WorldWideScience

Sample records for vestibular system identification

  1. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    that this may be caused by both cochlear and retrocochlear mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms may also be at play in the case of dizziness, which may broaden perspectives of therapeutic approach. This study presents a systematic and detailed assessment of vestibular histopathology in temporal bones from patients...... with VS. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of vestibular system histopathology in temporal bones from 17 patients with unilateral VS. The material was obtained from The Copenhagen Temporal Bone Collection. RESULTS: Vestibular schwannomas were associated with atrophy of the vestibular ganglion, loss of fiber...... density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...

  2. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Central vestibular system: vestibular nuclei and posterior cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmack, Neal H

    2003-06-15

    The vestibular nuclei and posterior cerebellum are the destination of vestibular primary afferents and the subject of this review. The vestibular nuclei include four major nuclei (medial, descending, superior and lateral). In addition, smaller vestibular nuclei include: Y-group, parasolitary nucleus, and nucleus intercalatus. Each of the major nuclei can be subdivided further based primarily on cytological and immunohistochemical histological criteria or differences in afferent and/or efferent projections. The primary afferent projections of vestibular end organs are distributed to several ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Vestibular nuclei communicate bilaterally through a commissural system that is predominantly inhibitory. Secondary vestibular neurons also receive convergent sensory information from optokinetic circuitry, central visual system and neck proprioceptive systems. Secondary vestibular neurons cannot distinguish between sources of afferent activity. However, the discharge of secondary vestibular neurons can distinguish between "active" and "passive" movements. The posterior cerebellum has extensive afferent and efferent connections with vestibular nuclei. Vestibular primary afferents are distributed to the ipsilateral uvula-nodulus as mossy fibers. Vestibular secondary afferents are distributed bilaterally. Climbing fibers to the cerebellum originate from two subnuclei of the contralateral inferior olive; the dorsomedial cell column and beta-nucleus. Vestibular climbing fibers carry information only from the vertical semicircular canals and otoliths. They establish a coordinate map, arrayed in sagittal zones on the surface of the uvula-nodulus. Purkinje cells respond to vestibular stimulation with antiphasic modulation of climbing fiber responses (CFRs) and simple spikes (SSs). The modulation of SSs is out of phase with the modulation of vestibular primary afferents. Modulation of SSs persists, even after vestibular primary afferents are destroyed by a

  4. Neuropharmacology of Vestibular System Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in...

  5. Pharmacology of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P F

    2000-02-01

    In the past year significant advances have been made in our understanding of the neurochemistry and neuropharmacology of the peripheral and central vestibular systems. The recognition of the central importance of excitatory amino acids and their receptors at the level of the hair cells, vestibular nerve and vestibular nucleus has progressed further, and the role of nitric oxide in relation to activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype is becoming increasingly clear. Increasing evidence suggests that excessive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation and nitric oxide production after exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics is a critical part of hair cell death, and new pharmacological strategies for preventing aminoglycoside ototoxicity are emerging as a result. Conversely, the use of aminoglycosides to lesion the peripheral vestibular system in the treatment of Meniere's disease has been studied intensively. In the vestibular nucleus, new studies suggest the importance of opioid, nociceptin and glucocorticoid receptors in the control of vestibular reflex function. Finally, the mechanisms of action and optimal use of antihistamines in the treatment of vestibular disorders has also received a great deal of attention.

  6. Neuropharmacology of vestibular system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-03-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and drug mechanisms of action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulator receptors and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. A critical review of the pharmacology and highlights of the major advances are discussed in each case.

  7. Anatomy of the vestibular system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Chang, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A sense of proper sensory processing of head motion and the coordination of visual and postural movements to maintain equilibrium is critical to everyday function. The vestibular system is an intricate organization that involves multiple levels of sensory processing to achieve this goal. This chapter provides an overview of the anatomical structures and pathways of the vestibular system. The five major vestibular structures are located in the inner ear and include: the utricle, the saccule, and the lateral, superior, and posterior semicircular canals. Hair cells on the neuroepithelium of the peripheral vestibular organs carry sensory impulses to primary processing centers in the brainstem and the cerebellum. These areas send input via ascending and descending projections to coordinate vital reflexes, such as the vestibuloocular reflex and the vestibulospinal reflex, which allow for the proper orientation of the eyes and body in response to head motion. Specific connections regarding higher level cortical vestibular structures are poorly understood. Vestibular centers in the brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex function to integrate sensory information from the peripheral vestibular organs, visual system, and proprioceptive system to allow for proper balance and orientation of the body in its environment.

  8. Neuropharmacological basis of vestibular system disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario; Seseña, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Clinicians are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and of drug action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulators dynamics and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. The critical analysis of the literature reveals that there is a significant lack of information defining the real utility of diverse drugs used in clinical practice. The development of basic studies addressing drug actions at the molecular, cellular and systems level, combined with reliable and well controlled clinical trials, would provide the scientific basis for new strategies for the treatment of vestibular disorders.

  9. The vestibular system and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-02-01

    The last year has seen a great deal of new information published relating vestibular dysfunction to cognitive impairment in humans, especially in the elderly. The objective of this review is to summarize and critically evaluate this new evidence in the context of the previous literature. This review will address the recent epidemiological/survey studies that link vestibular dysfunction with cognitive impairment in the elderly; recent clinical investigations into cognitive impairment in the context of vestibular dysfunction, both in the elderly and in the cases of otic capsule dehiscence and partial bilateral vestibulopathy; recent evidence that vestibular impairment is associated with hippocampal atrophy; and finally recent evidence relating to the hypothesis that vestibular dysfunction could be a risk factor for dementia. The main implication of these recent studies is that vestibular dysfunction, possibly of any type, may result in cognitive impairment, and this could be especially so for the elderly. Such symptoms will need to be considered in the treatment of patients with vestibular disorders.

  10. Idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Hullar, Timothy E; Dorward, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    ... in the etiology of scoliosis. In this article, we discuss putative mechanisms for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and review the current evidence supporting a role for the vestibular system in adolescent idiopathic...

  11. Idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Hullar, Timothy E; Dorward, Ian G

    2015-02-01

    Despite its high prevalence, the etiology underlying idiopathic scoliosis remains unclear. Although initial scrutiny has focused on genetic, biochemical, biomechanical, nutritional and congenital causes, there is growing evidence that aberrations in the vestibular system may play a role in the etiology of scoliosis. In this article, we discuss putative mechanisms for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and review the current evidence supporting a role for the vestibular system in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A comprehensive search of the English literature was performed using PubMed ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed ). Research articles studying interactions between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system were selected and evaluated for inclusion in a literature review. Eighteen manuscripts of level 3-4 clinical evidence to support an association between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and dysfunction of the vestibular system were identified. These studies include data from physiologic and morphologic studies in humans. Clinical data are supported by animal model studies to suggest a causative link between the vestibular system and AIS. Clinical data and a limited number of animal model studies suggest a causative role of the vestibular system in AIS, although this association has not been reproduced in all studies.

  12. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  13. Molecular aging of the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosel, Sonja; Laub, Christoph; Averdam, Anne; Bender, Andreas; Elstner, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Dizziness and imbalance frequently affect the elderly and contribute to falls and frailty. In many geriatric patients, clinical testing uncovers a dysfunction of the vestibular system, but no specific etiology can be identified. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated age-related degeneration of peripheral and central vestibular neurons, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In contrast, recent studies into age-related hearing loss strongly implicate mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death of cochlear hair cells. While some data suggest that analogous biological pathomechanisms may underlie vestibular dysfunction, actual proof is missing. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular causes of vestibular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda A. Mathews

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN, and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles.

  15. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Miranda A; Camp, Aaron J; Murray, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN), and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles.

  16. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate...

  17. Effects of Sound on the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    receptors and directly affects central nervous system nuclei. Visual, olfactory, and gustatory responses would be expected if sound directly affected the...AMRL-TR-75-89 EFFECTS OF SOUND ON THE VESTIBULAR SYSTEM MIAMI UNIVERSITY NO OXFORD, OHIO 45056 MARCH 1976 | j...Approvedrfor public release: distribution unlimited AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DMSION Air Force Systems Command Wright.Patterson

  18. The thalamocortical vestibular system in animals and humans

    OpenAIRE

    LOPEZ, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    The vestibular system provides the brain with sensory signals about three-dimensional head rotations and translations. These signals are important for postural and oculomotor control, as well as for spatial and bodily perception and cognition, and they are subtended by pathways running from the vestibular nuclei to the thalamus, cerebellum and the "vestibular cortex." The present review summarizes current knowledge on the anatomy of the thalamocortical vestibular system and discusses data fro...

  19. Understanding the links between vestibular and limbic systems regulating emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Archana; Jinu, K V; Sailesh, Kumar Sai; Mishra, Soumya; Reddy, Udaya Kumar; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular system, which consists of structures in the inner ear and brainstem, plays a vital role is body balance and patient well-being. In recent years, modulating this system by vestibular stimulation techniques are reported to be effective in stress relief and possibly patient's emotional well-being. Emotions refer to an aroused state involving intense feeling, autonomic activation, and related change in behavior, which accompany many of our conscious experiences. The limbic system is primarily involved in the regulation of emotions. Considering the extensive networks between vestibular and limbic system, it is likely that vestibular stimulation techniques may be useful in influencing emotions. Hence, we review here, the possible mechanisms through which vestibular system can influence emotions and highlight the necessary knowledge gaps, which warrants further research to develop vestibular stimulation techniques as a means to treat health conditions associated with emotional disturbances.

  20. System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary System Identification Introduction.- Part I: Data-based Identification.- System Response Methods.- Frequency Response Methods.- Correlation Methods.- Part II: Time-invariant Systems Identification.- Static Systems Identification.- Dynamic Systems Identification.- Part III: Time-varying

  1. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Andrea M.; Dora E. Angelaki

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem–...

  2. The thalamocortical vestibular system in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    The vestibular system provides the brain with sensory signals about three-dimensional head rotations and translations. These signals are important for postural and oculomotor control, as well as for spatial and bodily perception and cognition, and they are subtended by pathways running from the vestibular nuclei to the thalamus, cerebellum and the "vestibular cortex." The present review summarizes current knowledge on the anatomy of the thalamocortical vestibular system and discusses data from electrophysiology and neuroanatomy in animals by comparing them with data from neuroimagery and neurology in humans. Multiple thalamic nuclei are involved in vestibular processing, including the ventroposterior complex, the ventroanterior-ventrolateral complex, the intralaminar nuclei and the posterior nuclear group (medial and lateral geniculate nuclei, pulvinar). These nuclei contain multisensory neurons that process and relay vestibular, proprioceptive and visual signals to the vestibular cortex. In non-human primates, the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) has been proposed as the core vestibular region. Yet, vestibular responses have also been recorded in the somatosensory cortex (area 2v, 3av), intraparietal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex (area 7), area MST, frontal cortex, cingulum and hippocampus. We analyze the location of the corresponding regions in humans, and especially the human PIVC, by reviewing neuroimaging and clinical work. The widespread vestibular projections to the multimodal human PIVC, somatosensory cortex, area MST, intraparietal sulcus and hippocampus explain the large influence of vestibular signals on self-motion perception, spatial navigation, internal models of gravity, one's body perception and bodily self-consciousness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Rhythm by the Vestibular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Phillip; Zheng, Yiwen; Smith, Paul F

    2017-11-22

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved over millions of years to detect acceleration of the head, both rotational and translational, in three dimensions. One of its most important functions is to stabilize gaze during unexpected head movement; however, it is also important in the control of posture and autonomic reflexes. Theta rhythm is a 3-12 Hz oscillating EEG signal that is intimately linked to self-motion and is also known to be important in learning and memory. Many studies over the last two decades have shown that selective activation of the vestibular system, either using natural rotational or translational stimulation, or electrical stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system, can induce and modulate theta activity. Furthermore, inactivation of the vestibular system has been shown to significantly reduce theta in freely moving animals, which may be linked to its impairment of place cell function as well as spatial learning and memory. The pathways through which vestibular information modulate theta rhythm remain debatable. However, vestibular responses have been found in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) and activation of the vestibular system causes an increase in acetylcholine release into the hippocampus, probably from the medial septum. Therefore, a pathway from the vestibular nucleus complex and/or cerebellum to the PPTg, supramammillary nucleus, posterior hypothalamic nucleus and the septum, to the hippocampus, is likely. The modulation of theta by the vestibular system may have implications for vestibular effects on cognitive function and the contribution of vestibular impairment to the risk of dementia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  4. The cognitive neurology of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemungal, Barry M

    2014-02-01

    The aim is to reappraise the current state about what we know of vestibular cognition. The review focuses on cognition and perception, and hence the stress on human studies. In addition, the cerebral cortex is the main but not exclusive brain region of interest. There is a brief mention of vestibular ocular function if only to demonstrate the differential processing between reflex and perception. The effect of vestibular activation on some aspects of cognition, for example neglect, is not reviewed, as there have been no recent landmark findings in this area. The vestibular cerebellum is pivotal in the differential gating of vestibular perceptual and ocular signals to the cerebral cortex. The neuroanatomical correlates mediating vestibular sensations of self-motion ('am I moving?') and spatial orientation ('where am I now?') are distinct. Vestibular-motion perception is supported by a widespread white matter network. Vestibular activation specifically reduces visual motion cortical excitability, whereas other visual cortical regions show an increase in excitability. As the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) and self-motion perception can be uncoupled both behaviourally and in neural correlate, deficits underlying vestibular patients' symptoms may not be revealed by simple VOR assessment. Given the pivotal cerebellar role in gating vestibular signals to perceptual regions, modulating mechanisms of cerebellar plasticity, for example by combining training with medication or brain stimulation, may prove fruitful in treating the symptoms of chronic dizzy patients.

  5. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; hide

    2017-01-01

    ) similar to what astronauts experience during transitions to new gravitational environments. Stochastic electrical stimulation can be applied to the vestibular system through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears in the binaural configuration resulting in stimulation in the mediolateral (side-to-side) plane. An additional electrode can be placed over the bony landmark of the tip of the c7 spinous process for the double monaural configuration, which will cause stimulation in the anteroposterior (forward-backward) plane. A portable constant current bipolar stimulator with subject isolation was designed and built to deliver the stimulus. The unit is powered using a 3.7 V battery pack and designed to produce currents up to 5 mA. The stimulator, controlled by a Raspberry Pi 3 computer, offers several stimulus signal generation options including a standalone mode, which uses onboard signal files stored on the flash memory card. Stochastic stimulation signals will be generated in 0-30 Hz frequency bandwidth. Stimulation amplitude can be increased incrementally to a maximum amplitude of 5.0 mA (e.g., 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 mA). In control trials, subjects will be experiencing vestibular stimulation with 0-mA current applied through the electrodes. The system will be evaluated at various levels of stimulation and in both the binaural and double monaural electrode configurations. One of the objectives is to identify stimulation levels producing effects most comparable to the post-flight disturbances. This is a pilot study that will set the stage for a larger, more comprehensive study that will investigate wider aspects of post-flight sensorimotor dysfunction and set sensorimotor standards for crew health.

  6. Functional and anatomic alterations in the gentamicin-damaged vestibular system in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, HM; Dijk, T; Stokroos, [No Value; van der Want, TJL; Albers, FWJ

    Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expected functional and morphologic effect of gentamicin on the vestibular system simultaneously by measurement of vestibular evoked potentials and electron microscopic evaluation. Background: Vestibular short-latency evoked potentials to

  7. Prosthetic implantation of the human vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Justin S; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Nowack, Amy; Shepherd, Sarah J; Bierer, Steven M; Jameyson, Elyse; Kaneko, Chris R S; Phillips, James O; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2014-01-01

    A functional vestibular prosthesis can be implanted in human such that electrical stimulation of each semicircular canal produces canal-specific eye movements while preserving vestibular and auditory function. A number of vestibular disorders could be treated with prosthetic stimulation of the vestibular end organs. We have previously demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that a vestibular neurostimulator, based on the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant, can produce canal-specific electrically evoked eye movements while preserving auditory and vestibular function. An investigational device exemption has been obtained from the FDA to study the feasibility of treating uncontrolled Ménière's disease with the device. The UW/Nucleus vestibular implant was implanted in the perilymphatic space adjacent to the three semicircular canal ampullae of a human subject with uncontrolled Ménière's disease. Preoperative and postoperative vestibular and auditory function was assessed. Electrically evoked eye movements were measured at 2 time points postoperatively. Implantation of all semicircular canals was technically feasible. Horizontal canal and auditory function were largely, but not totally, lost. Electrode stimulation in 2 of 3 canals resulted in canal-appropriate eye movements. Over time, stimulation thresholds increased. Prosthetic implantation of the semicircular canals in humans is technically feasible. Electrical stimulation resulted in canal-specific eye movements, although thresholds increased over time. Preservation of native auditory and vestibular function, previously observed in animals, was not demonstrated in a single subject with advanced Ménière's disease.

  8. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  9. Genetic disorders of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppsteiner, Robert W; Smith, Richard J H

    2011-10-01

    This review highlights the current body of literature related to the genetics of inherited vestibular disorders and provides a framework for the characterization of these disorders. We emphasize peripheral causes of vestibular dysfunction and highlight recent advances in the field, point out gaps in understanding, and focus on key areas for future investigation. The discovery of a modifier gene that leads to a more severe Usher syndrome phenotype calls into question the assumption that Usher syndrome is universally a monogenic disorder. Despite the use of several investigational approaches, the genetic basis of Menière's disease remains poorly understood. Evidence for a vestibular phenotype associated with DFNB1 suggests that mutations in other genes causally related to nonsyndromic hearing loss also may have an unrecognized vestibular phenotype. Our understanding of the genetic basis for vestibular disorders is superficial. Significant challenges include defining the genetics of inherited isolated vestibular dysfunction and understanding the pathological basis of Menière's disease. However, improved characterization of inherited vestibular dysfunction, coupled with advanced genetic techniques such as targeted genome capture and massively parallel sequencing, provides an opportunity to investigate these diseases at the genetic level.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation in the central vestibular system--review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T; Takeda, N; Kiyama, H; Kubo, T

    1998-01-01

    Vestibular compensation consists of two stages: the inhibition of the contralesional medial vestibular nucleus (contra-MVe) activities at the acute stage after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) and the recovery and maintenance of the ipsilesional MVe (ipsi-MVe) spontaneous activities at the chronic stage after UL. In this paper, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation in the central vestibular system using several morphological and pharmacological approaches in rats. Based on our examinations, we propose the following hypotheses: i) at the acute stage after UL, the activated neurons in the ipsi-MVe project their axons into the flocculus to inhibit the contra-MVe neurons via the NMDA receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and/or GABA-mediated signalling, resulting in the restoration of balance between intervestibular nuclear activities. ii) At the chronic stage after UL, the flocculus depresses the inhibitory effects on the ipsi-MVe neurons via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) beta, protein kinase C (PKC) and glutamate receptor (GluR) delta-2, to help the recovery and maintenance of ipsi-MVe activities.

  11. Effects of the vestibular system on human development, part 2: Effects of vestibular stimulation on mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, and learning-disabled individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Z R

    1979-07-01

    In Part 1 of this two-part series, studies concerned with the effects of vestibular stimulation on human development and function were reviewed and some implications for therapy were suggested. In Part 2, three categories of dysfunction with possible links to the vestibular system are discussed. Studies in the category of mental retardation evaluate motor development and sensory preference. Possible vestibular associations with emotional disturbance are examined by review of studies concerned with etiology, motor activity, speech, and clinical observations. A brief review of studies concerned with early identification and speech and language factors of learning-disabled children constitutes the third category. Interpretations are drawn and some implications for therapy are made.

  12. [Neuronal plasticity of otolith-related vestibular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Suk-King; Lai, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Fu-Xing; Ma, Chun-Wai; Shum, Daisy K Y; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2008-12-01

    This review focuses on our effort in addressing the development and lesion-induced plasticity of the gravity sensing system. After severance of sensory input from one inner ear, there is a bilateral imbalance in response dynamics and spatial coding behavior between neuronal subpopulations on the two sides. These data provide the basis for deranged spatial coding and motor deficits accompanying unilateral labyrinthectomy. Recent studies have also confirmed that both glutamate receptors and neurotrophin receptors within the bilateral vestibular nuclei are implicated in the plasticity during vestibular compensation and development. Changes in plasticity not only provide insight into the formation of a spatial map and recovery of vestibular function but also on the design of drugs for therapeutic strategies applicable to infants or vestibular disorders such as vertigo and dizziness.

  13. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrea M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem-cerebellar circuitry. These include the sensorimotor transformations for reflex generation, the neural computations for inertial motion estimation, the distinction between active and passive head movements, as well as the integration of vestibular and proprioceptive information for body motion estimation. A common theme in the solution to such computational problems is the concept of internal models and their neural implementation. Recent studies have shed new insights into important organizational principles that closely resemble those proposed for other sensorimotor systems, where their neural basis has often been more difficult to identify. As such, the vestibular system provides an excellent model to explore common neural processing strategies relevant both for reflexive and for goal-directed, voluntary movement as well as perception.

  14. Sustained and Transient Vestibular Systems: A Physiological Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curthoys, Ian S; MacDougall, Hamish G; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Otolithic afferents with regular resting discharge respond to gravity or low-frequency linear accelerations, and we term these the static or sustained otolithic system. However, in the otolithic sense organs, there is anatomical differentiation across the maculae and corresponding physiological differentiation. A specialized band of receptors called the striola consists of mainly type I receptors whose hair bundles are weakly tethered to the overlying otolithic membrane. The afferent neurons, which form calyx synapses on type I striolar receptors, have irregular resting discharge and have low thresholds to high frequency (e.g., 500 Hz) bone-conducted vibration and air-conducted sound. High-frequency sound and vibration likely causes fluid displacement which deflects the weakly tethered hair bundles of the very fast type I receptors. Irregular vestibular afferents show phase locking, similar to cochlear afferents, up to stimulus frequencies of kilohertz. We term these irregular afferents the transient system signaling dynamic otolithic stimulation. A 500-Hz vibration preferentially activates the otolith irregular afferents, since regular afferents are not activated at intensities used in clinical testing, whereas irregular afferents have low thresholds. We show how this sustained and transient distinction applies at the vestibular nuclei. The two systems have differential responses to vibration and sound, to ototoxic antibiotics, to galvanic stimulation, and to natural linear acceleration, and such differential sensitivity allows probing of the two systems. A 500-Hz vibration that selectively activates irregular otolithic afferents results in stimulus-locked eye movements in animals and humans. The preparatory myogenic potentials for these eye movements are measured in the new clinical test of otolith function-ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. We suggest 500-Hz vibration may identify the contribution of the transient system to vestibular controlled

  15. Laboratory testing of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew H

    2010-10-01

    Recent reports on vestibular testing, relevant to clinical diagnosis, are reviewed.Besides the case history and bedside examination, objective measurement of the vestibuloocular reflex in all of its facets remains the cornerstone in the diagnostic process. In recent years, this has been enhanced considerably by reliable unilateral tests for the otolith organs, most notably by vestibular-evoked myogenic potential recording and estimation of subjective visual vertical. In addition, progress has been made in the investigation of multisensory interaction, involving visual acuity and posturography.Technological developments include improved eye movement measurement techniques, electrotactile and vibrotactile sensory enhancement or substitution, the use of virtual reality devices and motion stimulators such as hexapods and the rediscovery of galvanic vestibular stimulation as a research and diagnostic tool. The recent introduction of new tests, together with the development of novel technologies, is gradually increasing the scope of the physical and bedside examination of the dizzy patient (see chapter 'Medical management of peripheral disorders' in this issue). The use of more complex equipment, such as rotating chairs, linear sleds, hexapods and posturography platforms, is likely to become limited to specialized laboratories and rehabilitation centers in future years. Further, high resolution magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) and computed tomography have allowed insight into the morphology and determination of malformations of the human labyrinth.

  16. [Anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system: review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, L; Vitte, E

    2004-10-01

    The vestibular system is a complex system involving not only posterior labyrinth but also central structures such as cerebellum, striatum, thalamus, frontal and prefrontal cortex to assure balance, movements and walking. Information reaching the vestibular complex are not purely vestibular but also from visual, somatosensory and cerebellar origins. The equilibrium is also a complex physiological function needing concordance of vestibular, visual and somatosensory information or either central compensation after an injury but also an integrity of the central nervous system.

  17. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-12-26

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  18. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eLacquaniti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  19. [Localization of nitric oxide synthase in the chicken vestibular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guohui; Wang, Jibao

    2002-08-01

    To locate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the chicken vestibular system. The frozen section were processed for NADPH-d histochemistry in a solution containing NADPH and nitroblue tetnazolium (NBT) to demonstrate NOS positive reactivity. NOS positive staining, black-blue in color, was seen at the nerve ending, nerve fibers of the utricul and saculla and ampiculium. Ganglion cells had different activity. The shape of the cells seems to be round or oral. Collectively, data indicate the presence of active NOS in these tissue and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  20. Laboratory examinations for the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Rosengren, Sally; Kingma, Herman

    2018-02-01

    In the last decades, researchers suggested that clinical assessment of labyrinthine function in detail became easy thanks to video head impulse tests (VHITs), vestibular evoked myogenic potential test (VEMP) and video-oculography (VOG). It has been argued that they can replace electronystagmography, the caloric and rotatory chair tests. This review addresses the latest evaluations of these tests and the opportunities they offer, but also the limitations in clinical practice. The VHIT and suppression head impulse test (SHIMP) are under ideal circumstances able to accurately identify deficits of the VOR in 3D. However, in a relevant part of the patient population, pupil tracking is inaccurate, video-goggles slip and VOR quantification is problematic. The dissociation between the VHIT and caloric test suggests that these tests are complementary. A new 3D-VOG technique claims to quantify eye torsion better than before, opening multiple diagnostic possibilities. VEMPs remain difficult to standardize. Variability in normal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential amplitude is large. VEMPs become smaller or absent with age, raising questions of whether there is a lower normal limit at all. Recent research shows that the labyrinth is directly stimulated in the MRI offering new opportunities for diagnostics and research. In clinical practice, the VHIT, SHIMP, VEMP and new 3D-VOG techniques improve diagnostic power. Unfortunately, technical issues or variability prevent reliable quantitative evaluation in a part of the regular patient population. The traditional caloric and rotatory chair test can still be considered as valuable complementary tests.

  1. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  2. Anatomy, physiology, and physics of the peripheral vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, H; van de Berg, R

    2016-01-01

    Many medical doctors consider vertigo and dizziness as the major, almost obligatory complaints in patients with vestibular disorders. In this chapter, we will explain that vestibular disorders result in much more diverse and complex complaints. Many of these other complaints are unfortunately often misinterpreted and incorrectly classified as psychogenic. When we really understand the function of the vestibular system, it becomes quite obvious why patients with vestibular disorders complain about a loss of visual acuity, imbalance, fear of falling, cognitive and attentional problems, fatigue that persists even when the vertigo attacks and dizziness decreases or even disappears. Another interesting new aspect in this chapter is that we explain why the function of the otolith system is so important, and that it is a mistake to focus on the function of the semicircular canals only, especially when we want to understand why some patients seem to suffer more than others from the loss of canal function as objectified by reduced caloric responses. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Signal processing in the vestibular system during active versus passive head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Roy, Jefferson E

    2004-05-01

    In everyday life, vestibular receptors are activated by both self-generated and externally applied head movements. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the vestibular system reliably encodes head-in-space motion throughout our daily activities and that subsequent processing by upstream cerebellar and cortical pathways is required to transform this information into the reference frames required for voluntary behaviors. However, recent studies have radically changed the way we view the vestibular system. In particular, the results of recent single-unit studies in head-unrestrained monkeys have shown that the vestibular system provides the CNS with more than an estimate of head motion. This review first considers how head-in-space velocity is processed at the level of the vestibular afferents and vestibular nuclei during active versus passive head movements. While vestibular information appears to be similarly processed by vestibular afferents during passive and active motion, it is differentially processed at the level of the vestibular nuclei. For example, one class of neurons in vestibular nuclei, which receives direct inputs from semicircular canal afferents, is substantially less responsive to active head movements than to passively applied head rotations. The projection patterns of these neurons strongly suggest that they are involved in generating head-stabilization responses as well as shaping vestibular information for the computation of spatial orientation. In contrast, a second class of neurons in the vestibular nuclei that mediate the vestibuloocular reflex process vestibular information in a manner that depends principally on the subject's current gaze strategy rather than whether the head movement was self-generated or externally applied. The implications of these results are then discussed in relation to the status of vestibular reflexes (i.e., the vestibuloocular, vestibulocollic, and cervicoocular reflexes) and implications for higher

  4. Preoperative Identification of Facial Nerve in Vestibular Schwannomas Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Min-Su; Kwon, Hyeok-Gyu; Jang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Oh-Lyong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Facial nerve palsy is a common complication of treatment for vestibular schwannoma (VS), so preserving facial nerve function is important. The preoperative visualization of the course of facial nerve in relation to VS could help prevent injury to the nerve during the surgery. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for preoperative identification of facial nerve. Methods We prospectively collected data from 11 patients with VS, who underwent pr...

  5. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  6. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  7. Is hippocampal neurogenesis modulated by the sensation of self-motion encoded by the vestibular system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    It is now well accepted that physical exercise stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and may promote cognitive ability. Less clear are the mechanisms by which this process occurs. One potential contributing influence, that is usually neglected, is the vestibular system, which by its very nature must be activated during physical exercise and which essentially cannot be turned off without complete bilateral vestibular lesions. This paper reviews a small literature that demonstrates that bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) in rats modulates cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and that artificial electrical activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, does also. Although there are only a few piecemeal studies of this subject, because of the way that they were controlled, it is likely that the vestibular system has a regulatory role in cell proliferation in the DG and therefore possibly in neurogenesis, which needs to be taken into account in the interpretation of neurogenesis studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction.......Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF VESTIBULOOCULAR PROJECTION NEURONS IN THE DEVELOPING CHICKEN MEDIAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman-Davis, Adria; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2010-01-01

    Biocytin was injected into the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nucleus on one side using isolated chicken brainstem preparations or brain slices to identify the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to these targets. Oculomotor nucleus injections produced retrogradely labeled neurons in the contralateral ventrolateral MVN (MVNVL), with few labeled neurons in the ipsilateral MVNVL, and rarely in the dorsomedial MVN on either side. Labeled MVNVL neurons were identified as stellate (95%) and elongate cells (5%). Trochlear nucleus injections produced a similar pattern of MVN neuron labeling. Abducens nucleus injections resulted in retrogradely labeled stellate (87%) and elongate (13%) neurons in the MVNVL which had smaller cell bodies than those projecting to the oculomotor nucleus. Anteroposteriorly, labeled MVNVL neurons were coextensive with the tangential nucleus, with neurons projecting to the oculomotor nucleus distributed lateral to and intermixed with the more medially situated neurons projecting to the abducens nucleus. The fundamental pattern of vestibuloocular projecting neurons was similar at both embryonic ages studied, E16 and E13. In contrast to mammals, where most vestibuloocular projection neurons reside within the MVN, the majority of retrogradely labeled neurons in these chicken preparations were found within the ventrolateral vestibular, descending vestibular, and tangential nuclei. The morphological identification and mapping of vestibuloocular projection neurons in the chicken MVN described here represents the first step in a systematic evaluation of the relationship between avian vestibuloocular neuron structure and function. PMID:19705454

  10. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the "I". Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where "I" experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where "I" am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  11. Vestibular system and neural correlates of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1986-01-01

    Initial studies re-examine the role of certain central nervous system structures in the production of vestibular-induced vomiting and vomiting in general. All experiments were conducted using cats. Since these studies demonstrated that the essential role of various central structures in vestibular-induced vomiting is only poorly understood, efforts were re-directed to study the control of the effector muscles (diaphragm and abdominal muscles) that produce the pressure changes responsible for vomiting, with the goal of determining how this control mechanism is engaged during motion sickness. Experiments were conducted to localize the motoneurons that innervate the individual abdominal muscles and the portion of the diaphragm that surrounds the esophagus. A central question regarding respiratory muscle control during vomiting is whether these muscles are activated via the same brain stem pre-motor neurons that provide descending respiratory drive and/or by other descending input(s). In other experiments, the use of a combination of pitch and roll motions to produce motion sickness in unrestrained cats was evaluated. This stimulus combination can produce vomiting in only the most susceptible cats and is thus not as provacative a stimulus for cats as vertical linear acceleration.

  12. Influences of Vestibular System on Sympathetic Nervous System. Implications for countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denise, Pr Pierre

    As gravity is a direct and permanent stress on body fluids, muscles and bones, it is not surpris-ing that weightlessness has important effects on cardiovascular and musculo-skeletal systems. However, these harmful effects do not totally result from the removal of the direct stress of gravity on these organs, but are also partially and indirectly mediated by the vestibular sys-tem. Besides its well known crucial role in spatial orientation and postural equilibrium, it is now clear that the vestibular system is also involved in the regulation of other important physi-ological systems: respiratory and cardiovascular systems, circadian regulation, food intake and even bone mineralization. The neuroanatomical substrate for these vestibular-mediated reg-ulations is still poorly defined, but there is much evidence that vestibular system has strong impacts not only on brainstem autonomic centers but on many hypothalamic nuclei as well. As autonomic nervous system controls almost all body organs, bringing into play the vestibular system by hypergravity or microgravity could virtually affects all major physiological func-tions. There is experimental evidence that weightlessness as well as vestibular lesion induce sympathetic activation thus participating in space related physiological alterations. The fact that some effects of weightlessness on biological systems are mediated by the vestibular system has an important implication for using artificial gravity as a countermeasure: artificial gravity should load not only bones and the cardiovascular system but the vestibular system as well. In short-arm centrifuges, the g load at the head level is low because the head is near the axis of rotation. If the vestibular system is involved in cardiovascular deconditioning and bone loss during weightlessness, it would be more effective to significantly stimulate it and thus it would be necessary to place the head off-axis. Moreover, as the otolithic organs are non longer stimu-lated in

  13. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  14. The vestibular system: balancing more than just the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    The review presents a selection of recent studies in the field of vestibular neuroscience, including how vestibular stimulation modulates space and body perception. Recent neuroimaging studies identified the operculo-insular/retroinsular cortex as the core vestibular cortex and showed how it is reorganized after vestibular dysfunctions. Subliminal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) induces long-term reduction of hemispatial neglect and improves vertical perception in stroke patients, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. Healthy volunteer research suggests that GVS and caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) modulate visual and somatosensory processing and that beneficial effects of GVS/CVS in stroke patients are not limited to merely rebalancing brain hemispheric activity. Another mechanism would be that GVS/CVS anchors the self to the body, thus promoting an egocentric frame of reference. In addition to 'balancing the body', the vestibular cortical network contributes to modulate space, body and self-awareness. Emerging evidence suggests that the vestibular network expands into dimensions of emotion processing, mental health, and social cognition. Here, the importance of connecting vestibular physiology, affective neuroscience, and social neuroscience to better understand the psychological aspects of vertigo in otoneurology is discussed.

  15. The vestibular system: A spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian ePfeiffer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the ‘I’. Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system codes head position in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortex is likely to contribute to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where ‘I’ experience the world and self-location (the feeling where ‘I’ am located in space. We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation that show that vestibular signals contribute to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction (TPJ, parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC, medial superior temporal region (MST, and ventral intraparietal region (VIP. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is important for linking multisensory signals from within personal space with those from extrapersonal space, and for spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  16. The role of the thalamus in the human subcortical vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Julian; Baier, Bernhard; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Most of our knowledge concerning central vestibular pathways is derived from animal studies while evidence of the functional importance and localization of these pathways in humans is less well defined. The termination of these pathways at the thalamic level in humans is even less known. In this review we summarize the findings concerning the central subcortical vestibular pathways in humans and the role of these structures in the central vestibular system with regard to anatomical localization and function. Also, we review the role of the thalamus in the pathogenesis of higher order sensory deficits such as spatial neglect, pusher syndrome or thalamic astasia and the correlation of these phenomena with findings of a vestibular tone imbalance at the thalamic level. By highlighting thalamic structures involved in vestibular signal processing and relating the different nomenclatures we hope to provide a base for future studies on thalamic sensory signal processing.

