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Sample records for vestibular monitoring system

  1. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    that this may be caused by both cochlear and retrocochlear mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms may also be at play in the case of dizziness, which may broaden perspectives of therapeutic approach. This study presents a systematic and detailed assessment of vestibular histopathology in temporal bones from patients...... with VS. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of vestibular system histopathology in temporal bones from 17 patients with unilateral VS. The material was obtained from The Copenhagen Temporal Bone Collection. RESULTS: Vestibular schwannomas were associated with atrophy of the vestibular ganglion, loss of fiber...... density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...

  2. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Central vestibular system: vestibular nuclei and posterior cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmack, Neal H

    2003-06-15

    The vestibular nuclei and posterior cerebellum are the destination of vestibular primary afferents and the subject of this review. The vestibular nuclei include four major nuclei (medial, descending, superior and lateral). In addition, smaller vestibular nuclei include: Y-group, parasolitary nucleus, and nucleus intercalatus. Each of the major nuclei can be subdivided further based primarily on cytological and immunohistochemical histological criteria or differences in afferent and/or efferent projections. The primary afferent projections of vestibular end organs are distributed to several ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Vestibular nuclei communicate bilaterally through a commissural system that is predominantly inhibitory. Secondary vestibular neurons also receive convergent sensory information from optokinetic circuitry, central visual system and neck proprioceptive systems. Secondary vestibular neurons cannot distinguish between sources of afferent activity. However, the discharge of secondary vestibular neurons can distinguish between "active" and "passive" movements. The posterior cerebellum has extensive afferent and efferent connections with vestibular nuclei. Vestibular primary afferents are distributed to the ipsilateral uvula-nodulus as mossy fibers. Vestibular secondary afferents are distributed bilaterally. Climbing fibers to the cerebellum originate from two subnuclei of the contralateral inferior olive; the dorsomedial cell column and beta-nucleus. Vestibular climbing fibers carry information only from the vertical semicircular canals and otoliths. They establish a coordinate map, arrayed in sagittal zones on the surface of the uvula-nodulus. Purkinje cells respond to vestibular stimulation with antiphasic modulation of climbing fiber responses (CFRs) and simple spikes (SSs). The modulation of SSs is out of phase with the modulation of vestibular primary afferents. Modulation of SSs persists, even after vestibular primary afferents are destroyed by a

  4. Neuropharmacology of Vestibular System Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in...

  5. Pharmacology of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P F

    2000-02-01

    In the past year significant advances have been made in our understanding of the neurochemistry and neuropharmacology of the peripheral and central vestibular systems. The recognition of the central importance of excitatory amino acids and their receptors at the level of the hair cells, vestibular nerve and vestibular nucleus has progressed further, and the role of nitric oxide in relation to activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype is becoming increasingly clear. Increasing evidence suggests that excessive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation and nitric oxide production after exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics is a critical part of hair cell death, and new pharmacological strategies for preventing aminoglycoside ototoxicity are emerging as a result. Conversely, the use of aminoglycosides to lesion the peripheral vestibular system in the treatment of Meniere's disease has been studied intensively. In the vestibular nucleus, new studies suggest the importance of opioid, nociceptin and glucocorticoid receptors in the control of vestibular reflex function. Finally, the mechanisms of action and optimal use of antihistamines in the treatment of vestibular disorders has also received a great deal of attention.

  6. Neuropharmacology of vestibular system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-03-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and drug mechanisms of action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulator receptors and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. A critical review of the pharmacology and highlights of the major advances are discussed in each case.

  7. The value of close monitoring in vestibular rehabilitation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, M; Koaik, Y; Sabri, A

    2017-03-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is a well-established treatment modality for patients with vestibular problems. Performing vestibular rehabilitation therapy in a closely monitored setting may result in a better outcome than a home exercise programme. A retrospective study was conducted of patients undergoing vestibular rehabilitation therapy between June 2005 and November 2012 in a tertiary university hospital. The Dynamic Gait Index, the main outcome measure, was utilised before and after the rehabilitation programme. The magnitude of improvement for all patients was analysed, mainly to compare the home exercise group with the closely monitored therapy group. Only 32 patients underwent the vestibular rehabilitation therapy programme. In all patients, there was significant improvement in the mean Dynamic Gait Index score (from 11.75 to 17.38; p rehabilitation therapy resulted in improved performance status. More studies are needed to establish the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation therapy and compare closely monitored therapy with tailored home exercise rehabilitation.

  8. Anatomy of the vestibular system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Chang, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A sense of proper sensory processing of head motion and the coordination of visual and postural movements to maintain equilibrium is critical to everyday function. The vestibular system is an intricate organization that involves multiple levels of sensory processing to achieve this goal. This chapter provides an overview of the anatomical structures and pathways of the vestibular system. The five major vestibular structures are located in the inner ear and include: the utricle, the saccule, and the lateral, superior, and posterior semicircular canals. Hair cells on the neuroepithelium of the peripheral vestibular organs carry sensory impulses to primary processing centers in the brainstem and the cerebellum. These areas send input via ascending and descending projections to coordinate vital reflexes, such as the vestibuloocular reflex and the vestibulospinal reflex, which allow for the proper orientation of the eyes and body in response to head motion. Specific connections regarding higher level cortical vestibular structures are poorly understood. Vestibular centers in the brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex function to integrate sensory information from the peripheral vestibular organs, visual system, and proprioceptive system to allow for proper balance and orientation of the body in its environment.

  9. Neuropharmacological basis of vestibular system disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario; Seseña, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Clinicians are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and of drug action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulators dynamics and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. The critical analysis of the literature reveals that there is a significant lack of information defining the real utility of diverse drugs used in clinical practice. The development of basic studies addressing drug actions at the molecular, cellular and systems level, combined with reliable and well controlled clinical trials, would provide the scientific basis for new strategies for the treatment of vestibular disorders.

  10. The vestibular system and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-02-01

    The last year has seen a great deal of new information published relating vestibular dysfunction to cognitive impairment in humans, especially in the elderly. The objective of this review is to summarize and critically evaluate this new evidence in the context of the previous literature. This review will address the recent epidemiological/survey studies that link vestibular dysfunction with cognitive impairment in the elderly; recent clinical investigations into cognitive impairment in the context of vestibular dysfunction, both in the elderly and in the cases of otic capsule dehiscence and partial bilateral vestibulopathy; recent evidence that vestibular impairment is associated with hippocampal atrophy; and finally recent evidence relating to the hypothesis that vestibular dysfunction could be a risk factor for dementia. The main implication of these recent studies is that vestibular dysfunction, possibly of any type, may result in cognitive impairment, and this could be especially so for the elderly. Such symptoms will need to be considered in the treatment of patients with vestibular disorders.

