sympathetic efferents, sensory neuron afferents, and immune cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was the first member of the NT family to be discovered, with wide ranging actions associated with synapse formation, survival, proliferation, apoptosis, axonal and dendritic outgrowth, expression and activity of functionally important proteins such as ion channels, receptors, and neurotransmitters. In addition, NGF has been implicated in several disease states particularly neuropathic pain and most recently in the sensitization of the cough reflex. This review will briefly address the peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms of airway neurons and will then focus on NGF signaling and its role in cough hypersensitivity.

  18. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakarwal, Pradeep; Adediran, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs.Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously.Conclusion: Refl...

  19. A tapetal-like fundus reflex in a healthy male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Bregnhøj, Jesper; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2012-01-01

    To report on the retinal function and structure in a 37-year-old male who presented with a tapetal-like reflex (TLR) indistinguishable from that seen in female carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP).......To report on the retinal function and structure in a 37-year-old male who presented with a tapetal-like reflex (TLR) indistinguishable from that seen in female carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP)....

  20. Electroretinogram (ERG) to photic stimuli should be carefully distinct from photic brainstem reflex in patients with deep coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Masahiro; Hitomi, Takefumi; Aoyama, Akihiro; Kaido, Toshimi; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2017-08-31

    Patient 1: A 35-year-old woman became deep coma because of intracranial hemorrhage after pulmonary surgery. Patient 2: A 39-year-old woman became deep coma because of cerebellar hemorrhage after hepatic surgery. Scalp-recorded digital electroencephalography (EEG) showed electrocerebral inactivity in both cases. In addition, both EEG showed repetitive discharges at bilateral frontopolar electrodes in response to photic stimuli. The amplitude and latency of the discharges was 17 μV and 24 msec in case 1, and 9 μV and 27 msec in case 2 respectively. The activity at left frontopolar electrode disappeared after coverage of the ipsilateral eye. Based on these findings, we could exclude the possibility of brainstem response and judged it as electroretinogram (ERG). Photic stimulation is a useful activation method in EEG recording, and we can also evaluate brainstem function by checking photic blink reflex if it is evoked. However, we should be cautious about the distinction of ERG from photic blink reflex when brain death is clinically suspected.

  1. Flash visual evoked potentials in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping; Guo, Shu-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xiu

    2013-03-01

    To describe the development of flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) in preterm infants from 1 to 18 months and to determine if the maturation of FVEPs is similar to that of term infants. Longitudinal follow-up study. Twenty very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants, 42 low birth weight (LBW) preterm infants, and 41 term infants underwent FVEP recordings and neurodevelopmental examinations at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of corrected and chronological ages. The FVEP recordings were carried out with the VikingQuest-IV neuroelectrophysiological device (VikingQuest, Nicolet, WI), and neurodevelopmental assessments were made by the Development Screen Test and Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition. At 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age, neurodevelopment was measured with the Mental Index and Developmental Quotient. At 12 and 18 months, neurodevelopment was assessed using the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Developmental Index. Two FVEP values were analyzed: the P2 amplitude (peak to peak from the preceding N2 wave) and the latency of the P2 wave. There was no significant difference for age-dependent decreased pattern of FVEP P2 latency between preterm infants and the control group. This pattern consisted of a rapid decrease in the first 6 months of life, a gradual decline from 6 to 12 months of age, and a steady reduction from 12 to 18 months of age. The P2 latencies were prolonged significantly at all 6 recorded times in the VLBW group compared with the controls and showed a delay in the LBW group at 1 and 3 months of corrected age. The maturation of P2 latency in LBW infants is similar to that of the controls at 3 months of corrected age, but the maturation of P2 latency in VLBW children remained delayed when compared with the controls until 18 months of corrected age. Although the FVEP development pattern of preterm infants was similar to that of healthy full-term infants, the former had deficits in visual electrophysiologic maturation

  2. Embodied Reflexivity in Qualitative Analysis: A Role for Selfies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kelly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a case study on the use of selfies as a means to support embodied reflexivity in phenomenological research. There is a recognized need to make reflexive practice in qualitative health research more transparent. There is also a move towards an embodied type of reflexivity whereby researchers pay attention to their physical reactions as part of the research process. Being reflexive is especially challenging when researchers work in teams rather than as individuals, and when researchers and participants do not meet because data collection and analysis are separate from one another. We used FINLAY's (2005 model of reflexive embodied empathy to explain how taking selfies allowed an international team of researchers to engage reflexively with a participant when their primary access to her lifeworld was an interview transcript. Key concepts from FOUCAULT's (1988 theory of technologies of self, critical self-awareness and self-stylization, shed light on this phenomenon. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1702124

  3. HPLC analysis of closed, open, and reflex eye tear proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitaramamma T

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the closed, open and reflex eye tear proteins of normal subjects were compared and analysed. Tear proteins were resolved by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC utilising both gel filtration (P-300 SW and reverse-phase (C-18 columns and the HPLC fractions were further analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The protein composition of the closed-eye tear was significantly different from that of the open and reflex-eye tear. Secretory IgA (sIgA was the predominant protein in closed eye tears constituting 49% of the total protein compared to 11% in reflex tears, whereas lysozyme was the predominant protein (53% in reflex tears. Levels of lactoferrin, lipocalin and lysozyme were relatively constant in both open and reflex tears. HPLC profiles of the closed-eye tears, upon continuous stimulation of lacrimal glands indicated that sIgA was significantly reduced whereas lactoferrin, lipocalin, and lysozyme were significantly increased. These results indicate that the tear composition upon waking attains that of the open eye within 4 to 5 minutes, and upon continuous stimulation this reflects the reflex-eye tear composition. It also indicates that mechanisms responsible for changes in concentration of constitutive and regulated tear protein with stimulus can be studied successfully using non-invasive methods to collect human tears.

  4. HPLC analysis of closed, open, and reflex eye tear proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaramamma, T; Shivaji, S; Rao, G N

    1998-12-01

    Changes in the closed, open and reflex eye tear proteins of normal subjects were compared and analysed. Tear proteins were resolved by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) utilising both gel filtration (P-300 SW) and reverse-phase (C-18) columns and the HPLC fractions were further analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The protein composition of the closed-eye tear was significantly different from that of the open and reflex-eye tear. Secretory IgA (sIgA) was the predominant protein in closed eye tears constituting 49% of the total protein compared to 11% in reflex tears, whereas lysozyme was the predominant protein (53%) in reflex tears. Levels of lactoferrin, lipocalin and lysozyme were relatively constant in both open and reflex tears. HPLC profiles of the closed-eye tears, upon continuous stimulation of lacrimal glands indicated that sIgA was significantly reduced whereas lactoferrin, lipocalin, and lysozyme were significantly increased. These results indicate that the tear composition upon waking attains that of the open eye within 4 to 5 minutes, and upon continuous stimulation this reflects the reflex-eye tear composition. It also indicates that mechanisms responsible for changes in concentration of constitutive and regulated tear protein with stimulus can be studied successfully using non-invasive methods to collect human tears.