  17. Role of the insula and vestibular system in patients with chronic subjective dizziness: An fMRI study using sound-evoked vestibular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole eIndovina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence, long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD.We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC.We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients

  18. Vestibular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, W

    1979-01-01

    It is apparent from this and other reviews of the subject that our knowledge of vestibular function is most complete for the primary canal and otolithic afferents. Relatively little progress has been made in the understanding of receptor mechanisms and the functional importance of the efferent vestibular system. Since most of it has been summarized previously the latter were not considered here. Considerably more knowledge has accumulated in the field of central vestibular mechanisms, particularly those related to eye movements. Recent advances in functional synaptology of direct and indirect vestibuloocular pathways are described. It appears that the indirect pathways are essential for the central integration of the peripheral head velocity into a central eye position signal. Candidates for the neural integrator are presented and discussed and their connectivity described both for the horizontal and the relatively poorly studied vertical eye movement system. This field will certainly be studied extensively during the next years. Another interesting field is the role of the cerebellum in the control the vestibuloocular reflex. Recent data and hypotheses, including the problem of cerebellar plasticity, are summarized and evaluated. That the vestibular nuclei are by no means a simple relay system for specific vestibular signals destined for other sensory or motor centers is evidenced in this review by the description of multiple canal-canal, canalotolith, and visual-vestibular convergence at the nuclear level. Canal-otolith and polysensory convergence in vestibular neurons enables them to correct for the inherent inadequacies of the peripheral canal system in the low frequency range. The mechanisms of polysensory interaction in the central vestibular system will undoubtedly be an important and interesting field for future research.

  19. Comparison of the vascular innervation of the rat cochlea and vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M J; Payman, R N

    2000-03-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the neuronal and local control of inner ear blood flow, the vascular innervation to the rat cochlea and vestibular system was examined. Specimens were removed in toto beginning at the basilar artery extending to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, labyrinthine artery, common cochlear artery, modiolar artery and anterior vestibular artery. When possible the vessels were dissected in continuity through the cribrose area. The vestibular endorgans were also removed. Specimens were examined using immunohistochemical techniques for the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, neuropeptide-Y, substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide. Results show that the vasculature to the cochlea and vestibular portion of the inner ear receive similar types of nonadrenergic innervation, that within the vestibular endorgans, only CGRP and SP were found in the neuroepithelium or in association with vessels, and that within the vestibular system, the majority of the vascular innervation appears to stop at or near the cribrose area. In the cochlea however, it extends to include the radiating arterioles. These findings suggest that cochlear blood flow is under finer control and that neuronally induced changes in blood flow may have a more global effect in the vestibular periphery.

  20. The Vestibular System: A Newly Identified Regulator of Bone Homeostasis Acting Through the Sympathetic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaux, G; Besnard, S; Denise, P; Elefteriou, F

    2015-08-01

    The vestibular system is a small bilateral structure located in the inner ear, known as the organ of balance and spatial orientation. It senses head orientation and motion, as well as body motion in the three dimensions of our environment. It is also involved in non-motor functions such as postural control of blood pressure. These regulations are mediated via anatomical projections from vestibular nuclei to brainstem autonomic centers and are involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular function via sympathetic nerves. Age-associated dysfunction of the vestibular organ contributes to an increased incidence of falls, whereas muscle atrophy, reduced physical activity, cellular aging, and gonadal deficiency contribute to bone loss. Recent studies in rodents suggest that vestibular dysfunction might also alter bone remodeling and mass more directly, by affecting the outflow of sympathetic nervous signals to the skeleton and other tissues. This review will summarize the findings supporting the influence of vestibular signals on bone homeostasis, and the potential clinical relevance of these findings.

  1. Probing the human vestibular system with galvanic stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard C. Fitzpatrick; Brian L. Day

    2004-01-01

    .... This paper examines the electrophysiology and anatomy of the vestibular organs and the effects of GVS on human balance control and develops a model that explains the observed balance responses...

  2. Current concepts of the vestibular system reviewed: 1. The role of the vestibulospinal system in postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshner, E A; Cohen, H

    1989-05-01

    This paper reviews the research findings that support the presence of vestibulospinal reflexes in corrections for head and body instability. Studies of the importance of labyrinthine inputs to the central nervous system organization of eye, head, and body movements demonstrate that the vestibular nuclei are more than a simple relay station for labyrinthine activity. At all levels of the vestibular system beyond the primary vestibular afferents, parallel processing of labyrinthine signals occurs with input from other sensory systems. Thus, output of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) is not equivalent to the labyrinthine input. It is the VNC output that influences motor behavior. Various sensory inputs are available to the nervous system to detect and correct postural instability. Most notably, vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive signals contribute significantly to the stabilizing responses in humans. The intent of this paper is to review experimental results rather than to discuss treatment interventions. Wherever possible, conclusions are drawn as to the clinical implications of current research findings.

  3. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the “I”. Self- consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self- consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibul...

  4. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  5. Telefones celulares: influência nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aracy Pereira Silveira Balbani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Os sistemas de telecomunicações emitem radiofreqüência, uma radiação eletromagnética invisível. Telefones celulares transmitem microondas (450900 MHz no sistema analógico e 1,82,2 GHz no sistema digital, muito próximo à orelha do usuário. Esta energia é absorvida pela pele, orelha interna, nervo vestibulococlear e superfície do lobo temporal. OBJETIVO: Revisar a literatura sobre influência dos telefones celulares na audição e equilíbrio. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. METODOLOGIA: Foram pesquisados artigos nas bases Lilacs e Medline sobre a influência dos telefones celulares nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular, publicados de 2000 a 2005, e também materiais veiculados na Internet. RESULTADOS: Os estudos sobre radiação do telefone celular e risco de neurinoma do acústico apresentam resultados contraditórios. Alguns autores não encontram maior probabilidade de aparecimento do tumor nos usuários de celulares, enquanto outros relatam que a utilização de telefones analógicos por 10 anos ou mais aumenta o risco para o tumor. A exposição aguda às microondas emitidas pelo celular não influencia a atividade das células ciliadas externas da cóclea, in vivo e in vitro, a condução elétrica no nervo coclear, nem a fisiologia do sistema vestibular em humanos. As próteses auditivas analógicas são mais suscetíveis à interferência eletromagnética dos telefones celulares digitais. CONCLUSÃO: Não há comprovação de lesão cocleovestibular pelos telefones celulares.Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service very close to the user’s ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. AIM: literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. STUDY DESIGN: systematic

  6. Investigations of the Effects of Altered Vestibular System Function on Hindlimb Anti-Gravity Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Mary Sue

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different gravitational environments, both the microgravity of spaceflight and the hypergravity of centrifugation, result in altered vestibulo-spinal function which can be reversed by reacclimation to earth gravity (2). Control of orientation, posture, and locomotion are functions of the vestibular system which are altered by changes in gravitational environment. Not only is the vestibular system involved with coordination and proprioception, but the gravity sensing portion of the vestibular system also plays a major role in maintaining muscle tone through projections to spinal cord motoneurons that control anti-gravity muscles. I have been involved with investigations of several aspects of the link between vestibular inputs and muscle morphology and function during my work with Dr. Nancy Daunton this summer and the previous summer. We have prepared a manuscript for submission (4) to Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine based on work that I performed last summer in Dr. Daunton's lab. Techniques developed for that project will be utilized in subsequent experiments begun in the summer of 1998. I have been involved with the development of a pilot project to test the effects of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) on anti-gravity muscles and in another project testing the effects of the ototoxic drug streptomycin on the otolith-spinal reflex and anti-gravity muscle morphology.

  7. Impaired tunnel-maze behavior in rats with sensory lesions: vestibular and auditory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeppi, U; Krinke, G; FitzGerald, R E; Classen, W

    1991-01-01

    Maze behavior of rodents provides insight into processes of learning and memory and also serves to assess cognitive functions in neurotoxicity tests. Neurotoxic agents may impair maze behavior by acting upon different parts of the nervous system. To assess the dependence of maze learning upon vestibular and/or auditory input, the two systems were lesioned. Daily treatment of rat pups with streptomycin (400 mg/kg sc) on postnatal day 11 to 22 caused irreversible impairment of vestibular and auditory functions, whereas, 20 injections of neomycin in adult rats (100 mg/kg sc, postnatal weeks 8 to 11) led to hearing loss only. Hearing loss was assessed by absence of Preyer's reflex and impaired vestibular function by loss or shortened duration of postrotatory nystagmus. Learning in the unbaited 6-arm radial maze was tested at the age of 2 to 3 mon using a maze configuration that allowed to assess order of arm entries ("working memory") and left-right discrimination within each arm ("reference memory"). Treatment with streptomycin but not with neomycin led to impaired order of arm entries. Since treatment with streptomycin failed to induce any signs of brain lesions, impaired maze learning is considered to result from destruction of vestibular hair cell receptors with subsequent vestibular impairment and not from hearing loss or cognitive impairment.

  8. Expression of inducible nitric oxide-synthase in the vestibular system of hydropic guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A; Bloch, W; Su, J; Stennert, E; Addicks, K; Michel, O

    1999-04-02

    Immunohistochemical investigations of the guinea pig vestibular system, using a specific antibody to the inducible isoform of NO-synthase (iNOS/NOS II), have been performed 3 weeks after surgical closure of the right endolymphatic duct (n = 7). Endolymphatic hydrops (ELH) of the right temporal bone became evident by excavation of the Reissner's membrane in all seven animals. Those animals revealed iNOS-expression in ganglion cells, in the wall of blood vessels and in nerve fibers of the right vestibular system, while the corresponding left temporal bones and temporal bones of non-operated controls (n = 6) as well as of sham-operated animals (n = 3) did not show any iNOS-positive structures. iNOS-generated NO could be involved in the pathophysiology of vestibular dysfunction in Meniere's disease.

  9. Symmetries of the Central Vestibular System: Forming Movements for Gravity and a Three-Dimensional World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin McCollum

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic dynamics of the central vestibular system (CVS appear to be at least partly determined by the symmetries of its connections. The CVS contributes to whole-body functions such as upright balance and maintenance of gaze direction. These functions coordinate disparate senses (visual, inertial, somatosensory, auditory and body movements (leg, trunk, head/neck, eye. They are also unified by geometric conditions. Symmetry groups have been found to structure experimentally-recorded pathways of the central vestibular system. When related to geometric conditions in three-dimensional physical space, these symmetry groups make sense as a logical foundation for sensorimotor coordination.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of pressure and velocity distribution inside Meniere’s diseased vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, N. F. H.; Isa, N. M.; Taib, I.; Mohammed, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Meniere’s disease or known as endolymphatic hydrops is an incurable vestibular disorder of the inner ear. This is due to the excessive fluid build-up in the endolymphatic sac which causing the vestibular endolymphatic membrane to start stretching. Although this mechanism has been widely accepted as the likely mechanism of Meniere’s syndrome, the reason for its occurrence remains unclear. Thus, the aims of this study to investigate the critical parameters of fluid flow in membranous labyrinth that is influencing instability of vestibular system. In addition, to visualise the flow behaviour between a normal membranous labyrinth and dilated membranous labyrinth in Meniere’s disease in predicting instability of vestibular system. Three dimensional geometry of endolymphatic sac is obtained from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) and reconstructed using commercial software. As basis of comparison the two different model of endolymphatic sac is considered in this study which are normal membranous labyrinth for model I and dilated membranous labyrinth for model II. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is used to analyse the behaviour of pressure and velocity flow in the endolymphatic sac. The comparison was made in terms of pressure distribution and velocity profile. The results show that the pressure for dilated membranous labyrinth is greater than normal membranous labyrinth. Due to abnormally pressure in the vestibular system, it leads to the increasing value of the velocity at dilated membranous labyrinth while at the normal membranous labyrinth the velocity values decreasing. As a conclusion by changing the parameters which is pressure and velocity can significantly affect to the instability of vestibular system for Meniere’s disease.

  11. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular

  12. The vestibular system: multimodal integration and encoding of self-motion for motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how sensory pathways transmit information under natural conditions remains a major goal in neuroscience. The vestibular system plays a vital role in everyday life, contributing to a wide range of functions from reflexes to the highest levels of voluntary behavior. Recent experiments establishing that vestibular (self-motion) processing is inherently multimodal also provide insight into a set of interrelated questions. What neural code is used to represent sensory information in vestibular pathways? How do the interactions between the organism and the environment shape encoding? How is self-motion information processing adjusted to meet the needs of specific tasks? This review highlights progress that has recently been made towards understanding how the brain encodes and processes self-motion to ensure accurate motor control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The endocannabinoid system: A new player in the neurochemical control of vestibular function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Ashton, John C; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2006-01-01

    The results of recent clinical trials of medicinal cannabinoid drugs show that dizziness and vertigo are commonly reported adverse side-effects. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors were initially thought to be expressed in very low densities in the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC). Recent immunohistochemical studies have challenged this idea and suggested that CB1 receptors may exist in numbers similar to the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. This, together with evidence that brainstem CB1 receptors have a higher efficacy than those in many other parts of the brain and that application of cannabinoids can elicit potent electrophysiological effects in VNC neurons, suggests that CB1 receptors and their endogenous ligands may be important in central vestibular function. In this review, we consider the potential clinical significance of the endocannabinoid system for the development of vestibular disorders, the effects of recreational cannabis use and the therapeutic use of medicinal cannabinoids. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A versatile stereoscopic visual display system for vestibular and oculomotor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, P D; Roberts, D C; Shelhamer, M; Zee, D S

    1998-01-01

    Testing of the vestibular system requires a vestibular stimulus (motion) and/or a visual stimulus. We have developed a versatile, low cost, stereoscopic visual display system, using "virtual reality" (VR) technology. The display system can produce images for each eye that correspond to targets at any virtual distance relative to the subject, and so require the appropriate ocular vergence. We elicited smooth pursuit, "stare" optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and after-nystagmus (OKAN), vergence for targets at various distances, and short-term adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), using both conventional methods and the stereoscopic display. Pursuit, OKN, and OKAN were comparable with both methods. When used with a vestibular stimulus, VR induced appropriate adaptive changes of the phase and gain of the angular VOR. In addition, using the VR display system and a human linear acceleration sled, we adapted the phase of the linear VOR. The VR-based stimulus system not only offers an alternative to more cumbersome means of stimulating the visual system in vestibular experiments, it also can produce visual stimuli that would otherwise be impractical or impossible. Our techniques provide images without the latencies encountered in most VR systems. Its inherent versatility allows it to be useful in several different types of experiments, and because it is software driven it can be quickly adapted to provide a new stimulus. These two factors allow VR to provide considerable savings in time and money, as well as flexibility in developing experimental paradigms.

  15. Uptake of Fluorescent Gentamicin by Peripheral Vestibular Cells after Systemic Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianping; Kachelmeier, Allan; Dai, Chunfu; Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In addition to cochleotoxicity, systemic aminoglycoside pharmacotherapy causes vestibulotoxicity resulting in imbalance and visual dysfunction. The underlying trafficking routes of systemically-administered aminoglycosides from the vasculature to the vestibular sensory hair cells are largely unknown. We investigated the trafficking of systemically-administered gentamicin into the peripheral vestibular system in C56Bl/6 mice using fluorescence-tagged gentamicin (gentamicin-Texas-Red, GTTR) imaged by scanning laser confocal microscopy to determine the cellular distribution and intensity of GTTR fluorescence in the three semicircular canal cristae, utricular, and saccular maculae at 5 time points over 4 hours. Results Low intensity GTTR fluorescence was detected at 0.5 hours as both discrete puncta and diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence. The intensity of cytoplasmic fluorescence peaked at 3 hours, while punctate fluorescence was plateaued after 3 hours. At 0.5 and 1 hour, higher levels of diffuse GTTR fluorescence were present in transitional cells compared to hair cells and supporting cells. Sensory hair cells typically exhibited only diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence at all time-points up to 4 hours in this study. In contrast, non-sensory cells rapidly exhibited both intense fluorescent puncta and weaker, diffuse fluorescence throughout the cytosol. The numbers and size of fluorescent puncta in dark cells and transitional cells increased over time. There is no preferential GTTR uptake by the five peripheral vestibular organs’ sensory cells. Control vestibular tissues exposed to Dulbecco’s phosphate-buffered saline or hydrolyzed Texas Red had negligible fluorescence. Conclusions All peripheral vestibular cells rapidly take up systemically-administered GTTR, reaching peak intensity 3 hours after injection. Sensory hair cells exhibited only diffuse fluorescence, while non-sensory cells displayed both diffuse and punctate fluorescence. Transitional cells may

  16. Sustained and Transient Vestibular Systems: A Physiological Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish G; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Otolithic afferents with regular resting discharge respond to gravity or low-frequency linear accelerations, and we term these the static or sustained otolithic system. However, in the otolithic sense organs, there is anatomical differentiation across the maculae and corresponding physiological differentiation. A specialized band of receptors called the striola consists of mainly type I receptors whose hair bundles are weakly tethered to the overlying otolithic membrane. The afferent neurons,...

  17. Interactive wiimote gaze stabilization exercise training system for patients with vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Yin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2012-10-09

    Peripheral vestibular hypofunction is a major cause of dizziness. When complicated with postural imbalance, this condition can lead to an increased incidence of falls. In traditional clinical practice, gaze stabilization exercise is commonly used to rehabilitate patients. In this study, we established a computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation system by coupling infrared LEDs to an infrared receiver. This system enabled the subjects' head-turning actions to be quantified, and the training was performed using vestibular exercise combined with computer games and interactive video games that simulate daily life activities. Three unilateral and one bilateral vestibular hypofunction patients volunteered to participate in this study. The participants received 30 minutes of computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation training 2 days per week for 6 weeks. Pre-training and post-training assessments were completed, and a follow-up assessment was completed 1 month after the end of the training period. After 6 weeks of training, significant improvements in balance and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were observed in the four participants. Self-reports of dizziness, anxiety and depressed mood all decreased significantly. Significant improvements in self-confidence and physical performance were also observed. The effectiveness of this training was maintained for at least 1 month after the end of the training period. Real-time monitoring of training performance can be achieved using this rehabilitation platform. Patients demonstrated a reduction in dizziness symptoms after 6 weeks of training with this short-term interactive game approach. This treatment paradigm also improved the patients' balance function. This system could provide a convenient, safe and affordable treatment option for clinical practitioners.

  18. Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance: possible relationship to microgravity-induced plasticity in the vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B. J.; Kerman, I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Even after short spaceflights, most astronauts experience at least some postflight reduction of orthostatic tolerance; this problem is severe in some subjects. The mechanisms leading to postflight orthostatic intolerance are not well-established, but have traditionally been thought to include the following: changes in leg hemodynamics, alterations in baroreceptor reflex gain, decreases in exercise tolerance and aerobic fitness, hypovolemia, and altered sensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors in the periphery. Recent studies have demonstrated that signals from vestibular otolith organs play an important role in regulating blood pressure during changes in posture in a 1-g environment. Because spaceflight results in plastic changes in the vestibular otolith organs and in the processing of inputs from otolith receptors, it is possible that another contributing factor to postflight orthostatic hypotension is alterations in the gain of vestibular influences on cardiovascular control. Preliminary data support this hypothesis, although controlled studies will be required to determine the relationship between changes in the vestibular system and orthostatic hypotension following exposure to microgravity. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about age related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing...

  20. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  1. A low-cost video-oculography system for vestibular function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihwan Park; Youngsun Kong; Yunyoung Nam

    2017-07-01

    In order to remain in focus during head movements, vestibular-ocular reflex causes eyes to move in the opposite direction to head movement. Disorders of vestibular system decrease vision, causing abnormal nystagmus and dizziness. To diagnose abnormal nystagmus, various studies have been reported including the use of rotating chair tests and videonystagmography. However, these tests are unsuitable for home use due to their high costs. Thus, a low-cost video-oculography system is necessary to obtain clinical features at home. In this paper, we present a low-cost video-oculography system using an infrared camera and Raspberry Pi board for tracking the pupils and evaluating a vestibular system. Horizontal eye movement is derived from video data obtained from an infrared camera and infrared light-emitting diodes, and the velocity of head rotation is obtained from a gyroscope sensor. Each pupil was extracted using a morphology operation and a contour detection method. Rotatory chair tests were conducted with our developed device. To evaluate our system, gain, asymmetry, and phase were measured and compared with System 2000. The average IQR errors of gain, phase and asymmetry were 0.81, 2.74 and 17.35, respectively. We showed that our system is able to measure clinical features.

  2. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoceli, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  3. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-04-01

     The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation.  Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  4. Move it or lose it--is stimulation of the vestibular system necessary for normal spatial memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Darlington, Cynthia L; Zheng, Yiwen

    2010-01-01

    Studies in both experimental animals and human patients have demonstrated that peripheral vestibular lesions, especially bilateral lesions, are associated with spatial memory impairment that is long-lasting and may even be permanent. Electrophysiological evidence from animals indicates that bilateral vestibular loss causes place cells and theta activity to become dysfunctional; the most recent human evidence suggests that the hippocampus may cause atrophy in patients with bilateral vestibular lesions. Taken together, these studies suggest that self-motion information provided by the vestibular system is important for the development of spatial memory by areas of the brain such as the hippocampus, and when it is lost, spatial memory is impaired. This naturally suggests the converse possibility that activation of the vestibular system may enhance memory. Surprisingly, there is some human evidence that this may be the case. This review considers the relationship between the vestibular system and memory and suggests that the evolutionary age of this primitive sensory system as well as how it detects self-motion (i.e., detection of acceleration vs. velocity) may be the reasons for its unique contribution to spatial memory. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Estimation of Optimum Stimulus Amplitude for Balance Training using Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as posture and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts after gravitational transitions. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training can help alleviate decrements on exposure to novel sensorimotor environments based on the concept of 'learning to learn' by exposure to varying sensory challenges during posture and locomotion tasks (Bloomberg 2015). Supra-threshold Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation (SVS) can be used to provide one of many challenges by disrupting vestibular inputs. In this scenario, the central nervous system can be trained to utilize veridical information from other sensory inputs, such as vision and somatosensory inputs, for posture and locomotion control. The minimum amplitude of SVS to simulate the effect of deterioration in vestibular inputs for preflight training or for evaluating vestibular contribution in functional tests in general, however, has not yet been identified. Few studies (MacDougall 2006; Dilda 2014) have used arbitrary but fixed maximum current amplitudes from 3 to 5 mA in the medio-lateral (ML) direction to disrupt balance function in healthy adults. Giving this high level of current amplitude to all the individuals has a risk of invoking side effects such as nausea and discomfort. The goal of this study was to determine the minimum SVS level that yields an equivalently degraded balance performance. Thirteen subjects stood on a compliant foam surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in the ML direction. Duration of time they could stand on the foam surface was also measured. The minimum SVS dosage was defined to be that level which significantly degraded balance performance such that any further increase in stimulation level did not lead to further balance degradation. The minimum SVS level was determined by performing linear fits on the performance variable

  6. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP is a promising test for the evaluation of the cholic descending vestibular system. This reflex depends of the integrity from the saccular macula, from the inferior vestibular nerve, the vestibular nuclei, the vestibule-spinal tract and effectors muscles. Objective: Perform a systematic review of the pertinent literature by means of database (COCHRANE, MEDLINE, LILACS, CAPES. Conclusion: The clinical application of the VEMP has expanded in the last years, as goal that this exam is used as complementary in the otoneurological evaluation currently used. But, methodological issues must be clarified. This way, this method when combined with the standard protocol, can provide a more widely evaluation from the vestibular system. The standardization of the methodology is fundamental criterion for the replicability and sensibility of the exam.

  7. Pathologic Changes of the Peripheral Vestibular System Secondary to Chronic Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Monsanto, Rafael; Erdil, Mehmet; Pauna, Henrique F; Kwon, Geeyoun; Schachern, Patricia A; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the histopathologic changes of dark, transitional, and hair cells of the vestibular system in human temporal bones from patients with chronic otitis media. Comparative human temporal bone study. Otopathology laboratory. To compare the density of vestibular dark, transitional, and hair cells in temporal bones with and without chronic otitis media, we used differential interference contrast microscopy. In the chronic otitis media group (as compared with the age-matched control group), the density of type I and type II hair cells was significantly decreased in the lateral semicircular canal, saccule, and utricle (P otitis media group in the posterior semicircular canal (P = .005), but that of type II cells was not (P = .168). The mean number of dark cells was significantly decreased in the chronic otitis media group in the lateral semicircular canal (P = .014) and in the posterior semicircular canal (P = .002). We observed no statistically significant difference in the density of transitional cells between the 2 groups (P > .1). The findings of our study suggest that the decrease in the number of vestibular sensory cells and dark cells could be the cause of the clinical symptoms of imbalance of some patients with chronic otitis media. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  8. Author Identification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. Ben

    2009-01-01

    Many efforts are currently underway to disambiguate author names and assign unique identification numbers so that publications by a given scholar can be reliably grouped together. This paper reviews a number of operational and in-development services. Some systems like ResearcherId.Com depend on self-registration and self-identification of a…

  9. Systems analysis of the vestibulo-ocular system. [mathematical model of vestibularly driven head and eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular system is examined from the standpoint of system theory. The evolution of a mathematical model of the vestibulo-ocular system in an attempt to match more and more experimental data is followed step by step. The final model explains many characteristics of the eye movement in vestibularly induced nystagmus. The analysis of the dynamic behavior of the model at the different stages of its development is illustrated in time domain, mainly in a qualitative way.

  10. Significant vestibular system impairment is common in a cohort of elderly patients referred for assessment of falls risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gary P; McCaslin, Devin L; Grantham, Sarah L; Piker, Erin G

    2008-01-01

    Falls in elderly patients are associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare system. The development of falls risk assessment programs have represented a method of responding to what is known about injurious falls. The multidimensional assessments involve the comparison against normative data of a patient's performance on metrics known to influence the likelihood of future falls. The factors assessed usually include falls and medication history, measures of mentation, depression, orthostatic hypotension, simple or choice reaction time, gait stability, postural stability, and the integrity of the patient's vision, somesthetic, and vestibular senses. This investigation was conducted to measure the proportion of patients referred for falls risk assessment who have evidence of vestibular system impairment. Qualitative, retrospective review of data collected from 2003 to 2007. The cohort was 185 consecutive patients referred for multidimensional assessments of falls risk. Patients underwent quantitative assessments of peripheral and central vestibular system function consisting of electro- or videonystagmography (i.e., ENG/VNG), and sinusoidal harmonic acceleration testing. Results of these tests were compared to normative data. We found that 73% of the sample who underwent vestibular system assessment had quantitative evidence of either peripheral or central vestibular system impairment. Our results suggest that quantitative assessments of the vestibulo-ocular reflex should be conducted on patients who are evaluated for falls risk. These examinations should include at least caloric testing and, where available, rotational testing.

  11. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-12-16

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body's failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change--supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show--for the first time--a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth.

  12. Impact of electromagnetic fields on human vestibular system and standing balance: pilot results and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A.; Villard, S.; Corbacio, M.; Goulet, D.; Plante, M.; Souques, M.; Deschamps, F.; Ostiguy, G.; Lambrozo, J.; Thomas, A. W.; Legros, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have found that extremely low-frequency (ELF, displacement of their center of pressure will be collected and analyzed as an indicator of vestibular performance. During pilot testing (n=6), we found increased lateral sway with DC, and to a lesser extent, AC exposure. The ELFMF exposure system still needs to be adapted to allow meaningful results. Future protocol design will test for possible effects due to exposures in the radiofrequency range (i.e. above 3 kHz). These results will contribute to the literature documenting exposure guidelines aiming to protect workers and the general public.

  13. Models of the vestibular system and postural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. R.; Weiss, A.

    1974-01-01

    Applications of control theory and systems analysis to the problem of orientation and posture control are discussed, with the possible long range goals of contributing to the development of hardware for rehabilitation of the handicapped.

  14. The development of vestibular system and related function in mammals: Impact of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eJamon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This chapter reviews the knowledge about the adaptation to Earth gravity during the development of mammals. The impact of early exposure to altered gravity is evaluated at the level of the functions related to the vestibular system, including postural control, homeostatic regulation, and spatial memory. The hypothesis of critical periods in the adaptation to gravity is discussed. Demonstrating a critical period requires removing the gravity stimulus during delimited time windows, what is impossible to do on Earth surface. The Surgical destruction of the vestibular apparatus, and the use of mice strains with defective graviceptors have provided useful information on the consequences of missing gravity perception, and the possible compensatory mechanisms, but transitory suppression of the stimulus can only be operated during spatial flight. The rare studies on rat pups housed on board of space shuttle significantly contributed to this problem, but the use of hypergravity environment, produced by means of chronic centrifugation, is the only available tool when repeated experiments must be carried out on Earth. Even though hypergravity is sometimes considered as a mirror situation to microgravity, the two situations cannot be confused because a gravitational force is still present. The theoretical considerations that validate the paradigm of hypergravity to evaluate critical periods are discussed. The question of adaption of graviceptor is questioned from an evolutionary point of view. It is possible that graviception is hardwired, because life on Earth has evolved under the constant pressure of gravity. The rapid acquisition of motor programming by precocial mammals in minutes after birth is consistent with this hypothesis, but the slow development of motor skills in altricial species and the plasticity of vestibular perception in adults suggest that gravity experience is required for the tuning of graviceptors. The possible reasons for this

  15. Interaction of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is altered by vestibular otolith stimulation. This study examined interactive effects of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on MSNA in humans. In study 1, MSNA was measured during 4 min of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at either -10 or -30 mmHg with subjects in prone posture. During the 3rd min of LBNP, subjects lowered their head over the end of a table (head-down rotation, HDR) to engage the otolith organs. The head was returned to baseline upright position during the 4th min. LBNP increased MSNA above baseline during both trials with greater increases during the -30-mmHg trial. HDR increased MSNA further during the 3rd min of LBNP at -10 and -30 mmHg (Delta32% and Delta34%, respectively; P < 0.01). MSNA returned to pre-HDR levels during the 4th min of LBNP when the head was returned upright. In study 2, MSNA was measured during HDR, LBNP, and simultaneously performed HDR and LBNP. The sum of MSNA responses during individual HDR and LBNP trials was not significantly different from that observed during HDR and LBNP performed together (Delta131 +/- 28 vs. Delta118 +/- 47 units and Delta340 +/- 77 vs. Delta380 +/- 90 units for the -10 and -30 trials, respectively). These results demonstrate that vestibular otolith stimulation can increase MSNA during unloading of the cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflexes. Also, the interaction between the vestibulosympathetic reflex and baroreflexes is additive in humans. These studies indicate that the vestibulosympathetic reflex may help defend against orthostatic challenges in humans by increasing sympathetic outflow.

  16. The development of vestibular system and related functions in mammals: impact of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamon, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the knowledge about the adaptation to Earth gravity during the development of mammals. The impact of early exposure to altered gravity is evaluated at the level of the functions related to the vestibular system, including postural control, homeostatic regulation, and spatial memory. The hypothesis of critical periods in the adaptation to gravity is discussed. Demonstrating a critical period requires removing the gravity stimulus during delimited time windows, what is impossible to do on Earth surface. The surgical destruction of the vestibular apparatus, and the use of mice strains with defective graviceptors have provided useful information on the consequences of missing gravity perception, and the possible compensatory mechanisms, but transitory suppression of the stimulus can only be operated during spatial flight. The rare studies on rat pups housed on board of space shuttle significantly contributed to this problem, but the use of hypergravity environment, produced by means of chronic centrifugation, is the only available tool when repeated experiments must be carried out on Earth. Even though hypergravity is sometimes considered as a mirror situation to microgravity, the two situations cannot be confused because a gravitational force is still present. The theoretical considerations that validate the paradigm of hypergravity to evaluate critical periods are discussed. The question of adaption of graviceptor is questioned from an evolutionary point of view. It is possible that graviception is hardwired, because life on Earth has evolved under the constant pressure of gravity. The rapid acquisition of motor programming by precocial mammals in minutes after birth is consistent with this hypothesis, but the slow development of motor skills in altricial species and the plasticity of vestibular perception in adults suggest that gravity experience is required for the tuning of graviceptors. The possible reasons for this dichotomy are discussed.

  17. Neuroticism modulates brain visuo-vestibular and anxiety systems during a virtual rollercoaster task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Roberta; Indovina, Iole; Staab, Jeffrey P; Nigro, Salvatore; Augimeri, Antonio; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Passamonti, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Different lines of research suggest that anxiety-related personality traits may influence the visual and vestibular control of balance, although the brain mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. To our knowledge, this is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that investigates how individual differences in neuroticism and introversion, two key personality traits linked to anxiety, modulate brain regional responses and functional connectivity patterns during a fMRI task simulating self-motion. Twenty-four healthy individuals with variable levels of neuroticism and introversion underwent fMRI while performing a virtual reality rollercoaster task that included two main types of trials: (1) trials simulating downward or upward self-motion (vertical motion), and (2) trials simulating self-motion in horizontal planes (horizontal motion). Regional brain activity and functional connectivity patterns when comparing vertical versus horizontal motion trials were correlated with personality traits of the Five Factor Model (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion-introversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). When comparing vertical to horizontal motion trials, we found a positive correlation between neuroticism scores and regional activity in the left parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC). For the same contrast, increased functional connectivity between the left PIVC and right amygdala was also detected as a function of higher neuroticism scores. Together, these findings provide new evidence that individual differences in personality traits linked to anxiety are significantly associated with changes in the activity and functional connectivity patterns within visuo-vestibular and anxiety-related systems during simulated vertical self-motion. Hum Brain Mapp 38:715-726, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  19. The vestibular body: Vestibular contributions to bodily representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are integrated with signals from other sensory modalities. This convergence could reflect an important mechanism for maintaining the perception of the body. Here we review the current literature in order to develop a framework for understanding how the vestibular system contributes to body representation. According to recent models, we distinguish between three processes for body representation, and we look at whether vestibular signals might influence each process. These are (i) somatosensation, the primary sensory processing of somatic stimuli, (ii) somatoperception, the processes of constructing percepts and experiences of somatic objects and events and (iii) somatorepresentation, the knowledge about the body as a physical object in the world. Vestibular signals appear to contribute to all three levels in this model of body processing. Thus, the traditional view of the vestibular system as a low-level, dedicated orienting module tends to underestimate the pervasive role of vestibular input in bodily self-awareness.

  20. Wavelet-based artifact identification and separation technique for EEG signals during galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Mani; Cretu, Edmond

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for removing artifacts in electroencephalography (EEG) records during Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS). The main challenge in exploiting GVS is to understand how the stimulus acts as an input to brain. We used EEG to monitor the brain and elicit the GVS reflexes. However, GVS current distribution throughout the scalp generates an artifact on EEG signals. We need to eliminate this artifact to be able to analyze the EEG signals during GVS. We propose a novel method to estimate the contribution of the GVS current in the EEG signals at each electrode by combining time-series regression methods with wavelet decomposition methods. We use wavelet transform to project the recorded EEG signal into various frequency bands and then estimate the GVS current distribution in each frequency band. The proposed method was optimized using simulated signals, and its performance was compared to well-accepted artifact removal methods such as ICA-based methods and adaptive filters. The results show that the proposed method has better performance in removing GVS artifacts, compared to the others. Using the proposed method, a higher signal to artifact ratio of -1.625 dB was achieved, which outperformed other methods such as ICA-based methods, regression methods, and adaptive filters.

  1. Characteristics of human gait related variables in association with vestibular system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Edo, M; Yokomizo, M; Togawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Gait analysis was performed in patients with vestibular system disorders, using foot switches and electromyography. They were divided into three groups: 11 cases with vestibular neuronitis (VN), 10 cases with large acoustic neuroma (LAN) who had central lesion evidenced by neurotological examinations, and 10 cases with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). A total of 14 healthy adults served as controls. Results showed that time from heel strike to forefoot strike was the most sensitive variable to indicate gait abnormality but had no specificity. As for the variables of stance, swing, and time to reach the initial peak of the tibialis anterior's activity from forefoot off, occurrence rate of abnormality was high in the OPCA group, followed by the LAN and VN groups. Concerning the double support period which is related with body weight transfer from one leg to the other, the LAN and OPCA groups showed higher occurrence rate of abnormality than the VN group. These differences among the three groups could reflect different effects to the gait control systems caused by lesion.

  2. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  3. System for tamper identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbitt, III, John Thomas; Weeks, George E.

    2017-09-05

    A system for tamper identification. A fastener has a tamper identification surface with a unique grain structure that is altered if the fastener is removed or otherwise exposed to sufficient torque. After a period of time such as e.g., shipment and/or storage of the sealed container, a determination of whether tampering has occurred can be undertaken by examining the grain structure to determine if it has changed since the fastener was used to seal the container or secure the device.

  4. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Sasidharan, Chithra Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS) is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were above the damage risk criteria (DRC) compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01). Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  5. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs were above the damage risk criteria (DRC compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01. Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  6. Common Vestibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios G. Balatsouras

    2017-01-01

    /vomiting. Vestibular rehabilitation hastens the recovery. The efficacy of topical and systemic steroids requires further validation.