  11. Idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Hullar, Timothy E; Dorward, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    ... in the etiology of scoliosis. In this article, we discuss putative mechanisms for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and review the current evidence supporting a role for the vestibular system in adolescent idiopathic...

  12. Idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Hullar, Timothy E; Dorward, Ian G

    2015-02-01

    Despite its high prevalence, the etiology underlying idiopathic scoliosis remains unclear. Although initial scrutiny has focused on genetic, biochemical, biomechanical, nutritional and congenital causes, there is growing evidence that aberrations in the vestibular system may play a role in the etiology of scoliosis. In this article, we discuss putative mechanisms for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and review the current evidence supporting a role for the vestibular system in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A comprehensive search of the English literature was performed using PubMed ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed ). Research articles studying interactions between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system were selected and evaluated for inclusion in a literature review. Eighteen manuscripts of level 3-4 clinical evidence to support an association between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and dysfunction of the vestibular system were identified. These studies include data from physiologic and morphologic studies in humans. Clinical data are supported by animal model studies to suggest a causative link between the vestibular system and AIS. Clinical data and a limited number of animal model studies suggest a causative role of the vestibular system in AIS, although this association has not been reproduced in all studies.

  13. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  14. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  15. Molecular aging of the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosel, Sonja; Laub, Christoph; Averdam, Anne; Bender, Andreas; Elstner, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Dizziness and imbalance frequently affect the elderly and contribute to falls and frailty. In many geriatric patients, clinical testing uncovers a dysfunction of the vestibular system, but no specific etiology can be identified. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated age-related degeneration of peripheral and central vestibular neurons, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In contrast, recent studies into age-related hearing loss strongly implicate mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death of cochlear hair cells. While some data suggest that analogous biological pathomechanisms may underlie vestibular dysfunction, actual proof is missing. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular causes of vestibular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda A. Mathews

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN, and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles.

  17. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Miranda A; Camp, Aaron J; Murray, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN), and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles.

  18. Sodium arsanilate-induced vestibular dysfunction in rats: effects on open-field behavior and spontaneous activity in the automated digiscan monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkopp, K P; Prkacin, A; Hargreaves, E L

    1990-08-01

    Vestibular dysfunction was chemically induced in Long-Evans rats by intratympanic injections (30 mg per side) of sodium arsanilate (atoxyl). Following a one-week recovery period the rats were behaviorally assayed for integrity of the labyrinthine systems. All subjects were tested for presence of the air-righting reflex, the contact-righting reflex (by lightly holding a sheet of Plexiglas against the soles of the rat's feet), and body rotation-induced nystagmus. All animals were then tested for their ability to remain on a small (15 x 15 cm) platform. Next, the subjects were given two 10-min open-field tests during which ambulation, rearing, grooming, and defecation responses were recorded. Four to five weeks later all rats were tested twice (60 min per session) in the automated Digiscan Activity Monitor which provides a multivariate assessment of spontaneous motor activity. The rats with vestibular dysfunction (Group VNX) took significantly less time to fall off the platform (p less than 0.01). They also exhibited significantly more open-field ambulation but fewer rearing responses (ps less than 0.01). An examination of group correlation coefficients for open-field variables and the platform test scores revealed some interesting group differences (ps less than 0.05). In the Digiscan tests the atoxyl-treated rats exhibited fewer number of horizontal movements, but increased speed for these movements (ps less than 0.05). Vertical movements did not differ significantly in incidence, but these movements were greatly reduced in duration (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate...

  20. Effects of Sound on the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    receptors and directly affects central nervous system nuclei. Visual, olfactory, and gustatory responses would be expected if sound directly affected the...AMRL-TR-75-89 EFFECTS OF SOUND ON THE VESTIBULAR SYSTEM MIAMI UNIVERSITY NO OXFORD, OHIO 45056 MARCH 1976 | j...Approvedrfor public release: distribution unlimited AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DMSION Air Force Systems Command Wright.Patterson

  1. The thalamocortical vestibular system in animals and humans

    OpenAIRE

    LOPEZ, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    The vestibular system provides the brain with sensory signals about three-dimensional head rotations and translations. These signals are important for postural and oculomotor control, as well as for spatial and bodily perception and cognition, and they are subtended by pathways running from the vestibular nuclei to the thalamus, cerebellum and the "vestibular cortex." The present review summarizes current knowledge on the anatomy of the thalamocortical vestibular system and discusses data fro...

  2. Understanding the links between vestibular and limbic systems regulating emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Archana; Jinu, K V; Sailesh, Kumar Sai; Mishra, Soumya; Reddy, Udaya Kumar; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular system, which consists of structures in the inner ear and brainstem, plays a vital role is body balance and patient well-being. In recent years, modulating this system by vestibular stimulation techniques are reported to be effective in stress relief and possibly patient's emotional well-being. Emotions refer to an aroused state involving intense feeling, autonomic activation, and related change in behavior, which accompany many of our conscious experiences. The limbic system is primarily involved in the regulation of emotions. Considering the extensive networks between vestibular and limbic system, it is likely that vestibular stimulation techniques may be useful in influencing emotions. Hence, we review here, the possible mechanisms through which vestibular system can influence emotions and highlight the necessary knowledge gaps, which warrants further research to develop vestibular stimulation techniques as a means to treat health conditions associated with emotional disturbances.

  3. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Andrea M.; Dora E. Angelaki

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem–...

  4. The thalamocortical vestibular system in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    The vestibular system provides the brain with sensory signals about three-dimensional head rotations and translations. These signals are important for postural and oculomotor control, as well as for spatial and bodily perception and cognition, and they are subtended by pathways running from the vestibular nuclei to the thalamus, cerebellum and the "vestibular cortex." The present review summarizes current knowledge on the anatomy of the thalamocortical vestibular system and discusses data from electrophysiology and neuroanatomy in animals by comparing them with data from neuroimagery and neurology in humans. Multiple thalamic nuclei are involved in vestibular processing, including the ventroposterior complex, the ventroanterior-ventrolateral complex, the intralaminar nuclei and the posterior nuclear group (medial and lateral geniculate nuclei, pulvinar). These nuclei contain multisensory neurons that process and relay vestibular, proprioceptive and visual signals to the vestibular cortex. In non-human primates, the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) has been proposed as the core vestibular region. Yet, vestibular responses have also been recorded in the somatosensory cortex (area 2v, 3av), intraparietal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex (area 7), area MST, frontal cortex, cingulum and hippocampus. We analyze the location of the corresponding regions in humans, and especially the human PIVC, by reviewing neuroimaging and clinical work. The widespread vestibular projections to the multimodal human PIVC, somatosensory cortex, area MST, intraparietal sulcus and hippocampus explain the large influence of vestibular signals on self-motion perception, spatial navigation, internal models of gravity, one's body perception and bodily self-consciousness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Rhythm by the Vestibular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Phillip; Zheng, Yiwen; Smith, Paul F