  5. Repeated cycles of electrical stimulation decrease vasoconstriction and axon-reflex vasodilation to noradrenaline in the human forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Repeated cycles of electrical stimulation inhibit cutaneous vasoconstriction to noradrenaline, but the mechanism is unknown. Investigating this is important because peripheral electrical stimulation is useful for pain modulation and appears to assist cutaneous wound healing. What this study adds Intermittent, brief electrical stimulation of the forearm over a 10-day period inhibited vasoconstriction and axon-reflex vasodilation to noradrenaline, but did not affect vasoconstriction to vasopressin or axon-reflex vasodilation to histamine. Thus, electrical stimulation may evoke a specific reduction in responsiveness to noradrenaline. Aim To investigate whether desensitization to the vasomotor effects of noradrenaline is a specific effect of electrical stimulation. Methods Three sites on the forearm of 10 healthy volunteers were stimulated with 0.2 mA direct current for 2 min twice daily for 10 days. Noradrenaline and histamine were then displaced from ring-shaped iontophoresis chambers into two of the pretreated sites and two untreated sites on the contralateral forearm. Axon-reflex vasodilation was measured from the centre of the ring described by the iontophoresis chamber with a laser Doppler flowmeter. One or two days later, noradrenaline and vasopressin were introduced into pretreated and untreated sites by iontophoresis, and vasoconstriction at sites of administration was measured in the heated forearm. Results The pretreatment blocked vasoconstriction to noradrenaline [median increase in flow 1%, interquartile range (IR) −41 to 52%; median decrease at the untreated site 53%, IR. −70 to −10%; P noradrenaline was diminished at the pretreated site (median increase in flow 33%, IR 2–321%; untreated site 247%, IR 31–1087%; P noradrenaline. Repeated cycles of electrical stimulation may downregulate neural and vascular responses to noradrenaline by repetitively activating cutaneous sympathetic nerve fibres. PMID

  6. Dual, but not selective, COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, attenuate acetic acid-evoked bladder irritation in the anaesthetised female cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Alexandra; McCafferty, Gerald P; Evans, Christopher; Edwards, Richard M; Hieble, J Paul

    2006-05-01

    Non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors exert effects on lower urinary tract function in several species. The exact contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 isozymes have not been studied much. The present studies investigated the effects of non- and selective COX inhibitors on bladder irritation in the cat.Chloralose-anaesthetised female cats were catheterised through the bladder dome for cystometric evaluation of bladder responses to intravesical infusion of saline or acetic acid. Bladder capacity, voiding efficiency, threshold pressure, and reflex-evoked bladder contraction amplitude and duration were measured. The cat COX selectivity of the doses of inhibitors examined was determined using an in vitro whole-blood assay and analysis of plasma levels. Pretreatment with indomethacin or ketoprofen (non-selective COX inhibitors; 0.3 mg kg(-1) i.v.) inhibited acetic acid-evoked irritation (characterised by a decrease in bladder capacity in vehicle pretreated animals). FR-122047 (selective COX-1 inhibitor), NS-398 and nimesulide (selective COX-2 inhibitors; 1 and 3 mg kg(-1) i.v.) had no effects on bladder irritation. Analysis of plasma levels of the doses examined and determination of COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition in cat whole blood confirmed the reported selectivity of these compounds in this species. The present studies suggest that dual COX inhibition is required to attenuate acetic acid-evoked bladder irritation in the cat.

  7. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  9. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liila Taruffi

    Full Text Available This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772. The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  10. The Paradox of Music-Evoked Sadness: An Online Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners’ experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no “real-life” implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life. PMID:25330315

  11. Antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine and evaluation of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in foals.

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    Risberg, Åse I; Spadavecchia, Claudia; Ranheim, Birgit; Hendrickson, Eli H S; Lervik, Andreas; Haga, Henning A

    2015-05-01

    To elicit and evaluate the NWR (nociceptive withdrawal reflex) in 2 and 11 day old foals, to investigate if buprenorphine causes antinociception and determine if the NWR response changes with increasing age. The effect of buprenorphine on behaviour was also evaluated. Prospective, experimental cross-over trial. Nine Norwegian Fjord research foals. Buprenorphine, 10 μg kg(-1) was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the same foal at 2 days and at 11 days of age. The NWR and the effect of buprenorphine were evaluated by electromyograms recorded from the left deltoid muscle following electrical stimulation of the left lateral palmar nerve at the level of the pastern. Mentation, locomotor activity and respiratory rate were recorded before and after buprenorphine administration. We were able to evoke the NWR and temporal summation in foals using this model. Buprenorphine decreased the root mean square amplitude following single electrical stimulation (p buprenorphine. These findings indicate that buprenorphine has antinociceptive effect in foals. Opioid side effects often recognized in adult horses also occur in foals. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. A reflective account on becoming reflexive: the 7 Cs of caring conversations as a framework for reflexive questioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edel Roddy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: Some uncertainty surrounds both the definition and the application of reflexivity in participatory research and practice development. There is scope for further exploration of what reflexivity might look like in practice, and how the researcher/practice developer and participants might be involved. This paper does this in the context of a study that is using appreciative inquiry to explore the experience of inspection in care homes. Aims: I will explore my personal journey into the use of a relational constructionist approach to reflexivity and suggest that the 7 Cs of caring conversations provide a useful framework to inform reflexive practice. The 7 Cs will be used as a framework for the telling of this story. Implications for practice: Relational reflexivity has the potential to create the space for all those involved in research/practice development initiatives to voice their thoughts and feelings about the initiative and their involvement in it The 7 Cs of caring conversations can provide a framework for developing questions that may serve as a starting point for cultivating reflexive practice

  13. Role of glycine in nociceptive and non-nociceptive bladder reflexes and pudendal afferent inhibition of these reflexes in cats.

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    Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Reese, Jeremy N; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the role of glycinergic transmission in nociceptive and non-nociceptive bladder reflexes and in inhibition of these reflexes by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). Cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed in α-chloralose anesthetized cats by intravesical infusion of saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to trigger, respectively, non-nociceptive or nociceptive bladder reflexes. PNS at 2 or 4 times threshold (T) intensity for inducing anal twitch was used to inhibit the bladder reflexes. Strychnine (a glycine receptor antagonist) was administered in cumulative doses (0.001-0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) at 60-120 min intervals. Strychnine at 0.001-0.3 mg/kg significantly (P nociceptive bladder reflex. This is attributable to inhibition by glycine of another inhibitory mechanism. Glycine also has a minor role in PNS inhibition of the nociceptive bladder reflex. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:798-804, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Therapeutic effects of anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, corticospinal tract activities, and muscle stiffness in children with cerebral palsy.

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    Parvin, Sh; Taghiloo, A; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, M Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study therapeutic effects of antigravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, muscle stiffness, and corticospinal tract (CST) function in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Three children received AlterG training 3 days per week for 8 weeks as experimental group. Each session lasted 45 minutes. One child as control group received typical occupational therapy for the same amount of time. We evaluated hyper-excitability of lower limb muscles by H-reflex response. We quantified muscle stiffness by sonoelastography images of the affected muscles. We quantified CST activity by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We performed the evaluations before and after training for both groups. H response latency and maximum M-wave amplitude were improved in experimental group after training compared to control group. Two children of experimental group had TMS response. Major parameters of TMS (i.e. peak-to-peak amplitude of motor evoked potential (MEP), latency of MEP, cortical silent period, and intensity of pulse) improved for both of them. Three parameters of texture analysis of sonoelastography images were improved for experimental group (i.e. contrast, entropy, and shear wave velocity). These findings indicate that AlterG training can improve reflexes, muscle stiffness, and CST activity in children with spastic hemiplegic CP and can be considered as a therapeutic tool to improve neuromuscular abnormalities occurring secondary to CP.

  15. Reflex anuria from unilateral ureteral obstruction.

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    Catalano, C; Comuzzi, E; Davì, L; Fabbian, F

    2002-03-01

    Renal function is usually normal or only marginally affected in patients with unilateral ureteral obstruction due to the vicarious function of the contralateral kidney. Few reports exist in which unilateral renal obstruction is associated with anuria (reflex anuria, RA) and acute renal failure. We report the clinical case of a female patient who was referred to the emergency department due to anuria of 72 h duration and acute renal failure (serum creatinine 9 mg/dl) associated with several episodes of violent right flank pain with hematuria following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). A few weeks before ESWL, urography showed a 2-cm stone located in the right pelvis whilst the left kidney was functionally normal. On admission, renal ultrasound documented a normal left kidney, whilst the right pelvis was hydronephrotic and there were two indwelling stones at the right pyeloureteral junction. After the patient passed a urinary stone, diuresis restarted and acute renal failure was resolved. Thereafter, urography confirmed that the left kidney, the left ureter and bladder were functionally and morphologically normal. RA with acute renal failure has been so scarcely documented that it is considered to be legend by many clinicians. Major textbooks do not discuss RA with acute renal failure. Vascular or ureteral spasm related in part to a peculiar hyperexcitability of the autonomic nervous system may explain RA. We suggest that nephrologists should always consider RA when evaluating acute renal failure. On the other hand, RA might be relatively common and we cannot rule out that only the most severe and/or better-documented cases have been reported in the medical literature. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Cervical referral of head pain in migraineurs: effects on the nociceptive blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dean H; Drummond, Peter D