  7. Effects of hypergravity on gene levels in anti-gravity muscle and bone through the vestibular system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Morita, Hironobu; Nishida, Kazuaki; Obata, Koji; Tatsumi, Kohei; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2017-09-07

    We recently reported that hypergravity with 3 g for 4 weeks affects muscle and bone through the vestibular system in mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity with 2 g, which had no influence on circulating glucocorticoid level, on the gene levels in muscle and bone, as well as the roles of the vestibular system in those changes using vestibular lesioned (VL) mice. Hypergravity for 2 and 8 weeks or VL exerted little effects on the mRNA levels of muscle differentiation factors and myokines in the soleus muscle. Although hypergravity for 2 weeks significantly elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and type I collagen mRNA levels in the tibia, VL significantly attenuated the levels of ALP mRNA enhanced by hypergravity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that a 2-g load for 2 weeks enhances osteoblast differentiation partly through the vestibular system in mice.

  8. Aging and vestibular system: specific tests and role of melatonin in cognitive involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpini, D; Cesarani, A; Fraschini, F; Kohen-Raz, R; Capobianco, S; Cornelio, F

    2004-01-01

    Balance disorders are frequent with aging. They are particularly important because they decrease social autonomy of the aged subjects and they often provoke falls. The cause is always multifactorial. There is evidence that aging affects multiple sensory inputs, as well as the muscoloskeletal system and central nervous system ability to perform sensorimotor integration. For the evaluation of decreased balance skills in elderly, a specific questionnaire has been prepared, in order to identify high risk of falling called falling risk inventory (FRI) questionnaire, and a complex psycho-sensory-motor test has been studied by means of posturography, in order to detect specific vestibular impairment. Regarding ethiopathogenesis of balance disorders in aged subjects, because the decline of behavioral and cognitive performances are due also to decline of biological rhythm control, the role of melatonin (the hormone regulating circadian rhythms, being strictly connected with cerebellar function, and it is well known that cerebellum acts in elderly both at motor and cognitive regulation. The goals of the present paper are: (i) To present a self-administered FRI questionnaire aimed at identifying possible causes of falls and quantifying falling risk in aged. (ii) To validate posturography as a specific test to investigate vestibular involvement in elderly in correlation with FRI. (iii) To present a complex behavioral test (NT) aimed at evaluating both spatial orientation and spatial memory in elderly, factors involved into the genesis of complex dizziness and unsteadiness. (iv) To evaluate the role of melatonin in cognitive involvement in dizzy, old subjects due to the functional correlations between circadian rhythms, cerebellum balance disturbances and cognitive disorders. General conclusions are: FRI correlates with falling risk. Posturography identifies specific vestibular impairments correlated to balance disorders and elderly falls. Spatial orientation is altered in

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF LINEAR DYNAMIC SYSTEMS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTROL SYSTEMS , LINEAR SYSTEMS ), (*LINEAR SYSTEMS , IDENTIFICATION ), REAL TIME, MONTE CARLO METHOD, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, SERIES(MATHEMATICS), STOCHASTIC PROCESSES, MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION, OPTIMIZATION, STABILITY

  10. Nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the axolotl vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Soto, E; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed using intracellular and multiunit extracellular recording techniques in order to characterize the role of nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the vestibular system of the axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Bath application of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (0.01microM to 10microM) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (0.1microM to 1000microM) elicited a dose-dependent decrease in the basal discharge of the semicircular canal afferent fibers. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine also diminished the response to mechanical stimuli. Moreover, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (1microM) produced a hyperpolarization associated with a decrease in the spike discharge and diminished the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials on afferent fibers recorded intracellularly. Nitric oxide donors were also tested: (i) S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (0.1microM to 100microM) increased the basal discharge and the response to mechanical stimuli. At the maximum effective concentration (100microM) this drug affected neither the amplitude nor the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials. However, it slightly depolarized the afferent neurons and decreased their input resistance. (ii) 3-Morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride did not significantly affect the basal discharge or the mechanically evoked peak response of afferent neurons at any of the concentrations used (1microM to 1000microM). However, after 10min of perfusion in the bath, 1microM and 10microM 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride significantly modified the baseline of the mechanically evoked response, producing an increase in the mean spike discharge of the afferent fibers. These results indicate that nitric oxide may have a facilitatory role on the basal discharge and on the response to mechanical stimuli of the vestibular afferent fibers. Thus, nitric oxide probably participates in the sensory coding and adaptative changes of vestibular input in

  11. Vestibular stimulation-induced facilitation of cervical premotoneuronal systems in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Shun; Ariyasu, Ryohei; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Ohki, Yukari

    2017-01-01

    It is unclear how descending inputs from the vestibular system affect the excitability of cervical interneurons in humans. To elucidate this, we investigated the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on the spatial facilitation of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by combined pyramidal tract and peripheral nerve stimulation. To assess the spatial facilitation, electromyograms were recorded from the biceps brachii muscles (BB) of healthy subjects. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the contralateral primary motor cortex and electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral ulnar nerve at the wrist were delivered either separately or together, with interstimulus intervals of 10 ms (TMS behind). Anodal/cathodal GVS was randomly delivered with TMS and/or ulnar nerve stimulation. The combination of TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation facilitated BB MEPs significantly more than the algebraic summation of responses induced separately by TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation (i.e., spatial facilitation). MEP facilitation significantly increased when combined stimulation was delivered with GVS (p < 0.01). No significant differences were found between anodal and cathodal GVS. Furthermore, single motor unit recordings showed that the short-latency excitatory peak in peri-stimulus time histograms during combined stimulation increased significantly with GVS. The spatial facilitatory effects of combined stimulation with short interstimulus intervals (i.e., 10 ms) indicate that facilitation occurred at the premotoneuronal level in the cervical cord. The present findings therefore suggest that GVS facilitates the cervical interneuron system that integrates inputs from the pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves and excites motoneurons innervating the arm muscles. PMID:28388686

  12. The dizzy patient: don't forget disorders of the central vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common complaints in neurology clinics, and they account for about 13% of the patients entering emergency units. In this Review, we focus on central vestibular disorders, which are mostly attributable to acute unilateral lesions of the bilateral vestibular circuitry in the brain. In a tertiary interdisciplinary outpatient dizziness unit, central vestibular disorders, including vestibular migraine, comprise about 25% of the established diagnoses. The signs and symptoms of these disorders can mimic those of peripheral vestibular disorders with sustained rotational vertigo. Bedside examinations, such as the head impulse test and ocular motor testing to determine spontaneous and gaze-evoked nystagmus or skew deviation, reliably differentiate central from peripheral syndromes. We also consider disorders of 'higher vestibular functions', which involve more than one sensory modality as well as cognitive domains (for example, orientation, spatial memory and navigation). These disorders include hemispatial neglect, the room tilt illusion, pusher syndrome, and impairment of spatial memory and navigation associated with hippocampal atrophy in cases of peripheral bilateral vestibular loss.

  13. Vestibular compensation following vestibular neurotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devèze, A; Montava, M; Lopez, C; Lacour, M; Magnan, J; Borel, L

    2015-09-01

    Four studies assessing vestibular compensation in Menière's disease patients undergoing unilateral vestibular neurotomy, using different analysis methods, are reviewed, with a focus on the different strategies used by patients according to their preoperative sensory preference. Four prospective studies performed in a university tertiary referral center were reviewed, measuring the pattern of vestibular compensation in Menière's disease patients before and after unilateral vestibular neurotomy on various assessment protocols: postural syndrome assessed on static posturography and gait analysis; perceptual syndrome assessed on subjective visual vertical perception; and oculomotor syndrome assessed on ocular cyclotorsion. Vestibular compensation occurred at variable intervals depending on the parameter investigated. Open-eye postural control and gait/walking returned to normal one month after neurotomy. Fine balance analysis found that visual perception of the vertical and ocular cyclotorsion impairment persisted at long-term follow-up. Clinical postural disturbance persisted only when visual afferents were cut off (eyes closed). These impairments were the expression of a postoperative change in postural strategy related to the new use of visual and non-visual references. Understanding pre-operative interindividual variation in balance strategy is critical to screening for postural instability and tailoring vestibular rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Aseyev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored.

  15. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseyev, Nikolay; Vinarskaya, Alia Kh; Roshchin, Matvey; Korshunova, Tatiana A; Malyshev, Aleksey Yu; Zuzina, Alena B; Ierusalimsky, Victor N; Lemak, Maria S; Zakharov, Igor S; Novikov, Ivan A; Kolosov, Peter; Chesnokova, Ekaterina; Volkova, Svetlana; Kasianov, Artem; Uroshlev, Leonid; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard D; Balaban, Pavel M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored.

  16. Maternal susceptibility to nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: is the vestibular system involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    2002-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy shares many characteristics with motion sickness, a vestibular dependent phenomenon. A number of physiologic changes that occur in normal pregnancy are also known to accompany nausea and vomiting in patients with motion sickness and certain vestibular disorders. This chapter summarizes some shared features of both phenomena. The unmasking of subclinical vestibular disorders may account for some cases of hyperemesis gravidarum. Hormonal effects on neurotransmitter function may also play a role in nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and in some vestibular disorders; however, the specific neural mechanisms of nausea and vomiting have not been identified. Until the neurochemical processes underlying these phenomena are understood, prevention and management will remain in the domain of astute, but so far limited, clinical observation.

  17. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eHitier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the vestibular cortical projections areas, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: 1 the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; 2 the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of the head direction; 3 the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and 4 a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex, which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition.

  18. Localisation of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP-pathway in the vestibular system of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A; Bloch, W; Su, J; Stennert, E; Addicks, K; Michel, O

    1998-07-31

    The exact distribution of nitric oxide-synthases (NOS) in the vestibular system has not been described satisfying yet. Immunostaining, using specific antibodies to the three known NOS-isoforms, to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC), the second messenger system of nitric oxide (NO), was performed on paraffin sections of temporal bone from guinea pigs. eNOS could be detected in vestibular ganglion cells and in nerve fibres, including the calyces, surrounding the type 1 hair cells (HC). bNOS was found in the sensory epithelium, ganglion cells and in bone, while iNOS could not be found. NOS-detection was accompanied by reactivity to sGC and to cGMP. This finding implies that b- and eNOS-generated NO is involved in regulative processes in neurotransmission and regulation of blood flow.

  19. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The frog vestibular system as a model for lesion-induced plasticity: basic neural principles and implications for posture control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois M Lambert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the CNS to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the central nervous system include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims towards a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of

  1. Transforming the vestibular system one molecule at a time: the molecular and developmental basis of vertebrate auditory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeremy S; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    We review the molecular basis of auditory development and evolution. We propose that the auditory periphery (basilar papilla, organ of Corti) evolved by transforming a newly created and redundant vestibular (gravistatic) endorgan into a sensory epithelium that could respond to sound instead of gravity. Evolution altered this new epithelia's mechanoreceptive properties through changes of hair cells, positioned the epithelium in a unique position near perilymphatic space to extract sound moving between the round and the oval window, and transformed its otolith covering into a tympanic membrane. Another important step in the evolution of an auditory system was the evolution of a unique set of "auditory neurons" that apparently evolved from vestibular neurons. Evolution of mammalian auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons coincides with GATA3 being a transcription factor found selectively in the auditory afferents. For the auditory information to be processed, the CNS required a dedicated center for auditory processing, the auditory nuclei. It is not known whether the auditory nucleus is ontogenetically related to the vestibular or electroreceptive nuclei, two sensory systems found in aquatic but not in amniotic vertebrates, or a de-novo formation of the rhombic lip in line with other novel hindbrain structures such as pontine nuclei. Like other novel hindbrain structures, the auditory nuclei express exclusively the bHLH gene Atoh1, and loss of Atoh1 results in loss of most of this nucleus in mice. Only after the basilar papilla, organ of Corti evolved could efferent neurons begin to modulate their activity. These auditory efferents most likely evolved from vestibular efferent neurons already present. The most simplistic interpretation of available data suggest that the ear, sensory neurons, auditory nucleus, and efferent neurons have been transformed by altering the developmental genetic modules necessary for their development into a novel direction conducive for sound

  2. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Machine learning-based assessment tool for imbalance and vestibular dysfunction with virtual reality rehabilitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Huang, Ming-Chun; Wang, Pa-Chun; Fang, Te-Yung; Su, Mu-Chun; Tsai, Po-Yi; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Dizziness is a major consequence of imbalance and vestibular dysfunction. Compared to surgery and drug treatments, balance training is non-invasive and more desired. However, training exercises are usually tedious and the assessment tool is insufficient to diagnose patient's severity rapidly. An interactive virtual reality (VR) game-based rehabilitation program that adopted Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, and a sensor-based measuring system were introduced. To verify the therapeutic effect, a clinical experiment with 48 patients and 36 normal subjects was conducted. Quantified balance indices were measured and analyzed by statistical tools and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. In terms of balance indices, patients who completed the training process are progressed and the difference between normal subjects and patients is obvious. Further analysis by SVM classifier show that the accuracy of recognizing the differences between patients and normal subject is feasible, and these results can be used to evaluate patients' severity and make rapid assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vestibular Contributions to Human Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Laura; N/A,

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system is an ancient structure which supports the detection and control of self-motion. The pervasiveness of this sensory system is evidenced by the diversity of its anatomical projections and the profound impact it has on a range of higher level functions, particularly spatial memory. The aim of this thesis was to better characterise the association between the vestibular system and human memory; while many studies have explored this association from a biological perspective f...

  5. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eSmith; Cynthia eDarlington

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflex...

  6. The vestibular contribution to the head direction signal and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction (HD) cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on HD cells. We also examine the vestibular system's role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers.

  7. [Vestibular influences on human locomotion: results obtained using galvanic vestibular stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbkov, Iu K; Gerasimenko, Iu P

    2014-06-01

    Locomotion is the most important mode of our movement in space. The role of the vestibular system during human locomotion is not well studied, mainly due to problems associated with its isolation stimulation. It is difficult to stimulate this system in isolation during locomotion because the real movement of the head to activate the vestibular end-organs inevitably leads to the activation of other sensory inputs. Galvanic stimulation is not a natural way to stimulate the vestibular system, but it has the advantage providing an isolated stimulation of the vestibular inputs. This technique is relatively novel in the examination of vestibular contributions during human locomotion. In our review we consider the current data regarding the effect of vestibular signals on human locomotion by using galvanic vestibular stimulation.

  8. Sensitivity of Auditory and Vestibular Systems to Stimuli Other Than Sound and Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    obvious vestibular responses were induced by application of a physiotherapy vibrator to regions of the skull. With such treatments visual and postural...radiation by ♦he mammalian vestibulocochlear apparatus. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sei. 247: 182-193. Mason. R.K. 1968. Asthma and the h gh frequency

  9. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years. They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%, hearing difficulties (47.3%, dizziness (36.8%, headache (26.3%, intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%, and earache (15.7%. Seven musicians (37.0% showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%. There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  10. Vestibular findings in military band musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-04-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  11. Perspectives on aging vestibular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eAnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about age related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities like standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multi-sensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multi-sensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  12. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2015-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  13. System Identification with Quantized Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Le Yi; Zhang, Jifeng; Zhao, Yanlong

    2010-01-01

    This book presents recently developed methodologies that utilize quantized information in system identification and explores their potential in extending control capabilities for systems with limited sensor information or networked systems. The results of these methodologies can be applied to signal processing and control design of communication and computer networks, sensor networks, mobile agents, coordinated data fusion, remote sensing, telemedicine, and other fields in which noise-corrupted quantized data need to be processed. Providing a comprehensive coverage of quantized identification,

  14. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2013-10-29

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalization and derealization symptoms such as feeling "spaced out", "body feeling strange" and "not feeling in control of self". We propose in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ).

  15. Personality Changes in Patients with Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalisation and derealisation symptoms such as feeling ‘spaced out’, ‘body feeling strange’ and ‘not feeling in control of self’. We suggest in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through the information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction.

  16. Mechanisms of vestibular compensation: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutia, Mayank B

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews recent studies that have provided experimental evidence for mechanisms of neural and synaptic plasticity in the brain during vestibular compensation, the behavioural recovery that takes place following peripheral vestibular lesions. First, experimental evidence from animal studies indicates that an unbalanced vestibular commissural system is a fundamental cause of the syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Second, recent studies suggest the involvement of both GABAergic and glycinergic commissural neurons. In addition gliosis and reactive neurogenesis in the ipsilesional vestibular nuclei appear to be involved in compensation. Third, evidence from cerebellar-deficient mutant mice demonstrates an important role for cerebellum-dependent motor learning in the longer term. Factors such as stress steroids and neuromodulators such as histamine influence these plasticity mechanisms and may thus contribute to the development of compensation in patients. Vestibular compensation involves multiple, parallel plastic processes at various sites in the brain. Experimental evidence suggests that adaptive changes in the sensitivity of ipsilesional vestibular neurons to the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine, changes in the electrophysiological excitability of vestibular neurons, changes in the inhibitory control of the brainstem vestibular networks by the cerebellum, gliosis and neurogenesis in the ipsilesional vestibular nuclei, and activity-dependent reorganization of the synaptic connectivity of the vestibular pathways are mechanisms involved in compensation.

  17. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, H C; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-07-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control, which is characterized by a retarded EMG development in postural muscles. Our results indicate that the developing nervous system cannot compensate for a vestibular deficit during the early phase of ontogeny.

  18. Vestibular insights into cognition and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvich, Caroline; Maller, Jerome J; Lithgow, Brian; Haghgooie, Saman; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2013-11-06

    The vestibular system has traditionally been thought of as a balance apparatus; however, accumulating research suggests an association between vestibular function and psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, even when balance is measurably unaffected. There are several brain regions that are implicated in both vestibular pathways and psychiatric disorders. The present review examines the anatomical associations between the vestibular system and various psychiatric disorders. Despite the lack of direct evidence for vestibular pathology in the key psychiatric disorders selected for this review, there is a substantial body of literature implicating the vestibular system in each of the selected psychiatric disorders. The second part of this review provides complimentary evidence showing the link between vestibular dysfunction and vestibular stimulation upon cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. In summary, emerging research suggests the vestibular system can be considered a potential window for exploring brain function beyond that of maintenance of balance, and into areas of cognitive, affective and psychiatric symptomology. Given the paucity of biological and diagnostic markers in psychiatry, novel avenues to explore brain function in psychiatric disorders are of particular interest and warrant further exploration. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical therapy for persons with vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Susan L; Alghwiri, Alia; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    Persons with vestibular disorders experience symptoms of dizziness and balance dysfunction, resulting in falls, as well as impairments of daily life. Various interventions provided by physical therapists have been shown to decrease dizziness and improve postural control. In the present review, we will focus on the role of physical therapy in the management of vestibular symptoms in patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Persons with both acute and chronic central and peripheral vestibular disorders improve with vestibular rehabilitation. New interventions during the past 5 years have been designed to enhance recovery from problems with balance and dizziness. Examples include the use of virtual reality, vibrotactile feedback, optokinetic flow, YouTube videos, and innovative methods to change the gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Patients with central and peripheral vestibular disorders benefit from physical therapy interventions. Advances in physical therapy interventions include new methods to stimulate adaptation of the VOR and the vestibulospinal systems.

  20. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Identification systems. 1542.211 Section 1542.211... systems. (a) Personnel identification system. The personnel identification system under §§ 1542.201(b)(3... identification media stock and supplies. (iv) Auditing the system at a minimum of once a year or sooner, as...

  1. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have impaired balance function: involvement of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Selina B M; Pang, Marco Y C

    2009-08-01

    To compare standing balance performance and sensory organization of balance control in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (combined type) (ADHD-C) and typically developing children. School-aged children (n = 43) with ADHD-C and 50 age- and sex-matched typically developing children participated in the study. Sensory organization of standing balance was evaluated using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). In addition to the composite equilibrium score, somatosensory, vestibular, and visual ratios, which were indicators of the ability of the child to use information from the respective sensory systems to maintain balance, were computed. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups while controlling for physical activity level. MANCOVA revealed that children with ADHD-C had significantly lower composite equilibrium scores (P visual ratios (P = .001) than control children, by 10.3%, 2.1%, 15.6%, and 16.0%, respectively. Children with ADHD-C had significant deficits in standing balance performance in all conditions that included a disruption of sensory signals. The visual system tends to be more involved in contributing to the balance deficits in children with ADHD-C than the somatosensory and vestibular systems.

  2. Vestibular findings in fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM is a non-inflammatory musculoskeletal chronic syndrome, whose etiology is unknown, characterized by a diffuse pain, increase in palpation sensitivity and such symptoms as tiredness, insomnia, anxiety, depression, cold intolerance and otologic complaints. Objective: Evaluate the vestibular behavior in fibromyalgia patients. Method: A retrospective transversal study was performed. 25 patients aged between 26 and 65 (average age - 52.2 and standard deviation - 10.3 were evaluated and submitted to the following procedures: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngologic and vestibular evaluation by way of vector electronystamography. Results: a The most evident otoneurologic symptoms were: difficulty or pain when moving the neck and pain was spread to an arm or shoulder (92.0% in each, dizziness (84.0% and headache (76.0%. The different clinical symptoms mostly reported were: depression (80.0%, anxiety (76.0% and insomnia (72.0%; b vestibular examination showed an alteration in 12 patients (48.0% in the caloric test; c an alteration in the peripheral vestibular system prevailed, and d deficient peripheral vestibular disorders were prevalent. Conclusion: This study enabled the importance of the labyrinthic test to be verified, thus emphasizing that this kind of people must be studied better, since a range of rheumatologic diseases can cause severe vestibular changes as a result of their manifestations and impairment areas.

  3. Parameter identification in distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruh, H.; Meirovitch, L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the identification of the parameters entering into the equations of motion of distributed systems. Because the motion of distributed systems is described in terms of partial differential equations, these parameters are in general continuous functions of the spatial variables. For vibrating systems, these parameters ordinarily represent the mass, stiffness and damping distributions. In this paper, these distributions are expanded in terms of finite series of known functions of the spatial variables multiplied by undetermined coefficients. It is assumed that the nature of the equations of motion is known and that a limited number of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions is identified in advance. Use is then made of the least squares method, in conjunction with the eigenfunctions' orthogonality, to compute the undetermined coefficients, thus identifying the system distributed parameters. A method for the identification of the eigensolution is also presented. The procedure for the identification of the eigensolution and of the system parameters is demonstrated via a numerical example.

  4. International Clinical Protocol on Vestibular Disorders (Dizziness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinus, Kostiantyn; Claussen, Claus-Frenz

    2017-12-01

    26-28 May at 43 Congress of Neurootological and Equilibriometric Society (Budapest, Hungary) International Clinical Protocol on Vestibular Disorders (Dizziness) being discussed and accepted as Consensus Document. Cochrane reports estimates that dizziness has prevalence of 22.9% in the last 12 months and an incidence of 3.1%. Only 1.8% of adults consulted a physician in the last 12 months. Cochrane reviews suggest that the evidence base for dizziness evaluation is weak, thus necessitates the creation of evidence-based document. Protocol is based at the new concept of vestibular system, which involves the vestibular peripheral sensors, space orientation tetrad, vestibular presentations in the brain cortex and vestibular effectory projections in the brain. Labyrinth consists of sensors, for which six modalities are adequate: 1. acceleration, 2. gravitation, 3. low frequency whole-body vibration, 4. Infrasound, 5. magnetic impulse, 6. metabolic changes. Vestibular system from rhomboid fosse gets the inputs from visual, acoustic, somatosensory organs, integrating them and forming space perception and orientation. Interaction with space is realized through sensory, motor, vegetative and limbic projections. So, vestibular disturbances may manifest as paropsia, tinnitus, numbness. Vestibular evoked potentials (not VEMP) and craniocorpography have highest sensitivity (90% and more). As vestibular dysfunction has recurrent character patients need monitoring.

  5. Structure Errors in System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, G. A.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    An approach to system identification is presented which explicitly takes structure errors into account and hence provides a systematic way for answering questions concerning the magnitude of estimated parameter errors resulting from structural errors. It is indicated that, from this point of view, it is possible to define near equivalence between process and model and to obtain meaningful theoretical results on solution error system identification. It remains to apply these results to large realistic problems such as those involving models of complex man machine systems.

  6. Vestibular perception is slow: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Cowan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multisensory stimuli originating from the same event can be perceived asynchronously due to differential physical and neural delays. The transduction of and physiological responses to vestibular stimulation are extremely fast, suggesting that other stimuli need to be presented prior to vestibular stimulation in order to be perceived as simultaneous. There is, however, a recent and growing body of evidence which indicates that the perceived onset of vestibular stimulation is slow compared to the other senses, such that vestibular stimuli need to be presented prior to other sensory stimuli in order to be perceived synchronously. From a review of this literature it is speculated that this perceived latency of vestibular stimulation may reflect the fact that vestibular stimulation is most often associated with sensory events that occur following head movement, that the vestibular system rarely works alone, that additional computations are required for processing vestibular information, and that the brain prioritizes physiological response to vestibular stimulation over perceptual awareness of stimulation onset. Empirical investigation of these theoretical predictions is encouraged in order to fully understand this surprising result, its implications, and to advance the field.

  7. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eSmith; Yiwen eZheng

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, espe...

  8. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  9. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Gunter P Siegmund; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwid...

  10. A review of the interrelationship between vestibular dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problems and dyslexia were also associated with dysfunction of the vestibular system. Different tests evaluating vestibular loss were identified of which some can be used successfully by practitionars. Various programmes and activities were identified to successfully rehabilitate vestibular function. For better understanding ...

  11. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  12. Extending the Functional Cerebral Systems Theory of Emotion to the Vestibular Modality: A Systematic and Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Joseph E.; Holland, Alissa K.; Harrison, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout history, vestibular and emotional dysregulation have often manifested together in clinical settings, with little consideration that they may have a common basis. Regarding vestibular mechanisms, the role of brainstem and cerebellar structures has been emphasized in the neurological literature, whereas emotion processing in the cerebral…

  13. In vitro release kinetics of gentamycin from a sodium hyaluronate gel delivery system suitable for the treatment of peripheral vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R M; Meyer, J D; Matsuura, J E; Shefter, E; Hart, M J; Malone, D J; Manning, M C

    1999-01-01

    For certain patients who experience intense vertigo arising from unilateral vestibular lesions, the primary therapy is a vestibular nerve section, an intracranial surgical procedure. One alternative to this treatment is therapeutic ablation of vestibular function on the unaffected side using an ototoxic agent. We prepared a biodegradable sustained-release gel delivery system using sodium hyaluronate that can be administered into the middle ear using only a local anesthetic. The gel contains gentamycin sulfate, the ototoxic agent of choice for treatment of unilateral vestibulopathy, and it exhibits diffusion-controlled release of the drug over a period of hours. The released gentamycin could then diffuse into the inner ear through the round membrane. This represents an important advance over previous formulations, which used only gentamycin sulfate solutions, in that it should allow more careful control of the dose, it should reduce loss of the drug from the middle ear site, and it should maintain intimate contact with the round membrane. By carefully controlling the dose, it should be possible to inhibit vestibular function while minimizing hearing loss. Herein we describe the in vitro release kinetics of gentamycin sulfate from sodium hyaluronate gels and find that the system obeys Fickian behavior.

  14. System Identification and Robust Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, S.

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a coherent system identification based robust control design methodology by combining recent results from system identification and robust control. In order to accomplish this task new theoretical results will be given in both fields. Firstly, however......, an introduction to modern robust control design analysis and synthesis will be given. It will be shown how the classical frequency domain techniques can be extended to multivariable systems using the singular value decomposition. An introduction to norms and spaces frequently used in modern control theory......, a non-trivial problem which to some extent has been neglected by the theoreticians of robust control. An uncertainty specification has simply been assumed given. One way of obtaining a perturbation model is by physical modelling. Application if the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, mechanics, physics...

  15. Vestibular implants studied in animal models: clinical and scientific implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F

    2016-12-01

    Damage to the peripheral vestibular system can result in debilitating postural, perceptual, and visual symptoms. A potential new treatment for this clinical problem is to replace some aspects of peripheral vestibular function with an implant that senses head motion and provides this information to the brain by stimulating branches of the vestibular nerve. In this review I consider animal studies performed at our institution over the past 15 years, which have helped elucidate how the brain processes information provided by a vestibular (semicircular canal) implant and how this information could be used to improve the problems experienced by patients with peripheral vestibular damage. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. System parameter identification information criteria and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Badong; Hu, Jinchun; Principe, Jose C

    2013-01-01

    Recently, criterion functions based on information theoretic measures (entropy, mutual information, information divergence) have attracted attention and become an emerging area of study in signal processing and system identification domain. This book presents a systematic framework for system identification and information processing, investigating system identification from an information theory point of view. The book is divided into six chapters, which cover the information needed to understand the theory and application of system parameter identification. The authors' research pr

  17. Identification of material flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, G; Deistler, M; Gleiss, A; Glenck, E; Matyus, T

    1997-01-01

    Material Flow Analysis (MFA) has become an important instrument in environmental science and pollution research. In this paper, we look at the MFA problem as a particularly structured system identification problem. Special emphasis is given to the linear, static case, where we describe a procedure for reconciliating the flow measurements and for estimating the unmeasured flows and the transfer coefficients by taking into account a priori restrictions such as balance equations.

  18. Vestibular Restoration and Adaptation in Vestibular Neuritis and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome With Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Rueda, Almudena; Esteban-Sanchez, Jonathan; Yanes, Joaquin; Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Sanz-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate vestibular restoration and the evolution of the compensatory saccades in acute severe inflammatory vestibular nerve paralysis, including vestibular neuritis and Ramsay Hunt syndrome with vertigo. Prospective. Tertiary referral center. Vestibular neuritis (n = 18) and Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients with vertigo (n = 13) were enrolled. After treatment with oral corticosteroids, patients were followed up for 6 months. Functional recovery of the facial nerve was scored according to the House-Brackman grading system. Caloric and video head impulse tests were performed in every patient at the time of enrolment. Subsequently, successive video head impulse test (vHIT) exploration was performed at the 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up. Eighteen patients with vestibular neuritis and 13 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and associated vertigo were included. Vestibular function was significantly worse in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome than in those with vestibular neuritis. Similar compensatory saccades velocity and latency values were observed in both groups, in both the caloric and initial vHIT tests. Successive vHIT results showed a significantly higher vestibulo-ocular reflex gain recovery in vestibular neuritis patients than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. A significantly faster reduction in the latency, velocity, and organization of the compensatory saccades was observed in neuritis than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. In addition to the recovery of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the reduction of latency, velocity and the organization of compensatory saccades play a role in vestibular compensation.

  19. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarise the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, can modulate cognitive function.

  20. From ear to uncertainty: vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2013-11-26

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), can modulate cognitive function.

  1. Receptors of glutamate and neurotrophin in vestibular neuronal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y S; Chen, L W; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Yung, K K L; Zhang, F X

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed advances in understanding the roles of receptors of neurotrophin and glutamate in the vestibular system. In the first section of this review, the biological actions of neurotrophins and their receptors in the peripheral and central vestibular systems are summarized. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of neurotrophins in developmental plasticity and in the maintenance of vestibular function in the adult animal. This is reviewed in relation to the developmental expression pattern of neurotrophins and their receptors within the vestibular nuclei. The second part is focused on the functional role of different glutamate receptors on central vestibular neurons. The developmental expression pattern of glutamate receptor subunits within the vestibular nuclei is reviewed in relation to the potential role of glutamate receptors in regulating the development of vestibular function. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Automatic Identification System (AIS) User Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Identification System (AIS) User Requirements December 2000 Final Report This document is available to the U.S. public through...Report Type Final Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Automatic Identification System (AIS) User Requirements Contract Number Grant...The original document contains color images. Abstract Automatic Identification System (AIS) is a new technology that should improve situational

  3. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  4. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  5. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D E; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders.

  6. Interactions between stress and vestibular compensation – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yougan eSaman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function, and plasticity have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders.

  7. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  8. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  9. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  10. Recovery of vestibular ocular reflex function and balance control after a unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eAllum

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD on balance control as observed in stance and gait tests. Normally, a UPVD is defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR function. Therefore, we compare recovery observed in balance control over time with similar patterns of recovery or lack thereof in VOR function. Three types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis, vestibular loss prior to and after cerebellar pontine angle tumor (CPAT surgery during which a vestibular neurectomy was performed, and vestibular loss following neurectomy to eliminate disabling Ménière’s disease.To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes, mounted near the body’s centre of mass, were used for stance and gait tests. Measurement variables were the pitch (anterior-posterior and roll (lateral sway angles and angular velocities of the lower trunk-pelvis. All three groups showed balance deficits during stance tasks on foam, especially with eyes closed when stable control is highly dependent on vestibular inputs. Deficits in balance control during gait were present but were more profound for complex gait tasks such as tandem gait. Differences emerged between the groups concerning the severity of the deficit and its recovery. Generally, the effects of acute neuritis were more severe but recovered rapidly, deficits due to vestibular neurectomy were less severe but longer lasting. These results paralleled deficits in VOR function and raise questions about two modes of neural plasticity occurring in the vestibular system following vestibular loss: one mode being the limited central compensation for the loss, and the second mode being some restoration of peripheral vestibular function. Future work will need to correlate deficits in balance control during stance and gait more exactly with VOR deficits and carefully consider the differences between insufficient central compensation compared to inadequate peripheral

  11. Microgravity in the STS-29 space shuttle discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D.; Jones, T.; Vellinger, J.; Deuser, M.; Hester, P.; Hullinger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Out of 32 embryos flown (16 @ E2 + 16 @ E9) for 5 days, 16 survived. All sixteen E2 were dead at landing. Eight were opened and eight were incubated at 1.0G. Autopsy showed that 4 E2 survived over 24 hours in space. Eight E14 hatched without anatomical malformations, and 8 E14 were fixed. The height of the macular epithelia was 31 mu m (mean) in control and 26 mu m in flight chicks. The cross-sectional area of macular nuclei of control was 17 mu m(2) for hair cells and 14 mu m(2) in supporting cells. In flight, cross-sectional area was 17 mu m(2) in hair cells and 15 mu m(2) in supporting cells (n=250). The shape factor of cartilage cells (1.0 = perfect circle) between control (mean = 0.70) and flight (mean = 0.72), and the area of cartilaginous cells between controls (mean = 9 mu m(2)) and flight (mean = 9 mu m(2)) did not differ (n=300). The nuclei of support cells were closer to the basement membrane in flight than in control chicks. The immunoreactivity of otoconia with anti keratan, fibronectin or chrondroitin sulfate was not different between flight and control ears. There were more afferent fibers inside the macular epithelia of flight (p<0.05) than control. Three of 8 flight animals had elevated vestibular thresholds (VT), with normal mean response amplitudes and latencies. Modified afferent innervation patterns requiring weeks to compensate are sufficient to elevate VT, and should be investigated further. Other reversible (sublethal) microgravity effects on sensory epithelia (vacuoles, swelling, etc) require quantification.

  12. Personal identification credential system (PICS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Jackson R.; Cantrell, Thomas; Page, Lochlin; Cudlitz, Stephen; Higgins, Roy

    2005-03-01

    A pilot Personal Identification Credential System (PICS) has been developed and fielded. The PICS is a wireless biometric credential that interfaces with access control systems. The PICS consists of individual handheld Personal Identification Credentials (PIC), a PICS Reader located at a facility entry control point that interfaces with the facility entry control system, and a PICS Enrollment Station. In operation, an individual approaching a facility entry point in a vehicle picks up the PIC handheld unit and places a finger on its sensor. The PIC then authenticates the user and from within the vehicle initiates two-way, secure RF communication with the PICS Reader as the vehicle approaches the gate. The PICS Reader then verifies that the individual is authorized for admittance and notifies the facility gate entry control system, which informs the sentry that the request for access was successful or unsuccessful. If the request for access is unsuccessful, the gate entry control system automatically will close the gate. This sequence of events takes place while the car is moving through a normally open entry lane. The PIC is a small, handheld device which contains the biometric sensor (fingerprint sensor), wireless RF transceiver, processor, encryption and battery. The PIC may be used while traveling in a vehicle or may be used while on foot for access to a PICS controlled man gate or secure area access portal. The PIC is small enough to be carried in a shirt pocket, or it can be left in the user's vehicle. The PIC battery will power the PIC for months and is rechargeable. Up to 10 fingers may be stored in the PIC.

