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Sample records for vestibular nuclei neurons

  1. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

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    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  2. Neurosteroid modulation of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Dieni, Cristina; Dutia, Mayank B; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2007-07-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the influence of the neurosteroids tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) and allopregnanolone (ALLO) on the synaptically driven and spontaneous activity of vestibular neurons, by analysing their effects on the amplitude of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation and on the spontaneous firing rate of MVN neurons. Furthermore, the interaction with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate receptors was analysed by using specific antagonists for GABA(A) (bicuculline), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/ kainate [2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo(f)quinoxaline-7-sulphonamide disodium salt (NBQX)], N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) [D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5)] and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu-I) [(R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)] receptors. THDOC and ALLO evoked two opposite long-lasting effects, consisting of either a potentiation or a reduction of field potential and firing rate, which showed early and late components, occurring in conjunction or separately after neurosteroid application. The depressions depended on GABA(A) receptors, as they were abolished by bicuculline, while early potentiation involved glutamate AMPA/kainate receptors, as NBQX markedly reduced the incidence of early firing rate enhancement and, in the case of ALLO, even provoked depression. This suggests that THDOC and ALLO enhance the GABA(A) inhibitory influence on the MVN neurons and facilitate the AMPA/kainate facilitatory one. Conversely, a late potentiation effect, which was still induced after glutamate and GABA(A) receptor blockade, might involve a different mechanism. We conclude that the modulation of neuronal activity in the MVN by THDOC and ALLO, through their actions on GABA(A) and AMPA/kainate receptors, may have a physiological role in regulating the vestibular system function under normal

  3. Effects of 17beta-estradiol on glutamate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Scarduzio, M; Dutia, M B; Dieni, C; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-02-17

    We investigated the effects of the neurosteroid 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) on the evoked and spontaneous activity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in brainstem slices. E(2) enhances the synaptic response to vestibular nerve stimulation in type B neurons and depresses the spontaneous discharge in both type A and B neurons. The amplitude of the field potential, as well as the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) and current (EPSC), in type B neurons, are enhanced by E(2). Both effects are long-term phenomena since they outlast the drug washout. The enhancement of synaptic response is mainly due to facilitation of glutamate release mediated by pre-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), since the reduction of paired pulse ratio (PPR) and the increase of miniature EPSC frequency after E(2) are abolished under D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). E(2) also facilitates post-synaptic NMDARs, but it does not affect directly alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) and group I-metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs-I). In contrast, the depression of the spontaneous discharge of type A and type B neurons appears to depend on E(2) modulation of intrinsic ion conductances, as the effect remains after blockade of glutamate, GABA and glycine receptors (GlyRs). The net effect of E(2) is to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the synaptic response in type B neurons, relative to resting activity of all MVN neurons. These findings provide evidence for a novel potential mechanism to modulate the responsiveness of vestibular neurons to afferent inputs, and so regulate vestibular function in vivo.

  4. Long-term potentiation of synaptic response and intrinsic excitability in neurons of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Pettorossi, V E; Dieni, C V; Scarduzio, M; Grassi, S

    2011-07-28

    Using intracellular recordings, we investigated the effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on the evoked excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and intrinsic excitability (IE) of type-A and type-B neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN), in male rat brainstem slices. HFS induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of both EPSP and IE, which may occur in combination or separately. Synaptic LTP is characterized by an increase in the amplitude, slope and decay time constant of EPSP and IE-LTP through enhancements of spontaneous and evoked neuron firing and of input resistance (Rin). Moreover, IE-LTP is associated with a decrease in action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude and an increase in interspike slope steepness (ISS). The more frequent effects of HFS are EPSP-LTP in type-B neurons and IE-LTP in type-A neurons. In addition, the development of EPSP-LTP is fast in type-B neurons but slow in type-A, whereas IE-LTP develops slowly in both types. We have demonstrated that activation of N-methyl-d aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is only required for EPSP-LTP induction, whereas metabotropic glutamate receptors type-1 (mGluR1) are necessary for IE-LTP induction as well as the full development and maintenance of EPSP-LTP. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that brief and intense activation of vestibular afferent input to the MVN neurons may provoke synaptic LTP and/or IE-LTP that, induced in combination or separately, may assure the different selectivity of the MVN neuron response enhancement to the afferent signals. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Timing of neuron development in the rodent vestibular system

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    Keefe, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The timing of cell generation (onset and duration) in the developing rat vestibular and proprioceptive systems is investigated. The results clearly indicate a defined time-span for generation of all neurons in the central nervous system nuclei studied. This cytogenetic period in both vestibular and proprioceptive sensory nuclei is determined to occur during and immediately after placentation, a potentially critical period for spaceflight exposure due to alterations in maternal physiology.

  6. Synaptic plasticity in the medial vestibular nuclei: role of glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers in rat brainstem slices.

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    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of cellular-molecular events mediating synaptic plasticity within vestibular nuclei is an attempt to explain the mechanisms underlying vestibular plasticity phenomena. The present review is meant to illustrate the main results, obtained in vitro, on the mechanisms underlying long-term changes in synaptic strength within the medial vestibular nuclei. The synaptic plasticity phenomena taking place at the level of vestibular nuclei could be useful for adapting and consolidating the efficacy of vestibular neuron responsiveness to environmental requirements, as during visuo-vestibular recalibration and vestibular compensation. Following a general introduction on the most salient features of vestibular compensation and visuo-vestibular adaptation, which are two plastic events involving neuronal circuitry within the medial vestibular nuclei, the second and third sections describe the results from rat brainstem slice studies, demonstrating the possibility to induce long-term potentiation and depression in the medial vestibular nuclei, following high frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. In particular the mechanisms sustaining the induction and expression of vestibular long-term potentiation and depression, such as the role of various glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers have been described. The relevant role of the interaction between the platelet-activating factor, acting as a retrograde messenger, and the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors, in determining the full expression of vestibular long-term potentiation is also underlined. In addition, the mechanisms involved in vestibular long-term potentiation have been compared with those leading to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus to emphasize the most significant differences emerging from vestibular studies. The fourth part, describes recent results demonstrating the essential role of nitric oxide, another retrograde messenger, in the induction of vestibular

  7. Molecular composition of extracellular matrix in the vestibular nuclei of the rat.

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    Rácz, Eva; Gaál, Botond; Kecskes, Szilvia; Matesz, Clara

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the molecular and structural composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) shows regional differences in the central nervous system. By using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, we provide here a detailed map of the distribution of ECM molecules in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) of the rat. We have observed common characteristics of the ECM staining pattern in the VNC and a number of differences among the individual vestibular nuclei and their subdivisions. The perineuronal net (PNN), which is the pericellular condensation of ECM, showed the most intense staining for hyaluronan, aggrecan, brevican and tenascin-R in the superior, lateral and medial vestibular nuclei, whereas the HAPLN1 link protein and the neurocan exhibited moderate staining intensity. The rostral part of the descending vestibular nucleus (DVN) presented a similar staining pattern in the PNN, with the exception of brevican, which was negative. The caudal part of the DVN had the weakest staining for all ECM molecules in the PNN. Throughout the VNC, versican staining in the PNN, when present, was distinctive due to its punctuate appearance. The neuropil also exhibited heterogeneity among the individual vestibular nuclei in ECM staining pattern and intensity. We find that the heterogeneous distribution of ECM molecules is associated in many cases with the variable cytoarchitecture and hodological organization of the vestibular nuclei, and propose that differences in the ECM composition may be related to specific neuronal functions associated with gaze and posture control and vestibular compensation.

  8. Hoxb1 controls anteroposterior identity of vestibular projection neurons.

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    Chen, Yiju; Takano-Maruyama, Masumi; Fritzsch, Bernd; Gaufo, Gary O

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) consists of a collection of sensory relay nuclei that integrates and relays information essential for coordination of eye movements, balance, and posture. Spanning the majority of the hindbrain alar plate, the rhombomere (r) origin and projection pattern of the VNC have been characterized in descriptive works using neuroanatomical tracing. However, neither the molecular identity nor developmental regulation of individual nucleus of the VNC has been determined. To begin to address this issue, we found that Hoxb1 is required for the anterior-posterior (AP) identity of precursors that contribute to the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Using a gene-targeted Hoxb1-GFP reporter in the mouse, we show that the LVN precursors originate exclusively from r4 and project to the spinal cord in the stereotypic pattern of the lateral vestibulospinal tract that provides input into spinal motoneurons driving extensor muscles of the limb. The r4-derived LVN precursors express the transcription factors Phox2a and Lbx1, and the glutamatergic marker Vglut2, which together defines them as dB2 neurons. Loss of Hoxb1 function does not alter the glutamatergic phenotype of dB2 neurons, but alters their stereotyped spinal cord projection. Moreover, at the expense of Phox2a, the glutamatergic determinants Lmx1b and Tlx3 were ectopically expressed by dB2 neurons. Our study suggests that the Hox genes determine the AP identity and diversity of vestibular precursors, including their output target, by coordinating the expression of neurotransmitter determinant and target selection properties along the AP axis.

  9. Hoxb1 controls anteroposterior identity of vestibular projection neurons.

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    Yiju Chen

    Full Text Available The vestibular nuclear complex (VNC consists of a collection of sensory relay nuclei that integrates and relays information essential for coordination of eye movements, balance, and posture. Spanning the majority of the hindbrain alar plate, the rhombomere (r origin and projection pattern of the VNC have been characterized in descriptive works using neuroanatomical tracing. However, neither the molecular identity nor developmental regulation of individual nucleus of the VNC has been determined. To begin to address this issue, we found that Hoxb1 is required for the anterior-posterior (AP identity of precursors that contribute to the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN. Using a gene-targeted Hoxb1-GFP reporter in the mouse, we show that the LVN precursors originate exclusively from r4 and project to the spinal cord in the stereotypic pattern of the lateral vestibulospinal tract that provides input into spinal motoneurons driving extensor muscles of the limb. The r4-derived LVN precursors express the transcription factors Phox2a and Lbx1, and the glutamatergic marker Vglut2, which together defines them as dB2 neurons. Loss of Hoxb1 function does not alter the glutamatergic phenotype of dB2 neurons, but alters their stereotyped spinal cord projection. Moreover, at the expense of Phox2a, the glutamatergic determinants Lmx1b and Tlx3 were ectopically expressed by dB2 neurons. Our study suggests that the Hox genes determine the AP identity and diversity of vestibular precursors, including their output target, by coordinating the expression of neurotransmitter determinant and target selection properties along the AP axis.

  10. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

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    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46% code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54% changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral, providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing

  11. Isolation and culture of adult mouse vestibular nucleus neurons

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    Him, Aydın; Altuntaş, Serap; Öztürk, Gürkan; Erdoğan, Ender; Cengiz, Nureddin

    2017-12-19

    Background/aim: Isolated cell cultures are widely used to study neuronal properties due to their advantages. Although embryonic animals are preferred for culturing, their morphological or electrophysiological properties may not reflect adult neurons, which may be important in neurodegenerative diseases. This paper aims to develop a method for preparing isolated cell cultures of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) from adult mice and describe its morphological and electrophysiological properties.Materials and methods: Vestibular nucleus neurons were mechanically and enzymatically isolated and cultured using a defined medium with known growth factors. Cell survival was measured with propidium iodide, and electrophysiological properties were investigated with current-clamp recording.Results: Vestibular neurons grew neurites in cultures, gaining adult-like morphological properties, and stayed viable for 3 days in culture. Adding bovine calf serum, nerve growth factor, or insulin-like growth factor into the culture medium enhanced neuronal viability. Current-clamp recording of the cultured neurons revealed tonic and phasic-type neurons with similar input resistance, resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude, and duration. Conclusion: Vestibular neurons from adult mice can be cultured, and regenerate axons in a medium containing appropriate growth factors. Culturing adult vestibular neurons provides a new method to study age-related pathologies of the vestibular system.

  12. Retrograde transport of [3H]-D-aspartate label by cochlear and vestibular efferent neurons

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    Schwarz, D.W.; Schwarz, I.E.

    1988-01-01

    [ 3 H]-D-aspartic acid was injected into the inner ear of rats. After a six hour survival time, labeled cells were found at all locations known to contain efferent cochlear or vestibular neurons. Most labeled neurons were found in the ipsilateral lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), although both ventral nuclei of the trapezoid body (VTB), group E, and the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (CPR) just adjacent to the ascending limb of the facial nerve also contained labeled cells. Because not all efferent neurons in the rat could be previously shown to be cholinergic, aspartate and glutamate are efferent transmitter candidates

  13. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

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    Paul eSmith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular (VOR and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC, it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarises and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  14. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

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    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  15. Gaba mediated long-term depression (LTD) in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Grassi, S; Della Torre, G; Zampolini, M; Pettorossi, V E

    1995-01-01

    As previously demonstrated, high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents always induces a clear, long lasting depression of the polysynaptic (N2) component of the field potentials recorded in the dorsal portion of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN). The induction of the HFS effect was mediated by the activation of glutamate NMDA receptors, since it was blocked by AP5. The mechanisms at the basis of such a depression were studied. Our results demonstrate that Gaba, acting on both GabaA and GabaB receptors, is involved in mediating this phenomenon. In fact, HFS applied during Bicuculline and Saclofen perfusion, was no longer able to induce an N2 depression, but provoked a slight potentiation. However, the N2 depression clearly emerged after drug wash-out. Furthermore, Bicuculline and Saclofen fully abolished the N2 depression and highlighted the potentiation, when administered after HFS. The possibility that the N2 depression is the result of a homosynaptic LTD can be excluded on the basis of our results. On the contrary, our findings suggest that the depression is due to an enhancement of the Gaba inhibitory effect due to an HFS dependent increase in gabaergic interneuron activity, which resets vestibular neuron excitability at a lower level.

  16. Vestibular nuclei and cerebellum put visual gravitational motion in context.

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    Miller, William L; Maffei, Vincenzo; Bosco, Gianfranco; Iosa, Marco; Zago, Myrka; Macaluso, Emiliano; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Animal survival in the forest, and human success on the sports field, often depend on the ability to seize a target on the fly. All bodies fall at the same rate in the gravitational field, but the corresponding retinal motion varies with apparent viewing distance. How then does the brain predict time-to-collision under gravity? A perspective context from natural or pictorial settings might afford accurate predictions of gravity's effects via the recovery of an environmental reference from the scene structure. We report that embedding motion in a pictorial scene facilitates interception of gravitational acceleration over unnatural acceleration, whereas a blank scene eliminates such bias. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed blood-oxygen-level-dependent correlates of these visual context effects on gravitational motion processing in the vestibular nuclei and posterior cerebellar vermis. Our results suggest an early stage of integration of high-level visual analysis with gravity-related motion information, which may represent the substrate for perceptual constancy of ubiquitous gravitational motion.

  17. The role of GABA in NMDA-dependent long term depression (LTD) of rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Grassi, S; Della Torre, G; Capocchi, G; Zampolini, M; Pettorossi, V E

    1995-11-20

    The role of GABA in NMDA-dependent long term depression (LTD) in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) was studied on rat brainstem slices. High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents induces a long lasting reduction of the polysynaptic (N2) component of the field potentials recorded in the dorsal portion of the MVN. The induction but not the maintenance of this depression was abolished by AP5, a specific blocking agent for glutamate NMDA receptors. The involvement of GABA in mediating the depression was checked by applying the GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists, bicuculline and saclofen, before and after HFS. Under bicuculline and saclofen perfusion, HFS provoked a slight potentiation of the N2 wave, while the N2 depression clearly emerged after drug wash-out. This indicates that GABA is not involved in inducing the long term effect, but it is necessary for its expression. Similarly, the LTD reversed and a slight potentiation appeared when both drugs were administered after its induction. Most of these effects were due to the bicuculline, suggesting that GABAA receptors contribute to LTD more than GABAB do. According to our results, it is unlikely that the long lasting vestibular depression is the result of a homosynaptic LTD. On the contrary, our findings suggest that the depression is due to an enhancement of the GABA inhibitory effect, caused by an HFS dependent increase in gabaergic interneuron activity, which resets vestibular neuron excitability at a lower level.

  18. Low-frequency stimulation cancels the high-frequency-induced long-lasting effects in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

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    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E; Zampolini, M

    1996-05-15

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the effects of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on the amplitude of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN). LFS induced long-term effects, the sign of which depended on whether the vestibular neurons were previously conditioned by HFS. In unconditioned slices, LFS evoked modifications of the responses that were similar to those observed after HFS but had a smaller extension. In fact, LFS caused long-lasting potentiation of the N1 wave in the MVN ventral portion (Vp) and long-lasting depression of the N2 wave in the MVN dorsal portion (Dp), whereas it provoked small and variable effects on the N1 wave. By contrast, when the synaptic transmission was already conditioned, LFS influenced the synaptic responses oppositely, reducing or annulling the HFS long-term effects. This phenomenon was specifically induced by LFS, because HFS was not able to cause it. The involvement of NMDA receptors in mediating the LFS long-term effects was supported by the fact that AP-5 prevented their induction. In addition, the annulment of HFS long-term effects by LFS was also demonstrated by the shift in the latency of the evoked unitary potentials after LFS. In conclusion, we suggest that the reduction of the previously induced conditioning could represent a cancellation mechanism, useful to quickly adapt the vestibular system to continuous different needs and to avoid saturation.

  19. Vestibular nuclei characterized by calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity and tract tracing in Gekko gecko.

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    Song, Jing; Wang, Wenbo; Carr, Catherine E; Dai, Zhendong; Tang, Yezhong

    2013-02-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were used to describe the distribution of the calcium binding proteins calretinin, calbindin and parvalbumin as well as synaptic vesicle protein 2 in the vestibular nuclei of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). In addition, tract tracing was used to investigate connections between the vestibular nerves and brainstem nuclei. Seven vestibular nuclei were recognized: the nuclei cerebellaris lateralis (Cerl), vestibularis dorsolateralis (Vedl), ventrolateralis (Vevl), ventromedialis (Vevm), tangentialis (Vetg), ovalis (VeO) and descendens (Veds). Vestibular fibers entered the brainstem with the ascending branch projecting to Vedl and Cerl, the lateral descending branch to Veds, and the medial descending branch to ipsilateral Vevl. Cerl lay most rostral, in the cerebellar peduncle. Vedl, located rostrally, was ventral to the cerebellar peduncle, and consisted of loosely arranged multipolar and monopolar cells. Vevl was found at the level of the vestibular nerve root and contained conspicuously large cells and medium-sized cells. Veds is a large nucleus, the most rostral portion of which is situated lateral and ventral to Vevl, and occupies much of the dorsal brainstem extending caudally through the medulla. VeO is a spherically shaped cell group lateral to the auditory nucleus magnocellularis and dorsal to the caudal part of Vevl. Vevm and Vetg were small in the present study. Except for VeO, all other vestibular nuclei appear directly comparable to counterparts in other reptiles and birds based on their location, cytoarchitecture, and connections, indicating these are conserved features of the vestibular system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

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    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  1. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

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    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Precerebellar and vestibular nuclei of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

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    Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G; Watson, C R R

    2007-09-01

    The monotremes are a unique group of living mammals, which diverged from the line leading to placental mammals at least 125 million years ago. We have examined the organization of pontine, inferior olivary, lateral reticular and vestibular nuclei in the brainstem of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) to determine if the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of these nuclei are similar to that in placental mammals and marsupials. We have used Nissl staining in conjunction with enzyme-histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase, cytochrome oxidase and NADPH diaphorase as well as immunohistochemistry for non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody) and calcium binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin). Homologies could be established between the arch shaped inferior olivary complex of the echidna and the principal, dorsal and medial accessory subdivisions of the therian inferior olivary complex. The pontine nuclei of the echidna included basilar and reticulotegmental components with similar cyto- and chemarchitectural features to therians and there were magnocellular and subtrigeminal components of the lateral reticular nucleus, also as seen in therians. Subdivisions and chemoarchitecture of the vestibular complex of the echidna were both similar to that region in rodents. In all three precerebellar nuclear groups studied and in the vestibular nucleus organization, the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the echidna was very similar to that seen in therian mammals and no "primitive" or "reptilian" features were evident.

  3. Activation of PAF-synthesizing enzymes in rat brain stem slices after LTP induction in the medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francescangeli, Ermelinda; Grassi, Silvarosa; Pettorossi, Vito E; Goracci, Gianfrancesco

    2002-11-01

    LysoPAF acetyltransferase (lysoPAF-AT) and PAF-synthesizing phosphocholinetransferase (PAF-PCT) are the two enzymes which catalyze the final reactions for the synthesis of PAF. Their activities, assayed in the homogenate of rat brain stem slices and under their optimal conditions, increased 5 min after high frequency stimulation of vestibular afferents, inducing LTP in the medial vestibular nuclei. The activity of phosphatidylcholine-synthesizing phosphocholinetransferase, was not affected. Sixty minutes from the induction of LTP, PAF-PCT activity, but not that of lysoPAF-AT, was still significantly higher with respect to 5 min test stimulated control. We used AP-5 to verify whether this increase was strictly dependent upon LTP induction, which requires NMDA receptor activation. In AP-5 treated slices, lysoPAF-acetyltransferase and PAF-synthesizing phosphocholinetransferase activities increased, but they were reduced after high frequency stimulation under AP-5. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the activities of PAF-synthesizing enzymes are activated soon after the induction of LTP and that this effect is linked to the activation of NMDA-receptors. We suggest that the enzyme activation by AP-5, preventing LTP, might be due to glutamate enhancement but, in neurons showing LTP and under normal conditions, the activation of potentiation mechanisms is critical for the enhancement of enzyme activities.

  4. Exogenous glutamate induces short and long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Pessia, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-08

    In rat brain stem slices, high concentrations of exogenous glutamate induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. At low concentrations, glutamate can also induce short-term potentiation (STP), indicating that LTP and STP are separate events depending on the level of glutamatergic synapse activation. LTP and STP are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Conversely, blocking platelet-activating factor (PAF) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors only prevents the full development of LTP. Moreover, in the presence of blocking agents, glutamate causes transient inhibition, suggesting that when potentiation is impeded, exogenous glutamate can activate presynaptic mechanisms that reduce glutamate release.

  5. Influence of testosterone on synaptic transmission in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: estrogenic and androgenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Di Mauro, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-12-15

    In brainstem slices of young male rat, we investigated the influence of the neuroactive steroid testosterone (T) on the synaptic responses by analyzing the field potential evoked in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. T induced three distinct and independent long-term synaptic changes: fast long-lasting potentiation (fLP), slow long-lasting potentiation (sLP) and long-lasting depression (LD). The fLP was mediated by 17β-estradiol (E(2)) since it was abolished by blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) or the enzyme converting T to E(2). Conversely, sLP and LD were mediated by 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) since they were prevented by blocking the androgen receptors (ARs) or the enzyme converting T to DHT. Therefore, the synaptic effects of T were mediated by its androgenic or estrogenic metabolites. The pathways leading to estrogenic and androgenic conversion of T might be co-localized since, the occurrence of fLP under block of androgenic pathway, and that of sLP and LD under estrogenic block, were higher than those observed without blocks. In case of co-localization, the effect on synaptic transmission should depend on the prevailing enzymatic activity. We conclude that circulating and neuronal T can remarkably influence synaptic responses of the vestibular neurons in different and opposite ways, depending on its conversion to estrogenic or androgenic metabolites. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2000-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by high-frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. The nitric oxide scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide ] and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were administered before and after induction of potentiation. Both drugs completely prevented long-term potentiation, whereas they did not impede the potentiation build-up, or affect the already established potentiation. These results demonstrate that the induction, but not the maintenance of vestibular long-term potentiation, depends on the synthesis and release into the extracellular medium of nitric oxide. In addition, we analysed the effect of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside on vestibular responses. Sodium nitroprusside induced long-term potentiation, as evidenced through the field potential enhancement and unit peak latency decrease. This potentiation was impeded by D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was reduced under blockade of synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors by ginkgolide B and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors by (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid. When reduced, potentiation fully developed following the washout of antagonist, demonstrating an involvement of platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in its full development. Potentiation induced by sodium nitroprusside was also associated with a decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, which persisted under ginkgolide B, indicating that nitric oxide increases glutamate release independently of platelet-activating factor-mediated presynaptic events. We suggest that nitric oxide, released after the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, acts as a retrograde messenger leading to an enhancement of glutamate release to a

  7. Integration of canal and otolith inputs by central vestibular neurons is subadditive for both active and passive self-motion: implication for perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriot, Jerome; Jamali, Mohsen; Brooks, Jessica X; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2015-02-25

    Traditionally, the neural encoding of vestibular information is studied by applying either passive rotations or translations in isolation. However, natural vestibular stimuli are typically more complex. During everyday life, our self-motion is generally not restricted to one dimension, but rather comprises both rotational and translational motion that will simultaneously stimulate receptors in the semicircular canals and otoliths. In addition, natural self-motion is the result of self-generated and externally generated movements. However, to date, it remains unknown how information about rotational and translational components of self-motion is integrated by vestibular pathways during active and/or passive motion. Accordingly, here, we compared the responses of neurons at the first central stage of vestibular processing to rotation, translation, and combined motion. Recordings were made in alert macaques from neurons in the vestibular nuclei involved in postural control and self-motion perception. In response to passive stimulation, neurons did not combine canal and otolith afferent information linearly. Instead, inputs were subadditively integrated with a weighting that was frequency dependent. Although canal inputs were more heavily weighted at low frequencies, the weighting of otolith input increased with frequency. In response to active stimulation, neuronal modulation was significantly attenuated (∼ 70%) relative to passive stimulation for rotations and translations and even more profoundly attenuated for combined motion due to subadditive input integration. Together, these findings provide insights into neural computations underlying the integration of semicircular canal and otolith inputs required for accurate posture and motor control, as well as perceptual stability, during everyday life. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353555-11$15.00/0.

  8. Cyclic estrogenic fluctuation influences synaptic transmission of the medial vestibular nuclei in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, Vito E; Frondaroli, Adele; Grassi, Silvarosa

    2011-04-01

    The estrous cycle in female rats influences the basal synaptic responsiveness and plasticity of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons through different levels of circulating 17β-estradiol (cE(2)). The aim of this study was to verify, in the female rat, whether cyclic fluctuations of cE(2) influence long-term synaptic effects induced by high frequency afferent stimulation (HFS) in the MVN, since we found that HFS in the male rat induces fast long-term potentiation (fLTP), which depends on the neural synthesis of E(2) (nE(2)) from testosterone (T). We analyzed the field potential (FP) evoked in the MVN by vestibular afferent stimulation, under basal conditions, and after HFS, in brainstem slices of female rats during high levels (proestrus, PE) and low levels (diestrus, DE) of cE(2). Selective blocking agents of converting T enzymes were used. Unlike in the male rat, HFS induced three effects: fLTP through T conversion into E(2), and slow LTP (sLTP) and long-term depression (LTD), through T conversion into DHT. The occurrence of these effects depended on the estrous cycle phase: the frequency of fLTP was higher in DE, and those of sLTP and LTD were higher in PE. Conversely, the basal FP was also higher in PE than in DE.

  9. Different metabotropic glutamate receptors play opposite roles in synaptic plasticity of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2002-09-15

    In the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) of rat brainstem slices, the role of group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and of the subtypes of group I mGluRs: mGluR1, mGluR5, was investigated in basal synaptic transmission and in the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). We used selective antagonists and agonists for mGluRs and we analysed the field potentials evoked by vestibular afferent stimulation before and after high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP. The group II and III mGluR antagonist, (R,S)-alpha-2-methyl-4sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), induced LTP per se and caused a reduction of the paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) ratio indicating an enhancement of glutamate release. This suggests that group II and III mGluRs are activated under basal conditions to limit glutamate release. Both the group II and III mGluR selective antagonists, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoate (LY341495) and (R,S)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP), induced LTP, and the selective agonists, (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC) and L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed the field potentials and prevented HFS-LTP, with a prevailing contribution of group II mGluRs over that of group III mGluRs. The mGluR1 antagonist, 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) prevented the full development and maintenance of HFS-LTP. By contrast, the mGluR5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP) induced LTP per se, which was impeded by CPCCOEt, and it had no effect on LTP once induced by HFS. The PPF analysis showed an enhancement of glutamate release during MPEP potentiation. The group I mGluR agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) induced LTP per se, which was blocked by CPCCOEt. By contrast the mGluR5 agonist, (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxypheylglycine (CHPG) prevented LTP elicited by HFS and DHPG as well. In conclusion vestibular LTP is

  10. NMDA receptor-mediated long term modulation of electrically evoked field potentials in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocchi, G; Della Torre, G; Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E; Zampolini, M

    1992-01-01

    The effect of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on field potentials recorded in the ipsilateral Medial Vestibular Nuclei (MVN) was studied. Our results show that potentiation and depression can be induced in different portions of MVN, which are distinguishable by their anatomical organization. HFS induces potentiation of the monosynaptic component in the ventral portion of the MVN, whereas it provokes depression of the polysynaptic component in the dorsal portion of the same nucleus. The induction of both potentiation and depression was blocked under AP5 perfusion, thus demonstrating that NMDA receptor activation mediates both phenomena. Furthermore, the finding that the field potentials were not modified during perfusion with DL-AP5, as previously reported, supports the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are not involved in the normal synaptic transmission from the primary vestibular afferent fibres, but are only activated following hyperstimulation of this afferent system. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of long term modification of synaptic efficacy observed in MVN may underlie the plasticity phenomena occurring in vestibular nuclei.

  11. ERG voltage-gated K+ channels regulate excitability and discharge dynamics of the medial vestibular nucleus neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessia, Mauro; Servettini, Ilenio; Panichi, Roberto; Guasti, Leonardo; Grassi, Silvarosa; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Wanke, Enzo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2008-10-15

    The discharge properties of the medial vestibular nucleus neurones (MVNn) critically depend on the activity of several ion channel types. In this study we show, immunohistochemically, that the voltage-gated K(+) channels ERG1A, ERG1B, ERG2 and ERG3 are highly expressed within the vestibular nuclei of P10 and P60 mice. The role played by these channels in the spike-generating mechanisms of the MVNn and in temporal information processing was investigated electrophysiologically from mouse brain slices, in vitro, by analysing the spontaneous discharge and the response to square-, ramp- and sinusoid-like intracellular DC current injections in extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp studies. We show that more than half of the recorded MVNn were responsive to ERG channel block (WAY-123,398, E4031), displaying an increase in spontaneous activity and discharge irregularity. The response to step and ramp current injection was also modified by ERG block showing a reduction of first spike latency, enhancement of discharge rate and reduction of the slow spike-frequency adaptation process. ERG channels influence the interspike slope without affecting the spike shape. Moreover, in response to sinusoid-like current, ERG channel block caused frequency-dependent gain enhancement and phase-lead shift. Taken together, the data demonstrate that ERG channels control the excitability of MVNn, their discharge regularity and probably their resonance properties.

  12. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Physiological Characterization of Vestibular Efferent Brainstem Neurons Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijon, Sara; Magnusson, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    The functional role of efferent innervation of the vestibular end-organs in the inner ear remains elusive. This study provides the first physiological characterization of the cholinergic vestibular efferent (VE) neurons in the brainstem by utilizing a transgenic mouse model, expressing eGFP under a choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT)-locus spanning promoter in combination with targeted patch clamp recordings. The intrinsic electrical properties of the eGFP-positive VE neurons were compared to the properties of the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) brainstem neurons, which gives rise to efferent innervation of the cochlea. Both VE and the LOC neurons were marked by their negative resting membrane potential neurons differed significantly in the depolarizing range. When injected with positive currents, VE neurons fired action potentials faithfully to the onset of depolarization followed by sparse firing with long inter-spike intervals. This response gave rise to a low response gain. The LOC neurons, conversely, responded with a characteristic delayed tonic firing upon depolarizing stimuli, giving rise to higher response gain than the VE neurons. Depolarization triggered large TEA insensitive outward currents with fast inactivation kinetics, indicating A-type potassium currents, in both the inner ear-projecting neuronal types. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Kv4.3 and 4.2 ion channel subunits in both the VE and LOC neurons. The difference in spiking responses to depolarization is related to a two-fold impact of these transient outward currents on somatic integration in the LOC neurons compared to in VE neurons. It is speculated that the physiological properties of the VE neurons might be compatible with a wide-spread control over motion and gravity sensation in the inner ear, providing likewise feed-back amplification of abrupt and strong phasic signals from the semi-circular canals and of tonic signals from the gravito-sensitive macular organs. PMID:24867596

  14. Gaze-Stabilizing Central Vestibular Neurons Project Asymmetrically to Extraocular Motoneuron Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppik, David; Bianco, Isaac H; Prober, David A; Douglass, Adam D; Robson, Drew N; Li, Jennifer M B; Greenwood, Joel S F; Soucy, Edward; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2017-11-22

    Within reflex circuits, specific anatomical projections allow central neurons to relay sensations to effectors that generate movements. A major challenge is to relate anatomical features of central neural populations, such as asymmetric connectivity, to the computations the populations perform. To address this problem, we mapped the anatomy, modeled the function, and discovered a new behavioral role for a genetically defined population of central vestibular neurons in rhombomeres 5-7 of larval zebrafish. First, we found that neurons within this central population project preferentially to motoneurons that move the eyes downward. Concordantly, when the entire population of asymmetrically projecting neurons was stimulated collectively, only downward eye rotations were observed, demonstrating a functional correlate of the anatomical bias. When these neurons are ablated, fish failed to rotate their eyes following either nose-up or nose-down body tilts. This asymmetrically projecting central population thus participates in both upward and downward gaze stabilization. In addition to projecting to motoneurons, central vestibular neurons also receive direct sensory input from peripheral afferents. To infer whether asymmetric projections can facilitate sensory encoding or motor output, we modeled differentially projecting sets of central vestibular neurons. Whereas motor command strength was independent of projection allocation, asymmetric projections enabled more accurate representation of nose-up stimuli. The model shows how asymmetric connectivity could enhance the representation of imbalance during nose-up postures while preserving gaze stabilization performance. Finally, we found that central vestibular neurons were necessary for a vital behavior requiring maintenance of a nose-up posture: swim bladder inflation. These observations suggest that asymmetric connectivity in the vestibular system facilitates representation of ethologically relevant stimuli without

  15. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor block on the synaptic transmission and plasticity in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Malfagia, C; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-11-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the possible role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in modulating the synaptic transmission within the medial vestibular nuclei, under basal and plasticity inducing conditions. We analysed the effect of the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine on the amplitude of the field potentials and latency of unitary potentials evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation, and on the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, after high-frequency stimulation. Two effects were observed, consisting of a slight increase of the field potentials and reduction of unit latency during the drug infusion, and a further long-lasting development of these modifications after the drug wash-out. The long-term effect depended on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, as D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid prevented its development. We suggest that (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4carboxyphenylglycine enhances the vestibular responses and induces N-methyl-D-aspartate-dependent long-term potentiation by increasing glutamate release, through the block of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors which actively inhibit it. The block of these receptors was indirectly supported by the fact that the agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid reduced the vestibular responses and blocked the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency stimulation. The simultaneous block of metabotropic glutamate receptors facilitating synaptic plasticity, impedes the full expression of the long-term effect throughout the (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The involvement of such a facilitatory mechanism in the potentiation is supported by its reversible reduction following a second (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The drug also reduced the expression of potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation

  16. Developmental shift from long-term depression to long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyal, Julien; Grassi, Silvarosa; Dieni, Cristina; Frondaroli, Adele; Demêmes, Danielle; Raymond, Jaqueline; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2003-12-01

    The effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on synaptic transmission in the ventral part of the medial vestibular nuclei (vMVN) were studied during postnatal development and compared with the changes in the expression of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR5. During the first stages of development, HFS always induced a mGluR5- and GABAA-dependent long-term depression (LTD) which did not require NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. The probability of inducing LTD decreased progressively throughout the development and it was zero at about the end of the second postnatal week. Conversely, long-term potentiation (LTP) appeared at the beginning of the second week and its occurrence increased to reach the adult value at the end of the third week. Of interest, the sudden change in the LTP frequency occurred at the time of eye opening, about the end of the second postnatal week. LTP depended on NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. In parallel with the modifications in synaptic plasticity, we observed that the expression patterns and localizations of mGluR5 and mGluR1 in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) changed during postnatal development. At the earlier stages the mGluR1 expression was minimal, then increased progressively. In contrast, mGluR5 expression was initially high, then decreased. While mGluR1 was exclusively localized in neuronal compartments and concentrated at the postsynaptic sites at all stages observed, mGluR5 was found mainly in neuronal compartments at immature stages, then preferentially in glial compartments at mature stages. These results provide the first evidence for a progressive change from LTD to LTP accompanied by a distinct maturation expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 during the development of the MVN.

  17. [The distribution of NADPH-diaphorase and neuronal no synthase in rat medulla oblongata nuclei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, V M; Kotsuba, A E

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of nitroxide ergic neurons in the medulla oblongata nuclei in Wistar rats (n = 8) was studied histochemically (NADPH-diaphorase) and using immunohistochemistry with an antiserum against neuronal form of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). NADPH-diaphorase activity was found in large and small neurons of the sensory, autonomic and motor nuclei. The latter were especially rich in the cells demonstrating the activity of the enzyme. Unlike NADPH-diaphorase, nNOS in the corresponding nuclei was always detected in the fewer number of neurons, predominantly of small sizes. The sensory nuclei (nucleus of solitary tract, reticular parvocellular and lateral nuclei, spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve) contained 1.5-3 times more nNOS neurons than in motor nuclei. In some nuclei (nucleus ambiguus, hypoglossal nerve nucleus), containing numerous NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons, immunoreactive cells were particularly rare.

  18. Role of platelet-activating factor in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-06-01

    In rat brain stem slices, we investigated the role of platelet activating factor (PAF) in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the ventral part of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferent. The synaptosomal PAF receptor antagonist, BN-52021 was administered before and after HFS. BN-52021 did not modify the vestibular potentials under basal conditions, but it reduced the magnitude of potentiation induced by HFS, which completely developed after the drug wash-out. The same effect was obtained by using CV-62091, a more potent PAF antagonist at microsomal binding sites, but with concentrations higher than those of BN-52021. By contrast both BN-52021 and CV-6209 had no effect on the potentiation once induced. This demonstrates that PAF is involved in the induction but not in the maintenance of vestibular long-term effect through activation of synaptosomal PAF receptors. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the PAF analogue, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O- (methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (MC-PAF) and the inactive PAF metabolite, 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (Lyso-PAF) on vestibular responses. Our results show that MC-PAF, but not Lyso-PAF induced potentiation. This potentiation was prevented by D,L-2-amino 5-phosphonopentanoic acid, suggesting an involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Furthermore, under BN-52021 and CV-6209, the MC-PAF potentiation was reduced or abolished. The dose-effect curve of MC-PAF showed a shift to the right greater under BN-52021 than under CV-6209, confirming the main dependence of MC-PAF potentiation on the activation of synaptosomal PAF receptors. Our results suggest that PAF can be released in the MVN after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms triggering LTP, and it may act as a retrograde messenger which activates the presynaptic mechanisms facilitating synaptic plasticity.

  19. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  20. Bone conducted vibration selectively activates irregular primary otolithic vestibular neurons in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curthoys, Ian S; Kim, Juno; McPhedran, Samara K; Camp, Aaron J

    2006-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine whether bone-conducted vibration (BCV) is equally effective in activating both semicircular canal and otolith afferents in the guinea pig or whether there is preferential activation of one of these classes of vestibular afferents. To answer this question a large number (346) of single primary vestibular neurons were recorded extracellularly in anesthetized guinea pigs and were identified by their location in the vestibular nerve and classed as regular or irregular on the basis of the variability of their spontaneous discharge. If a neuron responded to angular acceleration it was classed as a semicircular canal neuron, if it responded to maintained roll or pitch tilts it was classified as an otolith neuron. Each neuron was then tested by BCV stimuli-either clicks, continuous pure tones (200-1,500 Hz) or short tone bursts (500 Hz lasting 7 ms)-delivered by a B-71 clinical bone-conduction oscillator cemented to the guinea pig's skull. All stimulus intensities were referred to that animal's own auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold to BCV clicks, and the maximum intensity used was within the animal's physiological range and was usually around 70 dB above BCV threshold. In addition two sensitive single axis linear accelerometers cemented to the skull gave absolute values of the stimulus acceleration in the rostro-caudal direction. The criterion for a neuron being classed as activated was an audible, stimulus-locked increase in firing rate (a 10% change was easily detectable) in response to the BCV stimulus. At the stimulus levels used in this study, semicircular canal neurons, both regular and irregular, were insensitive to BCV stimuli and very few responded: only nine of 189 semicircular canal neurons tested (4.7%) showed a detectable increase in firing in response to BCV stimuli up to the maximum 2 V peak-to-peak level we delivered to the B-71 oscillator (which produced a peak-to-peak skull acceleration of around

  1. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  2. Long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei depends on locally synthesized 17beta-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Dieni, Cristina; Scarduzio, Mariangela; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2009-08-26

    In male rat brainstem slices, we investigated the involvement of locally synthesized 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) in the induction in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) of long-term potentiation (LTP) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents. We demonstrated that the blockade of aromatase by letrozole or of E(2) receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) by ICI 182,780 prevented the HFS-induced LTP of the N1 wave of the evoked field potential (FP) without affecting baseline responses. Only prolonged afferent activation could induce low LTP. In contrast, HFS applied under a combined blockade of GABA(A) receptors and aromatase or ERs was still able to induce LTP, but it was significantly lower and slower. These findings demonstrate that E(2) does not have a tonic influence on the activity of the MVN neurons and provide the first evidence of the crucial role played by local synthesis of E(2) in inducing LTP. We suggest that the synthesis of E(2) occurs after aromatase activation during HFS and facilitates the development of vestibular synaptic plasticity by influencing glutamate and GABA transmission.

  3. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors reverses NMDA-R-dependent LTD by activating PKA in medial vestibular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Hai; Han, Lei; Wu, Kenneth Lap Kei; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2017-09-01

    The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) is a major output station for neurons that project to the vestibulo-spinal pathway. MVN neurons show capacity for long-term depression (LTD) during the juvenile period. We investigated LTD of MVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. High frequency stimulation (HFS) robustly induced LTD in 90% of type B neurons in the MVN, while only 10% of type A neurons were responsive, indicating that type B neurons are the major contributors to LTD in the MVN. The neuromodulator serotonin (5-HT) is known to modulate LTD in neural circuits of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. We therefore aim to determine the action of 5-HT on the LTD of type B MVN neurons and elucidate the relevant 5-HT receptor subtypes responsible for its action. Using specific agonists and antagonists of 5-HT receptors, we found that selective activation of 5-HT 7 receptor in type B neurons in the MVN of juvenile (P13-16) rats completely abolished NMDA-receptor-mediated LTD in a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. Our finding that 5-HT restricts plasticity of type B MVN neurons via 5-HT 7 receptors offers a mechanism whereby vestibular tuning contributes to the maturation of the vestibulo-spinal circuit and highlights the role of 5-HT in postural control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Histamine Excites Rat Superior Vestibular Nuclear Neurons via Postsynaptic H1 and H2 Receptors in vitro

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    Qian-Xing Zhuang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The superior vestibular nucleus (SVN, which holds a key position in vestibulo-ocular reflexes and nystagmus, receives direct hypothalamic histaminergic innervations. By using rat brainstem slice preparations and extracellular unitary recordings, we investigated the effect of histamine on SVN neurons and the underlying receptor mechanisms. Bath application of histamine evoked an excitatory response of the SVN neurons, which was not blocked by the low-Ca2+/high-Mg2+ medium, indicating a direct postsynaptic effect of the amine. Selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine and H2 receptor agonist dimaprit, rather than VUF8430, a selective H4 receptor agonist, mimicked the excitation of histamine on SVN neurons. In addition, selective H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine and H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine, but not JNJ7777120, a selective H4 receptor antagonist, partially blocked the excitatory response of SVN neurons to histamine. Moreover, mepyramine together with ranitidine nearly totally blocked the histamine-induced excitation. Immunostainings further showed that histamine H1 and H2 instead of H4 receptors existed in the SVN. These results demonstrate that histamine excites the SVN neurons via postsynaptic histamine H1 and H2 receptors, and suggest that the central histaminergic innervation from the hypothalamus may actively bias the SVN neuronal activity and subsequently modulate the SVN-mediated vestibular functions and gaze control.