    2014-06-01

    To investigate cervical, interictal reproduction of usual head pain and its effect on the nociceptive blink reflex in migraineurs. Anatomical and neurophysiological studies in animals and humans have confirmed functional convergence of trigeminal and cervical afferent pathways. Migraineurs often present with occipital and neck symptoms, and cervical pain is referred to the head in most cases, suggesting that cervical afferent information may contribute to headache. Furthermore, the effectiveness of greater occipital nerve blockade in migraine and demonstrable modulation of trigeminal transmission following greater occipital nerve blockade suggest an important role for cervical afferents in migraine. However, to what extent cervical afferents contribute actively to migraine is still unknown. The passive accessory intervertebral movements of the atlanto-occipital and C2-3 spinal segments of 15 participants (14 females, 1 male; age 24-44 years, mean age 33.3 years) with migraine were examined interictally. During 1 session, either the atlanto-occipital or C2-3 segment was examined, resulting in referred usual head pain, while in another session, pressure was applied over the common extensor origin (lateral epicondyle of the humerus) of the ipsilateral arm. Each intervention was repeated 4 times. The nociceptive blink reflex to a supraorbital electrical stimulus was elicited ipsilaterally during both sessions before and during each intervention. The main outcome variables were the number of recorded blinks, area under the curve and latencies of the R2 components of the nociceptive blink reflex. Participants also rated the intensity of referred head pain and the supraorbital stimulus on a scale of 0-10, where 0 = "no pain" and 10 = "intolerable pain," and rated the intensity of applied pressure where 0 = "pressure but no pain" and 10 = "intolerable pain." Participants reported a significant reduction in local tenderness ratings across the 4 trials for

  17. Exercise pressor reflex function is altered in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

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    Smith, Scott A; Williams, Maurice A; Leal, Anna K; Mitchell, Jere H; Garry, Mary G

    2006-12-15

    In hypertension, exercise elicits excessive elevations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increasing the risk for adverse cardiac events and stroke during physical activity. The exercise pressor reflex (a neural drive originating in skeletal muscle), central command (a neural drive originating in cortical brain centres) and the tonically active arterial baroreflex contribute importantly to cardiovascular control during exercise. Each of these inputs potentially mediates the heightened cardiovascular response to physical activity in hypertension. However, given that exercise pressor reflex overactivity is known to elicit enhanced circulatory responses to exercise in disease states closely related to hypertension (e.g. heart failure), we tested the hypothesis that the exaggerated cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension is mediated by an overactive exercise pressor reflex. To test this hypothesis, we used a rat model of exercise recently developed in our laboratory that selectively stimulates the exercise pressor reflex independent of central command and/or the arterial baroreflex. Activation of the exercise pressor reflex during electrically induced static muscle contraction in the absence of input from central command resulted in significantly larger increases in MAP and HR in male spontaneously hypertensive rats as compared to normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats over a wide range of exercise intensities. Similar findings were obtained in animals in which input from both central command and the arterial baroreflex were eliminated. These findings suggest that the enhanced cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension is mediated by an overactive exercise pressor reflex. Potentially, effective treatment of exercise pressor reflex dysfunction may reduce the cardiovascular risks associated with exercise in hypertension.

  18. Trigeminal cardiac reflex and cerebral blood flow regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga Lapi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals. During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart and brain, and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is requested within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing.The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral level, reducing the arterial blood pressure and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activated the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial. Therefore the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension, because produced opposite effects compared to those elicited by the diving reflex as it induces hypotension and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone.

  19. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yu Chang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  20. Pelviureteral inhibitory reflex and ureteropelvic excitatory reflex: role of the two reflexes in regulation of urine flow from the renal pelvis to the ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) regulates the passage of urine from the renal pelvis to the ureter, and prevents urinary backflow from the the ureter to the renal pelvis, is not completely understood. The current communication studies this mechanism in 18 dogs. With the dogs under anesthesia, nephrostomy was done through which two catheters (one pressure and one balloon-tipped) were introduced into the UPJ and the renal pelvis, respectively. Renal pelvis distension with a balloon filled with 1 ml of saline effected a rise of renal pelvic pressure from a mean basal pressure of 4.8 +/- 1.2 cm H2O to 6.9 +/- 2.3 cm H2O (P pelvic balloon (P > 0.05). Renal pelvic distension with 2, 3, and 4 ml caused a significant rise of renal pelvic pressure to 8.4 +/- 2.7 (P elevation of ureteric and UPJ pressure which was not significantly different from that observed with distension with 0.5 ml (P > 0.05). In contrast, the UPJ showed no significant pressure change upon distension of the locally anesthetized renal pelvis or ureter, respectively. Likewise, the locally anesthetized UPJ exhibited no significant pressure response to renal pelvic or ureteric distension. The study demonstrates that urine might have to accumulate in the renal pelvis up to a certain volume and pressure so as to effect UPJ opening, which occurs at its maximum irrespective of the distending volume. UPJ opening upon renal pelvic distension postulates a reflex relationship which we call "pelviureteral inhibitory reflex." This reflex is believed to regulate the passage of urine from the renal pelvis to the ureter. Ureteric distension closes the UPJ; we call this reflex action the "ureteropelvic excitatory reflex" as it seems to prevent reflux of urine through the UPJ and thus protects the kidney. The concept that the UPJ acts as a physiologic sphincter is put forward.

  1. Hering-Breuer inflation reflex in young and adult mammals.

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    Gaultier, C; Mortola, J P

    1981-09-01

    The apnea following lung inflation (Hering-Breuer expiratory promoting reflex) is a vagally mediated reflex which is initiated by the activation of pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR) and terminated by the interaction of several factors, which include adaptation of PSR, chemical stimuli, level of anaesthesia, and body temperature. Since PSR activity is determined by the changes in airway tension, the interpretation of the strength of vagal reflexes on the basis of changes in lung volume rather than transpulmonary pressure can be misleading when the mechanical properties of the respiratory system are not constant. In this study we compared the reflex apnea resulting from lung inflation of young and adult mammals, the respiratory system it can be considered weaker or stronger in the young depending upon the normalizing parameter used. However, when considered on the basis of the relative changes in transpulmonary pressure, which better reflects the activation of PSR, the reflex is weaker in young rats and rabbits than in their adult counterparts an similar in dogs. The analysis of the underlying mechanisms suggests a weaker vagal contribution in the young animal, but a satisfactory conclusion requires a better knowledge of the factors which, in the younger animals, result in the termination of the apnea.

  2. Habituation and conditioning of the human long latency stretch reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, J C; Day, B L; Berardelli, A; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    The effects of stretch repetition rate, prior warning stimuli and self administered stretch were examined on the size of the short and long latency components of the stretch reflex electromyographic EMG response in flexor pollicis longus and the flexor muscles of the wrist and fingers. Stretches of constant velocity and extent were given every 10 s, 5 s, 2 s, or 1 s to either the wrist or thumb during a small background contraction of the flexor muscles. The size of the long latency component of the stretch reflex (measured as the area under the averaged rectified EMG responses) declined dramatically at faster repetition rates, especially in the wrist and finger flexors. The size of the short latency component was relatively unaffected. The size of the electrically elicited H-reflex in forearm muscles also failed to habituate under the same conditions. If each individual trial of a series was examined, the long latency component of the stretch reflex EMG could be seen to decrease in size over the first three to six stretches if stretches were given every 1 s, but not if stretches were given every 10 s. When stretches were given every 5 s to either wrist or thumb, an electrical stimulus applied to the digital nerves of the opposite hand 1 s before stretch reduced the size of the long latency component of the reflex EMG response. The short latency component was unaffected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Reflexivity, critical qualitative research and emancipation: a Foucauldian perspective.