  13. Automated frequency domain system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Robert N.

    1996-05-01

    A major difficulty in designing active controllers for structural systems is the lack of mathematical models with high enough fidelity for effective control design. In order to generate models appropriate for active control design, it is often necessary to compute models directly from test data via system identification methods. Active Control eXperts (ACX), Inc. has developed two solutions to this problem. The first consists of an interactive, menu-driven program run from the Matlab computing environment. This software package, Smart IDTM, generates state space models from transfer function data using a combination of model synthesis, non-linear curve fitting, model reduction and model augmentation techniques. The second solution, and the focus of this paper, takes the Smart ID program a step farther. For large multivariable systems, it can be tedious to construct models in the interactive fashion dictated by the structure of the Smart ID program. Furthermore, in automated system ID/control design strategies, it is vital to have a system ID program that requires no user input. ACX has developed a fully automated version of the Smart ID program. This work discusses the steering logic and functionality of the program and presents system ID results using this program on several representative systems.

  14. Common Vestibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G

    2017-01-01

    The three most common vestibular diseases, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease (MD) and vestibular neuritis (VN), are presented in this paper. BPPV, which is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder, can be defined as transient vertigo induced by a rapid head position change, associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. Canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal is considered the most convincing theory of its pathogenesis and the ...

  15. Mastering system identification in 100 exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Schoukens, J; Rolain, Yves

    2012-01-01

    "This book enables readers to understand system identification and linear system modeling through 100 practical exercises without requiring complex theoretical knowledge. The contents encompass state-of-the-art system identification methods, with both time and frequency domain system identification methods covered, including the pros and cons of each. Each chapter features MATLAB exercises, discussions of the exercises, accompanying MATLAB downloads, and larger projects that serve as potential assignments in this learn-by-doing resource"--

  16. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  17. Static and dynamic body balance following provocation of the visual and vestibular systems in females with and without joint hypermobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridou, Katerina; Mandalidis, Dimitris; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Vagenas, George; Athanasopoulos, Spyros

    2014-04-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by excessive joint movement, musculoskeletal pain and neurophysiological deficits (i.e. decreased proprioceptive acuity, altered neuromuscular reflexes). Such deficits may affect body balance thus increasing the risk of injury. The present study aimed at examining static and dynamic body balance following challenge of the visual and vestibular systems in individuals with JHS. The sample consisted of 21 females with JHS and 20 controls without signs of JHS. Static body balance was assessed by the degree of anteroposterior and mediolateral deviation of the center of pressure, during 20-sec single-leg stances with eyes opened (EO), eyes closed (EC) and eyes opened with head extension (EO-HE) using a foot pressure platform. Dynamic body balance was assessed by the number of landing and balance errors committed during a multiple single-leg-hop-stabilization test. Nonparametric analysis showed that the JHS-group demonstrated significantly greater (a) mediolateral deviation during single-leg-stance with EO (p static balance following challenge of the vestibular system may be justified by vestibular deficiency and/or insufficient proprioceptive capabilities of the neck. Impairments of dynamic balance in individuals with JHS may be attributed to proprioceptive deficits, which can alter feedforward and feedback mechanisms. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-09-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.

  19. Machine Intelligence and Threat Identification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    COPY WRDC-TR-90-1076 MACHINE INTELLIGENCE AND THREAT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS Thomas Sudkamp M.B. Clausing Valerie Cross ID Department of Computer...and Threat Identification Systems 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sudkamp, Thomas Clausing, M.B. Cross, Valerie 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Applications include diagnostic expert systems , decision analysis, and identification problems. The motivating application of this project is the

  20. Culture media-based selection of endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes from the young mouse vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Cai, Jing; Hou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaohan; Kachelmeier, Allan; Shi, Xiaorui

    2017-03-01

    The vestibular blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) is comprised of perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms) and pericytes (PCs), in addition to endothelial cells (ECs) and basement membrane (BM), and bears strong resemblance to the cochlear BLB in the stria vascularis. Over the past few decades, in vitro cell-based models have been widely used in blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retina barrier (BRB) research, and have proved to be powerful tools for studying cell-cell interactions in their respective organs. Study of both the vestibular and strial BLB has been limited by the unavailability of primary culture cells from these barriers. To better understand how barrier component cells interact in the vestibular system to control BLB function, we developed a novel culture medium-based method for obtaining EC, PC, and PVM/M primary cells from tiny explants of the semicircular canal, sacculus, utriculus, and ampullae tissue of young mouse ears at post-natal age 8-12 d. Each phenotype is grown in a specific culture medium which selectively supports the phenotype in a mixed population of vestibular cell types. The unwanted phenotypes do not survive passaging. The protocol does not require additional equipment or special enzyme treatment. The harvesting process takes less than 2 h. Primary cell types are generated within 7-10 d. The primary culture ECs, PCs, and PVM/M shave consistent phenotypes more than 90% pure after two passages (∼ 3 weeks). The highly purified primary cell lines can be used for studying cell-cell interactions, barrier permeability, and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Model Updating Nonlinear System Identification Toolbox Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology (ZONA) proposes to develop an enhanced model updating nonlinear system identification (MUNSID) methodology that utilizes flight data with...

  2. Vestibular evaluation in children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkaila, E A; Emara, A A; Gabr, T A

    2015-04-01

    Fifty per cent of children with serous otitis media may have some balance disturbances. To evaluate vestibular function in children with otitis media with effusion. The control group comprised 25 children with bilateral normal hearing and middle-ear function. The study group consisted of 30 children with bilateral otitis media with effusion; these were divided into 2 subgroups according to air-bone gap size. Measures included the Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory, an imbalance evaluation sheet for children, vestibular bedside tests for children, and air- and bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing. Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores and some vestibular bedside test results were significantly abnormal, with normal video-nystagmography results, in children with otitis media with effusion. Air-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were recorded in 73 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion, with significantly delayed latencies. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were successfully detected in 100 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion with similar results to the control group. The Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory and vestibular bedside tests are valuable tools for detecting vestibular impairment in children. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials are useful for vestibular system evaluation.

  3. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical

  4. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Talebi; Mohammad Taghi Karimi; Seyed Hamid Reza Abtahi; Niloofar Fereshtenejad

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50 ? 7). We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of ...

  5. The Moving History of Vestibular Stimulation as a Therapeutic Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Grabherr, Luzia; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Macauda, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Although the discovery and understanding of the function of the vestibular system date back only to the 19th century, strategies that involve vestibular stimulation were used long before to calm, soothe and even cure people. While such stimulation was classically achieved with various motion devices, like Cox’s chair or Hallaran’s swing, the development of caloric and galvanic vestibular stimulation has opened up new possibilities in the 20th century. With the increasing knowledge and recogni...

  6. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system's contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  7. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  8. Identification and Damage Detection on Structural Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Palle

    1994-01-01

    A short introduction is given to system identification and damage assessment in civil engineering structures. The most commonly used FFT-based techniques for system identification are mentioned, and the Random decrement technique and parametric methods based on ARMA models are introduced. Speed...

  9. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. METHOD: This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. RESULTS: For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. CONCLUSION: Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  10. Prediction in the Vestibular Control of Arm Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, Etienne; Simoneau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of vestibular signals to motor control has been evidenced in postural, locomotor, and oculomotor studies. Here, we review studies showing that vestibular information also contributes to the control of arm movements during whole-body motion. The data reviewed suggest that vestibular information is used by the arm motor system to maintain the initial hand position or the planned hand trajectory unaltered during body motion. This requires integration of vestibular and cervical inputs to determine the trunk motion dynamics. These studies further suggest that the vestibular control of arm movement relies on rapid and efficient vestibulomotor transformations that cannot be considered automatic. We also reviewed evidence suggesting that the vestibular afferents can be used by the brain to predict and counteract body-rotation-induced torques (e.g., Coriolis) acting on the arm when reaching for a target while turning the trunk.

  11. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Forbes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3. This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz. In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  12. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  13. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rine, Rosemarie M; Schubert, Michael C; Whitney, Susan L; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S; Musolino, Mark C; Roche, Jennica L; Steed, Daniel P; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P; Shepard, Neil P; Jacobson, Gary P; Wrisley, Diane M; Hoffman, Howard J; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-03-12

    Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41-0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%-73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42-0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = -0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system.

  14. Unilateral Vestibular Loss Impairs External Space Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Liliane; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Cauvin, Pierre; Dumitrescu, Michel; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Péruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal) and far (extrapersonal) spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation), and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss. PMID:24523916

  15. Unilateral vestibular loss impairs external space representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Borel

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal and far (extrapersonal spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation, and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss.

  16. Clinical vestibular testing assessed with machine-learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesol, Adrian J; Cao, Mengfei; Brodley, Carla E; Lewis, Richard F

    2015-04-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are common clinical problems, and accurate diagnosis depends on determining whether damage is localized to the peripheral vestibular system. Vestibular testing guides this determination, but the accuracy of the different tests is not known. To determine how well each element of the vestibular test battery segregates patients with normal peripheral vestibular function from those with unilateral reductions in vestibular function. Retrospective analysis of vestibular test batteries in 8080 patients. Clinical medical records were reviewed for a subset of individuals with the reviewers blinded to the vestibular test data. A group of machine-learning classifiers were trained using vestibular test data from persons who were "manually" labeled as having normal vestibular function or unilateral vestibular damage based on a review of their medical records. The optimal trained classifier was then used to categorize patients whose diagnoses were unknown, allowing us to determine the information content of each element of the vestibular test battery. The information provided by each element of the vestibular test battery to segregate individuals with normal vestibular function from those with unilateral vestibular damage. The time constant calculated from the rotational test ranked first in information content, and measures that were related physiologically to the rotational time constant were 10 of the top 12 highest-ranked variables. The caloric canal paresis ranked eighth, and the other elements of the test battery provided minimal additional information. The sensitivity of the rotational time constant was 77.2%, and the sensitivity of the caloric canal paresis was 59.6%; the specificity of the rotational time constant was 89.0%, and the specificity of the caloric canal paresis was 64.9%. The diagnostic accuracy of the vestibular test battery increased from 72.4% to 93.4% when the data were analyzed with the optimal machine-learning classifier

  17. The effects of vestibular lesions on hippocampal function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Horii, Arata; Russell, Noah; Bilkey, David K; Zheng, Yiwen; Liu, Ping; Kerr, D Steve; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2005-04-01

    Interest in interaction between the vestibular system and the hippocampus was stimulated by evidence that peripheral vestibular lesions could impair performance in learning and memory tasks requiring spatial information processing. By the 1990s, electrophysiological data were emerging that the brainstem vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) and the hippocampus were connected polysynaptically and that hippocampal place cells could respond to vestibular stimulation. The aim of this review is to summarise and critically evaluate research published in the last 5 years that has seen major progress in understanding the effects of vestibular damage on the hippocampus. In addition to new behavioural studies demonstrating that animals with vestibular lesions exhibit impairments in spatial memory tasks, electrophysiological studies have confirmed long-latency, polysynaptic pathways between the VNC and the hippocampus. Peripheral vestibular lesions have been shown to cause long-term changes in place cell function, hippocampal EEG activity and even CA1 field potentials in brain slices maintained in vitro. During the same period, neurochemical investigations have shown that some hippocampal subregions exhibit long-term changes in the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, arginase I and II, and the NR1 and NR2A N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits following peripheral vestibular damage. Despite the progress, a number of important issues remain to be resolved, such as the possible contribution of auditory damage associated with vestibular lesions, to the hippocampal effects observed. Furthermore, although these studies demonstrate that damage to the vestibular system does have a long-term impact on the electrophysiological and neurochemical function of the hippocampus, they do not indicate precisely how vestibular information might be used in hippocampal functions such as developing spatial representations of the environment. Understanding this will require detailed

  18. Sensorintegrative dysfunction underlying vestibular disorders after traumatic brain injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Laura M. Franke, PhD; William C. Walker, MD; David X. Cifu, MD; Alfred L. Ochs, PhD; Henry L. Lew, MD, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms are persistent and problematic sequelae of blast exposure. Several lines of evidence suggest that these symptoms often stem from injury to the central nervous system. Current methods of assessing the vestibular system have described vestibular deficits that follow traumatic brain injury and differentiate blunt and blast trauma but have not examined the full range of vestibular functions that depend on the cerebral structures above the midbrain. Damage to the central vestib...

  19. Sensorintegrative dysfunction underlying vestibular disorders after traumatic brain injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Laura M; Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Ochs, Alfred L; Lew, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms are persistent and problematic sequelae of blast exposure. Several lines of evidence suggest that these symptoms often stem from injury to the central nervous system. Current methods of assessing the vestibular system have described vestibular deficits that follow traumatic brain injury and differentiate blunt and blast trauma but have not examined the full range of vestibular functions that depend on the cerebral structures above the midbrain. Damage to the central vestibular circuits can lead to deficits in vital processes of spatial perception and navigation, in addition to dizziness and disequilibrium, and may also affect emotional functioning, particularly noradrenergically modulated states of anxiety. Perceptual functions can be assessed to determine the extent of central nervous system involvement in vestibular symptoms and to provide greater confidence when vestibular dysfunction is to be excluded. The ability to detect central vestibular dysfunction will significantly enhance our response to the dizziness and balance symptoms that are a common source of distress for Veterans.

  20. Biobehavioural analysis of the vestibular system and posture control in patients with cervicogenic dizziness. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande-Alonso, M; Moral Saiz, B; Mínguez Zuazo, A; Lerma Lara, S; La Touche, R

    2016-07-21

    Cervicogenic dizziness is a musculoskeletal disorder mainly characterised by dizziness and disequilibrium associated with neck pain. The pathophysiology is unclear and the neurophysiological basis remains to be ascertained. The aim of this study is to compare the vestibulo-ocular reflex and postural control between patients with cervicogenic dizziness and asymptomatic subjects, and to assess the association between debilitating dizziness and other psychosocial variables. A total of 20 patients and 22 asymptomatic subjects were selected. Vestibulo-ocular reflex was assessed by performing the head impulse test. Computerised dynamic posturography was used to evaluate the postural control by means of the sensory organisation test. In addition, subjects self-reported their degree of disability due to dizziness, cervical disability, kinesiophobia, and state of anxiety and depression. There were no differences in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (P>.05). However, we found differences with a medium-to-large effect size (d>0.60) in variables related to proprioception and visual information integration; the former variable set was related to disability due to dizziness. Disability due to dizziness presents strong-to-moderate associations with cervical disability, kinesiophobia, and anxiety. Our data rule out changes in the vestibular system in cervicogenic dizziness, but they do point to proprioceptive impairment. According to our results, the association between dizziness-related disability and other psychosocial factors in cervicogenic dizziness is very relevant for clinical medicine and for future research projects. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. On System Identification of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Perisic, Nevena; Pedersen, B.J.

    . The operational model analysis (OMA) methodology can provide accurate estimates of the natural frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes of the systems as long as the measurements have a low noise to signal ratio. However, in order to take information about the wind turbine into account a grey......Recently several methods have been proposed for the system identification of wind turbines which can be considered as a linear time-varying system due to the operating conditions. For the identification of linear wind turbine models, either black-box or grey-box identification can be used......-box identification method can be used. This paper reviews proposed system identification methods and the durability and the limitations of the different methods are outlined....

  2. Process Identification through Test on Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzetti, M; Chadli, M; Coppier, H

    2008-01-01

    UNICOS (UNified Industrial Control System) is the CERN object-based control standard for the cryogenics of the LHC and its experiments. It includes a variety of embedded functions, dedicated to the specific cryogenic processes. To enlarge the capabilities of the standard it is proposed to integrate the parametrical identification step in the control system of large scale cryogenic plants. Different methods of parametrical identification have been tested and the results were combined to obtain a better model. The main objective of the work is to find a compromise between an easy-to-use solution and a good level of process identification model. The study focuses on identification protocol for large delayed system, the measurement consistency and correlation between different inputs and outputs. Furthermore the paper describes in details, the results and the tests carried out on parametrical identification investigations with large scale systems.

  3. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  4. Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Clement, Gilles R.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Taylor, Laura C..

    2015-01-01

    Control of vehicles and other complex systems is a high-level integrative function of the central nervous system (CNS). It requires well-functioning subsystem performance, including good visual acuity, eye-hand coordination, spatial and geographic orientation perception, and cognitive function. Evidence from space flight research demonstrates that the function of each of these subsystems is altered by removing gravity, a fundamental orientation reference, which is sensed by vestibular, proprioceptive, and haptic receptors and used by the CNS for spatial orientation, posture, navigation, and coordination of movements. The available evidence also shows that the degree of alteration of each subsystem depends on a number of crew- and mission-related factors. There is only limited operational evidence that these alterations cause functional impacts on mission-critical vehicle (or complex system) control capabilities. Furthermore, while much of the operational performance data collected during space flight has not been available for independent analysis, those that have been reviewed are somewhat equivocal owing to uncontrolled (and/or unmeasured) environmental and/or engineering factors. Whether this can be improved by further analysis of previously inaccessible operational data or by development of new operational research protocols remains to be seen. The true operational risks will be estimable only after we have filled the knowledge gaps and when we can accurately assess integrated performance in off-nominal operational settings (Paloski et al. 2008). Thus, our current understanding of the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight is limited primarily to extrapolation of scientific research findings, and, since there are limited ground-based analogs of the sensorimotor and vestibular changes associated with space flight, observation of their functional

  5. Vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan L; McDonnell, Michelle

    2011-02-16

    This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 4, 2007.Unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction (UPVD) can occur as a result of disease, trauma or postoperatively. The dysfunction is characterised by complaints of dizziness, visual or gaze disturbances and balance impairment. Current management includes medication, physical manoeuvres and exercise regimes, the latter known collectively as vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To assess the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation in the adult, community-dwelling population of people with symptomatic unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The most recent search was 1 July 2010, following a previous search in March 2007. Randomised trials of adults living in the community, diagnosed with symptomatic unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We sought comparisons of VR versus control (placebo etc.), other treatment (non-VR, e.g. pharmacological) or another form of VR. We considered the outcome measures of frequency and severity of dizziness or visual disturbance; changes in balance impairment, function or quality of life; and measure/s of physiological status with known functional correlation. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trials for risk of bias. We included 27 trials, involving 1668 participants, in the review. Trials addressed the effectiveness of VR against control/sham interventions, medical interventions or other forms of VR. Individual and pooled data showed a statistically significant effect in favour of VR over control or no intervention. The exception to this was when movement-based VR was compared to physical manoeuvres for benign

  6. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  7. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  8. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: What are vestibular aqueducts? How ... How are enlarged vestibular aqueducts related to childhood hearing loss? Research suggests that most children with enlarged vestibular ...

  9. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Anmo J.; Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowe...

  10. [Therapy of vestibular vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, K F

    1993-05-01

    The non-surgical treatment of vestibular disorders must be based on current knowledge of vestibular pathophysiology. It is generally accepted that after vestibular lesions a self-repair mechanism exists that allows a more or less complete recovery. In cases of persisting vestibular complaints the physician's duty consists in stimulation of these pre-existing mechanisms. This can be done by physical exercises, as has been recommended since the work of Cawthorne and Cooksey in 1946. This concept is meanwhile supported by modern neurophysiological research. This article describes a short training program consisting of exercises for fixation during rotations, smooth pursuit, optokinetic nystagmus and motor learning mechanisms. Physical exercises can be reinforced by nootropic drugs.

  11. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study...

  12. Sensing External and Self-Motion with Hair Cells: A Comparison of the Lateral Line and Vestibular Systems from a Developmental and Evolutionary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagnaud, Boris P; Engelmann, Jacob; Fritzsch, Bernd; Glover, Joel C; Straka, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Detection of motion is a feature essential to any living animal. In vertebrates, mechanosensory hair cells organized into the lateral line and vestibular systems are used to detect external water or head/body motion, respectively. While the neuronal components to detect these physical attributes are similar between the two sensory systems, the organizational pattern of the receptors in the periphery and the distribution of hindbrain afferent and efferent projections are adapted to the specific functions of the respective system. Here we provide a concise review comparing the functional organization of the vestibular and lateral line systems from the development of the organs to the wiring from the periphery and the first processing stages. The goal of this review is to highlight the similarities and differences to demonstrate how evolution caused a common neuronal substrate to adapt to different functions, one for the detection of external water stimuli and the generation of sensory maps and the other for the detection of self-motion and the generation of motor commands for immediate behavioral reactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Access control and personal identification systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Dan M

    1988-01-01

    Access Control and Personal Identification Systems provides an education in the field of access control and personal identification systems, which is essential in selecting the appropriate equipment, dealing intelligently with vendors in purchases of the equipment, and integrating the equipment into a total effective system. Access control devices and systems comprise an important part of almost every security system, but are seldom the sole source of security. In order for the goals of the total system to be met, the other portions of the security system must also be well planned and executed

  14. Evaluation of diagnostic tests of the otolith organs and their application in various vestibular pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current vestibular testing is limited. The general function of the vestibular system on both sides of the head can be tested, and one part of the peripheral vestibular organ, the horizontal semicircular canal, can be tested unilaterally. However, recently a test for the function of the otolith

  15. "Conflicting" motion cues to the visual and vestibular self-motion systems around 0.06 Hz evoke simulator sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Parker, Donald E; Philips, James O; Furness, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The basic question this research addressed was, how does simulator sickness vary with simulated motion frequency? Participants were 11 women and 19 men, 20 to 63 years of age. A visual self-motion frequency response curve was determined using a Chattecx posture platform with a VR4 head-mounted display (HMD) or a back-projected dome. That curve and one for vestibular self-motion specify a frequency range in which vestibular and visual motion stimuli could produce conflicting self-motion cues. Using a rotating chair and the HMD, a third experiment supported (p virtual reality sickness; for simulators intended to operate in this frequency range, appropriate simulator sickness interventions should be considered during the design process.

  16. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  17. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas; Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections-from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals-typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems-may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  18. Progression of changes in the sensorial elements of the cochlear and peripheral vestibular systems: The otitis media continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Schachern, Patricia; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate pathologic changes in the cochlear (inner and outer hair cells and stria vascularis) and vestibular (vestibular hair cells, dark, and transitional cells) sensorial elements in temporal bones from donors who had otitis media. We studied 40 temporal bones from such donors, which were categorized in serous otitis media (SOM), serous-purulent otitis media (SPOM), mucoid/mucoid-purulent otitis media (MOM/MPOM), and chronic otitis media (COM); control group comprised 10 nondiseased temporal bones. We found significant loss of inner and outer cochlear hair cells in the basal turn of the SPOM, MOM/MPOM and COM groups; significant loss of vestibular hair cells was observed in the MOM/MPOM and COM groups. All otitis media groups had smaller mean area of the stria vascularis in the basal turn of the cochlea when compared to controls. In conclusion, our study demonstrated more severe pathologic changes in the later stages of the continuum of otitis media (MOM/MPOM and COM). Those changes seem to progress from the basal turn of the cochlea (stria vascularis, then inner and outer hair cells) to the middle turn of the cochlea and to the saccule and utricle in the MOM/MPOM and COM stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Trigeminal, Visceral and Vestibular Inputs May Improve Cognitive Functions by Acting through the Locus Coeruleus and the Ascending Reticular Activating System: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sensory signals sustain the background discharge of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS which includes the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC neurons and controls the level of attention and alertness. Moreover, LC neurons influence brain metabolic activity, gene expression and brain inflammatory processes. As a consequence of the sensory control of ARAS/LC, stimulation of a sensory channel may potential influence neuronal activity and trophic state all over the brain, supporting cognitive functions and exerting a neuroprotective action. On the other hand, an imbalance of the same input on the two sides may lead to an asymmetric hemispheric excitability, leading to an impairment in cognitive functions. Among the inputs that may drive LC neurons and ARAS, those arising from the trigeminal region, from visceral organs and, possibly, from the vestibular system seem to be particularly relevant in regulating their activity. The trigeminal, visceral and vestibular control of ARAS/LC activity may explain why these input signals: (1 affect sensorimotor and cognitive functions which are not directly related to their specific informational content; and (2 are effective in relieving the symptoms of some brain pathologies, thus prompting peripheral activation of these input systems as a complementary approach for the treatment of cognitive impairments and neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. 2010 United States Automatic Identification System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2010 United States Automatic Identification System Database contains vessel traffic data for planning purposes within the U.S. coastal waters. The database is...

  1. Model Updating Nonlinear System Identification Toolbox Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology proposes to develop an enhanced model updating nonlinear system identification (MUNSID) methodology by adopting the flight data with state-of-the-art...

  2. Advanced 3D Object Identification System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optra will build an Advanced 3D Object Identification System utilizing three or more high resolution imagers spaced around a launch platform. Data from each imager...

  3. 2009 United States Automatic Identification System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2009 United States Automatic Identification System Database contains vessel traffic data for planning purposes within the U.S. coastal waters. The database is...

  4. 2014 United States Automatic Identification System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2014 United States Automatic Identification System Database contains vessel traffic data for planning purposes within the U.S. coastal waters. The database is...

  5. 2012 United States Automatic Identification System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2012 United States Automatic Identification System Database contains vessel traffic data for planning purposes within the U.S. coastal waters. The database is...

  6. 2011 United States Automatic Identification System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2011 United States Automatic Identification System Database contains vessel traffic data for planning purposes within the U.S. coastal waters. The database is...

  7. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cronin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections—from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals—typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems—may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  8. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental...

  9. Sensorial countermeasures for vestibular spatial disorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Aurore C; Quarck, Gaëlle; Denise, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Spatial disorientation is defined as an erroneous body orientation perceived by pilots during flights. Limits of the vestibular system provoke frequent spatial disorientation mishaps. Although vestibular spatial disorientation is experienced frequently in aviation, there is no intuitive countermeasure against spatial disorientation mishaps to date. The aim of this review is to describe the current sensorial countermeasures and to examine future leads in sensorial ergonomics for vestibular spatial disorientation. This work reviews: 1) the visual ergonomics, 2) the vestibular countermeasures, 3) the auditory displays, 4) the somatosensory countermeasures, and, finally, 5) the multisensory displays. This review emphasizes the positive aspects of auditory and somatosensory countermeasures as well as multisensory devices. Even if some aspects such as sensory conflict and motion sickness need to be assessed, these countermeasures should be taken into consideration for ergonomics work in the future. However, a recent development in aviation might offer new and better perspectives: unmanned aerial vehicles. Unmanned aerial vehicles aim to go beyond the physiological boundaries of human sensorial systems and would allow for coping with spatial disorientation and motion sickness. Even if research is necessary to improve the interaction between machines and humans, this recent development might be incredibly useful for decreasing or even stopping vestibular spatial disorientation.

  10. The odontology victim identification skill assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohn, Harry K; Dashkow, Sheila; Aschheim, Kenneth W; Dobrin, Lawrence A; Glazer, Howard S; Kirschbaum, Mitchell; Levitt, Daniel; Feldman, Cecile A

    2010-05-01

    Mass fatality identification efforts involving forensic odontology can involve hundreds of dental volunteers. A literature review was conducted and forensic odontologists and dental educators consulted to identify lessons learned from past mass fatality identification efforts. As a result, the authors propose a skill assessment system, the Odontology Victim Identification Skill Assessment System (OVID-SAS), which details qualifications required to participate on the Antemortem, Postmortem, Ante/Postmortem Comparison, Field, and Shift Leader/Initial Response Teams. For each qualification, specific skills have been identified along with suggested educational pedagogy and skill assessment methods. Courses and assessments can be developed by dental schools, professional associations, or forensic organizations to teach and test for the skills required for dental volunteers to participate on each team. By implementing a system, such as OVID-SAS, forensic odontologists responsible for organizing and managing a forensic odontology mass fatality identification effort will be able to optimally utilize individuals presenting with proven skills.

  11. Intelligent Storage System Based on Automatic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes RFID technology in conjunction with warehouse management systems. Article also deals with automatic identification and data capture technologies and each processes, which are used in warehouse management system. It describes processes from entering goods into production to identification of goods and also palletizing, storing, bin transferring and removing goods from warehouse. Article focuses on utilizing AMP middleware in WMS processes in Nowadays, the identification of goods in most warehouses is carried through barcodes. In this article we want to specify, how can be processes described above identified through RFID technology. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina, and also in Laboratory of Automatic Identification Goods and Services located in GS1 Slovakia. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of RFID technology in warehouse management system.

  12. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  13. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  14. LPV Identification of a Heat Distribution System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbæk, K; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with incremental system identification of district heating systems to improve control performance. As long as various parameters, e.g. valve settings, are kept fixed, the dynamics of district heating systems can be approximated well by linear models; however, the dynamics change ...

  15. An Engineering Model to Test for Sensory Reweighting: Nonhuman Primates Serve as a Model for Human Postural Control and Vestibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Goodworth, Adam D; Lewis, Richard F

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative animal models are critically needed to provide proof of concept for the investigation of rehabilitative balance therapies (e.g., invasive vestibular prostheses) and treatment response prior to, or in conjunction with, human clinical trials. This paper describes a novel approach to modeling the nonhuman primate postural control system. Our observation that rhesus macaques and humans have even remotely similar postural control motivates the further application of the rhesus macaque as a model for studying the effects of vestibular dysfunction, as well as vestibular prosthesis-assisted states, on human postural control. Previously, system identification methodologies and models were only used to describe human posture. However, here we utilized pseudorandom, roll-tilt balance platform stimuli to perturb the posture of a rhesus monkey in normal and mild vestibular (equilibrium) loss states. The relationship between rhesus monkey trunk sway and platform roll-tilt was determined via stimulus-response curves and transfer function results. A feedback controller model was then used to explore sensory reweighting (i.e., changes in sensory reliance), which prevented the animal from falling off of the tilting platform. Conclusions involving sensory reweighting in the nonhuman primate for a normal sensory state and a state of mild vestibular loss led to meaningful insights. This first-phase effort to model the balance control system in nonhuman primates is essential for future investigations toward the effects of invasive rehabilitative (balance) technologies on postural control in primates, and ultimately, humans.

  16. Identification of Uncommon Candida Species Using Commercial Identification Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Kweon, Oh Joo; Kim, Hye Ryoun; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2016-12-28

    Recently, several studies have revealed that commercial microbial identification systems do not accurately identify the uncommon causative species of candidiasis, including Candida famata, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, and C. auris. We investigated the accuracy of species-level identification in a collection of clinical isolates previously identified as C. famata (N = 38), C. lusitaniae (N = 1 2), and M. guilliermondii (N = 5) by the Vitek 2 system. All 55 isolates were re-analyzed by the Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics), two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analyzers (a Vitek MS and a Bruker Biotyper), and by sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions or 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domains. Among 38 isolates previously identified as C. famata by the Vitek 2 system, the majority (27/38 isolates, 71.1%) were identified as C. tropicalis (20 isolates) or C. albicans (7 isolates) by ITS sequencing, and none was identified as C. famata. Among 20 isolates that were identified as C. tropicalis, 17 (85%) were isolated from urine. The two isolates that were identified as C. auris by ITS sequencing originated from ear discharge. The Phoenix system did not accurately identify C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, or C. auris. The correct identification rate for 55 isolates was 92.7% (51/55 isolates) for the Vitek MS and 94.6% (52/55 isolates) for the Bruker Biotyper, as compared with results from ITS sequencing. These results suggest that C. famata is very rare in Korea, and that the possibility of misidentification should be noted when an uncommon Candida species is identified.

  17. Making Sense of the Body: the Role of Vestibular Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The role of the vestibular system in posture and eye movement control has been extensively described. By contrast, how vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions is a more recent research area in the field of cognitive neuroscience. In the present review article, I will summarize recent findings showing that vestibular signals play a crucial role in making sense of the body. First, data will be presented showing that vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions ranging from low-level bodily perceptions, such as touch, pain, and the processing of the body's metric properties, to higher level bodily perceptions, such as the sense of owning a body, the sense of being located within this body (embodiment), and the anchoring of the visuo-spatial perspective to this body. In the second part of the review article, I will show that vestibular information seems to be crucially involved in the visual perception of biological motion and in the visual perception of human body structure. Reciprocally, observing human bodies in motion influences vestibular self-motion perception, presumably due to sensorimotor resonance between the self and others. I will argue that recent advances in the mapping of the human vestibular cortex afford neuroscientific models of the vestibular contributions to human bodily self-consciousness.

  18. Recent Evidence About the Effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Susan L; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-03-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation of persons with peripheral and central vestibular disorders requires a thorough evaluation and a customized plan of care. Collaboration of the various members of the treatment team optimizes outcomes. Early intervention appears to be better than referring patients who have developed chronic symptoms of balance loss, dizziness, anxiety, and depression. There is a body of emerging evidence that supports that the central nervous system has the capability to reweigh sensory inputs in order to improve function. There continues to be a dearth of knowledge related to how to treat persons with otolithic dysfunction as compared to those with semicircular canal damage. With the use of vestibular rehabilitation, patients are less likely to fall, are less dizzy, balance and gait improve, and quality of life is enhanced. Recent Cochrane reviews and a clinical practice guideline support the use of vestibular rehabilitation for persons with vestibular dysfunction. Typical symptoms and their management including dysregulated gait, falling, fear of falling, increased sway in standing, visual blurring, symptoms with complex visual scenes in the periphery, and weakness are all discussed with ideas for intervention. Any patient with a vestibular disorder may benefit from a trial of vestibular rehabilitation. A discussion of recent evidence and innovations related to vestibular rehabilitation is also included.

  19. A Study of Relationship between the Acoustic Sensitivity of Vestibular System and the Ability to Trigger Sound-Evoked Muscle Reflex of the Middle Ear in Adults with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Emami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The vestibular system is sound sensitive and the sensitivity is related to the saccule. The vestibular afferents are projected to the middle ear muscles (such as the stapedius. The goal of this research was studying the relationship between the vestibular hearing and the sound-evoked muscle reflex of the middle ear to 500 HZ. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross sectional-comparison done in audiology department of Sheikholreis C‍‍linic (Hamadan, Iran. The study groups consisted of thirty healthy people and thirty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Inclusion criteria of the present study were to have normal hearing on pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, and speech discrimination scores. Based on ipsilateral acoustic reflex test at 500HZ, they were divided to normal and abnormal groups. Then they were evaluated by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and finally classified in three groups (N Normal ear , (CVUA Contra lateral vertiginous ear with unaffected saccular sensitivity to sound,(IVA Ipsilateral vertiginous ear with affected saccular sensitivity to sound. Results: Thirty affected ears (IVA with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by ab-normal cVEMPs, revealed abnormal findings of acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Whereas, both un-affected (CVUA and normal ears (N had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs (p13,n23 and acoustic reflex at500HZ among the three groups were sig-nificant. The correlation between acoustic reflex at 500HZ and p13 latencies was significant. The n23 latencies showed significant correlation with acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Conclusion: The vestibular sensitivity to sound retains the ability to trigger sound-evoked re-flex of the middle ear at 500 HZ. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:99-104

  20. System Identification A Frequency Domain Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pintelon, Rik

    2012-01-01

    System identification is a general term used to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamical models from measured data. Used for prediction, control, physical interpretation, and the designing of any electrical systems, they are vital in the fields of electrical, mechanical, civil, and chemical engineering. Focusing mainly on frequency domain techniques, System Identification: A Frequency Domain Approach, Second Edition also studies in detail the similarities and differences with the classical time domain approach. It high??lights many of the important steps in the identi

  1. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 µm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle...... relation to the VDCs in the utricle and the crista ampullaris of the lateral semicircular canal in the vestibular apparatus. One major vein emanated from these networks, which emptied into the vein of the vestibular aqueduct. Veins draining the saccule and the common crus of the superior and posterior...

  2. Eye Movements as Indicators of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshikova, Galina Ya; Kovalev, Artem I; Klimova, Oxana A; Chernorizov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality technologies are in wide use in sport psychology. An advantage of this kind of technology is the possibility to assess sportspeople's readiness to perform complex movements. This study is aimed at developing a method for the evaluation of vestibular function disturbances in young skaters. Such disturbances may occur while skaters are performing rotation movements. To achieve this goal, we induced a vection illusion, accompanied by virtual environment rotation in a CAVE virtual reality system. Vestibular disturbances were tested for two groups-professional skaters and people who had very little or no skating experience. The quantitative evaluation of vestibular dysfunction was based on eye movement characteristics, which were recorded in subjects experiencing a vection illusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. System identification application using Hammerstein model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saban Ozer

    because of its advanced theoretical background [3–5, 10]. However, many systems in real life have nonlinear beha- viours. Linear methods can be inadequate in ...... [24] Gotmare A, Patidar R and George N V 2015 Nonlinear system identification using a cuckoo search optimized adaptive Hammerstein model. Expert Syst.