    2017-11-22

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved over millions of years to detect acceleration of the head, both rotational and translational, in three dimensions. One of its most important functions is to stabilize gaze during unexpected head movement; however, it is also important in the control of posture and autonomic reflexes. Theta rhythm is a 3-12 Hz oscillating EEG signal that is intimately linked to self-motion and is also known to be important in learning and memory. Many studies over the last two decades have shown that selective activation of the vestibular system, either using natural rotational or translational stimulation, or electrical stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system, can induce and modulate theta activity. Furthermore, inactivation of the vestibular system has been shown to significantly reduce theta in freely moving animals, which may be linked to its impairment of place cell function as well as spatial learning and memory. The pathways through which vestibular information modulate theta rhythm remain debatable. However, vestibular responses have been found in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) and activation of the vestibular system causes an increase in acetylcholine release into the hippocampus, probably from the medial septum. Therefore, a pathway from the vestibular nucleus complex and/or cerebellum to the PPTg, supramammillary nucleus, posterior hypothalamic nucleus and the septum, to the hippocampus, is likely. The modulation of theta by the vestibular system may have implications for vestibular effects on cognitive function and the contribution of vestibular impairment to the risk of dementia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  6. The cognitive neurology of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemungal, Barry M

    2014-02-01

    The aim is to reappraise the current state about what we know of vestibular cognition. The review focuses on cognition and perception, and hence the stress on human studies. In addition, the cerebral cortex is the main but not exclusive brain region of interest. There is a brief mention of vestibular ocular function if only to demonstrate the differential processing between reflex and perception. The effect of vestibular activation on some aspects of cognition, for example neglect, is not reviewed, as there have been no recent landmark findings in this area. The vestibular cerebellum is pivotal in the differential gating of vestibular perceptual and ocular signals to the cerebral cortex. The neuroanatomical correlates mediating vestibular sensations of self-motion ('am I moving?') and spatial orientation ('where am I now?') are distinct. Vestibular-motion perception is supported by a widespread white matter network. Vestibular activation specifically reduces visual motion cortical excitability, whereas other visual cortical regions show an increase in excitability. As the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) and self-motion perception can be uncoupled both behaviourally and in neural correlate, deficits underlying vestibular patients' symptoms may not be revealed by simple VOR assessment. Given the pivotal cerebellar role in gating vestibular signals to perceptual regions, modulating mechanisms of cerebellar plasticity, for example by combining training with medication or brain stimulation, may prove fruitful in treating the symptoms of chronic dizzy patients.

  7. Functional and anatomic alterations in the gentamicin-damaged vestibular system in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, HM; Dijk, T; Stokroos, [No Value; van der Want, TJL; Albers, FWJ

    Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expected functional and morphologic effect of gentamicin on the vestibular system simultaneously by measurement of vestibular evoked potentials and electron microscopic evaluation. Background: Vestibular short-latency evoked potentials to

  8. Prosthetic implantation of the human vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Justin S; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Nowack, Amy; Shepherd, Sarah J; Bierer, Steven M; Jameyson, Elyse; Kaneko, Chris R S; Phillips, James O; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2014-01-01

    A functional vestibular prosthesis can be implanted in human such that electrical stimulation of each semicircular canal produces canal-specific eye movements while preserving vestibular and auditory function. A number of vestibular disorders could be treated with prosthetic stimulation of the vestibular end organs. We have previously demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that a vestibular neurostimulator, based on the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant, can produce canal-specific electrically evoked eye movements while preserving auditory and vestibular function. An investigational device exemption has been obtained from the FDA to study the feasibility of treating uncontrolled Ménière's disease with the device. The UW/Nucleus vestibular implant was implanted in the perilymphatic space adjacent to the three semicircular canal ampullae of a human subject with uncontrolled Ménière's disease. Preoperative and postoperative vestibular and auditory function was assessed. Electrically evoked eye movements were measured at 2 time points postoperatively. Implantation of all semicircular canals was technically feasible. Horizontal canal and auditory function were largely, but not totally, lost. Electrode stimulation in 2 of 3 canals resulted in canal-appropriate eye movements. Over time, stimulation thresholds increased. Prosthetic implantation of the semicircular canals in humans is technically feasible. Electrical stimulation resulted in canal-specific eye movements, although thresholds increased over time. Preservation of native auditory and vestibular function, previously observed in animals, was not demonstrated in a single subject with advanced Ménière's disease.

  9. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  10. Genetic disorders of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppsteiner, Robert W; Smith, Richard J H

    2011-10-01

    This review highlights the current body of literature related to the genetics of inherited vestibular disorders and provides a framework for the characterization of these disorders. We emphasize peripheral causes of vestibular dysfunction and highlight recent advances in the field, point out gaps in understanding, and focus on key areas for future investigation. The discovery of a modifier gene that leads to a more severe Usher syndrome phenotype calls into question the assumption that Usher syndrome is universally a monogenic disorder. Despite the use of several investigational approaches, the genetic basis of Menière's disease remains poorly understood. Evidence for a vestibular phenotype associated with DFNB1 suggests that mutations in other genes causally related to nonsyndromic hearing loss also may have an unrecognized vestibular phenotype. Our understanding of the genetic basis for vestibular disorders is superficial. Significant challenges include defining the genetics of inherited isolated vestibular dysfunction and understanding the pathological basis of Menière's disease. However, improved characterization of inherited vestibular dysfunction, coupled with advanced genetic techniques such as targeted genome capture and massively parallel sequencing, provides an opportunity to investigate these diseases at the genetic level.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation in the central vestibular system--review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T; Takeda, N; Kiyama, H; Kubo, T

    1998-01-01

    Vestibular compensation consists of two stages: the inhibition of the contralesional medial vestibular nucleus (contra-MVe) activities at the acute stage after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) and the recovery and maintenance of the ipsilesional MVe (ipsi-MVe) spontaneous activities at the chronic stage after UL. In this paper, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation in the central vestibular system using several morphological and pharmacological approaches in rats. Based on our examinations, we propose the following hypotheses: i) at the acute stage after UL, the activated neurons in the ipsi-MVe project their axons into the flocculus to inhibit the contra-MVe neurons via the NMDA receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and/or GABA-mediated signalling, resulting in the restoration of balance between intervestibular nuclear activities. ii) At the chronic stage after UL, the flocculus depresses the inhibitory effects on the ipsi-MVe neurons via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) beta, protein kinase C (PKC) and glutamate receptor (GluR) delta-2, to help the recovery and maintenance of ipsi-MVe activities.