  5. Changes of amino acid concentrations in the rat vestibular nuclei after inferior cerebellar peduncle transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yizhe; Godfrey, Donald A; Godfrey, Timothy G; Rubin, Allan M

    2007-02-15

    Although there is a close relationship between the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) and the cerebellum, little is known about the contribution of cerebellar inputs to amino acid neurotransmission in the VNC. Microdissection of freeze-dried brain sections and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were combined to measure changes of amino acid concentrations within the VNC of rats following transection of the cerebellovestibular connections in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Distributions of 12 amino acids within the VNC at 2, 4, 7, and 30 days after surgery were compared with those for control and sham-lesioned rats. Concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decreased by 2 days after unilateral peduncle transection in nearly all VNC regions on the lesioned side and to lesser extents on the unlesioned side and showed partial recovery up to 30 days postsurgery. Asymmetries between the two sides of the VNC were maintained through 30 days. Glutamate concentrations were reduced bilaterally in virtually all regions of the VNC by 2 days and showed complete recovery in most VNC regions by 30 days. Glutamine concentrations increased, starting 2 days after surgery, especially on the lesioned side, so that there was asymmetry generally opposite that of glutamate. Concentrations of taurine, aspartate, and glycine also underwent partially reversible changes after peduncle transection. The results suggest that GABA and glutamate are prominent neurotransmitters in bilateral projections from the cerebellum to the VNC and that amino acid metabolism in the VNC is strongly influenced by its cerebellar connections.

  6. Response of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons to vestibular stimuli in vertical planes. Role in vertical vestibulospinal reflexes of the decerebrate cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, P. S.; Goto, T.; Schor, R. H.; Wilson, V. J.; Yamagata, Y.; Yates, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. To investigate the neural substrate of vestibulospinal reflexes in decerebrate cats, we studied the responses of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons to natural stimulation of the labyrinth in vertical planes. Our principal aim was to determine whether reticulospinal neurons that terminate in, or are likely to give off collaterals to, the upper cervical segments had properties similar to those of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR). 2. Antidromic stimulation was used to determine whether the neurons projected to the neck, lower cervical, thoracic, or lumbar levels. Dynamics of the responses of spontaneously firing neurons were studied with sinusoidal stimuli delivered at 0.05-1 Hz and aligned to the plane of body rotation, that produced maximal modulation of the neuron (response vector orientation). Each neuron was assigned a vestibular input classification of otolith, vertical canal, otolith + canal, or spatial-temporal convergence (STC). 3. We found, in agreement with previous studies, that the largest fraction of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons projected to the lumbar cord, and that only a small number ended in the neck segments. Neurons projecting to all levels of the spinal cord had similar responses to labyrinth stimulation. 4. Reticulospinal neurons that received only vertical canal inputs were rare (1 of 67 units). Most reticulospinal neurons (48%) received predominant otolith inputs, 18% received otolith + canal input, and only 9% had STC behavior. These data are in sharp contrast to the results of our previous studies of vestibulospinal neurons. A considerable portion of vestibulospinal neurons receives vertical canal input (38%), fewer receive predominantly otolith input (22%), whereas the proportion that have otolith + canal input or STC behavior is similar to our present reticulospinal data. 5. The response vector orientations of our reticulospinal neurons, particularly those with canal inputs (canal, otolith + canal, STC) were predominantly in

  7. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  8. Role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors 2/3 and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in developing rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2005-08-22

    In brainstem slices from developing rats, metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 play different inhibitory roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity of the medial vestibular nuclei. The mGluR2/3 block (LY341495) reduces the occurrence of long-term depression after vestibular afferent high frequency stimulation at P8-P10, and increases that of long-term potentiation, while the mGluR5 block prevents high frequency stimulation long-term depression. Later on, the receptor block does not influence high frequency stimulation effects. In addition, while mGluR2/3 agonist (APDC) always provokes a transient reduction of synaptic responses, that of mGluR5 (CHPG) induces long-term depression per se at P8-P10. These results show a key role of mGluR5 in inducing high frequency stimulation long-term depression in developing medial vestibular nuclei, while mGluR2/3 modulate synaptic transmission, probably through presynaptic control of glutamate release.

  9. Electrophysiological Features of Neurons in the Mesencephalic Trigeminal Nuclei

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    Jun-Ling Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Mes V neurons represent an uncommon class of primary sensory neurons. Besides receiving somatosensory information, Mes V neurons are also involved in regulating multisensory information. The present review first describes the passive features as well as three important currents, followed by a distinct excitability classification and a description of the excitability transition of Mes V neurons. Furthermore, their resonance property, the existence of membrane oscillation and electrical coupling which may promote strong synchronization, as well as their function in controlling stretch reflex activity, are discussed.

  10. Platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors interact for full development and maintenance of long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1999-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in mediating long-term potentiation within the medial vestibular nuclei. We analysed the N1 field potential wave evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation. The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, prevented long-term potentiation induced by a platelet-activating factor analogue [1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-(methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine], as well as the full development of potentiation, induced by high-frequency stimulation under the blocking agent for synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors (ginkolide B), at drug washout. However, potentiation directly induced by the group I glutamate metabotropic receptor agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, was reduced by ginkolide B. These findings suggest that platelet-activating factor, whether exogenous or released following potentiation induction, exerts its effect through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, mediating the increase of glutamate release. In addition, we found that this mechanism, which led to full potentiation through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, was inactivated soon after application of potentiation-inducing stimulus. In fact, the long-lasting block of the platelet-activating factor and metabotropic glutamate receptors prevented the full potentiation development and the induced potentiation progressively declined to null. Moreover, ginkolide B, given when high-frequency-dependent potentiation was established, only reduced it within 5 min after potentiation induction. We conclude that to fully develop vestibular long-term potentiation requires presynaptic events. Platelet-activating factor, released after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms which induce potentiation, is necessary

  11. The repetition timing of high frequency afferent stimulation drives the bidirectional plasticity at central synapses in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarduzio, M; Panichi, R; Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S

    2012-10-25

    In this study we show that high frequency stimulation (HFS, 100Hz) of afferent fibers to the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) can induce opposite long-term modifications of synaptic responses in the type B neurons depending upon the stimulation pattern. Long burst stimulation (LBS: 2s) and short burst stimulation (SBS: 0.55s) were applied with different burst number (BN) and inter-burst intervals (IBI). It results that both LBS and SBS can induce either N-methyl-d aspartate receptors (NMDARs)-mediated long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD), depending on temporal organization of repetitive bursts. In particular, the IBI plays a relevant role in guiding the shift from LTP to LTD since by using both LBS and SBS LTP is induced by shorter IBI than LTD. By contrast, the sign of long-term effect does not depend on the mean impulse frequency evaluated within the entire stimulation period. Therefore, the patterns of repetitive vestibular activation with different ratios between periods of increased activity and periods of basal activity may lead to LTP or LTD probably causing different levels of postsynaptic Ca(2+). On the whole, this study demonstrates that glutamatergic vestibular synapse in the MVN can undergo NMDAR-dependent bidirectional plasticity and puts forward a new aspect for understanding the adaptive and compensatory plasticity of the oculomotor responses. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of bilateral vestibular nucleus lesions on cardiovascular regulation in conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R L; Cotter, L A; Arendt, H E; Olsheski, C J; Yates, B J

    2005-02-01

    The vestibular system participates in cardiovascular regulation during postural changes. In prior studies (Holmes MJ, Cotter LA, Arendt HE, Cas SP, and Yates BJ. Brain Res 938: 62-72, 2002, and Jian BJ, Cotter LA, Emanuel BA, Cass SP, and Yates BJ. J Appl Physiol 86: 1552-1560, 1999), transection of the vestibular nerves resulted in instability in blood pressure during nose-up body tilts, particularly when no visual information reflecting body position in space was available. However, recovery of orthostatic tolerance occurred within 1 wk, presumably because the vestibular nuclei integrate a variety of sensory inputs reflecting body location. The present study tested the hypothesis that lesions of the vestibular nuclei result in persistent cardiovascular deficits during orthostatic challenges. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in five conscious cats during nose-up tilts of varying amplitude, both before and after chemical lesions of the vestibular nuclei. Before lesions, blood pressure remained relatively stable during tilts. In all animals, the blood pressure responses to nose-up tilts were altered by damage to the medial and inferior vestibular nuclei; these effects were noted both when animals were tested in the presence and absence of visual feedback. In four of the five animals, the lesions also resulted in augmented heart rate increases from baseline values during 60 degrees nose-up tilts. These effects persisted for longer than 1 wk, but they gradually resolved over time, except in the animal with the worst deficits. These observations suggest that recovery of compensatory cardiovascular responses after loss of vestibular inputs is accomplished at least in part through plastic changes in the vestibular nuclei and the enhancement of the ability of vestibular nucleus neurons to discriminate body position in space by employing nonlabyrinthine signals.

  13. Influence of sex and estrous cycle on synaptic responses of the medial vestibular nuclei in rats: role of circulating 17β-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Scarduzio, Mariangela; Dieni, Cristina V; Brecchia, Gabriele; Boiti, Cristiano; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2012-02-10

    We investigated the possible influence of sex and estrous cycle on the synaptic responses of neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and their long-term modifications. In brain stem slices of male and female rats during proestrus (PE) and diestrus (DE), we evaluated the field potential evoked in the MVN by vestibular afferent stimulation. Here we find that in PE females the field potential had a lower threshold and higher amplitude than in DE females and in males and also that the stimulus-response curve was shifted to the left. Such difference is related to the level and cyclic fluctuation of circulating 17β-estradiol (E(2)). This is supported by the exogenous administration of E(2) in DE females and males, with low levels of circulating E(2) that enhanced the field potential amplitude to values close to those of PE females. Sex and estrous cycle also influence the MVN synaptic plasticity. This has been shown by investigating the effect of testosterone (T) on the induction of long-term effects, since T is the precursor for the neural synthesis of E(2) (estrogenic pathway), which is involved in the induction of fast long-term potentiation (LTP), or of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT, androgenic pathway) which mediates slow LTP and long-term depression (LTD). We found that T mostly induced LTD in PE females and no effect in DE females, while it only provoked fast LTP in males. We suggest that high level of circulating E(2) may interfere with the conversion of T, by inhibiting the neural estrogenic pathway and facilitating the androgenic one. On the whole these results demonstrate an influence of circulating E(2) on vestibular synaptic transmission and plasticity that in some cases may contribute to the sex and menstrual cycle dependence of symptoms in human vestibular pathology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Research on alteration of neurons in vagal nuclei in medulla oblongata in newborns with respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Hilmi; Shabani, Ragip; Shabani, Driton; Dacaj, Ramadan; Manxhuka, Suzana; Azemi, Mehmedali; Krasniqi, Shaip; Kurtishi, Ilir

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal and axonal degenerative changes in motor vagal neurons (DMNV) and sensory vagal neurons (nTS) in the medulla oblongata in newborns were studied. Material was taken from the autopsies of newborns, live and dead newborns, in different gestational weeks (aborted, immature, premature and mature). 46 cases were studied. Material for research was taken from the medulla oblongata and lung tissue. Serial horizontal incisions were made in the medulla oblongata (± 4 mm), commencing from the obex, where the DMNV and nTS vagal nuclei were explored. Fixed cuttings in buffered formalin (10%) were used for histochemical staining. Serial cuttings were done with a microtome (7 µm). Pulmonary infections, being significant (p medulla oblongata in newborns in different gestational weeks are more emphasized in matures in comparison to aborted and immature (p < 0.05). Depending on the lifetime of dead newborns, neuronal morphological changes in vagus nerve nuclei are significant (p < 0.05). Therefore, it can be concluded that pulmonary infections are often caused due to dramatic respiratory distress in newborns, while hypoxaemic changes in the population of vagus nerve neurons in respiratory distress are more emphasized in matures.

  15. Influence of visual experience on developmental shift from long-term depression to long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Dieni, Cristina; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2004-11-01

    The influence of visual experience deprivation on changes in synaptic plasticity during postnatal development was studied in the ventral part of the rat medial vestibular nuclei (vMVN). We analysed the differences in the occurrence, expressed as a percentage, of long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents in rats reared in the light (LR) and those in the dark (DR). In LR rats, HFS only induced LTD in the early stages of development, but the occurrence of LTD progressively decreased to zero before their eyes opened, while that of LTP enhanced from zero to about 50%. Once the rats' eyes had opened, LTD was no longer inducible while LTP occurrence gradually reached the normal adult value (70%). In DR rats, a similar shift from LTD to LTP was observed before their eyes opened, showing only a slightly slower LTD decay and LTP growth, and the LTD annulment was delayed by 1 day. By contrast, the time courses of LTD and LTP development in DR and LR rats showed remarkable differences following eye opening. In fact, LTD occurrence increased to about 50% in a short period of time and remained high until the adult stage. In addition, the occurrence of LTP slowly decreased to less than 20%. The effect of light-deprivation was reversible, since the exposure of DR rats to light, 5 days after eye opening, caused a sudden disappearance of LTD and a partial recover of LTP occurrence. In addition, we observed that a week of light deprivation in LR adult rats did not affect the normal adult LTP occurrence. These results provide evidence that in a critical period of development visual input plays a crucial role in shaping synaptic plasticity of the vMVN, and suggest that the visual guided shift from LTD to LTP during development may be necessary to refine and consolidate vestibular circuitry.

  16. Different contributions of platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S

    2001-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the differential role of nitric oxide (NO) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO) and the PAF receptor antagonist ginkgolide B (BN-52021) were administered before and after induction of potentiation. The effect of carboxy-PTIO was to completely prevent LTP. By contrast, BN-52021 only reduced the amplitude of HFS potentiation, which could develop fully at the drug washout or decline to zero, becoming a short-term phenomenon, in the case of long-lasting PAF receptor block. Both drugs, when given after HFS, had no effect on the already established potentiation, but whilst BN-52021 showed an influence within 5 min of the LTP induction, carboxy-PTIO did not affect the response once HFS was delivered. Moreover, we showed that the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, and methylcarbamyl PAF (mc-PAF) induced LTP which was associated with an increase in glutamate release as shown by reduction in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio. The mc-PAF LTP was prevented by the NO scavenger, while NO LTP was only reduced by BN-52021. We suggest that NO and PAF are implicated as retrograde messengers in two different phases of vestibular LTP: NO in the induction phase; and PAF in the full expression phase.

  17. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  18. 3D Segmentations of Neuronal Nuclei from Confocal Microscope Image Stacks

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    Antonio eLaTorre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an algorithm to create 3D segmentations of neuronal cells from stacks of previously segmented 2D images. The idea behind this proposal is to provide a general method to reconstruct 3D structures from 2D stacks, regardless of how these 2D stacks have been obtained. The algorithm not only reuses the information obtained in the 2D segmentation, but also attempts to correct some typical mistakes made by the 2D segmentation algorithms (for example, under segmentation of tightly-coupled clusters of cells. We have tested our algorithm in a real scenario --- the segmentation of the neuronal nuclei in different layers of the rat cerebral cortex. Several representative images from different layers of the cerebral cortex have been considered and several 2D segmentation algorithms have been compared. Furthermore, the algorithm has also been compared with the traditional 3D Watershed algorithm and the results obtained here show better performance in terms of correctly identified neuronal nuclei.

  19. Progressive supranuclear palsy: neuronal and glial cytoskeletal pathology in the higher order processing autonomic nuclei of the lower brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Del Tredici, K; Schultz, C; de Vos, R A I; Jansen Steur, E N H; Arai, K; Braak, H

    2002-02-01

    The medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei (MPB, LPB), the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (GI), the raphes magnus (RMG) and raphes obscurus nuclei (ROB), as well as the intermediate reticular zone (IRZ) represent pivotal subordinate brainstem centres, all of which control autonomic functions. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and severity of the neuronal and glial cytoskeletal pathology in these six brainstem nuclei from 17 individuals with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The association between the severity of the pathology and the duration of the disease was investigated by means of correlation analysis. The brainstem nuclei in all of the PSP cases were affected by the neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, with the IRZ and GI regularly showing severe involvement, the MPB, RMG, and ROB marked involvement, and the LPB mild involvement. In the six nuclear greys studied, glial cells undergo alterations of their cytoskeleton on an irregular basis, whereby diseased oligodendrocytes predominantly presented as coiled bodies and affected astrocytes as thorn-shaped astrocytes. In all six nuclei, the severity of the neuronal or glial cytoskeletal pathology showed no correlation with the duration of PSP. In view of their functional role, the neuronal pathology in the nuclei studied offers a possible explanation for the autonomic dysfunctions that eventually develop in the course of PSP.

  20. The neuronal structure of paramamillary nuclei in Bison bonasus: Nissl and Golgi pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robak, A; Szteyn, S; Równiak, M

    1998-01-01

    The studies were carried out on the hypothalamus of bison bonasus aged 2 and 3 months. Sections were made by means of Bagiński's technique and Nissl and Klüver-Barrera methods. Four types of neurons were distinguished in the paramamillary nuclei: nucleus supramamillaris (Sm) and nucleus tuberomammillaris pars posterior (Tmp). Type I, small and medium-size, triangular or fusiform cells, which have 2-3 slender, poorly ramified dendrites; typical leptodendritic neurons. Type II, medium size neurons with quadrangular or spindle-shaped perikaryons. Most of them have 3-4 thick dendritic trunks with ramifying relatively long dendrites. These cells show stalked-appearance and possess different appendages sparsely distributed. Type III is similar to type II, but is made of medium-size to large multipolar cells having quadrangular, triangular or fusiform perikaryons and relatively short dendrites. Type IV, small and medium-size, globular cells with 2 or 3 dendritic trunks, which dichotomously subdivide into quaternary dendrites. In all types of neurons, axons emerge from the perikaryon or initial portion of a dendritic trunk. Type I was found in both studied nuclei. Types II and III constitute mainly the nucleus tuberomamillaris pars posterior. Type IV preponderate in the nucleus supramamillaris. The characteristic feature of Tmp cells, in Nissl picture was irregular contour of their somas and clumps of rough Nisls granules, which appear to lie outside the perikaryons. In Sm there were also lightly stained small rounded cells having both small amount of the cytoplasm and tigroid matter.

  1. Neuronal vacuolation of the trigeminal nuclei in goats caused by ingestion of Prosopis juliflora pods (mesquite beans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabosa, I M; Souza, J C; Graça, D L; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Almeida, R N; Riet-Correa, F

    2000-06-01

    Three groups of 6 goats each were fed a ration containing 30, 60, or 90%, on a dry matter base, of Prosopis juliflora pods. A control group of 4 goats ingested only the basic ration. Two hundred and ten days after the start of the experiment 3 goats that ingested 60% pods in and 4 that ingested 90% had mandibular tremors, mainly during chewing. All animals were killed after 270 d of ingestion. No gross lesions were observed. Histologic lesions were characterized by fine vacuolation of the pericaryon of neurons from the trigeminal nuclei. Occasionally neurons of the oculomotor nuclei were also affected. Wallerian degeneration was occasionally observed in the mandibular and trigeminal nerves. Denervation atrophy of the masseter, temporal, hypoglossus, genioglossus, styloglossus, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles was seen. The clinical signs from feeding the P juliflora pods were caused by a selective toxicity to neurons of some cranial nerve nuclei.

  2. Synaptic long-term potentiation and depression in the rat medial vestibular nuclei depend on neural activation of estrogenic and androgenic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarduzio, Mariangela; Panichi, Roberto; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Grassi, Silvarosa

    2013-01-01

    Estrogenic and androgenic steroids can be synthesised in the brain and rapidly modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity through direct interaction with membrane receptors for estrogens (ERs) and androgens (ARs). We used whole cell patch clamp recordings in brainstem slices of male rats to explore the influence of ER and AR activation and local synthesis of 17β-estradiol (E2) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on the long-term synaptic changes induced in the neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN). Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) caused by different patterns of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents were assayed under the blockade of ARs and ERs or in the presence of inhibitors for enzymes synthesizing DHT (5α-reductase) and E2 (P450-aromatase) from testosterone (T). We found that LTD is mediated by interaction of locally produced androgens with ARs and LTP by interaction of locally synthesized E2 with ERs. In fact, the AR block with flutamide prevented LTD while did not affect LTP, and the blockade of ERs with ICI 182,780 abolished LTP without influencing LTD. Moreover, the block of P450-aromatase with letrozole not only prevented the LTP induction, but inverted LTP into LTD. This LTD is likely due to the local activation of androgens, since it was abolished under blockade of ARs. Conversely, LTD was still induced in the presence of finasteride the inhibitor of 5α-reductase demonstrating that T is able to activate ARs and induce LTD even when DHT is not synthesized. This study demonstrates a key and opposite role of sex neurosteroids in the long-term synaptic changes of the MVN with a specific role of T-DHT for LTD and of E2 for LTP. Moreover, it suggests that different stimulation patterns can lead to LTD or LTP by specifically activating the enzymes involved in the synthesis of androgenic or estrogenic neurosteroids.

  3. nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkov N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated within a deformed shell model with the Bardeen-Cooper- Schrieffer (BCS pairing interaction over a wide range of quadrupole and octupole deformations. We found that in most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation, while the 2qp energies indicate regions of nuclei in which the presence of high-K isomeric states may be associated with the presence of octupole softness or even with octupole deformation. In the present work we also examine the influence of the BCS pairing strength on the energy of the blocked isomer configuration. We show that the formation of 2qp energy minima in the space of quadrupole-octupole and eventually higher multipolarity deformations is a subtle effect depending on nuclear pairing correlations.

  4. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  5. Thalamocortical Projection Neuron and Interneuron Numbers in the Visual Thalamic Nuclei of the Adult C57BL/6 Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelio, Marian; García-Amado, María; Clascá, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    A key parameter to constrain predictive, bottom-up circuit models of a given brain domain is the number and position of the neuronal populations involved. These include not only the neurons whose bodies reside within the domain, but also the neurons in distant regions that innervate the domain. The mouse visual cortex receives its main subcortical input from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and the lateral posterior (LP) complex of the thalamus. The latter consists of three different nuclei: lateral posterior lateral (LPL), lateral posterior medial rostral (LPMR), and lateral posterior medial caudal (LPMC), each exhibiting specific patterns of connections with the various visual cortical areas. Here, we have determined the number of thalamocortical projection neurons and interneurons in the LP complex and dLGN of the adult C57BL/6 male mouse. We combined Nissl staining and histochemical and immunolabeling methods for consistently delineating nuclei borders, and applied unbiased stereological cell counting methods. Thalamic interneurons were identified using GABA immunolabeling. The C57BL/6 dLGN contains ∼21,200 neurons, while LP complex contains ∼31,000 total neurons. The dLGN and LP are the only nuclei of the mouse dorsal thalamus containing substantial numbers GABA-immunoreactive interneurons. These interneurons, however, are scarcer than previously estimated; they are 5.6% of dLGN neurons and just 1.9% of the LP neurons. It can be thus inferred that the dLGN contains ∼20,000 and the LP complex ∼30,400 thalamocortical projection neurons (∼12,000 in LPL, 15,200 in LPMR, and 4,200 in LPMC). The present dataset is relevant for constraining models of mouse visual thalamocortical circuits, as well as for quantitative comparisons between genetically modified mouse strains, or across species.

  6. Subset of Cortical Layer 6b Neurons Selectively Innervates Higher Order Thalamic Nuclei in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Hayashi, Shuichi; Upton, Louise; Nolan, Zachary; Casas-Torremocha, Diana; Grant, Eleanor; Viswanathan, Sarada; Kanold, Patrick O; Clasca, Francisco; Kim, Yongsoo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2018-05-01

    The thalamus receives input from 3 distinct cortical layers, but input from only 2 of these has been well characterized. We therefore investigated whether the third input, derived from layer 6b, is more similar to the projections from layer 6a or layer 5. We studied the projections of a restricted population of deep layer 6 cells ("layer 6b cells") taking advantage of the transgenic mouse Tg(Drd1a-cre)FK164Gsat/Mmucd (Drd1a-Cre), that selectively expresses Cre-recombinase in a subpopulation of layer 6b neurons across the entire cortical mantle. At P8, 18% of layer 6b neurons are labeled with Drd1a-Cre::tdTomato in somatosensory cortex (SS), and some co-express known layer 6b markers. Using Cre-dependent viral tracing, we identified topographical projections to higher order thalamic nuclei. VGluT1+ synapses formed by labeled layer 6b projections were found in posterior thalamic nucleus (Po) but not in the (pre)thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). The lack of TRN collaterals was confirmed with single-cell tracing from SS. Transmission electron microscopy comparison of terminal varicosities from layer 5 and layer 6b axons in Po showed that L6b varicosities are markedly smaller and simpler than the majority from L5. Our results suggest that L6b projections to the thalamus are distinct from both L5 and L6a projections.

  7. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  8. Synaptic long-term potentiation and depression in the rat medial vestibular nuclei depend on neural activation of estrogenic and androgenic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Scarduzio

    Full Text Available Estrogenic and androgenic steroids can be synthesised in the brain and rapidly modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity through direct interaction with membrane receptors for estrogens (ERs and androgens (ARs. We used whole cell patch clamp recordings in brainstem slices of male rats to explore the influence of ER and AR activation and local synthesis of 17β-estradiol (E2 and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT on the long-term synaptic changes induced in the neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN. Long-term depression (LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP caused by different patterns of high frequency stimulation (HFS of the primary vestibular afferents were assayed under the blockade of ARs and ERs or in the presence of inhibitors for enzymes synthesizing DHT (5α-reductase and E2 (P450-aromatase from testosterone (T. We found that LTD is mediated by interaction of locally produced androgens with ARs and LTP by interaction of locally synthesized E2 with ERs. In fact, the AR block with flutamide prevented LTD while did not affect LTP, and the blockade of ERs with ICI 182,780 abolished LTP without influencing LTD. Moreover, the block of P450-aromatase with letrozole not only prevented the LTP induction, but inverted LTP into LTD. This LTD is likely due to the local activation of androgens, since it was abolished under blockade of ARs. Conversely, LTD was still induced in the presence of finasteride the inhibitor of 5α-reductase demonstrating that T is able to activate ARs and induce LTD even when DHT is not synthesized. This study demonstrates a key and opposite role of sex neurosteroids in the long-term synaptic changes of the MVN with a specific role of T-DHT for LTD and of E2 for LTP. Moreover, it suggests that different stimulation patterns can lead to LTD or LTP by specifically activating the enzymes involved in the synthesis of androgenic or estrogenic neurosteroids.

  9. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  10. Ultrastructure of projections to the oculomotor nucleus and inferior olive from vestibular and cerebellar neurons involved in compensatory eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R. Wentzel (Pierre)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractEarly in the evolution of vertebrates eye movements were strictly primitive reflexes that were predominantly controlled by vestibular and visual sensory stimuli. Later during phylogeny, along with the development of the fovea of the retina, vertebrates acquired the ability to make

  11. IN VITRO EXAMINATION OF ONTOGENESIS OF DEVELOPING NEURONAL CELLS IN VAGAL NUCLEI IN MEDULLA OBLONGATA IN NEWBORNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Hilmi; Shabani, Ragip; Bexheti, Sadi; Behluli, Ibrahim; Šukalo, Aziz; Raka, Denis; Koliqi, Rozafa; Haliti, Naim; Dauti, Hilmi; Krasniqi, Shaip; Disha, Mentor

    2008-01-01

    The development of neuron cells in vagal nerve nuclei in medulla oblongata was studied in vitro in live newborns and stillborns from different cases. Morphological changes were studied in respiratory nuclei of dorsal motor centre (DMNV) and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in medulla oblongata. The material from medulla oblongata was fixated in 10μ buffered formalin solution. Fixated material was cut in series of 10μ thickness, with starting point from obex in ± 4 mm thickness. Special histochemical and histoenzymatic methods for central nervous system were used: cresyl echt violet coloring, tolyidin blue, Sevier-Munger modification and Grimelius coloring. In immature newborns (abortions and immature) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV) population stages S1, S2, S3 are dominant. In neuron population in vagal sensory nuclei (NTS) stages S1, S2 are dominant. In more advanced stages of development of newborns (premature), in DMNV stages S3 and S4 are seen and in NTS stages S2 and S3 are dominant. In mature phase of newborns (maturity) in vagal nucleus DMNV stages S5 and S6 are dominant, while in sensory nucleus NTS stages S4 and S5 are dominant. These data suggest that neuron population in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV) are more advanced in neuronal maturity in comparison with sensory neuron population of vagal sensory nucleus NTS. This occurrence shows that phylogenetic development of motor complex is more advanced than the sensory one, which is expected to take new information’s from the extra uterine life after birth (extra uterine vagal phenotype) PMID:19125713

  12. Activity-based anorexia activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in distinct brain nuclei of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharner, Sophie; Prinz, Philip; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Lommel, Reinhard; Kobelt, Peter; Hofmann, Tobias; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-12-15

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an established animal model for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa (AN). The pathophysiology of AN and the involvement of food intake-regulatory peptides is still poorly understood. Nesfatin-1, an anorexigenic peptide also involved in the mediation of stress, anxiety and depression might be a likely candidate involved in the pathogenesis of AN. Therefore, activation of nesfatin-1 immunoreactive (ir) brain nuclei was investigated under conditions of ABA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and divided into four groups (n=6/group): activity-based anorexia (ABA), restricted feeding (RF), activity (AC) and ad libitum fed (AL). After the 21-day experimental period and development of ABA, brains were processed for c-Fos/nesfatin-1 double labeling immunohistochemistry. ABA increased the number of nesfatin-1 immunopositive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus and in the rostral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract compared to AL and AC groups (p0.05). Moreover, we observed significantly more c-Fos and nesfatin-1 ir double-labeled cells in ABA rats compared to RF, AL and AC in the supraoptic nucleus (p<0.05) and compared to AL and AC in the paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus and the rostral raphe pallidus (p<0.05). Since nesfatin-1 plays a role in the inhibition of food intake and the response to stress, we hypothesize that the observed changes of brain nesfatin-1 might play a role in the pathophysiology and symptomatology under conditions of ABA and potentially also in patients with AN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  14. At the centre of neuronal, synaptic and axonal pathology in murine prion disease: degeneration of neuroanatomically linked thalamic and brainstem nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Renata; Hennessy, Edel; Murray, Caoimhe; Griffin, Éadaoin W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The processes by which neurons degenerate in chronic neurodegenerative diseases remain unclear. Synaptic loss and axonal pathology frequently precede neuronal loss and protein aggregation demonstrably spreads along neuroanatomical pathways in many neurodegenerative diseases. The spread of neuronal pathology is less studied. Methods We previously demonstrated severe neurodegeneration in the posterior thalamus of multiple prion disease strains. Here we used the ME7 model of prion disease to examine the nature of this degeneration in the posterior thalamus and the major brainstem projections into this region. Results We objectively quantified neurological decline between 16 and 18 weeks post‐inoculation and observed thalamic subregion‐selective neuronal, synaptic and axonal pathology while demonstrating relatively uniform protease‐resistant prion protein (PrP) aggregation and microgliosis across the posterior thalamus. Novel amyloid precursor protein (APP) pathology was particularly prominent in the thalamic posterior (PO) and ventroposterior lateral (VPL) nuclei. The brainstem nuclei forming the major projections to these thalamic nuclei were examined. Massive neuronal loss in the PO was not matched by significant neuronal loss in the interpolaris (Sp5I), while massive synaptic loss in the ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM) did correspond with significant neuronal loss in the principal trigeminal nucleus. Likewise, significant VPL synaptic loss was matched by significant neuronal loss in the gracile and cuneate nuclei. Conclusion These findings demonstrate significant spread of neuronal pathology from the thalamus to the brainstem in prion disease. The divergent neuropathological features in adjacent neuronal populations demonstrates that there are discrete pathways to neurodegeneration in different neuronal populations. PMID:25727649

  15. Neurons in the monoaminergic nuclei of the rat and human central nervous system express FA1/dlk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Meyer, M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2001-01-01

    The gene DLK1 encodes a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily, delta-like (dlk). When exposed in vivo to the action of an unknown protease, this type 1 membrane protein generates a soluble peptide referred to as Fetal antigen 1 (FA1). By acting in juxtacrine as well as paracrine....../autocrine manners, both forms have been shown to be active in the differentiation/proliferation process of various cell types. In adults, FA1/dlk has been demonstrated mainly within (neuro) endocrine tissues. In this study we investigated the presence of FA1/dlk in other parts of the developing and adult rat...... and human CNS. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization we found that in both species FA1/dlk was expressed in neurons of the Edinger-Westphal's nucleus as well as in substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area (VTA), locus coeruleus and in certain parts of the raphe nuclei....

  16. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in peripheral vestibular structures and vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F X; Pang, Y W; Zhang, M M; Zhang, T; Dong, Y L; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Li, J L; Li, Y Q

    2011-01-26

    Glutamate transmission from vestibular end organs to central vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) plays important role in transferring sensory information about head position and movements. Three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) have been considered so far the most specific markers for glutamatergic neurons/cells. In this study, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were immunohistochemically localized to axon terminals in VNC and somata of vestibular primary afferents in association with their central and peripheral axon endings, and VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 were co-localized to hair cells of otolith maculae and cristae ampullaris. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 defined three subsets of Scarpa's neurons (vestibular ganglionic neurons): those co-expressing VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 or expressing only VGLUT2, and those expressing neither. In addition, many neurons located in all vestibular subnuclei were observed to contain hybridized signals for VGLUT2 mRNA and a few VNC neurons, mostly scattered in medial vestibular nucleus (MVe), displayed VGLUT1 mRNA labelling. Following unilateral ganglionectomy, asymmetries of VGLUT1-immunoreactivity (ir) and VGLUT2-ir occurred between two VNCs, indicating that the VNC terminals containing VGLUT1 and/or VGLUT2 are partly of peripheral origin. The present data indicate that the constituent cells/neurons along the vestibular pathway selectively apply VGLUT isoforms to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles for glutamate transmission. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell Death, Neuronal Plasticity and Functional Loading in the Development of the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research on the precise timing and regulation of neuron production and maturation in the vestibular and visual systems of Wistar rats and several inbred strains of mice (C57B16 and Pallid mutant) concentrated upon establishing a timing baseline for mitotic development of the neurons of the vestibular nuclei and the peripheral vestibular sensory structures (maculae, cristae). This involved studies of the timing and site of neuronal cell birth and preliminary studies of neuronal cell death in both central and peripheral elements of the mammalian vestibular system. Studies on neuronal generation and maturation in the retina were recently added to provide a mechanism for more properly defining the in utero' developmental age of the individual fetal subject and to closely monitor potential transplacental effects of environmentally stressed maternal systems. Information is given on current efforts concentrating upon the (1) perinatal period of development (E18 thru P14) and (2) the role of cell death in response to variation in the functional loading of the vestibular and proprioreceptive systems in developing mammalian organisms.

  18. A BMP-mediated transcriptional cascade involving Cash1 and Tlx-3 specifies first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbruch, Amata; Ma, Grace; Ballermann, Mark A; Tumova, Katerina; Liu, Dan; Cairine Logan, C

    2005-07-01

    The divergent homeobox-containing transcription factor, Tlx-3 (also known as Hox11L2/Rnx), is required for proper formation of first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing vertebrate brainstem. To date, however, the inductive signals and transcriptional regulatory cascade underlying their development are poorly understood. We previously isolated the chick Tlx-3 homologue and showed it is expressed early (i.e. beginning at HH15) in distinct subcomponents of both the trigeminal/solitary and vestibular nuclei. Here we show via in vivo rhombomere inversions that expression of Tlx-3 is under control of local environmental signals. Our RNA in situ analysis shows expression of the BMP-specific receptor, Bmpr-1b, correlates well with Tlx-3. Furthermore, manipulation of the BMP signaling pathway in vivo via electroporation of expression vectors encoding either BMP or NOGGIN coupled with MASH1 gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that a BMP-mediated transcriptional cascade involving Cash1 and Tlx-3 specifies first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing brainstem. Notably, high-level Noggin misexpression results in an increase in newly differentiated Tlx-3+ neurons that correlates with a corresponding increase in the number of Calretinin+ neurons in vestibular nuclei at later developmental stages strongly suggesting that Tlx-3, in addition to being required for proper formation of somatic as well as visceral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and solitary nuclei, respectively, is sufficient for proper formation of special somatic sensory neurons in vestibular nuclei.

  19. Subpopulations of somatostatin-immunoreactive nonpyramidal neurons in the amygdala and adjacent external capsule project to the basal forebrain: evidence for the existence of GABAergic projection neurons in the cortical nuclei and basolateral nuclear complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. McDonald

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus and amygdala are key structures of the limbic system whose connections include reciprocal interactions with the basal forebrain (BF. The hippocampus receives both cholinergic and GABAergic afferents from the medial septal area of the BF. Hippocampal projections back to the medial septal area arise from nonpyramidal GABAergic neurons that express somatostatin (SOM, calbindin (CB, and neuropeptide Y (NPY. Recent experiments in our lab have demonstrated that the basolateral amygdala, like the hippocampus, receives both cholinergic and GABAergic afferents from the BF. These projections arise from neurons in the substantia innominata and ventral pallidum. It remained to be determined, however, whether the amygdala has projections back to the BF that arise from GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons. This question was investigated in the present study by combining Fluorogold (FG retrograde tract tracing with immunohistochemistry for GABAergic nonpyramidal cell markers, including SOM, CB, NPY, parvalbumin, calretinin, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD. FG injections into the basal forebrain produced a diffuse array of retrogradely labeled neurons in many nuclei of the amygdala. The great majority of amygdalar FG+ neurons did not express nonpyramidal cell markers. However, a subpopulation of nonpyramidal SOM+ neurons, termed long range nonpyramidal neurons (LRNP neurons, in the external capsule, basolateral amygdala, and cortical and medial amygdalar nuclei were FG+. About one-third of the SOM+ LRNP neurons were CB+ or NPY+, and one-half were GAD+. It remains to be determined if these inhibitory amygdalar projections to the BF, like those from the hippocampus, are important for regulating synchronous oscillations in the amygdalar-BF network.

  20. Towards a neuromorphic vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Federico; Zambrano, Davide; Raglianti, Marco; Passetti, Giovanni; Laschi, Cecilia; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the sense of balance and spatial orientation in mammals. It is a sensory system that detects both rotational and translational motion of the head, via its semicircular canals and otoliths respectively. In this work, we propose a real-time hardware model of an artificial vestibular system, implemented using a custom neuromorphic Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) multi-neuron chip interfaced to a commercial Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The artificial vestibular system is realized with spiking neurons that reproduce the responses of biological hair cells present in the real semicircular canals and otholitic organs. We demonstrate the real-time performance of the hybrid analog-digital system and characterize its response properties, presenting measurements of a successful encoding of angular velocities as well as linear accelerations. As an application, we realized a novel implementation of a recurrent integrator network capable of keeping track of the current angular position. The experimental results provided validate the hardware implementation via comparisons with a detailed computational neuroscience model. In addition to being an ideal tool for developing bio-inspired robotic technologies, this work provides a basis for developing a complete low-power neuromorphic vestibular system which integrates the hardware model of the neural signal processing pathway described with custom bio-mimetic gyroscopic sensors, exploiting neuromorphic principles in both mechanical and electronic aspects.

  1. Hyperosmotic stimulus induces reversible angiogenesis within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei of the adult rat: a potential role for neuronal vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anne

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, the CNS vasculature is established during the postnatal period via active angiogenesis, providing different brain regions with capillary networks of various densities that locally supply adapted metabolic support to neurons. Thereafter this vasculature remains essentially quiescent excepted for specific pathologies. In the adult rat hypothalamus, a particularly dense network of capillary vessels is associated with the supraoptic (SON and paraventricular (PVN nuclei containing the magnocellular neurons secreting vasopressin and oxytocin, two neurohormones involved in the control of the body fluid homoeostasis. In the seventies, it was reported that proliferation of astrocytes and endothelial cells occurs within these hypothalamic nuclei when strong metabolic activation of the vasopressinergic and oxytocinergic neurons was induced by prolonged hyperosmotic stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether such proliferative response to osmotic stimulus is related to local angiogenesis and to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. Results Our results provide evidence that cell proliferation occurring within the SON of osmotically stimulated adult rats corresponds to local angiogenesis. We show that 1 a large majority of the SON proliferative cells is associated with capillary vessels, 2 this proliferative response correlates with a progressive increase in density of the capillary network within the nucleus, and 3 SON capillary vessels exhibit an increased expression of nestin and vimentin, two markers of newly formed vessels. Contrasting with most adult CNS neurons, hypothalamic magnocellular neurons were found to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, a potent angiogenic factor whose production was increased by osmotic stimulus. When VEGF was inhibited by dexamethasone treatment or by the local application of a blocking antibody, the angiogenic response was strongly

  2. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Ungureanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been also made, have been retrospectively analyzed. Results: Anamnestic data and the results of evaluation permitted classification of peripheric vestibular pathology according to topo-lesional and etiological criteria. The most frequently diagnosed diseases were: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière syndrome and vestibular neuronitis. Conclusions: Testing of the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes through videonystagmoscopy and, respectively, computerized dynamic posturography, besides tonal vocal audiometry and precocious auditive potentials, is especially important for a positive diagnosis and etiological differentiation of vestibular syndromes.

  3. Cerebellar nuclei neurons show only small excitatory responses to optogenetic olivary stimulation in transgenic mice: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huo eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the olivary input to the cerebellar nuclei (CN we used optogenetic stimulation in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 in olivary neurons. We obtained in vivo extracellular Purkinje cell (PC and CN recordings in anesthetized mice while stimulating the contralateral inferior olive (IO with a blue laser (single pulse, 10 - 50 ms duration. Peri-stimulus histograms were constructed to show the spike rate changes after optical stimulation. Among 29 CN neurons recorded, 15 showed a decrease in spike rate of variable strength and duration, and only 1 showed a transient spiking response. These results suggest that direct olivary input to CN neurons is usually overridden by stronger Purkinje cell inhibition triggered by climbing fiber responses. To further investigate the direct input from the climbing fiber collaterals we also conducted whole cell recordings in brain slices, where we used local stimulation with blue light. Due to the expression of ChR2 in Purkinje cell axons as well as the IO in our transgenic line, strong inhibitory responses could be readily triggered with optical stimulation (13 of 15 neurons. After blocking this inhibition with GABAzine, only in 5 of 13 CN neurons weak excitatory responses were revealed. Therefore our in vitro results support the in vivo findings that the excitatory input to CN neurons from climbing fiber collaterals in adult mice is masked by the inhibition under normal conditions.