  4. Dental orthopantomogram biometrics system for human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Bhargava, Darpan; Deshpande, Ashwini

    2013-07-01

    Fingerprinting is the most widely accepted method of identification of people. But in cases of disfigured, decomposed, burnt or fragmented bodies, it is of limited value. Teeth and dental restorations on the other hand are extremely resistant to destruction by fire. They retain a number of their original characteristics, which are often unique and hence offer a possibility of rather accurate and legally acceptable identification of such remains. This study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of orthopantomography for human identification and propose a coding system for orthopantomogram (OPG), which can be utilized as an identification tool in forensic sciences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic review of vestibular disorders related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, B; Swanepoel, D W; Hofmeyr, L M

    2011-09-01

    Disorders of the auditory and vestibular system are often associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the extent and nature of these vestibular manifestations are unclear. To systematically review the current peer-reviewed literature on vestibular manifestations and pathology related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Systematic review of peer-reviewed articles related to vestibular findings in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several electronic databases were searched. We identified 442 records, reduced to 210 after excluding duplicates and reviews. These were reviewed for relevance to the scope of the study. We identified only 13 reports investigating vestibular functioning and pathology in individuals affected by human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This condition can affect both the peripheral and central vestibular system, irrespective of age and viral disease stage. Peripheral vestibular involvement may affect up to 50 per cent of patients, and central vestibular involvement may be even more prevalent. Post-mortem studies suggest direct involvement of the entire vestibular system, while opportunistic infections such as oto- and neurosyphilis and encephalitis cause secondary vestibular dysfunction resulting in vertigo, dizziness and imbalance. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome should routinely be monitored for vestibular involvement, to minimise functional limitations of quality of life.

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation using a wide field of view virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparto, P J; Furman, J M; Whitney, S L; Hodges, L F; Redfern, M S

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical justification for using a wide field of view (FOV) virtual reality display system for use in vestibular rehabilitation. A wide FOV environment offers some unique features that may be beneficial to vestibular rehabilitation. Primarily, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. If this hypothesis is correct, then wide FOV systems will have an advantage over narrow field of view input devices such as head mounted or desktop displays. Devices that we have incorporated into our system that are critical for monitoring improvement in this clinical population will also be described.

  7. Cost Optimal System Identification Experiment Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    A structural system identification experiment design method is formulated in the light of decision theory, structural reliability theory and optimization theory. The experiment design is based on a preposterior analysis, well-known from the classical decision theory. I.e. the decisions concerning...... reflecting the cost of the experiment and the value of obtained additional information. An example concerning design of an experiment for parametric identification of a single degree of freedom structural system shows the applicability of the experiment design method.......A structural system identification experiment design method is formulated in the light of decision theory, structural reliability theory and optimization theory. The experiment design is based on a preposterior analysis, well-known from the classical decision theory. I.e. the decisions concerning...

  8. The challenge of vestibular migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Eric W

    2013-10-01

    Migraine is a common illness and migraine-related dizziness occurs in up to 3% of the population. Because the diagnosis is controversial and may be difficult, many patients go undiagnosed and untreated. This review summarizes current understanding of the taxonomy and diagnosis of vestibular migraine, the relation of vestibular migraine to labyrinthine disease, and the treatment of the condition in adults and children. The categories of migraine accepted by the International Headache Society do not reflect the complex presentations of patients suspected of having vestibular migraine. In clinical practice and research, criteria are increasingly accepted that divide patients suspected of vestibular migraine into 'definite vestibular migraine' and 'probable vestibular migraine.' Because vertigo itself may trigger migraine, patients with vestibular migraine should be suspected of having vestibular end-organ disease until proven otherwise. Treatment remains controversial because of a notable lack of randomized controlled studies of vestibular migraine treatment. For now, the best strategy for the treatment of suspected vestibular migraine patients is dietary/lifestyle modification, antinausea/antiemetics for acute vertigo, and preventive medication for patients who have continued disruptive symptoms. Patients with vestibular migraine should be monitored regularly for the development of latent audiovestibular end-organ disease.

  9. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  10. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  11. Optimized Experiment Design for Marine Systems Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Knudsen, Morten

    1999-01-01

    and proposes a sensitivity approach to solve the practical experiment design problem. The applicability of the sensitivity approach is demonstrated on a large non-linear model of surge, sway, roll and yaw of a ship. The use of the method is illustrated for a container-ship where both model and full-scale tests......Simulation of maneuvring and design of motion controls for marine systems require non-linear mathematical models, which often have more than one-hundred parameters. Model identification is hence an extremely difficult task. This paper discusses experiment design for marine systems identification...

  12. Vestibular rehabilitation following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, James M; Hujsak, Bryan D; Kelly, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are a symptom complex that is commonly found following concussion. Early metabolic changes following concussion may lead to worsening of the injury and symptoms in individuals not properly managed from the outset. When symptoms do not recover spontaneously, skilled vestibular rehabilitation can be an effective modality in an attempt to normalize the individual's vestibular responses. The purpose of this review is to appraise the current and accepted methods available to the skilled clinician in quantifying and treating vestibular dysfunction following concussion. Incidence and prognostic indicators will be reviewed along with common barriers to recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation following concussion utilizes similar tools and techniques employed when treating those solely with peripheral pathology. The clinician must not only have a solid understanding of when and why certain exercises are required, but also be willing to accept that less exercise may be indicated in this population. As injury to the system following mild traumatic brain injury can include both peripheral and central structures, the duration of therapy and the time to recovery may be prolonged. Co-morbidities including cognitive and behavioral issues, visual-perceptual dysfunction, metabolic dysfunction, and autonomic dysfunction may hamper the effectiveness of the traditional Vestibular Rehabilitation approach. As successful treatment does not occur in a vacuum, working closely with other disciplines well versed in treating these co-morbid issues will help the individual to obtain optimal recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation is an effective modality for managing dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance following concussion. Careful consideration of the acuity of the injury, along with effective management of co-morbid conditions will optimize the result.

  13. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  14. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnera, Cibele; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Greters, Mário Edvin; Basta, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard™ biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS) of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG), which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard™ for ten days, and a control group (CG), which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), were used. After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p=0.007) and C6 (p=0.01). On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p=0.04). The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p=0.04). The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard™ system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Emotional System for Military Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    J. & Ioerger, T.R. (2000). FLAME– fuzzy logic adaptive model of emotions. Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems , 3(3), 219–257. Emotional...Proceedings of the Sixteenth European Meeting on Cybernetics and System Research, Vienna, 751–756. [16] Doya K. (2002). Meta-learning and neuro ...RTO-MP-IST-087 18 - 1 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Emotional System for Military Target Identification Prof. Dr. Adnan

  16. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  17. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-01

    .... Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators...

  18. Attacks on RFID Identification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Mikhaylov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is about attacks on RFID systems. Currently antivirus developers are not developing systems that protect from viruses that could exist on RFID tags. Such viruses are considered as not existing because the RFID tag memory is very small. Unfortunately such viruses exist. This article is concerned to such viruses and attacks that hackers could do using such viruses. Based on this article methods to prevent RFID-viruses attacks could be developed.

  19. Nonlinear-Adaptive Mathematical System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Sands

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available By reversing paradigms that normally utilize mathematical models as the basis for nonlinear adaptive controllers, this article describes using the controller to serve as a novel computational approach for mathematical system identification. System identification usually begins with the dynamics, and then seeks to parameterize the mathematical model in an optimization relationship that produces estimates of the parameters that minimize a designated cost function. The proposed methodology uses a DC motor with a minimum-phase mathematical model controlled by a self-tuning regulator without model pole cancelation. The normal system identification process is briefly articulated by parameterizing the system for least squares estimation that includes an allowance for exponential forgetting to deal with time-varying plants. Next, towards the proposed approach, the Diophantine equation is derived for an indirect self-tuner where feedforward and feedback controls are both parameterized in terms of the motor’s math model. As the controller seeks to nullify tracking errors, the assumed plant parameters are adapted and quickly converge on the correct parameters of the motor’s math model. Next, a more challenging non-minimum phase system is investigated, and the earlier implemented technique is modified utilizing a direct self-tuner with an increased pole excess. The nominal method experiences control chattering (an undesirable characteristic that could potentially damage the motor during testing, while the increased pole excess eliminates the control chattering, yet maintains effective mathematical system identification. This novel approach permits algorithms normally used for control to instead be used effectively for mathematical system identification.

  20. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh eDolatshahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  1. Ultra-Wideband Radio Frequency Identification Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nekoogar, Faranak

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-Wideband Radio Frequency Identification Systems describes the essentials of radio frequency identification systems as well as their target markets. The authors provide a study of commercially available RFID systems and characterizes their performance in terms of read range and reliability in the presence of conductive and dielectric materials. The capabilities and limitations of some commercial RFID systems are reported followed by comprehensive discussions of the advantages and challenges of using ultra-wideband technology for tag/reader communications. The book presents practical aspects of UWB RFID system such as: pulse generation, remote powering, tag and reader antenna design, as well as special applications of  UWB RFIDs in a simple and easy-to-understand language.

  2. Estudo do equilíbrio postural estático em pacientes com vestibulopatia mediante sistema de sensores eletromagnéticos tridimensionais Static postural balance study in patients with vestibular disorders using a three dimensional eletromagnetic sensor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greco Varela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação do reflexo vestíbulo ocular é importante; porém, insuficiente. Sistemas de sensores eletromagnéticos tridimensionais são uma nova opção para avaliação posturográfica. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a oscilação corporal em voluntários hígidos, com Manobras de Epley e Dix-Hallpike positivas e com outras disfunções vestibulares usando um sistema tridimensional. Forma de estudo: Prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Participaram: 23 mulheres saudáveis, 15 com disfunção vestibular periférica detectada à prova calórica e 10 com manobras de Epley e Dix-Hallpike positivas. Todas realizaram exames nas posições: olhos abertos e fechados em superfície estável e instável. RESULTADOS:Na condição Olhos Abertos e Superfície Estável, houve p The vestibular-ocular reflex assessment is important, but not enough. Tridimensional electromagnetic sensor systems represent a new method to assess posturography. AIM: To assess body sway in healthy subjects who had positive Dix Hallpike and Epley maneuvers and with other vestibular dysfunctions by means of a three-dimensional system. Study design: Prospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We had 23 healthy women, 15 with peripheral vestibular dysfunction found upon caloric test and 10 with positive Epley and Dix Hallpike maneuvers. All tests performed in the following positions: open and closed eyes on stable and unstable surfaces. RESULTS: With the Eyes Open and on a stable surface, p < 0.01 between the control group and the one with peripheral vestibular dysfunction in all variables, except the a-p maximum, full speed and mediolateral trajectory velocity, which had a p < 0.01 between the group with vestibular dysfunction and controls in all positions. The group with positive Epley and Dix Hallpike maneuvers had p < 0.01 at full speed and in its components in the x and y in positions with open and eyes closed on an unstable surface. CONCLUSION: The tridimensional electromagnetic sensors system was

  3. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; "super entrainment" was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans.

  4. New methodology for a person identification system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    suitable for any real-time applications such as e-voting, employee management, terrorist identification, passport verification and other applications. It opens a new avenue in iris recognition research work. In further development, this system can be improved to identify a person at a few metres distance and a new approach ...

  5. System identification application using Hammerstein model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, system identification applications of Hammerstein model that is cascade of nonlinear second order volterra and linear FIR model are studied. Recursive least square algorithm is used to identify the proposed Hammerstein model parameters. Furthermore, the results are compared to identify the success of ...

  6. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  7. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies.

  8. Treating vertigo with vestibular rehabilitation: results in 155 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, R S M; Pedalini, M E B; Lorenzi, M C; Formigoni, L G

    2002-01-01

    Balance is fundamental to our daily activities and the vestibular system, together with vision and proprioceptive functions, are the main structures involved in this process. Dizziness is the main clinical manifestation of malfunction of these systems. The mechanisms of vestibular compensation are one of the most studied aspects since they play an important role in the patient's everyday activities. In this retrospective description of a series of cases the authors present their results in 155 patients that underwent a program of vestibular rehabilitation (VR). The program, first described by Cawthorne and Coosey, is based on mechanisms of potentiation of the cervico-ocular reflex and substitution of the lost vestibular cues for visual and somatosensory cues. The results were satisfactory (remission or partial cure) in 75.5% of the patients, with an average treatment time of up to 2 months and 5 or fewer sessions performed in most of the cases. The results were somewhat inferior in those cases in which a central vestibular lesion or more than one etiologic factor was present. The results of a subgroup of elderly patients (age > 65 years) were similar to those of the total number of studied subjects. Vestibular rehabilitation, associated to the specific etiological treatment, appears to be a very useful tool in the management of patients suffering from dizziness of all ages, although different clinical responses to the therapy may vary according to the presence of a central or a peripheral vestibular lesion or multiple etiological factors.

  9. HAWK-IFF. A TACTICAL AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM FOR HAWK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTINUOUS WAVE RADAR, CONTROL PANELS, FIRE CONTROL SYSTEMS , IDENTIFICATION , IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS , MAINTENANCE, POWER SUPPLIES, RADAR HOMING....ARMY AIRCRAFT, *SURFACE TO AIR MISSILES, *RADAR RECEIVERS, AIRCRAFT, AMPLIFIERS, ANTENNAS, ANTIAIRCRAFT DEFENSE SYSTEMS , CIRCUITS, CODING

  10. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Entropy and gain analysis of HIT using wireless electro-oculography system could be used to detect the VOR dysfunctions of AUVL and may become effective methods for evaluating vestibular disorders.

  11. An efficient automatic firearm identification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Zun Liang; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Ghani, Nor Azura Md.

    2014-06-01

    Automatic firearm identification system (AFIS) is highly demanded in forensic ballistics to replace the traditional approach which uses comparison microscope and is relatively complex and time consuming. Thus, several AFIS have been developed for commercial and testing purposes. However, those AFIS are still unable to overcome some of the drawbacks of the traditional firearm identification approach. The goal of this study is to introduce another efficient and effective AFIS. A total of 747 firing pin impression images captured from five different pistols of same make and model are used to evaluate the proposed AFIS. It was demonstrated that the proposed AFIS is capable of producing firearm identification accuracy rate of over 95.0% with an execution time of less than 0.35 seconds per image.

  12. System identification: a frequency domain approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pintelon, R; Schoukens, J

    2001-01-01

    ... in the Identification Process 17 1.4.1 Collect Information about the System 17 1.4.2 Select a Model Structure to Represent the System 17 1.4.3 Match the Selected Model Structure to the Measurements 19 1.4.4 Validate the Selected Model 19 1.4.5 Conclusion 19 A Statistical Approach to the Estimation Problem 1.5.1 Least Squares Estimation 20 1.5.2 Weighted Least Squar...

  13. Sodium arsanilate-induced vestibular dysfunction in rats: effects on open-field behavior and spontaneous activity in the automated digiscan monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkopp, K P; Prkacin, A; Hargreaves, E L

    1990-08-01

    Vestibular dysfunction was chemically induced in Long-Evans rats by intratympanic injections (30 mg per side) of sodium arsanilate (atoxyl). Following a one-week recovery period the rats were behaviorally assayed for integrity of the labyrinthine systems. All subjects were tested for presence of the air-righting reflex, the contact-righting reflex (by lightly holding a sheet of Plexiglas against the soles of the rat's feet), and body rotation-induced nystagmus. All animals were then tested for their ability to remain on a small (15 x 15 cm) platform. Next, the subjects were given two 10-min open-field tests during which ambulation, rearing, grooming, and defecation responses were recorded. Four to five weeks later all rats were tested twice (60 min per session) in the automated Digiscan Activity Monitor which provides a multivariate assessment of spontaneous motor activity. The rats with vestibular dysfunction (Group VNX) took significantly less time to fall off the platform (p less than 0.01). They also exhibited significantly more open-field ambulation but fewer rearing responses (ps less than 0.01). An examination of group correlation coefficients for open-field variables and the platform test scores revealed some interesting group differences (ps less than 0.05). In the Digiscan tests the atoxyl-treated rats exhibited fewer number of horizontal movements, but increased speed for these movements (ps less than 0.05). Vertical movements did not differ significantly in incidence, but these movements were greatly reduced in duration (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vestibular schwannoma is key to preventing its serious consequences. There are three options for managing a vestibular ... Disorders Balance Problems and Disorders - National Institute on Aging Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss Genetics ...

  15. Isosorbide delays gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of isosorbide for protection from vestibular sensory cell damage was investigated. The effects of isosorbide on gentamicin-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied by means of the fluorescence indicators 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate and dihydrotetramethylrosamine. The effect on gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell damage was examined by using an in vitro LIVE/DEAD system. Isosorbide inhibited the production of both NO and ROS. Isosorbide limited the vestibular sensory cell damage caused by gentamicin. It is, therefore, suggested that isosorbide may help to treat inner ear disorders.

  16. Diagnosis of acute unilateral vestibular deficit by virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Renzo; Cesarani, Antonio; Meloni, Francesco; Passali, Francesco Maria; Mora, Francesco; Passali, Giulio Cesare; Barbieri, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to establish a new diagnostic approach, through the use of virtual reality, to the study of the subjective vertical bar in unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We subjected 174 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction (ages 18-82 years) to vestibular diagnosis with the virtual reality system. We changed the classic configuration of the subjective visual vertical into a subjective visual horizontal bar. This technique revealed values of the subjective visual horizontal outside the normal range in 91% of patients.

  17. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes.

  18. Vestibular syndrome: a change in internal spatial representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, L; Lopez, C; Péruch, P; Lacour, M

    2008-12-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions from reflexes to spatial representation. This paper reviews behavioral, perceptive, and cognitive data that highlight the role of changes in internal spatial representation on the vestibular syndrome. Firstly, we review how visual vertical perception and postural orientation depend on multiple reference frames and multisensory integration and how reference frames are selected according to the status of the peripheral vestibular system (i.e., unilateral or bilateral hyporeflexia), the environmental constraints (i.e., sensory cues), and the postural constraints (i.e., balance control). We show how changes in reference frames are able to modify vestibular lesion-induced postural and locomotor deficits and propose that fast changes in reference frame may be considered as fast-adaptive processes after vestibular loss. Secondly, we review data dealing with the influence of vestibular loss on higher levels of internal representation sustaining spatial orientation and navigation. Particular emphasis is placed on spatial performance according to task complexity (i.e., the required level of spatial knowledge) and to the sensory cues available to define the position and orientation within the environment (i.e., real navigation in darkness or visual virtual navigation without any actual self-motion). We suggest that vestibular signals are necessary for other sensory cues to be properly integrated and that vestibular cues are involved in extrapersonal space representation. In this respect, vestibular-induced changes would be based on a dynamic mental representation of space that is continuously updated and that supports fast-adaptive processes.

  19. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  20. The relationship between senile hearing loss and vestibular activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifi Kurtaran

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A considerable high number of SNHL patients also suffer from dizziness and related vestibular symptoms. Objective: To evaluate the association of vestibular dysfunction and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in adult patients. Methods: Prospective, double-blinded, controlled studies composed by 63 adult patients without any vestibular symptoms or diagnosed vestibular diseases. Audiological status was measured with pure tone audiometry and the vestibular system was tested with vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP. Patients were divided into two groups: a study group (patients with SNHL and a control group (patients without SNHL. VEMP results of the groups were calculated and compared. Results: Mean P1 (23.54 and N1 (30.70 latencies were prolonged in the study group (p < 0.001 and the amplitudes of the study group were significantly reduced (p < 0.001. Both parameters of the VEMP test were abnormal in the study group when compared to the control group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that age-related SNHL may be accompanied by vestibular weakness without any possible predisposing factors for vestibulopathy.

  1. The relationship between senile hearing loss and vestibular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtaran, Hanifi; Acar, Baran; Ocak, Emre; Mirici, Emre

    A considerable high number of SNHL patients also suffer from dizziness and related vestibular symptoms. To evaluate the association of vestibular dysfunction and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in adult patients. Prospective, double-blinded, controlled studies composed by 63 adult patients without any vestibular symptoms or diagnosed vestibular diseases. Audiological status was measured with pure tone audiometry and the vestibular system was tested with vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Patients were divided into two groups: a study group (patients with SNHL) and a control group (patients without SNHL). VEMP results of the groups were calculated and compared. Mean P1 (23.54) and N1 (30.70) latencies were prolonged in the study group (p<0.001) and the amplitudes of the study group were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Both parameters of the VEMP test were abnormal in the study group when compared to the control group. These findings suggest that age-related SNHL may be accompanied by vestibular weakness without any possible predisposing factors for vestibulopathy. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Luigi; Iorio, Giuseppina; Salafia, Francesca; Mazzone, Salvatore; Califano, Maria

    2015-02-01

    To determine the utility of the hyperventilation test (HVT) in the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma (VS). A retrospective analysis of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVIN) in 45 patients with unilateral VS. A tertiary referral center. Forty-five patients with VS; 30 patients with chronic vestibular neuritis; 20 healthy subjects with normal hearing and without symptoms or a history of vertigo, migraine, or neurological diseases (control group). Audiological and vestibular examination; "side-stream" measurement of end-tidal CO2 pressure (P(EtCO2)) to standardize the procedure; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centered on the cerebellopontine angle. An analysis of HVIN, its patterns, and its appearance threshold via the measurement of P(EtCO2) correlations with the tumor size. HVIN was observed in 40 of 45 cases (88.9%) in the schwannoma group and in 12 of 30 cases (40%) in the chronic vestibular neuritis group; HVIN was not observed in the control group (0/20 cases) (p hyperventilation event causes metabolic changes in the vestibular system and reveals a latent vestibular asymmetry. The presence of an excitatory pattern is the major criterion that suggests VS in patients with signs of unilateral vestibular deficit.

  3. Intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Daniel; Idoux, Erwin; Beraneck, Mathieu; Moore, L E; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies in rodents have shown that the functional efficacy of several neurotransmitter receptors and the intrinsic membrane excitability of central vestibular neurons, as well as the organization of synaptic connections within and between vestibular nuclei can be modified during postnatal development, after a lesion of peripheral vestibular organs or in vestibular-deficient mutant animals. This review mainly focuses on the intrinsic membrane properties of neurons of the medial vestibular nuclei of rodents, their postnatal maturation, and changes following experimental or congenital alterations in vestibular inputs. It also presents the concomitant modifications in the distribution of these neurons into different neuron types, which has been based on their membrane properties in relation to their anatomical, biochemical, or functional properties. The main points discussed in this review are that (1) the intrinsic membrane properties can be used to distinguish between two dominant types of neurons, (2) the system remains plastic throughout the whole life of the animal, and finally, (3) the intracellular calcium concentration has a major effect on the intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons.

  4. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  5. Prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Duarte, Juliana Antoniolli; Morganti, Lígia Oliveira Golçalves; Brandão, Priscila Valéria Caus; Nakao, Bruno Higa; Villa, Thais Rodrigues; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is now accepted as a common cause of episodic vertigo. Treatment of VM involves two situations: the vestibular symptom attacks and the period between attacks. For the latter, some prophylaxis methods can be used. The current recommendation is to use the same prophylactic drugs used for migraines, including β-blockers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The recent diagnostic definition of vestibular migraine makes the number of studies on its ...

  6. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel J. Brown; Christopher J. Pastras; Ian S. Curthoys

    2017-01-01

    .... Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort...

  7. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  8. Latent nystagmus: vestibular nystagmus with a twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Michael C; Tusa, Ronald J

    2004-02-01

    Latent nystagmus is a horizontal binocular oscillation that is evoked by unequal visual input to the 2 eyes. It develops primarily in humans with congenital esotropia. To investigate the interrelationship between latent and peripheral vestibular nystagmus and their corollary neuroanatomical pathways. Examination of subcortical neuroanatomical pathways producing latent nystagmus and review of the neurophysiological mechanisms by which they become activated in congenital esotropia. The vestibular nucleus presides over motion input from the eyes and labyrinths. Latent nystagmus corresponds to the optokinetic component of ocular rotation that is driven monocularly by nasal optic flow during a turning movement of the body in lateral-eyed animals. Congenital esotropia alters visual pathway development from the visual cortex to subcortical centers that project to the vestibular nucleus, allowing this primitive subcortical motion detection system to generate latent nystagmus under conditions of monocular fixation. Latent nystagmus is the ocular counterpart of peripheral vestibular nystagmus. Its clinical expression in humans proclaims the evolutionary function of the eyes as sensory balance organs.

  9. Influence of Caloric Vestibular Stimulation on Body Experience in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas eSchönherr; Christian-Albrecht eMay

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system has more connections with and influence on higher cortical centers than previously thought. These interactions with higher cortical centers and the phenomena that they elicit require a structural intact cerebral cortex. To date, little is known about the role and influence of the vestibular system on one’s body experience. In this study we show that caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) in healthy participants has an effect on the perceptive component of one’s body experi...

  10. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; Cavuscens, Samuel; Ranieri, Maurizio; Schwarz, Konrad; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; van den Boogert, Thomas; Lucieer, Floor; van Hoof, Marc; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman; Micera, Silvestro; Perez Fornos, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no

  11. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be

  12. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of dispatch system. 72... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... identification of dispatch system. (2) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, each unit or...

  13. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System... Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions carrying broadband video information shall be identified through the use of an automatic transmitter identification system as specified below. (a...

  14. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research inclu...

  15. New Insights into Pathophysiology of Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory–inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM

  16. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  17. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  18. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  19. Power system identification toolbox: Phase two progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes current progress on a project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to develop a set of state-of-the-art analysis software (termed the Power System Identification [PSI] Toolbox) for fitting dynamic models to measured data. The project is being conducted as a three-phase effort. The first phase, completed in late 1992, involved investigating the characteristics of the analysis techniques by evaluating existing software and developing guidelines for best use. Phase Two includes extending current software, developing new analysis algorithms and software, and demonstrating and developing applications. The final phase will focus on reorganizing the software into a modular collection of documented computer programs and developing user manuals with instruction and application guidelines. Phase Two is approximately 50% complete; progress to date and a vision for the final product of the PSI Toolbox are described. The needs of the power industry for specialized system identification methods are particularly acute. The industry is currently pushing to operate transmission systems much closer to theoretical limits by using real-time, large-scale control systems to dictate power flows and maintain dynamic stability. Reliably maintaining stability requires extensive system-dynamic modeling and analysis capability, including measurement-based methods. To serve this need, the BPA has developed specialized system-identification computer codes through in-house efforts and university contract research over the last several years. To make full integrated use of the codes, as well as other techniques, the BPA has commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to further develop the codes and techniques into the PSI Toolbox.

  20. Realization-Based System Identification with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel N.

    The identification of dynamic system behavior from experimentally measured or computationally simulated data is fundamental to the fields of control system design, modal analysis, and defect detection. In this dissertation, methods for system identification are developed based on classical linear system realization theory. The common methods of state-space realization from a measured, discrete-time impulse response are generalized to the following additional types of experiments: measured step responses, arbitrary sets of input-output data, and estimated cross-covariance functions of input-output data. The methods are particularly well suited to systems with large input and/or output dimension, for which classical system identification methods based on maximum likelihood estimation may fail due to their reliance on non-convex optimizations. The realization-based methods by themselves require a finite number of linear algebraic operations. Because these methods implicitly optimize cost functions that are linear in state-space parameters, they may be augmented with convex constraints to form convex optimization problems. Several common behavioral constraints are translated into eigenvalue constraints stated as linear matrix inequalities, and the realization-based methods are converted into semidefinite programming problems. Some additional constraints on transient and steady-state behavior are derived and incorporated into a quadratic program, which is solved following the semidefinite program. The newly developed realization-based methods are applied to two experiments: the aeroelastic response of a fighter aircraft and the transient thermal behavior of a light-emitting diode. The algorithms for each experiment are implemented in two freely available software packages.

  1. On closed loop transient response system identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Dalen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Some methods for transient closed loop step response system identification presented in the literature are reviewed. Interestingly some errors in a method published in the early 80's where propagated into a recently published method. These methods are reviewed and some improved methods are suggested and presented. The methods are compared against each other on some closed loop system examples, e.g. a well pipeline-riser severe-slugging flow regime example, using Monte Carlo simulations for comparison of the methods.

  2. Injectable electronic identification, monitoring, and stimulation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyk, P R

    1999-01-01

    Historically, electronic devices such as pacemakers and neuromuscular stimulators have been surgically implanted into animals and humans. A new class of implants made possible by advances in monolithic electronic design and implant packaging is small enough to be implanted by percutaneous injection through large-gauge hypodermic needles and does not require surgical implantation. Among these, commercially available implants, known as radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, are used for livestock, pet, laboratory animal, and endangered-species identification. The RFID tag is a subminiature glass capsule containing a solenoidal coil and an integrated circuit. Acting as the implanted half of a transcutaneous magnetic link, the RFID tag is powered by and communicates with an extracorporeal magnetic reader. The tag transmits a unique identification code that serves the function of identifying the animal. Millions of RFID tags have been sold since the early 1980s. Based on the success of the RFID tags, research laboratories have developed injectable medical implants, known as micromodules. One type of micromodule, the microstimulator, is designed for use in functional-neuromuscular stimulation. Each microstimulator is uniquely addressable and could comprise one channel of a multichannel functional-neuromuscular stimulation system. Using bidirectional telemetry and commands, from a single extracorporeal transmitter, as many as 256 microstimulators could form the hardware basis for a complex functional-neuromuscular stimulation feedback-control system. Uses include stimulation of paralyzed muscle, therapeutic functional-neuromuscular stimulation, and neuromodulatory functions such as laryngeal stimulation and sleep apnea.

  3. The vestibular contribution to the head direction cells signal and navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Taube

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on head direction cells. We also examine the vestibular system’s role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers.

  4. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc J P

    2017-10-01

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied, the role of the vestibular system in higher level sensorimotor functions is less clear. This review covers new research on the vestibular influence on perceptual judgments, motor decisions, and the ability to learn multiple motor actions. Guided by concepts such as optimization, inference, estimation and control, we focus on how the brain determines causal relationships between memorized and visual representations in the updating of visual space, and how vestibular, visual and efferent motor information are integrated in the estimation of body motion. We also discuss evidence that these computations involve multiple coordinate representations, some of which can be probed in parietal cortex using neuronal oscillations derived from EEG. In addition, we describe work on decision making during self-motion, showing a clear modulation of bottom-up acceleration signals on decisions in the saccadic system. Finally, we consider the importance of vestibular signals as contextual cues in motor learning and recall. Taken together, these results emphasize the impact of vestibular information on high-level sensorimotor functions, and identify future directions for theoretical, behavioral, and neurophysiological investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Presbyastasis and application of vestibular rehabilitation in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa de Araujo, P; Demanez, L; Lechien, J; Bauvir, P; Petermans, J

    2011-03-01

    Balance disorders can have a major functional impact among the elderly. The main risk is falling. Three elements are implicated in the loss of balance: vision, proprioception and the vestibular system. This article will discuss mainly vestibular damage and its implications. The assessment of balance disorders, particularly in geriatric patients, is based on validated scales composed of several items. These provide scores and are based on the results of chronometric measurements. They can be useful for the application of Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR), a technique improving the adaptation and autonomy of these patients. Vestibular rehabilitation is therefore part of an overall support, the goal of therapy being to improve daily life and to reduce the risk of falls.

  6. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  7. True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Thomsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.......The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging....

  8. Direction Identification System of Garlic Clove Based on Machine Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Gao Chi; Gao Hui

    2013-01-01

    In order to fulfill the requirements of seeding direction of garlic cloves, the paper proposed a research method of garlic clove direction identification based on machine vision, it expounded the theory of garlic clove direction identification, stated the arithmetic of it, designed the direction identification device of it, then developed the control system of garlic clove direction identification based on machine vision, at last tested the garlic clove direction identification, and the resul...

  9. Vestibular involvement in cognition: Visuospatial ability, attention, executive function, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests the inner ear vestibular system has a substantial impact on cognitive function. The strongest evidence exists in connecting vestibular function to the cognitive domain of visuospatial ability, which includes spatial memory, navigation, mental rotation, and mental representation of three-dimensional space. Substantial evidence also exists suggesting the vestibular system has an impact on attention and cognitive processing ability. The cognitive domains of memory and executive function are also implicated in a number of studies. We will review the current literature, discuss possible causal links between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive performance, and suggest areas of future research.

  10. [Present situation and development of ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Juan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Myogenic potentials evoked by air conducted sound (ACS), bone conducted vibration (BCV) or galvanic pulses can be recorded with surface electrodes over contracted muscles. These myogenic potentials are of vestibular origin (utricle and saccule) and so these potentials are called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). Since the vestibular system has projections to many muscle systems, there are many such VEMPs. In this review, we discuss the generated origin, response pathway, waveform characteristics and clinical application of ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP).

  11. Evaluation of the influence of vestibular system in the young adults balance through dynamic posturografy foam-laser and platform of power Avaliação da influência do sistema vestibular no equilíbrio de adultos jovens através de posturografia dinâmica foam-laser e plataforma de força

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alexandre Loth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tasks for the human postural control system is to maintain body balance on a small support base provided by the feet. As a gravity sensor, the vestibular system is one of the most important nervous system tools in posture control . The objective of this work was to study the influence of the vestibular system on the young adults’ balance control through Dynamic Posturografy Foam-laser (FLS. Participated in the study 30 young adults from the UFSM’s physical education undergraduate course, who volunteered to go under postural control evaluation through the FLP and platform of power, simultaneously, during the Sensorial Organization Test (TOS I and V. Results showed that there was a moderate and strong rate of correlation between TOS I and V values and the area of displacement of the pressure center (CP registered by the platform of power. They also showed that the FLP is a very useful method for balance evaluation, showing a good correlation with the CP displacement area . Uma das tarefas mais importantes do sistema do controle postural humano é o equilíbrio do corpo sobre a pequena base de apoio fornecida pelos pés. Como um sensor de gravidade, o sistema vestibular é uma das ferramentas mais importantes do sistema nervoso no controle da postura. O presente estudo teve como objetivo estudar a influencia do sistema vestibular no equilíbrio de adultos jovens, por meio da Posturografia Dinâmica Foam-laser (FLP. Para a realização do estudo, foram convidados 30 voluntários adultos jovens, acadêmicos do curso de educação física da UFSM, que foram submetidos à avaliação do controle postural através de FLP e plataforma de força simultaneamente, durante o Teste de Organização Sensorial (TOS I e V. Os resultados revelaram que houve moderado e forte índice de correlação entre os valores obtidos nos TOS I e V e a área de deslocamento do centro de pressão (CP registrada pela plataforma de força. Conclui

  12. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate vestibular compensation. Adequate vestibular compensation allows a patient to get rid of dizziness and unsteadiness even though vestibular system injury is irreversible. Some medications are able to enhance the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation. At the same time, the optimal duration of treatment for the most common vestibular disorders has not beenadequately explored. The paper gives the results of an observational program, whose purpose was to determine the optimal duration of vestibular rehabilitation in combination with the use of tanakan in patients with non-progressive unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder.Patients and methods. Data on 46 patients aged 19 to 70 years who underwent vestibular rehabilitation and took tanakan for vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis (n = 44, labyrinthitis (n =1, or Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1 were analyzed. All the patients were examined four times. The symptoms were recorded and the histories of disease were considered. The degree of vestibular disorders, including vertigo, was assessed when collecting complaints. The symptoms of vertigo were objectivized using its vertigo rating scale and five-point subjective rating scale for vertigo. All the patients underwent standard somatic and neurological examinations and videonystagmography. During the first visit after diagnosis, vestibular exercises were chosen for the patients and tanakan was used in a dose of 40 mg thrice daily to accelerate

  13. Prevalence of vestibular disorder in older people who experience dizziness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Chau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim was to accurately identify the prevalence of: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV, peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy six participants aged 51 to 92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years were tested using the Head Thrust Dynamic Visual Acuity (htDVA test, Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for: htDVA score; DHI score; sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1 - 2 Hz with peak-velocity at 30deg/s Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR gain and phase; transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150deg/s/s to a constant velocity rotation of 50deg/s VOR gain and time constant; OptoKinetic Nystagmus (OKN gain and time constant (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50deg/s. We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38% and 1% of participants respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5 - 1 Hz and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction.

  14. The vestibular contribution to the head direction cells signal and navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Yoder, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we r...