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    McCabe, Janet L; Holmes, Dave

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we consider reflexivity, not only as a concept of qualitative validity, but also as a tool used during the research process to achieve the goals of emancipation that are intrinsic to qualitative research conducted within a critical paradigm. Research conducted from a critical perspective poses two challenges to researchers: validity of the research must be ensured and the emancipatory aims of the research need to be realized and communicated. The traditional view of reflexivity as a means of ensuring validity in qualitative research limits its potential to inform the research process. The Medline and CINAHL data bases were searched (1998-2008 inclusive) using keywords such as reflexivity, validity, subjectivity, bias, emancipation, empowerment and disability. In addition, the work of Michel Foucault was examined. Using the work of the late French philosopher Michel Foucault, we explore how Foucault's 'technologies of the self' can be employed during critical qualitative research to achieve emancipatory changes. Using research conducted with marginalized populations as an example (specifically, individuals with disabilities), we demonstrate the potential for using reflexivity, in a Foucauldian sense, during the research process. Shifting the traditional view of reflexivity allows researchers to focus on the subtle changes that comprise emancipation (in a Foucauldian sense). As a result, researchers are better able to see, understand and analyse this process in both the participants and themselves.

  4. Nociception-specific blink reflex: pharmacology in healthy volunteers.

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    Marin, J C A; Gantenbein, A R; Paemeleire, K; Kaube, H; Goadsby, P J

    2015-01-01

    The physiology and pharmacology of activation or perception of activation of pain-coding trigeminovascular afferents in humans is fundamental to understanding the biology of headache and developing new treatments. The blink reflex was elicited using a concentric electrode and recorded in four separate sessions, at baseline and two minutes after administration of ramped doses of diazepam (final dose 0.07 mg/kg), fentanyl (final dose 1.11 μg/kg), ketamine (final dose 0.084 mg/kg) and 0.9 % saline solution. The AUC (area under the curve, μV*ms) and the latency (ms) of the ipsi- and contralateral R2 component of the blink reflex were calculated by PC-based offline analysis. Immediately after each block of blink reflex recordings certain psychometric parameters were assessed. There was an effect due to DRUG on the ipsilateral (F 3,60 = 7.3, P blink reflex (nBR) without any μ-opiate or glutamate NMDA receptor component. The nociception specific blink reflex offers a reproducible, quantifiable method of assessment of trigeminal nociceptive system in humans that can be used to dissect pharmacology relevant to primary headache disorders.

  5. Blink reflex role in algorithmic genetic testing of inherited polyneuropathies.

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    Wang, Wei; Litchy, William J; Mandrekar, Jay; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    In severely affected inherited polyneuropathy patients, primary demyelination can be difficult to determine by routine extremity limb nerve conduction studies (NCS). Blink reflexes may help classify severe polyneuropathies as either axonal or demyelinating. However, blink reflex studies have not been studied systematically in any genetically confirmed cohort. Patients with a genetic diagnosis who had undergone blink reflex testing and extremity NCS were identified retrospectively. Blink reflex R1 latency, extremity NCS, and severity were compared. We identified 26 demyelinating and 23 axonal, genetically confirmed cases, including 20 with PMP22 duplications. In 12 (25%), the ulnar CMAP amplitude was ≤0.5 mV making electrophysiological classification difficult. However, the R1-latency cutoff of >13 ms (demyelinating) robustly classified all patients regardless of severity. We show that blink reflex studies are reliable for identification of inherited demyelinating polyneuropathy regardless of severity and can facilitate algorithmic decisions in genetic testing. Muscle Nerve 55: 316-322, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Trigeminocardiac Reflex: A Reappraisal with Relevance to Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Darpan; Thomas, Shaji; Chakravorty, Nupur; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to undertake a review of literature on trigeminocardiac reflex in oral and maxillofacial online data-base and discuss the pathophysiology, risk factor assessment, presentation of the reflex, prevention, management with emphasis on the role of the attending anaesthetist and the maxillofacial surgeon. The available literature relevant to oral and maxillofacial surgery in online data-base of the United States National Library of Medicine: Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) was searched. The inclusion criterion was to review published clinical papers, abstracts and evidence based reviews on trigeminocardiac reflex relevant to oral and maxillofacial surgery. Sixty-five articles were found with the search term "trigeminocardiac reflex" in the literature searched. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria for this study. The relevant data was extracted, tabulated and reviewed to draw evidence based conclusions for the management of trigeminocardiac reflex. Conclusions were drawn and discussed based on the reviewed maxillofacial literature with emphasis on the anaesthetist's and the surgeon's role in the management of this detrimental event in maxillofacial surgical practice.

  7. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflexivity: a methodological tool in the knowledge translation process?

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    Alley, Sarah; Jackson, Suzanne F; Shakya, Yogendra B

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge translation is a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and application of knowledge. It is considered the bridge that closes the gap between research and practice. Yet it appears that in all areas of practice, a significant gap remains in translating research knowledge into practical application. Recently, researchers and practitioners in the field of health care have begun to recognize reflection and reflexive exercises as a fundamental component to the knowledge translation process. As a practical tool, reflexivity can go beyond simply looking at what practitioners are doing; when approached in a systematic manner, it has the potential to enable practitioners from a wide variety of backgrounds to identify, understand, and act in relation to the personal, professional, and political challenges they face in practice. This article focuses on how reflexive practice as a methodological tool can provide researchers and practitioners with new insights and increased self-awareness, as they are able to critically examine the nature of their work and acknowledge biases, which may affect the knowledge translation process. Through the use of structured journal entries, the nature of the relationship between reflexivity and knowledge translation was examined, specifically exploring if reflexivity can improve the knowledge translation process, leading to increased utilization and application of research findings into everyday practice. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Faroese long-distance reflexives face off against Icelandic long-distance reflexives

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    Tania E. Strahan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance reflexives (LDRs in Faroese are often compared to those in Icelandic, and are even considered to have the same distribution (Thráinsson et al., 2004. In this paper I evaluate the extent to which this is true. The results from recent fieldwork show that there are clear differences between the LDR in the two closely related languages, in particular that Faroese speakers often reject LDR sentences that contain a non-third person, and that Faroese LDR is often completely acceptable out of a non-complement clause. In addition, initial findings suggest that there may be dialectal variation with respect to at least these two aspects of LDR in Faroese.

  10. The nociceptive withdrawal reflex does not adapt to joint position change and short-term motor practice [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2lr

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    Nathan Eckert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nociceptive withdrawal reflex is a protective mechanism to mediate interactions within a potentially dangerous environment. The reflex is formed by action-based sensory encoding during the early post-natal developmental period, and it is unknown if the protective motor function of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in the human upper-limb is adaptable based on the configuration of the arm or if it can be modified by short-term practice of a similar or opposing motor action. In the present study, nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were evoked by a brief train of electrical stimuli applied to digit II, 1 in five different static arm positions and, 2 before and after motor practice that was opposite (EXT or similar (FLEX to the stereotyped withdrawal response, in 10 individuals. Withdrawal responses were quantified by the electromyography (EMG reflex response in several upper limb muscles, and by the forces and moments recorded at the wrist. EMG onset latencies and response amplitudes were not significantly different across the arm positions or between the EXT and FLEX practice conditions, and the general direction of the withdrawal response was similar across arm positions. In addition, the force vectors were not different after practice in either the practice condition or between EXT and FLEX conditions. We conclude the withdrawal response is insensitive to changes in elbow or shoulder joint angles as well as remaining resistant to short-term adaptations from the practice of motor actions, resulting in a generalized limb withdrawal in each case. It is further hypothesized that the multisensory feedback is weighted differently in each arm position, but integrated to achieve a similar withdrawal response to safeguard against erroneous motor responses that could cause further harm. The results remain consistent with the concept that nociceptive withdrawal reflexes are shaped through long-term and not short-term action based sensory encoding.

  11. Human auditory evoked potentials. II - Effects of attention

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    Picton, T. W.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Attention directed toward auditory stimuli, in order to detect an occasional fainter 'signal' stimulus, caused a substantial increase in the N1 (83 msec) and P2 (161 msec) components of the auditory evoked potential without any change in preceding components. This evidence shows that human auditory attention is not mediated by a peripheral gating mechanism. The evoked response to the detected signal stimulus also contained a large P3 (450 msec) wave that was topographically distinct from the preceding components. This late positive wave could also be recorded in response to a detected omitted stimulus in a regular train and therefore seemed to index a stimulus-independent perceptual decision process.