  4. Signalling properties of identified deep cerebellar nuclear neurons related to eye and head movements in the alert cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruart, A; Delgado-García, J M

    1994-07-01

    1. The spike activity of deep cerebellar nuclear neurons was recorded in the alert cat during spontaneous and during vestibularly and visually induced eye movements. 2. Neurons were classified according to their location in the nuclei, their antidromic activation from projection sites, their sensitivity to eye position and velocity during spontaneous eye movements, and their responses to vestibular and optokinetic stimuli. 3. Type I EPV (eye position and velocity) neurons were located mainly in the posterior part of the fastigial nucleus and activated antidromically almost exclusively from the medial longitudinal fasciculus close to the oculomotor complex. These neurons, reported here for the first time, increased their firing rate during saccades and eye fixations towards the contralateral hemifield. Their position sensitivity to eye fixations in the horizontal plane was 5.3 +/- 2.6 spikes s-1 deg-1 (mean +/- S.D.). Eye velocity sensitivity during horizontal saccades was 0.71 +/- 0.52 spikes s-1 deg-1 s-1. Variability of their firing rate during a given eye fixation was higher than that shown by abducens motoneurons. 4. Type I EPV neurons increased their firing rate during ipsilateral head rotations at 0.5 Hz with a mean phase lead over eye position of 95.3 +/- 9.5 deg. They were also activated by contralateral optokinetic stimulation at 30 deg s-1. Their sensitivity to eye position and velocity in the horizontal plane during vestibular and optokinetic stimuli yielded values similar to those obtained for spontaneous eye movements. 5. Type II neurons were located in both fastigial and dentate nuclei and were activated antidromically from the restiform body, the medial longitudinal fasciculus close to the oculomotor complex, the red nucleus and the pontine nuclei. Type II neurons were not related to spontaneous eye movements. These neurons increased their firing rate in response to contralateral head rotation and during ipsilateral optokinetic stimulation, and

  5. Neuronal thresholds and choice-related activity of otolith afferent fibers during heading perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiong-jie; Dickman, J David; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2015-05-19

    How activity of sensory neurons leads to perceptual decisions remains a challenge to understand. Correlations between choices and single neuron firing rates have been found early in vestibular processing, in the brainstem and cerebellum. To investigate the origins of choice-related activity, we have recorded from otolith afferent fibers while animals performed a fine heading discrimination task. We find that afferent fibers have similar discrimination thresholds as central cells, and the most sensitive fibers have thresholds that are only twofold or threefold greater than perceptual thresholds. Unlike brainstem and cerebellar nuclei neurons, spike counts from afferent fibers do not exhibit trial-by-trial correlations with perceptual decisions. This finding may reflect the fact that otolith afferent responses are poorly suited for driving heading perception because they fail to discriminate self-motion from changes in orientation relative to gravity. Alternatively, if choice probabilities reflect top-down inference signals, they are not relayed to the vestibular periphery.

  6. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  7. Electrical vestibular stimulation after vestibular deafferentation and in vestibular schwannoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Tin Aw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic vestibular stimulation (EVS, are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. METHODS: EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0] mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD, 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD, four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. RESULTS: After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. CONCLUSIONS: The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear.

  8. Neural Correlates of Sensory Substitution in Vestibular Pathways Following Complete Vestibular Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory substitution is the term typically used in reference to sensory prosthetic devices designed to replace input from one defective modality with input from another modality. Such devices allow an alternative encoding of sensory information that is no longer directly provided by the defective modality in a purposeful and goal-directed manner. The behavioral recovery that follows complete vestibular loss is impressive and has long been thought to take advantage of a natural form of sensory substitution in which head motion information is no longer provided by vestibular inputs, but instead by extra-vestibular inputs such as proprioceptive and motor efference copy signals. Here we examined the neuronal correlates of this behavioral recovery after complete vestibular loss in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulata). We show for the first time that extra-vestibular inputs substitute for the vestibular inputs to stabilize gaze at the level of single neurons in the VOR premotor circuitry. The summed weighting of neck proprioceptive and efference copy information was sufficient to explain simultaneously observed behavioral improvements in gaze stability. Furthermore, by altering correspondence between intended and actual head movement we revealed a four-fold increase in the weight of neck motor efference copy signals consistent with the enhanced behavioral recovery observed when head movements are voluntary versus unexpected. Thus, taken together our results provide direct evidence that the substitution by extra-vestibular inputs in vestibular pathways provides a neural correlate for the improvements in gaze stability that are observed following the total loss of vestibular inputs. PMID:23077054

  9. Neurophysiology of vestibular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Timothy C

    2011-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sophisticated human control system. Accurate processing of sensory input about rapid head and postural motion is critical. Not surprisingly, the body uses multiple, partially redundant sensory inputs and motor outputs, combined with a very competent central repair capability. The system as a whole can adapt to substantial peripheral vestibular dysfunction. The Achilles' heel of the vestibular system is a relative inability to repair central vestibular dysfunction.

  10. Neurophysiology of vestibular rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Hain Timothy, C.

    2011-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sophisticated human control system. Accurate processing of sensory input about rapid head and postural motion is critical. Not surprisingly, the body uses multiple, partially redundant sensory inputs and motor outputs, combined with a very competent central repair capability. The system as a whole can adapt to substantial peripheral vestibular dysfunction. The Achilles' heel of the vestibular system is a relative inability to repair central vestibular dysfunction.

  11. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-06-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3±8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p7.501; p<0.0001), consisting with delayed central conduction time of brainstem neural transmission. Highly exposed children showed significant evidence of inflammatory markers and their auditory and vestibular nuclei accumulated α synuclein and/or β amyloid(1-42). Medial superior olive neurons, critically involved in BAEPs, displayed significant pathology. Children's exposure to urban air pollution increases their risk for auditory and vestibular impairment. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A vestibular sensation: probabilistic approaches to spatial perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, Dora E; Klier, Eliana M; Snyder, Lawrence H

    2009-11-25

    The vestibular system helps maintain equilibrium and clear vision through reflexes, but it also contributes to spatial perception. In recent years, research in the vestibular field has expanded to higher-level processing involving the cortex. Vestibular contributions to spatial cognition have been difficult to study because the circuits involved are inherently multisensory. Computational methods and the application of Bayes theorem are used to form hypotheses about how information from different sensory modalities is combined together with expectations based on past experience in order to obtain optimal estimates of cognitive variables like current spatial orientation. To test these hypotheses, neuronal populations are being recorded during active tasks in which subjects make decisions based on vestibular and visual or somatosensory information. This review highlights what is currently known about the role of vestibular information in these processes, the computations necessary to obtain the appropriate signals, and the benefits that have emerged thus far.

  13. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vestibular Dysfunction in Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: Predominant Impairment of the Horizontal Semicircular Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Han Lee

    2018-03-01

    predominant impairment of the HSCs seems to be the most common finding of WE likely related to enhanced vulnerability of the medial vestibular nuclei neurons to thiamine deficiency. Quantitative vHIT of all six semicircular canals is therefore a useful tool for the diagnosis and should be applied in all patients with suspected WE.

  15. Hippocampal Ghrelin-positive neurons directly project to arcuate hypothalamic and medial amygdaloid nuclei. Could they modulate food-intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cristina; Russo, Antonella; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Stanzani, Stefania

    2017-07-13

    Feeding is a process controlled by a complex of associations between external and internal stimuli. The processes that involve learning and memory seem to exert a strong control over appetite and food intake, which is modulated by a gastrointestinal hormone, Ghrelin (Ghre). Recent studies claim that Ghre is involved in cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the conditioning of eating behaviors. The expression of Ghre increases in anticipation of food intake based on learned behaviors. The hippocampal Ghre-containing neurons neurologically influence the orexigenic hypothalamus and consequently the learned feeding behavior. The CA1 field of Ammon's horn of the hippocampus (H-CA1) constitutes the most important neural substrate to control both appetitive and ingestive behavior. It also innervates amygdala regions that in turn innervate the hypothalamus. A recent study also implies that Ghre effects on cue-potentiated feeding behavior occur, at the least, via indirect action on the amygdala. In the present study, we investigate the neural substrates through which endogenous Ghre communicates conditioned appetite and feeding behavior within the CNS. We show the existence of a neural Ghre dependent pathway whereby peripherally-derived Ghre activates H-CA1 neurons, which in turn activate Ghre-expressing hypothalamic and amygdaloid neurons to stimulate appetite and feeding behavior. To highlight this pathway, we use two fluorescent retrograde tracers (Fluoro Gold and Dil) and immunohistochemical detection of Ghre expression in the hippocampus. Triple fluorescent-labeling has determined the presence of H-CA1 Ghre-containing collateralized neurons that project to the hypothalamus and amygdala monosynaptically. We hypothesize that H-Ghre-containing neurons in H-CA1 modulate food-intake behavior through direct pathways to the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus and medial amygdaloid nucleus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Central vestibular dysfunction in an otorhinolaryngological vestibular unit: incidence and diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Badr E; Kahky, Ayman O El; Kader, Hisham M Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  17. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa, Badr E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years. Provisional videonystagmography (VNG results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41 had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23% were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus. Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  18. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  19. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in The VOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which can be distorted in case of peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain.In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e. different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies.

  20. Model-based Vestibular Afferent Stimulation: Modular Workflow for Analyzing Stimulation Scenarios in Patient Specific and Statistical Vestibular Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Handler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Our sense of balance and spatial orientation strongly depends on the correct functionality of our vestibular system. Vestibular dysfunction can lead to blurred vision and impaired balance and spatial orientation, causing a significant decrease in quality of life. Recent studies have shown that vestibular implants offer a possible treatment for patients with vestibular dysfunction. The close proximity of the vestibular nerve bundles, the facial nerve and the cochlear nerve poses a major challenge to targeted stimulation of the vestibular system. Modeling the electrical stimulation of the vestibular system allows for an efficient analysis of stimulation scenarios previous to time and cost intensive in vivo experiments. Current models are based on animal data or CAD models of human anatomy. In this work, a (semi-automatic modular workflow is presented for the stepwise transformation of segmented vestibular anatomy data of human vestibular specimens to an electrical model and subsequently analyzed. The steps of this workflow include (i the transformation of labeled datasets to a tetrahedra mesh, (ii nerve fiber anisotropy and fiber computation as a basis for neuron models, (iii inclusion of arbitrary electrode designs, (iv simulation of quasistationary potential distributions, and (v analysis of stimulus waveforms on the stimulation outcome. Results obtained by the workflow based on human datasets and the average shape of a statistical model revealed a high qualitative agreement and a quantitatively comparable range compared to data from literature, respectively. Based on our workflow, a detailed analysis of intra- and extra-labyrinthine electrode configurations with various stimulation waveforms and electrode designs can be performed on patient specific anatomy, making this framework a valuable tool for current optimization questions concerning vestibular implants in humans.

  1. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study...

  2. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  3. Common Vestibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios G. Balatsouras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most common vestibular diseases, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, Meniere's disease (MD and vestibular neuritis (VN, are presented in this paper. BPPV, which is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder, can be defined as transient vertigo induced by a rapid head position change, associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. Canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal is considered the most convincing theory of its pathogenesis and the development of appropriate therapeutic maneuvers resulted in its effective treatment. However, involvement of the horizontal or the anterior canal has been found in a significant rate and the recognition and treatment of these variants completed the clinical picture of the disease. MD is a chronic condition characterized by episodic attacks of vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, aural pressure and a progressive loss of audiovestibular functions. Presence of endolymphatic hydrops on postmortem examination is its pathologic correlate. MD continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Patients with the disease range from minimally symptomatic, highly functional individuals to severely affected, disabled patients. Current management strategies are designed to control the acute and recurrent vestibulopathy but offer minimal remedy for the progressive cochlear dysfunction. VN is the most common cause of acute spontaneous vertigo, attributed to acute unilateral loss of vestibular function. Key signs and symptoms are an acute onset of spinning vertigo, postural imbalance and nausea as well as a horizontal rotatory nystagmus beating towards the non-affected side, a pathological headimpulse test and no evidence for central vestibular or ocular motor dysfunction. Vestibular neuritis preferentially involves the superior vestibular labyrinth and its afferents. Symptomatic medication is indicated only during the acute phase to relieve the vertigo and nausea

  4. Vestibular signals in primate cortex for self-motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yong

    2018-04-21

    The vestibular peripheral organs in our inner ears detect transient motion of the head in everyday life. This information is sent to the central nervous system for automatic processes such as vestibulo-ocular reflexes, balance and postural control, and higher cognitive functions including perception of self-motion and spatial orientation. Recent neurophysiological studies have discovered a prominent vestibular network in the primate cerebral cortex. Many of the areas involved are multisensory: their neurons are modulated by both vestibular signals and visual optic flow, potentially facilitating more robust heading estimation through cue integration. Combining psychophysics, computation, physiological recording and causal manipulation techniques, recent work has addressed both the encoding and decoding of vestibular signals for self-motion perception. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. GABAergic systems in the vestibular nucleus and their contribution to vestibular compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliddon, Catherine M; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2005-01-01

    GABA and the GABAA and GABAB receptors play a pivotal role in the coordination of the central vestibular pathways. The commissural inhibition, which exists between the two vestibular nucleus complexes (VNCs) and which is responsible for enhancing the dynamic sensitivity of VNC neurons to head acceleration, is known to be substantially mediated by GABA acting on GABAA and GABAB receptors. After unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD), the large asymmetry in spontaneous resting activity between the two VNCs is reinforced and exacerbated by the GABAergic interaction between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. Although it has been suggested that reduced GABAergic inhibition of the ipsilateral VNC may be partially responsible for the recovery of resting activity that underlies vestibular compensation of the static symptoms of UVD, at present there are few data available to test this hypothesis systematically. There is some evidence that GABA concentrations change in the ipsilateral VNC during the development of compensation; however, it is unclear whether these changes relate to GABA release or to metabolic pools of GABA. Most biochemical studies of GABA receptors have been conducted at the gene expression level. Therefore, it is unclear whether changes in the receptor protein also occur, although the most recent data suggest that changes in GABAA and GABAB receptor density in the VNC are unlikely. The few radioligand binding data relate to GABAA receptors with benzodiazepine binding sites only. A decrease in the sensitivity of ipsilateral VNC neurons from compensated animals to GABA receptor agonists has been reported; however, these studies have employed brainstem slices and therefore the functional identity of the neurons involved has been unclear. Although it seems likely that some changes in central GABAergic systems accompany the recovery of resting activity in the ipsilateral VNC during the development of vestibular compensation, at the present stage

  6. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  7. Hereditary familial vestibular degenerative diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes involved in hereditary vestibular disease is growing at a remarkable pace. Mutant mouse technology can be an important tool for understanding the biological mechanism of human vestibular diseases.

  8. Unilateral vestibular deafferentation-induced changes in calcium signaling-related molecules in the rat vestibular nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumura, Chisako; Horii, Arata; Mitani, Kenji; Kitahara, Tadashi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Kubo, Takeshi

    2007-03-23

    Inquiries into the neurochemical mechanisms of vestibular compensation, a model of lesion-induced neuronal plasticity, reveal the involvement of both voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC) and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Indeed, our previous microarray analysis showed an up-regulation of some calcium signaling-related genes such as the alpha2 subunit of L-type calcium channels, calcineurin, and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase 1 (PMCA1) in the ipsilateral vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD). To further elucidate the role of calcium signaling-related molecules in vestibular compensation, we used a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to confirm the microarray results and investigated changes in expression of these molecules at various stages of compensation (6 h to 2 weeks after UVD). We also investigated the changes in gene expression during Bechterew's phenomenon and the effects of a calcineurin inhibitor on vestibular compensation. Real-time PCR showed that genes for the alpha2 subunit of VGCC, PMCA2, and calcineurin were transiently up-regulated 6 h after UVD in ipsilateral VNC. A subsequent UVD, which induced Bechterew's phenomenon, reproduced a complete mirror image of the changes in gene expressions of PMCA2 and calcineurin seen in the initial UVD, while the alpha2 subunit of VGCC gene had a trend to increase in VNC ipsilateral to the second lesion. Pre-treatment by FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, decelerated the vestibular compensation in a dose-dependent manner. Although it is still uncertain whether these changes in gene expression are causally related to the molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation, this observation suggests that after increasing the Ca(2+) influx into the ipsilateral VNC neurons via up-regulated VGCC, calcineurin may be involved in their synaptic plasticity. Conversely, an up-regulation of PMCA2, a brain-specific Ca(2+) pump, would increase an efflux of Ca

  9. Pseudomagic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown previously that, below a critical angular momentum, yrast bands of nonmagic nuclei are well described by the two-parameter variable moment of inertia model. Some striking exceptions to this rule are found in nuclei which have the same mass number as doubly magic nuclei but possess either one (or two) proton pairs beyond a magic number and one (or two) neutron hole pairs, or vice versa. Yrast bands in these pseudomagic nuclei resemble those in magic nuclei. 17 references

  10. Central and peripheral components of short latency vestibular responses in the chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, A. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1998-01-01

    Far-field recordings of short latency vestibular responses to pulsed cranial translation are composed of a series of positive and negative peaks occurring within 10 ms following stimulus onset. In the bird, these vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) can be recorded noninvasively and have been shown in the chicken and quail to depend strictly upon the activation of the vestibular component of the eighth nerve. The utility of the VsEP in the study of vestibular systems is dependent upon a clear understanding of the neural sources of response components. The primary aim of the current research in the chicken was to critically test the hypotheses that 1) responses are generated by both peripheral and central neurons and 2) peaks P1 and N1 originate from first order vestibular neurons, whereas later waves primarily depend on activity in higher order neurons. The principal strategy used here was to surgically isolate the eighth nerve as it enters the brainstem. Interruption of primary afferents of the eighth nerve in the brainstem substantially reduced or eliminated peaks beyond P2, whereas P1 and N1 were generally spared. Surgical sections that spared vestibular pathways had little effect on responses. The degree of change in response components beyond N1 was correlated with the extent of damage to central vestibular relays. These findings support the conclusion that responses are produced by both peripheral and central elements of the vestibular system. Further, response peaks later than N1 appear to be dependent upon central relays, whereas P1 and N1 reflect activity of the peripheral nerve. These findings clarify the roles of peripheral and central neurons in the generation of vestibular evoked potentials and provide the basis for a more useful and detailed interpretation of data from vestibular response testing.

  11. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate vestibular compensation. Adequate vestibular compensation allows a patient to get rid of dizziness and unsteadiness even though vestibular system injury is irreversible. Some medications are able to enhance the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation. At the same time, the optimal duration of treatment for the most common vestibular disorders has not beenadequately explored. The paper gives the results of an observational program, whose purpose was to determine the optimal duration of vestibular rehabilitation in combination with the use of tanakan in patients with non-progressive unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder.Patients and methods. Data on 46 patients aged 19 to 70 years who underwent vestibular rehabilitation and took tanakan for vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis (n = 44, labyrinthitis (n =1, or Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1 were analyzed. All the patients were examined four times. The symptoms were recorded and the histories of disease were considered. The degree of vestibular disorders, including vertigo, was assessed when collecting complaints. The symptoms of vertigo were objectivized using its vertigo rating scale and five-point subjective rating scale for vertigo. All the patients underwent standard somatic and neurological examinations and videonystagmography. During the first visit after diagnosis, vestibular exercises were chosen for the patients and tanakan was used in a dose of 40 mg thrice daily to accelerate

  12. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Right-sided dominance of the bilateral vestibular system in the upper brainstem and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Marianne; Kirsch, V; Brandt, T

    2017-10-01

    MRI diffusion tensor imaging tractography was performed on the bilateral vestibular brainstem pathways, which run from the vestibular nuclei via the paramedian and posterolateral thalamic subnuclei to the parieto-insular vestibular cortex. Twenty-one right-handed healthy subjects participated. Quantitative analysis revealed a rope-ladder-like system of vestibular pathways in the brainstem with crossings at pontine and mesencephalic levels. Three structural types of right-left fiber distributions could be delineated: (1) evenly distributed pathways at the lower pontine level from the vestibular nuclei to the pontine crossing, (2) a moderate, pontomesencephalic right-sided lateralization between the pontine and mesencephalic crossings, and (3) a further increase of the right-sided lateralization above the mesencephalic crossing leading to the thalamic vestibular subnuclei. The increasing lateralization along the brainstem was the result of an asymmetric number of pontine and mesencephalic crossing fibers which was higher for left-to-right crossings. The dominance of the right vestibular meso-diencephalic circuitry in right-handers corresponds to the right-hemispheric dominance of the vestibular cortical network. The structural asymmetry apparent in the upper brainstem might be interpreted in relation to the different functions of the vestibular system depending on their anatomical level: a symmetrical sensorimotor reflex control of eye, head, and body mediated by the lower brainstem; a lateralized right-sided upper brainstem-thalamic function as part of the dominant right-sided cortical/subcortical vestibular system that enables a global percept of body motion and orientation in space.

  14. Immunocytochemical and stereological analysis of GABA(B) receptor subunit expression in the rat vestibular nucleus following unilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ashton, John; Horii, Arata; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2005-03-10

    The process of behavioral recovery that occurs following damage to one vestibular labyrinth, vestibular compensation, has been attributed in part to a down-regulation of GABA(B) receptors in the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) ipsilateral to the lesion, which could potentially reduce commissural inhibition from the contralateral VNC. In this study, we tested the possibility that this occurs through a decrease in the expression of either the GABA(B1) or GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B) receptor. We used Western blotting to quantify the expression of these subunits in the VNC at 10 h and 50 h following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) or sham surgery in rats. We then used immunocytochemistry and stereological counting methods to estimate the number of neurons expressing these subunits in the MVN at 10 h and 2 weeks following UVD or sham surgery. Compared to sham controls, we found no significant changes in either the expression of the two GABA(B) receptor subunits in the VNC or in the number of MVN neurons expressing these GABA(B) receptor subunits post-UVD. These results suggest that GABA(B) receptor expression does not change substantially in the VNC during the process of vestibular compensation.

  15. Vestibular Dysfunction in Patients with Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Chris K; Chien, Wade W; King, Kelly A; Muskett, Julie A; Baron, Rachel E; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Brewer, Carmen C

    2015-08-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the most common inner ear malformation. While a strong correlative relationship between EVA and hearing loss is well established, its association with vestibular dysfunction is less well understood. In this study, we examine the effects of EVA on the vestibular system in patients with EVA. Prospective, cross-sectional study of a cohort ascertained between 1999 and 2013. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, a federal biomedical research facility. In total, 106 patients with unilateral or bilateral EVA, defined as a midpoint diameter greater than 1.5 mm, were referred or self-referred to participate in a study of the clinical and molecular aspects of EVA. Clinical history was ascertained with respect to the presence or absence of various vestibular signs and symptoms and history of head trauma. Videonystagmography (VNG), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP), and rotational vestibular testing (RVT) were performed to assess the vestibular function. Of the patients with EVA, 45% had vestibular signs and symptoms, and 44% of tested patients had abnormal VNG test results. An increased number of vestibular signs and symptoms was correlated with the presence of bilateral EVA (P = .008) and a history of head injury (P VNG results also correlated with a history of head injury (P = .018). Vestibular dysfunction is common in patients with EVA. However, not all patients with vestibular signs and symptoms have abnormal vestibular test results. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with EVA. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Vestibular function in the space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  17. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. K. Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no viable treatment option. Vestibular implants could eventually restore vestibular function. Most vestibular implant prototypes to date are modified cochlear implants to fast-track development. These use various objective measurements, such as the electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP, to supplement behavioral information. We investigated whether eCAPs could be recorded in patients with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. Specifically, eCAPs were successfully recorded for cochlear and vestibular setups, as well as for mixed cochlear-vestibular setups. Similarities and slight differences were found for the recordings of the three setups. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of eCAP recording with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. They could be used in the short term to reduce current spread and avoid activation of non-targeted neurons. More research is warranted to better understand the neural origin of vestibular eCAPs and to utilize them for clinical applications.

  18. Premotor neurons encode torsional eye velocity during smooth-pursuit eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, Dora E.; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Responses to horizontal and vertical ocular pursuit and head and body rotation in multiple planes were recorded in eye movement-sensitive neurons in the rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) of two rhesus monkeys. When tested during pursuit through primary eye position, the majority of the cells preferred either horizontal or vertical target motion. During pursuit of targets that moved horizontally at different vertical eccentricities or vertically at different horizontal eccentricities, eye angular velocity has been shown to include a torsional component the amplitude of which is proportional to half the gaze angle ("half-angle rule" of Listing's law). Approximately half of the neurons, the majority of which were characterized as "vertical" during pursuit through primary position, exhibited significant changes in their response gain and/or phase as a function of gaze eccentricity during pursuit, as if they were also sensitive to torsional eye velocity. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant contribution of torsional eye movement sensitivity to the responsiveness of the cells. These findings suggest that many VN neurons encode three-dimensional angular velocity, rather than the two-dimensional derivative of eye position, during smooth-pursuit eye movements. Although no clear clustering of pursuit preferred-direction vectors along the semicircular canal axes was observed, the sensitivity of VN neurons to torsional eye movements might reflect a preservation of similar premotor coding of visual and vestibular-driven slow eye movements for both lateral-eyed and foveate species.

  19. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  20. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  1. True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Thomsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.......The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging....

  2. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  3. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in the elderly with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-11-01

    Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

  4. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  5. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  6. Role of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in the patterning of vestibular system influences on sympathetic nervous system outflow to the upper and lower body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yates, Bill J

    2011-05-01

    Research on animal models as well as human subjects has demonstrated that the vestibular system contributes to regulating the distribution of blood in the body through effects on the sympathetic nervous system. Elimination of vestibular inputs results in increased blood flow to the hindlimbs during vestibular stimulation, because it attenuates the increase in vascular resistance that ordinarily occurs in the lower body during head-up tilts. Additionally, the changes in vascular resistance produced by vestibular stimulation differ between body regions. Electrical stimulation of vestibular afferents produces an inhibition of most hindlimb vasoconstrictor fibers and a decrease in hindlimb vascular resistance, but an initial excitation of most upper body vasoconstrictor fibers accompanied by an increase in upper body vascular resistance. The present study tested the hypothesis that neurons in the principal vasomotor region of the brainstem, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), whose projections extended past the T10 segment, to spinal levels containing sympathetic preganglionic neurons regulating lower body blood flow, respond differently to electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve than RVLM neurons whose axons terminate rostral to T10. Contrary to our hypothesis, the majority of RVLM neurons were excited by vestibular stimulation, despite their level of projection in the spinal cord. These findings indicate that the RVLM is not solely responsible for establishing the patterning of vestibular-sympathetic responses. This patterning apparently requires the integration by spinal circuitry of labyrinthine signals transmitted from the brainstem, likely from regions in addition to the RVLM.

  7. Perspectives on aging vestibular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eAnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about age related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities like standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multi-sensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multi-sensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  8. Vestibular findings in fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM is a non-inflammatory musculoskeletal chronic syndrome, whose etiology is unknown, characterized by a diffuse pain, increase in palpation sensitivity and such symptoms as tiredness, insomnia, anxiety, depression, cold intolerance and otologic complaints. Objective: Evaluate the vestibular behavior in fibromyalgia patients. Method: A retrospective transversal study was performed. 25 patients aged between 26 and 65 (average age - 52.2 and standard deviation - 10.3 were evaluated and submitted to the following procedures: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngologic and vestibular evaluation by way of vector electronystamography. Results: a The most evident otoneurologic symptoms were: difficulty or pain when moving the neck and pain was spread to an arm or shoulder (92.0% in each, dizziness (84.0% and headache (76.0%. The different clinical symptoms mostly reported were: depression (80.0%, anxiety (76.0% and insomnia (72.0%; b vestibular examination showed an alteration in 12 patients (48.0% in the caloric test; c an alteration in the peripheral vestibular system prevailed, and d deficient peripheral vestibular disorders were prevalent. Conclusion: This study enabled the importance of the labyrinthic test to be verified, thus emphasizing that this kind of people must be studied better, since a range of rheumatologic diseases can cause severe vestibular changes as a result of their manifestations and impairment areas.

  9. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  10. Vestibular hearing and neural synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Vestibular hearing as an auditory sensitivity of the saccule in the human ear is revealed by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs). The range of the vestibular hearing lies in the low frequency. Also, the amplitude of an auditory brainstem response component depends on the amount of synchronized neural activity, and the auditory nerve fibers' responses have the best synchronization with the low frequency. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate correlation between vestibular hearing using cVEMPs and neural synchronization via slow wave Auditory Brainstem Responses (sABR). Study Design. This case-control survey was consisted of twenty-two dizzy patients, compared to twenty healthy controls. Methods. Intervention comprised of Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA), Impedance acoustic metry (IA), Videonystagmography (VNG), fast wave ABR (fABR), sABR, and cVEMPs. Results. The affected ears of the dizzy patients had the abnormal findings of cVEMPs (insecure vestibular hearing) and the abnormal findings of sABR (decreased neural synchronization). Comparison of the cVEMPs at affected ears versus unaffected ears and the normal persons revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Safe vestibular hearing was effective in the improvement of the neural synchronization.

  11. Functional Plasticity after Unilateral Vestibular Midbrain Infarction in Human Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Baier, Bernhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bartenstein, Peter; Zwergal, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to uncover mechanisms of central compensation of vestibular function at brainstem, cerebellar, and cortical levels in patients with acute unilateral midbrain infarctions presenting with an acute vestibular tone imbalance. Eight out of 17 patients with unilateral midbrain infarctions were selected on the basis of signs of a vestibular tone imbalance, e.g., graviceptive (tilts of perceived verticality) and oculomotor dysfunction (skew deviation, ocular torsion) in F18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET at two time points: A) in the acute stage, and B) after recovery 6 months later. Lesion-behavior mapping analyses with MRI verified the exact structural lesion sites. Group subtraction analyses and comparisons with healthy controls were performed with Statistic Parametric Mapping for the PET data. A comparison of PET A of acute-stage patients with that of healthy controls showed increases in glucose metabolism in the cerebellum, motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, and inferior temporal lobe, but none in vestibular cortex areas. At the supratentorial level bilateral signal decreases dominated in the thalamus, frontal eye fields, and anterior cingulum. These decreases persisted after clinical recovery in contrast to the increases. The transient activations can be attributed to ocular motor and postural recovery (cerebellum) and sensory substitution of vestibular function for motion perception (visual cortex). The persisting deactivation in the thalamic nuclei and frontal eye fields allows alternative functional interpretations of the thalamic nuclei: either a disconnection of ascending sensory input occurs or there is a functional mismatch between expected and actual vestibular activity. Our data support the view that both thalami operate separately for each hemisphere but receive vestibular input from ipsilateral and contralateral midbrain integration centers. Normally they have gatekeeper functions for multisensory input to the cortex and automatic

  12. Superdeformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Superdeformation was first proposed some twenty years ago to explain the fission isomers observed in some actinide nuclei. It was later realized that superdeformed shapes can occur at high angular momentum in lighter nuclei. The interest in the mechanisms responsible for these exotic shapes has increased enormously with the discovery of a superdeformed band of nineteen discrete lines in 152 Dy (8). At about the same time, evidence for highly deformed nuclei (axis ratio 3:2) was also reported near 132 Ce(9). Striking properties emerged from the first experiments, such as the essentially constant energy spacing between transitions (picket-fence spectra), the unexpectedly strong population of superdeformed bands at high spins, and the apparent lack of a link between the superdeformed states and the yrast levels. These findings were reviewed by Nolan and Twin. The present article follows upon their work and discusses the wealth of information that has since become available. This includes the discovery of a new island of superdeformation near A = 190, the detailed spectroscopy of ground and excited bands in the superdeformed well near A = 150 and A = 190, the surprising occurrence of superdeformed bands with identical transition energies in nuclei differing by one or two mass units, and the improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for the feeding into and the decay out of the superdeformed states

  13. Evidence for a role of orexin/hypocretin system in vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3, 3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL on the orexin-A (OXA labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.. The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v. on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48 and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  14. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    OpenAIRE

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deteri...

  15. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  17. [Infrared videonystagmography in vestibular diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, A; Piazza, F; Quaranta, N

    2000-01-01

    Vestibular examination relied upon electronystagmography (ENG) for more than 50 years. This method is based on recording of nystagmus (Ny) without any possibility to see the ocular movements directly. More recently, infrared videonystagmography (VNG) entered the diagnostic protocol of vestibular disorders. VNG permits to record and visualize Ny, both in the darkness and with open eyes. Aim of the present study was to verify the possible advantages of VNG versus ENG for functional evaluation of the vestibular system in patients suffering from otoneurological disorders. To that purpose, VNG and ENG tracings were recorded in 12 patients. The preliminary results show that there are not significant differences in quantitative evaluation of Ny between the two methods. Anyhow, VNG has some technical and clinical advantages that make it the method of choice.

  18. Vestibular migraine: who is the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno; Teggi, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular migraine has been classified as a specific entity in which vestibular symptomatology is defined as part of the migrainous disorder. New and appropriate diagnostic criteria have been proposed by the Barany and International Headache Societies. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine mainly depends on the patient history. The NIVE project is a prospectic multicentric study on vestibular migraine. The aim of this project is to evaluate demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations of migraine and vertigo in a large cohort of Caucasian patients affected by vestibular migraine.

  19. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiao; Zhang, Fu-Xing; Pang, You-Wang; Li, Jin-Lian; Li, Yun-Qing

    2006-07-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1-3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  20. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao DENG; Fu-Xing ZHANG; You-Wang PANG; Jin-Lian LI; Yun-Qing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1~3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidinbiotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  1. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  2. HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND VESTIBULAR DYSFUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Monzani, Fabio; Petrolo, Claudio; Fattori, Bruno; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Cassandro, Ettore; Costante, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to analyze the existing literature concerning the relationship between Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and vestibular dysfunction. We used electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library) to search and collect all published articles about the association between HT and vestibular disorders. Several observational and retrospective studies have postulated a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and vestibular disorders. In most cases, an appropriate control group was lacking, and the impact of thyroid functional status could not precisely be established. In recent years, two well-designed prospective studies have provided convincing evidence that the association is not random. One article reported that patients with Ménière disease (MD) had a significantly higher prevalence of positive anti-thyroid autoantibody as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, more than half of MD patients had either positive anti-thyroid or non-organ-specific autoantibody titers, compared to less than 30% of both patients with unilateral vestibular paresis without cochlear involvement and healthy controls. Another study found that patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) had significantly higher serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and antithyroid autoantibody levels than healthy controls. Additionally, almost one-fifth of euthyroid patients with HT had signs of BPPV. The published results indicate that patients with MD or BPPV are potential candidates to also develop HT. Thus, in HT patients, the presence of even slight symptoms or signs potentially related to vestibular lesions should be carefully investigated. AITD = autoimmune thyroid disease; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; EH = endolymphatic hydrops; HT = Hashimoto thyroiditis; L-T 4 = L-thyroxine; MD = Ménière disease; PS = Pendred syndrome; Tg = thyroglobulin; TPO = thyroid peroxidase; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  3. Karyometric changes of neurons of hypothalamus and ependyma nuclei of the third cerebral ventricle of sheep following administration of Gn-RH and subsequent irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanikova, A.; Arendarcik, J.; Tokos, M.; Balun, J.; Chlebovsky, O.

    1983-01-01

    A karyometric analysis was used for the study of changes in the cell nucleus volume of the neurons of nucleus paraventricularis, nucleus arcuatus, and the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle of sheep after the administration of Gn-RH, followed by exposure to X rays. The test animals included 12 ewes in physiological anoestrus and two rams. The trials were conducted in spring. The first group of four ewes and two rams were left as controls; in the ewes of the second group the hypothalamo-hypophysial region was irradiated with 516.5 mC/kg (200 R);in the four ewes of the third group, ovaries were directly irradiated at laparotomy with 64.4 mC/kg (250 R). The ewes of the second and third groups were treated with i.m. administration of 400 μg Gn-RH per head before irradiation. The excisions were collected and processed the tenth day from irradiation. The karyometric analysis was performed at 3000-fold magnification, 200 cells being measured in each sample. Changes in neurosecretory cells were described in the regions of nucleus paraventricularis, nucleus arcuatus and in the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle. The results of the karyometric analysis of nucleus paraventricularis and nucleus arcuatus suggest that the administration of Gn-RH and irradiation of the hypothalamo-hypophysial region, and direct irradiation of the ovaries stimulated the studied cerebral structures. The changes observed in the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle after the administration of Gn-RH and subsequent irradiation of the hypothalamo-hypophysial region were insignificant; it was only after direct irradiation of the ovaries that these cells were inhibited indirectly through the feedback mechanism. (author)

  4. Regenerative therapy for vestibular disorders using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs): neural differentiation of human iPSC-derived neural stem cells after in vitro transplantation into mouse vestibular epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taura, Akiko; Nakashima, Noriyuki; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Funabiki, Kazuo; Ito, Juichi; Omori, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    Vestibular ganglion cells, which convey sense of motion from vestibular hair cells to the brainstem, are known to degenerate with aging and after vestibular neuritis. Thus, regeneration of vestibular ganglion cells is important to aid in the recovery of balance for associated disorders. The present study derived hNSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and transplanted these cells into mouse utricle tissues. After a 7-day co-culture period, histological and electrophysiological examinations of transplanted hNSCs were performed. Injected hNSC-derived cells produced elongated axon-like structures within the utricle tissue that made contact with vestibular hair cells. A proportion of hNSC-derived cells showed spontaneous firing activities, similar to those observed in cultured mouse vestibular ganglion cells. However, hNSC-derived cells around the mouse utricle persisted as immature neurons or occasionally differentiated into putative astrocytes. Moreover, electrophysiological examination showed hNSC-derived cells around utricles did not exhibit any obvious spontaneous firing activities. Injected human neural stem cells (hNSCs) showed signs of morphological maturation including reconnection to denervated hair cells and partial physiological maturation, suggesting hNSC-derived cells possibly differentiated into neurons.

  5. Primordial nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The recent detection of intergalactic helium by NASA's Astro-2 mission backs up two earlier measurements by ESA and the University of California, San Diego, using instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Taken together, these results give strong evidence that this helium is primordial, confirming a key prediction of the Big Bang theory. The amount of helium the results imply could also account for some of the Universe's invisible dark matter - material which affects galactic motion but is otherwise undetectable. According to theory, helium nuclei formed at around 100 seconds after the Big Bang, but the amount of helium depended on even earlier events. Initially, protons turned into neutrons with the same probability that neutrons turned into protons. But after about one second, the Universe had cooled down enough for the weak interaction to freeze out. Neutrons continued to decay into the slightly lighter protons, whilst the opposite reaction became much more scarce. At around 100 seconds, thermonuclear fusion reactions could begin, and all the neutrons that were left became absorbed into helium nuclei, leaving the remaining protons locked up in hydrogen. The ratio of helium to hydrogen was therefore determined by events occurring when the Universe was just one second old. Standard models of primordial nucleosynthesis fix this ratio at slightly less than 2 5% by mass. All heavier elements were cooked up much later in the stars, and amount to less than 1 % of the Universe's mass. These predictions have been borne out remarkably well by observation, although proof of the primordial origins of hydrogen and helium has remained elusive until now. Big Bang nucleosynthesis goes on to estimate that primordial baryonic matter in the form of light nuclei could account for around 10% of the Universe's dark matter. All three recent measurements used the same technique of looking at distant quasars, some of the most luminous objects in the Universe, to

  6. Multiplexing Visual Signals in the Suprachiasmatic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Stinchcombe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, the site of the mammalian circadian (daily pacemaker, contains thousands of interconnected neurons, some of which receive direct retinal input. Here, we study the fast (<1 s responses of SCN neurons to visual stimuli with a large-scale mathematical model tracking the ionic currents and voltage of all SCN neurons. We reconstruct the SCN network connectivity and reject 99.99% of theoretically possible SCN networks by requiring that the model reproduces experimentally determined receptive fields of SCN neurons. The model shows how the SCN neuronal network can enhance circadian entrainment by sensitizing a population of neurons in the ventral SCN to irradiance. This SCN network also increases the spatial acuity of neurons and increases the accuracy of a simulated subconscious spatial visual task. We hypothesize that much of the fast electrical activity within the SCN is related to the processing of spatial information.

  7. Prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Cavalcante Salmito

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is now accepted as a common cause of episodic vertigo. Treatment of VM involves two situations: the vestibular symptom attacks and the period between attacks. For the latter, some prophylaxis methods can be used. The current recommendation is to use the same prophylactic drugs used for migraines, including β-blockers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The recent diagnostic definition of vestibular migraine makes the number of studies on its treatment scarce. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic treatment used in patients from a VM outpatient clinic. Methods: Review of medical records from patients with VM according to the criteria of the Bárány Society/International Headache Society of 2012 criteria. The drugs used in the treatment and treatment response obtained through the visual analog scale (VAS for dizziness and headache were assessed. The pre and post-treatment VAS scores were compared (the improvement was evaluated together and individually, per drug used. Associations with clinical subgroups of patients were also assessed. Results: Of the 88 assessed records, 47 were eligible. We included patients that met the diagnostic criteria for VM and excluded those whose medical records were illegible and those of patients with other disorders causing dizziness and/or headache that did not meet the 2012 criteria for VM. 80.9% of the patients showed improvement with prophylaxis (p < 0.001. Amitriptyline, Flunarizine, Propranolol and Topiramate improved vestibular symptoms (p < 0.001 and headache (p < 0.015. The four drugs were effective in a statistically significant manner. There was a positive statistical association between the time of vestibular symptoms and clinical improvement. There was no additional benefit in hypertensive patients who used antihypertensive drugs as prophylaxis or depressed patients who used antidepressants in relation to other prophylactic drugs. Drug

  8. A study on vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials via galvanic vestibular stimulation in normal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Discussions: Galvanic vestibular stimulation could elicit biphasic EMG responses from SCM via the vestibular nerve but not from the otolith organs. Galvanic stimulation together with air conducted sound (ACS or bone conducted vibration (BCV can elicit VEMPs and may enable the differentiation of retrolabyrinthine lesions from labyrinthine lesions in vestibular system.

  9. Personality Changes in Patients with Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalisation and derealisation symptoms such as feeling ‘spaced out’, ‘body feeling strange’ and ‘not feeling in control of self’. We suggest in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through the information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction.

  10. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  11. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma. A treatm......This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma...

  12. Influences of Vestibular System on Sympathetic Nervous System. Implications for countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denise, Pr Pierre

    As gravity is a direct and permanent stress on body fluids, muscles and bones, it is not surpris-ing that weightlessness has important effects on cardiovascular and musculo-skeletal systems. However, these harmful effects do not totally result from the removal of the direct stress of gravity on these organs, but are also partially and indirectly mediated by the vestibular sys-tem. Besides its well known crucial role in spatial orientation and postural equilibrium, it is now clear that the vestibular system is also involved in the regulation of other important physi-ological systems: respiratory and cardiovascular systems, circadian regulation, food intake and even bone mineralization. The neuroanatomical substrate for these vestibular-mediated reg-ulations is still poorly defined, but there is much evidence that vestibular system has strong impacts not only on brainstem autonomic centers but on many hypothalamic nuclei as well. As autonomic nervous system controls almost all body organs, bringing into play the vestibular system by hypergravity or microgravity could virtually affects all major physiological func-tions. There is experimental evidence that weightlessness as well as vestibular lesion induce sympathetic activation thus participating in space related physiological alterations. The fact that some effects of weightlessness on biological systems are mediated by the vestibular system has an important implication for using artificial gravity as a countermeasure: artificial gravity should load not only bones and the cardiovascular system but the vestibular system as well. In short-arm centrifuges, the g load at the head level is low because the head is near the axis of rotation. If the vestibular system is involved in cardiovascular deconditioning and bone loss during weightlessness, it would be more effective to significantly stimulate it and thus it would be necessary to place the head off-axis. Moreover, as the otolithic organs are non longer stimu-lated in

  13. [Effectiveness of Self-efficacy Promoting Vestibular Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Vestibular Hypofunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2016-10-01

    In this study an examination was done of the effect of self-efficacy promoting vestibular rehabilitation (S-VR) on dizziness, exercise selfefficacy, adherence to vestibular rehabilitation (VR), subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness in patients with vestibular hypofunction. This was a randomized controlled study. Data were collected 3 times at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after beginning the intervention. Outcome measures were level of dizziness, exercise self-efficacy, and level of adherence to VR. Subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness were also obtained. Data were analyzed using Windows SPSS 21.0 program. After 4 weeks of S-VR, there was no difference between the groups for dizziness, subjective and objective vestibular functions. However, exercise self-efficacy and adherence to VR were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. After 8 weeks of S-VR, dizziness (p=.018) exercise self-efficacy (pexercise self-efficacy, subjective vestibular function and adherence to VR. Objective vestibular function and vestibular compensation were also improved in the experimental group at the end of 8 weeks of S-VR.