  15. Reabilitação vestibular: tendências e indicações

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira,Clarissa Stefani; Pereira, Érico Felden; Rossi, Angela Garcia; Daronco, Luciane Sanchotene Etchepare

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular rehabilitation, generally recommended for the treatment of dysfunctions in the vestibular system, has been prescribed for people with other problems related to balance and to spacial orientation. This study, with a bibliographic basis, had as objective to make a synthesis of the studies about vestibular rehabilitation that are focused in other morbidities besides the vestibulopathies, pointing out the tendencies of investigations and the main results, specially the ones with in...

  16. Vertigo and the processing of vestibular information: A review in the context of predictive coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Axer, Hubertus; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates the processing of vestibular information by interpreting current experimental knowledge in the framework of predictive coding. We demonstrate that this theoretical framework give us insights into several important questions regarding specific properties of the vestibular system. Particularly, we discuss why the vestibular network is more spatially distributed than other sensory networks, why a mismatch in the vestibular system is more clinically disturbing than in other sensory systems, why the vestibular system is only marginally affected by most cerebral lesions, and whether there is a primary vestibular cortex. The use of predictive coding as a theoretical framework further points to some problems with the current interpretation of results that are gained from vestibular stimulation studies. In particular, we argue that cortical responses of vestibular stimuli cannot be interpreted in the same way as responses of other sensory modalities. Finally, we discuss the implications of the new insights, hypotheses and problems that were identified in this review on further directions of research of vestibular information processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics and clinical applications of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, C; Gürkov, R

    2012-12-01

    Recently, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) have been described and added to the neuro-otologic test battery as a new measure for the vestibulo-ocular reflex. oVEMPs represent extraocular muscle activity in response to otolith stimulation e.g. by air-conducted sound or bone-conducted vibration. In response to vestibular stimulation, electromyographic activity of the extraocular muscles can be recorded by means of surface electrodes placed beneath the contralateral eye. oVEMPs are likely to reflect predominantly utricular function, while the widely established cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) assess saccular function. Thus, measuring oVEMPs and cVEMPs in addition to caloric and head impulse testing provides further evaluation of the vestibular system and enables quick and cost-effective assessment of otolith function. This review summarizes the neurophysiological properties of oVEMPs, gives recommendations for recording conditions and discusses oVEMP alterations in various disorders of the vestibular system. With increasing insight into oVEMP characteristics in vestibular disorders, e.g. Menière's disease and superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome, oVEMPs are becoming a promising new diagnostic tool for evaluating utricular function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins E Silva, Diandra Caroline; Bastos, Victor Hugo; de Oliveira Sanchez, Mariana; Nunes, Monara Kedma Gomes; Orsini, Marco; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Teixeira, Silmar Silva

    2016-08-01

    Aging is characterized by gradual physiological changes in body systems. Changes in the vestibular system can occur and cause dizziness, vertigo and imbalance, symptoms that are common in the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is a therapeutic resource that has been widely used to improve this condition. To complete a systematic review of the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on the elderly. A search for relevant publications was conducted in SCIELO, PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE and LILACS databases. Clinical trials and cohort studies that were written in the English language and published over the course of the last 10 years were selected. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the PEDro scale. A critical analysis of the studies was composed. Eight studies that involved subjects who were over the age of 60 were selected for inclusion in the systematic review. The most common vestibular dysfunction identified was complaints about dizziness and imbalance. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory was the most frequently used assessment instrument, and the treatment protocol that prevailed was that suggested by Cawthorne and Cooksey. The PEDro scale showed that only one article was of an acceptable methodological quality and presented satisfactory outcome measures. This was due, in part, to a lack of a hidden randomization, masking of the subject, evaluators and therapists, and lack of outcome measures, which can reduce the quality of the evidence presented in this study. Clinical trials indicate that vestibular rehabilitation represents an effective means of treating elderly patients with vestibular disorders; however, evidence of its effectiveness remains lacking.

  19. Neuropharmacological Targets for Drug Action in Vestibular Sensory Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongheon; Jones, Timothy A

    2017-09-01

    The use of pharmacological agents is often the preferred approach to the management of vestibular dysfunction. In the vestibular sensory pathways, the sensory neuroepithelia are thought to be influenced by a diverse number of neuroactive substances that may act to enhance or inhibit the effect of the primary neurotransmitters [i.e., glutamate (Glu) and acetylcholine (ACh)] or alter their patterns of release. This review summarizes various efforts to identify drug targets including neurotransmitter and neuromodulator receptors in the vestibular sensory pathways. Identifying these receptor targets provides a strategic basis to use specific pharmacological tools to modify receptor function in the treatment and management of debilitating balance disorders. A review of the literature reveals that most investigations of the neuropharmacology of peripheral vestibular function have been performed using in vitro or ex vivo animal preparations rather than studying drug action on the normal intact vestibular system in situ. Such noninvasive approaches could aid the development of more accurate and effective intervention strategies for the treatment of dizziness and vertigo. The current review explores the major neuropharmacological targets for drug action in the vestibular system.

  20. Hypervascular vestibular Schwannoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Most vestibular schwannoma is hypovascular with well known poor tumor staining in cerebral angiography. However, hypervascular vestibular schwannoma might be observed as a rare subtype with increased risk of bleeding during surgery. Multimodal imaging features which represent hypervascularity of the tumor can be observed in hypervascular vestibular schwannoma. Here we report a case of hypervascular vestibular schwannoma with brief literature review.

  1. A computerised system for the identification of lactic acid bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Bruggeman, M.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Zwietering, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    A generic computerised system for the identification of bacteria was developed. The system is equipped with a key to the identification of lactic acid bacteria. The identification is carried out in two steps. The first step distinguishes groups of bacteria by following a decision tree with general

  2. System Identification, Environmental Modelling, and Control System Design

    CERN Document Server

    Garnier, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    System Identification, Environmetric Modelling, and Control Systems Design is dedicated to Professor Peter Young on the occasion of his seventieth birthday. Professor Young has been a pioneer in systems and control, and over the past 45 years he has influenced many developments in this field. This volume is comprised of a collection of contributions by leading experts in system identification, time-series analysis, environmetric modelling and control system design – modern research in topics that reflect important areas of interest in Professor Young’s research career. Recent theoretical developments in and relevant applications of these areas are explored treating the various subjects broadly and in depth. The authoritative and up-to-date research presented here will be of interest to academic researcher in control and disciplines related to environmental research, particularly those to with water systems. The tutorial style in which many of the contributions are composed also makes the book suitable as ...

  3. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in the elderly with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-11-01

    Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

  4. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  5. Binding body and self in visuo-vestibular conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauda, Gianluca; Bertolini, Giovanni; Palla, Antonella; Straumann, Dominik; Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2015-03-01

    Maintenance of the bodily self relies on the accurate integration of multisensory inputs in which visuo-vestibular cue integration is thought to play an essential role. Here, we tested in healthy volunteers how conflicting visuo-vestibular bodily input might impact on body self-coherence in a full body illusion set-up. Natural passive vestibular stimulation was provided on a motion platform, while visual input was manipulated using virtual reality equipment. Explicit (questionnaire) and implicit (skin temperature) measures were employed to assess illusory self-identification with either a mannequin or a control object. Questionnaire results pointed to a relatively small illusion, but hand skin temperature, plausibly an index of illusory body ownership, showed the predicted drop specifically in the condition when participants saw the mannequin moving in congruence with them. We argue that this implicit measure was accessible to visuo-vestibular modulation of the sense of self, possibly mediated by shared neural processes in the insula involved in vestibular and interoceptive signalling, thermoregulation and multisensory integration. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of Metallic Coil Identification System Based on RFID

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Myunsik; Song, Beobsung; Ju, Daegeun; Choi, Eunjung; Cho, Byunglok

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes RFID based metal products identification technique for SCM of iron and steel industry. Specially, the coil identification system is developed. To cope with the falling off the tag identification performance affected by neighbouring metallic objects, the tag attachment method based on flagtag is proposed and the reader antenna packaging technique is developed to improve the performance of target coil identification. A Crane equipped with the developed system can detect the...

  7. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  8. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: sergioanat.morf@epm.br; Smith, Ricardo Luiz [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isotani, Sadao [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Alonso, Luis Garcia [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Anadao, Carlos Augusto [Otorhinolaryngology Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prates, Jose Carlos [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm{sup 2} of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm{sup 2}, 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant.

  9. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Bernal Valls; Víctor Faus Cuñat; Raquel Bernal Valls

    2006-01-01

    El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a represent...

  10. Visuo-vestibular contributions to anxiety and fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carlos M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-01-01

    The interactive roles of the visual and vestibular systems allow for postural control within boundaries of perceived safety. In specific circumstances, visual vestibular and postural interactions act as a cue that trigger fear, similarly to what occurs in motion sickness. Unusual patterns of visuo-vestibular interaction that emerge without warning can elicit fear, which can then become associated to a certain stimuli or situation, creating a CS-US association, (i.e., phobia), or can emerge without warning but also without becoming associated to a particular concomitant event (i.e., panic). Depending on the individual sensitivity to visuo-vestibular unusual patterns and its impact in postural control, individuals will be more or less vulnerable to develop these disorders. As such, the mechanism we here propose is also sufficient to explain the lack of certain fears albeit exposure. Following this rationale, a new subcategory of anxiety disorders, named visuo-vestibular fears can be considered. This model brings important implications for developmental and evolutionary psychological science, and invites to place visuo-vestibular fears in a particular subtype or specification within the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. The Moving History of Vestibular Stimulation as a Therapeutic Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabherr, Luzia; Macauda, Gianluca; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2015-01-01

    Although the discovery and understanding of the function of the vestibular system date back only to the 19th century, strategies that involve vestibular stimulation were used long before to calm, soothe and even cure people. While such stimulation was classically achieved with various motion devices, like Cox's chair or Hallaran's swing, the development of caloric and galvanic vestibular stimulation has opened up new possibilities in the 20th century. With the increasing knowledge and recognition of vestibular contributions to various perceptual, motor, cognitive, and emotional processes, vestibular stimulation has been suggested as a powerful and non-invasive treatment for a range of psychiatric, neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions. Yet, the therapeutic interventions were, and still are, often not hypothesis-driven as broader theories remain scarce and underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are often vague. We aim to critically review the literature on vestibular stimulation as a form of therapy in various selected disorders and present its successes, expectations, and drawbacks from a historical perspective.

  13. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  14. Vestibular telemedicine and rehabilitation. Applications for virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viirre, E

    1996-01-01

    This paper will discuss the use of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies in the rehabilitation of patients with vestibular disorders and in the provision of remote medical consultations for those patients. Patients with a vestibular problem are very common (vertigo is the second most common neurological complaint after headache) and yet there are very few vestibular neurotologists: specialists in their diagnosis and treatment. New treatments for various disorders causing vertigo now exist. This means that appropriate diagnosis can significantly improve patients' well-being. Remote medical diagnosis and treatment facilities could make the few vestibular disorder specialists much more available to patients. An analysis of the technological and economic factors influencing the provision of this service is necessary. The main long term effect of many vestibular disorders is damage to the sensing apparatus of the inner ear. The damage can lead to inappropriate interaction between visually driven orientation sensing and sensing of orientation by the inner ear. The consequence for the patient is vertigo (a sensation of turning), motion sickness and imbalance. Current rehabilitation efforts are intended to drive the nervous system to adapt to the disordered vestibular input. Adaptation appears to occur slowly in many subjects, even those within rehabilitation programs. An appropriately designed VR experience could greatly increase the rate of adaptation in these patients.

  15. Transformation of Vestibular Signals for the Control of Standing in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Luu, Billy L; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-11-09

    During standing balance, vestibular signals encode head movement and are transformed into coordinates that are relevant to maintaining upright posture of the whole body. This transformation must account for head-on-body orientation as well as the muscle actions generating the postural response. Here, we investigate whether this transformation is dependent upon a muscle's ability to stabilize the body along the direction of a vestibular disturbance. Subjects were braced on top of a robotic balance system that simulated the mechanics of standing while being exposed to an electrical vestibular stimulus that evoked a craniocentric vestibular error of head roll. The balance system was limited to move in a single plane while the vestibular error direction was manipulated by having subjects rotate their head in yaw. Vestibular-evoked muscle responses were greatest when the vestibular error was aligned with the balance direction and decreased to zero as the two directions became orthogonal. This demonstrates that muscles respond only to the component of the error that is aligned with the balance direction and thus relevant to the balance task, not to the cumulative afferent activity, as expected for vestibulospinal reflex loops. When we reversed the relationship between balancing motor commands and associated vestibular sensory feedback, the direction of vestibular-evoked ankle compensatory responses was also reversed. This implies that the nervous system quickly reassociates new relationships between vestibular sensory signals and motor commands related to maintaining balance. These results indicate that vestibular-evoked muscle activity is a highly flexible balance response organized to compensate for vestibular disturbances. The postural corrections critical to standing balance and navigation rely on transformation of sensory information into reference frames that are relevant for the required motor actions. Here, we demonstrate that the nervous system transforms

  16. Is the Headache in Patients with Vestibular Migraine Attenuated by Vestibular Rehabilitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Sugaya, Nagisa; ARAI, Miki; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background Vestibular rehabilitation is the most effective treatment for dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction. Given the biological relationship between vestibular symptoms and headache, headache in patients with vestibular migraine (VM) could be improved by vestibular rehabilitation that leads to the improvement of dizziness. This study aimed to compare the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on headache and other outcomes relating to dizziness, and the psychological factors in patien...

  17. Effects of weightlessness on the development of the vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The chronic 2g centrifuge was constructed for testing weightlessness effects on development of vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat. Both the stationary and rotating rail tests were performed. A physiological review is presented on vestibular apparatus, along with a system analysis. Time constants and input threshold level of the system are also considered.

  18. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  19. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. K. Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no viable treatment option. Vestibular implants could eventually restore vestibular function. Most vestibular implant prototypes to date are modified cochlear implants to fast-track development. These use various objective measurements, such as the electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP, to supplement behavioral information. We investigated whether eCAPs could be recorded in patients with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. Specifically, eCAPs were successfully recorded for cochlear and vestibular setups, as well as for mixed cochlear-vestibular setups. Similarities and slight differences were found for the recordings of the three setups. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of eCAP recording with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. They could be used in the short term to reduce current spread and avoid activation of non-targeted neurons. More research is warranted to better understand the neural origin of vestibular eCAPs and to utilize them for clinical applications.

  20. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  1. Rescue of peripheral vestibular function in Usher syndrome mice using a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Depreux, Frederic F; Jodelka, Francine M; Lentz, Jennifer J; Rigo, Frank; Jones, Timothy A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2017-09-15

    Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C/harmonin) is associated with profound retinal, auditory and vestibular dysfunction. We have previously reported on an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-29) that dramatically improves auditory function and balance behavior in mice homozygous for the harmonin mutation Ush1c c.216G > A following a single systemic administration. The findings were suggestive of improved vestibular function; however, no direct vestibular assessment was made. Here, we measured vestibular sensory evoked potentials (VsEPs) to directly assess vestibular function in Usher mice. We report that VsEPs are absent or abnormal in Usher mice, indicating profound loss of vestibular function. Strikingly, Usher mice receiving ASO-29 treatment have normal or elevated vestibular response thresholds when treated during a critical period between postnatal day 1 and 5, respectively. In contrast, treatment of mice with ASO-29 treatment at P15 was minimally effective at rescuing vestibular function. Interestingly, ASO-29 treatment at P1, P5 or P15 resulted in sufficient vestibular recovery to support normal balance behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit to balance with ASO-29 treatment at P15 despite the profound vestibular functional deficits that persist with treatment at this later time. These findings provide the first direct evidence of an effective treatment of peripheral vestibular function in a mouse model of USH1C and reveal the potential for using antisense technology to treat vestibular dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Vestibular Function in the Temporal and Parietal Cortex: Distinct Velocity and Inertial Processing Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne eVentre-Dominey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of behavioural and neuroimaging studies have reported converging data in favour of a cortical network for vestibular function, distributed between the temporo-parietal cortex and the prefrontal cortex in the primate. In this review, we focus on the role of the cerebral cortex in visuo-vestibular integration including the motion sensitive temporo-occipital areas i.e. the middle superior temporal area (MST and the parietal cortex. Indeed these two neighbouring cortical regions, though they both receive combined vestibular and visual information, have distinct implications in vestibular function. In sum, this review of the literature leads to the idea of two separate cortical vestibular sub-systems forming (1 a velocity pathway including MST and direct descending pathways on vestibular nuclei. As it receives well defined visual and vestibular velocity signals, this pathway is likely involved in heading perception and rapid top-down regulation of eye/head coordination and (2 an inertial processing pathway involving the parietal cortex in connection with the subcortical vestibular nuclei complex responsible for velocity storage integration. This vestibular cortical pathway would be implicated in high order multimodal integration and cognitive functions, including world space and self- referential processing.

  3. Vestibular function in the temporal and parietal cortex: distinct velocity and inertial processing pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    A number of behavioral and neuroimaging studies have reported converging data in favor of a cortical network for vestibular function, distributed between the temporo-parietal cortex and the prefrontal cortex in the primate. In this review, we focus on the role of the cerebral cortex in visuo-vestibular integration including the motion sensitive temporo-occipital areas i.e., the middle superior temporal area (MST) and the parietal cortex. Indeed, these two neighboring cortical regions, though they both receive combined vestibular and visual information, have distinct implications in vestibular function. In sum, this review of the literature leads to the idea of two separate cortical vestibular sub-systems forming (1) a velocity pathway including MST and direct descending pathways on vestibular nuclei. As it receives well-defined visual and vestibular velocity signals, this pathway is likely involved in heading perception and rapid top-down regulation of eye/head coordination and (2) an inertial processing pathway involving the parietal cortex in connection with the subcortical vestibular nuclei complex responsible for velocity storage integration. This vestibular cortical pathway would be implicated in high-order multimodal integration and cognitive functions, including world space and self-referential processing. PMID:25071481

  4. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental group) or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p>0.005) regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p<0.05) in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p<0.05) in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Manso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD (experimental group or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p > 0.005 regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p < 0.05 in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p < 0.05 in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  6. The effect of vestibular rehabilitation on adults with bilateral vestibular hypofunction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciuncula, Franchino; Johnson, Connie C; Glickman, Leslie B

    2012-01-01

    Adults with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) experience significant disability. A systematic review assessed evidence for vestibular rehabilitation (VR). NUMBER OF STUDIES: 14 studies. Search identification of studies based on inclusion criteria: (a) population: adults with BVH of peripheral origin; (b) interventions: vestibular exercises, balance training, education, or sensory prosthetics; (c) comparison: single interventions or compared to another psychophysical intervention, placebo, or healthy population; (d) outcomes: based on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Body Functions and Structure, Activity, and Participation; (e) study designs: prospective and interventional, Levels of Evidence I to III per Centre of Evidence-based Medicine grading. Coding and appraisal based on ICF framework and strength of evidence synthesis. Five Level II studies and nine Level III studies: All had outcomes on gaze and postural stability, five with outcomes on gait speed and perceptions of oscillopsia and disequilibrium. (a) Moderate evidence strength on improved gaze and postural stability (ICF-Body Functions) following exercise-based VR; (b) Inadequate number of studies supporting benefit of VR on ICF-Participation outcomes; (c) Sensory prosthetics in early phase of development. Moderate evidence strength in support of VR from an impairment level; clinical practice and research needed to explore interventions extending to ICF-Activity and Participation.

  7. Neural network model of vestibular nuclei reaction to onset of vestibular prosthetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eDigiovanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of ‘optimal’ stimulation configurations for humans. Here we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time-point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate and pulse amplitude modulation. Pulse amplitude modulation was more effective than pulse rate modulation for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost pulse amplitude modulation. Co-modulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both

  8. Guided and unguided internet based vestibular rehabilitation versus usual care for dizzy adults of 50 years and older: a protocol for a three armed randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Vugt, V; van der Wouden, C; Bosmans, J; Smallbrugge, M; van Diest, W; Essery, Rosie; Yardley, Lucy; H Horst; Maarsingh, O

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dizziness is a common symptom in general practice with a high prevalence among older adults. The most common cause of dizziness in general practice is peripheral vestibular disease. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a safe and effective treatment for peripheral vestibular disease that entails specific exercises to maximise the central nervous system compensation for the effects of vestibular pathology. An internet-based VR intervention has recently been shown to be safe and effec...

  9. Age-Related Vestibular Loss: Current Understanding and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system sub-serves a number of reflex and perceptual functions, comprising the peripheral apparatus, the vestibular nerve, the brainstem and cerebellar processing circuits, the thalamic relays, and the vestibular cerebral cortical network. This system provides signals of self-motion, important for gaze and postural control, and signals of traveled distance, for spatial orientation, especially in the dark. Current evidence suggests that certain aspects of this multi-faceted system may deteriorate with age and sometimes with severe consequences, such as falls. Often the deterioration in vestibular functioning relates to how the signal is processed by brain circuits rather than an impairment in the sensory transduction process. We review current data concerning age-related changes in the vestibular system, and how this may be important for clinicians dealing with balance disorders.

  10. Age-Related Vestibular Loss: Current Understanding and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Allen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system sub-serves a number of reflex and perceptual functions, comprising the peripheral apparatus, the vestibular nerve, the brainstem and cerebellar processing circuits, the thalamic relays, and the vestibular cerebral cortical network. This system provides signals of self-motion, important for gaze and postural control, and signals of traveled distance, for spatial orientation, especially in the dark. Current evidence suggests that certain aspects of this multi-faceted system may deteriorate with age and sometimes with severe consequences, such as falls. Often the deterioration in vestibular functioning relates to how the signal is processed by brain circuits rather than an impairment in the sensory transduction process. We review current data concerning age-related changes in the vestibular system, and how this may be important for clinicians dealing with balance disorders.

  11. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  12. Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Scott; Bean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We characterize both nonlinear and high order linear responses of fiber-optic and optoelectronic components using spread spectrum temperature cycling methods. This Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS) provides much more detail than conventional narrowband or quasi-static temperature profiling methods. This detail allows us to match components more thoroughly, detect subtle reversible shifts in performance, and investigate the cause of instabilities or irreversible changes. In particular, we create parameterized models of athermal fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), delay line interferometers (DLIs), and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, then subject the alternative models to selection via the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Detailed pairing of components, e.g. FBGs, is accomplished by means of weighted distance metrics or norms, rather than on the basis of a single parameter, such as center wavelength.

  13. Writer identification system for Ethiopic handwriting | Demoze | Zede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writer identification is a popular and ongoing research area having a wide variety of applications in banking, criminal justice system, access control, determining the authenticity of handwritten mails, etc. In this paper, an off-line text independent Ethiopic writer identification system has been proposed. The system uses 50 ...

  14. A study on switched linear system identification using game ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis results to estimation of system parameters and identification of stabilizing switching control rules. The system trajectory is ascertained by simulation tests, wherein subsystem failure time intervals are varied. The study demonstrates feasibility of the non-classical methods in system identification from first ...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification check system. 75.1715 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1715 Identification check system. Each operator of a coal mine shall establish a check-in and check-out system which will provide...

  16. Waterway Performance Monitoring via Automatic Identification System (AIS) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    the systems of navigation 6 projects. The Nationwide Automatic Identification System (NAIS) for vessels operating in 7 coastal waters, instituted...revised from original submittal. 3 INTRODUCTION 1 The United States Coast Guard (USCG) maintains the Nationwide Automatic Identification 2 System

  17. Spatial cognition, body representation and affective processes: the role of vestibular information beyond ocular reflexes and control of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W; Preuss, Nora; Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: (1) Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths), body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals), in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. (2) Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. (3) Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are-at least in part-associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  18. Spatial Cognition, Body Representation and Affective Processes: The Role of Vestibular Information beyond Ocular Reflexes and Control of Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred W Mast

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: 1 Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths, body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals, in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. 2 Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. 3 Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are – at least in part – associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  19. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of changes in perilymphatic K+ on the vestibular evoked potential in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect on the functioning of the vestibular system of a rupture of Reissner's membrane, artificial endolymph was injected in scala media of ten guinea pigs and vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs), evoked by vertical acceleration pulses, were measured. Directly after injection of

  1. The role of stereo vision in visual-vestibular integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John S; Campos, Jennifer L; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Smith, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    Self-motion through an environment stimulates several sensory systems, including the visual system and the vestibular system. Recent work in heading estimation has demonstrated that visual and vestibular cues are typically integrated in a statistically optimal manner, consistent with Maximum Likelihood Estimation predictions. However, there has been some indication that cue integration may be affected by characteristics of the visual stimulus. Therefore, the current experiment evaluated whether presenting optic flow stimuli stereoscopically, or presenting both eyes with the same image (binocularly) affects combined visual-vestibular heading estimates. Participants performed a two-interval forced-choice task in which they were asked which of two presented movements was more rightward. They were presented with either visual cues alone, vestibular cues alone or both cues combined. Measures of reliability were obtained for both binocular and stereoscopic conditions. Group level analyses demonstrated that when stereoscopic information was available there was clear evidence of optimal integration, yet when only binocular information was available weaker evidence of cue integration was observed. Exploratory individual analyses demonstrated that for the stereoscopic condition 90% of participants exhibited optimal integration, whereas for the binocular condition only 60% of participants exhibited results consistent with optimal integration. Overall, these findings suggest that stereo vision may be important for self-motion perception, particularly under combined visual-vestibular conditions.

  2. Dynamic mode decomposition for compressive system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhe; Kaiser, Eurika; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan; Brunton, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition has emerged as a leading technique to identify spatiotemporal coherent structures from high-dimensional data. In this work, we integrate and unify two recent innovations that extend DMD to systems with actuation and systems with heavily subsampled measurements. When combined, these methods yield a novel framework for compressive system identification, where it is possible to identify a low-order model from limited input-output data and reconstruct the associated full-state dynamic modes with compressed sensing, providing interpretability of the state of the reduced-order model. When full-state data is available, it is possible to dramatically accelerate downstream computations by first compressing the data. We demonstrate this unified framework on simulated data of fluid flow past a pitching airfoil, investigating the effects of sensor noise, different types of measurements (e.g., point sensors, Gaussian random projections, etc.), compression ratios, and different choices of actuation (e.g., localized, broadband, etc.). This example provides a challenging and realistic test-case for the proposed method, and results indicate that the dominant coherent structures and dynamics are well characterized even with heavily subsampled data.

  3. Older adults demonstrate superior vestibular perception for virtual rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ryan M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Dalton, Brian H; Inglis, J Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Adult ageing results in a progressive loss of vestibular hair cell receptors and afferent fibres. Given the robustness of vestibulo-ocular and vestibular-evoked whole-body responses to age-related deterioration, it was proposed that the vestibular system compensates centrally. Here we examine the potential for central compensation in vestibular sensitivity with adult ageing by using a combination of real and virtual rotation-based psychophysical testing at two stimulus frequencies (0.1 & 1Hz). Real rotations activate semi-circular canal hair cell receptors naturally via mechanotransduction, while electrical current used to evoke virtual rotations does not rely on mechanical deformation of hair cell receptors to activate vestibular afferents. This two-pronged approach allows us to determine the independent effects of age-related peripheral afferent receptor loss and potential compensatory mechanisms. Older adults had thresholds for discriminating real rotations that were significantly greater than young adults at 0.1Hz (7.2 vs. 3°/s), but the effect of age was weaker (non-significant) at 1Hz (2.4 vs. 1.3°/s). For virtual rotations, older adults had greater thresholds than young adults at 0.1Hz (1.2 vs. 0.5mA), however, older adults outperformed young adults at 1Hz (0.6 vs. 1.1mA). Based on these thresholds, we argue that central vestibular processing gain is enhanced in older adults for 1Hz real and virtual rotations, partially offsetting the negative impact of normal age-related hair cell receptor and primary afferent loss. We propose that the frequency dependence of this compensation reflects the physiological importance of the 1-5Hz range in natural vestibular input. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function-A Review of Electrovestibulography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J; Pastras, Christopher J; Curthoys, Ian S

    2017-01-01

    Electrocochleography (EcochG), incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM), the Summating Potential (SP), and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP), has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC) and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG), incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system.

  5. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J.; Pastras, Christopher J.; Curthoys, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    Electrocochleography (EcochG), incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM), the Summating Potential (SP), and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP), has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC) and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG), incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system. PMID:28620284

  6. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrocochleography (EcochG, incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM, the Summating Potential (SP, and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP, has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG, incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system.

  7. Practical Modeling and Comprehensive System Identification of a BLDC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changle Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline all the steps in a rigorous and simple procedure for system identification of BLDC motor. A practical mathematical model for identification is derived. Frequency domain identification techniques and time domain estimation method are combined to obtain the unknown parameters. The methods in time domain are founded on the least squares approximation method and a disturbance observer. Only the availability of experimental data for rotor speed and armature current are required for identification. The proposed identification method is systematically investigated, and the final identified model is validated by experimental results performed on a typical BLDC motor in UAV.

  8. The normal distribution and projections of constitutive NADPH-d/NOS neurons in the brainstem vestibular complex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, D W; Beitz, A J

    2000-09-11

    The vestibular system is a highly conserved sensory system in vertebrates that is largely responsible for maintenance of one's orientation in space, posture, and balance and for visual fixation of objects during motion. In light of the considerable literature indicating an involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in sensory systems, it is important to determine whether NO is associated with vestibular pathways. To study the relationship of NO to vestibular pathways, we first examined the normal distribution of constitutive NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in the vestibular complex (VC) and then examined its association with selected vestibular projection neurons. Survey of the four major vestibular nuclei revealed that only the medial vestibular nucleus contained significant numbers of perikarya stained for NADPH-d/NOS. By contrast, all the vestibular nuclei contained a network of fine processes that stained positive for NADPH-d, although the density of this network varied among the individual nuclei. To determine whether NADPH-d/NOS neurons project to vestibular efferent targets, injections of the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold were made into known targets of second-order vestibular neurons. Vestibular neurons containing constitutive NADPH-d/NOS were found to project predominantly to the oculomotor nucleus. A small number of neurons also participate in vestibulothalamic and intrinsic vestibular connections. These results indicate that NADPH-d/NOS neurons are prevalent in the MVN and that a subpopulation of these neurons project to the oculomotor complex. Nitric oxide is probably released locally from axons located throughout the vestibular complex but may play a particularly important role in vestibulo-ocular pathways. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Advanced 3D Object Identification System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the Phase I effort, OPTRA developed object detection, tracking, and identification algorithms and successfully tested these algorithms on computer-generated...

  10. Performance Assessment of the CapitalBio Mycobacterium Identification Array System for Identification of Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Yan, Zihe; Han, Min; Han, Zhijun; Jin, Lingjie; Zhao, Yanlin

    2012-01-01

    The CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification microarray system is a rapid system for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The performance of this system was assessed with 24 reference strains, 486 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, and 40 clinical samples and then compared to the “gold standard” of DNA sequencing. The CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification microarray system showed highly concordant identification results of 100% and 98.4% for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification array for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were 99.6% and 100%, respectively, for direct detection and identification of clinical samples, and the overall sensitivity was 52.5%. It was 100% for sputum, 16.7% for pleural fluid, and 10% for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, respectively. The total assay was completed in 6 h, including DNA extraction, PCR, and hybridization. The results of this study confirm the utility of this system for the rapid identification of mycobacteria and suggest that the CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification array is a molecular diagnostic technique with high sensitivity and specificity that has the capacity to quickly identify most mycobacteria. PMID:22090408

  11. Performance assessment of the CapitalBio mycobacterium identification array system for identification of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Yue, Jun; Yan, Zihe; Han, Min; Han, Zhijun; Jin, Lingjie; Zhao, Yanlin

    2012-01-01

    The CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification microarray system is a rapid system for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The performance of this system was assessed with 24 reference strains, 486 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, and 40 clinical samples and then compared to the "gold standard" of DNA sequencing. The CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification microarray system showed highly concordant identification results of 100% and 98.4% for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification array for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were 99.6% and 100%, respectively, for direct detection and identification of clinical samples, and the overall sensitivity was 52.5%. It was 100% for sputum, 16.7% for pleural fluid, and 10% for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, respectively. The total assay was completed in 6 h, including DNA extraction, PCR, and hybridization. The results of this study confirm the utility of this system for the rapid identification of mycobacteria and suggest that the CapitalBio Mycobacterium identification array is a molecular diagnostic technique with high sensitivity and specificity that has the capacity to quickly identify most mycobacteria.

  12. Particle Identification with the LHCb RICH System

    CERN Document Server

    Harnew, Neville

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system to provide particle identification over the momentum range 2-100 GeV/c. Two RICH detectors are employed. The upstream detector, RICH1, utilizes both aerogel and C$_4$F$_{10}$ gas radiators whilst the downstream RICH2 uses a CF$_4$ gas radiator. The RICH2 detector has been fabricated and is installed in the LHCb interaction region; RICH1 has a programme of phased design and construction. Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders to allow operation in magnetic fields up to 50mT. The performance of pre-series HPDs and the results obtained from a particle test beam using the full LHCb readout chain is presented. The production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has recently commenced. The expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from real...

  13. Vestibular information is necessary for maintaining metric properties of representational space: evidence from mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péruch, Patrick; Lopez, Christophe; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Escoffier, Guy; Zeitoun, Alain; Sanjuan, Mélanie; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2011-09-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions, from postural and oculomotor reflexes to spatial representation and cognition. Vestibular signals are important to maintain an internal, updated representation of the body position and movement in space. However, it is not clear to what extent they are also necessary to mentally simulate movement in situations that do not involve displacements of the body, as in mental imagery. The present study assessed how vestibular loss can affect object-based mental transformations (OMTs), i.e., imagined rotations or translations of objects relative to the environment. Participants performed one task of mental rotation of 3D-objects and two mental scanning tasks dealing with the ability to build and manipulate mental images that have metric properties. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (1 week and 1 month). They were compared to healthy participants tested at similar time intervals and to bilateral vestibular-defective patients tested after the recovery period. Vestibular loss impaired all mental imagery tasks. Performance varied according to the extent of vestibular loss (bilateral patients were frequently the most impaired) and according to the time elapsed after unilateral vestibular neurotomy (deficits were stronger at the early stage after neurotomy and then gradually compensated). These findings indicate that vestibular signals are necessary to perform OMTs and provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in processing metric properties of mental representations. They suggest that vestibular loss disorganizes brain structures commonly involved in mental imagery, and more generally in mental representation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  15. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Hammam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans.

  16. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans. PMID:28798718

  17. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System (AIS). (a) The following vessels must have a properly installed, operational, type approved...) Passenger vessels, of 150 gross tonnage or more, not later than July 1, 2003; (ii) Tankers, regardless of...

  18. Using Automatic Identification System Technology to Improve Maritime Border Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    System xiii POE port of entry QHSR Quadrennial Homeland Security Review RCMP Royal Canadian Mounted Police RFID radio frequency identification...IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE MARITIME BORDER SECURITY by Tedric R. Lindstrom December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Robert Simeral... SECURITY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Tedric R. Lindstrom 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey

  19. NNSYSID - toolbox for system identification with neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, M.; Ravn, Ole; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2002-01-01

    The NNSYSID toolset for System Identification has been developed as an add on to MATLAB(R). The NNSYSID toolbox has been designed to assist identification of nonlinear dynamic systems. It contains a number of nonlinear model structures based on neural networks, effective training algorithms...

  20. [Effect of nitric oxide in vestibular compensation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zi-dong; Zhang, Lian-shan

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of nitric oxide (NO) in vestibular compensation after unilateral vestibular deafferentation. Eighteen animals were divided into two groups, 6 of group a as control, 12 of group b received gentamicin intratympanic injection in the left ear. Half of the animals were killed respectively after 5 days and 10 days. Vestibular endorgan and brainstem tissue sections were subjected to NADPH-d reactive test of NOS for histochemical examination. In group a, NOS-like reactivity in both sides of vestibular endorgan and nucli. In group b during 5 days, NOS-like reactivity in right side of vestibular endorgan and nucli, those of the left side were negative. During 10 days, NOS-like reactivity only in the right side of vestibular endorgan. Changes of NOS expression in the contralateral vestibular nucli might have played a role in vestibular compensation.