  12. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adediran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Conclusion: Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries.

  13. Pavlov on the conditioned reflex method and its limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1995-01-01

    Pavlov's aim was to use the salivary conditioning method to investigate the function of the brain of higher animals in their adaptation to the external environment. The salivary reflex, according to Pavlov, was of minor biological significance but a good indicator of the subtle changes in the brain under different experimental conditions. To account for conditioned reflex phenomena, Pavlov faced two alternatives: to offer an objective (physiological) or a subjective (psychological) explanation. In 1901, after a bitter conflict with his disciple A. T. Snarskiy, Pavlov chose the first alternative. During the next decades, Pavlov provided reasons for this decision: The physiological approach (a) avoids anthropomorphizing or speculations about the dogs' subjective experiences, and (b) permits the explanation of observed phenomena which the subjective method is not capable of doing. Pavlov realized that the conditioned reflex method has a limitation; it cannot be used in the study of human subjects because their thinking interferes with experimental results.

  14. The frequency of buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Hülya; Ünal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gülnihal; Öcal, Ruhsen; İnan, Levent Ertuğrul

    2016-11-17

    This study aimed to define the frequency of a primitive reflex, the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and its association with the clinical situation in patients with Parkinson disease. Between May 2010 and May 2011, 222 patients, 115 with Parkinson disease and 107 patients without any sign of neurodegenerative disease, were included in the study. All included patients were examined for BPR and snout reflex and were also evaluated with the Mini Mental State Examination. All patients with Parkinson disease were classified with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr Score to determine their clinical severity. Sixteen patients with Parkinson disease (13.9%) had a BPR (+) and 4 patients in the control group (3.7%) (P Parkinson disease than in patients without a neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Direct and consensual murine pupillary reflex metrics: establishing normative values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rehana Z; Hopkins, Steven C; Frohman, Elliot M; Eagar, Todd N; Cravens, Petra C; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Vernino, Steven; Stüve, Olaf

    2009-12-03

    Pupillometry is a non-invasive technique, based on well-established neurophysiologic principles, that can be utilized to objectively characterize pathophysiologic demyelinating and neurodegenerative changes involving the pupillary reflex pathway. In animal models of human disorders, pupillometry derived reflex metrics could potentially be used to longitudinally monitor disease activity and responses to pharmacotherapies. These investigations would have important implications for translational initiatives focused on the identification and application of novel neuroprotective and restorative treatments for human diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we have established normal reference values for various pupillary reflex metrics across different mouse strains. Ultimately, we anticipate that this new data will help to catalyze unique lines of inquiry using pupillometry methods.

  16. Adrenergic control of tendon jerk reflexes in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S J; Richens, A; Shand, D G

    1973-03-01

    1. Tendon jerk responses and H reflexes were recorded from conscious human volunteers before and after intravenous injection of methylamphetamine, thymoxamine and propranolol, and during intravenous infusion of noradrenaline.2. Methylamphetamine produced a significant increase in the amplitude of the tendon jerk, whereas noradrenaline had no effect in doses which caused a greater pressor response than methylamphetamine.3. Thymoxamine produced a dose-related reduction in the tendon jerk.4. Propranolol had no significant effect on the jerk.5. None of these drugs significantly affected the H reflex.6. It is suggested that central adrenoceptors, possibly alpha in type, exist in man, and that stimulation of these receptors facilitates tendon jerk reflexes by an action on the fusimotor system.

  17. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Krause

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIndividuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP.Methods44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16–25 Hz, 1.5–3 mm. Assessment included (1 recordings of stretch reflex (SR activity of the triceps surae, (2 electromyography (EMG measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3 neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM. We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL, m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM, m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint.ResultsAfter WBV, (1 SOL SRs were decreased (p < 0.01 while (2 maximal voluntary activation (p < 0.05 and (3 angular excursion in the knee joint (p < 0.01 were significantly increased. No changes could be observed for GM SR amplitudes or ankle joint excursion. Neuromuscular coordination expressed by greater agonist–antagonist ratios during aROM was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05.DiscussionThe findings point toward acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects following one bout of WBV. Protocols demonstrate that pathological reflex responses are reduced (spinal level, while the execution of voluntary movement (supraspinal level is improved in regards to kinematic and neuromuscular control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor

  18. Automated data reduction workflows for astronomy. The ESO Reflex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudling, W.; Romaniello, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Ballester, P.; Forchi, V.; García-Dabló, C. E.; Moehler, S.; Neeser, M. J.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Data from complex modern astronomical instruments often consist of a large number of different science and calibration files, and their reduction requires a variety of software tools. The execution chain of the tools represents a complex workflow that needs to be tuned and supervised, often by individual researchers that are not necessarily experts for any specific instrument. Aims: The efficiency of data reduction can be improved by using automatic workflows to organise data and execute a sequence of data reduction steps. To realize such efficiency gains, we designed a system that allows intuitive representation, execution and modification of the data reduction workflow, and has facilities for inspection and interaction with the data. Methods: The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has developed Reflex, an environment to automate data reduction workflows. Reflex is implemented as a package of customized components for the Kepler workflow engine. Kepler provides the graphical user interface to create an executable flowchart-like representation of the data reduction process. Key features of Reflex are a rule-based data organiser, infrastructure to re-use results, thorough book-keeping, data progeny tracking, interactive user interfaces, and a novel concept to exploit information created during data organisation for the workflow execution. Results: Automated workflows can greatly increase the efficiency of astronomical data reduction. In Reflex, workflows can be run non-interactively as a first step. Subsequent optimization can then be carried out while transparently re-using all unchanged intermediate products. We found that such workflows enable the reduction of complex data by non-expert users and minimizes mistakes due to book-keeping errors. Conclusions: Reflex includes novel concepts to increase the efficiency of astronomical data processing. While Reflex is a specific implementation of astronomical scientific workflows within the Kepler workflow

  19. Contact heat evoked potentials using simultaneous EEG and fMRI and their correlation with evoked pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atherton Duncan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS utilises rapidly delivered heat pulses with adjustable peak temperatures to stimulate the differential warm/heat thresholds of receptors expressed by Aδ and C fibres. The resulting evoked potentials can be recorded and measured, providing a useful clinical tool for the study of thermal and nociceptive pathways. Concurrent recording of contact heat evoked potentials using electroencephalogram (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has not previously been reported with CHEPS. Developing simultaneous EEG and fMRI with CHEPS is highly desirable, as it provides an opportunity to exploit the high temporal resolution of EEG and the high spatial resolution of fMRI to study the reaction of the human brain to thermal and nociceptive stimuli. Methods In this study we have recorded evoked potentials stimulated by 51°C contact heat pulses from CHEPS using EEG, under normal conditions (baseline, and during continuous and simultaneous acquisition of fMRI images in ten healthy volunteers, during two sessions. The pain evoked by CHEPS was recorded on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results Analysis of EEG data revealed that the latencies and amplitudes of evoked potentials recorded during continuous fMRI did not differ significantly from baseline recordings. fMRI results were consistent with previous thermal pain studies, and showed Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD changes in the insula, post-central gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA, middle cingulate cortex and pre-central gyrus. There was a significant positive correlation between the evoked potential amplitude (EEG and the psychophysical perception of pain on the VAS. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of recording contact heat evoked potentials with EEG during continuous and simultaneous fMRI. The combined use of the two methods can lead to identification of distinct patterns of brain

  20. Evoked responses to sinusoidally modulated sound in unanaesthetized dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielen, A.M.; Kamp, A.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Reneau, J.P.; Storm van Leeuwen, W.