  12. [Neuronal plasticity of otolith-related vestibular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Suk-King; Lai, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Fu-Xing; Ma, Chun-Wai; Shum, Daisy K Y; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2008-12-01

    This review focuses on our effort in addressing the development and lesion-induced plasticity of the gravity sensing system. After severance of sensory input from one inner ear, there is a bilateral imbalance in response dynamics and spatial coding behavior between neuronal subpopulations on the two sides. These data provide the basis for deranged spatial coding and motor deficits accompanying unilateral labyrinthectomy. Recent studies have also confirmed that both glutamate receptors and neurotrophin receptors within the bilateral vestibular nuclei are implicated in the plasticity during vestibular compensation and development. Changes in plasticity not only provide insight into the formation of a spatial map and recovery of vestibular function but also on the design of drugs for therapeutic strategies applicable to infants or vestibular disorders such as vertigo and dizziness.

  13. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrea M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem-cerebellar circuitry. These include the sensorimotor transformations for reflex generation, the neural computations for inertial motion estimation, the distinction between active and passive head movements, as well as the integration of vestibular and proprioceptive information for body motion estimation. A common theme in the solution to such computational problems is the concept of internal models and their neural implementation. Recent studies have shed new insights into important organizational principles that closely resemble those proposed for other sensorimotor systems, where their neural basis has often been more difficult to identify. As such, the vestibular system provides an excellent model to explore common neural processing strategies relevant both for reflexive and for goal-directed, voluntary movement as well as perception.

  14. Sustained and Transient Vestibular Systems: A Physiological Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curthoys, Ian S; MacDougall, Hamish G; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Otolithic afferents with regular resting discharge respond to gravity or low-frequency linear accelerations, and we term these the static or sustained otolithic system. However, in the otolithic sense organs, there is anatomical differentiation across the maculae and corresponding physiological differentiation. A specialized band of receptors called the striola consists of mainly type I receptors whose hair bundles are weakly tethered to the overlying otolithic membrane. The afferent neurons, which form calyx synapses on type I striolar receptors, have irregular resting discharge and have low thresholds to high frequency (e.g., 500 Hz) bone-conducted vibration and air-conducted sound. High-frequency sound and vibration likely causes fluid displacement which deflects the weakly tethered hair bundles of the very fast type I receptors. Irregular vestibular afferents show phase locking, similar to cochlear afferents, up to stimulus frequencies of kilohertz. We term these irregular afferents the transient system signaling dynamic otolithic stimulation. A 500-Hz vibration preferentially activates the otolith irregular afferents, since regular afferents are not activated at intensities used in clinical testing, whereas irregular afferents have low thresholds. We show how this sustained and transient distinction applies at the vestibular nuclei. The two systems have differential responses to vibration and sound, to ototoxic antibiotics, to galvanic stimulation, and to natural linear acceleration, and such differential sensitivity allows probing of the two systems. A 500-Hz vibration that selectively activates irregular otolithic afferents results in stimulus-locked eye movements in animals and humans. The preparatory myogenic potentials for these eye movements are measured in the new clinical test of otolith function-ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. We suggest 500-Hz vibration may identify the contribution of the transient system to vestibular controlled

  15. Laboratory testing of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew H

    2010-10-01

    Recent reports on vestibular testing, relevant to clinical diagnosis, are reviewed.Besides the case history and bedside examination, objective measurement of the vestibuloocular reflex in all of its facets remains the cornerstone in the diagnostic process. In recent years, this has been enhanced considerably by reliable unilateral tests for the otolith organs, most notably by vestibular-evoked myogenic potential recording and estimation of subjective visual vertical. In addition, progress has been made in the investigation of multisensory interaction, involving visual acuity and posturography.Technological developments include improved eye movement measurement techniques, electrotactile and vibrotactile sensory enhancement or substitution, the use of virtual reality devices and motion stimulators such as hexapods and the rediscovery of galvanic vestibular stimulation as a research and diagnostic tool. The recent introduction of new tests, together with the development of novel technologies, is gradually increasing the scope of the physical and bedside examination of the dizzy patient (see chapter 'Medical management of peripheral disorders' in this issue). The use of more complex equipment, such as rotating chairs, linear sleds, hexapods and posturography platforms, is likely to become limited to specialized laboratories and rehabilitation centers in future years. Further, high resolution magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) and computed tomography have allowed insight into the morphology and determination of malformations of the human labyrinth.

  16. [Anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system: review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, L; Vitte, E

    2004-10-01

    The vestibular system is a complex system involving not only posterior labyrinth but also central structures such as cerebellum, striatum, thalamus, frontal and prefrontal cortex to assure balance, movements and walking. Information reaching the vestibular complex are not purely vestibular but also from visual, somatosensory and cerebellar origins. The equilibrium is also a complex physiological function needing concordance of vestibular, visual and somatosensory information or either central compensation after an injury but also an integrity of the central nervous system.

  17. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-12-26

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  18. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eLacquaniti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  19. [Localization of nitric oxide synthase in the chicken vestibular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guohui; Wang, Jibao

    2002-08-01

    To locate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the chicken vestibular system. The frozen section were processed for NADPH-d histochemistry in a solution containing NADPH and nitroblue tetnazolium (NBT) to demonstrate NOS positive reactivity. NOS positive staining, black-blue in color, was seen at the nerve ending, nerve fibers of the utricul and saculla and ampiculium. Ganglion cells had different activity. The shape of the cells seems to be round or oral. Collectively, data indicate the presence of active NOS in these tissue and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  20. Laboratory examinations for the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Rosengren, Sally; Kingma, Herman

    2018-02-01

    In the last decades, researchers suggested that clinical assessment of labyrinthine function in detail became easy thanks to video head impulse tests (VHITs), vestibular evoked myogenic potential test (VEMP) and video-oculography (VOG). It has been argued that they can replace electronystagmography, the caloric and rotatory chair tests. This review addresses the latest evaluations of these tests and the opportunities they offer, but also the limitations in clinical practice. The VHIT and suppression head impulse test (SHIMP) are under ideal circumstances able to accurately identify deficits of the VOR in 3D. However, in a relevant part of the patient population, pupil tracking is inaccurate, video-goggles slip and VOR quantification is problematic. The dissociation between the VHIT and caloric test suggests that these tests are complementary. A new 3D-VOG technique claims to quantify eye torsion better than before, opening multiple diagnostic possibilities. VEMPs remain difficult to standardize. Variability in normal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential amplitude is large. VEMPs become smaller or absent with age, raising questions of whether there is a lower normal limit at all. Recent research shows that the labyrinth is directly stimulated in the MRI offering new opportunities for diagnostics and research. In clinical practice, the VHIT, SHIMP, VEMP and new 3D-VOG techniques improve diagnostic power. Unfortunately, technical issues or variability prevent reliable quantitative evaluation in a part of the regular patient population. The traditional caloric and rotatory chair test can still be considered as valuable complementary tests.