  1. Age-Related Change in Vestibular Ganglion Cell Populations in Individuals With Presbycusis and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Nelson, Erik G

    2017-04-01

    We sought to establish that the decline of vestibular ganglion cell counts uniquely correlates with spiral ganglion cell counts, cochlear hair cell counts, and hearing phenotype in individuals with presbycusis. The relationship between aging in the vestibular system and aging in the cochlea is a topic of ongoing investigation. Histopathologic age-related changes the vestibular system may mirror what is seen in the cochlea, but correlations with hearing phenotype and the impact of presbycusis are not well understood. Vestibular ganglion cells, spiral ganglion cells, and cochlear hair cells were counted in specimens from individuals with presbycusis and normal hearing. These were taken from within a large collection of processed human temporal bones. Correlations between histopathology and hearing phenotype were investigated. Vestibular ganglion cell counts were positively correlated with spiral ganglion cell counts and cochlear hair cell counts and were negatively correlated with hearing phenotype. There was no statistical evidence on linear regression to suggest that the relationship between age and cell populations differed significantly according to whether presbycusis was present or not. Superior vestibular ganglion cells were more negatively correlated with age than inferior ganglion cells. No difference in vestibular ganglion cells was noted based on sex. Vestibular ganglion cell counts progressively deteriorate with age, and this loss correlates closely with changes in the cochlea, as well as hearing phenotype. However, these correlations do not appear to be unique in individuals with presbycusis as compared with those with normal hearing.

  2. 77 FR 18689 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... Standard Numbering System (SNS), the Vessel Identification System, and accident reporting; require... Vessel Identification System II. Regulatory History On May 7, 2010, we published a notice of proposed...

  3. Recovery of Vestibular Ocular Reflex Function and Balance Control after a Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    John eAllum

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery ...

  4. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to per...

  5. Interaction between vestibular compensation mechanisms and vestibular rehabilitation therapy: ten recommendations for optimal functional recovery

    OpenAIRE

    LACOUR eMichel; BERNARD DEMANZE eLaurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalogue of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to p...

  6. Clinical romberg testing does not detect vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longridge, Neil S; Mallinson, Arthur I

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of tandem Romberg and tandem walking testing at detecting vestibular disease and to increase the difficulty of these standard screening assessments in an attempt to try and make them more effective in the clinical office setting. A prospective study in a tertiary and quaternary care neuro-otology clinic comparing performance on tandem Romberg and tandem walking between patients with vestibular disease and controls matched for age and sex. Making the tandem Romberg test and tandem walking tests more difficult for patients was not helpful because it also made the tests more difficult to perform for controls with no symptoms of vestibular disease. When comparing a young and an old cohort, there was a significant difference in performance. Our techniques of sharpening and sensitizing tandem Romberg and tandem walking tests were not useful at delineating vestibular disease, and age itself may be a confound that mimics the effects of balance system disease. The tandem Romberg and tandem walking tests, despite being in widespread clinical use as office screening tests, may not be effective at determining the presence of newly developed vestibular disease.

  7. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill J Yates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that nonlabyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  8. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Andrew A; Yates, Bill J

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  9. An adaptive vestibular rehabilitation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Benjamin T; Schubert, Michael C

    2017-05-23

    There is a large variation in vestibular rehabilitation (VR) results depending on type of therapy, adherence, and the appropriateness for the patient's level of function. A novel adaptive vestibular rehabilitation (AVR) program was developed and evaluated. Technology and procedure development, and prospective multicenter trial. Those with complete unilateral vestibular hypofunction and symptomatic at least 3 months with a Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) >30 were eligible. Patients were given a device to use with their own computer. They were instructed to use the program daily, with each session lasting about 10 minutes. The task consisted of reporting orientation of the letter C, which appeared when their angular head velocity exceeded a threshold. The letter size and head velocity required were adjusted based on prior performance. Performance on the task was remotely collected by the investigator as well as a weekly DHI score. Four patients aged 31 to 74 years (mean = 51 years) were enrolled in this feasibility study to demonstrate efficacy. Two had treated vestibular schwannomas and two had vestibular neuritis. Starting DHI was 32 to 56 (mean = 42), which was reduced to 0 to 16 (mean = 11.5) after a month of therapy, a clinically and statistically significant (P VR in terms of cost and customization for patient ability and obtained a major improvement in symptoms. This study demonstrated a clinically and statistically significant decrease in symptoms after 4 weeks of therapy. 2b Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. [Identification system for Sildenafil in health foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyasu, T; Shigeoka, S; Kishimoto, K; Ishikawa, F; Nakajima, J; Kamimura, H; Yasuda, I

    2001-10-01

    A substantially available identification system for Sildenafil in health foods was established using 3 different analytical methods; i.e. TLC, preparative TLC/MS and HPLC/photo-diode array. Sildenafil in health foods was extracted with ethyl acetate under alkaline conditions as sample solutions for TLC and preparative TLC, and also extracted with 50% methanol and then diluted with solution of HPLC mobile phase for HPLC. The sample solution for TLC was applied to Silica gel 60 F254 plates with chloroform/methanol/28% ammonia (90:1:5, under layer) as mobile phase. Spots were located under UV radiation at 254 nm and 366 nm, and spraying dragendorff reagent. The conditions for preparative TLC were the same as these of TLC method, and samples abtained from preparative TLC were determined by MS with APCI interface, under both positive and negative modes. The HPLC analysis was carried out on a column of Cosmosil 5C18-AR (4.6 mm x 150 mm, 5 microns) with 0.05 mol/l phosphate buffer pH 3.0/acetonitrile(73:27) as mobile phase and the eluate was monitored by a photo-diode array detector. The quantitative analysis was available, when the peak of this sample on HPLC was detected at 290 nm. When this system was applied to commercial health foods, Sildenafil was identified and their contents were 25 mg-45 mg/tablet or bottle. These contents nearly correspond to that in Viagra, 25 mg, 50 mg/tablet. Therefore, there is a fear of side effects for Sildenafil, when it is taken as health foods.

  11. Genetic Algorithm-Based Identification of Fractional-Order Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxi Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus has become an increasingly popular tool for modeling the complex behaviors of physical systems from diverse domains. One of the key issues to apply fractional calculus to engineering problems is to achieve the parameter identification of fractional-order systems. A time-domain identification algorithm based on a genetic algorithm (GA is proposed in this paper. The multi-variable parameter identification is converted into a parameter optimization by applying GA to the identification of fractional-order systems. To evaluate the identification accuracy and stability, the time-domain output error considering the condition variation is designed as the fitness function for parameter optimization. The identification process is established under various noise levels and excitation levels. The effects of external excitation and the noise level on the identification accuracy are analyzed in detail. The simulation results show that the proposed method could identify the parameters of both commensurate rate and non-commensurate rate fractional-order systems from the data with noise. It is also observed that excitation signal is an important factor influencing the identification accuracy of fractional-order systems.

  12. Decentralized system identification using stochastic subspace identification for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-04-08

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model.

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  14. [Vestibular rehabilitation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Karina; Marangoni, Bruna E M; Schmidt, Kizi B; Cobe, Fernanda A; Matuti, Gabriela S; Nishino, Lúcia K; Thomaz, Rodrigo B; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Lianza, Sérgio; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2007-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory illness, that attack the white matter of the central nervous system, and abnormal vestibular sensations (vertigo, disequilibrium) are frequent. The vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is determined by mechanisms of adaptations, neural substitutions and compensations. This study evaluated the improvement of the central or peripheral vertigo in patients with relapsing-remitting MS submitted to the VR (exercises of Cawthorne-Cooksey), through the scale of Berg and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). In this sample of 4 cases the VR, carried through in a period of 2 months, demonstrated the improvement in 3 patients according to the Berg scale and in 2 patients considering that of the DHI.

  15. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Lu, R. [Hudson Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  16. System Identification for the Clipper Liberty C96 Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showers, Daniel

    System identification techniques are powerful tools that help improve modeling capabilities of real world dynamic systems. These techniques are well established and have been successfully used on countless systems in many areas. However, wind turbines provide a unique challenge for system identification because of the difficulty in measuring its primary input: wind. This thesis first motivates the problem by demonstrating the challenges with wind turbine system identification using both simulations and real data. It then suggests techniques toward successfully identifying a dynamic wind turbine model including the notion of an effective wind speed and how it might be measured. Various levels of simulation complexity are explored for insights into calculating an effective wind speed. In addition, measurements taken from the University of Minnesota's Clipper Liberty C96 research wind turbine are used for a preliminary investigation into the effective wind speed calculation and system identification of a real world wind turbine.

  17. Neighborhood detection for the identification of spatiotemporal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Billings, S A

    2008-06-01

    Neighborhood detection and local state vector construction for the identification of spatiotemporal systems is considered in this paper. Determining the neighborhood size both in the space and time domain can considerably reduce the complexity of the set of candidate model terms for the identification of coupled map lattice models. The computation requirements of the model identification algorithm can also be greatly reduced instead of the more direct identification approach of searching over the entire spatiotemporal neighborhood in the original space. In this paper, a new neighborhood detection method is introduced based on embedding theory for nonlinear dynamical systems to produce an initial spatiotemporal neighborhood for the identification of spatiotemporal systems. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the new neighborhood detection method.

  18. Journal of EEA, Vol. 27, 2010 WRITER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    messy

    further processing by the identification system. Two approaches ... identification, writer verification, image pre-processing, multi-channel .... yxf be digital value of pixel ),( yx in digital image, where zero value correspond to black pixel and one correspond to white pixel. The horizontal projection profile. (HPP) is defined as. ∑.

  19. Evaluation of Cervical Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Subjects with Chronic Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Salam, Nehal Mamdouh; Ismail, Elshahat Ibrahem; El Saeed El Sharabasy, Ayman

    2017-12-14

    Noise has been recognized as a major cause of cochlear damage resulting in both tinnitus and hearing loss. On the other hand, damage to the vestibular system, especially the saccule, can be considered as a potential problem. The cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) have been established as a clinical test of measuring both sac-cular and inferior vestibular nerve function. Therefore, it is thought to be sensitive to the noise-induced damage to the vestibular system. Accordingly, this study was designed to assess the vestibular system in subjects exposed to noise during work by using cVEMPs. This study was performed in over 60 adult males who were divided into a study group (consisting of 40 adult males) with history of chronic occupational noise exposure and with variable degree of hearing levels and a control group consisting of 20 healthy adults with normal peripheral hearing, with no history of noise exposure and no vestibular complaints. cVEMP recordings were elicited using 95dB nHL click stimuli. There was statistically significant prolonged cVEMP latency of the P13 and N23 waves of the study versus the control groups. As regard to the sense of imbalance, there were significant prolonged cVEMPs latencies in present versus absent sense of imbalance. However, there were statistically insignificant reduced cVEMP amplitudes in present versus absent sense of imbalance. Chronic noise exposure damages the vestibular system especially the saccule in addition to cochlear damage.

  20. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Byron K.

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1- g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1- g

  1. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of electrotactile vestibular substitution on rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Camila Giacomo Carneiro; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Danilov, Yuri

    2010-06-07

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of electrotactile tongue biofeedback (BrainPort((R))) as a sensory substitute for the vestibular apparatus in patients with bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) who did not have a good response to conventional vestibular rehabilitation (VR). Seven patients with BVL were trained to use the device. Stimulation on the surface of the tongue was created by a dynamic pattern of electrical pulses and the patient was able to adjust the intensity of stimulation and spatially centralize the stimulus on the electrode array. Patients were directed to continuously adjust head orientation and to maintain the stimulus pattern at the center of the array. Postural tasks that present progressive difficulties were given during the use of the device. Pre- and post-treatment distribution of the sensory organization test (SOT) composite score showed an average value of 38.3+/-8.7 and 59.9+/-11.3, respectively, indicating a statistically significant improvement (p=0.01). Electrotactile tongue biofeedback significantly improved the postural control of the study group, even if they had not improved with conventional VR. The electrotactile tongue biofeedback system was able to supply additional information about head position with respect to gravitational vertical orientation in the absence of vestibular input, improving postural control. Patients with BVL can integrate electrotactile information in their postural control in order to improve stability after conventional VR. These results were obtained and verified not only by the subjective questionnaire but also by the SOT composite score. The limitations of the study are the small sample size and short duration of the follow-up. The current findings show that the sensory substitution mediated by electrotactile tongue biofeedback may contribute to the improved balance experienced by these patients compared to VR. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) related with recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzari, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal related to the bony labyrinth of the inner ear and represents the non-sensory components of the endolymph-filled, closed, membranous labyrinth. The association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss with a large or enlarged vestibular aqueduct is well known as the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). The enlarged VA (EVA) comprises abnormalities not only in the structure of the inner ear, but also in the physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems. The clinical picture of this clinical entity is variable [Yetiser S, Kertment M, Ozkaptan Y. Vestibular disturbance in patients with Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS). Acta Otolaryngol (StochK) 1999;119: 641-646]. Signs and symptoms of the auditory impairment are more commonly described in the literature: hearing loss ranges from mild to profound, arising from fluctuating to stepwise progressive or sudden. Vestibular disturbances, ranging from mild imbalance to episodic vertigo, are rarely described in the literature. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a labyrinthine disorder with a typical behavior: intense crises of rotational vertigo induced by postural changes of the head, with short duration and usually good responsiveness to rehabilitative maneuvers. These maneuvers are effective in about 80% of patients with BPPV. BPPV often recurs. About 1/3 of patients have a recurrence in the first year after treatment, and by five years, about half of all patients have a recurrence. Vestibular aqueduct has been demonstrated by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT), however, CT scans cannot show the membranous labyrinth itself. On MR images it is not the vestibular aqueduct that is visualized but its contents, the endolymphatic duct and sac, and can show the abnormalities of the fluid spaces related to the membranous labyrinth. It is proposed that recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is related with volumetric abnormalities

  4. Vestibular Loss Predicts Poorer Spatial Cognition in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Eric X; Oh, Esther S; Harun, Aisha; Ehrenburg, Matthew; Agrawal, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    The vestibular system is an important contributor to balance control, spatial orientation, and falls risk. Recent evidence has shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have a higher prevalence of vestibular impairment relative to healthy controls. We sought to evaluate whether vestibular loss is specifically associated with poor spatial cognitive skills among patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. We enrolled 50 patients (22 MCI and 28 AD) from an interdisciplinary Memory Clinic and measured vestibular physiologic function in all patients. Spatial cognitive function was assessed using the Money Road Map Test (MRMT) and the Trail Making Test Part B (TMT-B). General cognitive function was assessed with the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE). In multivariable linear regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, education level, and MMSE, MCI and AD patients with vestibular loss made significantly more errors on the MRMT relative to patients with normal vestibular function (β= 7.3, 95% CI 2.4, 12.1 for unilateral vestibular loss and β= 6.4, 95% CI 1.9, 10.9 for bilateral vestibular loss). We further stratified AD patients into "spatially normal" and "spatially impaired" groups based on MRMT performance, and found that the prevalence of vestibular loss was significantly higher in the spatially impaired AD group relative to the spatially normal AD group. These findings support the hypothesis that vestibular loss contributes specifically to a decline in spatial cognitive ability in MCI and AD patients, independently of general cognitive decline, and may predict a "spatially impaired" subtype of AD.

  5. Ethical, anatomical and physiological issues in developing vestibular implants for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Gay, Annietta; Kos, Maria Izabel; Pelizzone, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Effort towards the development of a vestibular implant for human use are being made. This paper will summarize the first important steps conducted in Geneva towards this ambitious goal. Basically, we have faced three major issues. First, an ethical issue. While it was clear that such development would require the collaboration of human volunteers, it was also clear that stimulation of the vestibular system may produce periods of significant incomfort. We know today how to minimize (and potentially eliminate) this type of incomfort. The second issue was anatomical. The anatomical topology of the vestibular system is complex, and of potentially dangerous access (i.e. facial nerve damage). We choose not to place the electrodes inside the ampullae but close the vestibular nerve branches, to avoid any opening of the inner ear and limit the risk of hearing loss. Work on cadaver heads, confirmed by acute stimulations trials on patients undergoing ear surgery under local anesthesia, demonstrated that it is possible to stimulate selectively both the posterior and lateral ampullary nerves, and elicit the expected vertical and horizontal nystagmic responses. The third issue was physiological. One of the goal of a vestibular implant will be to produce smooth eye movements to stabilize gaze direction when the head is moving. Indeed, after restoring a baseline or "rest" activity in the vestibular pathways with steady-state electrical stimulation, we demonstrated that modulation of this stimulation is producing smooth eye movements. In conclusion, humans can adapt to electrical stimulation of the vestibular system without too much discomfort. Surgical access to the posterior and lateral ampullary nerves have been developed and, electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can be used to artificially elicit smooth eye movements of different speeds and directions, once the system is in adapted state. Therefore, the major prerequisites to develop a prototype vestibular implant

  6. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.; Selen, L.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied,

  7. Altered auditory and vestibular functioning in individuals with low bone mineral density: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Jha, Raghav Hira; Gargeshwari, Aditi; Kumar, Prawin

    2018-01-01

    Alteration in the process of bone remodelling is associated with falls and fractures due to increased bone fragility and altered calcium functioning. The auditory system consists of skeletal structures and is, therefore, prone to getting affected by altered bone remodelling. In addition, the vestibule consists of huge volumes of calcium (CaCO3) in the form of otoconia crystals and alteration in functioning calcium levels could, therefore, result in vestibular symptoms. Thus, the present study aimed at compiling information from various studies on assessment of auditory or vestibular systems in individuals with reduced bone mineral density (BMD). A total of 1977 articles were searched using various databases and 19 full-length articles which reported auditory and vestibular outcomes in persons with low BMD were reviewed. An intricate relationship between altered BMD and audio-vestibular function was evident from the studies; nonetheless, how one aspect of hearing or balance affects the other is not clear. Significant effect of reduced bone mineral density could probably be due to the metabolic changes at the level of cochlea, secondary to alterations in BMD. One could also conclude that sympathetic remodelling is associated with vestibular problems in individual; however, whether vestibular problems lead to altered BMD cannot be ascertained with confidence. The studies reviewed in the article provide an evidence of possible involvement of hearing and vestibular system abnormalities in individuals with reduced bone mineral density. Hence, the assessment protocol for these individuals must include hearing and balance evaluation as mandatory for planning appropriate management.

  8. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  9. Identification of a hereditary system with distributed delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha

    1985-01-01

    We study the identification problem that arises in a linear hereditary system with distributed delay. This involves estimating an infinite-dimensional parameter and we use the method of sieves, proposed by Grenander, to solve this problem.

  10. Automated dental identification system: An aid to forensic odontology

    OpenAIRE

    Parvathi Devi; V B Thimmarasa; Vishal Mehrotra; Vikas Singla

    2011-01-01

    Automated dental identification system is computer-aided software for the postmortem identification of deceased individuals based on dental characteristics specifically radiographs. This system is receiving increased attention because of the large number of victims encountered in the mass disasters and it is 90% more time saving and accurate than the conventional radiographic methods. This technique is based on the intensity of the overall region of tooth image and therefore it does not neces...

  11. Separable identification of nonlinear aggregate power system loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosehart, William; Westwick, David; Jazayeri, Pouyan [Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Aguado, Jose; Martin, Sebastian [University of Malaga, Malaga (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    An identification algorithm for a power system load model is proposed in this paper. The overall non-convex identification problem is separated into convex and non-convex subproblems, allowing for a global optimum to be found. Numerical experiments using data from both simulated and physical systems illustrate the accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Experiments are performed to investigate the robustness of the algorithm. (author)

  12. Continuous Speech Classification Systems for Voice Pathologies Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Hugo; Meneses, Carlos; Fonseca, José

    2015-01-01

    Part 8: Signal Processing in Medicine; International audience; Voice pathologies identification using speech processing methods can be used as a preliminary diagnostic. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of sustained vowel /a/ and continuous speech task in identification systems to diagnose voice pathologies. The system recognizes between three classes consisting of two different pathologies sets and healthy subjects. The signals are evaluated using MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstr...

  13. Achados vestibulares em usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Vestibular findings in hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Paulin

    2009-01-01

    patients, 18 (90% showed tinnitus complaint, 15 (75% dizziness complaint and eight (40% headache complaint; b There was a prevalence of alterations in the caloric test and in the peripheral vestibular system; c the results of the vestibular exam showed alterations in 14 patients (70% being, eight cases (40% of peripheral vestibular irritative syndromes and six cases (30% of peripheral vestibular deficiency syndromes; d we verified significant difference between the vestibular exam results and how long the patient had use the hearing aid; e from the five patients that did not related vestibular symptoms four (80% showed alterations in the vestibular exam. CONCLUSION: the importance and sensibility of the functional study regarding the balance system in this type of population must be emphasized because same disorders may occur in the vestibular exam in spite of symptom presence.

  14. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in a large series of vestibular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, L; Melillo, M G; Vassallo, A; Mazzone, S

    2011-02-01

    The Hyperventilation Test is widely used in the "bed-side examination" of vestibular patients. It can either activate a latent nystagmus in central or peripheral vestibular diseases or it can interact with a spontaneous nystagmus, by reducing it or increasing it. Aims of this study were to determine the incidence, patterns and temporal characteristics of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients suffering from vestibular diseases, as well as its contribution to the differential diagnosis between vestibular neuritis and neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve, and its behaviour in some central vestibular diseases. The present study includes 1202 patients featuring, at vestibular examination, at least one sign of vestibular system disorders or patients diagnosed with a "Migraine-related vertigo" or "Chronic subjective dizziness". The overall incidence of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was 21.9%. It was detected more frequently in retrocochlear vestibular diseases rather than in end-organ vestibular diseases: 5.3% in Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, 37.1% in Menière's disease, 37.6% in compensated vestibular neuritis, 77.2% in acute vestibular neuritis and 91.7% in neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve. In acute vestibular neuritis, three HVIN patterns were observed: Paretic pattern: temporary enhancement of the spontaneous nystagmus; Excitatory pattern: temporary inhibition of the spontaneous nystagmus; Strong excitatory pattern: temporary inversion of the spontaneous nystagmus. Excitatory patterns proved to be time-dependent in that they disappeared and were replaced by the paretic pattern over a period of maximum 18 days since the beginning of the disorder. In acoustic neuroma, Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was frequently observed (91.7%), either in the form of an excitatory pattern (fast phases towards the affected site) or in the form of a paretic pattern (fast phases towards the healthy side). The direction of the nystagmus is only partially related to

  15. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  16. Comparison of Excitation Signals in Active Magnetic Bearing System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Vuojolainen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Active magnetic bearings (AMBs offer frictionless suspension, vibration insulation, programmable stiffness, and damping, among other advantages, in levitated rotor applications. However, AMBs are inherently unstable and require accurate system models for the high-performance model-based multi-input multi-output control of rotor position. Control electronics with high calculation capacity and accurate sensors of AMBs provide an opportunity to implement various identification schemes. A variety of artificial excitation signal-based identification methods can thus be achieved with no additional hardware. In this paper, a selection of excitation signals, namely the pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS, chirp signal, multisine, and stepped sine are presented, applied, and compared with the AMB system identification. From the identification experiments, the rotor-bearing system, the inner current control loop, and values of position and current stiffness are identified. Unlike recently published works considering excitation-based identification of AMB rotor systems, it is demonstrated that identification of the rotor system dynamics can be carried out using various well-established excitation signals. Application and feasibility of these excitation signals in AMB rotor systems are analyzed based on experimental results.

  17. Time-Delay System Identification Using Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Seested, Glen Thane

    2013-01-01

    Due to the unknown dead-time coefficient, the time-delay system identification turns to be a non-convex optimization problem. This paper investigates the identification of a simple time-delay system, named First-Order-Plus-Dead-Time (FOPDT), by using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. The qual......Due to the unknown dead-time coefficient, the time-delay system identification turns to be a non-convex optimization problem. This paper investigates the identification of a simple time-delay system, named First-Order-Plus-Dead-Time (FOPDT), by using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique....... The quality and performance of the GA-based identification are compared with those based on extended Least-Mean-Square (LMS) methods, subject to the consideration of different types of time-delay systems, excitation signals, Signal-to-Noise Ratios, and different evaluation criteria. The obtained results...... exhibit that the GA technique has a very promising capability in handling this type of non-convex system identification problem....

  18. Interactive 3-dimensional virtual reality rehabilitation for patients with chronic imbalance and vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Chen, Shuya; Wang, Pa-Chun; Su, Mu-Chun; Chang, Chia-Huang; Tsai, Po-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic imbalance is common in patients with vestibular dysfunction. Vestibular rehabilitation is effective in improving upright balance control. Vestibular rehabilitation exercises, such as Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, include simple repetitive movements and have limited feedback and adaptive training protocols. Interactive systems based on virtual reality (VR) technology may improve vestibular rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an interactive 3-dimensional VR system for vestibular rehabilitation. In 49 subjects with vestibular dysfunction, VR rehabilitation exercises were performed in 6 sessions. Before and after rehabilitation, subjects were evaluated for performance of the training exercises; the center of pressure was measured for 20 seconds and balance indices were determined. Five training scores (total 6) showed a significant improvement. For balance indices in condition of non-stimulation, all of them (total 5) showed a trend of improvement, in which there was a significant improvement in mean mediolateral. For balance indices in condition of post-stimulation, there was a significant improvement in statokinesigram and maximum mediolateral. The VR rehabilitation exercises were effective in improving upright balance control in patients with vestibular dysfunction.

  19. Vestibular Stimulation for Stress Management in Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2016-02-01

    Although several methods are developed to alleviate stress among college students, logistic limitations in adopting them have limited their utility. Hence, we aimed to test a very practical approach to alleviate stress among college students by achieving vestibular stimulation using swings. In this study 60 male and female participants were randomly assigned into vestibular stimulation or control groups. Depression, anxiety, stress scores, sleep quality, heart rate, blood pressure, Autonomic functions, respiratory, haematological, cognitive function, Quality of life were recorded before and after 1(st), 7(th), 14(th), 21(st), 28(th) days of vestibular stimulation. STAI S and STAI T scores were significantly improved on day 28(th) following vestibular stimulation. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were significantly decreased and remained within normal limits in vestibular group on day 28(th) following vestibular stimulation. Postural fall in blood pressure was significantly improved on day 14 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. Respiratory rate was significantly improved on day 7 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. PSQI sleep disturbance, PSQI sleep latency, PSQI total score and bleeding time was significantly improved following vestibular stimulation. Our study supports the adoption of vestibular stimulation for stress management. Hence, placement of swings in college campuses must be considered, which may be a simple approach to alleviate stress among college students.

  20. Closed-loop System Identification with New Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, K; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with system identification of new system dynamics revealed by online introduction of new sensors in existing multi-variable linear control systems. The so-called "Hansen Scheme" utilises the dual Youla-Kucera parameterisation of all systems stabilised by a given linear controller...... to transform closed-loop system identification problems into open-loop-like problems. We show that this scheme can be formally extended to accomodate extra sensors in a nice way. The approach is illustrated on a simple simulation example....

  1. [Rapid identification system for seedlings of medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pengfei; Guo, Qiaosheng; Wang, Tao; Shao, Qingsong

    2012-04-01

    To achieve the rapid identification for seedlings of medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium, the discriminant equation was established and the software for rapid identification was designed. Leaf structure of medicinal Chrysanthemum of 12 cultivars was analyzed to establish the discriminant equation based on variance analysis and discriminant analysis. On this basis, the identification program and software (based on the python language) were designed. Through the analysis of variance and multiple comparisons for the 11 leaf parameter index data of 12 different cultivars, it was found that that the leaf parameters were significant different from each other and reached significant levels. The discriminant equation and the rapid identification software were set up based on the analysis of various indicators. The rapid identification system of seedlings of medicinal Chrysanthemum could be achieved through the establishment of discriminant equation combined with computer technology.

  2. Particle identification system based on dense aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Beloborodov, K.I., E-mail: K.I.Beloborodov@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Danilyuk, A.F. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, 5, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Golubev, V.B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gulevich, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kononov, S.A.; Kravchenko, E.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Onuchin, A.P.; Martin, K.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Serednyakov, S.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-12-21

    A threshold Cherenkov counter based on dense aerogel with refraction index n=1.13 is described. This counter is used for kaon identification at momenta below 1 GeV/c in the SND detector, which takes data at the VEPP-2000 e{sup +}e{sup −} collider. The results of measurements of the counter efficiency using electrons, muons, pions, and kaons produced in e{sup +}e{sup −} annihilation are presented.

  3. Cross-Platform Programming Through System Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriacou, T.; Nehmzow, U.; Igelsiais, R.; Billings, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the Robot MODIC procedure (robot modelling, identification and characterisation) as a process which lets us identify the robot's motion through a nonlinear polynomial function (NARMAX). This procedure represents an important step towards a science of mobile robots, because the Narmax function can be analysed to understand the underlying phenomena governing the robot's behaviour and it also can be used to subsequently control the movement of the robot.\\ud As we'll see ...

  4. Online identification of continuous bimodal and trimodal piecewise affine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, Q.T.; van den Boom, A.J.J.; Baldi, S.; Rantzer, Anders; Bagterp Jørgensen, John; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the identification of continuous piecewise affine systems in state space form with jointly unknown partition and subsystem matrices. The partition of the system is generated by the so-called centers. By representing continuous piecewise affine systems in the max-form and

  5. Incremental Closed-loop Identification of Linear Parameter Varying Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with system identification for control of linear parameter varying systems. In practical applications, it is often important to be able to identify small plant changes in an incremental manner without shutting down the system and/or disconnecting the controller; unfortunately, cl...

  6. Identification of bilinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, a novel identification method based on differential evolu- tion algorithm has been applied to bilinear systems and its performance has been compared to that of genetic algorithm. Box–Jenkins system and different type bilinear systems have been identified using differential evolution and genetic ...

  7. [BEHAVIOURAL AND FUNCTIONAL VESTIBULAR DISTURBANCES AFTER SPACE FLIGHT. 1. MAMMALS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychakov, D V

    2015-01-01

    The review contains data on functional changes in mammals caused by changes in the operation of vestibular system after space flight. These data show that the vestibular system of mammals responds to weightlessness challenge differently at various ontogenetic stages. Orbital space flight conditions have a weak effect on the developing vestibular system during embryonic period. The weightlessness conditions have rather beneficial effect on development of the fetuses. During the early postnatal period, when optimal sensory-motor tactics are created, the prolonged stay under conditions of space flight leads to development of novel, "extraterrestrial" sensory-motor programs that can be fixed in CNS, apparently, for the whole life. In adult individuals after landing essential vestibular changes and disturbances may occur that depend on the spaceflight duration. The adult organism must simultaneously solve two contradicting problems--it should adapt to weightlessness conditions, and should not adapt to them to pass the process of readaptation after returning easier. Thus, individuals must protect themselves against weightlessness influence to keep the intact initial state of health. The protection methods against weightlessness ought to be adjusted according to the duration of space flight. It should be mentioned that not all functional changes registered in adult individuals after landing can be adequately explained. Some of these changes may have chronic or even pathological character. The question of necessity to examine the influence of weightlessness on an aging (senile) organism and on its vestibular system is raised for the first time in this review. In our opinion the development of space gerontology, as a special branch of space biology and medicine, is of undoubted interest, and in the future it may be of practical importance especially taking into account the steadily growing age of cosmonauts (astronauts).

  8. 78 FR 6732 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 173, 174, 181, and 187 RIN 1625-AB45 Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule... Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database rule became effective...

  9. Vestibular Activation Differentially Modulates Human Early Visual Cortex and V5/MT Excitability and Response Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC. PMID:22291031

  10. Evaluation of vestibular function in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; Shafik, Amr Gouda; El Makhzangy, Aly M N; Taha, Hesham; Abdel Mageed, Heba Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess vestibular functions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) with and without sensorineural hearing loss. This was a prospective case study performed at a tertiary referral university hospital. Sixty patients with CSOM were included, and patients with a history of head trauma, diabetes, hypertension, previous ear surgery, use of ototoxic drugs, neurological deficits and suspected fistulae were excluded. The patients underwent basic audiological evaluation, and clinical and instrumental vestibular evaluation. The incidence and extent of vestibular dysfunction in patients with CSOM were analyzed. A total of 42 males and 16 females with a mean age of 29.5 years were included in this study. Forty ears had tubotympanic disease and 19 had cholesteatoma. There were 14 ears with sensorineural hearing loss. A positive history of vertigo was reported in 53.5% of the cases. Rotatory chair abnormalities were found in 70% of the cases, caloric hypofunction was found in 61.6%, and vestibular myogenic evoked potentials were abnormal in 25%. The only positive correlation with vestibular dysfunction was the duration of disease. The vestibular system is significantly affected in cases with CSOM. Both semicircular canals and the saccule are affected. All patients with long-standing CSOM should be evaluated for vestibular dysfunction irrespective of their hearing levels. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Vestibular Involvement in Patients With Otitis Media With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuka; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Izumi, Shuji; Kubota, Yamato; Ohshima, Shinsuke; Horii, Arata

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (OMAAV) is a novel concept of ear disease that is characterized by progressive mixed or sensorineural hearing loss with occasional systemic involvement. Considering the accumulating knowledge about the characteristics of and treatment for auditory dysfunction in OMAAV, the objective of this study was to investigate the vestibular function and symptoms of patients with OMAAV. Retrospective chart review. University hospital. Thirty-one OMAAV patients met criteria proposed by the OMAAV study group in Japan. Clinical characteristics and vestibular tests. Eleven of 31 OMAAV patients had vestibular symptoms; 3 patients had acute vertigo attack with sudden hearing loss and 8 patients had chronic dizziness. Episodic vertigo was not seen in any of the patients. Three patients who received a less intensive therapy without immunosuppressive agents developed intractable persistent dizziness. All symptomatic patients and six of the nine OMAAV patients without vestibular symptoms showed unilateral or bilateral caloric weakness; therefore, vestibular involvement was present in 84% of OMAAV patients. Gain of vestibulo-ocular reflex was reduced in symptomatic patients. The eye-tracking test and optokinetic nystagmus revealed no evidence of central dysfunction. Vestibular dysfunction was seen in 84% of OMAAV patients. One-third of OMAAV patients showed vestibular symptoms such as acute vertigo attack or chronic dizziness, which are of peripheral origin. One-third of the symptomatic patients developed intractable dizziness. Initial intensive treatment by combination therapy with steroid and immunosuppressive agents may be essential for preventing the development of intractable dizziness.

  12. Efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation on chronic unilateral vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, Oya; Topuz, Bülent; Ardiç, F Necdet; Sarhuş, Merih; Ogmen, Gülsen; Ardiç, Füsun

    2004-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation exercises on patients with chronic unilateral vestibular dysfunction. Prospective study. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic and Otolaryngology Clinic of a tertiary referral hospital. One-hundred and twenty-five patients with unilateral chronic vestibular dysfunction were included in the study. Eight-week, two-staged (clinic and home) vestibular rehabilitation programme with components of Cawthorne-Cooksey and Norre exercises was applied. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were completed three times (at the beginning, end of the second week and end of the treatment). Data for 112 patients in the first stage and 93 patients in the second stage were evaluated because of insufficient compliance of the other patients. The mean DHI score was decreased from 50.42 +/- 24.12 points to 21.21 +/- 15.97 points (p < 0.001) at the end of first two weeks, and to 19.93 +/- 19.33 points at the end of the whole treatment. The mean VAS score was decreased from 5.87 +/- 2.27 to 2.02 +/- 1.75 (p < 0.001) at the end of second week, and to 1.51 +/- 1.29 at the end of eighth week. In respect to both VAS and DHI scores, improvement was noted in 67 patients (77.4%). Age, gender and disability level had no predictive value about therapy outcome. There was a fast recovery in the supervised exercise session, whereas there was no significant difference in the home exercise session. These findings suggest that either supervised exercise is better than home exercise or that 10 supervised sessions are sufficient to get the end result.

  13. MAC, A System for Automatically IPR Identification, Collection and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrão, Carlos

    Controlling Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in the Digital World is a very hard challenge. The facility to create multiple bit-by-bit identical copies from original IPR works creates the opportunities for digital piracy. One of the most affected industries by this fact is the Music Industry. The Music Industry has supported huge losses during the last few years due to this fact. Moreover, this fact is also affecting the way that music rights collecting and distributing societies are operating to assure a correct music IPR identification, collection and distribution. In this article a system for automating this IPR identification, collection and distribution is presented and described. This system makes usage of advanced automatic audio identification system based on audio fingerprinting technology. This paper will present the details of the system and present a use-case scenario where this system is being used.

  14. Identification of System Parameters by the Random Decrement Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, Anders

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and illustrate the possibilities of using correlation functions estimated by the Random Decrement Technique as a basis for parameter identification. A two-stage system identification system is used: first, the correlation functions are estimated by the Random...... Decrement Technique, and then the system parameters are identified from the correlation function estimates. Three different techniques are used in the parameter identification process: a simple non-parametric method, estimation of an Auto Regressive (AR) model by solving an overdetermined set of Yule......-Walker equations and finally, least-square fitting of the theoretical correlation function. The results are compared to the results of fitting an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model directly to the system output from a single-degree-of-freedom system loaded by white noise....