    1. 1. Responses evoked by sinusoidally amplitude-modulated sound in unanaesthetized dogs have been recorded from inferior colliculus and from auditory cortex structures by means of chronically indwelling stainless steel wire electrodes. 2. 2. Harmonic analysis of the average responses demonstrated

  1. Pattern visual evoked responses in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, I R; Mastaglia, F L; Edis, R; Howe, J W

    1981-01-01

    Pattern visual evoked responses were studied in 13 patients from nine families with dominant herditary spastic paraplegia and in seven sporadic cases. The responses were normal in all the dominantly inherited cases but abnormal in three of the seven sporadic cases. PMID:7217977

  2. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Visual Evoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: To report our experience in management of patients with optic neuritis. The effects of brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential on management were investigated. Methods: This is a four years clinical trial that included patients presenting with first attack of optic neuritis older than 16 years ...

  3. Temporal Tuning Effects in the Visually Evoked Response,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Berger (1932) also observed that these brain waves are slowed in states of depressed function such as sleep activity and that they can be blocked by...Ma4cay and Jefferys, 1973). Transient VER’s, polyphasic in form and 200-500 milliseconds in duration, are evoked by stepwise changes in one or more per

  4. Visual evoked potentials in workers with chronic solvent encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Maarten M.; Brons, Joke T.; Sallé, Herman J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. Two promising variations of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were studied in solvent-exposed workers: the effect of a low-contrast stimulus in comparison with the usually applied high contrast, and the ability of pattern-onset VEP to reveal damage to specific visual cortical areas. In

  5. The computation of evoked heart rate and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, G.; Mulder, L.J.M.; van der Veen, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    For many years psychophysiologists have been interested in stimulus related changes in heart rate and blood pressure. To represent these evoked heart rate and blood pressure patterns, heart rate and blood pressure data have to be transformed into equidistant time series. This paper presents an

  6. Single-sweep spectral analysis of contact heat evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine M; Graversen, Carina; Frøkjaer, Jens B

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The cortical response to nociceptive thermal stimuli recorded as contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) may be altered by morphine. However, previous studies have averaged CHEPs over multiple stimuli, which are confounded by jitter between sweeps. Thus, the aim was to assess single-sweep ch...

  7. Toward Optimizing Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials: Normalization Reduces the Need for Strong Neck Muscle Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noij, Kimberley S; Herrmann, Barbara S; Rauch, Steven D; Guinan, John J

    2018-01-12

    The cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) represents an inhibitory reflex of the saccule measured in the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) in response to acoustic or vibrational stimulation. Since the cVEMP is a modulation of SCM electromyographic (EMG) activity, cVEMP amplitude is proportional to muscle EMG amplitude. We sought to evaluate muscle contraction influences on cVEMP peak-to-peak amplitudes (VEMPpp), normalized cVEMP amplitudes (VEMPn), and inhibition depth (VEMPid). cVEMPs at 500 Hz were measured in 25 healthy subjects for 3 SCM EMG contraction ranges: 45-65, 65-105, and 105-500 μV root mean square (r.m.s.). For each range, we measured cVEMP sound level functions (93-123 dB peSPL) and sound off, meaning that muscle contraction was measured without acoustic stimulation. The effect of muscle contraction amplitude on VEMPpp, VEMPn, and VEMPid and the ability to distinguish cVEMP presence/absence were evaluated. VEMPpp amplitudes were significantly greater at higher muscle contractions. In contrast, VEMPn and VEMPid showed no significant effect of muscle contraction. Cohen's d indicated that for all 3 cVEMP metrics contraction amplitude variations produced little change in the ability to distinguish cVEMP presence/absence. VEMPid more clearly indicated saccular output because when no acoustic stimulus was presented the saccular inhibition estimated by VEMPid was zero, unlike those by VEMPpp and VEMPn. Muscle contraction amplitude strongly affects VEMPpp amplitude, but contractions 45-300 μV r.m.s. produce stable VEMPn and VEMPid values. Clinically, there may be no need for subjects to exert high contraction effort. This is especially beneficial in patients for whom maintaining high SCM contraction amplitudes is challenging. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Alfentanil blocks reflex pupillary dilation in response to noxious stimulation but does not diminish the light reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, M D; Kurz, A; Sessler, D I; Dechert, M; Bjorksten, A R; Tayefeh, F

    1997-10-01

    Estimation of the mu-agonist opioid effect in anesthetized and paralyzed patients is often imprecise and can be obscured by concomitant administration of drugs that affect the sympathetic nervous system, such as beta-adrenergic blocking agents. As an alternative to hemodynamic measures of opioid effect, the authors tested the hypothesis that the pupillary light reflex or pupillary reflex dilation correlated with alfentanil concentrations during isoflurane anesthesia. Six volunteers were anesthetized on 4 days with 0.8% isoflurane. Alfentanil was administered intravenously to target total plasma concentrations of 0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml. A 5-s tetanic electrical stimulus was applied to the skin. Pupil size and the pupillary light reflex were recorded before and after alfentanil administration, and before and for 8 min after the stimulus. Alfentanil exponentially impaired reflex pupillary dilation, decreasing the maximum response amplitude from 5 mm at 0 ng/ml, to 2.3 mm at 25 ng/ml, to 1.0 mm at 50 ng/ml, and finally to 0.2 mm at 100 ng/ml. In contrast, only the highest concentration of alfentanil depressed the dilation of the pupil in the first 2 s after the stimulus. Alfentanil administration had no effect on the pupillary light reflex. Dilation of the pupil in response to a noxious stimulus is a measure of opioid effect in isoflurane-anesthetized volunteers. In contrast, the pupillary light reflex is unaffected by alfentanil during isoflurane anesthesia. These data suggest that stimulus-induced pupillary dilation may be used to evaluate the analgesic component of a combined volatile and opioid anesthetic.

  9. Comparison of clinical and evoked pain measures in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard E; Gracely, Richard H; McLean, Samuel A; Williams, David A; Giesecke, Thorsten; Petzke, Frank; Sen, Ananda; Clauw, Daniel J

    2006-07-01

    Evoked pain measures such as tender point count and dolorimetry are often used to determine tenderness in studies of fibromyalgia (FM). However, these measures frequently do not improve in clinical trials and are known to be influenced by factors other than pain such as distress and expectancy. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether evoked pain paradigms that present pressure stimuli in a random fashion (eg, Multiple Random Staircase [MRS]) would track with clinical pain improvement in patients with FM better than traditional measures. Sixty-five subjects enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of acupuncture were observed longitudinally. Clinical pain was measured on a 101-point numerical rating scale (NRS) and the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), whereas evoked pressure sensitivity was assessed via manual tender point count, dolorimetry, and MRS methods. Improvements in clinical pain and evoked pain were assessed irrespective of group assignment. Improvement was seen in clinical pain during the course of the trial as measured by both NRS (P = .032) and SF-MPQ (P = .001). The MRS was the only evoked pain measure to improve correspondingly with treatment (MRS, P = .001; tender point count and dolorimeter, P > .05). MRS change scores were correlated with changes in NRS pain ratings (P = .003); however, this association was not stronger than tender point or dolorimetry correlations with clinical pain improvement (P > .05). Pain sensitivity as assessed by random paradigms was associated with improvements in clinical FM pain. Sophisticated pain testing paradigms might be responsive to change in clinical trials. Trials in fibromyalgia often use both clinical and experimental methods of pain assessment; however, these two outcomes are often poorly correlated. We explore the relationship between changes in clinical and experimental pain within FM patients. Pressure pain testing that applies stimuli in a random order is associated with

  10. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Yu; Hung, Chi Feng; Huang, Shu Kuei; Kuo, Jinn Rung; Wang, Su Jane

    2017-03-01

    Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pavel; Zakharov, Sergey; Diblík, Pavel; Pelclová, Daniela; Ridzoň, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP) examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females) was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012-2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test) were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%), 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04). The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1-9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to sound and vibration: characteristics in vestibular migraine that enable separation from Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael L; Zagami, Alessandro S; Gibson, William Pr; Black, Deborah A; Watson, Shaun Rd; Halmagyi, Michael G; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2012-02-01

    It can be difficult to distinguish vestibular migraine (VM) from Menière's disease (MD) in its early stages. Using vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), we sought to identify test parameters that would help discriminate between these two vestibular disorders. We first recorded ocular and cervical VEMPs (oVEMP/cVEMP) to air-conducted clicks and bone-conducted vibration in 30 control participants, 30 participants with clinically definite VM and 30 participants with clinically probable VM. Results were compared with a group of 60 MD patients from a previous study. oVEMPs and cVEMPs were then recorded at octave frequencies of 250 Hz to 2000 Hz in 20 controls and 20 participants each with clinically definite VM and MD. Inter-aural amplitude asymmetry ratios and amplitude frequency ratios were compared between groups. For click, tendon-hammer-tap and minishaker-tap VEMPs, there were no significant differences in reflex amplitudes or symmetry between controls, definite VM and probable VM. Compared with MD patients, participants with VM had significantly fewer reflex abnormalities for click-cVEMP, click-oVEMPs and minitap-cVEMPs. The ratio of cVEMP amplitude generated by tone bursts at a frequency of 0.5 kHz to that generated by 1 kHz was significantly lower for MD affected ears than for VM or controls ears. cVEMP asymmetry ratios for 0.5 kHz tone bursts were significantly higher for MD than VM. The 0.5/1 kHz frequency ratio, 0.5 kHz asymmetry ratio and caloric test combined, separated MD from VM with a sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity of 70.0%.