  14. Diagnostics and therapy of vestibular schwannomas – an interdisciplinary challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosahl, Steffen; Bohr, Christopher; Lell, Michael; Hamm, Klaus; Iro, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) expand slowly in the internal auditory canal, in the cerebellopontine angle, inside the cochlear and the labyrinth. Larger tumors can displace and compress the brainstem. With an annual incidence of 1:100,000 vestibular schwannoma represent 6–7% of all intracranial tumors. In the cerebellopontine angle they are by far the most neoplasm with 90% of all lesions located in this region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), audiometry, and vestibular diagnostics are the mainstays of the clinical workup for patients harboring tumors. The first part of this paper delivers an overview of tumor stages, the most common grading scales for facial nerve function and hearing as well as a short introduction to the examination of vestibular function. Upholding or improving quality of life is the central concern in counseling and treating a patient with vestibular schwannoma. Preservation of neuronal function is essential and the management options – watchful waiting, microsurgery and stereotactic radiation – should be custom-tailored to the individual situation of the patient. Continuing interdisciplinary exchange is important to monitor treatment quality and to improve treatment results. Recently, several articles and reviews have been published on the topic of vestibular schwannoma. On the occasion of the 88th annual meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck surgery a special volume of the journal “HNO” will be printed. Hence this presentation has been designed to deviate from the traditional standard which commonly consists of a pure literature review. The current paper was conceptually woven around a series of interdisciplinary cases that outline examples for every stage of the disease that show characteristic results for management options to date. Systematic clinical decision pathways have been deduced from our experience and from results reported in the literature. These pathways are graphically outlined after

  15. [Threefold intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of vestibular neurectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, R; Kasper, A

    1991-01-01

    A threefold intraoperative monitoring of facial nerve, auditory nerve and vestibular nerve function was performed in 14 cases of retrosigmoidal neurectomy. The facial nerve was monitoring with a pressure transducer placed against the cheek (Opalarm system). The auditory nerve was monitored with acoustically (click) evoked early potentials and the vestibular nerve was monitored with electrically evoked vestibular potentials obtained by direct stimulation (biphasic current pulses of 0.75-mA p-p, 100 us, 20/s) of the exposed vestibular nerve in the cerebellopontine angle before, during and after neurectomy. A characteristic vertex negative peak having a latency of approximately 2 ms and approximately 0.5 uV amplitude was obtained between a forehead and an ipsilateral ear lobe electrode (2 x 1,000 averaged responses over 10 ms) before the neurectomy. This response disappeared after selective vestibular nerve section proximal to the stimulation site. A diminished response amplitude was measured after incomplete nerve section. Simultaneous acoustic masking had no influence on the vestibular potential. The 14 operated patients became all free of vertiginous spells and drop-attacks except one patient who developed a contralateral Menière's. Facial nerve function remained normal in all. Hearing preservation was obtained in 12 patients (86%). The threefold intraoperative monitoring has turned out to be an additional safety factor for facial and auditory nerve preservation and, thanks to the recording of vestibular potentials, it increased the efficiency of vestibular neurectomy.

  16. Vestibular Function and Activities of Daily Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Harun MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vestibular dysfunction increases with age and is associated with mobility difficulties and fall risk in older individuals. We evaluated whether vestibular function influences the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs. Method: We analyzed the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged older than 40 years ( N = 5,017. Vestibular function was assessed with the Modified Romberg test. We evaluated the association between vestibular function and difficulty level in performing specific basic and instrumental ADLs, and total number of ADL impairments. Results: Vestibular dysfunction was associated with significantly higher odds of difficulty with nine ADLs, most strongly with difficulty managing finances (odds ratio [ OR ] = 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.18, 5.90]. In addition, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a significantly greater number of ADL impairments (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.09, 0.33]. This effect size was comparable with the influence of heavy smoking (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.06, 0.36] and hypertension (β = .10, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.18] on the number of ADL impairments. Conclusion: Vestibular dysfunction significantly influences ADL difficulty, most strongly with a cognitive rather than mobility-based task. These findings underscore the importance of vestibular inputs for both cognitive and physical daily activities.

  17. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  18. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation combined with transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation in patients with chronic dizziness: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koganemaru, Satoko; Goto, Fumiyuki; Arai, Miki; Toshikuni, Keitaro; Hosoya, Makoto; Wakabayashi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Nobuko; Minami, Shujiro; Ikeda, Satoshi; Ikoma, Katsunori; Mima, Tatsuya

    Vestibular rehabilitation is useful to alleviate chronic dizziness in patients with vestibular dysfunction. It aims to induce neuronal plasticity in the central nervous system (especially in the cerebellum) to promote vestibular compensation. Transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation (tcDCS) reportedly enhances cerebellar function. We investigated whether vestibular rehabilitation partially combined with tcDCS is superior to the use of rehabilitation alone for the alleviation of dizziness. Patients with chronic dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction received rehabilitation concurrently with either 20-min tcDCS or sham stimulation for 5 days. Pre- and post-intervention (at 1 month) dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) scores and psychometric and motor parameters were compared. Sixteen patients completed the study. DHI scores in the tcDCS group showed significant improvement over those in the sham group (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.033). Vestibular rehabilitation partially combined with tcDCS appears to be a promising approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it.

  20. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it. PMID:26630202

  1. Distribution of Fos-Like Immunoreactivity, Catecholaminergic and Serotoninergic Neurons Activated by the Laryngeal Chemoreflex in the Medulla Oblongata of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolu; Guo, Ruichen; Zhao, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) induces apnea, glottis closure, bradycardia and hypertension in young and maturing mammals. We examined the distribution of medullary nuclei that are activated by the LCR and used immunofluorescent detection of Fos protein as a cellular marker for neuronal activation to establish that the medullary catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons participate in the modulation of the LCR. The LCR was elicited by the infusion of KCl-HCl solution into the laryngeal lumen of adult rats in the experimental group, whereas the control group received the same surgery but no infusion. In comparison, the number of regions of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) that were activated by the LCR significantly increased in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), the loose formation of the nucleus ambiguus (AmbL), the rostral ventral respiratory group (RVRG), the ventrolateral reticular complex (VLR), the pre-Bötzinger complex (PrBöt), the Bötzinger complex (Böt), the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SP5), and the raphe obscurus nucleus (ROb) bilaterally from the medulla oblongata. Furthermore, 12.71% of neurons with FLI in the dorsolateral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (SolDL) showed tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (TH-ir, catecholaminergic), and 70.87% of neurons with FLI in the ROb were serotoninergic. Our data demonstrated the distribution of medullary nuclei that were activated by the LCR, and further demonstrated that catecholaminergic neurons of the SolDL and serotoninergic neurons of the ROb were activated by the LCR, indicating the potential central pathway of the LCR.

  2. Distribution of Fos-Like Immunoreactivity, Catecholaminergic and Serotoninergic Neurons Activated by the Laryngeal Chemoreflex in the Medulla Oblongata of Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Wang

    Full Text Available The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR induces apnea, glottis closure, bradycardia and hypertension in young and maturing mammals. We examined the distribution of medullary nuclei that are activated by the LCR and used immunofluorescent detection of Fos protein as a cellular marker for neuronal activation to establish that the medullary catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons participate in the modulation of the LCR. The LCR was elicited by the infusion of KCl-HCl solution into the laryngeal lumen of adult rats in the experimental group, whereas the control group received the same surgery but no infusion. In comparison, the number of regions of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI that were activated by the LCR significantly increased in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC, the loose formation of the nucleus ambiguus (AmbL, the rostral ventral respiratory group (RVRG, the ventrolateral reticular complex (VLR, the pre-Bötzinger complex (PrBöt, the Bötzinger complex (Böt, the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SP5, and the raphe obscurus nucleus (ROb bilaterally from the medulla oblongata. Furthermore, 12.71% of neurons with FLI in the dorsolateral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (SolDL showed tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (TH-ir, catecholaminergic, and 70.87% of neurons with FLI in the ROb were serotoninergic. Our data demonstrated the distribution of medullary nuclei that were activated by the LCR, and further demonstrated that catecholaminergic neurons of the SolDL and serotoninergic neurons of the ROb were activated by the LCR, indicating the potential central pathway of the LCR.

  3. Betahistine Treatment in a Cat Model of Vestibular Pathology: Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Approaches

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    Brahim Tighilet

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD approach using betahistine doses levels in unilateral vestibular neurectomized cats (UVN comparable to those used in humans for treating patients with Menière's disease. The aim is to investigate for the first time oral betahistine administration (0.2 and 2 mg/kg/day with plasma concentrations of betahistine and its major metabolite 2-pyridylacetic acid (2-PAA (N = 9 cats, the time course of posture recovery (N = 13 cats, and the regulation of the enzyme synthesizing histamine (histidine decarboxylase: HDC in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN of UVN treated animals (N = the same 13 cats plus 4 negative control cats. In addition the effect of co-administration of the lower betahistine dose (0.2 mg/kg/day and selegiline (1 mg/kg/day, an inhibitor of the monamine oxidase B (MAOBi implicated in betahistine catabolism was investigated. The PK parameters were the peak concentration (Cmax, the time when the maximum concentration is reached (Tmax for both betahistine and 2-PAA and the area under the curve (AUC. The PD approach consisted at quantifying the surface support area, which is a good estimation of posture recovery. The plasma concentration-time-profiles of betahistine and 2-PAA in cats were characterized by early Cmax-values followed by a phase of rapid decrease of plasma concentrations and a final long lasting low level of plasma concentrations. Co administration of selegiline and betahistine increased values of Cmax and AUC up to 146- and 180-fold, respectively. The lowest dose of betahistine (0.2 mg/kg has no effects on postural function recovery but induced an acute symptomatic effect characterized by a fast balance improvement (4–6 days. The higher dose (2 mg/kg and the co-administration treatment induced both this acute effect plus a significant acceleration of the recovery process. The histaminergic activity of the neurons in the TMN was significantly increased under

  4. Acute Bilateral Superior Branch Vestibular Neuropathy

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    Dario A. Yacovino

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid onset of a bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH is often attributed to vestibular ototoxicity. However, without any prior exposure to ototoxins, the idiopathic form of BVH is most common. Although sequential bilateral vestibular neuritis (VN is described as a cause of BVH, clinical evidence for simultaneous and acute onset bilateral VN is unknown. We describe a patient with an acute onset of severe gait ataxia and oscillopsia with features compatible with acute BVH putatively due to a bilateral VN, which we serially evaluated with clinical and laboratory vestibular function testing over the course of 1 year. Initially, bilateral superior and horizontal semicircular canals and bilateral utricles were impaired, consistent with damage to both superior branches of each vestibular nerve. Hearing was spared. Only modest results were obtained following 6 months of vestibular rehabilitation. At a 1-year follow-up, only the utricular function of one side recovered. This case is the first evidence supporting an acute presentation of bilateral VN as a cause for BVH, which would not have been observed without critical assessment of each of the 10 vestibular end organs.

  5. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  6. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  7. Progress toward development of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis for treatment of bilateral vestibular deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation-inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  8. Vestibular Restoration and Adaptation in Vestibular Neuritis and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome With Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Rueda, Almudena; Esteban-Sanchez, Jonathan; Yanes, Joaquin; Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Sanz-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate vestibular restoration and the evolution of the compensatory saccades in acute severe inflammatory vestibular nerve paralysis, including vestibular neuritis and Ramsay Hunt syndrome with vertigo. Prospective. Tertiary referral center. Vestibular neuritis (n = 18) and Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients with vertigo (n = 13) were enrolled. After treatment with oral corticosteroids, patients were followed up for 6 months. Functional recovery of the facial nerve was scored according to the House-Brackman grading system. Caloric and video head impulse tests were performed in every patient at the time of enrolment. Subsequently, successive video head impulse test (vHIT) exploration was performed at the 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up. Eighteen patients with vestibular neuritis and 13 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and associated vertigo were included. Vestibular function was significantly worse in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome than in those with vestibular neuritis. Similar compensatory saccades velocity and latency values were observed in both groups, in both the caloric and initial vHIT tests. Successive vHIT results showed a significantly higher vestibulo-ocular reflex gain recovery in vestibular neuritis patients than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. A significantly faster reduction in the latency, velocity, and organization of the compensatory saccades was observed in neuritis than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. In addition to the recovery of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the reduction of latency, velocity and the organization of compensatory saccades play a role in vestibular compensation.

  9. Differences between otolith- and semicircular canal-activated neural circuitry in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Yoshio; Kushiro, Keisuke

    2011-12-01

    In the last two decades, we have focused on establishing a reliable technique for focal stimulation of vestibular receptors to evaluate neural connectivity. Here, we summarize the vestibular-related neuronal circuits for the vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulocollic reflex, and vestibulospinal reflex arcs. The focal stimulating technique also uncovered some hidden neural mechanisms. In the otolith system, we identified two hidden neural mechanisms that enhance otolith receptor sensitivity. The first is commissural inhibition, which boosts sensitivity by incorporating inputs from bilateral otolith receptors, the existence of which was in contradiction to the classical understanding of the otolith system but was observed in the utricular system. The second mechanism, cross-striolar inhibition, intensifies the sensitivity of inputs from both sides of receptive cells across the striola in a single otolith sensor. This was an entirely novel finding and is typically observed in the saccular system. We discuss the possible functional meaning of commissural and cross-striolar inhibition. Finally, our focal stimulating technique was applied to elucidate the different constructions of axonal projections from each vestibular receptor to the spinal cord. We also discuss the possible function of the unique neural connectivity observed in each vestibular receptor system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual-vestibular cue integration for heading perception: applications of optimal cue integration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Christopher R; Deangelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2010-05-01

    The perception of self-motion is crucial for navigation, spatial orientation and motor control. In particular, estimation of one's direction of translation, or heading, relies heavily on multisensory integration in most natural situations. Visual and nonvisual (e.g., vestibular) information can be used to judge heading, but each modality alone is often insufficient for accurate performance. It is not surprising, then, that visual and vestibular signals converge frequently in the nervous system, and that these signals interact in powerful ways at the level of behavior and perception. Early behavioral studies of visual-vestibular interactions consisted mainly of descriptive accounts of perceptual illusions and qualitative estimation tasks, often with conflicting results. In contrast, cue integration research in other modalities has benefited from the application of rigorous psychophysical techniques, guided by normative models that rest on the foundation of ideal-observer analysis and Bayesian decision theory. Here we review recent experiments that have attempted to harness these so-called optimal cue integration models for the study of self-motion perception. Some of these studies used nonhuman primate subjects, enabling direct comparisons between behavioral performance and simultaneously recorded neuronal activity. The results indicate that humans and monkeys can integrate visual and vestibular heading cues in a manner consistent with optimal integration theory, and that single neurons in the dorsal medial superior temporal area show striking correlates of the behavioral effects. This line of research and other applications of normative cue combination models should continue to shed light on mechanisms of self-motion perception and the neuronal basis of multisensory integration.

  11. Unilateral vestibular loss impairs external space representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Borel

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal and far (extrapersonal spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation, and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss.

  12. Metabolic disorders of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, L P

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the impact of metabolic disorders on vestibular function. Diabetes mellitus is a disorder of glucose metabolism that can be associated with vestibular dysfunction. Vertigo can be alleviated by diet management in many cases. Elevated levels of blood lipids have been implicated in cochleovestibular disorders. Treatment with a lipid-lowering drug has resulted in improved auditory and vestibular function in a placebo-controlled trial. Hypothyroidism may affect different parts of the vestibular system depending on the severity and duration of thyroid deficiency. Severe congenital hypothyroidism can cause central vestibular disorders affecting the cerebellum, whereas mild hypothyroidism may result in peripheral vestibulopathy. Endogenous alterations in concentrations of estrogen and progesterone in the premenstrual syndrome or with the use of exogenous hormones such as oral contraceptives may trigger vertigo. Metabolic evaluations for unexplained vertigo should include a lipoprotein profile, with cholesterol and triglyceride levels, glucose tolerance test, and thyroid hormone measurements. Nutritional and drug therapy may be useful to reverse the vestibular dysfunction.

  13. Patients with vestibular loss, tullio phenomenon, and pressure-induced nystagmus: vestibular atelectasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Angela; Ward, Bryan K; Schubert, Michael C; Kheradmand, Amir; Zee, David S; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Carey, John Patrick

    2014-06-01

    To propose an etiology for a syndrome of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-evoked eye movements with normal hearing thresholds. Retrospective case series. Tertiary care referral center. Four patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction, sound and/or pressure-evoked nystagmus and normal hearing thresholds were identified over a 3-year period. No evidence of other known vestibular disorders was identified. None of these patients presented with a history of exposure to toxins, radiation, aminoglycosides or chemotherapy; head trauma; or a family history of inherited vestibular loss. All patients underwent high-resolution CT scan of the temporal bones to evaluate for labyrinthine dehiscence. Additionally, all individuals underwent audiometric testing to ANSI standards, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) testing using either click stimulus cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs), or tone burst ocular VEMPs (oVEMPs). Bithermal caloric stimulation was used to measure horizontal semicircular canal function, with either videonystagmography (VNG) or electronystagmography (ENG) to record eye movements. Individual responses of each of the 6 semicircular canals (SCC) to rapid head rotations were tested with the bedside head impulse test. We identified 4 patients with a combination of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-induced eye movements, normal-hearing thresholds and no evidence for any other vestibular disorder. We suggest that this unique combination of symptoms should be considered as the clinical presentation of vestibular atelectasis, which has been previously described histologically as collapse of the endolymph-containing portions of the labyrinth.

  14. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  15. Orexinergic fibers are in contact with Kölliker-Fuse nucleus neurons projecting to the respiration-related nuclei in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shigefumi; Oka, Tatsuro; Asano, Hirohiko; Yasui, Yukihiko

    2016-10-01

    The neural pathways underlying the respiratory variation dependent on vigilance states remain unsettled. In the present study, we examined the orexinergic innervation of Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) neurons sending their axons to the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG) and phrenic nucleus (PhN) as well as to the hypoglossal nucleus (HGN) by using a combined retrograde tracing and immunohistochemistry. After injection of cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) into the KFN, CTb-labeled neurons that are also immunoreactive for orexin (ORX) were found prominently in the perifornical and medial regions and additionally in the lateral region of the hypothalamic ORX field. After injection of fluorogold (FG) into the rVRG, PhN or HGN, we found an overlapping distribution of ORX-immunoreactive axon terminals and FG-labeled neurons in the KFN. Within the neuropil of the KFN, asymmetrical synaptic contacts were made between these terminals and neurons. We further demonstrated that many neurons labeled with FG injected into the rVRG, PhN, or HGN are immunoreactive for ORX receptor 2. Present data suggest that rVRG-, PhN- and HGN-projecting KFN neurons may be under the excitatory influence of the ORXergic neurons for the state-dependent regulation of respiration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic Morphometry of Catecholamine Nuclei in the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Domenico; Busceti, Carla L; Calierno, Maria T; Di Pietro, Paola; Madonna, Michele; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Catecholamine nuclei within the brainstem reticular formation (RF) play a pivotal role in a variety of brain functions. However, a systematic characterization of these nuclei in the very same experimental conditions is missing so far. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immune-positive cells of the brainstem correspond to dopamine (DA)-, norepinephrine (NE)-, and epinephrine (E)-containing cells. Here, we report a systematic count of TH-positive neurons in the RF of the mouse brainstem by using stereological morphometry. All these nuclei were analyzed for anatomical localization, rostro-caudal extension, volume, neuron number, neuron density, and mean neuronal area for each nucleus. The present data apart from inherent informative value wish to represent a reference for neuronal mapping in those studies investigating the functional anatomy of the brainstem RF. These include: the sleep-wake cycle, movement control, muscle tone modulation, mood control, novelty orienting stimuli, attention, archaic responses to internal and external stressful stimuli, anxiety, breathing, blood pressure, and innumerable activities modulated by the archaic iso-dendritic hard core of the brainstem RF. Most TH-immune-positive cells fill the lateral part of the RF, which indeed possesses a high catecholamine content. A few nuclei are medial, although conventional nosography considers all these nuclei as part of the lateral column of the RF. Despite the key role of these nuclei in psychiatric and neurological disorders, only a few of them aspired a great attention in biomedical investigation, while most of them remain largely obscure although intense research is currently in progress. A simultaneous description of all these nuclei is not simply key to comprehend the variety of brainstem catecholamine reticular neurons, but probably represents an intrinsically key base for understanding brain physiology and physiopathology.

  17. Systematic Morphometry of Catecholamine Nuclei in the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Bucci

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Catecholamine nuclei within the brainstem reticular formation (RF play a pivotal role in a variety of brain functions. However, a systematic characterization of these nuclei in the very same experimental conditions is missing so far. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immune-positive cells of the brainstem correspond to dopamine (DA-, norepinephrine (NE-, and epinephrine (E-containing cells. Here, we report a systematic count of TH-positive neurons in the RF of the mouse brainstem by using stereological morphometry. All these nuclei were analyzed for anatomical localization, rostro-caudal extension, volume, neuron number, neuron density, and mean neuronal area for each nucleus. The present data apart from inherent informative value wish to represent a reference for neuronal mapping in those studies investigating the functional anatomy of the brainstem RF. These include: the sleep-wake cycle, movement control, muscle tone modulation, mood control, novelty orienting stimuli, attention, archaic responses to internal and external stressful stimuli, anxiety, breathing, blood pressure, and innumerable activities modulated by the archaic iso-dendritic hard core of the brainstem RF. Most TH-immune-positive cells fill the lateral part of the RF, which indeed possesses a high catecholamine content. A few nuclei are medial, although conventional nosography considers all these nuclei as part of the lateral column of the RF. Despite the key role of these nuclei in psychiatric and neurological disorders, only a few of them aspired a great attention in biomedical investigation, while most of them remain largely obscure although intense research is currently in progress. A simultaneous description of all these nuclei is not simply key to comprehend the variety of brainstem catecholamine reticular neurons, but probably represents an intrinsically key base for understanding brain physiology and physiopathology.

  18. Studies of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the nuclei far off stability valley is of much interest for testing the nuclear models established for the stable nuclei but also for astrophysics to understand the nucleosynthesis. Experiments aim to measure the mass and lifetime, to build the decay schemes and also to study the structure and the properties of these nuclei. The radioactive beam group focused its research on light neutron-rich nuclei having a halo neutron structure. Mass measurements in N ∼ Z nuclei namely in A ∼ 60-80 proton-rich nuclei, important for understanding the rp process, are mentioned, as well as in nuclei in the 100 Sn region. In the newly obtained 26 O and 28 O nuclei the lifetimes, the probabilities of emission of one for more neutrons were determined. The data analysis has permitted to determine also for the first time the lifetimes of 27,29 F and 30 Ne. Studies of nuclei in the 100 Sn region, near the proton drip line in the ground and isomeric states are now under way. The spectroscopy (energy levels, gamma emissions, etc.) of the neutron-rich nuclei produced by the 36 S fragmentation has been carried out in 31 Ne, 17 B and 29 F. Studies by Coulomb excitation of the 2 + excited states and associated probability B (E2) in O, Ne, Ni and Zn are now analysed

  19. Long-term potentiation and depression after unilateral labyrinthectomy in the medial vestibular nucleus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Dutia, Mayank; Frondaroli, Adele; Dieni, Cristina; Grassi, Silvarosa

    2003-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in rat brainstem slices that high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the vestibular afferents induces long-term potentiation (LTP) in the ventral part (Vp) of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and long-term depression (LTD) in the dorsal part (Dp). Both LTP and LTD depend on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, which increases synaptic efficacy; however, in the Dp, LTP reverses to LTD because of the activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons. Here we show that the probability of inducing long-term effects in the MVN of rat brainstem slices is altered after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). In fact, LTP occurs less frequently in the ventral contra-lesional side compared with sham-operated rats. In the dorsal ipsi-lesional side, LTD is reduced and LTP enhanced, while the opposite occurs in the dorsal contra-lesional side. These changes in synaptic plasticity may be useful for re-balancing the tonic discharge of the MVN of the two sides during vestibular compensation, and for enhancing the dynamic responses of the deafferented MVN neurons in the long term.

  20. Zolpidem, a selective GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit agonist, induces comparable Fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and accessory but not supraoptic nuclei in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, Alexander; Søderman, Andreas; Bundzikova, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Functional activation of oxytocinergic (OXY) cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei was investigated in response to acute treatment with Zolpidem (a GABA(A) receptor agonist with selectivity for alpha(1) subunits) utilizing dual Fos/OXY immun...

  1. Vestibular-related frontal cortical areas and their roles in smooth-pursuit eye movements: representation of neck velocity, neck-vestibular interactions and memory-based smooth-pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuro eFukushima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Smooth-pursuit eye movements are voluntary responses to small slow-moving objects in the fronto-parallel plane. They evolved in primates, who possess high-acuity foveae, to ensure clear vision about the moving target. The primate frontal cortex contains two smooth-pursuit related areas; the caudal part of the frontal eye fields (FEF and the supplementary eye fields (SEF. Both areas receive vestibular inputs. We review functional differences between the two areas in smooth-pursuit. Most FEF pursuit neurons signal pursuit parameters such as eye velocity and gaze-velocity, and are involved in cancelling the vestibulo-ocular reflex by linear addition of vestibular and smooth-pursuit responses. In contrast, gaze-velocity signals are rarely represented in the SEF. Most FEF pursuit neurons receive neck velocity inputs, while discharge modulation during pursuit and trunk-on-head rotation adds linearly. Linear addition also occurs between neck velocity responses and vestibular responses during head-on-trunk rotation in a task-dependent manner. During cross-axis pursuit-vestibular interactions, vestibular signals effectively initiate predictive pursuit eye movements. Most FEF pursuit neurons discharge during the interaction training after the onset of pursuit eye velocity, making their involvement unlikely in the initial stages of generating predictive pursuit. Comparison of representative signals in the two areas and the results of chemical inactivation during a memory-based smooth-pursuit task indicate they have different roles; the SEF plans smooth-pursuit including working memory of motion-direction, whereas the caudal FEF generates motor commands for pursuit eye movements. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease were asked to perform this task, since impaired smooth-pursuit and visual working memory deficit during cognitive tasks have been reported in most patients. Preliminary results suggested specific roles of the basal ganglia in memory

  2. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction.......Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  3. Nuclei and quantum worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gathers the slides and their commentaries that have been presented at the conference 'physics and fundamental questions' by P. Chomaz. The author reviews the different quantum aspects of nuclei: tunnel effect, symmetries, magic numbers, wave functions, size, shapes and deformations. The author shows that nuclei are quantum objects of great complexity, their structures are not yet well understood and the study of exotic nuclei will continue bringing valuable information

  4. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  5. Vestibular Function Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Fujimiya, Suguru; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Kadono, Kotarou; Shimizu, Kotone; Fujizuka, Natsu; Takiguchi, Shino; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Monzen, Tatsuya; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Falls and fractures due to impaired balance in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an adverse effect on the clinical course of the disease. To evaluate balance impairment in AD from the viewpoint of vestibular functional impairment. The subjects were 12 patients with AD, 12 dementia-free elderly adults, and 12 younger adults. Vestibular function was assessed using a stepping test, caloric nystagmus, and a visual suppression (VS) test. The stepping test was abnormal in 9 of the 12 patients in the AD group. An abnormal stepping test was not associated with self-reported dizziness or tendency to fall. Significant VS abnormalities were present in the AD group. The suppression rate of VS was lower in AD patients with either a tendency to fall or constructional apraxia than in AD patients without either. The velocity of the rapid phase of caloric nystagmus before the VS test was similar in the AD group and the elderly control group. Significant abnormalities of both caloric nystagmus and VS were not present in either the elderly or the younger control groups. AD could involve impairments in the vestibular control of balance. The VS test is useful for assessing the tendency to fall in AD. Impairment of VS in AD might arise from cerebral vestibular cortex impairment rather than comorbid peripheral vestibular disorders.

  6. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Betka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225 removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI was observed in 124 cases (45% immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33% on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%, headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery.

  7. Pairing correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, C.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    There are many similarities between the properties of nucleons in nuclei and electrons in metals. In addition to the properties explainable in terms of independent particle motion, there are many important co-operative effects suggesting correlated motion. Pairing correlation which leads to superconductivity in metals and several important properties in nuclei , is an exmple of such correlations. An attempt has been made to review the effects of pairing correlations in nuclei. Recent indications of reduction in pairing correlations at high angular momenta is discussed. A comparision between pairing correlations in the cases of nuclei and electrons in metals is attempted. (author). 20 refs., 10 figs

  8. Can a finding of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials contribute to vestibular migraine diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Vešligaj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate differences in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP results with patients suffering from vestibular migraine and healthy people, taking into consideration values of threshold and latency of occurrence of the characteristic wave complex, size of amplitude, and interaural amplitude ratio. According to the results, determine the importance and usefulness of VEMP in vestibular migraine diagnostics. Methods A total number of 62 subjects were included in the study, 32 of them belonging to a group of patients suffering from vestibular migraine (VM, while other 30 were in a control group of healthy subjects. Information was collected during the diagnostic evaluation. General and otoneurological history of patients and bedside tests, audiological results, videonystagmography and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP were made. Results There was a difference in an interaural ratio of amplitudes in the experimental and control groups, but it was not found to be clinically significant. By ToneBurst 500 Hz method, the interaural amplitude ratio higher than 35% was measured in 46.97% subjects, while the response was totally unilaterally missing in 28.8% patients. Conclusion Even the sophisticated method as cVEMP does not give the ultimate result confirming the vestibular migraine diagnosis, and neither do other diagnostic methods. cVEMP result can contribute to the completion of full mosaic of vestibular migraine diagnostics.

  9. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    It is still debated to what extent the vestibular deficits in Usher patients are due to either central vestibulocerebellar or peripheral vestibular problems. Here, we determined the origin of the vestibular symptoms in Usher 1B patients by subjecting them to compensatory eye movement tests and by

  10. Effects of aging on nitrergic system in human basal nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a gaseous molecule that plays a role in a number of physiologic processes. The available evidence suggests that NO is a major neurotransmitter involved in motor control and emotion/behavior modulation. To investigate the distribution and morphology of the nitrergic system in human basal nuclei, we studied samples from the striatum, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra and pedunculopontine nucleus of 20 human brains from subjects without neurologic/psychiatric diseases. The samples were stained for NADPH-diaphorase using histochemistry and for neuronal NO synthase using immunohistochemistry. We then analyzed the nitrergic neuronal density and its morphometric parameters. Our data demonstrated that: (I the most posterior regions of the striatum exhibit a higher neuronal density; (II the limbic cortex-associated areas of the striatum exhibit higher neuronal density than other functional subdivisions; (III approximately 90% of the neurons in the subthalamic nucleus express NO; (IV the pedunculopontine nucleus exhibits a massive nitrergic neuronal density; (V in the globus pallidus, there is a marked presence of NO neurons in the medial medullary lamina; and (VI nitrergic neurons were not detected in the substantia nigra. Aging did not change the neuronal density or the morphometric parameters of nitrergic neurons in the analyzed nuclei.

  11. A New Population of Parvocellular Oxytocin Neurons Controlling Magnocellular Neuron Activity and Inflammatory Pain Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliava, Marina; Melchior, Meggane; Knobloch-Bollmann, H Sophie; Wahis, Jérôme; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Tang, Yan; Ciobanu, Alexandru Cristian; Triana Del Rio, Rodrigo; Roth, Lena C; Althammer, Ferdinand; Chavant, Virginie; Goumon, Yannick; Gruber, Tim; Petit-Demoulière, Nathalie; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Tan, Linette L; Mitre, Mariela; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Giese, Günter; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Seeburg, Peter H; Stoop, Ron; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery

    2016-03-16

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide elaborated by the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Magnocellular OT neurons of these nuclei innervate numerous forebrain regions and release OT into the blood from the posterior pituitary. The PVN also harbors parvocellular OT cells that project to the brainstem and spinal cord, but their function has not been directly assessed. Here, we identified a subset of approximately 30 parvocellular OT neurons, with collateral projections onto magnocellular OT neurons and neurons of deep layers of the spinal cord. Evoked OT release from these OT neurons suppresses nociception and promotes analgesia in an animal model of inflammatory pain. Our findings identify a new population of OT neurons that modulates nociception in a two tier process: (1) directly by release of OT from axons onto sensory spinal cord neurons and inhibiting their activity and (2) indirectly by stimulating OT release from SON neurons into the periphery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiplexing Visual Signals in the Suprachiasmatic Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Adam R; Mouland, Joshua W; Wong, Kwoon Y; Lucas, Robert J; Forger, Daniel B

    2017-11-07

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of the mammalian circadian (daily) pacemaker, contains thousands of interconnected neurons, some of which receive direct retinal input. Here, we study the fast (<1 s) responses of SCN neurons to visual stimuli with a large-scale mathematical model tracking the ionic currents and voltage of all SCN neurons. We reconstruct the SCN network connectivity and reject 99.99% of theoretically possible SCN networks by requiring that the model reproduces experimentally determined receptive fields of SCN neurons. The model shows how the SCN neuronal network can enhance circadian entrainment by sensitizing a population of neurons in the ventral SCN to irradiance. This SCN network also increases the spatial acuity of neurons and increases the accuracy of a simulated subconscious spatial visual task. We hypothesize that much of the fast electrical activity within the SCN is related to the processing of spatial information. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Opposite long-term synaptic effects of 17β-estradiol and 5α-dihydrotestosterone and localization of their receptors in the medial vestibular nucleus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Scarduzio, Mariangela; Panichi, Roberto; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Boiti, Cristiano; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2013-08-01

    In brainstem slices of male rats, we examined in single neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) the effect of exogenous administration of estrogenic (17β-estradiol, E2) and androgenic (5α-dihydrotestosterone, DHT) steroids on the synaptic response to vestibular afferent stimulation. By whole cell patch clamp recordings we showed that E2 induced synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) that was cancelled by the subsequent administration of DHT. Conversely, DHT induced synaptic long-term depression (LTD) that was partially reversed by E2. The electrophysiological findings were supported by immunohistochemical analysis showing the presence of estrogen (ER: α and β) and androgen receptors (AR) in the MVN neurons. We found that a large number of neurons were immunoreactive for ERα, ERβ, and AR and most of them co-localized ERβ and AR. We also showed the presence of P450-aromatase (ARO) in the MVN neurons, clearly proving that E2 can be locally synthesized in the MVN. On the whole, these results demonstrate a role of estrogenic and androgenic signals in modulating vestibular synaptic plasticity and suggest that the enhancement or depression of vestibular synaptic response may depend on the local conversion of T into E2 or DHT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  15. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  16. Baryon resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenhoevel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The field of baryon resonances in nuclei is reviewed. Theoretical developments and experimental evidence as well are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on electromagnetic processes for the two nucleon system. Some aspects of real isobars in nuclei are touched upon. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclei in high forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, Z.; Berger, J.F.; Heenen, P.H.; Heyde, K.; Haas, B.; Janssens, R.; Paya, D.; Gogny, D.; Huber, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Brack, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of 1991 Joliot-Curie Summer School is to review the most advances in the understanding of the nuclei physics after the considerable progress in gamma spectroscopy. It covers the following topics: Highly and super-deformed nuclei, nuclear structures, mean-field approach and beyond, fission isomers, nuclear excitations with long lifetime and metal clusters

  18. Pair correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Except for the closed shell nuclei, almost all nuclei are in the superconducting state at their ground states. This well-known pair correlation in nuclei causes various interesting phenomena. It is especially to be noted that the pair correlation becomes weak in the excited states of nuclei with high angular momentum, which leads to the pair phase transition to the normal state in the high spin limit. On the other hand, the pair correlation becomes stronger in the nuclei with lower nucleon density than in those with normal density. In the region of neutron halo or skin state of unstable nuclei, this phenomenon is expected to be further enhanced to be observed compared to the ground state of stable nuclei. An overview of those interesting aspects caused via the pair correlation is presented here in the sections titled 'pair correlations in ground states', pair correlations in high spin states' and 'pair correlations in unstable nuclei' focusing on the high spin state. (S. Funahashi)

  19. Eta mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of producing eta-mesic nuclei by the use of pions is discussed. If these nuclei are observed experimentally, then the binding energies of the eta in this new nuclear matter can be used to extract accurately the eta-N-N* coupling constant in a nucleus. The framework for these calculations is the coupled channel isobar model

  20. Characterization of mitochondrial respiratory chain energetics in the vestibular nucleus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, John C; Khalessi, Amirala; Kapoor, Mohit; Clarkson, Andrew; Sammut, Ivan A; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2005-04-01

    Despite having very high neuronal firing rates, the VNC does not have unusually high mitochondrial activity in vitro. This study is the first in which functionally active mitochondria from the hindbrain have been isolated and characterized. Neurons in the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) have exceptionally high spontaneous firing rates. Neuronal mitochondria generate adenosine triphosphate critical for maintaining the membrane potentials required for axon firing. We therefore hypothesized a high rate of mitochondrial activity in the VNC. To test this hypothesis, we compared mitochondrial activity in the VNC with mitochondrial activity from another area of the hindbrain, the cerebellum. Mitochondrial respiratory activity was assessed by measuring oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complex activity. Assay results were not significantly different in the VNC compared to those obtained with the cerebellum or with rat brain mitochondria in previous studies.

  1. Vestibular neuritis: three-dimensional videonystagmography and vestibular evoked myogenic potential results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C W; Young, Y H; Wu, C H

    2000-10-01

    Eight patients diagnosed with vestibular neuritis received the newly developed three-dimensional videonystagmography (3D VNG) and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) examination in order to localize the lesion site. Two (25%) of the 8 patients exhibited spontaneous nystagmus with 3 components, indicating that both the horizontal semicircular canal (HSCC) and anterior semicircular canal (ASCC) were affected. The remaining 6 patients (75%) displayed only horizontal nystagmus, meaning that only the HSCC was involved. Seven (88%) of the 8 patients had bilateral normal VEMPs, revealing sparing of the posterior semicircular canal (PSCC). In a comparative study, another seven patients with vestibular neuritis 1 year post-treatment also received the caloric test, 3D VNG and VEMP examination. Only one patient exhibited spontaneous nystagmus. An absent caloric response of the lesioned side persisted in 5 (71%) of the 7 patients. However, all patients showed normal VEMPs bilaterally. 3D VNG and VEMP examination indicates that vestibular neuritis mainly affects the superior division of the vestibular nerve, which innervates the HSCC and ASCC. Meanwhile, the function of the PSCC and saccule, innervated by the inferior vestibular nerve, is preserved.

  2. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  3. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  4. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Gianpiero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. Conclusion The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  5. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritto, Simona; Botta, Laura; Zampini, Valeria; Zucca, Gianpiero; Valli, Paolo; Masetto, Sergio

    2009-06-29

    Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to) H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  6. Nucleons in nuclei, however

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, P.; Mathiot, J.F.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Frascaria, R.; Gales, S.

    1990-01-01

    The topics presented at the 1989 Joliot-Curie Lectures are reported. Two main subjects were retained: a simplified description of the N-body motion of particles in the quasi-particle configuration; study of the dynamics of nuclear components which are not described by nucleons in their ground state. The following themes were presented: quasiparticles and the Green functions, relativistic aspects of the quasiparticle concept, the dimensions of nucleons in the nuclei and the EMC effect, quarks and gluons in the nuclei, the delta in the nuclei, the strangeness, quasiparticles far from the Fermi sea, diffusion of electrons, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis [fr

  7. Dynamic polarisation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghini, M.; Abragam, A.

    1961-01-01

    In magnetic fields of about 13000 gauss, at a temperature of 1.5 deg. K, in samples of about 2 mm 3 , we have obtained by the 'solid effect' (application of a magnetic field at an appropriate frequency around 35000 MHz), nuclear polarizations /I of a few percent: 19 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in single crystals of La 2 Mg 3 (NO 3 ) 12 , 24H 2 O; 5 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in polystyrene; 6 per cent for fluorine nuclei in single crystals of LiF. (author) [fr

  8. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    The paper concerns the behaviour of quarks in nuclei. Confinement size changes and dynamical rescaling; A dependence; low-x region; gluons and confinement size; and nucleons in a nucleus; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  9. The shape of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    For the class of nuclei which are 'strongly deformed' it is possible to introduce the idea of an empirically measurable static nuclear shape. The limitations of this concept as applied to nuclei (fundamentally quantum-mechanical objects) are discussed. These are basically the limitations of the rotational model which must be introduced in order to define and measure nuclear shape. A unified discussion of the ways in which the shape has been parametrized is given with emphasis on the fact that different parametrizations correspond to different nuclear structures. Accounts of the various theoretical procedures for calculating nuclear shapes and of the interaction between nuclear shapes and nuclear spectroscopy are given. A coherent account of a large subset of nuclei (strongly deformed nuclei) can be given by means of a model in which the concept of nuclear shape plays a central role. (author)

  10. Structure of Warm Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, S.; Uhrenholt, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of nuclei in the energy region between the ground state and the neutron separation energy, here called warm nuclei. The onset of chaos in the nucleus as excitation energy is increased is briefly reviewed. Chaos implies fluctuations of energies and wave functions qualitatively the same for all chaotic nuclei. On the other hand, large structure effects are seen, e.g. in the level-density function at same excitation energies. A microscopic model for the level density is reviewed and we discuss effects on structure of the total level-density function, parity enhancement, and the spin distribution function. Comparisons to data are performed at the neutron separation energy for all observed nuclei, and structure of the level-density function for a few measured cases. The role of structure effects in the level-density function for fission dynamics is exemplified.

  11. Vestibular evaluation in children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkaila, E A; Emara, A A; Gabr, T A

    2015-04-01

    Fifty per cent of children with serous otitis media may have some balance disturbances. To evaluate vestibular function in children with otitis media with effusion. The control group comprised 25 children with bilateral normal hearing and middle-ear function. The study group consisted of 30 children with bilateral otitis media with effusion; these were divided into 2 subgroups according to air-bone gap size. Measures included the Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory, an imbalance evaluation sheet for children, vestibular bedside tests for children, and air- and bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing. Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores and some vestibular bedside test results were significantly abnormal, with normal video-nystagmography results, in children with otitis media with effusion. Air-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were recorded in 73 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion, with significantly delayed latencies. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were successfully detected in 100 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion with similar results to the control group. The Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory and vestibular bedside tests are valuable tools for detecting vestibular impairment in children. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials are useful for vestibular system evaluation.

  12. Hot nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1993-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of nuclei above 5 MeV temperature. Considerable progress has been made recently on the understanding of the formation and the fate of such hot nuclei. It appears that the nucleus seems more stable against temperature than predicted by static calculations. However, the occurrence of multifragment production at high excitation energies is now well established. The various experimental features of the fragmentation process are discussed. (author) 59 refs., 12 figs

  13. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  14. Immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins defines subregions of the vestibular nuclear complex of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Baker, James F

    2005-07-01

    The vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) is classically divided into four nuclei on the basis of cytoarchitectonics. However, anatomical data on the distribution of afferents to the VNC and the distribution of cells of origin of different efferent pathways suggest a more complex internal organization. Immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins has proven useful in many areas of the brain for revealing structure not visible with cell, fiber or Golgi stains. We have looked at the VNC of the cat using immunoreactivity for the calcium-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin. Immunoreactivity for calretinin revealed a small, intensely stained region of cell bodies and processes just beneath the fourth ventricle in the medial vestibular nucleus. A presumably homologous region has been described in rodents. The calretinin-immunoreactive cells in this region were also immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase. Evidence from other studies suggests that the calretinin region contributes to pathways involved in eye movement modulation but not generation. There were focal dense regions of fibers immunoreactive to calbindin in the medial and inferior nuclei, with an especially dense region of label at the border of the medial nucleus and the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. There is anatomical evidence that suggests that the likely source of these calbindin-immunoreactive fibers is the flocculus of the cerebellum. The distribution of calbindin-immunoreactive fibers in the lateral and superior nuclei was much more uniform. Immunoreactivity to parvalbumin was widespread in fibers distributed throughout the VNC. The results suggest that neurochemical techniques may help to reveal the internal complexity in VNC organization.