  1. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  2. Anatomy, physiology, and physics of the peripheral vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, H; van de Berg, R

    2016-01-01

    Many medical doctors consider vertigo and dizziness as the major, almost obligatory complaints in patients with vestibular disorders. In this chapter, we will explain that vestibular disorders result in much more diverse and complex complaints. Many of these other complaints are unfortunately often misinterpreted and incorrectly classified as psychogenic. When we really understand the function of the vestibular system, it becomes quite obvious why patients with vestibular disorders complain about a loss of visual acuity, imbalance, fear of falling, cognitive and attentional problems, fatigue that persists even when the vertigo attacks and dizziness decreases or even disappears. Another interesting new aspect in this chapter is that we explain why the function of the otolith system is so important, and that it is a mistake to focus on the function of the semicircular canals only, especially when we want to understand why some patients seem to suffer more than others from the loss of canal function as objectified by reduced caloric responses. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Signal processing in the vestibular system during active versus passive head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Roy, Jefferson E

    2004-05-01

    In everyday life, vestibular receptors are activated by both self-generated and externally applied head movements. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the vestibular system reliably encodes head-in-space motion throughout our daily activities and that subsequent processing by upstream cerebellar and cortical pathways is required to transform this information into the reference frames required for voluntary behaviors. However, recent studies have radically changed the way we view the vestibular system. In particular, the results of recent single-unit studies in head-unrestrained monkeys have shown that the vestibular system provides the CNS with more than an estimate of head motion. This review first considers how head-in-space velocity is processed at the level of the vestibular afferents and vestibular nuclei during active versus passive head movements. While vestibular information appears to be similarly processed by vestibular afferents during passive and active motion, it is differentially processed at the level of the vestibular nuclei. For example, one class of neurons in vestibular nuclei, which receives direct inputs from semicircular canal afferents, is substantially less responsive to active head movements than to passively applied head rotations. The projection patterns of these neurons strongly suggest that they are involved in generating head-stabilization responses as well as shaping vestibular information for the computation of spatial orientation. In contrast, a second class of neurons in the vestibular nuclei that mediate the vestibuloocular reflex process vestibular information in a manner that depends principally on the subject's current gaze strategy rather than whether the head movement was self-generated or externally applied. The implications of these results are then discussed in relation to the status of vestibular reflexes (i.e., the vestibuloocular, vestibulocollic, and cervicoocular reflexes) and implications for higher

  4. Interactive wiimote gaze stabilization exercise training system for patients with vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Yin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2012-10-09

    Peripheral vestibular hypofunction is a major cause of dizziness. When complicated with postural imbalance, this condition can lead to an increased incidence of falls. In traditional clinical practice, gaze stabilization exercise is commonly used to rehabilitate patients. In this study, we established a computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation system by coupling infrared LEDs to an infrared receiver. This system enabled the subjects' head-turning actions to be quantified, and the training was performed using vestibular exercise combined with computer games and interactive video games that simulate daily life activities. Three unilateral and one bilateral vestibular hypofunction patients volunteered to participate in this study. The participants received 30 minutes of computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation training 2 days per week for 6 weeks. Pre-training and post-training assessments were completed, and a follow-up assessment was completed 1 month after the end of the training period. After 6 weeks of training, significant improvements in balance and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were observed in the four participants. Self-reports of dizziness, anxiety and depressed mood all decreased significantly. Significant improvements in self-confidence and physical performance were also observed. The effectiveness of this training was maintained for at least 1 month after the end of the training period. Real-time monitoring of training performance can be achieved using this rehabilitation platform. Patients demonstrated a reduction in dizziness symptoms after 6 weeks of training with this short-term interactive game approach. This treatment paradigm also improved the patients' balance function. This system could provide a convenient, safe and affordable treatment option for clinical practitioners.

  5. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  6. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  7. Is hippocampal neurogenesis modulated by the sensation of self-motion encoded by the vestibular system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    It is now well accepted that physical exercise stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and may promote cognitive ability. Less clear are the mechanisms by which this process occurs. One potential contributing influence, that is usually neglected, is the vestibular system, which by its very nature must be activated during physical exercise and which essentially cannot be turned off without complete bilateral vestibular lesions. This paper reviews a small literature that demonstrates that bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) in rats modulates cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and that artificial electrical activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, does also. Although there are only a few piecemeal studies of this subject, because of the way that they were controlled, it is likely that the vestibular system has a regulatory role in cell proliferation in the DG and therefore possibly in neurogenesis, which needs to be taken into account in the interpretation of neurogenesis studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction.......Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  9. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the "I". Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where "I" experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where "I" am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  10. Vestibular system and neural correlates of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1986-01-01

    Initial studies re-examine the role of certain central nervous system structures in the production of vestibular-induced vomiting and vomiting in general. All experiments were conducted using cats. Since these studies demonstrated that the essential role of various central structures in vestibular-induced vomiting is only poorly understood, efforts were re-directed to study the control of the effector muscles (diaphragm and abdominal muscles) that produce the pressure changes responsible for vomiting, with the goal of determining how this control mechanism is engaged during motion sickness. Experiments were conducted to localize the motoneurons that innervate the individual abdominal muscles and the portion of the diaphragm that surrounds the esophagus. A central question regarding respiratory muscle control during vomiting is whether these muscles are activated via the same brain stem pre-motor neurons that provide descending respiratory drive and/or by other descending input(s). In other experiments, the use of a combination of pitch and roll motions to produce motion sickness in unrestrained cats was evaluated. This stimulus combination can produce vomiting in only the most susceptible cats and is thus not as provacative a stimulus for cats as vertical linear acceleration.