  13. Effects of the reappearance of primitive reflexes on eating function and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Kimiko; Kawase, Junko; Tamura, Fumiyo; Groher, Michael; Kikutani, Takeshi; Sunakawa, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Primitive reflexes can reappear with diseases of the brain, particularly those affecting the frontal lobes. Most studies on primitive reflexes have reported an association between such reflexes and brain damage, and the clinical symptoms of dementia. These reflexes can also be present during eating; however, their effects on eating function are difficult to evaluate. The purpose of the present study was to identify the frequency at which primitive reflexes reappear in elderly people, and to determine the effects that such reflexes have on eating function, nutritional status and prognosis. We followed 121 nursing home residents for 6 months. All patients required long-term care and were examined for the presence of a sucking reflex, snout reflex and phasic bite reflex for baseline measures. Demographic characteristics, physical and cognitive function, and nutritional status were obtained from chart reviews, interviews with nurses, and a brief physical examination at baseline and incidence of aspiration pneumonia during the study period. The sucking reflex was confirmed in 31 patients (25.6%), snout reflex in 15 patients (12.3%) and phasic bite reflex in 28 patients (23.1%). One or more of these reflexes was identified in 38 patients (31.4%). A relationship between the presence of a primitive reflex and nutritional status was shown. An association with the presence of these reflexes and the development of aspiration pneumonia during 6 months was also confirmed. The appearance of primitive reflexes appears to be associated with the risk of malnutrition and developing aspiration pneumonia. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Intact thumb reflex in areflexic Guillain Barré syndrome: A novel phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Karkal Ravishankar Naik; Aralikatte Onkarappa Saroja; Manik Mahajan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Areflexia is one of the cardinal clinical features for the diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome. However, some patients may have sluggish proximal muscle stretch reflexes. Presence of thumb reflex, a distal stretch muscle reflex has not been documented in Guillain Barré syndrome. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated thumb reflex in Guillain Barré syndrome patients and age matched controls from April to September 2013. Results: There were 31 patients with Guillain Ba...

  15. Obligatory Reflexivity in a Minimalist Grammar of Afrikaans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper deals with the phenomenon of obligatory reflexivity in Afrikaans. Adopting the general framework of Minimalist Syntax, an attempt is made to develop a novel analysis of this phenomenon that can provide a conceptually adequate account for the facts, and that is amenable to extension beyond Afrikaans.

  16. Reflexive modules with finite Gorenstein dimension with respect to a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 125, No. 1, February 2015, pp. 21–28. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Reflexive modules with finite Gorenstein dimension with respect to a semidualizing module. ELHAM TAVASOLI1,∗, MARYAM SALIMI1 and SIAMAK YASSEMI2,3. 1Department of Mathematics, East Tehran Branch, ...

  17. Non-Grammatical Reflexive Binding Phenomena: The Case of Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Sonoko

    Two non-syntactic phenomena of Japanese reflexive binding by "zibun" ("self") are analyzed with respect to a pragmatic use condition on "zibun," a culture-specific condition, and the Maxim of Politeness (Fukada 1986). The first phenomenon is the tendency by native speakers of Japanese to avoid referring to an honored…

  18. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after modified radical mastectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddison, D K; Vanek, V W

    1993-07-01

    Despite the long history of descriptions of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), much confusion remains regarding its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. It most commonly occurs after trauma and is more frequent in women, white persons, and the elderly. The first case of RSD after mastectomy is reported and the proposed pathophysiology and management of RSD are reviewed.

  19. Positioning Resumes and Cover Letters as Reflective-Reflexive Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, Chalice

    2012-01-01

    Although the resume and cover letter genre is widely discussed in both popular and scholarly publications, discussion thus far has failed to acknowledge that the process of creating a resume and cover letter has the potential for encouraging students' reflective and reflexive capacities. This article suggests that business communication educators…

  20. Shared bimanual tasks elicit bimanual reflexes during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutha, Pratik K; Sainburg, Robert L

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested distinct predictive and reactive control mechanisms for bimanual movements compared with unimanual motion. Recent studies have extended these findings by demonstrating that movement corrections during bimanual movements might differ depending on whether or not the task is shared between the arms. We hypothesized that corrective responses during shared bimanual tasks recruit bilateral rapid feedback mechanisms such as reflexes. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing one arm as subjects performed uni- and bimanual movements. Movements were made in a virtual-reality environment in which hand position was displayed as a cursor on a screen. During bimanual motion, we provided cursor feedback either independently for each arm (independent-cursor) or such that one cursor was placed at the average location between the arms (shared-cursor). On random trials, we applied a 40 N force pulse to the right arm 100 ms after movement onset. Our results show that while reflex responses were rapidly elicited in the perturbed arm, electromyographic activity remained close to baseline levels in the unperturbed arm during the independent-cursor trials. In contrast, when the cursor was shared between the arms, reflex responses were reduced in the perturbed arm and were rapidly elicited in the unperturbed arm. Our results thus suggest that when both arms contribute to achieving the task goal, reflex responses are bilaterally elicited in response to unilateral perturbations. These results agree with and extend recent suggestions that bimanual feedback control might be modified depending on task context.

  1. Neural reflex pathways in intestinal inflammation: hypotheses to viable therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemze, Rose A.; Luyer, Misha D.; Buurman, Wim A.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in neuroscience and immunology have clarified much of the anatomical and cellular basis for bidirectional interactions between the nervous and immune systems. As with other organs, intestinal immune responses and the development of immunity seems to be modulated by neural reflexes.

  2. The plantar reflex : a historical, clinical and electromyographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Gijn (Jan)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe plantar reflex is one of the most important physical signs in medicine. Few patients undergoing a full medical examination can avoid having their soles stroked, because an upgoing great toe is regarded as a reliable sign of dysfunction of corticospinal nerve fibres. So far, there

  3. How to test for the red reflex in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adapted from the poster: ‘See RED’ produced by JR Ainsworth, UK National Retinoblastoma Service, Birmingham, UK and the Childhood Eye Cancer Trust. www.chect.org.uk.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Examination of pupil reflections, also known as the red reflex text, can reveal problems in the cornea, lens and sometimes the vitreous, and is particularly useful in young children. These photographs show what can occur in the case of certain major eye conditions, the most serious of which is retinoblastoma.