  15. Opioid precursor protein isoform is targeted to the cell nuclei in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kononenko, Olga; Bazov, Igor; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    to the cell nuclei in a model cellular system. This may be driven by bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is cryptic in the full-length PDYN molecule and becomes functional when signal peptide is truncated. Nuclear PDYN isoform was identified by western blot and radioimmunoassay in neuronal nuclei...

  16. Effects of Electrical Stimulation of the Rat Vestibular Labyrinth on c-Fos Expression in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitier, Martin; Sato, Go; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2018-04-22

    Several studies have demonstrated that electrical activation of the peripheral vestibular system can evoke field potential, multi-unit neuronal activity and acetylcholine release in the hippocampus (HPC). However, no study to date has employed the immediate early gene protein, c-Fos, to investigate the distribution of activation of cells in the HPC following electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. We found that vestibular stimulation increased the number of animals expressing c-Fos in the dorsal HPC compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.02), but not in the ventral HPC. c-Fos was also expressed in an increased number of animals in the dorsal dentate gyrus (DG) compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.0001), and to a lesser extent in the ventral DG (P ≤ 0.006). The results of this study show that activation of the vestibular system results in a differential increase in the expression of c-Fos across different regions of the HPC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. METHOD: This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. RESULTS: For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. CONCLUSION: Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  18. PROJECTIONS OF DORSAL AND MEDIAN RAPHE NUCLEI TO DORSAL AND VENTRAL STRIATUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Hassanzadeh G. Behzadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascending serotonergic projections are derived mainly from mesencephalic raphe nuclei. Topographical projections from mesencephalic raphe nuclei to the striatum were examined in the rat by the retrograde transport technique of HRP (horseradish peroxidase. In 29 rats stereotaxically injection of HRP enzyme were performed in dorsal and ventral parts of striatum separately. The extent of the injection sites and distribution of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies were drawed on representative sections using a projection microscope. Following ipsilateral injection of HRP into the dorsal striatum, numerous labeled neurons were seen in rostral portion of dorsal raphe (DR nucleus. In the same level the cluster of labeled neurons were hevier through caudal parts of DR. A few neurons were also located in lateral wing of DR. More caudally some labeled neurons were found in lateral, medial line of DR. In median raphe nucleus (MnR the labeled neurons were scattered only in median portion of this nucleus. The ipsilateral injection of HRP into the ventral region of striatum resulted on labeling of numerous neurons in rostral, caudal and lateral portions of DR. Through the caudal extension of DR on 4th ventricle level, a large number of labeled neurons were distributed along the ventrocaudal parts of DR. In MnR, labeled neurons were observed only in median part of this nucleus. These findings suggest the mesencephalic raphe nuclei projections to caudo-putamen are topographically organized. In addition dorsal and median raphe nuclei have a stronger projection to the ventral striatum.

  19. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  20. Multifragmentation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1990-10-01

    It is difficult to deposit a large amount (∼ 1 Gev) of excitation energy into a nucleus. And if one wants to deposit large excitation energy values, the best way consists of shooting a given target nucleus with several nucleons, which can be achieved by using intermediate energy (10-100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. Such very excited objects were named hot nuclei. The study of hot nuclei has been undertaken only for 7 years because intermediate energy heavy ion facilities were not available before. The game is then to determine the decay properties of such nuclei, their limits of existence. Their study is connected with general properties of nuclear matter: namely its equation of state. Of special interest, is the onset of a new decay mechanism: multifragmentation, which is the non-sequential disassembly of a hot nucleus into several light nuclei (often called intermediate-mass fragments or IMF) or particles. This paper, shows how this mechanism can reflect fundamental properties of nuclear matter, but also how its experimental signature is difficult to establish. Multifragmentation has also been studied by using very energetic projectiles (protons and heavy ions) in the relativistic or ultra-relativistic region. The multifragmentation question of hot nuclei is far from being solved. One knows that IMF production increases when the excitation energy brought into a system is strongly increased, but very little is known about the mechanisms involved and a clear onset for multifragmentation is not established

  1. Cosmology and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis has established itself as one of the three pillars of Big Bang cosmology. Many of the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis reactions involve unstable nuclei. Hence there is a tight relationship hetween the subject of this conference and cosmology. The prime role of unstable nuclei in cosmology is related to lithium synthesis and the lack of cosmological synthesis of Be and B. These nuclei will thus be focused upon. Nucleosynthesis involves comparing calculated abundances with observed abundances. In general, abundance determinations are dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors, and work on bounding systematics is crucial. The quark-hadron inspired inhomogeneous calculations now unanimously agree that only relatively small variations in Ω b are possible vis-a-vis the homogeneous model; hence the robustness of Ω b ∼0.05 is now apparent. (These calculations depend critically on unstable nuclei.) The above argues that the bulk of the baryons in the universe are not producing visible light. A comparison with the ROSAT cluster data is also shown to be consistent with the standard BBN model. Ω b ∼1 seems to be definitely excluded, so if Ω TOTAL =1, as some recent observations may hint, then non-baryonic dark matter is required. The implications of the recently reported halo microlensing events are discussed. In summary, it is argued that the physics of unstable nuclei affects the fundamental dark matter argument. ((orig.))

  2. Vestibular involvement in adults with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Barbara M; Vinck, Bart M; Hofmeyr, Louis M; Swanepoel, De Wet

    2014-04-01

    HIV/AIDS is responsible for widespread clinical manifestations involving the head, and neck. The prevalence and nature of vestibular involvement is still largely unknown. This study, aimed to describe and compare the occurrence and nature of vestibular involvement among a group of, adults infected with HIV compared to a control group. It also aimed to compare the vestibular function, of symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV positive adults who receive antiretroviral (ARV) therapies to, subjects not receiving ARV. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 53 adults (29 male, 24 female, aged 23-49 years, mean=38.5, SD=4.4) infected with HIV, compared to a control group of 38 HIV negative adults (18, male, 20 female, aged 20-49 years, mean=36.9, SD=8.2). A structured interview probed the subjective, perception of vestibular symptoms. Medical records were reviewed for CD4+ cell counts and the use of, ARV medication. An otologic assessment and a comprehensive vestibular assessment (bedside, assessments, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, ocular motor and positional tests and bithermal, caloric irrigation) were conducted. Vestibular involvement occurred in 79.2% of subjects with HIV in all categories of disease, progression, compared to 18.4% in those without HIV. Vestibular involvement increased from 18.9% in CDC category 1 to 30.2% in category 2. Vestibular involvement was 30.1% in category 3. There were, vestibular involvement in 35.9% of symptomatic HIV positive subjects, and 41.5% in asymptomatic, HIV positive subjects. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of vestibular involvement, in subjects receiving ARV therapies compared to those not receiving ARV therapies (p=.914; chi-square, test). The odds ratio indicates that individuals with HIV have a 16.61 times higher risk of developing, vestibular involvement during their lifetime of living with the disease and that it may occur despite, being asymptomatic. Vestibular involvement was significantly more

  3. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  5. Complications of microsurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Betka, J.; Zvěřina, E.; Balogová, Zuzana; Profant, Oliver; Skřivan, J.; Kraus, J.; Lisý, J.; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, May 28 (2014), s. 315952 ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA MZd NT12459 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT11543; GA MŠk(CZ) UNCE 204013; GA UK(CZ) SVV 266513; GA MŠk(CZ) Prvouk-P27/LF1/1 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : acoustic neurona surgery * tumor surgery * vestibular schwannomas Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2014

  6. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  7. Audiovestibular Function Deficits in Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von Kirschbaum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vestibular schwannomas (VS are benign tumours of the vestibular nerve and can lead to hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, facial palsy, and brainstem compression. Audiovestibular diagnostic tests are essential for detection and treatment planning. Methods. Medline was used to perform a systematic literature review with regard to how audiovestibular test parameters correlate with symptoms, tumour size, and tumour location. Results. The auditory brainstem response can be used to diagnose retrocochlear lesions caused by VS. Since hearing loss correlates poorly with tumour size, a retrocochlear lesion is probably not the only cause for hearing loss. Also cochlear mechanisms seem to play a role. This can be revealed by abnormal otoacoustic emissions, despite normal ABR and new MRI techniques which have demonstrated endolymphatic hydrops of the inner ear. Caloric and head impulse tests show frequency specific dynamics and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may help to identify the location of the tumour regarding the involved nerve parts. Conclusion. In order to preserve audiovestibular function in VS, it is important to stop the growth of the tumour and to avoid degenerative changes in the inner ear. A detailed neurotological workup helps to diagnose VS of all sizes and can also provide useful prognostic information.

  8. Critical-point nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple ΔK = 0 and ΔK = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested

  9. Asymmetric vestibular stimulation reveals persistent disruption of motion perception in unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, R; Faralli, M; Bruni, R; Kiriakarely, A; Occhigrossi, C; Ferraresi, A; Bronstein, A M; Pettorossi, V E

    2017-11-01

    Self-motion perception was studied in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions (UVL) due to acute vestibular neuritis at 1 wk and 4, 8, and 12 mo after the acute episode. We assessed vestibularly mediated self-motion perception by measuring the error in reproducing the position of a remembered visual target at the end of four cycles of asymmetric whole-body rotation. The oscillatory stimulus consists of a slow (0.09 Hz) and a fast (0.38 Hz) half cycle. A large error was present in UVL patients when the slow half cycle was delivered toward the lesion side, but minimal toward the healthy side. This asymmetry diminished over time, but it remained abnormally large at 12 mo. In contrast, vestibulo-ocular reflex responses showed a large direction-dependent error only initially, then they normalized. Normalization also occurred for conventional reflex vestibular measures (caloric tests, subjective visual vertical, and head shaking nystagmus) and for perceptual function during symmetric rotation. Vestibular-related handicap, measured with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) at 12 mo correlated with self-motion perception asymmetry but not with abnormalities in vestibulo-ocular function. We conclude that 1 ) a persistent self-motion perceptual bias is revealed by asymmetric rotation in UVLs despite vestibulo-ocular function becoming symmetric over time, 2 ) this dissociation is caused by differential perceptual-reflex adaptation to high- and low-frequency rotations when these are combined as with our asymmetric stimulus, 3 ) the findings imply differential central compensation for vestibuloperceptual and vestibulo-ocular reflex functions, and 4 ) self-motion perception disruption may mediate long-term vestibular-related handicap in UVL patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A novel vestibular stimulus, combining asymmetric slow and fast sinusoidal half cycles, revealed persistent vestibuloperceptual dysfunction in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. The compensation of

  10. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  11. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1983-01-01

    Some features of quark degrees of freedom in nuclei are discussed in the light of recent developments in QCD. The principal aim of this talk is to propose, and give a tentative support to, the motion that one can study through nuclear matter different facets of the vacuum structure implied by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This will be done using the recent (exciting) results obtained in particle physics, in particular lattice gauge calculations. Relevance of this aspect of problem to quark degrees of freedom as well as meson degrees of freedom in nuclei will be discussed. (orig.)

  12. Disintegration of comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V.

    2012-02-01

    The breaking up of comets into separate pieces, each with its own tail, was seen many times by astronomers of the past. The phenomenon was in sharp contrast to the idea of the eternal and unchangeable celestial firmament and was commonly believed to be an omen of impending disaster, especially for comets with tails stretching across half the sky. It is only now that we have efficient enough space exploration tools to see comet nuclei and even - in the particular case of small comet Hartley-2 in 2010 - to watch their disintegration stage. There are also other suspected candidates for disintegration in the vast family of comet nuclei and other Solar System bodies.

  13. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on kinematic separation and mass analysis of heavy recoiling nuclei, dynamical effects prior to heavy ion fusion, VACTIV-DELPHI graphical dialog based program for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra, irradiation of nuclear emulsions in relativistic beams of 6 He and 3 H nuclei, optical and structural investigations of PLZT x/65/35 (x = 4, 8 %) ferroelectric ceramics irradiated by a high-current pulsed electron beam, the oscillating charge and first evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay

  14. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on physics from extra dimensions, new physics in the new millennium with GENIUS: double beta decay, dark matter, solar neutrinos, the (μ - , e + ) conversion in nuclei mediated by light Majorana neutrinos, exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model, solar neutrino problem accounting for self consistent magnetohydrodynamics solution for solar magnetic fields, first neutrino observations from the Sudbury neutrino observatory and status report on BOREXINO and results of the muon-background measurements at CERN

  15. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  16. Can Electrical Vestibular Noise Be Used for the Treatment of Brain Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kwak, Shin

    2005-11-01

    The therapy currently available for the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases is far from satisfactory, and a novel therapeutic strategy, especially for pharmacologically unresponsive patients, would be welcomed. The vestibular nerves are known to influence neuronal circuits in the medullary cardiovascular areas and, through the cerebellar vermis, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. By means of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), it may now be possible to ameliorate blunted responsiveness of degenerated neuronal circuits in the brains of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, through a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. We evaluate the effect of 24-hour noisy GVS on long-term heart rate dynamics in seven MSA patients, and on daytime locomotor activity dynamics in twelve patients with either PD or levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism. Short-range heart rate variability and long-range anti-correlation of trunk activity are significantly increased by the noisy GVS compared with sham stimulation, suggestive of improved autonomic and motor responsiveness. The noisy GVS is effective in boosting the neuro-degenerative brains of MSA and/or PD patients, including those unresponsive to standard levodopa therapy.

  17. Head movements evoked in alert rhesus monkey by vestibular prosthesis stimulation: implications for postural and gaze stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E Mitchell

    Full Text Available The vestibular system detects motion of the head in space and in turn generates reflexes that are vital for our daily activities. The eye movements produced by the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR play an essential role in stabilizing the visual axis (gaze, while vestibulo-spinal reflexes ensure the maintenance of head and body posture. The neuronal pathways from the vestibular periphery to the cervical spinal cord potentially serve a dual role, since they function to stabilize the head relative to inertial space and could thus contribute to gaze (eye-in-head + head-in-space and posture stabilization. To date, however, the functional significance of vestibular-neck pathways in alert primates remains a matter of debate. Here we used a vestibular prosthesis to 1 quantify vestibularly-driven head movements in primates, and 2 assess whether these evoked head movements make a significant contribution to gaze as well as postural stabilization. We stimulated electrodes implanted in the horizontal semicircular canal of alert rhesus monkeys, and measured the head and eye movements evoked during a 100 ms time period for which the contribution of longer latency voluntary inputs to the neck would be minimal. Our results show that prosthetic stimulation evoked significant head movements with latencies consistent with known vestibulo-spinal pathways. Furthermore, while the evoked head movements were substantially smaller than the coincidently evoked eye movements, they made a significant contribution to gaze stabilization, complementing the VOR to ensure that the appropriate gaze response is achieved. We speculate that analogous compensatory head movements will be evoked when implanted prosthetic devices are transitioned to human patients.

  18. Symmetries and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclei are very useful for testing symmetries, and for studies of symmetry breaking. This thesis is illustrated for two improper space-time transformations, parity and time-reversal and for one internal symmetry: charge symmetry and independence. Recent progress and present interest is reviewed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Electroweak interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1984-06-01

    Topics include: introduction to electroweak theory; the Weinberg-Salam theory for leptons; the Weinberg-Salam theory for hadrons-the GIM mechanism; electron scattering as a probe of the electroweak interaction (observation of PV, the weak interaction for nucleons, and parity violation in atoms); and time reversed invariance and electric dipole moments of nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. 52 references

  20. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs

  1. Collisions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulamov, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that interactions of high energy particles with nuclei, owing to possible intranuclear rescatterings, may provide information about the space-time behaviour of the production process. Therefore the main goals of these investigations are related with the attempts to study the space-time process of hadronization of coloured quarks and gluons produced at the initial stage of an interaction to white final state particles and to clarify the influence of composite quark-gluon structure of both the projectile and target on features of the production mechanisms. Since in both the initial and final states of these reactions the authors have strongly interacting multiparticle systems, it is of importance to study the collective properties of these systems. The questions to the point are: what is the degree of collectivization of particles newly produced in collisions with nuclei and what is the influence of the collective nature of a nucleus itself on the production mechanisms, in particular, what are the manifestations of possible multinucleon (multiquark) configurations in nuclei? It is obvious that the reductability of, say, hadron-nucleus (hA) interaction to hadron-nucleon (hN) collisions is directly related to the above problems. Due to time limitations the author discusses here only a few aspects of low p/sub t/ hA interactions which in his opinion are of importance for better understanding of general regularities of collisions with nuclei and for further investigations of the above problems

  2. Nucleons in nuclei (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This summary is a review of our understanding of nuclei in terms of hadrons exchanging mesons. The open problems are: the determination of the high momentum components of nuclear systems, the role of the three-body forces and the nature of the short range correlations. The ways of studying these problems are discussed

  3. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs

  4. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1977-01-01

    History is surveyed of the development of the theory of rotational states in nuclei. The situation in the 40's when ideas formed of the collective states of a nucleus is evoked. The general rotation theory and the relation between the single-particle and rotational motion are briefly discussed. Future prospects of the rotation theory development are indicated. (I.W.)

  5. Mesons and light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlik, E.; Mach, R.

    1992-01-01

    62 papers and one summary talk were presented at the conference, on subject matters in between nuclear physics (mainly light nuclei) and elementary particle physics, as indicated by the session headings (1) Electroweak nuclear interaction (2) Nuclear physics with pions and antiprotons (3) Nuclear physics with strange particles (4) Relativistic nuclear physics (5) Quark degrees of freedom. (Quittner)

  6. Radii of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Plagnol, E.; Schutz, Y.

    1989-11-01

    A new simple direct method for the measurement of the total reaction cross section (σ R ) for several light radioactive nuclei (A≤40) is developed. From that, the reduced strong absorption radii (r o 2 ) are obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained by other techniques. A strong isospin dependence of the nuclear radii is observed. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Alpha clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nucleon clustering in nuclei are described, with reference to both nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and the advantages of using the cluster formalism to describe a range of phenomena are discussed. It is shown that bound and scattering alpha-particle states can be described in a unified way using an energy-dependent alpha-nucleus potential. (author)

  8. Particles, imaging and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1986-01-01

    The book on particles, imaging and nuclei is one of the Background Readers for the Revised Nuffield Advanced Physics course. The contents contain five educational articles, which extend concepts covered in the course and examine recent developments in physics. Four of the articles on:- particles and the forces of nature, radioisotopes, lasers probe the atomic nucleus, and nuclear history, are indexed separately. (UK)

  9. Internal Models, Vestibular Cognition, and Mental Imagery: Conceptual Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W; Ellis, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular cognition has recently gained attention. Despite numerous experimental and clinical demonstrations, it is not yet clear what vestibular cognition really is. For future research in vestibular cognition, adopting a computational approach will make it easier to explore the underlying mechanisms. Indeed, most modeling approaches in vestibular science include a top-down or a priori component. We review recent Bayesian optimal observer models, and discuss in detail the conceptual value of prior assumptions, likelihood and posterior estimates for research in vestibular cognition. We then consider forward models in vestibular processing, which are required in order to distinguish between sensory input that is induced by active self-motion, and sensory input that is due to passive self-motion. We suggest that forward models are used not only in the service of estimating sensory states but they can also be drawn upon in an offline mode (e.g., spatial perspective transformations), in which interaction with sensory input is not desired. A computational approach to vestibular cognition will help to discover connections across studies, and it will provide a more coherent framework for investigating vestibular cognition.

  10. Translabyrinthine surgery for disabling vertigo in vestibular schwannoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godefroy, W. P.; Hastan, D.; van der Mey, A. G. L.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the impact of translabyrinthine surgery on the quality of life in vestibular schwannoma patients with rotatory vertigo. Prospective study in 18 vestibular schwannoma patients. The study was conducted in a multispecialty tertiary care clinic. All 18 patients had a unilateral

  11. Assessment of auditory and vestibular functions in vitiligo patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Abd Elmohsin Dawoud

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The results in this study showed that 50% of vitiligo patients suffered from peripheral vestibular disorders in addition to auditory affection. Vitiligo patients require routine monitoring for auditory and vestibular functions for early identification and monitoring of changes as the disease progress.

  12. Inner ear malformations in siblings presenting with vestibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the association between inner ear abnormalities and progressive sensorineural hearing loss is well known, vestibular signs or loss of vestibular function in these ... We provide a brief overview of the latest classification of these inner ear defects as well as a review of the literature pertaining to children with inner ear ...

  13. Body ownership and embodiment: vestibular and multisensory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, C; Halje, P; Blanke, O

    2008-06-01

    Body ownership and embodiment are two fundamental mechanisms of self-consciousness. The present article reviews neurological data about paroxysmal illusions during which body ownership and embodiment are affected differentially: autoscopic phenomena (out-of-body experience, heautoscopy, autoscopic hallucination, feeling-of-a-presence) and the room tilt illusion. We suggest that autoscopic phenomena and room tilt illusion are related to different types of failures to integrate body-related information (vestibular, proprioceptive and tactile cues) in addition to a mismatch between vestibular and visual references. In these patients, altered body ownership and embodiment has been shown to occur due to pathological activity at the temporoparietal junction and other vestibular-related areas arguing for a key importance of vestibular processing. We also review the possibilities of manipulating body ownership and embodiment in healthy subjects through exposition to weightlessness as well as caloric and galvanic stimulation of the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In healthy subjects, disturbed self-processing might be related to interference of vestibular stimulation with vestibular cortex leading to disintegration of bodily information and altered body ownership and embodiment. We finally propose a differential contribution of the vestibular cortical areas to the different forms of altered body ownership and embodiment.

  14. Vestibular morphology in the German Waltzing guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Sachie; Hultcrantz, Malou; Jin, Zhe; Ulfendahl, Mats; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2010-04-01

    The German waltzing guinea pig is a special strain of animal with a recessively inherited inner ear defect, resulting in deafness and a severe vestibular dysfunction. The hearing loss in the cochlea of the German strain is a result of a collapse of the Reissner membrane and the absence of scala media. The vestibular organ has not yet been described. German waltzing guinea pigs (homozygote and heterozygote) of different ages ranging from embryologic age 25 days to adulthood were investigated. The living animals were tested with four different vestibular tests, and the fetuses were controlled according to breeding. The morphology of the vestibular parts (ampulla, saccule, and utricle) was observed by using the light and transmission electron microscopy. Collapse of the membranous labyrinth was found already at embryologic age 50 days and progressed over time. Vestibular dysfunction was noted already from birth. Vestibular atelectasis has been shown to have the same morphology as the reported vestibular dysfunction in the German waltzing guinea pig. Owing to this similarity, this animal can be a good model for vestibular research.

  15. A review of the interrelationship between vestibular dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    functions, the effect of rehabilitation focused on the functioning of a specific canal, and the effect of different rehabilitation programmes on different vestibular deficiencies are suggested. Keywords: Vestibular dysfunction; Motor development; Learning disabilities; Posture; Rehabilitation and exercises. South African Journal ...

  16. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Conrad

    Full Text Available Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1 whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2 whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF were tested for symptoms of hemineglect.Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing.Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction.A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields.

  17. Long-term hearing preservation in vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Thomsen, Jens; Tos, Mirko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term hearing during "wait and scan" management of vestibular schwannomas.......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term hearing during "wait and scan" management of vestibular schwannomas....

  18. Evidence for cognitive vestibular integration impairment in idiopathic scoliosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercier Pierre

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is characterized by a three-dimensional deviation of the vertebral column and its etiopathogenesis is unknown. Various factors cause idiopathic scoliosis, and among these a prominent role has been attributed to the vestibular system. While the deficits in sensorimotor transformations have been documented in idiopathic scoliosis patients, little attention has been devoted to their capacity to integrate vestibular information for cognitive processing for space perception. Seated idiopathic scoliosis patients and control subjects experienced rotations of different directions and amplitudes in the dark and produced saccades that would reproduce their perceived spatial characteristics of the rotations (vestibular condition. We also controlled for possible alteration of the oculomotor and vestibular systems by measuring the subject's accuracy in producing saccades towards memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and the gain of their vestibulo-ocular reflex. Results Compared to healthy controls, the idiopathic scoliosis patients underestimated the amplitude of their rotations. Moreover, the results revealed that idiopathic scoliosis patients produced accurate saccades to memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and that their vestibulo-ocular reflex gain did not differ from that of control participants. Conclusion Overall, results of the present study demonstrate that idiopathic scoliosis patients have an alteration in cognitive integration of vestibular signals. It is possible that severe spine deformity developed partly due to impaired vestibular information travelling from the cerebellum to the vestibular cortical network or alteration in the cortical mechanisms processing the vestibular signals.

  19. The decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs

  20. Isotope shifts in unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebel, H.

    1980-05-01

    Current experimental investigations of isotope shifts in atomic spectra of unstable nuclei and the resulting information about size and shape of nuclei far off stability are discussed with reference to some representative examples. (orig.)

  1. The frog vestibular system as a model for lesion-induced plasticity: basic neural principles and implications for posture control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois M Lambert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the CNS to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the central nervous system include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims towards a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of

  2. Vestibular characterization in the menstrual cycle Caracterização vestibular no ciclo menstrual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Ishii

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal disorders in the menstrual cycle can affect labyrinthine fluid homeostasis, causing balance and hearing dysfunctions. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. AIM: compare the results from vestibular tests in young women, in the premenstrual and postmenstrual periods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: twenty women were selected with ages ranging from 18 to 35 years, who were not using any kind of contraceptive method for at least six months, and without vestibular or hearing complaints. The test was carried out in each subject before and after the menstrual period, respecting the limit of ten days before or after menstruation. RESULTS: there was a statistically significant difference in the menstrual cycle phases only in the following vestibular tests: calibration, saccadic movements, PRPD and caloric-induced nystagmus. We also noticed that age; a regular menstrual cycle; hearing loss or dizziness cases in the family; and premenstrual symptoms such as tinnitus, headache, sleep disorders, anxiety, nausea and hyperacusis can interfere in the vestibular test. CONCLUSION: there are differences in the vestibular tests of healthy women when comparing their pre and postmenstrual periods.As alterações hormonais do ciclo menstrual podem comprometer a homeostase dos fluidos labirínticos, gerando alterações no equilíbrio e na audição. FORMA DO ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo. OBJETIVO: Comparar os resultados dos testes do exame vestibular em mulheres jovens, nos períodos pré e pós-menstrual. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram selecionadas vinte mulheres, entre dezoito e trinta e cinco anos, que não fizessem uso de qualquer tipo de anticoncepcional, com audição normal e sem queixas vestibulares. O exame vestibular foi realizado em cada participante no período pré e no período pós-menstrual, em ordem aleatória, e respeitando o limite de até dez dias antes do início da menstruação e até dez dias após o início da menstruação. RESULTADO: Foi observada

  3. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  4. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  5. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  6. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  7. Task-dependent vestibular feedback responses in reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Johannes; Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc P J

    2017-07-01

    When reaching for an earth-fixed object during self-rotation, the motor system should appropriately integrate vestibular signals and sensory predictions to compensate for the intervening motion and its induced inertial forces. While it is well established that this integration occurs rapidly, it is unknown whether vestibular feedback is specifically processed dependent on the behavioral goal. Here, we studied whether vestibular signals evoke fixed responses with the aim to preserve the hand trajectory in space or are processed more flexibly, correcting trajectories only in task-relevant spatial dimensions. We used galvanic vestibular stimulation to perturb reaching movements toward a narrow or a wide target. Results show that the same vestibular stimulation led to smaller trajectory corrections to the wide than the narrow target. We interpret this reduced compensation as a task-dependent modulation of vestibular feedback responses, tuned to minimally intervene with the task-irrelevant dimension of the reach. These task-dependent vestibular feedback corrections are in accordance with a central prediction of optimal feedback control theory and mirror the sophistication seen in feedback responses to mechanical and visual perturbations of the upper limb. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Correcting limb movements for external perturbations is a hallmark of flexible sensorimotor behavior. While visual and mechanical perturbations are corrected in a task-dependent manner, it is unclear whether a vestibular perturbation, naturally arising when the body moves, is selectively processed in reach control. We show, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, that reach corrections to vestibular perturbations are task dependent, consistent with a prediction of optimal feedback control theory. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Electric Current Transmission Through Tissues of the Vestibular Labyrinth of a Patient: Perfection of the Vestibular Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, V. P.; Shchetinin, P. P.; Melnichuk, S. V.; Kingma, H.; Van de Berg, R.; Pleshkov, M. O.; Starkov, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    An electric model of current transmission through tissues of the vestibular labyrinth of a patient is suggested. To stimulate directly the vestibular nerve in surgical operation, terminations of the electrodes are implanted through the bone tissue of the labyrinth into the perilymph in the vicinity of the vestibular nerve. The biological tissue of the vestibular labyrinth surrounding the electrodes and having heterogeneous composition possesses conductive and dielectric properties. Thus, when a current pulse from the vestibular implant is applied to one of the electrodes, conductive disturbance currents may arise between the electrodes and the vestibular nerves that can significantly deteriorate the direct signal quality. To study such signals and to compensate for the conductive disturbance currents, an equivalent electric circuit with actual electric impedance properties of tissues of the vestibular system is suggested, and the time parameters of the conductive disturbance current transmission are calculated. It is demonstrated that these parameters can reach large values. The suggested electric model and the results of calculations can be used for perfection of the vestibular implant.

  9. EL SINDROME VESTIBULAR EN EL ADULTO MAYOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Hamlet Suárez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available El vértigo, la inestabilidad y las caídas tienen una incidencia relevante en el adulto mayor, disminuye su calidad de vida y puede ser causa de muerte en esta población. Este artículo describe las presentaciones clínicas y el abordaje de la evaluación de la patología vestibular en este grupo de edad, utilizando diferentes instrumentos para el diagnóstico así como también las reglas generales del tratamiento.

  10. Disintegration of comet nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V

    2012-01-01

    The breaking up of comets into separate pieces, each with its own tail, was seen many times by astronomers of the past. The phenomenon was in sharp contrast to the idea of the eternal and unchangeable celestial firmament and was commonly believed to be an omen of impending disaster, especially for comets with tails stretching across half the sky. It is only now that we have efficient enough space exploration tools to see comet nuclei and even - in the particular case of small comet Hartley-2 in 2010 - to watch their disintegration stage. There are also other suspected candidates for disintegration in the vast family of comet nuclei and other Solar System bodies. (physics of our days)

  11. Pions scatter by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huefner, J.

    1975-01-01

    Are pions a good tool to study nuclei. If the emphasis of this question rests on ''tool'', the answer must be ''not yet.'' The reason: one does not even understand how a pion interacts with a nucleus. This is part of the many-body problem for strongly interacting particles and its study is a basic problem in physics. One must investigate questions like: Can one understand pion-nucleus interactions from pion-nucleon physics. How does a Δ-resonance look in nuclei. Once one has solved those basic problems, there will be spinoffs in medical, technical and nuclear areas. Then pions can be used as a tool to study nuclear properties

  12. Chaos in collective nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    Random Matrix Theory successfully describes the statistics of the low-lying spectra of some nuclei but not of others. It is currently believed that this theory applies to systems in which the corresponding classical motion is chaotic. This conjecture is tested for collective nuclei by studying the Interacting Boson Model. Quantum and classical measures of chaos are proposed and found to be in agreement throughout the parameter space of the model. For some parameter values the measures indicate the presence of a previously unknown approximate symmetry. A phenomenon called partial dynamical symmetry is explored and shown to lead to a suppression of chaos. A time dependent function calculated from the quantum spectrum is discussed. This function is sensitive to the extent of chaos and provides a robust method of analyzing experimental spectra

  13. Chaotic behavior in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, G.; Shriner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) were available by the early 1960s, data of sufficiently high quality to adequately test the theory were only obtained a decade later by Rainwater. It was another decade later that Bohigas, Haq and Pandey combined the best available nuclear resonance data - the Columbia neutron resonances in heavy nuclei and the TUNL proton resonances in lighter nuclei - to form the Nuclear Data Ensemble. They obtained excellent agreement for the level statistics with the RMT predictions. The expected Porter-Thomas (PT) distribution was considered very early. However, since the widths (amplitudes squared) are measured, the predicted Gaussian distribution for the amplitudes was only qualitatively confirmed. A much more sensitive test was performed by measuring two widths and the relative phase between the two amplitudes. By comparison of the width and amplitude correlations, the Gaussian distribution was confirmed at the 1% level. Following the Bohigas conjecture - that quantum analogs of classically chaotic systems obey RMT - there was an explosion of activity utilizing level statistics in many different quantum systems. In nuclei the focus was verifying the range of applicability of RMT. Of particular interest was the effect of collectivity and of excitation energy on statistical properties. The effect of symmetry breaking on level statistics was examined and early predictions by Dyson were confirmed. The effect of symmetry breaking on the width distribution was also measured for the first time. Although heuristic arguments predicted no change from the PT distribution, experimentally there was a large deviation from the PT prediction. Later theoretical efforts were consistent with this result. The stringent conditions placed on the experiments - for eigenvalue tests the data need to be essentially perfect (few or no missing levels or mis assigned quantum numbers) - has limited the amount of suitable experimental data. The

  14. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  15. Structures of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Discoveries of many different types of nuclear shape coexistence are being found at both low and high excitation energies throughout the periodic table, as documented in recent reviews. Many new types of shape coexistence have been observed at low excitation energies, for examples bands on more than four different overlapping and coexisting shapes are observed in 185 Au, and competing triaxial and prolate shapes in 71 Se and 176 Pt. Discrete states in super-deformed bands with deformations β 2 ∼ 0.4-0.6, coexisting with other shapes, have been seen to high spin up to 60ℎ in 152 Dy, 132 Ce and 135 Nd. Super-deformed nuclei with N and Z both around 38 and around Z = 38, N ≥ 60. These data led to the discovery of new shell gaps and magic numbers of 38 for N and Z and 60 for N but now for deformed shapes. Marked differences in structure are observed at spins of 6 to 20 in nuclei in this region, which differ by only two protons; for example, 68 Ge and 70 Se. The differences are thought to be related to the competing shell gaps in these nuclei

  16. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, R.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Nagar, N. M.; Bianchi, S.; Böker, T.; Colbert, E.; Krabbe, A.; Marconi, A.; Matt, G.; Salvati, M.

    2003-10-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically `elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive active galactic nuclei (AGN) in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 1024 cm-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical narrow-line region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30-keV bump of the X-ray background.

  17. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement.

  18. Effectiveness of vestibular exercise in acute vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, N.D.; Abdullah, A.; Ami, M.; Rahman, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of vestibular exercises in acute vertigo. 45 patients with acute vertigo were divided into 2 groups; 23 in study group (SG) and 22 in control group (CG). All patients were given tablet betahistine 24 mg twice daily as basic medical treatment and tablet Stemetil 5mg as a rescue. Those in SG also received vestibular exercise. Assessment was done using validated questionnaires, neuro-otology tests and individual diaries. Results : Intragroup comparison of intensity of symptoms showed a significant improvement from baseline, 3-month and 6-month visit with p<0.001. While intergroup comparison showed reduction of scores in both groups and which was greater in SG at 6 months visit. An improvement of neuro-otology tests was seen in all five tests whereby the Romber test, Unterberger-Fukuda test and spontaneous nystagmus test showed earlier improvement in SG at 3-month visit than CG. The SG also recovered faster and used lesser medication. 30.4% patients in SG were asymptomatic as early as first to third week after intervention. The number of rescue medications required in each group lessened towards the end of study. By week 7, 56.3% of SG and 43.8% of CG needed no rescue medication. (author)

  19. Treatment of peripheral vestibular dysfunction using photobiomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Young; Hyun, Jai-Hwan; Suh, Myung-Whan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae Yun; Rhee, Chung Ku

    2017-08-01

    Gentamicin, which is still used in modern medicine, is a known vestibular toxic agent, and various degrees of balance problems have been observed after exposure to this pharmacologic agent. Photobiomodulation is a candidate therapy for vertigo due to its ability to reach deep inner ear organs such as the cochlea. Previous reports have suggested that photobiomodulation can improve hearing and cochlea function. However, few studies have examined the effect of photobiomodulation on balance dysfunction. We used a rat model to mimic human vestibulopathy resulting from gentamicin treatment and evaluated the effect of photobiomodulation on vestibular toxicity. Slow harmonic acceleration (SHA) rotating platform testing was used for functional evaluation and both qualitative and quantitative epifluorescence analyses of cupula histopathology were performed. Animals were divided into gentamicin only and gentamicin plus laser treatment groups. Laser treatment was applied to one ear, and function and histopathology were evaluated in both ears. Decreased function was observed in both ears after gentamicin treatment, demonstrated by low gain and no SHA asymmetry. Laser treatment minimized the damage resulting from gentamicin treatment as shown by SHA asymmetry and recovered gain in the treated ear. Histology results reflected the functional results, showing increased hair cell density and epifluorescence intensity in laser-treated cupulae.

  20. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E Héroux

    Full Text Available To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8 stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance.

  1. Impedance pattern of vaginal and vestibular mucosa in cyclic goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Křivánek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes of vaginal and vestibular impedance during the oestrous cycle in goats were examined. The onset of oestrus was teased with a buck once a day during the experiment. Impedance was mea­sured by a four-terminal method. The vaginal impedance was recorded under slight pressure of electrodes to the vaginal dorsal wall at the cervix. The vestibular impedance was recorded under slight pressure of electrodes to the vestibular dorsal wall 5 cm from the vulva and at the vulva. The im­pe­dan­ce was measured once a day from 4 days before the expected oestrus to 6 days after onset of oestrus. The vaginal impedance at the cervix decreased during pro-oestrus (P < 0.01 and increased du­ring oestrus (P < 0.01. The vestibular impedance 5 cm from the vulva decreased during pro-oestrus (P < 0.01 and increased after oestrus (P < 0.01. The decrease of vaginal impedance during peri-oestrus was nearly twofold in comparison with the vestibular impedance 5 cm from the vulva. No sig­ni­fi­cant decrease of the vestibular impedance at the vulva was found during the oestrous cycle. The results indicate that the vaginal impedance at the cervix and vestibular impedance 5 cm from the vulva measured by means of a four-terminal method during the oestrous cycle display cyclic changes that are closely related to the oestrous behaviour of goats.

  2. Vestibular and balance issues following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Hale, Troy D

    2015-01-01

    To review relevant literature regarding the effect of concussion on vestibular function, impairments, assessments and management strategies. REASONING: Dizziness and balance impairments are common following sport-related concussion. Recommendations regarding the management of sport-related concussion suggest including tests of balance within the multifactorial assessment paradigm for concussive injuries. The literature was searched for guidelines and original studies related to vestibular impairments following concussion, oculomotor and balance assessments and treatment or rehabilitation of vestibular impairments. The databases searched included Medline, CINAHL, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews through October 2013. Dizziness following concussion occurs in ∼67-77% of cases and has been implicated as a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Balance impairments also occur after concussion and last 3-10 days post-injury. Assessments of balance can be done using both clinical and instrumented measures with success. Vestibular rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with vestibular impairments, with one study demonstrating success in decreasing symptoms and increasing function following concussion. Best practices suggest that the assessment of vestibular function through cranial nerve, oculomotor and balance assessments are an important aspect of concussion management. Future studies should evaluate the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation for improving patient outcomes.

  3. Clinical evaluation of elderly people with chronic vestibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Juliana Maria; Ganança, Fernando Freitas; Aratani, Mayra Cristina; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi

    2006-01-01

    Dizziness is common among the elderly. To characterize social, demographic, clinical, functional and otoneurological data in elderly patients with chronic vestibular disorder. A sequential study of 120 patients with chronic vestibular disorder. Simple descriptive analyses were undertaken. Most of the patients were female (68.3%) with a mean age of 73.40+/-5.77 years. The average number of illnesses associated with the vestibular disorder was 3.83+/-1.84; the patients were taking on average 3.86+/-2.27 different medications. The most prevalent diagnosis on the vestibular exam was unilateral vestibular loss (29.8%) and the most prevalent etiology was metabolic vestibulopathy (40.0%) followed by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (36.7%). Fifty-two patients (43.3%) had experienced dizziness for 5 years or more. Sixty-four patients (53.3%) had at least one fall in the last year and thirty-five (29.2%) had recurrent falls. Most of the sample included females with associated diseases, and using many different drugs. The most prevalent vestibular diseases were metabolic and vascular labyrinth conditions. Dizziness is a chronic symptom in elderly patients. The association of two vestibular diseases is common. Falls are prevalent in chronic dizzy elderly patients.

  4. [Vestibular testing abnormalities in individuals with motion sickness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Ou, Yongkang; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Yiqing

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the vestibular function of motion sickness. VNG, which tests the vestibular function of horizontal semicircular canal, and CPT, which tests vestibulospinal reflex and judge proprioceptive, visual and vestibular status, were performed in 30 motion sickness patients and 20 healthy volunteers (control group). Graybiel score was recorded at the same time. Two groups' Graybiel score (12.67 +/- 11.78 vs 2.10 +/- 6.23; rank test P<0.05), caloric test labyrinth value [(19.02 +/- 8.59) degrees/s vs (13.58 +/- 5.25) degrees/s; t test P<0.05], caloric test labyrinth value of three patients in motion sickness group exceeded 75 degrees/s. In computerized posturography testing (CPT), motion sickness patients were central type (66.7%) and disperse type (23.3%); all of control group were central type. There was statistical significance in two groups' CTP area, and motion sickness group was obviously higher than control group. While stimulating vestibulum in CPT, there was abnormality (35%-50%) in motion sickness group and none in control group. Generally evaluating CPT, there was only 2 proprioceptive hypofunction, 3 visual hypofunction, and no vestibular hypofunction, but none hypofunction in control group. Motion sickness patients have high vestibular susceptible, some with vestibular hyperfunction. In posturography, a large number of motion sickness patients are central type but no vestibular hypofunction, but it is hard to keep balance when stimulating vestibulum.