  11. Influences of Vestibular System on Sympathetic Nervous System. Implications for countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denise, Pr Pierre

    As gravity is a direct and permanent stress on body fluids, muscles and bones, it is not surpris-ing that weightlessness has important effects on cardiovascular and musculo-skeletal systems. However, these harmful effects do not totally result from the removal of the direct stress of gravity on these organs, but are also partially and indirectly mediated by the vestibular sys-tem. Besides its well known crucial role in spatial orientation and postural equilibrium, it is now clear that the vestibular system is also involved in the regulation of other important physi-ological systems: respiratory and cardiovascular systems, circadian regulation, food intake and even bone mineralization. The neuroanatomical substrate for these vestibular-mediated reg-ulations is still poorly defined, but there is much evidence that vestibular system has strong impacts not only on brainstem autonomic centers but on many hypothalamic nuclei as well. As autonomic nervous system controls almost all body organs, bringing into play the vestibular system by hypergravity or microgravity could virtually affects all major physiological func-tions. There is experimental evidence that weightlessness as well as vestibular lesion induce sympathetic activation thus participating in space related physiological alterations. The fact that some effects of weightlessness on biological systems are mediated by the vestibular system has an important implication for using artificial gravity as a countermeasure: artificial gravity should load not only bones and the cardiovascular system but the vestibular system as well. In short-arm centrifuges, the g load at the head level is low because the head is near the axis of rotation. If the vestibular system is involved in cardiovascular deconditioning and bone loss during weightlessness, it would be more effective to significantly stimulate it and thus it would be necessary to place the head off-axis. Moreover, as the otolithic organs are non longer stimu-lated in

  12. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  13. The vestibular system: balancing more than just the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    The review presents a selection of recent studies in the field of vestibular neuroscience, including how vestibular stimulation modulates space and body perception. Recent neuroimaging studies identified the operculo-insular/retroinsular cortex as the core vestibular cortex and showed how it is reorganized after vestibular dysfunctions. Subliminal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) induces long-term reduction of hemispatial neglect and improves vertical perception in stroke patients, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. Healthy volunteer research suggests that GVS and caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) modulate visual and somatosensory processing and that beneficial effects of GVS/CVS in stroke patients are not limited to merely rebalancing brain hemispheric activity. Another mechanism would be that GVS/CVS anchors the self to the body, thus promoting an egocentric frame of reference. In addition to 'balancing the body', the vestibular cortical network contributes to modulate space, body and self-awareness. Emerging evidence suggests that the vestibular network expands into dimensions of emotion processing, mental health, and social cognition. Here, the importance of connecting vestibular physiology, affective neuroscience, and social neuroscience to better understand the psychological aspects of vertigo in otoneurology is discussed.

  14. The vestibular system: A spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian ePfeiffer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the ‘I’. Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system codes head position in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortex is likely to contribute to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where ‘I’ experience the world and self-location (the feeling where ‘I’ am located in space. We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation that show that vestibular signals contribute to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction (TPJ, parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC, medial superior temporal region (MST, and ventral intraparietal region (VIP. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is important for linking multisensory signals from within personal space with those from extrapersonal space, and for spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  15. The role of the thalamus in the human subcortical vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Julian; Baier, Bernhard; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Most of our knowledge concerning central vestibular pathways is derived from animal studies while evidence of the functional importance and localization of these pathways in humans is less well defined. The termination of these pathways at the thalamic level in humans is even less known. In this review we summarize the findings concerning the central subcortical vestibular pathways in humans and the role of these structures in the central vestibular system with regard to anatomical localization and function. Also, we review the role of the thalamus in the pathogenesis of higher order sensory deficits such as spatial neglect, pusher syndrome or thalamic astasia and the correlation of these phenomena with findings of a vestibular tone imbalance at the thalamic level. By highlighting thalamic structures involved in vestibular signal processing and relating the different nomenclatures we hope to provide a base for future studies on thalamic sensory signal processing.

  16. Role of the insula and vestibular system in patients with chronic subjective dizziness: An fMRI study using sound-evoked vestibular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole eIndovina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence, long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD.We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC.We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients

  17. International Clinical Protocol on Vestibular Disorders (Dizziness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinus, Kostiantyn; Claussen, Claus-Frenz

    2017-12-01

    26-28 May at 43 Congress of Neurootological and Equilibriometric Society (Budapest, Hungary) International Clinical Protocol on Vestibular Disorders (Dizziness) being discussed and accepted as Consensus Document. Cochrane reports estimates that dizziness has prevalence of 22.9% in the last 12 months and an incidence of 3.1%. Only 1.8% of adults consulted a physician in the last 12 months. Cochrane reviews suggest that the evidence base for dizziness evaluation is weak, thus necessitates the creation of evidence-based document. Protocol is based at the new concept of vestibular system, which involves the vestibular peripheral sensors, space orientation tetrad, vestibular presentations in the brain cortex and vestibular effectory projections in the brain. Labyrinth consists of sensors, for which six modalities are adequate: 1. acceleration, 2. gravitation, 3. low frequency whole-body vibration, 4. Infrasound, 5. magnetic impulse, 6. metabolic changes. Vestibular system from rhomboid fosse gets the inputs from visual, acoustic, somatosensory organs, integrating them and forming space perception and orientation. Interaction with space is realized through sensory, motor, vegetative and limbic projections. So, vestibular disturbances may manifest as paropsia, tinnitus, numbness. Vestibular evoked potentials (not VEMP) and craniocorpography have highest sensitivity (90% and more). As vestibular dysfunction has recurrent character patients need monitoring.

  18. Vestibular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, W

    1979-01-01

    It is apparent from this and other reviews of the subject that our knowledge of vestibular function is most complete for the primary canal and otolithic afferents. Relatively little progress has been made in the understanding of receptor mechanisms and the functional importance of the efferent vestibular system. Since most of it has been summarized previously the latter were not considered here. Considerably more knowledge has accumulated in the field of central vestibular mechanisms, particularly those related to eye movements. Recent advances in functional synaptology of direct and indirect vestibuloocular pathways are described. It appears that the indirect pathways are essential for the central integration of the peripheral head velocity into a central eye position signal. Candidates for the neural integrator are presented and discussed and their connectivity described both for the horizontal and the relatively poorly studied vertical eye movement system. This field will certainly be studied extensively during the next years. Another interesting field is the role of the cerebellum in the control the vestibuloocular reflex. Recent data and hypotheses, including the problem of cerebellar plasticity, are summarized and evaluated. That the vestibular nuclei are by no means a simple relay system for specific vestibular signals destined for other sensory or motor centers is evidenced in this review by the description of multiple canal-canal, canalotolith, and visual-vestibular convergence at the nuclear level. Canal-otolith and polysensory convergence in vestibular neurons enables them to correct for the inherent inadequacies of the peripheral canal system in the low frequency range. The mechanisms of polysensory interaction in the central vestibular system will undoubtedly be an important and interesting field for future research.

  19. Comparison of the vascular innervation of the rat cochlea and vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M J; Payman, R N

    2000-03-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the neuronal and local control of inner ear blood flow, the vascular innervation to the rat cochlea and vestibular system was examined. Specimens were removed in toto beginning at the basilar artery extending to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, labyrinthine artery, common cochlear artery, modiolar artery and anterior vestibular artery. When possible the vessels were dissected in continuity through the cribrose area. The vestibular endorgans were also removed. Specimens were examined using immunohistochemical techniques for the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, neuropeptide-Y, substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide. Results show that the vasculature to the cochlea and vestibular portion of the inner ear receive similar types of nonadrenergic innervation, that within the vestibular endorgans, only CGRP and SP were found in the neuroepithelium or in association with vessels, and that within the vestibular system, the majority of the vascular innervation appears to stop at or near the cribrose area. In the cochlea however, it extends to include the radiating arterioles. These findings suggest that cochlear blood flow is under finer control and that neuronally induced changes in blood flow may have a more global effect in the vestibular periphery.