  15. Vestibular control of entorhinal cortex activity in spatial navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Yves eJacob

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Navigation in rodents depends on both self-motion (idiothetic and external (allothetic information. Idiothetic information has a predominant role when allothetic information is absent or irrelevant. The vestibular system is a major source of idiothetic information in mammals. By integrating the signals generated by angular and linear accelerations during exploration, a rat is able to generate and update a vector pointing to its starting place and to perform accurate return. This navigation strategy, called path integration, has been shown to involve a network of brain structures. Among these structures, the entorhinal cortex (EC may play a pivotal role as suggested by lesion and electrophysiological data. In particular, it has been recently discovered that some neurons in the medial EC display multiple firing fields producing a regular grid-like pattern across the environment. Such regular activity may arise from the integration of idiothetic information. This hypothesis would be strongly strengthened if it was shown that manipulation of vestibular information interferes with grid cell activity. In the present paper we review neuroanatomical and functional evidence indicating that the vestibular system influences the activity of the brain network involved in spatial navigation. We also provide new data on the effects of reversible inactivation of the peripheral vestibular system on the EC theta rhythm. The main result is that TTX administration abolishes velocity-controlled theta oscillations in the EC, indicating that vestibular information is necessary for EC activity. Since recent data demonstrate that disruption of theta rhythm in the medial EC induces a disorganization of grid cell firing, our findings indicate that the integration of idiothetic information in the EC is essential to form a spatial representation of the environment.

  16. Vestibular control of entorhinal cortex activity in spatial navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pierre-Yves; Poucet, Bruno; Liberge, Martine; Save, Etienne; Sargolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Navigation in rodents depends on both self-motion (idiothetic) and external (allothetic) information. Idiothetic information has a predominant role when allothetic information is absent or irrelevant. The vestibular system is a major source of idiothetic information in mammals. By integrating the signals generated by angular and linear accelerations during exploration, a rat is able to generate and update a vector pointing to its starting place and to perform accurate return. This navigation strategy, called path integration, has been shown to involve a network of brain structures. Among these structures, the entorhinal cortex (EC) may play a pivotal role as suggested by lesion and electrophysiological data. In particular, it has been recently discovered that some neurons in the medial EC display multiple firing fields producing a regular grid-like pattern across the environment. Such regular activity may arise from the integration of idiothetic information. This hypothesis would be strongly strengthened if it was shown that manipulation of vestibular information interferes with grid cell activity. In the present paper we review neuroanatomical and functional evidence indicating that the vestibular system influences the activity of the brain network involved in spatial navigation. We also provide new data on the effects of reversible inactivation of the peripheral vestibular system on the EC theta rhythm. The main result is that tetrodotoxin (TTX) administration abolishes velocity-controlled theta oscillations in the EC, indicating that vestibular information is necessary for EC activity. Since recent data demonstrate that disruption of theta rhythm in the medial EC induces a disorganization of grid cell firing, our findings indicate that the integration of idiothetic information in the EC is essential to form a spatial representation of the environment.

  17. Changing perspective: The role of vestibular signals

    OpenAIRE

    Deroualle, Diane; Borel, Liliane; Deveze, Arnaud; Lopez, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions depend on mechanisms such as the ability to take another person's viewpoint, i.e. visuo-spatial perspective taking. However, little is known about the sensorimotor mechanisms underpinning perspective taking. Because vestibular signals play roles in mental rotation and spatial cognition tasks and because damage to the vestibular cortex can disturb egocentric perspective, vestibular signals stand as important candidates for the sensorimotor foundations of perspective taking....

  18. Online identification of nonlinear spatiotemporal systems using kernel learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hanwen; Jing, Xingjian; Cheng, Li

    2011-09-01

    The identification of nonlinear spatiotemporal systems is of significance to engineering practice, since it can always provide useful insight into the underlying nonlinear mechanism and physical characteristics under study. In this paper, nonlinear spatiotemporal system models are transformed into a class of multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) partially linear systems (PLSs), and an effective online identification algorithm is therefore proposed by using a pruning error minimization principle and least square support vector machines. It is shown that many benchmark physical and engineering systems can be transformed into MIMO-PLSs which keep some important physical spatiotemporal relationships and are very helpful in the identification and analysis of the underlying system. Compared with several existing methods, the advantages of the proposed method are that it can make full use of some prior structural information about system physical models, can realize online estimation of the system dynamics, and achieve accurate characterization of some important nonlinear physical characteristics of the system. This would provide an important basis for state estimation, control, optimal analysis, and design of nonlinear distributed parameter systems. The proposed algorithm can also be applied to identification problems of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamical systems. Numeral examples and comparisons are given to demonstrate our results.

  19. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Talebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50±7. We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of pressure (COP and path length in anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML planes with eyes open and with eyes closed. Results. There was no significant difference between COP excursions in ML and AP planes between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value > 0.05. In contrast, the difference between velocity and path length of COP in the mentioned planes was significant between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value < 0.05. Conclusions. The present study showed the static instability and balance of patients with vestibular impairments indicated by the abnormal characteristics of body balance.

  20. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Hossein; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Abtahi, Seyed Hamid Reza; Fereshtenejad, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50 ± 7). We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of pressure (COP) and path length in anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) planes with eyes open and with eyes closed. Results. There was no significant difference between COP excursions in ML and AP planes between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value > 0.05). In contrast, the difference between velocity and path length of COP in the mentioned planes was significant between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value static instability and balance of patients with vestibular impairments indicated by the abnormal characteristics of body balance.

  1. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential findings in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela García, Vicente; Llópez Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts Alborch, Miguel; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving the occurrence of demyelinating, chronic neurodegenerative lesions in the central nervous system. We studied vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in this pathology, to allow us to evaluate the saccule, inferior vestibular nerve and vestibular-spinal pathway non-invasively. There were 23 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis who underwent VEMP recordings, comparing our results with a control group consisting of 35 healthy subjects. We registered p13 and n23 wave latencies, interaural amplitude difference and asymmetry ratio between both ears. Subjects also underwent an otoscopy and audiometric examination. The prolongation of p13 and n23 wave latencies was the most notable characteristic, with a mean p13 wave latency of 19.53 milliseconds and a mean latency of 30.06 milliseconds for n23. In contrast, the asymmetry index showed no significant differences with our control group. In case of multiple sclerosis, the prolongation of the p13 and n23 VEMP wave latencies is a feature that has been attributed to slowing of conduction by demyelination of the vestibular-spinal pathway. In this regard, alteration of the response or lack thereof in these potentials has a locator value of injury to the lower brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  3. Vestibular activation, smooth pursuit tracking, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A M; Pivik, R T

    1985-04-01

    Pursuit tracking and vestibular activation procedures were combined in an investigation to determine if smooth pursuit tracking deficits could be related to abnormalities of visual-vestibular interaction in psychiatric patients. In actively psychotic patients, but not in comparison groups of schizophrenic outpatients with remitted symptomatology or normal controls, a significant failure of visual fixation to suppress caloric nystagmus was related to a higher incidence of disordered tracking during both baseline and postirrigation conditions. Other vestibular irregularities including dysrhythmia and reduced fast phase velocity were observed in these same patients. The results are supportive of a central deficit in visual-vestibular interaction that may contribute to pursuit tracking deficits in psychosis.

  4. The role of the vestibular assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J S; FitzGerald, J E; Bath, A P

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the role of vestibular assessment in the management of the dizzy patient. A retrospective review of case notes and vestibular assessment reports of 100 consecutive patients referred for vestibular assessment. Sixty of the 100 patients had an abnormal vestibular assessment. Eleven patients had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo as the sole diagnosis, of whom nine had not had a Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre performed before referral. Of patients referred for vestibular rehabilitation, 76 per cent had an abnormal electrophysiological assessment. After vestibular assessment, 35 patients were discharged with no further follow-up appointments in the ENT department. All patients should have a Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre performed prior to referral for vestibular assessment. The majority of our patients undergoing vestibular rehabilitation had abnormal test results, although a significant number did not. Prior to referral, it is worth considering the implication of a 'normal' and 'abnormal' result for the management of the patient. Careful consideration should be given to the development of dedicated dizziness clinics run by practitioners with a specialist interest in balance disorders, in order to ensure appropriate requests for vestibular assessment.

  5. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma. A treatm......This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma....... A treatment strategy based on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing also is discussed....

  6. Isolated vestibular nuclear infarction: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Seung-Han; Park, Jae Han; Choi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral infarction presenting with isolated vertigo remains a diagnostic challenge. To define the clinical characteristics of unilateral infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, two patients with isolated unilateral vestibular nuclear infarction had bedside and laboratory evaluation of the ocular motor and vestibular function, including video-oculography, bithermal caloric irrigation, the head impulse test (HIT) using magnetic scleral coils, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We also reviewed the literature on isolated vertigo from lesions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, and analyzed the clinical features of seven additional patients. Both patients showed spontaneous torsional-horizontal nystagmus that beat away from the lesion side, and direction-changing gaze-evoked nystagmus. Recording of HIT using a magnetic search coil system documented decreased gains of the vestibular-ocular reflex for the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals on both sides, but more for the ipsilesional canals. Bithermal caloric tests showed ipsilesional canal paresis in both patients. Cervical and ocular VEMPs showed decreased or absent responses during stimulation of the ipsilesional ear. Initial MRIs including diffusion-weighted images were normal or equivocal, but follow-up imaging disclosed a circumscribed acute infarction in the area of the vestibular nuclei. Infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei may present with isolated vertigo with features of both peripheral and central vestibulopathies. Central signs should be sought even in patients with spontaneous horizontal-torsional nystagmus and positive HIT. In patients with combined peripheral and central vestibulopathy, a vestibular nuclear lesion should be considered especially when hearing is preserved.

  7. Identification of System Parameters by the Random Decrement Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, Anders

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and illustrate the possibilities of using correlation functions estimated by the Random Decrement Technique as a basis for parameter identification. A two-stage system identification method is used: first the correlation functions are estimated by the Random...... Decrement technique and then the system parameters are identified from the correlation function estimates. Three different techniques are used in the parameters identification process: a simple non-paramatic method, estimation of an Auto Regressive(AR) model by solving an overdetermined set of Yule......-Walker equations and finally least square fitting of the theoretical correlation function. The results are compared to the results of fitting an Auto Regressive Moving Average(ARMA) model directly to the system output. All investigations are performed on the simulated output from a single degree-off-freedom system...

  8. Text-independent speaker identification system based on adaptive wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambe, Shubha L.; Srinivasan, Pramila

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a text-independent phoneme-based speaker identification system that uses adaptive wavelets to model the phonemes. This system identifies a speaker by modeling a very short segment of phonemes and then by clustering all the phonemes belonging to the same speaker into one class. The classification is achieved by using a two layer feed forward neural network classifier. The performance of this speaker identification system is demonstrated by considering the phonemes that were extracted from various sentences spoken by three speakers in the TIMIT acoustic-phonetic speech corpus.

  9. Digital system identification and its application to digital flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotob, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1974-01-01

    On-line system identification of linear discrete systems for implementation in a digital adaptive flight controller is considered by the conventional extended Kalman filter and a decoupling process in which the linear state estimation problem and the linear parameter identification problem are each treated separately and alternately. Input requirements for parameter identifiability are established using the standard conditions of observability for a time variant system. Experimental results for simulated linearized lateral aircraft motion are included along with the effect of different initialization and updating procedures for the priming trajectory used by the filter.

  10. Anatomical and Physiological Considerations in Vestibular Dysfunction and Compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.; Mills, Kristal N.; Gaines, G Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory/proprioceptive systems are integrated in the brain in complex ways to produce a final motor output to muscle groups for maintaining gaze, head and body posture, and controlling static and dynamic balance. The balance system is complex, which can make differential diagnosis of dizziness quite challenging. On the other hand, this complex system is organized anatomically in a variety of pathways and some of these pathways have be...

  11. Experiment design for identification of structured linear systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Experiment Design for system identification involves the design of an optimal input signal with the purpose of accurately estimating unknown parameters in a system. Specifically, in the Least-Costly Experiment Design (LCED) framework, the optimal input signal results from an optimisation problem in

  12. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  13. Decentralized System Identification Using Stochastic Subspace Identification for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojin Cho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model.

  14. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M D; Tomko, D L

    1998-11-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Changing perspective: The role of vestibular signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroualle, Diane; Borel, Liliane; Devèze, Arnaud; Lopez, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Social interactions depend on mechanisms such as the ability to take another person's viewpoint, i.e. visuo-spatial perspective taking. However, little is known about the sensorimotor mechanisms underpinning perspective taking. Because vestibular signals play roles in mental rotation and spatial cognition tasks and because damage to the vestibular cortex can disturb egocentric perspective, vestibular signals stand as important candidates for the sensorimotor foundations of perspective taking. Yet, no study merged natural full-body vestibular stimulations and explicit visuo-spatial perspective taking tasks in virtual environments. In Experiment 1, we combined natural vestibular stimulation on a rotatory chair with virtual reality to test how vestibular signals are processed to simulate the viewpoint of a distant avatar. While they were rotated, participants tossed a ball to a virtual character from the viewpoint of a distant avatar. Our results showed that vestibular signals influence perspective taking in a direction-specific way: participants were faster when their physical body rotated in the same direction as the mental rotation needed to take the avatar's viewpoint. In Experiment 2, participants realized 3D object mental rotations, which did not involve perspective taking, during the same whole-body vestibular stimulation. Our results demonstrated that vestibular stimulation did not affect 3D object mental rotations. Altogether, these data indicate that vestibular signals have a direction-specific influence on visuo-spatial perspective taking (self-centered mental imagery), but not a general effect on mental imagery. Findings from this study suggest that vestibular signals contribute to one of the most crucial mechanisms of social cognition: understanding others' actions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of sensory information on static balance in older patients with vestibular disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Camila; Gazzola,Juliana Maria; Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni [UNIFESP; Doná, Flávia; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: With aging, the sensory systems suffer an accumulation of degenerative, infectious and/or traumatic processes that may hinder the body balance maintenance. Objective: To assess the influence of sensory information on static body balance of elderly individuals with vestibular disorders. Methods: Cross-sectional study of elderly individuals with vestibular disorders. The Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance and posturography integrated with virtual reality (Balance Reh...

  18. How Vestibular Neurons Solve the Tilt/Translation Ambiguity: Comparison of Brainstem, Cerebellum, and Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Dora E. Angelaki; Yakusheva, Tatyana A.

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is faced by a sensory ambiguity, where primary otolith afferents respond identically to translational (inertial) accelerations and changes in head orientation relative to gravity. Under certain conditions, this sensory ambiguity can be resolved using extra-otolith cues, including semicircular canal signals. Here we review and summarize how neurons in the vestibular nuclei, rostral fastigial nuclei, cerebellar nodulus/uvula, and thalamus respond during combinat...

  19. [Effectiveness of Self-efficacy Promoting Vestibular Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Vestibular Hypofunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2016-10-01

    In this study an examination was done of the effect of self-efficacy promoting vestibular rehabilitation (S-VR) on dizziness, exercise selfefficacy, adherence to vestibular rehabilitation (VR), subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness in patients with vestibular hypofunction. This was a randomized controlled study. Data were collected 3 times at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after beginning the intervention. Outcome measures were level of dizziness, exercise self-efficacy, and level of adherence to VR. Subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness were also obtained. Data were analyzed using Windows SPSS 21.0 program. After 4 weeks of S-VR, there was no difference between the groups for dizziness, subjective and objective vestibular functions. However, exercise self-efficacy and adherence to VR were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. After 8 weeks of S-VR, dizziness (p=.018) exercise self-efficacy (pVR (pVR is effective in reducing dizziness, and improving exercise self-efficacy, subjective vestibular function and adherence to VR. Objective vestibular function and vestibular compensation were also improved in the experimental group at the end of 8 weeks of S-VR.

  20. Aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury: maintaining a sense of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, Robert E; Zelenitsky, Sheryl A; Kassum, Diamond A

    2008-09-01

    To describe the mechanism and risk factors for the development of aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury and discuss their implications for therapeutic monitoring of aminoglycoside antibiotics. A MEDLINE search (1975-January 2008) was performed to identify literature on aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury and risk factors associated with this outcome and their impact on therapeutic drug monitoring. Additional references were identified through review of bibliographies of identified articles. Data on the mechanisms of vestibular toxicity and its development in association with aminoglycoside exposure were extracted from identified references. The mechanism leading to the development of irreversible vestibular injury from exposure to aminoglycosides appears to be through the excessive production of oxidative free radicals. This production and subsequent toxicity appears to be a time-dependent process and is unrelated to dose or serum concentration. For similarly designed studies, the pooled incidence of vestibular toxicity is 10.9% for gentamicin, 7.4% for amikacin, 3.5% for tobramycin, and 1.1% for netilmicin. Current evidence suggests that this form of drug toxicity is not restricted to traditionally dosed systemic therapy, since intraperitoneal administration, high-dose once-daily administration, topical inhalation, and eardrop administration have all been associated with the development of this adverse outcome. Given the lack of association between serum concentrations and vestibulotoxicity, it is imperative for the pharmacist to interview the patient and not focus solely on maintaining target range drug concentrations. Minimizing the duration of exposure to aminoglycosides is recommended to reduce the risk from this form of drug toxicity.

  1. Identification of Nonlinear Systems: Volterra Series Simplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novák

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional measurement of multimedia systems, e.g. linear impulse response and transfer function, are sufficient but not faultless. For these methods the pure linear system is considered and nonlinearities, which are usually included in real systems, are disregarded. One of the ways to describe and analyze a nonlinear system is by using Volterra Series representation. However, this representation uses an enormous number of coefficients. In this work a simplification of this method is proposed and an experiment with an audio amplifier is shown. 

  2. Deterministic System Identification Using RBF Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilson Batista de Almeida Rego

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an artificial intelligence application using a nonconventional mathematical tool: the radial basis function (RBF networks, aiming to identify the current plant of an induction motor or other nonlinear systems. Here, the objective is to present the RBF response to different nonlinear systems and analyze the obtained results. A RBF network is trained and simulated in order to obtain the dynamical solution with basin of attraction and equilibrium point for known and unknown system and establish a relationship between these dynamical systems and the RBF response. On the basis of several examples, the results indicating the effectiveness of this approach are demonstrated.

  3. System identification based approach to dynamic weighing revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Meller, Michał; Pietrzak, Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic weighing, i.e., weighing of objects in motion, without stopping them on the weighing platform, allows one to increase the rate of operation of automatic weighing systems, used in industrial production processes, without compromising their accuracy. Since the classical identification-based approach to dynamic weighing, based on the second-order mass-spring-damper model of the weighing system, does not yield satisfactory results when applied to conveyor belt type checkweighers, several extensions of this technique are examined. Experiments confirm that when appropriately modified the identification-based approach becomes a reliable tool for dynamic mass measurement in checkweighers.

  4. Comparison of System Identification Methods using Ambient Bridge Test Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Peeters, B.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method, the stocha......In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method...

  5. Gaze stabilization exercises derive sensory reweighting of vestibular for postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Yusuke; Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Oku, Kosuke; Okuno, Kojiro; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shohei; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Douchi, Shinya; Mori, Nobuhiko

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether gaze stabilization exercise derives sensory reweighting of vestibular for upright postural control. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers participated in this study. The center of pressure of the total trajectory length was measured before (pre), immediately after (post), and 10 min after (post10) gaze stabilization exercise, in the static standing position, with the eyes open or closed, on the floor or on foam rubber. The sensory contribution values of the visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems were calculated using center of pressure of the total trajectory length value in these measuring conditions. [Results] The center of pressure of the total trajectory length on foam rubber in post and post10 were significantly lower than that in the pre. The sensory contribution values of vestibular in post10 stages were significantly higher than that in pre-stage. [Conclusion] Gaze stabilization exercise can improve the static body balance in a condition that particularly requires vestibular function. The possible mechanism involves increasing sensory contribution of the vestibular system for postural control by the gaze stabilization exercise, which may be useful to derive sensory reweighting of the vestibular system for rehabilitation.

  6. Gaze stabilization exercises derive sensory reweighting of vestibular for postural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Yusuke; Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Oku, Kosuke; Okuno, Kojiro; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shohei; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Douchi, Shinya; Mori, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether gaze stabilization exercise derives sensory reweighting of vestibular for upright postural control. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers participated in this study. The center of pressure of the total trajectory length was measured before (pre), immediately after (post), and 10 min after (post10) gaze stabilization exercise, in the static standing position, with the eyes open or closed, on the floor or on foam rubber. The sensory contribution values of the visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems were calculated using center of pressure of the total trajectory length value in these measuring conditions. [Results] The center of pressure of the total trajectory length on foam rubber in post and post10 were significantly lower than that in the pre. The sensory contribution values of vestibular in post10 stages were significantly higher than that in pre-stage. [Conclusion] Gaze stabilization exercise can improve the static body balance in a condition that particularly requires vestibular function. The possible mechanism involves increasing sensory contribution of the vestibular system for postural control by the gaze stabilization exercise, which may be useful to derive sensory reweighting of the vestibular system for rehabilitation. PMID:28931974

  7. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  8. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. METHODS: A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. RESULTS: Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints. PMID:28954005

  9. Vestibular Function and Activities of Daily Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Harun MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vestibular dysfunction increases with age and is associated with mobility difficulties and fall risk in older individuals. We evaluated whether vestibular function influences the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs. Method: We analyzed the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged older than 40 years ( N = 5,017. Vestibular function was assessed with the Modified Romberg test. We evaluated the association between vestibular function and difficulty level in performing specific basic and instrumental ADLs, and total number of ADL impairments. Results: Vestibular dysfunction was associated with significantly higher odds of difficulty with nine ADLs, most strongly with difficulty managing finances (odds ratio [ OR ] = 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.18, 5.90]. In addition, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a significantly greater number of ADL impairments (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.09, 0.33]. This effect size was comparable with the influence of heavy smoking (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.06, 0.36] and hypertension (β = .10, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.18] on the number of ADL impairments. Conclusion: Vestibular dysfunction significantly influences ADL difficulty, most strongly with a cognitive rather than mobility-based task. These findings underscore the importance of vestibular inputs for both cognitive and physical daily activities.

  10. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisler, HC; Gramsbergen, A

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control,

  11. Bionic models for identification of biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerget, O. M.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a clinical decision support system that processes biomedical data. For this purpose a bionic model has been designed based on neural networks, genetic algorithms and immune systems. The developed system has been tested on data from pregnant women. The paper focuses on the approach to enable selection of control actions that can minimize the risk of adverse outcome. The control actions (hyperparameters of a new type) are further used as an additional input signal. Its values are defined by a hyperparameter optimization method. A software developed with Python is briefly described.

  12. System identification advances and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Mehra, Raman K

    1976-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  13. A NEURAL NETWORK BASED IRIS RECOGNITION SYSTEM FOR PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usham Dias

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents biometric personal identification based on iris recognition using artificial neural networks. Personal identification system consists of localization of the iris region, normalization, enhancement and then iris pattern recognition using neural network. In this paper, through results obtained, we have shown that a person’s left and right eye are unique. In this paper, we also show that the network is sensitive to the initial weights and that over-training gives bad results. We also propose a fast algorithm for the localization of the inner and outer boundaries of the iris region. Results of simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the neural system in personal identification. Finally a hardware iris recognition model is proposed and implementation aspects are discussed.

  14. Innovation Policy Design: Identification of Systemic Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Edquist, Charles

    2011-01-01

    ‘Activities’ in innovation systems are the determinants of the development and diffusion of innovations. Examples are R&D, provision of organizations and institutions, financing of innovations, incubation, etc. These activities are partly performed by private organizations and partly by public organizations, the latter performing tasks that constitute innovation policy. As a basis for innovation policy, the problems (failures) in the systems must be identified. This paper focuses upon the des...

  15. 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), NASA Headquarters, and NASA Research and Education Support Services (NRESS) on December 17, 2015 (list of participants is in Section VI of this report). The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight (from here on referred to as the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report), and also received a status review of the Risk. The opening section of the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report provides written descriptions of various incidents that have occurred during space missions. In most of these incidents, the main underlying contributing factors are not easy to identify unambiguously. For example, in section 1.9, a number of falls occurred while astronauts were walking on the moon. It is not clear to the SRP, however, why they fell. It is only possible to extrapolate from likely specific psychophysical or physiological abnormalities, but how these abnormalities were determined, and how they were directly responsible for the falls is unclear to the SRP. Section 2.1.2 on proprioception is very interesting, but the functional significance of the abnormalities detected is not clear. The SRP sees this as a problem throughout the report: a mapping between the component abnormalities identified and the holistic behaviors that are most relevant, for example, controlling the vehicle, and locomotion during egress, is generally lacking. The SRP thinks the cognitive section is too strongly focused on vestibular functioning. The SRP questions the notion that the main cognitive effects are mainly attributable to reversible vestibular changes induced by spaceflight. The SRP thinks that there can also

  16. Vestibular Function and Depersonalization/Derealization Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui Renaud, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    Patients with an acquired sensory dysfunction may experience symptoms of detachment from self or from the environment, which are related primarily to nonspecific symptoms of common mental disorders and secondarily, to the specific sensory dysfunction. This is consistent with the proposal that sensory dysfunction could provoke distress and a discrepancy between the multi-sensory frame given by experience and the actual perception. Both vestibular stimuli and vestibular dysfunction can underlie unreal experiences. Vestibular afferents provide a frame of reference (linear and angular head acceleration) within which spatial information from other senses is interpreted. This paper reviews evidence that symptoms of depersonalization/derealization associated with vestibular dysfunction are a consequence of a sensory mismatch between disordered vestibular input and other sensory signals of orientation.

  17. Avaliação vestibular no tremor essencial Vestibular evaluation in the essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    members and neither any lowering of her auditory sharpness nor buzzing. The patient informed that one of her children suffered hand tremors two years ago and also that both grandparents had Parkinson’s disease. The following procedures were performed: anamnesis, otological inspection and vestibular evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. RESULTS: the following findings from the vestibular exam were observed: positioning nystagmus with central characteristics, spontaneous nystagmus with the eyes open, semi-spontaneous nystagmus of the multiple and hyperreflexia type in readings absolute to the caloric test at 20ºC (RE and LE. CONCLUSION: the vestibular exam was shown to be sensitive and important for garnering alterations in tests that suggested involvement of the central nervous system.

  18. Distribution of high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in rat vestibular epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Felix E; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R; Hoffman, Larry F

    2009-11-10

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development.

  19. Parameter identification and synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li-Guo; Yang, Qi-Gui

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge about parameters and order is very important for synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems. In this article, identification of parameters and order of fractional-order chaotic systems is converted to an optimization problem. Particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to solve this optimization problem. Based on the above parameter identification, synchronization of the fractional-order Lorenz, Chen and a novel system (commensurate or incommensurate order) is derived using active control method. The new fractional-order chaotic system has four-scroll chaotic attractors. The existence and uniqueness of solutions for the new fractional-order system are also investigated theoretically. Simulation results signify the performance of the work.

  20. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  1. [Vestibular rehabilitation in elderly patients with dizziness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardini, Francisco Halilla; Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon; Marques, Jair Mendes; Martins-Bassetto, Jackeline

    2007-01-01

    The aging of the population is a natural process and is manifested by a decline in the functions of several organs. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a therapeutic process that seeks to promote a significant reduction in the symptoms of the labyrinth. To verify the benefits of VR exercises through the application of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaire--Brazilian version--pre and post rehabilitation. Participants of this study were eight elderly patients with dizziness, ages between 63 and 82 years, three male and five female. The following procedures were carried out: medical history, otologic inspection, vestibular evaluation with vectoelectronystagmography (VENG), application of the DHI questionnaire and of the Cawthorne (1944) and Cooksey (1946) VR exercises. Regarding the auditory and vestibular complaints which were referred to in the medical history, the following was observed: presence of tinnitus, hearing loss, postural vertigo and of unbalance. In the evaluation of the vestibular function alterations were observed for all of the participants, mainly in the caloric test, with a prevalence of unilateral and bilateral hypofunction. In the vestibular exam the following was observed: three cases of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit syndrome, three cases of bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit syndrome, one case of bilateral central vestibular deficit syndrome and one case of irritating bilateral central vestibular syndrome. There was a statistically significant improvement of the following aspects after VR: physical (p=0.00413), functional (p=0.00006) and emotional (p=0.03268). The VR protocol favored the improvement of life quality of the participants and was of assistance in the process of vestibular compensation.

  2. Quadrotor system identification using the multivariate multiplex b-spline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, T.; De Visser, C.C.; Van Kampen, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for aircraft system identification is presented that is based on a new multivariate spline type; the multivariate multiplex B-spline. The multivariate multiplex B-spline is a generalization of the recently introduced tensor-simplex B-spline. Multivariate multiplex splines obtain

  3. suitability of vitek 2 system in identification and susceptibility testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... identify bacteria and determine their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (3). The VITEK® 2 system (bioMérieux) is an automated bacteria identification and antimicrobial sensitivity testing platform that conventionally uses bacteria colonies obtained from cultures of clinical specimens. For blood this means ...

  4. Developing a Speaker Identification System for the DARPA RATS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plchot, O; Matsoukas, S; Matejka, P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the speaker identification (SID) system developed by the Patrol team for the first phase of the DARPA RATS (Robust Automatic Transcription of Speech) program, which seeks to advance state of the art detection capabilities on audio from highly degraded communication channels. We...

  5. Identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents an introductory survey ofthe methodsthat have been developed for identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input-output data. The two basic approaches may be described as. the indirect method, where first a discrete-time model is estimated from the sampled data and then an ...

  6. Friction ridge skin - Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes the development and the forensic use of automated fingerprint identification systems (AFISs). AFISs were initially developed in order to overcome the limitations of the paper-based fingerprint collections, by digitizing the ten-print cards in computerized databases and to

  7. Time-Delay System Identification Using Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Seested, Glen Thane

    2013-01-01

    problem through an identification approach using the real coded Genetic Algorithm (GA). The desired FOPDT/SOPDT model is directly identified based on the measured system's input and output data. In order to evaluate the quality and performance of this GA-based approach, the proposed method is compared...

  8. Neural network based system for script identification in Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    environments. The system developed includes a feature extractor and a modular neural network. The feature extractor consists of two stages. In the first stage ... environments is script/language identification (Muthusamy et al 1994; Hochberg et al 1997). ... In order to take advantage of the learning and generalization abilities ...

  9. Improved system blind identification based on second-order ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Improved system blind identification based on second-order cyclostationary statistics: A group delay approach. P V S GIRIDHAR1 and S V NARASIMHAN2. 1Dept. of Electronics & Communication Engineering, Karnataka Regional. Engineering College, Surathkal 574 157, India. Present address: Centre for Development of ...

  10. Identification of Parameters in Active Magnetic Bearing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Jonas Skjødt; Voigt, Andreas Jauernik; Mandrup-Poulsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A method for identifying uncertain parameters in Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) based rotordynamic systems is introduced and adapted for experimental application. The Closed Loop Identification (CLI) method is utilised to estimate the current/force factors Ki and the displacement/force factors Ks...

  11. Advances in Modelling, System Identification and Parameter ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    industrial plants, determination of transfer function between motion responses and control inputs of an aircraft or helicopter, and many other electromechanical systems, most of which are inherently ... feedforward neural network for estimation of stability and control derivatives of an aeroelastic aircraft using the so-called ...

  12. Neural - fuzzy approach for system identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tien, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    Most real-world processes have nonlinear and complex dynamics. Conventional methods of constructing nonlinear models from first principles are time consuming and require a level of knowledge about the internal functioning of the system that is often not available. Consequently, in such

  13. Galvanic vestibular stimulation improves the results of vestibular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Ferrero, Antonela; Pianetti, Guillermina; Escolá, Natalia; Arteaga, María Victoria; Frankel, Lilian

    2011-09-01

    Here, we present findings from a three-step investigation of the effect of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in normal subjects and in subjects undergoing vestibular rehabilitation (VR). In an initial study, we examined the body sway of 10 normal subjects after one minute of 2 mA GVS. The effect of the stimulation lasted for at least 20 minutes in all subjects and up to two hours in 70% of the subjects. We then compared a group of patients who received conventional VR (40 patients) with a group that received a combination of VR and GVS. Results suggest a significant improvement in the second group. Finally, we attempted to establish the optimal number of GVS sessions and to rule out a placebo effect. Fifteen patients received "systematic" GVS: five sessions, once a week. Five patients received "nonsystematic" galvanic stimulation in a sham protocol, which included two stimulations of the clavicle. These data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test and indicated that the best results were obtained after three sessions of GVS and no placebo effect was observed. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Identification of protective antigens for vaccination against systemic salmonellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eBumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50-200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing.

  15. System for identification of microorganism and detection of infectious disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    tuberculosis, in single or multiplexed formats enable diseases to be diagnosed, treated, or prevented through the identification of potentially harmful organisms. This disclosure includes also follow-up tests or continued monitoring to evaluate responses to treatment or eradication efforts. In a further aspect......, processed substrates are identified and potentially quantified by one or more of a range of standard molecular biology methods and read-out systems. The identification and potential quantification of microorganisms and infectious agents, including but not limited to Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium...

  16. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  17. Gain Scheduling Control based on Closed-Loop System Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    This paper deals with system identification and gain scheduling control of multi-variable nonlinear systems. We propose a novel scheme where a linear approximation of the system model is obtained in an operating point; then, a Youla-Kucera (YJBK) parameter specifying the difference between the fi....... In a constructive manner, we show how to use the YJBK parameterisation to achieve a smooth scheduling between the controllers. The approach is tested on a simple, but highly nonlinear model of a coal-fired power plant.......This paper deals with system identification and gain scheduling control of multi-variable nonlinear systems. We propose a novel scheme where a linear approximation of the system model is obtained in an operating point; then, a Youla-Kucera (YJBK) parameter specifying the difference between...... the first and a second operating point is identified in closed-loop using system identification methods with open-loop properties. Next, a linear controller is designed for this linearised model, and gain scheduling control can subsequently be achieved by interpolating between each controller...

  18. Vortex Tube Modeling Using the System Identification Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaeyoung; Jeong, Jiwoong; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seokyeon [Tongmyong Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In this study, vortex tube system model is developed to predict the temperature of the hot and the cold sides. The vortex tube model is developed based on the system identification method, and the model utilized in this work to design the vortex tube is ARX type (Auto-Regressive with eXtra inputs). The derived polynomial model is validated against experimental data to verify the overall model accuracy. It is also shown that the derived model passes the stability test. It is confirmed that the derived model closely mimics the physical behavior of the vortex tube from both the static and dynamic numerical experiments by changing the angles of the low-temperature side throttle valve, clearly showing temperature separation. These results imply that the system identification based modeling can be a promising approach for the prediction of complex physical systems, including the vortex tube.

  19. Vestibular end organ injury induced by middle ear treatment with ferric chloride in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Park, B R

    2017-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia, pyramidal signs, and vestibular deficits characterize superficial siderosis of the central nervous system. This study investigated changes in vestibular function, free radical formation, and phosphorylated cJun expression in the vestibular end organs after middle ear treatment with a ferric chloride (FeCl3) solution. A single injection of 70% FeCl3 solution into the unilateral middle ear cavity caused static vestibular symptoms, such as spontaneous nystagmus and head tilt. Asymmetric expression of c-Fos protein was observed in the bilateral vestibular nuclei and prepositus hypoglossal nuclei within 6 h after injection. Histopathologic examinations revealed partial hair cell loss, degeneration of the supporting stroma, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the neuroepithelial layer of the crista ampullaris in FeCl3-treated animals. 5-(And-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester and diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate fluorescence and immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine increased markedly in the sensory neuroepithelial layer and nerve bundles of the crista ampullaris after 2 h. Strong immunoreactivity for phospho-cJun and cJun was observed in the type I hair cells of the crista ampullaris 120 h after injection. Thus, a single short-term treatment with a high concentration of FeCl3 in the unilateral middle ear cavity can induce activation of intracellular signals for cJun protein and oxidative stress through the formation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in vestibular sensory receptors, resulting in vestibular dysfunction. These results suggest that activation of intracellular signals for cJun protein and oxidative stress may be a key component of the pathogenesis of vestibular deficits in patients with superficial siderosis.

  20. Probabilistic Ontology Architecture for a Terrorist Identification Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Handbook on Ontologies in Information Systems.: Springer-Verlag, 2003. [15] Paulo Cesar G. da Costa. (2005, July) PhD George Mason Univeristy. [Online...Probabilistic Ontology Architecture for a Terrorist Identification Decision Support System Topic 3: Data, Information,and Knowledge Topic 5: Modeling...number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Probabilistic Ontology