  5. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  6. Hypothesis: The Vestibular and Cerebellar Basis of the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Cohen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mal de Debarquement syndrome (MdDS generally follows sea voyages, but it can occur after turbulent flights or spontaneously. The primary features are objective or perceived continuous rocking, swaying, and/or bobbing at 0.2 Hz after sea voyages or 0.3 Hz after flights. The oscillations can continue for months or years and are immensely disturbing. Associated symptoms appear to be secondary to the incessant sensation of movement. We previously suggested that the illness can be attributed to maladaptation of the velocity storage integrator in the vestibular system, but the actual neural mechanisms driving the MdDS are unknown. Here, based on experiments in subhuman primates, we propose a series of postulates through which the MdDS is generated: (1 The MdDS is produced in the velocity storage integrator by activation of vestibular-only (VO neurons on either side of the brainstem that are oscillating back and forth at 0.2 or 0.3 Hz. (2 The groups of VO neurons are driven by signals that originate in Purkinje cells in the cerebellar nodulus. (3 Prolonged exposure to roll, either on the sea or in the air, conditions the roll-related neurons in the nodulus. (4 The prolonged exposure causes a shift of the pitch orientation vector from its original position aligned with gravity to a position tilted in roll. (5 Successful treatment involves exposure to a full-field optokinetic stimulus rotating around the spatial vertical countering the direction of the vestibular imbalance. This is done while rolling the head at the frequency of the perceived rocking, swaying, or bobbing. We also note experiments that could be used to verify these postulates, as well as considering potential flaws in the logic. Important unanswered questions: (1 Why does the MdDS predominantly affect women? (2 What aspect of roll causes the prolongation of the tilted orientation vector, and why is it so prolonged in some individuals? (3 What produces the increase in symptoms of

  7. Nuclei transmutation by collisions with fast hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Drzymala, A.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic nuclei change their mass- and charge-numbers if bombarded by fast hadrons and nuclei; the transmutation appears as a complicated process. It proceeds in a definite way - through a few stages or phases. Adequate identification of the nucleons and light nuclear fragments emitted and evaporated in a hadron-nucleus or nucleus-nucleus collisions and in the collision-induced intranuclear reactions allows one to estimate quantitatively the nuclei transmutations in the various stages (phases) of the process

  8. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  9. Anomalous carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from a bubble chamber experiment to search for anomalous mean free path (MFP) phenomena for secondary multicharged fragments (Zsub(f)=5 and 6) of the beam carbon nucleus at 4.2 GeV/c per nucleon. A total of 50000 primary interactions of carbon with propane (C 3 H 8 ) were created. Approximately 6000 beam tragments with charges Zsub(f)=5 and 6 were analyzed in detail to find out an anomalous decrease of MFP. The anomaly is observed only for secondary 12 C nuclei

  10. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on the interaction of high energy Λ 6 He hypernuclear beams with atomic nuclei, the position-sensitive detector of a high spatial resolution on the basis of a multiwire gas electron multiplier, pseudorapidity hadron density at the LHC energy, high precision laser control of the ATLAS tile-calorimeter module mass production at JINR, a new approach to ECG's features recognition involving neural network, subcriticity of a uranium target enriched in 235 U, beam space charge effects in high-current cyclotron injector CI-5, a homogeneous static gravitational field and the principle of equivalence

  11. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This AGN textbook includes phenomena based on new results in the X-Ray domain from new telescopes such as Chandra and XMM Newton not mentioned in any other book. Furthermore, it considers also the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope with its revolutionary advances of unprecedented sensitivity, field of view and all-sky monitoring. Those and other new developments as well as simulations of AGN merging events and formations, enabled through latest super-computing capabilities. The book gives an overview on the current knowledge of the Active Galacitc Nuclei phenomenon. The spectral energy d

  12. Elementary excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmer, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The role of elementary quasi-particle and quasi-hole excitations is reviewed in connection with the analysis of data involving high-lying nuclear states. This article includes discussions on: (i) single quasi-hole excitations in pick-up reactions, (ii) the formation of single quasi-hole and quasi-particle excitations (in different nuclei) during transfer reactions, followed by (iii) quasi-particle quasi-hole excitations in the same nucleus that are produced by photon absorption. Finally, the question of photon absorption in the vicinity of the elementary Δ resonance is discussed, where nucleonic as well as nuclear degrees of freedom can be excited

  13. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains six separate records on the DELPHI experiment at LEP, the Fermi-surface dynamics of rotating nuclei, production of large samples of the silica dioxide aerogel in the 37-litre autoclave and test of its optical properties, preliminary radiation resource results on scintillating fibers, a new algorithm for the direct transformation method of time to digital with the high time resolution and development and design of analogue read-out electronics for HADES drift chamber system

  14. Cumulation of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Bondarev, V.K.; Golovanov, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    Limit fragmentation of light nuclei (deuterium, helium) bombarded with 8,6 GeV/c protons was investigated. Fragments (pions, protons and deuterons) were detected within the emission angle 50-150 deg with regard to primary protons and within the pulse range 150-180 MeV/c. By the kinematics of collision of a primary proton with a target at rest the fragments observed correspond to a target mass upto 3 GeV. Thus, the data obtained correspond to teh cumulation upto the third order

  15. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  16. Improved results for vestibular schwannoma radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, J C; Kondziolka, D; Pollock, B; Lunsford, L D

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Treatment techniques in radiosurgery have changed since 1987. We reviewed patients who received radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma to identify these changes and to investigate any differences in tumor control and complications. MATERIALS and METHODS: One hundred thirty-eight unilateral vestibular schwannoma patients with a minimum follow-up of two years after treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery between 1987 and 1992 were analyzed. The early treatment group consisted of 55 patients treated between 1987-1989 (median: tumor volume 3.63 cc, Dmin 18.1 Gy, Dmax 35.4 Gy, isocenters 2.3, follow-up 50.4 mos.). The later treatment group consisted of 83 patients treated between 1990-1992 (median: tumor volume 3.81 cc, Dmin 16.0 Gy, Dmax 31.6 Gy, isocenters 4.7, follow-up 35.8 mos.) RESULTS: Clinical tumor recurrence requiring surgical intervention occurred in one patient in each group. The overall actuarial clinical tumor control rate was 98%. Slight increases in tumor size (1 to 2 mm) were identified in five other patients not requiring intervention, because of no further tumor growth (n=4) or shrinkage (n=1). This led to an overall radiologic tumor control rate of 92% (not significantly different in either group). Compared to the early treatment group, the incidence of facial neuropathy (temporary or permanent) decreased in the later group (49% vs. 11%, p < 0.0001), as did trigeminal neuropathy (40% vs. 8%, p < 0.0001). Serviceable hearing preservation improved only slightly in the later group (27% vs. 40%, p = 0.70). CONCLUSION: We document a significant decrease in the morbidity of vestibular schwannoma radiosurgery over this time period with no decrease in the high rate of tumor control. This improvement is attributed to a) better conformal dose-planning with stereotactic MRI rather than CT, b) an increase in the number of isocenters used, and c) a reduction in the average dose administered by 2 Gy.

  17. Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, Griffith R.; Thornton, Allan F.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Rabinov, James D.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The proton beam's Bragg peak permits highly conformal radiation of skull base tumors. This study, prompted by reports of transient (30% each) and permanent (10% each) facial and trigeminal neuropathy after stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas with marginal doses of 16-20 Gy, assessed whether proton beam radiosurgery using a marginal dose of only 12 Gy could control vestibular schwannomas while causing less neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients (mean age 67 years) were treated between 1992 and 1998. The mean tumor volume was 2.49 cm 3 . The dose to the tumor margin (70% isodose line) was 12 Gy. The prospectively specified follow-up consisted of neurologic evaluation and MRI at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Results: After a mean clinical follow-up of 44 months and imaging follow-up of 34 months in 64 patients, 35 tumors (54.7%) were smaller and 25 (39.1%) were unchanged (tumor control rate 94%; actuarial control rate 94% at 2 years and 84% at 5 years). Three tumors enlarged: one shrank after repeated radiosurgery, one remained enlarged at the time of unrelated death, and one had not been imaged for 4 years in a patient who remained asymptomatic at last follow-up. Intratumoral hemorrhage into one stable tumor required craniotomy that proved successful. Thus, 97% of tumors required no additional treatment. Three patients (4.7%) underwent shunting for hydrocephalus evident as increased ataxia. Of 6 patients with functional hearing ipsilaterally, 1 improved, 1 was unchanged, and 4 progressively lost hearing. Cranial neuropathies were infrequent: persistent facial hypesthesia (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%); intermittent facial paresthesias (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%); persistent facial weakness (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%) requiring oculoplasty; transient partial facial weakness (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%), and synkinesis (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%). Conclusion: Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas at the

  18. Ongoing cell death and immune influences on regeneration in the vestibular sensory organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchol, M. E.; Matsui, J. I.; Simkus, E. L.; Ogilive, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Hair cells in the vestibular organs of birds have a relatively short life span. Mature hair cells appear to die spontaneously and are then quickly replaced by new hair cells that arise from the division of epithelial supporting cells. A similar regenerative mechanism also results in hair cell replacement after ototoxic damage. The cellular basis of hair cell turnover in the avian ear is not understood. We are investigating the signaling pathways that lead to hair cell death and the relationship between ongoing cell death and cell production. In addition, work from our lab and others has demonstrated that the avian inner ear contains a resident population of macrophages and that enhanced numbers of macrophages are recruited to sites of hair cells lesions. Those observations suggest that macrophages and their secretory products (cytokines) may be involved in hair cell regeneration. Consistent with that suggestion, we have found that treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone reduces regenerative cell proliferation in the avian ear, and that certain macrophage-secreted cytokines can influence the proliferation of vestibular supporting cells and the survival of statoacoustic neurons. Those results suggest a role for the immune system in the process of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  19. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  20. Isolation of Nuclei and Nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendle, Alison F; Shaw, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe methods for producing nuclei from Arabidopsis suspension cultures or root tips of Arabidopsis, wheat, or pea. These methods could be adapted for other species and cell types. The resulting nuclei can be further purified for use in biochemical or proteomic studies, or can be used for microscopy. We also describe how the nuclei can be used to obtain a preparation of nucleoli.

  1. Balancing awareness: Vestibular signals modulate visual consciousness in the absence of awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Roy; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The processing of visual and vestibular information is crucial for perceiving self-motion. Visual cues, such as optic flow, have been shown to induce and alter vestibular percepts, yet the role of vestibular information in shaping visual awareness remains unclear. Here we investigated if vestibular signals influence the access to awareness of invisible visual signals. Using natural vestibular stimulation (passive yaw rotations) on a vestibular self-motion platform, and optic flow masked through continuous flash suppression (CFS) we tested if congruent visual-vestibular information would break interocular suppression more rapidly than incongruent information. We found that when the unseen optic flow was congruent with the vestibular signals perceptual suppression as quantified with the CFS paradigm was broken more rapidly than when it was incongruent. We argue that vestibular signals impact the formation of visual awareness through enhanced access to awareness for congruent multisensory stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Presbyastasis and application of vestibular rehabilitation in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa de Araujo, P; Demanez, L; Lechien, J; Bauvir, P; Petermans, J

    2011-03-01

    Balance disorders can have a major functional impact among the elderly. The main risk is falling. Three elements are implicated in the loss of balance: vision, proprioception and the vestibular system. This article will discuss mainly vestibular damage and its implications. The assessment of balance disorders, particularly in geriatric patients, is based on validated scales composed of several items. These provide scores and are based on the results of chronometric measurements. They can be useful for the application of Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR), a technique improving the adaptation and autonomy of these patients. Vestibular rehabilitation is therefore part of an overall support, the goal of therapy being to improve daily life and to reduce the risk of falls.

  3. Inner ear malformations in siblings presenting with vestibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any child presenting with vestibular symptoms should be referred for an audiological assessment. I R T Butler, MMed ... rhythmically to music. The patient was ... was enrolled in an intensive speech therapy programme at age 2 years 7 months.

  4. Distinct spontaneous shrinkage of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    on "shrinkage" or "negative growth" or "regression" or "involution" of the tumor were selected, and the contents on the rate, extent and mechanism of spontaneous tumor shrinkage were extracted and reviewed. The reported rate of spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma is 5-10% of patients managed......We present a case with outspoken spontaneous vestibular schwannoma shrinkage and review the related literature. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left-sided, intrameatal vestibular schwannoma, which subsequently grew into the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA), followed by total shrinkage...... of the CPA component without any intervention over a 12-year observation period. The literature on spontaneous tumor shrinkage was retrieved by searching the subject terms "vestibular schwannoma, conservative management" in PubMed/MEDLINE database, without a time limit. Of the published data, the articles...

  5. Theory of magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosov, V.G.; Kamchatnov, A.M.

    A consistent theory of the shell and magic oscillations of the masses of spherical nuclei is developed on the basis of the Fermi liquid concept of the energy spectrum of nuclear matter. A ''magic'' relationship between the system's dimensions and the limiting momentum of the quasi-particle distribution is derived; an integer number of the de Broglie half-waves falls on the nuclear diameter. An expression for the discontinuity in the nucleon binding energy in the vicinity of a magic nucleus is obtained. The role of the residual interaction is analyzed. It is shown that the width of the Fermi-surface diffuseness due to the residual interaction is proportional to the squared vector of the quasi-particle orbital angular momentum. The values of the corresponding proportionality factors (the coupling constant for quasi particles) are determined from the experimental data for 52 magic nuclei. The rapid drop of the residual interaction with increasing nuclear size is demonstrated. (7 figures, 3 tables) (U.S.)

  6. Stability of superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The potential-energy surfaces of an extended set of heavy and superheavy even-even nuclei with 92 ≤Z ≤126 and isospins 40 ≤N -Z ≤74 are evaluated within the recently developed Fourier shape parametrization. Ground-state and decay properties are studied for 324 different even-even isotopes in a four-dimensional deformation space, defined by nonaxiality, quadrupole, octupole, and hexadecapole degrees of freedom. Nuclear deformation energies are evaluated in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the Lublin-Strasbourg drop model and a Yukawa-folded mean-field potential. The evolution of the ground-state equilibrium shape (and possible isomeric, metastable states) is studied as a function of Z and N . α -decay Q values and half-lives, as well as fission-barrier heights, are deduced. In order to understand the transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission along the Fm isotopic chain, the properties of all identified fission paths are investigated. Good agreement is found with experimental data wherever available. New interesting features about the population of different fission modes for nuclei beyond Fm are predicted.

  7. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for 4 consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and one-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy.

  8. Vestibular syndrome in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Fabricio Singaretti de; Gubulin Carvalho, Paula Fernanda; Bueno de Camargo, Mauro Henrique; Delfini, Aline; Martins, Leandro [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    A síndrome vestibular é uma afecção bem descrita em animais domésticos e pouco relatada em selvagens. Este relato descreveu essa afecção de origem central em uma fêmea adulta de tamanduá-bandeira (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), caquética, apresentando deambulação em círculos, hipermetria extensora nos membros torácicos, desvio da cabeça e nistagmo espontâneo horizontal e posicional vertical. O animal foi alimentado por sonda oral, 2x/dia e instituiu-se tratamento com dexametasona subcutânea na dos...

  9. Outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas, with special focus on the facial nerve function. The study design is a case series from a national centralized database and it is set in two University Hospitals in Denmark....... Participants were 1244 patients who underwent translabyrinthine surgery during a period of 33 years from 1976 to 2009. Main outcome measures were tumor removal, intraoperative facial nerve preservation, complications, and postoperative facial nerve function. In 84% patients, the tumor was totally resected...... and in ~85% the nerve was intact during surgery. During 33 years, 12 patients died from complications to surgery and ~14% had cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Before surgery, 74 patients had facial paresis and 46% of these improved after surgery. In patients with normal facial function, overall ~70% had a good...

  10. Cluster structures in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, H.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Clustering in neutron-rich nuclei is discussed. To understand the novel features (1,2,3) of the clustering in neutron-rich nuclei, the basic features of the clustering in stable nuclei (4) are briefly reviewed. In neutron-rich nuclei, the requirement of the stability of clusters is questioned and the threshold rule is no more obeyed. Examples of clustering in Be and B isotopes (4,5) are discussed in some detail. Possible existence of novel type of clustering near neutron dripline is suggested (1). (author)

  11. Vestibular feedback maintains reaching accuracy during body movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Reaching movements can be perturbed by vestibular input, but the function of this response is unclear.Here, we applied galvanic vestibular stimulation concurrently with real body movement while subjects maintained arm position either fixed in space or fixed with respect to their body.During the fixed‐in‐space conditions, galvanic vestibular stimulation caused large changes in arm trajectory consistent with a compensatory response to maintain upper‐limb accuracy in the face of body movement.Galvanic vestibular stimulation responses were absent during the body‐fixed task, demonstrating task dependency in vestibular control of the upper limb.The results suggest that the function of vestibular‐evoked arm movements is to maintain the accuracy of the upper limb during unpredictable body movement, but only when reaching in an earth‐fixed reference frame. Abstract When using our arms to interact with the world, unintended body motion can introduce movement error. A mechanism that could detect and compensate for such motion would be beneficial. Observations of arm movements evoked by vestibular stimulation provide some support for this mechanism. However, the physiological function underlying these artificially evoked movements is unclear from previous research. For such a mechanism to be functional, it should operate only when the arm is being controlled in an earth‐fixed rather than a body‐fixed reference frame. In the latter case, compensation would be unnecessary and even deleterious. To test this hypothesis, subjects were gently rotated in a chair while being asked to maintain their outstretched arm pointing towards either earth‐fixed or body‐fixed memorized targets. Galvanic vestibular stimulation was applied concurrently during rotation to isolate the influence of vestibular input, uncontaminated by inertial factors. During the earth‐fixed task, galvanic vestibular stimulation produced large polarity‐dependent corrections in arm

  12. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Smith, Ricardo Luiz; Isotani, Sadao; Alonso, Luis Garcia; Anadao, Carlos Augusto; Prates, Jose Carlos; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm 2 of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm 2 , 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant

  13. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  14. Vestibular Function in Adults With Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Tohamy, Amal M; Oseilly, Amira M

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate vestibular function in adults with chronic epilepsy of unknown etiology in the inter-ictal period. Epilepsy is a chronic medical disorder. Life-long therapy may be required in one-third of patients. Epilepsy is associated with comorbid somatic conditions which impairs patients' quality of life. This cross-sectional study included 28 with generalized tonic clonic (GTC) convulsions and 14 and 3 with temporal (TLE) and frontal lobe (FLE) epilepsies with secondary generalization (all were on regular carbamazepine therapy) and 40 healthy control subjects. The patients' mean age was 34.97 ± 7.35 years and the duration of illness was 18.75 ± 7.99 years. All underwent videonystagmography (VNG). Compared with controls, patients had frequent vestibular symptoms including dizziness (62.22%) (p = 0.0001) and sense of imbalance (44.44%) (p = 0.0001). Eleven patients (24.44%) had central vestibular dysfunction (p = 0.0001); 9 (20%) had mixed vestibular dysfunction and one (2.22%) had peripheral vestibular dysfunction (p = 0.0001). Abnormalities were observed in saccadic (44.4%) and pursuit (42.2%) eye movements, optokinetic nystagmus (42.2%) and positioning/positional (11.11%) and caloric (13.33%) testing. TLE and FLE were associated with more VNG abnormalities than GTC. No significant differences were observed in the demographic and clinical characteristics between patients with and without VNG abnormalities. Vestibular manifestations are frequent in patients with epilepsy. This may be a result of the permanent damaging effect of chronic epilepsy on the vestibular cortical areas and/or a toxic effect from prolonged carbamazepine therapy on the peripheral and central vestibular systems.

  15. Quality of life in patients after vestibular Schwannoma surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hajná, Barbora

    2011-01-01

    TVestibular schwannoma is a benign tumor that arises from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, facial and trigeminal dysfunction and vertigo are the most common symptoms. Surgical removal of the tumor is one of the treatment modalities of this disease. Surgical excision usually involves the complete vestibular nerve resection and there is also a risk of cochlear and facial nerve lesion. This thesis deals with changes in quality of life in patients afte...

  16. Successive neuron loss in the thalamus and cortex in a mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Catherine; Maddox, Lucy; Bible, Ellen; Pontikis, Charlie C; Macauley, Shannon L; Griffey, Megan A; Wong, Michael; Sands, Mark S; Cooper, Jonathan D

    2007-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). We have investigated the onset and progression of pathological changes in Ppt1 deficient mice (Ppt1-/-) and the development of their seizure phenotype. Surprisingly, cortical atrophy and neuron loss occurred only late in disease progression but were preceded by localized astrocytosis within individual thalamic nuclei and the progressive loss of thalamic neurons that relay different sensory modalities to the cortex. This thalamic neuron loss occurred first within the visual system and only subsequently in auditory and somatosensory relay nuclei or the inhibitory reticular thalamic nucleus. The loss of granule neurons and GABAergic interneurons followed in each corresponding cortical region, before the onset of seizure activity. These findings provide novel evidence for successive neuron loss within the thalamus and cortex in Ppt1-/- mice, revealing the thalamus as an important early focus of INCL pathogenesis.

  17. Level structures in Yb nuclei far from stable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Akira

    1982-01-01

    Applying n-γ, γ-γ coincidence techniques, the excited levels in 158 Yb and in 157 Yb nuclei were studied. Stress is placed ona neutron detection technique to assign (HI,xn) reactions which produce the nuclei far from β stability line. (author)

  18. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  19. Hindbrain Catecholamine Neurons Activate Orexin Neurons During Systemic Glucoprivation in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Elsarelli, Megan M; Brown, R Lane; Ritter, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Hindbrain catecholamine neurons are required for elicitation of feeding responses to glucose deficit, but the forebrain circuitry required for these responses is incompletely understood. Here we examined interactions of catecholamine and orexin neurons in eliciting glucoprivic feeding. Orexin neurons, located in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH), are heavily innervated by hindbrain catecholamine neurons, stimulate food intake, and increase arousal and behavioral activation. Orexin neurons may therefore contribute importantly to appetitive responses, such as food seeking, during glucoprivation. Retrograde tracing results showed that nearly all innervation of the PeFLH from the hindbrain originated from catecholamine neurons and some raphe nuclei. Results also suggested that many catecholamine neurons project collaterally to the PeFLH and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Systemic administration of the antiglycolytic agent, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, increased food intake and c-Fos expression in orexin neurons. Both responses were eliminated by a lesion of catecholamine neurons innervating orexin neurons using the retrogradely transported immunotoxin, anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin, which is specifically internalized by dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing catecholamine neurons. Using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs in transgenic rats expressing Cre recombinase under the control of tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, catecholamine neurons in cell groups A1 and C1 of the ventrolateral medulla were activated selectively by peripheral injection of clozapine-N-oxide. Clozapine-N-oxide injection increased food intake and c-Fos expression in PeFLH orexin neurons as well as in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus neurons. In summary, catecholamine neurons are required for the activation of orexin neurons during glucoprivation. Activation of orexin neurons may contribute to appetitive responses required for glucoprivic feeding.

  20. Electron scattering off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattone, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    Two recently developed aspects related to the scattering of electrons off nuclei are presented. On the one hand, a model is introduced which emphasizes the relativistic aspects of the problem in the impulse approximation, by demanding strict maintenance of the algebra of the Poincare group. On the other hand, the second model aims at a more sophisticated description of the nuclear response in the case of collective excitations. Basically, it utilizes the RPA formalism with a new development which enables a more careful treatment of the states in the continuum as is the case for the giant resonances. Applications of both models to the description of elastic scattering, inelastic scattering to discrete levels, giant resonances and the quasi-elastic region are discussed. (Author) [es

  1. Antideuteron annihilation on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cugnon, J.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of antideuteron annihilation on nuclei within an intranuclear cascade (INC) model is presented. Two models are set up to describe the annihilation itself, which either implies the antideuteron as a whole and occurs at a single point, or which may be considered as two independent nucleon-antinucleon annihilation occurring at different points and different times. Particular attention is paid to the energy transferred from the pions issued from the annihilation to the nuclear system and to the possibility of having a multifragmentation of the target. The latter feature is investigated within a percolation model. The pion distribution and the energy distribution are also discussed. Predictions of proton multiplicity distributions are compared with experiment. (orig.)

  2. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains ten separate records on Wien filter using in exploring on low-energy radioactive nuclei, memory effects in dissipative nucleus-nucleus collision, topological charge and topological susceptibility in connection with translation and gauge invariance, solutions of the multitime Dirac equation, the maximum entropy technique. System's statistical description, the charged conductor inside dielectric. Solution of boundary condition by means of auxiliary charges and the method of linear algebraic equations, optical constants of the TGS single crystal irradiated by power pulsed electron beam, interatomic pair potential and n-e amplitude from slow neutron scattering by noble gases, the two-coordinate multiwire proportional chamber of the high spatial resolution and neutron drip line in the region of O-Mg isotopes

  3. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on the integral representation for structure functions and target mass effects, multiscale properties of DNA primary structure including cross-scale correlations, dissipative evolution of the elementary act, the fine structure of the M T =1 Gamow-Teller resonance in 147g Tb→ 147 Gd β + /EC decay, the behaviour of the TVO temperature sensors in the magnetic fields, a fast method for searching for tracks in multilayer drift chambers of HADES spectrometer, a novel approach to particle track etching including surfactant enhanced control of pore morphology, azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in 32 S induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei at 4.5 GeV/ c/ nucleon

  4. Pulsars: gigantic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Renxin

    2011-01-01

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the gigantic nucleus speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction. (author)

  5. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  6. Pion production in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afnan, I.R.; Thomas, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been suggested for relating μ-capture in nuclei to pion absorption through partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis. The success of the method relies heavily on the knowledge of the pion absorption amplitude at a momentum transfer equal to the μ-meson mass. That is we need to know the pion absorption amplitude off the mass-shell. The simplest nucleus for which this suggestion can be examined is μ-capture in deuterium. The Koltum-Reitan model is used to determine the pion absorption amplitude off the mass shell. In particular the senstivity of this off-mass-shell extrapolution to details of the N-N interaction is studied. (author)

  7. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors)

  8. IBA in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for 168 Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong β → γ transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the β → γ transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ΔK=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics

  9. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Nuclei in the actinide chain and beyond are prone to fission owing to ... mass nuclei are typically more difficult, because the intensity is .... j15/2 neutron alignments in a region where shell stablization effects are crucial.

  11. Problem of ''deformed'' superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobiczewski, A.; Patyk, Z.; Muntian, I.

    2000-08-01

    Problem of experimental confirmation of deformed shapes of superheavy nuclei situated in the neighbourhood of 270 Hs is discussed. Measurement of the energy E 2+ of the lowest 2+ state in even-even species of these nuclei is considered as a method for this confirmation. The energy is calculated in the cranking approximation for heavy and superheavy nuclei. The branching ratio p 2+ /p 0+ between α decay of a nucleus to this lowest 2+ state and to the ground state 0+ of its daughter is also calculated for these nuclei. The results indicate that a measurement of the energy E 2+ for some superheavy nuclei by electron or α spectroscopy is a promising method for the confirmation of their deformed shapes. (orig.)

  12. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Roy J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  13. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F; Jandl, Nico M; Helmchen, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC), visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs). Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain) was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly, proprioceptive

  14. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sprenger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC, visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs. Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly

  15. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F.; Jandl, Nico M.; Helmchen, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC), visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs). Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain) was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly, proprioceptive

  16. Combined ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential in individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and in patients with Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tatiana Rocha; de Resende, Luciana Macedo; Santos, Marco Aurélio Rocha

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential is a potential of mean latency that measures the muscle response to auditory stimulation. This potential can be generated from the contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and also from the contraction of extraocular muscles in response to high-intensity sounds. This study presents a combined or simultaneous technique of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential in individuals with changes in the vestibular system, for use in otoneurologic diagnosis. To characterize the records and analyze the results of combined cervical and ocular VEMP in individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and in those with Ménière's disease. The study included 120 subjects: 30 subjects with vestibular hyporeflexia, 30 with Ménière's disease, and 60 individuals with normal hearing. Data collection was performed by simultaneously recording the cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. There were differences between the study groups (individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and individuals with Ménière's disease) and the control group for most of wave parameters in combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. For cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential, it was observed that the prolongation of latency of the P13 and N23 waves was the most frequent finding in the group with vestibular hyporeflexia and in the group with Ménière's disease. For ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential, prolonged latency of N10 and P15 waves was the most frequent finding in the study groups. Combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential presented relevant results for individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and for those with Ménière's disease. There were differences between the study groups and the control group for most of the wave parameters in combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia

  17. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  18. MR imaging features and clinical value of vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic sac in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zheming; Lou Xin; Lan Lan; Wang Hui; Wang Qiuju; Wu Nanzhou; Zhang Xiaojing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate MR imaging features of endolymphatic sac and vestibular aqueduct in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) and its correlation with hearing loss. Methods: MR imaging findings of LVAS were analyzed in 31 cases (62 ears) retrospectively. MR imaging features were grouped into 4 types. In the first type, the signals of endolymphatic and vestibular aqueduct were hypointense without any hyperintense area. In the second type, the signals of endolymphatic sac and vestibular were hyperintense which were confined within vestibular fissure. In the third type, the area from vestibular aqueduct backward out of the edge of the petrous bone was hyperintense, but its lower boundary was above posterior semicircular. In the fourth type the area which was hyperintense was below the posterior semicircular. To avoid errors in visual inspection, the hyperintense and hypointense area of endolymphatic and the signal intensity of vestibular aqueduct and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured. The differences of signal intensity among the vestibular endolymphatic sac between the high-signal areas and low signal areas were compared with paired t-test. The correlation of the endolymphatic sac MRI classification and degree of hearing loss was analyzed by corrected Chi-square test and Spearman correlation analysis. Result: Ten ears belonged to type Ⅰ (moderate hearing loss in 1 ear,severe in 4 ears,profound in 5 ears), 17 ears belonged to type Ⅱ (moderate hearing loss in 1 ear; severe in 5 ears,profound in 11 ears), 23 ears to type Ⅲ (moderate hearing loss in 3 ear, severe in 5 ears, profound in 15 ears) and 12 ears belonged to Ⅳ (mild hearing loss in 1 ear, moderate in 1 ear, severe 3 ear, profound in 7 ears). The boundary between hyperintense and hypointense area was clear, and the signal intensity ratios was 2.02 ± 0.06. The signal ratios of hyperintense and hypointense area to vestibular and CSF were 0.95 ±0.12, 0.49 ±0.10, 0.99 ± 0

  19. A single-neuron tracing study of arkypallidal and prototypic neurons in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakano, Takashi; Matsuda, Wakoto; Furuta, Takahiro; Udagawa, Jun; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    The external globus pallidus (GP) is known as a relay nucleus of the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. Recent studies in dopamine-depleted and healthy rats indicate that the GP comprises two main types of pallidofugal neurons: the so-called "prototypic" and "arkypallidal" neurons. However, the reconstruction of complete arkypallidal neurons in healthy rats has not been reported. Here we visualized the entire axonal arborization of four single arkypallidal neurons and six single prototypic neurons in rat brain using labeling with a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein and examined the distribution of axon boutons in the target nuclei. Results revealed that not only the arkypallidal neurons but nearly all of the prototypic neurons projected to the striatum with numerous axon varicosities. Thus, the striatum is a major target nucleus for pallidal neurons. Arkypallidal and prototypic GP neurons located in the calbindin-positive and calbindin-negative regions mainly projected to the corresponding positive and negative regions in the striatum. Because the GP and striatum calbindin staining patterns reflect the topographic organization of the striatopallidal projection, the striatal neurons in the sensorimotor and associative regions constitute the reciprocal connection with the GP neurons in the corresponding regions.

  20. K-bar-mesic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dote, Akinobu; Akaishi, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2005-01-01

    New nuclei 'K-bar-Mesic Nuclei' having the strangeness are described. At first it is shown that the strongly attractive nature of K-bar N interaction is reasoned inductively from consideration of the relation between Kaonic hydrogen atom and Λ (1405) which is an excited state of hyperon Λ. The K-bar N interactions are reviewed and summarized into three categories: 1. Phenomenological approach with density dependent K-bar N interaction (DD), relativistic mean field (RMF) approach, and hybrid of them (RMF+DD). 2. Boson exchange model. 3. Chiral SU(3) theory. The investigation of some light K-bar-nuclei by Akaishi and Yamazaki using phenomenological K-bar N interaction is explained in detail. Studies by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) approach are also presented. From these theoretical researches, the following feature of K-bar-mesic nuclei are revealed: 1) Ground state is discrete and bound by 100 MeV or more. 2) Density is very high in side the K-bar-mesic nuclei. 3) Strange structures develop which are not seen in ordinary nuclei. Finally some recent experiments to explore K-bar-mesic nuclei are reviewed. (S. Funahashi)

  1. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abbas Ebrahimi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB. They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP. For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France. Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS, vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05. The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  2. Deconvolution of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Basel, Türker

    2012-02-07

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and the associated variance modulation can be understood by a convolution model. Two functions of time are incorporated into the model: the motor unit action potential (MUAP) of an average motor unit, and the temporal modulation of the MUAP rate of all contributing motor units, briefly called rate modulation. The latter is the function of interest, whereas the MUAP acts as a filter that distorts the information contained in the measured data. Here, it is shown how to recover the rate modulation by undoing the filtering using a deconvolution approach. The key aspects of our deconvolution algorithm are as follows: (1) the rate modulation is described in terms of just a few parameters; (2) the MUAP is calculated by Wiener deconvolution of the VEMP with the rate modulation; (3) the model parameters are optimized using a figure-of-merit function where the most important term quantifies the difference between measured and model-predicted variance modulation. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with simulated data. An analysis of real data confirms the view that there are basically two components, which roughly correspond to the waves p13-n23 and n34-p44 of the VEMP. The rate modulation corresponding to the first, inhibitory component is much stronger than that corresponding to the second, excitatory component. But the latter is more extended so that the two modulations have almost the same equivalent rectangular duration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  4. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs

  5. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs.

  6. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, T.

    2013-01-01

    An electron scattering facility is under construction in RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan, which is dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. This is the world's first and currently only facility of its type. The construction is nearly completed, and the first electron scattering experiment off short-lived nuclei will be carried out in the beginning of next year. The charge density distributions of short-lived nuclei will be precisely determined by elastic electron scattering for the first time. Physics pursued at this facility including future perspectives are explained

  7. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    , and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...

  8. Trigeminal, Visceral and Vestibular Inputs May Improve Cognitive Functions by Acting through the Locus Coeruleus and the Ascending Reticular Activating System: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sensory signals sustain the background discharge of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS which includes the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC neurons and controls the level of attention and alertness. Moreover, LC neurons influence brain metabolic activity, gene expression and brain inflammatory processes. As a consequence of the sensory control of ARAS/LC, stimulation of a sensory channel may potential influence neuronal activity and trophic state all over the brain, supporting cognitive functions and exerting a neuroprotective action. On the other hand, an imbalance of the same input on the two sides may lead to an asymmetric hemispheric excitability, leading to an impairment in cognitive functions. Among the inputs that may drive LC neurons and ARAS, those arising from the trigeminal region, from visceral organs and, possibly, from the vestibular system seem to be particularly relevant in regulating their activity. The trigeminal, visceral and vestibular control of ARAS/LC activity may explain why these input signals: (1 affect sensorimotor and cognitive functions which are not directly related to their specific informational content; and (2 are effective in relieving the symptoms of some brain pathologies, thus prompting peripheral activation of these input systems as a complementary approach for the treatment of cognitive impairments and neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Gluon density in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  10. Supersymmetry in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jolie, J

    2002-01-01

    All the elementary particles that make up matter (as do quarks, electrons, neutrinos....) are fermions, the particles that convey the fundamental interactions (as do photons, gluons, W, Z...) are bosons. Composite particles are either bosons, or fermions according to the number of fermions they contain: if this number is even the particle is a boson, otherwise it is a fermion. According to this rule a proton is a fermion and the He sup 4 atom is a boson. Symmetry plays an important role in the standard model, a symmetry is a transformation that connect bosons with other bosons or fermions with other fermions. Supersymmetry associates a boson with a fermion or a fermion with a boson, in fact supersymmetry connects nuclei that are not generally considered as akin. Supersymmetry has just been observed in low energy levels of Gold sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 sup - sup 1 sup 9 sup 6 and Platinum sup 1 sup 9 sup 4 - sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 , it means that the description of these energy levels is simplified and can be made by a co...

  11. Supersymmetry in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolie, J.

    2002-01-01

    All the elementary particles that make up matter (as do quarks, electrons, neutrinos....) are fermions, the particles that convey the fundamental interactions (as do photons, gluons, W, Z...) are bosons. Composite particles are either bosons, or fermions according to the number of fermions they contain: if this number is even the particle is a boson, otherwise it is a fermion. According to this rule a proton is a fermion and the He 4 atom is a boson. Symmetry plays an important role in the standard model, a symmetry is a transformation that connect bosons with other bosons or fermions with other fermions. Supersymmetry associates a boson with a fermion or a fermion with a boson, in fact supersymmetry connects nuclei that are not generally considered as akin. Supersymmetry has just been observed in low energy levels of Gold 195-196 and Platinum 194 - 195 , it means that the description of these energy levels is simplified and can be made by a common set of quantum numbers. (A.C.)

  12. Photon interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a progress report for DOE Grant No. FG05-89ER40501, A000. The grant began March, 1989. Our primary research effort has been expended at the LEGS project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report will summarize our present research effort at LEGS as well as data analysis and publications from previous experiments performed at SLAC. In addition the principal investigators are heavily involved in the CLAS collaboration in Hall B at CEBAF. We have submitted several letters of intent and proposals and have made commitments to construct experimental equipment for CEBAF. We expect our primary experimental effort to continue at LEGS until CEBAF becomes operational. This report will be divided into separate sections describing our progress at LEGS, SLAC, and CEBAF. We will also discuss our significant efforts in the education and training of both undergraduate and graduate students. Photon detectors are described as well as experiments on delta deformation in nuclei of quasielastic scattering and excitation of the delta by 4 He(e,e')

  13. Parity violation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of parity violating effects in nuclei is given. Thanks to vigorous experimental and theoretical effort, it now appears that a reasonably well-defined value for the weak isovector π-nucleon coupling constant can be obtained. There is one major uncertainty in the analysis, namely the M2/E1 mixing ratio for the 2.79 MeV transition in 21 Ne. This quantity is virtually impossible to calculate reliably and must be measured. If it turns out to be much larger than 1, then a null result in 21 Ne is expected no matter what the weak interaction, so an experimental determination is urgently needed. The most promising approach is perhaps a measurement of the pair internal conversion coefficient. Of course, a direct measurement of a pure isovector case is highly desirable, and it is to be hoped that the four ΔT = 1 experiments will be pushed still further, and that improved calculations will be made for the 6 Li case. Nuclear parity violation seems to be rapidly approaching an interesting and useful synthesis

  14. Fragmentation of relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cork, B.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclei with energies of several GeV/n interact with hadrons and produce fragments that encompass the fields of nuclear physics, meson physics, and particle physics. Experimental results are now available to explore problems in nuclear physics such as the validity of the shell model to explain the momentum distribution of fragments, the contribution of giant dipole resonances to fragment production cross sections, the effective Coulomb barrier, and nuclear temperatures. A new approach to meson physics is possible by exploring the nucleon charge-exchange process. Particle physics problems are explored by measuring the energy and target dependence of isotope production cross sections, thus determining if limiting fragmentation and target factorization are valid, and measuring total cross sections to determine if the factorization relation, sigma/sub AB/ 2 = sigma/sub AA/ . sigma/sub BB/, is violated. Also, new experiments have been done to measure the angular distribution of fragments that could be explained as nuclear shock waves, and to explore for ultradense matter produced by very heavy ions incident on heavy atoms. (12 figures, 2 tables)

  15. Symmetries in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, A.

    2003-01-01

    (1) There are symmetries in nature, and the concept of symmetry has been used in art and architecture. The symmetry is evaluated high in the European culture. In China, the symmetry is broken in the paintings but it is valued in the architecture. In Japan, however, the symmetry has been broken everywhere. The serious and interesting question is why these differences happens? (2) In this lecture, I reviewed from the very beginning the importance of the rotational symmetry in quantum mechanics. I am sorry to be too fundamental for specialists of nuclear physics. But for people who do not use these theories, I think that you could understand the mathematical aspects of quantum mechanics and the relation between the angular momentum and the rotational symmetry. (3) To the specialists of nuclear physics, I talked about my idea as follows: dynamical treatment of collective motions in nuclei by IBM, especially the meaning of the degeneracy observed in the rotation bands top of γ vibration and β vibration, and the origin of pseudo-spin symmetry. Namely, if there is a symmetry, a degeneracy occurs. Conversely, if there is a degeneracy, there must be a symmetry. I discussed some details of the observed evidence and this correspondence is my strong belief in physics. (author)

  16. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author)

  17. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  18. Quantification of vestibular-induced eye movements in zebrafish larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Weike

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular reflexes coordinate movements or sensory input with changes in body or head position. Vestibular-evoked responses that involve the extraocular muscles include the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, a compensatory eye movement to stabilize retinal images. Although an angular VOR attributable to semicircular canal stimulation was reported to be absent in free-swimming zebrafish larvae, recent studies reveal that vestibular-induced eye movements can be evoked in zebrafish larvae by both static tilts and dynamic rotations that tilt the head with respect to gravity. Results We have determined herein the basis of sensitivity of the larval eye movements with respect to vestibular stimulus, developmental stage, and sensory receptors of the inner ear. For our experiments, video recordings of larvae rotated sinusoidally at 0.25 Hz were analyzed to quantitate eye movements under infrared illumination. We observed a robust response that appeared as early as 72 hours post fertilization (hpf, which increased in amplitude over time. Unlike rotation about an earth horizontal axis, rotation about an earth vertical axis at 0.25 Hz did not evoke eye movements. Moreover, vestibular-induced responses were absent in mutant cdh23 larvae and larvae lacking anterior otoliths. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a functional vestibulo-oculomotor circuit in 72 hpf zebrafish larvae that relies upon sensory input from anterior/utricular otolith organs.

  19. Vestibular dysfunction in Turner syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Michael; Agrawal, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    Turner syndrome is a well-known cause of sensorineural hearing loss, and the lack of estrogen has been implicated in cochlear dysfunction. It has never been associated with vestibular dysfunction. We report a case of a patient with Turner syndrome who was found to have bilateral vestibular dysfunction based on video-oculography (VOG) testing. A single patient with a history of Turner syndrome who was found to have significant bilateral vestibular dysfunction. After noticing a deficit in the vestibulo-ocular reflexes on qualitative horizontal head impulse examination, the patient underwent VOG testing. VOG testing quantatively measures angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) gain in the horizontal semicircular canal plane. AVOR gain represents the eye movement response to a head movement; in normal individuals the eye movement is fully compensatory and gain values are close to unity. VOG results showed AVOR gains of 0.29 and 0.36 on the right and left sides, respectively. We have presented a case of a woman with Turner syndrome with asymptomatic vestibular dysfunction demonstrated with VOG testing. Although there is a documented relationship between Turner syndrome and sensorineural hearing loss, there are no previous studies or case reports linking Turner syndrome and vestibular dysfunction. Additional research and added vigilance in monitoring Turner syndrome patients may be warranted.

  20. Impaired math achievement in patients with acute vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ivan; Vibert, Dominique; Caversaccio, Marco D; Mast, Fred W

    2017-12-01

    Broad cognitive difficulties have been reported in patients with peripheral vestibular deficit, especially in the domain of spatial cognition. Processing and manipulating numbers relies on the ability to use the inherent spatial features of numbers. It is thus conceivable that patients with acute peripheral vestibular deficit show impaired numerical cognition. Using the number Stroop task and a short math achievement test, we tested 20 patients with acute vestibular neuritis and 20 healthy, age-matched controls. On the one hand, patients showed normal congruency and distance effects in the number Stroop task, which is indicative of normal number magnitude processing. On the other hand, patients scored lower than healthy controls in the math achievement test. We provide evidence that the lower performance cannot be explained by either differences in prior math knowledge (i.e., education) or slower processing speed. Our results suggest that peripheral vestibular deficit negatively affects numerical cognition in terms of the efficient manipulation of numbers. We discuss the role of executive functions in math performance and argue that previously reported executive deficits in patients with peripheral vestibular deficit provide a plausible explanation for the lower math achievement scores. In light of the handicapping effects of impaired numerical cognition in daily living, it is crucial to further investigate the mechanisms that cause mathematical deficits in acute PVD and eventually develop adequate means for cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of cochlear implantation on peripheral vestibular receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Eike; Louza, Julia P R; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Gürkov, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to assess the influence of a cochlear implantation on peripheral vestibular receptor function in the inner ear in the implant and in the nonimplant side, and 2) to analyze a possible correlation with resulting vertigo symptoms. Prospective clinical study. Cochlear implant center at tertiary referral hospital. A total of 32 patients, aged 15 to 83 years, undergoing cochlear implantation were assessed pre- and postoperatively for caloric horizontal semicircular canal response and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials of the sacculus, and postoperatively for subjective vertigo symptoms. Patients with vertigo were compared with patients without symptoms with regard to the findings of the vestibular function tests. Cochlear implantation represents a significant risk factor for horizontal semicircular canal impairment (P 0.05). Cochlear implantation is a relevant risk factor for damage of peripheral vestibular receptor function. Therefore, preservation not only of residual hearing function but also of vestibular function should be aimed for, by using minimally invasive surgical techniques. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurochemistry of olivocochlear neurons in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss, Stefan; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Antoniou-Lipfert, Patricia; Gholi, Maryam Najaf; Riemann, Elke; Riemann, Randolf

    2009-04-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the superior olivary complex (SOC) of the lower brain stem in the pigmented Djungarian hamster Phodopus sungorus. Using Nissl-stained serial cryostat sections from fresh-frozen brains, we determined the borders of the SOC nuclei. We also identified olivocochlear (OC) neurons by retrograde neuronal tracing upon injection of Fluoro-Gold into the scala tympani. To evaluate the SOC as a putative source of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin (OT), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) that were all found in the cochlea, we conducted immunohistochemistry on sections exhibiting retrogradely labeled neurons. We did not observe AVP-, OT-, or VIP-immunoreactivity, neither in OC neurons nor in the SOC at all, revealing that cochlear AVP, OT, and VIP are of nonolivary origin. However, we found nNOS, the enzyme responsible for nitric oxide synthesis in neurons, and PACAP in neuronal perikarya of the SOC. Retrogradely labeled neurons of the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) system in the lateral superior olive did not contain PACAP and were only infrequently nNOS-immunoreactive. In contrast, some shell neurons and some of the medial OC (MOC) system exhibited immunofluorescence for either substance. Our data obtained from the dwarf hamster Phodopus sungorus confirm previous observations that a part of the LOC system is nitrergic. They further demonstrate that the medial olivocochlear system is partly nitrergic and use PACAP as neurotransmitter or modulator.