  20. The Vestibular System: A Newly Identified Regulator of Bone Homeostasis Acting Through the Sympathetic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaux, G; Besnard, S; Denise, P; Elefteriou, F

    2015-08-01

    The vestibular system is a small bilateral structure located in the inner ear, known as the organ of balance and spatial orientation. It senses head orientation and motion, as well as body motion in the three dimensions of our environment. It is also involved in non-motor functions such as postural control of blood pressure. These regulations are mediated via anatomical projections from vestibular nuclei to brainstem autonomic centers and are involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular function via sympathetic nerves. Age-associated dysfunction of the vestibular organ contributes to an increased incidence of falls, whereas muscle atrophy, reduced physical activity, cellular aging, and gonadal deficiency contribute to bone loss. Recent studies in rodents suggest that vestibular dysfunction might also alter bone remodeling and mass more directly, by affecting the outflow of sympathetic nervous signals to the skeleton and other tissues. This review will summarize the findings supporting the influence of vestibular signals on bone homeostasis, and the potential clinical relevance of these findings.

  1. Probing the human vestibular system with galvanic stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard C. Fitzpatrick; Brian L. Day

    2004-01-01

    .... This paper examines the electrophysiology and anatomy of the vestibular organs and the effects of GVS on human balance control and develops a model that explains the observed balance responses...

  2. Current concepts of the vestibular system reviewed: 1. The role of the vestibulospinal system in postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshner, E A; Cohen, H

    1989-05-01

    This paper reviews the research findings that support the presence of vestibulospinal reflexes in corrections for head and body instability. Studies of the importance of labyrinthine inputs to the central nervous system organization of eye, head, and body movements demonstrate that the vestibular nuclei are more than a simple relay station for labyrinthine activity. At all levels of the vestibular system beyond the primary vestibular afferents, parallel processing of labyrinthine signals occurs with input from other sensory systems. Thus, output of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) is not equivalent to the labyrinthine input. It is the VNC output that influences motor behavior. Various sensory inputs are available to the nervous system to detect and correct postural instability. Most notably, vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive signals contribute significantly to the stabilizing responses in humans. The intent of this paper is to review experimental results rather than to discuss treatment interventions. Wherever possible, conclusions are drawn as to the clinical implications of current research findings.

  3. Cochlear Nerve Action Potential Monitoring for Preserving Function of an Unseen Cochlear Nerve in Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Kojima, Atsuhiro; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Kusaka, Gen; Naritaka, Heiji

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cochlear nerve action potential (CNAP) has been used in patients with small vestibular schwannoma (<15 mm) to preserve cochlear nerve function. We performed surgery for a larger vestibular schwannoma under CNAP monitoring with the aim of preserving cochlear nerve function, and compared the data with findings from 10 patients with hemifacial spasm who underwent microvascular decompression surgery. We report the case of a patient with a 26-mm vestibular schwannoma and normal hearing function who underwent neurosurgery under electrophysiological monitoring of the facial and cochlear nerves. Amplitudes of evoked facial muscle responses were maintained at approximately 70% during the operation. The latency of wave V on brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) increased by 0.5 ms, and amplitude was maintained at approximately 70% of the value at the beginning of the operation. Latencies of P1, N1, and P2 on CNAP did not change intraoperatively. These latencies were comparable to those of 10 normal patients with hemifacial spasm. CNAP monitoring proved very useful in confirming the location of the cochlear nerve in the operative field and preserving cochlear nerve function. Both facial nerve function and hearing acuity were completely preserved after tumor removal, and wave V latency on BAEP returned to normal and was maintained in the normal range for at least 2 years. CNAP monitoring is extremely useful for preserving the function of the unseen cochlear nerve during vestibular schwannoma surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the “I”. Self- consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self- consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibul...

  5. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  6. Telefones celulares: influência nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aracy Pereira Silveira Balbani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Os sistemas de telecomunicações emitem radiofreqüência, uma radiação eletromagnética invisível. Telefones celulares transmitem microondas (450900 MHz no sistema analógico e 1,82,2 GHz no sistema digital, muito próximo à orelha do usuário. Esta energia é absorvida pela pele, orelha interna, nervo vestibulococlear e superfície do lobo temporal. OBJETIVO: Revisar a literatura sobre influência dos telefones celulares na audição e equilíbrio. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. METODOLOGIA: Foram pesquisados artigos nas bases Lilacs e Medline sobre a influência dos telefones celulares nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular, publicados de 2000 a 2005, e também materiais veiculados na Internet. RESULTADOS: Os estudos sobre radiação do telefone celular e risco de neurinoma do acústico apresentam resultados contraditórios. Alguns autores não encontram maior probabilidade de aparecimento do tumor nos usuários de celulares, enquanto outros relatam que a utilização de telefones analógicos por 10 anos ou mais aumenta o risco para o tumor. A exposição aguda às microondas emitidas pelo celular não influencia a atividade das células ciliadas externas da cóclea, in vivo e in vitro, a condução elétrica no nervo coclear, nem a fisiologia do sistema vestibular em humanos. As próteses auditivas analógicas são mais suscetíveis à interferência eletromagnética dos telefones celulares digitais. CONCLUSÃO: Não há comprovação de lesão cocleovestibular pelos telefones celulares.Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service very close to the user’s ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. AIM: literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. STUDY DESIGN: systematic

  7. Investigations of the Effects of Altered Vestibular System Function on Hindlimb Anti-Gravity Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Mary Sue

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different gravitational environments, both the microgravity of spaceflight and the hypergravity of centrifugation, result in altered vestibulo-spinal function which can be reversed by reacclimation to earth gravity (2). Control of orientation, posture, and locomotion are functions of the vestibular system which are altered by changes in gravitational environment. Not only is the vestibular system involved with coordination and proprioception, but the gravity sensing portion of the vestibular system also plays a major role in maintaining muscle tone through projections to spinal cord motoneurons that control anti-gravity muscles. I have been involved with investigations of several aspects of the link between vestibular inputs and muscle morphology and function during my work with Dr. Nancy Daunton this summer and the previous summer. We have prepared a manuscript for submission (4) to Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine based on work that I performed last summer in Dr. Daunton's lab. Techniques developed for that project will be utilized in subsequent experiments begun in the summer of 1998. I have been involved with the development of a pilot project to test the effects of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) on anti-gravity muscles and in another project testing the effects of the ototoxic drug streptomycin on the otolith-spinal reflex and anti-gravity muscle morphology.