  4. Decreased fibularis reflex response during inversion perturbations in FAI subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Matthew S; Docherty, Carrie L; Riley, Zachary A

    2014-02-01

    Investigate reflex responses in muscles throughout the lower limb and low back during sudden inversion perturbations in individuals with and without Functional Ankle Instability (FAI) while walking. Forty subjects participated in the study. Surface electromyogram recordings were obtained from the fibularis (FIB), gluteus medius (GM), erector spinae (ES), and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) of the injured/matched side as well as the uninjured/matched contralateral side (FIB_CLS, GM_CLS, or ES_CLS). Latency and amplitude data were collected while subjects were walking on a custom-built perturbation walkway. The onset of the short-latency stretch reflex of the FIB was significantly later in the injured side of the FAI individuals when compared to the control group (P=0.009). Both the short and long latency reflex amplitude was significantly smaller in the FIB muscle in the FAI group than in the control group (P.05). Interpretation of these results indicate that during a dynamic perturbation task individuals with FAI demonstrate longer fibularis muscle latencies on the injured side while no significant changes in the proximal muscle groups. Additionally, short and long latency reflex amplitude was significantly decreased in FAI individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Review article: Autonomous neural inflammatory reflex and control of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inflammation is common pathology associated with infections and other diseases process that lead to non specific sickness behaviours. Identification of autonomous neural inflammatory reflex that is regulated through autonomic nervous system and their receptors give a way forward on how this can be use as therapeutic ...

  6. Reflexive Pronouns in Dagbani Samuel Alhassan Issah1 Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subject, Tense and Truth: Towards a Modular Approach to. Binding. In Gueron, Obenauer, and Pollock 1985: 259-292. Pica, P. 1987. On the Nature of the Reflexivization Cycle. In Proceedings of NELS 17: 483-499. GLSA, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Rappaport, G. C. 1986. On Binding and Reflexives in Russian.

  7. Trait dominance promotes reflexive staring at masked angry body postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortensius, R.; van Honk, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188602801; De Gelder, B.; Terburg, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32304087X

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So

  8. Power from Switching across Netdoms through Reflexive and Indexical Language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontdevila, Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In differentiated societies with far-reaching yet fragmented social networks, the ability to manage pervasive ambiguity is crucial to navigate domination orders. In this paper we contend that identities, to enhance their control through switchings across networks and domains (netdoms, manage growing ambiguity via language’s reflexive and indexical features. We elaborate on several features—metapragmatics, heteroglossia, and poetics—and assert that they are seldom innocent performances to build consensus in the reproduction of social orders. On the contrary, language is inherently implicated in relations of domination. We then argue that metapragmatic control of stories acquired in countless netdom switchings leads to strong footings that secure resources and opportunity; that rhetorics that include rich heteroglossic voicing via structural holes generate stories that can be reflexively transposed to other institutional arenas; and that poetic control of speech styles may transform identities into power-law constellations with robust footing that decouple into prisms to preserve quality. Our goal is to twofold: First, to show that the reflexivity and indexicality of language emerges from myriad switchings across netdoms; and second, to demonstrate that reflexive and indexical language is critical to identities’ struggles for control—of footing and domination—via their switchings across rapidly polymerizing netdoms.

  9. Language Constructing Language: The Implications of Reflexivity for Linguistic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Talbot J.

    2000-01-01

    Asks what first-order language might be like if there were no way to talk, write, or sign about it--that is, what if there were no second-order metalanguage. By considering the consequences for writing, translation, pragmatics, semantics, and language acquisition and evolution, it is suggested that without second-order, reflexive properties,…

  10. PhD Students, Interculturality, Reflexivity, Community and Internationalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interviews with a small group of doctoral students at a British university indicate that the students feel that the programme provides an environment within which they develop interculturality through reflexive engagement with the PhD community and in some cases with the participants in their research. Significant here is that they are…

  11. Capeverdean reflexives: the importance of a silent Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pratas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Capeverdean, a Portuguese-based Creole language, many reflexive contexts do not show any overt reflexive expression. This is the case of transitive verbs like bisti ‘dress’ in simple clauses: Ana bisti ‘Ana has dressed herself’. This is a perplexing fact, given that there is an anaphor of the SELF-type available in the language: (si kabesa — literally ‘his/her head’ —, meaning ‘himself/ herself’, which participates in reflexive clauses with other verbs. The current paper explores this puzzle, en-ding with a proposal supported empirically and also by recent studies for other languages. This novel analysis goes as follows: all Capeverdean finite sentences, except unaccusatives, have a Voice head, responsible for assigning external theta-roles. This also includes mid-dles, passives and this type of reflexives. It is this Voice head that, in spite of being silent, attracts the internal argument to a preverbal position and provides the interpretation for an implicit external argument, which is syntactically active.

  12. Soleus H-reflex excitability during pedaling post-stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler-Ivens, Sheila; Brown, David A.; Lewis, Gwyn N.

    2008-01-01

    A major contributor to impaired locomotion post-stroke is abnormal phasing of paretic muscle activity, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that, in the paretic limb of people post-stroke, Group Ia reflexes are abnormally elevated and fail to decrease in amplitude during...

  13. Cortical and cerebellar activation induced by reflexive and voluntary saccades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.K. Schraa-Tam (Caroline); P.C.A. van Broekhoven (Flip); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); M.A. Frens (Maarten); M. Smits (Marion); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractReflexive saccades are driven by visual stimulation whereas voluntary saccades require volitional control. Behavioral and lesional studies suggest that there are two separate mechanisms involved in the generation of these two types of saccades. This study investigated differences in

  14. REFLEX CLOSURE OF THE OESOPHAGEAL GROOVE AND ITS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oesophageal groove reflex and indeed the very function of the oesophageal groove has intrigued physiolo- gists for some considerable period and very rightly so. lt has been generally agreed that the anatomical nature of the oesophageal groove enabled it to function as a con- tinuation of the oesophagus leading from ...

  15. Increased medial olivocochlear reflex strength in normal-hearing, noise-exposed humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Bhatt

    Full Text Available Research suggests that college-aged adults are vulnerable to tinnitus and hearing loss due to exposure to traumatic levels of noise on a regular basis. Recent human studies have associated exposure to high noise exposure background (NEB, i.e., routine noise exposure with the reduced cochlear output and impaired speech processing ability in subjects with clinically normal hearing sensitivity. While the relationship between NEB and the functions of the auditory afferent neurons are studied in the literature, little is known about the effects of NEB on functioning of the auditory efferent system. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR strength and NEB in subjects with clinically normal hearing sensitivity. It was hypothesized that subjects with high NEB would exhibit reduced afferent input to the MOCR circuit which would subsequently lead to reduced strength of the MOCR. In normal-hearing listeners, the study examined (1 the association between NEB and baseline click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs and (2 the association between NEB and MOCR strength. The MOCR was measured using CEOAEs evoked by 60 dB pSPL linear clicks in a contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS-off and CAS-on (a broadband noise at 60 dB SPL condition. Participants with at least 6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in the CAS-off and CAS-on conditions were included for analysis. A normalized CEOAE inhibition index was calculated to express MOCR strength in a percentage value. NEB was estimated using a validated questionnaire. The results showed that NEB was not associated with the baseline CEOAE amplitude (r = -0.112, p = 0.586. Contrary to the hypothesis, MOCR strength was positively correlated with NEB (r = 0.557, p = 0.003. NEB remained a significant predictor of MOCR strength (β = 2.98, t(19 = 3.474, p = 0.003 after the unstandardized coefficient was adjusted to control for effects of smoking, sound

  16. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report…

  17. A task dependent change in the medium latency component of the soleus stretch reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Larsen, Birgit; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In comparison to the H-reflex, the task dependency of the human stretch reflex during locomotive and postural tasks has not received a great deal of attention in the literature. The few studies on reflex task dependency that have been performed to date have concentrated on either the group Ia...

  18. The effects of neural synchronization and peripheral compression on the acoustic-reflex threshold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Wehlau, Matthias; Mauermann, Manfred; Dau, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) dependency on stimulus phase utilizing low-level reflex audiometry [Neumann et al., Audiol. Neuro-Otol. 1, 359–369 (1996)]. The goal is to obtain optimal broadband stimuli for elicitation of the acoustic reflex and to obtain objective...

  19. Isometric and Dynamic Control of Neck Muscles : Reflexive contributions and muscle synergies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes the head using reflexive feedback and cocontraction. The major reflexive pathways in the neck are through muscle spindles generating the cervicocollic reflex (CCR) and through the vestibular organ generating the vestibulocollic

  20. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson L.A.; Haburcakova C.; Gong W; Lee D.J.; Wall Iii C.; Merfeld D.M.; Lewis R.F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly in...