  3. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  4. Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Leen; De Kegel, Alexandra; Van Waelvelde, Hilde; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-12-01

    The clinical balance performance of normal-hearing (NH) children was compared with the balance performance of hearing-impaired (HI) children with and without vestibular dysfunction to identify an association between vestibular function and motor performance. Prospective study. Tertiary referral center. Thirty-six children (mean age, 7 yr 5 mo; range, 3 yr 8 mo-12 yr 11 mo) divided into three groups: NH children with normal vestibular responses, HI children with normal vestibular responses, and HI children with abnormal vestibular function. A vestibular test protocol (rotatory and collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing) in combination with three clinical balance tests (balance beam walking, one-leg hopping, one-leg stance). Clinical balance performance. HI children with abnormal vestibular test results obtained the lowest quotients of motor performance, which were significantly lower compared with the NH group (p beam walking and one-leg stance; p = 0.003 for one-leg hopping). The balance performance of the HI group with normal vestibular responses was better in comparison with the vestibular impaired group but still significantly lower compared with the NH group (p = 0.020 for balance beam walking; p = 0.001 for one-leg stance; not significant for one-leg hopping). These results indicate an association between vestibular function and motor performance in HI children, with a more distinct motor deterioration if a vestibular impairment is superimposed to the auditory dysfunction.

  5. Morphology and electrophysiology of the vestibular organ in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, Markus Lee Yang Murti

    2003-01-01

    To obtain more information about the anatomy and function of the vestibular organ in normal and pathological conditions, evaluation methods are needed. For experimental purposes, the vestibular organ of the guinea pig is often used as a model for the human vestibular organ. The purpose of the

  6. Evaluation of diagnostic tests of the otolith organs and their application in various vestibular pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current vestibular testing is limited. The general function of the vestibular system on both sides of the head can be tested, and one part of the peripheral vestibular organ, the horizontal semicircular canal, can be tested unilaterally. However, recently a test for the function of the otolith

  7. Intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus in Lewy body diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Daniel; Halliday, Glenda M

    2009-02-16

    Although the intralaminar thalamus is a target of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, the degree of neuronal loss in Lewy body diseases has not been assessed. We have used unbiased stereological techniques to quantify neuronal loss in intralaminar thalamic nuclei concentrating alpha-synuclein pathology (the anterodorsal, cucullar, parataenial, paraventricular, central medial, central lateral and centre-median/parafascicular complex) in different clinical forms of Lewy body disease (Parkinson's disease with and without dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, N=21) compared with controls (N=5). Associations were performed in the Lewy body cases between intralaminar cell loss and the main diagnostic clinical (parkinsonism, dementia, fluctuation in consciousness, and visual hallucinations) and pathological (Braak stage of Parkinson's disease) features of these diseases, as well as between cell loss and the scaled severity of the alpha-synuclein deposition within the intralaminar thalamus. As expected, significant alpha-synuclein accumulation occurred in the intralaminar thalamus in the cases with Lewy body disease. Pathology concentrated anteriorly and in the central lateral and paraventricular nuclei was related to the Braak stage of Parkinson's disease, ageing, and the presence of dementia. Across all types of Lewy body cases there was substantial atrophy and neuronal loss in the central lateral, cucullar and parataenial nuclei, and neuronal loss without atrophy in the centre-median/parafascicular complex. Cases with visual hallucinations showed a greater degree of atrophy of the cucullar nucleus, possibly due to amygdala denervation. The significant degeneration demonstrated in the intralaminar thalamus is likely to contribute to the movement and cognitive dysfunction observed in Lewy body disorders.

  8. Dynamic polarization of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yu.F.; Lyuboshits, V.L.; )

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive nuclei, embedded into a frozen polarized proton target, atr proposed to polarize by means of some dynamic polarization methods. Angular distributions of γ-quanta emitted ny 22 Na(3 + ) in the cascade β-γ-radiation are calculated. It is shown that this distribution does not depend on the spin temperature sing at the Boltzmann distribution of populations among the Zeeman magnetic substates, whereas the tensor polarization of quadrupole nuclei, placed in the electric field of the crystal, causes the considerable sing dependence. The new method promises wide opportunities for the magnetic structure investigations as well as for the study of spin-spin interaction dynamics of rare nuclei in dielectrics. Physical-technical advantages and disadvantages of the given method are discussed for the polarization of heavy nuclei in the on-line implantation mode [ru

  9. The delta in nuclei. Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy-Stephan, M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental aspects of the Δ excitation will be presented. The Δ excitation in nuclei will be compared to the free Δ excitation. Various probes will be reviewed and their specific features will be underlined [fr

  10. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Research Center for Electron-Photon Science, Tohoku University, 1-2-1 ... nuclei precisely determined by elastic scattering [1]. .... In order to fulfill these requirements, a window-frame shaped dipole magnet with a gap.

  11. Collisions between complex atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaagen, J. S.

    1977-08-01

    The use of heavy ion accelerators in the study of nuclear structure and states is reviewed. The reactions discussed are the quasielastic reactions in which small amounts of energy and few particles are exchanged between the colliding nuclei. The development of heavy ion accelerators is also discussed, as well as detection equipment. Exotic phenomena, principally the possible existence of superheavy nuclei, are also treated. (JIW)

  12. Particles and nuclei in PANIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-07-15

    PANIC is the triennal International Conference on Particles and Nuclei, and judging from the latest PANIC, held in Kyoto from 20-24 April there is no need for panic yet. Faced with two pictures – one of nuclei described in nucleon and meson terms, and another of nucleons containing quarks and gluons – physicists are intrigued to know what new insights from the quark level can tell us about nuclear physics, or vice versa.

  13. Particles and nuclei in PANIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    PANIC is the triennal International Conference on Particles and Nuclei, and judging from the latest PANIC, held in Kyoto from 20-24 April there is no need for panic yet. Faced with two pictures – one of nuclei described in nucleon and meson terms, and another of nucleons containing quarks and gluons – physicists are intrigued to know what new insights from the quark level can tell us about nuclear physics, or vice versa

  14. Investigation of copper nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    An extensive study has been performed on copper isotopes in the mass region A=63-66. The results of a precise measurement are presented on the properties of levels of 64 Cu and 66 Cu. They were obtained by bombarding the 63 Cu and 65 Cu nuclei with neutrons. The gamma spectra collected after capture of thermal, 2-keV, 24-keV neutrons have been analysed and combined to give a rather extensive set of precise level energies and gamma transition strengths. From the angular distribution of the gamma rays it is possible to obtain information concerning the angular momentum J of several low-lying states. The level schemes derived from such measurements have been used as a test for calculations in the framework of the shell model. The spectral distributions of eigenstates in 64 Cu for different configuration spaces are presented and discussed. In this study the relative importance of configurations with n holes in the 1f7/2 shell with n up to 16, are investigated. It is found that the results strongly depend on the values of the single-particle energies. The results of the spectral-distribution method were utilized for shell-model calculations. From the information obtained from the spectral analysis it was decided to adopt a configuration space which includes up to one hole in the 1f7/2 shell and up to two particles in the 1g9/2 shell. Further, restrictions on seniority and on the coupling of the two particles in the 1g9/2 orbit have been applied and their effects have been studied. It is found that the calculated excitation energies reproduce the measured values in a satisfactory way, but that some of the electromagnetic properties are less well in agreement with experimental data. (Auth.)

  15. Quest for superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenen, P.H. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique (Belgium); Nazarewicz, W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej

    2002-02-01

    This article draws the long history of the discovery of new heavy nuclei since its beginning in 1940 when neptunium was found, and presents the current status of research in this field. The last 3 years have brought a number of experimental surprises which have truly rejuvenated the field. In January 1999, scientists from Dubna (Russia) reported the synthesis of 1 atom of element 114 ({sup 298}Uuq) in a hot fusion reaction between a {sup 48}Ca beam and a {sup 244}Pu target. This discovery was followed by 3 other reports from Dubna. First using the {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3n) reaction, they produced {sup 287}Uuq. In 1999 the synthesis of another isotope of Z=114, the even-even {sup 288}Uuq was reported. The element Z=116 ({sup 292}Uuh) was discovered as a product of the {sup 248}Cm({sup 48}Ca,4n) reaction. The GSI (Germany) group found a new even isotope of the element 110: {sup 270}Uun and also {sup 272}Uuu (element 111) and {sup 277}Uub (element 112). 2 new isotopes of the element 107: {sup 266}Bh and {sup 267}Bh have been found at Berkeley (Usa). The synthesis of the new element Z=118 ({sup 293}Uuo) announced in 1999 by the Berkeley group was retracted 2 years later. The lifetimes reported for the elements {sup 284}Uub and {sup 280}Uun are by many orders of magnitude longer than those of the isotopes with Z{<=}112 previously discovered at GSI. (A.C.)

  16. Vestibular myogenic and acoustical brainstem evoked potentials in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Korepina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the inspection of acoustical cortex and brainstem EP in neurologic, otoneurologic and audiologic practice recently start to use so-called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. It is shown, that at ear stimulation by a loud sound and record of sterno-cleidomastoid contraction is possible to estimate function of the inferior vestibular nerve and vestibulospinal pathways, a sacculo-cervical reflex. In article some methodical and clinical questions of application of these kinds are presented. Combine research acoustic brainstem EP and VEMP allows to confirm effectively lesions of acoustical and vestibular ways at brainstem. The conclusion becomes, that this kind of inspection is important for revealing demielinisation and defeats in vestibulospinal tract, that quite often happens at MS, and at estimation of efficiency of treatment

  17. The effects of aging on clinical vestibular evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime eMaheu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders are common issues for aging populations due to the effects of normal aging on peripheral vestibular structures. These changes affect the results of vestibular function evaluations and make the interpretation of these results more difficult. The objective of this article is to review the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant vestibular measures. We will first focus on otolith function assessment methods cVEMP and oVEMP, then the caloric and vHIT methods for semi-circular canals assessment. cVEMP and oVEMP are useful methods, though research on the effects of age for some parameters are still inconclusive. vHIT results are largely independent of age as compared to caloric stimulation and should therefore be preferred for the evaluation of the semi-circular canals function.

  18. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eLacquaniti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  19. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  20. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs. To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR) responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls. Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals - thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls. Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity). Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  1. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-12-26

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  2. Rapid adaptation of multisensory integration in vestibular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome eCarriot

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensing gravity is vital for our perception of spatial orientation, the control of upright posture, and generation of our every day activities. When an astronaut transitions to microgravity or returns to earth, the vestibular input arising from self-motion will not match the brain’s expectation. Our recent neurophysiological studies have provided insight into how the nervous system rapidly reorganizes when vestibular input becomes unreliable by both 1 updating its internal model of the sensory consequences of motion and 2 up-weighting more reliable extra-vestibular information. These neural strategies, in turn, are linked to improvements in sensorimotor performance (e.g., gaze and postural stability, locomotion, orienting and perception characterized by similar time courses. We suggest that furthering our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie sensorimotor adaptation will have important implications for optimizing training programs for astronauts before and after space exploration missions and for the design of goal-oriented rehabilitation for patients.

  3. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Quail, Stephanie L.; Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5–6, 8–9 and 27–28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2–3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27–28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27–28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27–28 months. Conclusion: this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed. PMID:26869921

  4. Motor performance is impaired following vestibular stimulation in ageing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria W.K. Tung

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5-6, 8-9 and 27-28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod and newly-developed behavioural tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus. In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2-3 Hz and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27-28 months that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13, and 27-28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13, and 27-28 months. Conclusion: This study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioural changes in task performance were observed.

  5. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Victoria W K; Burton, Thomas J; Quail, Stephanie L; Mathews, Miranda A; Camp, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5-6, 8-9 and 27-28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2-3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27-28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27-28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27-28 months. this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed.

  6. Plasticity during vestibular compensation: the role of saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Gavin MacDougall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focussed on one major aspect of compensation: the recent behavioural findings concerning oculomotor responses in human vestibular compensation and their possible implications for recovery after unilateral vestibular loss (UVL. New measurement techniques have provided new insights into how patients recover after UVL and have given clues for vestibular rehabilitation. Prior to this it has not been possible to quantify the level of function of all the peripheral vestibular sense organs. Now it is. By using vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials to measure utricular and saccular function and by new video head impulse testing to measure semicircular canal function to natural values of head accelerations. With these new video procedures it is now possible to measure both slow phase eye velocity and also saccades during natural head movements. The present evidence is that there is little or no recovery of slow phase eye velocity responses to natural head accelerations. It is doubtful as to whether the modest changes in slow phase eye velocity to small angular accelerations are functionally effective during compensation. On the other hand it is now clear that saccades can play a very important role in helping patients compensate and return to a normal lifestyle. Preliminary evidence suggests that different patterns of saccadic response may predict how well patients recover. It may be possible to train patients to produce more effective saccadic patterns in the first days after their unilateral loss. Some patients do learn new strategies, new behaviours, to conceal their inadequate VOR but when those strategies are prevented from operating by using passive, unpredictable, high acceleration natural head movements, as in the head impulse test, their vestibular loss can be demonstrated. It is those very strategies which the tests exclude, which may be the cause of their successful compensation.

  7. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  8. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances L Meredith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  9. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  10. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  11. The Vestibular Effects of Repeated Low-Level Blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Philip D; Pinto, Robin L; Burrows, Holly L; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a prospective cohort of United States Marine Corps (USMC) instructors to identify any acute or long-term vestibular dysfunction following repeated blast exposures during explosive breaching training. They were assessed in clinic and on location during training at the USMC Methods of Entry School, Quantico, VA. Subjects received comprehensive baseline vestibular assessments and these were repeated in order to identify longitudinal changes. They also received shorter assessments immediately following blast exposure in order to identify acute findings. The main outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, vestibular Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of subjective vestibular function, videonystagmography (VNG), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), rotary chair (including the unilateral centrifugation test), computerized dynamic posturography, and computerized dynamic visual acuity. A total of 11 breachers and 4 engineers were followed for up to 17 months. No acute effects or longitudinal deteriorations were identified, but there were some interesting baseline group differences. Upbeat positional nystagmus was common, and correlated (p<0.005) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several instructors had abnormally short low-frequency phase leads on rotary chair testing. This study evaluated breaching instructors over a longer test period than any other study, and the results suggest that this population appears to be safe from a vestibular standpoint at the current exposure levels. Upbeat positional nystagmus correlated with a history of mTBI in this population, and this has not been described elsewhere. The data trends also suggest that this nystagmus could be an acute blast effect. However, the reasons for the abnormally short phase leads seen in rotary chair testing are unclear at this time. Further investigation seems warranted.

  12. Exercise increases blood flow to locomotor, vestibular, cardiorespiratory and visual regions of the brain in miniature swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, M. D.; Armstrong, R. B.; Godfrey, D. A.; Laughlin, M. H.; Ross, C. D.; Wilkerson, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    1. The purpose of these experiments was to use radiolabelled microspheres to measure blood flow distribution within the brain, and in particular to areas associated with motor function, maintenance of equilibrium, cardiorespiratory control, vision, hearing and smell, at rest and during exercise in miniature swine. Exercise consisted of steady-state treadmill running at intensities eliciting 70 and 100 % maximal oxygen consumption (V(O(2),max)). 2. Mean arterial pressure was elevated by 17 and 26 % above that at rest during exercise at 70 and 100 % V(O(2),max), respectively. 3. Mean brain blood flow increased 24 and 25 % at 70 and 100 % V(O(2),max), respectively. Blood flow was not locally elevated to cortical regions associated with motor and somatosensory functions during exercise, but was increased to several subcortical areas that are involved in the control of locomotion. 4. Exercise elevated perfusion and diminished vascular resistance in several regions of the brain related to the maintenance of equilibrium (vestibular nuclear area, cerebellar ventral vermis and floccular lobe), cardiorespiratory control (medulla and pons), and vision (dorsal occipital cortex, superior colliculi and lateral geniculate body). Conversely, blood flow to regions related to hearing (cochlear nuclei, inferior colliculi and temporal cortex) and smell (olfactory bulbs and rhinencephalon) were unaltered by exercise and associated with increases in vascular resistance. 5. The data indicate that blood flow increases as a function of exercise intensity to several areas of the brain associated with integrating sensory input and motor output (anterior and dorsal cerebellar vermis) and the maintenance of equilibrium (vestibular nuclei). Additionally, there was an intensity-dependent decrease of vascular resistance in the dorsal cerebellar vermis.

  13. Spectrin-like proteins in plant nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Ketelaar, T.; Blumenthal, S.S.D.; Emons, A.M.C.; Schel, J.H.N.

    2000-01-01

    We analysed the presence and localization of spectrin-like proteins in nuclei of various plant tissues, using several anti-erythrocyte spectrin antibodies on isolated pea nuclei and nuclei in cells. Western blots of extracted purified pea nuclei show a cross-reactive pair of bands at 220–240 kDa,

  14. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  15. Vestibular schwannoma and fitness to fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Yoann; Raynal, Marc; Hunkemöller, Iris; Lepage, Pierre; Kossowski, Michel

    2010-10-01

    When a pilot is referred for vestibular schwannoma (VS), his or her fitness to fly may be questioned. The objective of this retrospective study was to describe a series of VS cases in a pilot population and to discuss their fitness to fly options. Between September 2002 and March 2010, the ENT/Head and Neck Surgery Department of the National Pilot Expertise Center conducted nearly 120,000 expert consultations for 40,000 pilots. We examined the files of 10 pilots who were referred to our 2 national experts for VS. At the time of the expert consultation, hypoacusis was present in nine cases (four with total deafness), tinnitus in one case, and vertigo in nine cases. In our series, only 2 of the 10 pilots experienced a negative impact on their fitness to fly. Decisions on fitness to fly were based on several factors: minimally disturbed audition, i.e., less than a 35-dB hearing loss with a good speech discrimination score; good balance, i.e., no reported difficulties; no spontaneous nystagmus recorded on videonystagmography (VNG); no postural deviation; and a normal head-shaking test. The delay and the VS's evolution between diagnosis and expert consultation are important because the selection of a treatment to control VS is critical in minimizing the possible associated complications. When a pilot is referred for VS, his or her fitness to fly is determined by the size of the tumor, balance, auditory status, and the follow-up results of these findings. The complications that may arise from VS treatments must also be considered.

  16. [Cavernous haemangiomas: hearing and vestibular inaugural symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, G; Schmerber, S

    2004-11-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas (cavernomas)(CH) are relatively rare (2% of cranial tumoral pathology) vascular malformations mostly observed in the central nervous system. Their most common topographical site in brain stem is midline in the pons, for which clinical course may mimic symptoms of peripheral origin (sudden deafness, fluctuating hearing loss, Meniere-like vertigo). To establish the correlation between the clinical manifestations of hearing and balance disturbance and the anatomical site within the pons of cavernous haemangiomas, and to describe their clinical features, and the findings on auditory brainstem response (ABR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To propose a literature review about CH and its implications. We made a retrospective review of the histories of three patients aged 24, 44 and 45 years, diagnosed as having cavernomas of the brainstem in which audiometric evaluation, videonystagmography (VNG), ABR and imaging techniques lead to the diagnosis of intracranial cavernoma. The clinical and radiological files were reviewed and a direct relationship between symptoms and localization was found in all 3 patients, especially in relation to our understanding of the auditory and vestibular pathways within the brainstem. The literature regarding cavernomas of the pons is reviewed and the clinical, neuroimage, pathological, natural course and management aspects of the disease are discussed. We recommend the use of cerebral MRI for initial diagnosis which shows a typical rosette-like appearance with a heterogeneous signal on T2-weighted images, along with follow-up and investigation into similar profiles among family members. At present there is no consensus about the treatment to follow when cavernomas are located in the brain stem. There is no specific medical treatment for this condition, and surgery is indicated only exceptionally. Anticoagulant therapy, platelet-dispersing medication and violent sports activities are contraindicated.

  17. A Stimulator ASIC Featuring Versatile Management for Vestibular Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai Jiang; Demosthenous, Andreas; Perkins, Timothy; Xiao Liu; Donaldson, Nick

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a multichannel stimulator ASIC for an implantable vestibular prosthesis. The system features versatile stimulation management which allows fine setting of the parameters for biphasic stimulation pulses. To address the problem of charge imbalance due to rounding errors, the digital processor can calculate and provide accurate charge correction. A technique to reduce the data rate to the stimulator is described. The stimulator ASIC was implemented in 0.6-μ m high-voltage CMOS technology occupying an area of 2.27 mm(2). The measured performance of the ASIC has been verified using vestibular electrodes in saline.

  18. Vestibular migraine: the most frequent entity of episodic vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Marianne; Obermann, Mark; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in adults as well as in children. The diagnostic criteria of the consensus document of the International Bárány Society for Neuro-Otology and the International Headache Society (2012) combine the typical signs and symptoms of migraine with the vestibular symptoms lasting 5 min to 72 h and exclusion criteria. Although VM accounts for 7% of patients seen in dizziness clinics and 9% of patients seen in headache clinics it is still underdiagnosed. This review provides an actual overview on the pathophysiology, the clinical characteristics to establish the diagnosis, the differential diagnosis, and the treatment of VM.

  19. Focal increase of blood flow in the cerebral cortex of man during vestibular stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olsen, T S; Roland, P E

    1985-01-01

    This study is an attempt to reveal projection areas for vestibular afferents to the human brain. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured over 254 cortical regions during caloric vestibular stimulation with warm water (44 degrees C). rCBF was measured when the external auditory...... meatus was irrigated with water at body temperature as a control to vestibular stimulation. During vestibular stimulation there was only a single cortical area, located in the superior temporal region, which showed a consistent focal activation in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated side...... stimulation that gives rise to the associated conscious vestibular sensation of vertigo....

  20. Two distinct populations of projection neurons in the rat lateral parafascicular thalamic nucleus and their cholinergic responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J A; Sylwestrak, E L; Cox, C L

    2009-08-04

    The lateral parafascicular nucleus (lPf) is a member of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, a collection of nuclei that characteristically provides widespread projections to the neocortex and basal ganglia and is associated with arousal, sensory, and motor functions. Recently, lPf neurons have been shown to possess different characteristics than other cortical-projecting thalamic relay neurons. We performed whole cell recordings from lPf neurons using an in vitro rat slice preparation and found two distinct neuronal subtypes that were differentiated by distinct morphological and physiological characteristics: diffuse and bushy. Diffuse neurons, which had been previously described, were the predominant neuronal subtype (66%). These neurons had few, poorly-branching, extended dendrites, and rarely displayed burst-like action potential discharge, a ubiquitous feature of thalamocortical relay neurons. Interestingly, we discovered a smaller population of bushy neurons (34%) that shared similar morphological and physiological characteristics with thalamocortical relay neurons of primary sensory thalamic nuclei. In contrast to other thalamocortical relay neurons, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors produced a membrane hyperpolarization via activation of M(2) receptors in most lPf neurons (60%). In a minority of lPf neurons (33%), muscarinic agonists produced a membrane depolarization via activation of predominantly M(3) receptors. The muscarinic receptor-mediated actions were independent of lPf neuronal subtype (i.e. diffuse or bushy neurons); however the cholinergic actions were correlated with lPf neurons with different efferent targets. Retrogradely-labeled lPf neurons from frontal cortical fluorescent bead injections primarily consisted of bushy type lPf neurons (78%), but more importantly, all of these neurons were depolarized by muscarinic agonists. On the other hand, lPf neurons labeled by striatal injections were predominantly hyperpolarized by muscarinic

  1. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: an overview Potencial evocado miogênico vestibular: uma visão geral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP test is a relatively new diagnostic tool that is in the process of being investigated in patients with specific vestibular disorders. Briefly, the VEMP is a biphasic response elicited by loud clicks or tone bursts recorded from the tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscle, being the only resource available to assess the function of the saccule and the lower portion of the vestibular nerve. AIM: In this review, we shall highlight the history, methods, current VEMP status, and discuss its specific application in the diagnosis of the Ménière's Syndrome.O teste do potencial evocado miogênico vestibular (PEMV é um instrumento diagnóstico relativamente novo e ainda em processo de validação em estudos com pacientes portadores de desordens vestibulares específicas. De forma resumida, o PEMV é uma resposta bifásica em resposta a estímulos sonoros gravados a partir de contrações do músculo esternocleidomastóideo e é o único recurso existente para avaliar a função do sáculo e da divisão inferior do nervo vestibular. OBJETIVO: Nesta revisão iremos destacar a história, método de realização, situação atual da pesquisa envolvendo o PEMV, além de discutir as suas aplicações específicas no diagnóstico da síndrome de Ménière.

  2. Immunohistochemical profile of cytokines and growth factors expressed in vestibular schwannoma and in normal vestibular nerve tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurone, Samanta; Bianchi, Enrica; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Di Gioia, Cira; Ierinó, Rocco; Carubbi, Cecilia; Galli, Daniela; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Giangaspero, Felice; Filipo, Roberto; Zanza, Christian; Artico, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, also known as acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors, which originate from myelin-forming Schwann cells. They develop in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. The clinical progression of the condition involves slow and progressive growth, eventually resulting in brainstem compression. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression level and the localization of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the adhesion molecules, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in order to determine whether these factors are involved in the transformation and development of human vestibular schwannoma. The present study investigated whether changes in inflammation are involved in tumor growth and if so, the mechanisms underlying this process. The results of the current study demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β1, IL-1β and IL-6 exhibited increased expression in human vestibular schwannoma tissue compared with normal vestibular nerve samples. TNF-α was weakly expressed in Schwann cells, confirming that a lower level of this cytokine is involved in the proliferation of Schwann cells. Neoplastic Schwann cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that may act in an autocrine manner, stimulating cellular proliferation. In addition, the increased expression of VEGF in vestibular schwannoma compared with that in normal vestibular nerve tissue, suggests that this factor may induce neoplastic growth via the promotion of angiogenesis. The present findings suggest that inflammation may promote angiogenesis and consequently contribute to tumor progression. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in vestibular

  3. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  4. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  5. Complete destruction of heavy nuclei by hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstov, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    The total disintegration is considered of Ag and Pb nuclei and 4 He, 12 C nuclei With a momentum of 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon. It is shown that nucleons are mainly emitted, and there is no residual nUcleus the mass of which is comparable to that of the primary nucleus. The probability of total nucleus disintegration is considered as a function of projectile energy and the mass. The multiplicity, energy and emission angle of particles are considerred as well. It is shown that the density of nuclear matter in the overlap zone of colliding nuclei exceeds the usual one by a factor of approximately 4. A comparison is made with interaction models. A conclusion is drawn of the collective interaction mechanism (perhaps, of the shock wave type) of particle ejection from the target nucleus at the first stage of interaction and of explosive decay of the residual nucleus at the next one

  6. Reflection asymmetric shapes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Emling, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data show that there is no even-even nucleus with a reflection asymmetric shape in its ground state. Maximum octupole- octupole correlations occur in nuclei in the mass 224 (N∼134, Z∼88) region. Parity doublets, which are the characteristic signature of octupole deformation, have been observed in several odd mass Ra, Ac and Pa nuclei. Intertwined negative and positive parity levels have been observed in several even-even Ra and Th nuclei above spin ∼8ℎ. In both cases, the opposite parity states are connected by fast El transitions. In some medium-mass nuclei intertwined negative and positive parity levels have also been observed above spin ∼7ℎ. The nuclei which exhibit octupole deformation in this mass region are 144 Ba, 146 Ba and 146 Ce; 142 Ba, 148 Ce, 150 Ce and 142 Xe do not show these characteristics. No case of parity doublet has been observed in the mass 144 region. 32 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  7. Predictors of vertigo in patients with untreated vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jan Fredrik; Nilsen, Kathrin Skorpa; Vassbotn, Flemming Slinning; Møller, Per; Myrseth, Erling; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Goplen, Frederik Kragerud

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that vertigo is the most powerful negative predictor of quality of life in patients with vestibular schwannomas, but the variability in vertigo symptom severity is still poorly understood. We wanted to find out whether vertigo could be related to objective parameters such as tumor size, location, vestibular nerve function, hearing, and postural stability in patients with untreated vestibular schwannomas. Baseline data from prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral center. Four hundred thirty-four consecutive patients with unilateral VS diagnosed on MRI. Mean age 56 years (range 16-84 yr). Fifty-three percent women. Diagnostic, with a medical history, otolaryngological examination, pure-tone and speech audiometry, MRI, posturography, and videonystagmography with bithermal caloric tests. Dizziness measured on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcome measures were canal paresis and postural imbalance (static and dynamic posturography). Three hundred three patients (70%) completed the VAS. Severe dizziness, defined as VAS 75 or greater, was reported by 9% of the patients. Larger tumors were associated with higher risk of postural instability and canal paresis. Moderate to severe dizziness was associated with postural imbalance and canal paresis, and possibly with small to medium-sized tumors. Postural instability was related to tumor size and canal paresis when measured by dynamic, but not with static, posturography. A minority of VS patients experience severe vestibular symptoms related to canal paresis and postural instability. A curvilinear relationship is hypothesized between tumor size and dizziness.

  8. Task-dependent vestibular feedback responses in reaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyser, J.; Medendorp, W.P.; Selen, L.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    When reaching for an earth-fixed object during self-rotation, the motor system should appropriately integrate vestibular signals and sensory predictions to compensate for the intervening motion and its induced inertial forces. While it is well established that this integration occurs rapidly, it is

  9. Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency: Quality of Life and Economic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daniel Q; Ward, Bryan K; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C

    2014-06-01

    Bilateral vestibular deficiency (BVD) causes chronic imbalance and unsteady vision and greatly increases the risk of falls; however, its effects on quality of life and economic impact are not well defined. To quantify disease-specific and health-related quality of life, health care utilization, and economic impact on individuals with BVD in comparison with those with unilateral vestibular deficiency (UVD). Cross-sectional survey study of patients with BVD or UVD and healthy controls at an academic medical center. Vestibular dysfunction was diagnosed by means of caloric nystagmography. Survey questionnaire. Health status was measured using the Dizziness Handicap Index (DHI) and Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3). Economic burden was estimated using participant responses to questions on disease-specific health care utilization and lost productivity. Fifteen patients with BVD, 22 with UVD, and 23 healthy controls participated. In comparison with patients with UVD and controls, patients with BVD had significantly worse DHI (P work days (P life and imposes substantial economic burdens on individuals and society. These results underscore the limits of adaptation and compensation in BVD. Furthermore, they quantify the potential benefits of prosthetic restoration of vestibular function both to these individuals and to society.

  10. Normalization reduces intersubject variability in cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Mark J; Herrmann, Barbara S; Guinan, John J; Rauch, Steven D

    2014-09-01

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are used to assess saccular and inferior vestibular nerve function. Normalization of the VEMP waveform has been proposed to reduce the variability in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials by correcting for muscle activation. In this study, we test the hypothesis that normalization of the raw cervical VEMP waveform causes a significant decrease in the intersubject variability. Prospective cohort study. Large specialty hospital, department of otolaryngology. Twenty healthy subjects were used in this study. All subjects underwent cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing using short tone bursts at 250, 500, 750, and 1,000 Hz. Both intersubject and intrasubject variability was assessed. Variability between raw and normalized peak-to-peak amplitudes was compared using the coefficient of variation. Intrasubject variability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient and interaural asymmetry ratio. cVEMPs were present in most ears. Highest peak-to-peak amplitudes were recorded at 750 Hz. Normalization did not alter cVEMP tuning characteristics. Normalization of the cVEMP response caused a significant reduction in intersubject variability of the peak-to-peak amplitude. No significant change was seen in the intrasubject variability. Normalization significantly reduces cVEMP intersubject variability in healthy subjects without altering cVEMP characteristics. By reducing cVEMP amplitude variation due to nonsaccular, muscle-related factors, cVEMP normalization is expected to improve the ability to distinguish between healthy and pathologic responses in the clinical application of cVEMP testing.

  11. Current concepts and future approaches to vestibular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernström, Fredrik; Zur, Oz; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades methods of vestibular rehabilitation to enhance adaptation to vestibular loss, habituation to changing sensory conditions, and sensory reweighting in the compensation process have been developed. However, the use of these techniques still depends to a large part on the educational background of the therapist. Individualized assessment of deficits and specific therapeutic programs for different disorders are sparse. Currently, vestibular rehabilitation is often used in an unspecific way in dizzy patients irrespective of the clinical findings. When predicting the future of vestibular rehabilitation, it is tempting to foretell advances in technology for assessment and treatment only, but the current intense exchange between clinicians and basic scientists also predicts advances in truly understanding the complex interactions between the peripheral senses and central adaptation mechanisms. More research is needed to develop reliable techniques to measure sensory dependence and to learn how this knowledge can be best used--by playing off the patient's sensory strength or working on the weakness. To be able using the emerging concepts, the neuro-otological community must strive to educate physicians, physiotherapists and nurses to perform the correct examinations for assessment of individual deficits and to look for factors that might impede rehabilitation.

  12. Comparative analysis of vestibular ecomorphology in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Starmer-Jones, Ethan; Close, Roger A; Walsh, Stig A

    2017-12-01

    The bony labyrinth of vertebrates houses the semicircular canals. These sense rotational accelerations of the head and play an essential role in gaze stabilisation during locomotion. The sizes and shapes of the semicircular canals have hypothesised relationships to agility and locomotory modes in many groups, including birds, and a burgeoning palaeontological literature seeks to make ecological interpretations from the morphology of the labyrinth in extinct species. Rigorous tests of form-function relationships for the vestibular system are required to support these interpretations. We test the hypothesis that the lengths, streamlines and angles between the semicircular canals are related to body size, wing kinematics and flying style in birds. To do this, we applied geometric morphometrics and multivariate phylogenetic comparative methods to a dataset of 64 three-dimensional reconstructions of the endosseous labyrinth obtained using micro-computed tomography scanning of bird crania. A strong relationship between centroid size of the semicircular canals and body size indicates that larger birds have longer semicircular canals compared with their evolutionary relatives. Wing kinematics related to manoeuvrability (and quantified using the brachial index) explain a small additional portion of the variance in labyrinth size. We also find strong evidence for allometric shape change in the semicircular canals of birds, indicating that major aspects of the shape of the avian labyrinth are determined by spatial constraints. The avian braincase accommodates a large brain, a large eye and large semicircular canals compared with other tetrapods. Negative allometry of these structures means that the restriction of space within the braincase is intense in small birds. This may explain our observation that the angles between planes of the semicircular canals of birds deviate more strongly from orthogonality than those of mammals, and especially from agile, gliding and flying

  13. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, B K

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1-g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1-g. From

  14. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  15. Nuclei in a neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, K.; Yamada, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in understanding the matter in the crust of a neutron star. For nuclides in the outer crust, recently measured masses of neutron-rich nuclei enable us to determine more accurately the stable nuclide as a function of the matter density. In the inner crust, the compressible liquid-drop model predicts successive change of the nuclear shape, from sphere to cylinder, slab, cylindrical hole and spherical hole at densities just before the transition to uniform matter. In order to go beyond the liquiddrop model, we performed the Thomas-Fermi calculation paying special attention to the surface diffuseness, and have recently calculated the shell energies of the non-spherical nuclei. We have found from these studies that all these non-spherical nuclei exist stably in the above order even if we include the surface diffuseness and shell energies. (author)

  16. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Neutron scattering on deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Haight, R.C.; Pohl, B.A.; Wong, C.; Lagrange, C.

    1984-09-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections around 14 MeV for 9 Be, C, 181 Ta, 232 Th, 238 U and 239 Pu have been analyzed using a coupled channel (CC) formalism for deformed nuclei and phenomenological global optical model potentials (OMP). For the actinide targets these results are compared with the predictions of a semi-microscopic calculation using Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux (JLM) microscopic OMP and a deformed ground state nuclear density. The overall agreement between calculations and the measurements is reasonable good even for the very light nuclei, where the quality of the fits is better than those obtained with spherical OMP

  18. Nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bopp, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a short introduction to the physics of the nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles for students of physics. Important facts and model imaginations on the structure, the decay, and the scattering of nuclei, the 'zoology' of the hadrons and basic facts of hadronic scattering processes, a short introduction to quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics and the most important processes of lepton and parton physics, as well as the current-current approach of weak interactions and the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam theory are presented. (orig.) With 153 figs., 10 tabs [de

  19. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets

  20. Exotic Nuclei Arena in JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1991-12-01

    The Exotic Nuclei Arena planned in Japanese Hadron Project aims to accelerate various unstable nuclei produced in 1-GeV proton-induced reactions up to 6.5 MeV/u by means of heavy-ion linacs. The present status of research and development for the Earena is briefly reported. The construction of the prototype facility to accelerate unstable beams up to 0.8 MeV/u is planned in 1992-94, in which the existing cyclotron in INS is used as the primary accelerator. (author)

  1. Spinodal decomposition of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[LNS, Catania (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Multifragmentation of atomic nuclei is discussed. It is shown that this description of the dynamics of first order phase transitions in infinite and finite system is now partially achieved. An important conclusion is that in some specific cases well-defined collective motions were initiating the self-organisation of the unstable matter in fragments. In the case of finite systems the possible signals kept from this early fragmentation stage can inform on the possible occurrence of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. (K.A.). 21 refs.

  2. Spinodal decomposition of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1996-01-01

    Multifragmentation of atomic nuclei is discussed. It is shown that this description of the dynamics of first order phase transitions in infinite and finite system is now partially achieved. An important conclusion is that in some specific cases well-defined collective motions were initiating the self-organisation of the unstable matter in fragments. In the case of finite systems the possible signals kept from this early fragmentation stage can inform on the possible occurrence of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. (K.A.)

  3. Are there superheavy atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1982-04-01

    The author presents a populary introduction to the formation of nuclei with special regards to superheavy nuclei. After a general description of the methods of physics the atomic hypothesis is considered. Thereafter the structure of the nucleus is discussed, and the different isotopes are considered. Then radioactivity is described as an element transmutation. Thereafter the thermonuclear reactions in the sun are considered. Then the synthesis of elements using heavy ion reactions is described. In this connection the transuranium elements and the superheavy elements are considered. (orig./HSI) [de

  4. The mechanism of total disintegration of heavy nuclei by fast hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalska-Gola, E.; Strugalski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of the total disintegration of atomic nuclei by fast hadrons and nuclei is considered. The passage of energetic hadrons through layers of intranuclear matter, accompanied by emission of fast nucleons with kinetic energies from about 20 up to about 500 MeV from definite local small regions in the nuclei around projectile courses in them, allows one to explain simply the occurrence of the total destruction of nuclei involved in the collisions. Light nuclei may be totally disintegrated by fast hadrons and nuclei; heavier nuclei may be totally disintegrated only in central collisions of nuclei with similar mass numbers

  5. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential elicited from binaural air-conducted stimulations: clinical feasibility in patients with peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Egami, Naoya; Inoue, Aki; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimoto, Chisato; Murofushi, Toshihisa; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) to binaural air-conducted stimulation (ACS) may provide a convenient way of assessing the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with vestibular dysfunction as well as in healthy subjects. To investigate the clinical feasibility of using oVEMPs in response to binaural ACS to assess normal subjects and patients with vestibular dysfunction. The study investigated 24 normal subjects (14 men and 10 women, aged from 23 to 60 years) and 14 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Each subject underwent oVEMP testing in response to monaural ACS and binaural ACS (500 Hz tone burst, 135 dBSPL). In normal subjects, bilateral oVEMPs were elicited in 75% of subjects in response to monaural ACS and in 91% in response to binaural ACS. Asymmetry ratios (ARs) of the responses to binaural ACS were significantly smaller than those of the responses to monaural ACS (p binaural ACS. Approximately 30% of patients showed reduced ARs to binaural ACS relative to monaural ACS, primarily due to contamination by uncrossed responses elicited in healthy ears.

  6. Refractory episodic vertigo: role of intratympanic gentamicin and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Even today, the treatment of intractable vertigo remains a challenge. Vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin stands as a good alternative in the management of refractory vertigo patients. Objective: To control intractable vertigo through complete saccular and horizontal canal vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin treatment. Methods: Patients with refractory episodic vertigo were included. The inclusion criteria were: unilateral ear disease, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, and failure to other treatments. Included patients underwent 0.5-0.8 mL of gentamicin intratympanic application at a 30 mg/mL concentration. Vestibular ablation was confirmed by the absence of response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. Audiometry, electronystagmography with iced water, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were performed in all patients. Results: Ten patients were included; nine patients with Meniere's disease and one patient with (late onset delayed hydrops. Nine patients showed an absent response on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. The only patient with low amplitude on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials had vertigo recurrence. Vertigo control was achieved in 90% of the patients. One patient developed hearing loss >30 dB. Conclusions: Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials confirmed vestibular ablation in patients treated with intratympanic gentamicin. High-grade vertigo control was due to complete saccular and horizontal canal ablation (no response to iced water in electronystagmography and no response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

  7. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, G. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Pai, H. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, India and Present Address: Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  8. Cluster structure in Cf nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shailesh K.; Biswal, S.K.; Bhuyan, M.; Patra, S.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the availability of advance experimental facilities, it is possible to probe the nuclei upto their nucleon level very precisely and analyzed the internal structure which will help us to resolve some mysterious problem of the decay of nuclei. Recently, the relativistic nuclear collision, confirmed the α cluster type structure in the 12 C which is the mile stone for the cluster structure in nuclei. The clustering phenomena in light and intermediate elements in nuclear chart is very interesting. There is a lot of work done by our group in the clustering behaviour of the nuclei. In this paper, the various prospectus of clustering in the isotopes of Cf nucleus including fission state is discussed. Here, 242 Cf isotope for the analysis, which is experimentally known is taken. The relativistic mean field model with well established NL3 parameter set is taken. For getting the exact ground state configuration of the isotopes, the calculation for minimizing the potential energy surface is performed by constraint method. The clustering structure of other Cf isotopes is discussed

  9. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  10. Particle detection from oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, J.; Moor, P. de; Schuurmans, P.; Severijns, N.; Vanderpoorten, W.; Vanneste, L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of particle emission from nuclei that have been spin oriented by cryogenical means. Experiments and recent developments with detectors in the low temperature environment and their on-line application are reviewed. The most recent results are mentioned. Some phenomena to be unraveled in future studies are pointed out. (orig.)

  11. Rotational damping motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egido, J.L.; Faessler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The recently proposed model to explain the mechanism of the rotational motion damping in nuclei is exactly solved. When compared with the earlier approximative solution, we find significative differences in the low excitation energy limit (i.e. Γ μ 0 ). For the strength functions we find distributions going from the Wigner semicircle through gaussians to Breit-Wigner shapes. (orig.)

  12. Percolation and multifragmentation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmakov, S.Yu.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A method to build the 'cold' nuclei as percolation clusters is suggested. Within the framework of definite assumptions of the character of nucleon-nucleon couplings breaking resulting from the nuclear reactions as description of the multifragmentation process in the hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies is obtained. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  13. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions

  14. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  15. Visual-vestibular integration motion perception reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Reschke, Millard R.; Parker, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Self-orientation and self/surround-motion perception derive from a multimodal sensory process that integrates information from the eyes, vestibular apparatus, proprioceptive and somatosensory receptors. Results from short and long duration spaceflight investigations indicate that: (1) perceptual and sensorimotor function was disrupted during the initial exposure to microgravity and gradually improved over hours to days (individuals adapt), (2) the presence and/or absence of information from different sensory modalities differentially affected the perception of orientation, self-motion and surround-motion, (3) perceptual and sensorimotor function was initially disrupted upon return to Earth-normal gravity and gradually recovered to preflight levels (individuals readapt), and (4) the longer the exposure to microgravity, the more complete the adaptation, the more profound the postflight disturbances, and the longer the recovery period to preflight levels. While much has been learned about perceptual and sensorimotor reactions and adaptation to microgravity, there is much remaining to be learned about the mechanisms underlying the adaptive changes, and about how intersensory interactions affect perceptual and sensorimotor function during voluntary movements. During space flight, SMS and perceptual disturbances have led to reductions in performance efficiency and sense of well-being. During entry and immediately after landing, such disturbances could have a serious impact on the ability of the commander to land the Orbiter and on the ability of all crew members to egress from the Orbiter, particularly in a non-nominal condition or following extended stays in microgravity. An understanding of spatial orientation and motion perception is essential for developing countermeasures for Space Motion Sickness (SMS) and perceptual disturbances during spaceflight and upon return to Earth. Countermeasures for optimal performance in flight and a successful return to Earth require

  16. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  17. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eLopez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience, altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization. In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  18. Vestibular asymmetry predicts falls among elderly patients with multi- sensory dizziness

    OpenAIRE

    Ekvall Hansson, Eva; Magnusson, M?ns

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dizziness is the most common symptom in elderly patients and has been identified as a risk factor for falls. While BPPV is the most common cause of dizziness among elderly, multisensory deficits is the second, with visual, vestibular and proprioceptive reduced function. Asymmetric vestibular function is overrepresented in elderly persons with hip fractures and wrist fractures and can be accessed for screening. The objective was to study if vestibular asymmetry, vibration sense, ba...

  19. Estimation of an Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). The goal of this project was to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection.

  20. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System

    OpenAIRE

    D'Silva, Linda J.; Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pa...

  1. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaux, G.; Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C.; Machado, M.L.; Denise, P.; Comoz, F.; Hitier, M.; Landemore, G.; Philoxène, B.; Besnard, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  2. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  3. Rescue of peripheral vestibular function in Usher syndrome mice using a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Depreux, Frederic F; Jodelka, Francine M; Lentz, Jennifer J; Rigo, Frank; Jones, Timothy A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2017-09-15

    Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C/harmonin) is associated with profound retinal, auditory and vestibular dysfunction. We have previously reported on an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-29) that dramatically improves auditory function and balance behavior in mice homozygous for the harmonin mutation Ush1c c.216G > A following a single systemic administration. The findings were suggestive of improved vestibular function; however, no direct vestibular assessment was made. Here, we measured vestibular sensory evoked potentials (VsEPs) to directly assess vestibular function in Usher mice. We report that VsEPs are absent or abnormal in Usher mice, indicating profound loss of vestibular function. Strikingly, Usher mice receiving ASO-29 treatment have normal or elevated vestibular response thresholds when treated during a critical period between postnatal day 1 and 5, respectively. In contrast, treatment of mice with ASO-29 treatment at P15 was minimally effective at rescuing vestibular function. Interestingly, ASO-29 treatment at P1, P5 or P15 resulted in sufficient vestibular recovery to support normal balance behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit to balance with ASO-29 treatment at P15 despite the profound vestibular functional deficits that persist with treatment at this later time. These findings provide the first direct evidence of an effective treatment of peripheral vestibular function in a mouse model of USH1C and reveal the potential for using antisense technology to treat vestibular dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A rare case of vestibular sinus tract: A periodontist enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Nagpal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinus tract occurs commonly in teeth with periapical/periodontal infection but the formation of a vestibular opening, causing esthetic compromise and food lodgement, is uncommon. Definitive treatment of a chronic sinus tract requires treatment of the original problem, that is, the necrotic pulp treated by endodontic therapy or by extraction of the tooth. However, at times endodontic therapy may not be adequate necessitating periodontal intervention. The present case had vestibular opening communicating with root canal of concerned tooth appearing ten years after trauma. The diagnosis of such cases can only be made after careful evaluation and the treatment plan has to be modified from the conventional. The success of such cases depends on the regular follow up as presented here and careful observation after each phase of treatment.

  5. Representation of visual gravitational motion in the human vestibular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Bosco, Gianfranco; Zago, Myrka; Macaluso, Emiliano; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2005-04-15

    How do we perceive the visual motion of objects that are accelerated by gravity? We propose that, because vision is poorly sensitive to accelerations, an internal model that calculates the effects of gravity is derived from graviceptive information, is stored in the vestibular cortex, and is activated by visual motion that appears to be coherent with natural gravity. The acceleration of visual targets was manipulated while brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In agreement with the internal model hypothesis, we found that the vestibular network was selectively engaged when acceleration was consistent with natural gravity. These findings demonstrate that predictive mechanisms of physical laws of motion are represented in the human brain.

  6. Vestibular involvement in cognition: Visuospatial ability, attention, executive function, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests the inner ear vestibular system has a substantial impact on cognitive function. The strongest evidence exists in connecting vestibular function to the cognitive domain of visuospatial ability, which includes spatial memory, navigation, mental rotation, and mental representation of three-dimensional space. Substantial evidence also exists suggesting the vestibular system has an impact on attention and cognitive processing ability. The cognitive domains of memory and executive function are also implicated in a number of studies. We will review the current literature, discuss possible causal links between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive performance, and suggest areas of future research.

  7. Diabetes, vestibular dysfunction, and falls: analyses from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Yuri; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Schubert, Michael C; Minor, Lloyd B

    2010-12-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk both for falls and for vestibular dysfunction, a known risk factor for falls. Our aims were 1) to further characterize the vestibular dysfunction present in patients with diabetes and 2) to evaluate for an independent effect of vestibular dysfunction on fall risk among patients with diabetes. National cross-sectional survey. Ambulatory examination centers. Adults from the United States aged 40 years and older who participated in the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5,86). Diagnosis of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and retinopathy. Vestibular function measured by the modified Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support Surfaces and history of falling in the previous 12 months. We observed a higher prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with diabetes with longer duration of disease, greater serum hemoglobin A1c levels and other diabetes-related complications, suggestive of a dose-response relationship between diabetes mellitus severity and vestibular dysfunction. We also noted that vestibular dysfunction independently increased the odds of falling more than 2-fold among patients with diabetes (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.1), even after adjusting for peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy. Moreover, we found that including vestibular dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy, and retinopathy in multivariate models eliminated the significant association between diabetes and fall risk. Vestibular dysfunction may represent a newly recognized diabetes-related complication, which acts as a mediator of the effect of diabetes mellitus on fall risk.

  8. Potencial evocado miogênico vestibular ocular: revisão de literatura

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Tatiana Rocha; Resende,Luciana Macedo de; Santos,Marco Aurélio Rocha

    2016-01-01

    RESUMO Objetivo Identificar e sistematizar os principais estudos sobre o potencial evocado miogênico vestibular ocular e suas aplicações no diagnóstico das diversas doenças vestibulares. Estratégia de pesquisa Foram localizados artigos que descrevem a utilização do potencial evocado miogênico vestibular ocular na avaliação de doenças vestibulares nas bases PubMed, Web of Science, MEDLINE, Scopus, LILACS e SciELO. Critérios de seleção Foram incluídos estudos originais, com resumo disponí...

  9. Evidence of central and peripheral vestibular pathology in blast-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Burrows, Holly; Pinto, Robin; Littlefield, Philip; French, Louis M; Tarbett, Aaron K; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    To prospectively assay the vestibular and oculomotor systems of blast-exposed service members with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prospective, nonblinded, nonrandomized descriptive study. Tertiary care facility (Department of Defense Medical Center). Twenty-four service members recovering from blast-related TBI sustained in Iraq or Afghanistan. Focused history and physical, videonystagmography (VNG), rotational chair, cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials, computerized dynamic posturography, and self-report measures. Vestibular testing confirms a greater incidence of vestibular and oculomotor dysfunction in symptomatic (vestibular-like dizziness) personnel with blast-related TBI relative to asymptomatic group members. VNG in the symptomatic group revealed abnormal nystagmus or oculomotor findings in 6 of 12 subjects tested. Similarly, rotational chair testing in this group revealed evidence of both peripheral (4/12) and central (2/12) vestibular pathology. By contrast, the asymptomatic group revealed less vestibular impairment with 1 of 10 rotational chair abnormalities. The asymptomatic group was further characterized by fewer aberrant nystagmus findings (4/12 abnormal VNGs). Computerized dynamic posturography testing revealed no significant differences between groups. Self-report measures demonstrated differences between groups. Vestibular function testing confirms a greater incidence of peripheral vestibular hypofunction in dizzy service members with blast-related TBI relative to those who are asymptomatic. Additionally, oculomotor abnormalities and/or nystagmus consistent with central involvement were present in 10 of the 24 study participants tested. The precise cause of these findings remains unknown.

  10. Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation in Hemi-Spatial Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemi-spatial neglect is an attentional disorder in which the sufferer fails to acknowledge or respond to stimuli appearing in contralesional space. In recent years, it has become clear that a measurable reduction in contralesional neglect can occur during galvanic vestibular stimulation, a technique by which transmastoid, small amplitude current induces lateral, attentional shifts via asymmetric modulation of the left and right vestibular nerves. However, it remains unclear whether this reduction persists after stimulation is stopped. To estimate longevity of effect, we therefore conducted a double-blind, randomized, dose-response trial involving a group of stroke patients suffering from left-sided neglect (n=52, mean age=66 years. To determine whether repeated sessions of galvanic vestibular stimulation more effectively induce lasting relief than a single session, participants received 1, 5, or 10 sessions, each lasting 25mins, of sub-sensory, left-anodal right-cathodal noisy direct current (mean amplitude=1mA. Ninety five percent confidence intervals indicated that all three treatment arms showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-stimulation baseline and the final day of stimulation on the primary outcome measure, the conventional tests of the Behavioural Inattention Test. More remarkably, this change (mean change=28%, SD=18 was still evident 1month later. Secondary analyses indicated an allied increase of 20% in median Barthel Index score, a measure of functional capacity, in the absence of any adverse events or instances of participant non-compliance. Together these data suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation, a simple, cheap technique suitable for home-based administration, may produce lasting reductions in neglect that are clinically important. Further protocol optimization is now needed ahead of a larger effectiveness study.

  11. Comparative anatomy of the vestibular nuclear complex in submammalian vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A synopsis of the literature on the natural history of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) in lower vertebrates is presented in an attempt to assess the knowledge available. The review discloses that there is considerable descriptive information that is widely dispersed in the literature. However, information about the topology, number, and cellular composition of the cell groups that compose the VNC is sketchy. Major cytological and hodological information is still needed to establish which parts of the VNC actually are homologous.

  12. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Kevin Ward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS in individuals with unilateral loss of labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with differences consistent with their residual labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Eye movements were recorded using infrared videooculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology.

  13. Association between vestibular schwannomas and mobile phone use

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, In Seok; Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Won-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) grow in the region where the energy from mobile phone use is absorbed. We examined the associations of VSs with mobile phone use. This study included 119 patients who had undergone surgical tumor removal. We used two approaches in this investigation. First, a case–control study for the association of mobile phone use and incidence of VSs was conducted. Both cases and controls were investigated with questions based on INTERPHONE guidelines. Amount of mobile phone u...

  14. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  15. Cavitation nuclei measurements - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billet, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of cavitation nuclei has been the goal of many cavitation research laboratories and has resulted in the development of many methods. Two significantly different approaches have been developed. One is to measure the particulate-microbubble distribution by utilizing acoustical, electrical or optical methods. The other approach measures a liquid tension and a rate of cavitation events for a liquid in order to establish a cavitation susceptibility. Comparisons between various methods indicate that most methods are capable of giving an indication of the nuclei distribution. Measurements obtained in the ocean environment indicate an average of three bubbles per cubic centimeter are present; whereas, water tunnel bubble distributions vary from much less than one to over a hundred per cubic centimeter

  16. Phonon operators in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    For the description of the excited states in deformed nuclei new phonon operators are introduced, which depend on the sign of the angular momentum projection onto the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. In the calculations with new phonons the Pauli principle is correctly taken into account in the two-phonon components of the wave functions. There is a difference in comparison with the calculation with phonons independent of the sign of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons should be used in deformed nuclei if the Pauli principle is consistently taken into account and in the calculations with the excited state wave functions having the components with more than one phonon operator [ru

  17. Phonon operators for deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical formalism with the phonon operators independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection turns out to be inadequate for describing excited states of deformed nuclei. New phonon operators are introduced which depend on the signature of the angular momentum projection on the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. It is shown that the calculations with the new phonons take correctly into account the Pauli principle in two-phonon components of wave functions. The results obtained differ from those given by the phonons independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons must be used in deformed nuclei at taking systematically the Pauli principle into account and in calculations involving wave functions of excited states having components with more than one-phonon operator

  18. Nuclear treasure island [superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Soon after the experiments at Dubna, which synthesized element 114 and made the first footprints on the beach of the "island of nuclear stability", two new superheavy elements have been discovered at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Element 118 and its immediate decay product, element 116, were manufactured at Berkeley's 88 inch cyclotron by fusing targets of lead-208 with an intense beam of 449 MeV krypton-86 ions. Although both new nuclei almost instantly decay into lighter ones, the decay sequence is consistent with theories that have long predicted the island of stability for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184 neutrons. Theorist Robert Smolanczuk, visiting from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Poland, had calculated that this reaction should have particularly favourable production rates. Now that this route has been signposted, similar reactions could be possible: new elements and isotopes, tests of nuclear stability and mass models, and a new under...

  19. Moessbauer effects on oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayouti, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Standard nuclear orientation methods (not sensitive to the polarization) do not give information on the sign of the magnetic moment. Mossbauer effect separates right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized components, thus its detection on oriented nuclei (T approximately 10 mK) gives the sign of the magnetic moment of oriented state. In this thesis we applied this method to study the 3/2 - ground states of 191 Pt and 193 Os, which are in the prolate-oblate transition region, where assignement of experimental levels to theoretical states is often umbiguous. We show that for those nuclei the sign of the magnetic moment is the signature of the configuration, and its determination establishes the correspondance between experimental and theoretical levels [fr

  20. Clusters in nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is presently one of the domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics facing both the greatest challenges and opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physics decided to team up in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This first volume, gathering seven extensive lectures, covers the follow topics: - Cluster Radioactivity - Cluster States and Mean Field Theories - Alpha Clustering and Alpha Condensates - Clustering in Neutron-rich Nuclei - Di-neutron Clustering - Collective Clusterization in Nuclei - Giant Nuclear Molecules By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical nature of presentation throughout, these lectures will both serve as a reference and as advanced teaching material for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  1. Vestibular System Evaluation: Results on Analysis of Vestibulony stagmography (VNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Janghorban

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Falls are one of the major problems in the elderly and are considered one of the “Geriatric Giants”. Recurrent falls an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this segment of the population and is a marker of poor physical and cognitive status. The aim of the present study is to compare the VNG (Videonystagmography test results in adults with and without falls history. Materials & Methods: 60 adults ( 30 with one or more falls history and 30 without any falls history above 65 year old performed the VNG subtests included saccade, gaze, smooth pursuit, positional nystagmus, spontaneous nystagmus and caloric at rehabilitation faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Results: According to the data 74% of the faller group showed abnormal performance in the caloric subtest and more than 60% had abnormal results in the saccade, gaze and smooth pursuit subtests too. The members who suffered from central vestibular disorders had worse function than the others who suffered from peripheral vestibular ones. Conclusion: The non- faller group had better performance than the faller group in all of the subtests which indicates better vestibular system status in this group. According to the results, VNG performance can help guide the clinicians in the development of a safe exercise program.

  2. Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Mast, Fred W; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

  3. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the complexity of vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) via entropy analysis of head impulses. Horizontal head impulse test (HIT) with high-velocity alternating directions was used to evaluate 12 participants with AUVL and 16 healthy volunteers. Wireless electro-oculography and electronic gyrometry were used to acquire eye positional signals and head velocity signals. The eye velocity signals were then obtained through differentiation, band-pass filtering. The approximate entropy of eye velocity to head velocity (R ApEn ) was used to evaluate chaos property. VOR gain, gain asymmetry ratio, and R ApEn asymmetry ratio were also used to compare the groups. For the lesion-side HIT of the patient group, the mean VOR gain was significantly lower and the mean R ApEn was significantly greater compared with both nonlesion-side HIT and healthy controls (p Entropy and gain analysis of HIT using wireless electro-oculography system could be used to detect the VOR dysfunctions of AUVL and may become effective methods for evaluating vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  5. Contribution of intracranial vertebral artery asymmetry to vestibular neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Y M; Chern, C M; Liao, W H; Hsu, L C; Lien, C F; Lirng, J F; Shiao, A S; Ko, J S C

    2011-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) may affect the lateralisation of vestibular neuropathy (VN), probably through haemodynamic effect on the vestibular labyrinth. 69 patients with unilateral VN were examined with a magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) and caloric test. 50 healthy subjects served as controls. The diagnosis of intracranial VAH was based on MRA if 40%. The authors then correlated the canal paretic side with the VAH side. MRA study revealed 29 VAH (right/left: 23/6) in VN subjects and six VAH in controls (right/left: 5/1). The RR of VAH in VN subjects compared with controls was elevated (RR=2.2; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.8). There was a high accordance rate between the side of VAH and VN. Among 29 patients with unilateral VAH, 65.5% (N=19) had an ipsilateral VN, in which left VAH showed a higher accordance rate (83.3%) than the right side (60.9%). VN subjects with vascular risk factors also had a higher VAH accordance rate (81%) than those without (25%). VAH may serve as a regional haemodynamic negative contributor and impede blood supply to the ipsilateral vestibular labyrinth, contributing to the development of VN, which could be enhanced by atherosclerotic risk factors and the left-sided location.

  6. Posterior insular cortex - a site of vestibular-somatosensory interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Bernhard; Zu Eulenburg, Peter; Best, Christoph; Geber, Christian; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Birklein, Frank; Dieterich, Marianne

    2013-09-01

    Background In previous imaging studies the insular cortex (IC) has been identified as an essential part of the processing of a wide spectrum of perception and sensorimotor integration. Yet, there are no systematic lesion studies in a sufficient number of patients examining whether processing of vestibular and the interaction of somatosensory and vestibular signals take place in the IC. Methods We investigated acute stroke patients with lesions affecting the IC in order to fill this gap. In detail, we explored signs of a vestibular tone imbalance such as the deviation of the subjective visual vertical (SVV). We applied voxel-lesion behaviour mapping analysis in 27 patients with acute unilateral stroke. Results Our data demonstrate that patients with lesions of the posterior IC have an abnormal tilt of SVV. Furthermore, re-analysing data of 20 patients from a previous study, we found a positive correlation between thermal perception contralateral to the stroke and the severity of the SVV tilt. Conclusions We conclude that the IC is a sensory brain region where different modalities might interact.

  7. Are Covert Saccade Functionally Relevant in Vestibular Hypofunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, R; Pelisson, D; Dumas, O; Urquizar, Ch; Truy, E; Tilikete, C

    2018-06-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex maintains gaze stabilization during angular or linear head accelerations, allowing adequate dynamic visual acuity. In case of bilateral vestibular hypofunction, patients use saccades to compensate for the reduced vestibulo-ocular reflex function, with covert saccades occurring even during the head displacement. In this study, we questioned whether covert saccades help maintain dynamic visual acuity, and evaluated which characteristic of these saccades are the most relevant to improve visual function. We prospectively included 18 patients with chronic bilateral vestibular hypofunction. Subjects underwent evaluation of dynamic visual acuity in the horizontal plane as well as video recording of their head and eye positions during horizontal head impulse tests in both directions (36 ears tested). Frequency, latency, consistency of covert saccade initiation, and gain of covert saccades as well as residual vestibulo-ocular reflex gain were calculated. We found no correlation between residual vestibulo-ocular reflex gain and dynamic visual acuity. Dynamic visual acuity performance was however positively correlated with the frequency and gain of covert saccades and negatively correlated with covert saccade latency. There was no correlation between consistency of covert saccade initiation and dynamic visual acuity. Even though gaze stabilization in space during covert saccades might be of very short duration, these refixation saccades seem to improve vision in patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction during angular head impulses. These findings emphasize the need for specific rehabilitation technics that favor the triggering of covert saccades. The physiological origin of covert saccades is discussed.

  8. Vestibular regeneration--experimental models and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Silviu; Muresanu, Dafin F

    2012-09-01

    Therapies aimed at the protection and/or regeneration of inner ear hair cells are of great interest, given the significant monetary and quality of life impact of balance disorders. Different viral vectors have been shown to transfect various cell types in the inner ear. The past decade has provided tremendous advances in the use of adenoviral vectors to achieve targeted treatment delivery. Several routes of delivery have been identified to introduce vectors into the inner ear while minimizing injury to surrounding structures. Recently, the transcription factor Atoh1 was determined to play a critical role in hair cell differentiation. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of Atoh1 in culture and in vivo has demonstrated the ability to regenerate vestibular hair cells by causing transdifferentiation of neighbouring epithelial-supporting cells. Functional recovery of the vestibular system has also been documented following adenoviral-induced Atoh1 overexpression. Experiments demonstrating gene transfer in human vestibular epithelial cells reveal that the human inner ear is a suitable target for gene therapy. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Enhancing vestibular function in the elderly with imperceptible electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrador, Jorge M; Deegan, Brian M; Geraghty, Maria C; Wood, Scott J

    2018-01-10

    Age-related loss of vestibular function can result in decrements in gaze stabilization and increased fall risk in the elderly. This study was designed to see if low levels of electrical stochastic noise applied transcutaneously to the vestibular system can improve a gaze stabilization reflex in young and elderly subject groups. Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) using a video-based technique was obtained in 16 subjects during low frequency passive roll tilts. Consistent with previous studies, there was a significant reduction in OCR gains in the elderly compared to the young group. Imperceptible stochastic noise significantly increased OCR in the elderly (Mean 23%, CI: 17-35%). Increases in OCR gain were greatest for those with lowest baseline gain and were negligible in those with normal gain. Since stimulation was effective at low levels undetectable to subjects, stochastic noise may provide a new treatment alternative to enhance vestibular function, specifically otolith-ocular reflexes, in the elderly or patient populations with reduced otolith-ocular function.

  10. Effect of practicing yoga on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambhu, Tejaswini; Kumar, Shubhaganga Dhrruva; Prabhu, Prashanth

    2017-10-01

    The present study attempted to determine the effect of practicing yoga on functioning of sacculo-collic pathway using cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP). cVEMP was recorded from 40 participants (20 who practice yoga regularly and 20 who do not practice yoga regularly). The differences in amplitude of P1, N1, P1-N1 complex, asymmetry ratio and latencies of P1 and N1 of cVEMP were compared between both the groups. The results of the study showed that there was a significant increase (p yoga was significantly lower (Mean = 6.73) compared to the control group (Mean = 19.13). Multivariate regression analyses suggested that the number of years of yoga practice significantly predicted the amplitude of P1-N1 complex (β = 0.70, p yoga improves postural control and strengthens the muscles and vestibular system leading to enhanced cVEMP responses. The plastic changes in the vestibular system and increased muscular strength because of constant practicing of yoga could have led to changes in cVEMP responses. However, further studies on a larger group of individuals are essential for better clinical applicability of the results.

  11. Mesons and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.

    1980-01-01

    A short review of the topic of mesons in nuclei is exposed paying particular attention to the relationship between several mesonic processes. Special emphasis is put into the microscopic pictures that can ultimately relate all these processes with the elementary coupling of mesons to the nuclear hadronic components. The importance of the short range part of the nuclear interaction opens the doors to a more basic understanding in terms of the quark components of nucleons and isobars. (orig.)

  12. Exclusive photoreactions on light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, K.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanism of photon absorption on light nuclei in the Δ-resonance region is discussed. The present status of experimental results is briefly summarized. A recent data from 1.3-GeV Tokyo ES using a π sr spectrometer is introduced. Exclusive measurements of the photodisintegration of 3 He and 4 He may be a clear way to identify 2N, 3N and 4N absorptions. (author)

  13. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems

  14. The creation of new nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Hessberger, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    In the last 60 years physicists have created 20 artificial elements beyond uranium. In 1934 Enrico Fermi predicted the creation of new elements by bombarding atoms with neutrons. This method led to the discovery of neptunium (Z=93), plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium and fermium (Z=100). In fact the capture of a neutron is followed by a beta-decay which increases the atomic number (Z) by one unit. Beyond Z=100 beta-decay no more occurs so a new approach was necessary. Between the American Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Russian Dubna Institute a fierce competition broke out to produce new elements by bombarding transuranium nuclei with light elements such as helium, carbon, nitrogen. This new method required heavy equipment: ion accelerator and detectors but led to the creation of all the elements from Z=101 to Z=106. A new idea was to provoke the fusion of heavy nuclei such as lead and bismuth with colliding argon, nickel or zinc ion beams. This method called 'cold fusion' opened the way to reach the nuclei beyond Z=107. In 1996 the element Z=112 was the last discovered. The next step could be the element Z=114 for which a particular stability is expected. (A.C.)

  15. Radii of nuclei off stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to determine systematically the radii of the nuclei produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collision. The measurement of total reaction cross section using the projectile fragments of a single nuclide on a target give information about nuclear radii. The production cross section of the fragments is appreciable for many nuclides. Therefore, it is possible to map systematically the reaction radii of the nuclei which can be produced as the projectile fragments. In an experiment using the projectile fragments as the incident beam, the cross section can be expressed as a function of the radii of a projectile and a target. An experiment with He-8 produced by the fragmentation of C-12 is proposed. The He-8 has four neutrons in the p-3/2 orbit outside the He-4 core. Proton and neutron distributions for He isotopes were calculated on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method. The information related to this kind of distribution can be obtained by the proposed experiment. The nuclear structure effect is seen in the nuclear radii of other unstable nuclei. The experimental examples of the isotope shift measurement and the excitation energy are presented. (Kato, T.)

  16. Density functional theory of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaki, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The density functional theory of nuclei has come to draw attention of scientists in the field of nuclear structure because the theory is expected to provide reliable numerical data in wide range on the nuclear chart. This article is organized to present an overview of the theory to the people engaged in the theory of other fields as well as those people in the nuclear physics experiments. At first, the outline of the density functional theory widely used in the electronic systems (condensed matter, atoms, and molecules) was described starting from the Kohn-Sham equation derived on the variational principle. Then the theory used in the field of nuclear physics was presented. Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation by using Skyrme interaction was explained. Comparison of the results of calculations and experiments of binding energies and ground state mean square charge radii of some magic number nuclei were shown. The similarity and dissimilarity between the two streams were summarized. Finally the activities of the international project of Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF) which was started recently lead by US scientist was reported. This project is programmed for five years. One of the applications of the project is the calculation of the neutron capture cross section of nuclei on the r-process, which is absolutely necessary for the nucleosynthesis research. (S. Funahashi)

  17. Thermodynamical description of excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, P.

    1989-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions it has been possible to obtain composite systems at rather high excitation energies corresponding to temperatures of several MeV. The theoretical studies of these systems are based on concepts borrowed from thermodynamics or statistical physics, such as the temperature. In these lectures, we present the concepts of statistical physics which are involved in the physics of heavy ion as they are produced nowadays in the laboratory and also during the final stage of a supernova collapse. We do not attempt to describe the reaction mechanisms which yield such nuclear systems nor their decay by evaporation or fragmentation. We shall only study their static properties. The content of these lectures is organized in four main sections. The first one gives the basic features of statistical physics and thermodynamics necessary to understand quantum mechanics at finite temperature. In the second one, we present a study of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear physics. A phenomenological approach of the stability of hot nuclei follows. The microscopic point of view is proposed in the third part. Starting from the basic concepts derived in the first part, it provides a description of excited or hot nuclei which confirms the qualitative results of the second part. Furthermore it gives a full description of most properties of these nuclei as a function of temperature. Finally in the last part, a microscopic derivation of the equation of state of nuclear matter is proposed to study the collapse of a supernova core

  18. Exotic Nuclei and Yukawa's Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, ... This turned out to be changed, once we entered the regime of exotic nuclei. This shell evolution develops at many places on the nuclear chart in various forms. For example, superheavy magic numbers may be altered. Thus, we are led to a new paradigm as to how and where the nuclear shell evolves, and what consequences arise. The evolution of the shell affects weak process transitions, and plays a crucial role in deformation. The π and ρ mesons generate tensor forces, and are the fundamental elements of such intriguing phenomena. Thus, physics of exotic nuclei arises as a manifestation of Yukawa's forces

  19. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazzani, Elisa; Tritto, Simona; Spaiardi, Paolo; Botta, Laura; Manca, Marco; Prigioni, Ivo; Masetto, Sergio; Russo, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is to convert glutamate in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Glutamate decarboxylase exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67, that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  20. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo eRusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD is to convert glutamate in -aminobutyric acid (GABA.GAD exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67,.that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  1. The colours of Hubble Sc galaxy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskudaryan, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    The colorimetric data on the nuclei of the Sc galaxies are given. Comparison of the following parameters: color of a nucleus, integral color of a galaxy, Byurakan class, and spectral type of normal spirals gives the possibility to conclude: (1) The colors of the nuclei of the Sc galaxies have a high dispersion in its values. In all Byurakan classes the galaxies with intensely red and blue nuclei occur; (2) Some Sc galaxies exhibit a discrepancy between the spectral and morphological types. The results of colorimetry of nuclei indicate that almost all such Sc galaxies have intensely red nuclei which, naturally, provide for these late spectral types. It can be assumed that the intensely red color of the nuclei of such Sc galaxies is a result of a new type of activity of these nuclei; and (3) some Sc galaxies show the characteristics of the Markarian objects

  2. Vestibular cerebellum of thick-toed geckos (Chondrodactylus turnery GRAY, 1864) and C57/BL6N mice after the long-term space flight on the biosatellite BION-M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandra, Proshchina; Anastasia, Kharlamova; Valeriy, Barabanov; Victoria, Gulimova; Sergey, Saveliev

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of long-term space flights on neuronal and glial cells of the vestibular cerebellum of C57/BL6N mice and thick-toed geckos (Chondrodactylus turnery GRAY, 1864). The cerebella from 26 mice and 13 geckos were used in this study. Ten mice and five geckos were flown aboard the BION-M1 biosatellite. The other animals were used as controls. We used immunohistochemical techniques and classical histological method to reveal cell types in the vestibular cerebellum. Nonspecific pathomorphological changes in the Purkinje cells (such as chromatolysis, vacuolization and hyperchromatosis) were observed in the flight groups. However, these changes are reversible and were also found in some neurons in the control groups. In addition, as the vestibular cerebellum is an evolutionarily stable structure, thick-toed geckos may be a useful model for space flight studies on the vertebrate cerebellum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pre-adaptation to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation is associated with enhanced sensorimotor performance in novel vestibular environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance on a visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular stimulation was assessed in nine healthy subjects. Four subjects had previously been adapted to 120 minutes exposure to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS over 12 weekly sessions of 10 minutes; the remaining five subjects had never experienced GVS. Subjects were seated in a flight simulator and asked to null the roll motion of a visual bar presented on a screen using a joystick. Both the visual bar and the simulator cabin were moving in roll with a pseudorandom (sum of sines waveform that were uncorrelated. The cross correlation coefficient, which ranges from 1 (identical waveforms to 0 (unrelated waveforms, was calculated for the ideal (perfect nulling of bar motion and actual joystick input waveform for each subject. The cross correlation coefficient for the GVS-adapted group (0.90 [SD 0.04] was significantly higher (t[8]=3.162; p=0.013 than the control group (0.82 [SD 0.04], suggesting that prior adaptation to GVS was associated with an enhanced ability to perform the visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular noise.

  4. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  5. Preliminary evidence of improved cognitive performance following vestibular rehabilitation in children with combined ADHD (cADHD) and concurrent vestibular impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Younes; Rezazadeh, Nima; Moossavi, Abdollah; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah; Rostami, Reza; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Badfar, Faride; Moghadam, Sedigheh Farokhi; Sadeghi-Firoozabadi, Vahid; Khodabandelou, Yousef

    2017-12-01

    Balance function has been reported to be worse in ADHD children than in their normal peers. The present study hypothesized that an improvement in balance could result in better cognitive performance in children with ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of comprehensive vestibular rehabilitation therapy on the cognitive performance of children with combined ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. Subject were 54 children with combined ADHD. Those with severe vestibular impairment (n=33) were randomly assigned to two groups that were matched for age. A rehabilitation program comprising overall balance and gate, postural stability, and eye movement exercises was assigned to the intervention group. Subjects in the control group received no intervention for the same time period. Intervention was administered twice weekly for 12 weeks. Choice reaction time (CRT) and spatial working memory (SWM) subtypes of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were completed pre- and post-intervention to determine the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on the cognitive performance of the subjects with ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. ANCOVA was used to compare the test results of the intervention and control group post-test. The percentage of correct trial scores for the CRT achieved by the intervention group post-test increased significantly compared to those of the control group (p=0.029). The CRT mean latency scores were significantly prolonged in the intervention group following intervention (p=0.007) compared to the control group. No significant change was found in spatial functioning of the subjects with ADHD following 12 weeks of intervention (p>0.05). The study highlights the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on the cognitive performance of children with combined ADHD and concurrent vestibular disorder. The findings indicate that attention can be affected by early vestibular

  6. Achados vestibulares em usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Vestibular findings in hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Paulin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar os achados vestibulares em pacientes com perda auditiva neurossenssorial usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. MÉTODOS: vinte pacientes, 11 do sexo feminino e nove do sexo masculino, com idades entre 39 e 85 anos, com perda auditiva neurossenssorial bilateral de grau moderado e severo foram atendidos em uma Instituição de Ensino Superior e submetidos a uma anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação audiológica, imitanciometria e ao exame vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: a dos 20 pacientes avaliados, 18 (90% apresentaram queixa de zumbido, 15 (75% queixa de tontura e oito (40% queixa de cefaléia; b houve predomínio de alteração na prova calórica e no sistema vestibular periférico; c o resultado do exame vestibular esteve alterado em 14 pacientes (70%, sendo, oito casos (40% de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa e seis casos (30% de síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária; d verificou-se diferença significativa entre o resultado do exame vestibular e o tempo de uso do aparelho de amplificação sonora individual; e dos cinco pacientes que não referiram nenhum sintoma vestibular, quatro (80% apresentaram alteração no exame. CONCLUSÃO: ressalta-se a sensibilidade e importância do estudo funcional do sistema do equilíbrio neste tipo de população, uma vez que podem ocorrer alterações na avaliação labiríntica independente da presença de sintomas.PURPOSE: to check vestibular findings in patients with sensoneural hearing loss, hearing aid users. METHODS: 20 patients (eleven females and nine males aging from 39 to 85-year-old with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, from moderate to severe degrees, were attended in a higher education institution evaluated by medical history, otological inspections, complete basic conventional audiological evaluations, acoustic impedance tests and vectoeletronystagmography. RESULTS: a from the 20 evaluated

  7. Oculomotor and Vestibular Findings in Gaucher Disease Type 3 and Their Correlation with Neurological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Bremova-Ertl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesTo evaluate the function of the oculomotor and vestibular systems and to correlate these findings with the clinical status of patients with Gaucher disease type 3 (GD3. The goal of this cross-sectional and longitudinal study was to find oculomotor biomarkers for future clinical trials.MethodsTwenty-six patients with GD3 were assessed for eligibility and 21 were able to perform at least one task. Horizontal and vertical reflexive saccades, smooth pursuit, gaze-holding, optokinetic nystagmus, and horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR were examined by video-oculography/video-head impulse test and compared concurrently with 33 healthy controls. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA, the modified Severity Scoring Tool (mSST, and Grooved Pegboard Test (GPT were administered to assess overall neurological function. Eleven patients were also re-assessed after 1 year.ResultsNine out of 17 patients exhibited gaze-holding deficits. One patient had upbeat nystagmus. Three patients presented with bilateral abducens palsy in combination with central oculomotor disorders, suggesting a bilateral involvement of the abducens nucleus. Horizontal angular VOR gain was reduced in all patients (0.66 ± 0.37 compared with controls (1.1 ± 0.11, p < 0.001. Most strongly correlated with clinical rating scales were peak velocity of downward saccades (SARA: ρ = −0.752, p < 0.0005; mSST: ρ = −0.611, p = 0.003; GPT: ρ = −0.649, p = 0.005 and duration of vertical saccades (SARA: ρ = 0.806, p < 0.001; mSST: ρ = 0.700, p < 0.0005; GPT: ρ = 0.558, p = 0.02 together with the VOR gain (SARA: ρ = −0.63, p = 0.016; mSST: ρ = −0.725, p = 0.003; GPT: ρ = −0.666, p = 0.004. Vertical smooth pursuit gain decreased significantly at follow-up.InterpretationThis study shows neuronal degeneration of the brainstem and cerebellum with combined involvement of

  8. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppelier, N.A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11 Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20i Pb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208 Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  9. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrocochleography (EcochG, incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM, the Summating Potential (SP, and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP, has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG, incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system.

  10. Rapid limb-specific modulation of vestibular contributions to ankle muscle activity during locomotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Vlutters, Mark; Dakin, Christopher J.; van der Kooij, Herman; Blouin, Jean Sébastien; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2017-01-01

    Key points: -The vestibular influence on human walking is phase-dependent and modulated across both limbs with changes in locomotor velocity and cadence. -Using a split-belt treadmill, we show that vestibular influence on locomotor activity is modulated independently in each limb. -The independent

  11. Vestibular brain changes within 70 days of head down bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; De Dios, Yiri; Gadd, Nichole; Wood, Scott; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2018-03-12

    Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) is frequently utilized as a spaceflight analog research environment to study the effects of axial body unloading and fluid shifts that are associated with spaceflight in the absence of gravitational modifications. HDBR has been shown to result in balance changes, presumably due to sensory reweighting and adaptation processes. Here, we examined whether HDBR results in changes in the neural correlates of vestibular processing. Thirteen men participated in a 70-day HDBR intervention; we measured balance, functional mobility, and functional brain activity in response to vestibular stimulation at 7 time points before, during, and after HDBR. Vestibular stimulation was administered by means of skull taps, resulting in activation of the vestibular cortex and deactivation of the cerebellar, motor, and somatosensory cortices. Activation in the bilateral insular cortex, part of the vestibular network, gradually increased across the course of HDBR, suggesting an upregulation of vestibular inputs in response to the reduced somatosensory inputs experienced during bed rest. Furthermore, greater increase of activation in multiple frontal, parietal, and occipital regions in response to vestibular stimulation during HDBR was associated with greater decrements in balance and mobility from before to after HDBR, suggesting reduced neural efficiency. These findings shed light on neuroplastic changes occurring with conditions of altered sensory inputs, and reveal the potential for central vestibular-somatosensory convergence and reweighting with bed rest. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The prevalence of vestibular symptoms in migraine or tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdal, Gülden; Ozge, Aynur; Ergör, Gül

    2013-01-01

    We assessed frequency of vestibular symptoms in Headache Clinic patients over 10 years. A descriptive study of 5111 consecutive patients with tension-type headache or migraine, analyzed for dizziness/ vertigo accompanying headache and for a lifetime history of motion-sickness, cyclic vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy. Migraine patients were re-grouped as those with vestibular symptoms (dizziness/vertigo or motion sickness) and those without and their data then re-analyzed. There were 1880 migraine patients and 3231 tension-type headache patients. Significantly more migraine patients than tension-type headache patients experienced vestibular symptoms (p< 0.0001). The migraine with vestibular symptoms group was significantly younger (p< 0.05) had more aura, more phonophobia with migraine attacks (p< 0.0001). Menstruation and reported sleep problems impacted on headaches. While past history of cyclical vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy was about twice as common in migraine with aura and it was also more common in migraine with vestibular symptoms than migraine without vestibular symptoms. Vestibular symptoms are common in migraine patients. Migraine with vestibular symptoms might constitute a special group, one more likely to have had cyclic vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy.

  13. Intermediate Latency-Evoked Potentials of Multimodal Cortical Vestibular Areas: Galvanic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kammermeier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHuman multimodal vestibular cortical regions are bilaterally anterior insulae and posterior opercula, where characteristic vestibular-related cortical potentials were previously reported under acoustic otolith stimulation. Galvanic vestibular stimulation likely influences semicircular canals preferentially. Galvanic stimulation was compared to previously established data under acoustic stimulation.Methods14 healthy right-handed subjects, who were also included in the previous acoustic potential study, showed normal acoustic and galvanic vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. They received 2,000 galvanic binaural bipolar stimuli for each side during EEG recording.ResultsVestibular cortical potentials were found in all 14 subjects and in the pooled data of all subjects (“grand average” bilaterally. Anterior insula and posterior operculum were activated exclusively under galvanic stimulation at 25, 35, 50, and 80 ms; frontal regions at 30 and 45 ms. Potentials at 70 ms in frontal regions and at 110 ms at all of the involved regions could also be recorded; these events were also found using acoustic stimulation in our previous study.ConclusionGalvanic semicircular canal stimulation evokes specific potentials in addition to those also found with acoustic otolith stimulation in identically located regions of the vestibular cortex. Vestibular cortical regions activate differently by galvanic and acoustic input at the peripheral sensory level.SignificanceDifferential effects in vestibular cortical-evoked potentials may see clinical use in specific vertigo disorders.

  14. Age-Related Change in Vestibular Ganglion Cell Populations in Individuals With Presbycusis and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Nelson, Erik G

    2017-04-01

    We sought to establish that the decline of vestibular ganglion cell counts uniquely correlates with spiral ganglion cell counts, cochlear hair cell counts, and hearing phenotype in individuals with presbycusis. The relationship between aging in the vestibular system and aging in the cochlea is a topic of ongoing investigation. Histopathologic age-related changes the vestibular system may mirror what is seen in the cochlea, but correlations with hearing phenotype and the impact of presbycusis are not well understood. Vestibular ganglion cells, spiral ganglion cells, and cochlear hair cells were counted in specimens from individuals with presbycusis and normal hearing. These were taken from within a large collection of processed human temporal bones. Correlations between histopathology and hearing phenotype were investigated. Vestibular ganglion cell counts were positively correlated with spiral ganglion cell counts and cochlear hair cell counts and were negatively correlated with hearing phenotype. There was no statistical evidence on linear regression to suggest that the relationship between age and cell populations differed significantly according to whether presbycusis was present or not. Superior vestibular ganglion cells were more negatively correlated with age than inferior ganglion cells. No difference in vestibular ganglion cells was noted based on sex. Vestibular ganglion cell counts progressively deteriorate with age, and this loss correlates closely with changes in the cochlea, as well as hearing phenotype. However, these correlations do not appear to be unique in individuals with presbycusis as compared with those with normal hearing.

  15. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eCandidi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical-cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (Vestibular Neuritis – VN- and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo – BPPV with respect to healthy matched controls (C. We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: i mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and ii mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations.

  16. Interaction of visual and