  8. Impaired tunnel-maze behavior in rats with sensory lesions: vestibular and auditory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeppi, U; Krinke, G; FitzGerald, R E; Classen, W

    1991-01-01

    Maze behavior of rodents provides insight into processes of learning and memory and also serves to assess cognitive functions in neurotoxicity tests. Neurotoxic agents may impair maze behavior by acting upon different parts of the nervous system. To assess the dependence of maze learning upon vestibular and/or auditory input, the two systems were lesioned. Daily treatment of rat pups with streptomycin (400 mg/kg sc) on postnatal day 11 to 22 caused irreversible impairment of vestibular and auditory functions, whereas, 20 injections of neomycin in adult rats (100 mg/kg sc, postnatal weeks 8 to 11) led to hearing loss only. Hearing loss was assessed by absence of Preyer's reflex and impaired vestibular function by loss or shortened duration of postrotatory nystagmus. Learning in the unbaited 6-arm radial maze was tested at the age of 2 to 3 mon using a maze configuration that allowed to assess order of arm entries ("working memory") and left-right discrimination within each arm ("reference memory"). Treatment with streptomycin but not with neomycin led to impaired order of arm entries. Since treatment with streptomycin failed to induce any signs of brain lesions, impaired maze learning is considered to result from destruction of vestibular hair cell receptors with subsequent vestibular impairment and not from hearing loss or cognitive impairment.

  9. Expression of inducible nitric oxide-synthase in the vestibular system of hydropic guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A; Bloch, W; Su, J; Stennert, E; Addicks, K; Michel, O

    1999-04-02

    Immunohistochemical investigations of the guinea pig vestibular system, using a specific antibody to the inducible isoform of NO-synthase (iNOS/NOS II), have been performed 3 weeks after surgical closure of the right endolymphatic duct (n = 7). Endolymphatic hydrops (ELH) of the right temporal bone became evident by excavation of the Reissner's membrane in all seven animals. Those animals revealed iNOS-expression in ganglion cells, in the wall of blood vessels and in nerve fibers of the right vestibular system, while the corresponding left temporal bones and temporal bones of non-operated controls (n = 6) as well as of sham-operated animals (n = 3) did not show any iNOS-positive structures. iNOS-generated NO could be involved in the pathophysiology of vestibular dysfunction in Meniere's disease.

  10. Symmetries of the Central Vestibular System: Forming Movements for Gravity and a Three-Dimensional World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin McCollum

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic dynamics of the central vestibular system (CVS appear to be at least partly determined by the symmetries of its connections. The CVS contributes to whole-body functions such as upright balance and maintenance of gaze direction. These functions coordinate disparate senses (visual, inertial, somatosensory, auditory and body movements (leg, trunk, head/neck, eye. They are also unified by geometric conditions. Symmetry groups have been found to structure experimentally-recorded pathways of the central vestibular system. When related to geometric conditions in three-dimensional physical space, these symmetry groups make sense as a logical foundation for sensorimotor coordination.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of pressure and velocity distribution inside Meniere’s diseased vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, N. F. H.; Isa, N. M.; Taib, I.; Mohammed, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Meniere’s disease or known as endolymphatic hydrops is an incurable vestibular disorder of the inner ear. This is due to the excessive fluid build-up in the endolymphatic sac which causing the vestibular endolymphatic membrane to start stretching. Although this mechanism has been widely accepted as the likely mechanism of Meniere’s syndrome, the reason for its occurrence remains unclear. Thus, the aims of this study to investigate the critical parameters of fluid flow in membranous labyrinth that is influencing instability of vestibular system. In addition, to visualise the flow behaviour between a normal membranous labyrinth and dilated membranous labyrinth in Meniere’s disease in predicting instability of vestibular system. Three dimensional geometry of endolymphatic sac is obtained from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) and reconstructed using commercial software. As basis of comparison the two different model of endolymphatic sac is considered in this study which are normal membranous labyrinth for model I and dilated membranous labyrinth for model II. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is used to analyse the behaviour of pressure and velocity flow in the endolymphatic sac. The comparison was made in terms of pressure distribution and velocity profile. The results show that the pressure for dilated membranous labyrinth is greater than normal membranous labyrinth. Due to abnormally pressure in the vestibular system, it leads to the increasing value of the velocity at dilated membranous labyrinth while at the normal membranous labyrinth the velocity values decreasing. As a conclusion by changing the parameters which is pressure and velocity can significantly affect to the instability of vestibular system for Meniere’s disease.

  12. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular

  13. Effects of the vestibular system on human development, part 2: Effects of vestibular stimulation on mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, and learning-disabled individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Z R

    1979-07-01

    In Part 1 of this two-part series, studies concerned with the effects of vestibular stimulation on human development and function were reviewed and some implications for therapy were suggested. In Part 2, three categories of dysfunction with possible links to the vestibular system are discussed. Studies in the category of mental retardation evaluate motor development and sensory preference. Possible vestibular associations with emotional disturbance are examined by review of studies concerned with etiology, motor activity, speech, and clinical observations. A brief review of studies concerned with early identification and speech and language factors of learning-disabled children constitutes the third category. Interpretations are drawn and some implications for therapy are made.

  14. The vestibular system: multimodal integration and encoding of self-motion for motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how sensory pathways transmit information under natural conditions remains a major goal in neuroscience. The vestibular system plays a vital role in everyday life, contributing to a wide range of functions from reflexes to the highest levels of voluntary behavior. Recent experiments establishing that vestibular (self-motion) processing is inherently multimodal also provide insight into a set of interrelated questions. What neural code is used to represent sensory information in vestibular pathways? How do the interactions between the organism and the environment shape encoding? How is self-motion information processing adjusted to meet the needs of specific tasks? This review highlights progress that has recently been made towards understanding how the brain encodes and processes self-motion to ensure accurate motor control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The endocannabinoid system: A new player in the neurochemical control of vestibular function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Ashton, John C; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2006-01-01

    The results of recent clinical trials of medicinal cannabinoid drugs show that dizziness and vertigo are commonly reported adverse side-effects. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors were initially thought to be expressed in very low densities in the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC). Recent immunohistochemical studies have challenged this idea and suggested that CB1 receptors may exist in numbers similar to the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. This, together with evidence that brainstem CB1 receptors have a higher efficacy than those in many other parts of the brain and that application of cannabinoids can elicit potent electrophysiological effects in VNC neurons, suggests that CB1 receptors and their endogenous ligands may be important in central vestibular function. In this review, we consider the potential clinical significance of the endocannabinoid system for the development of vestibular disorders, the effects of recreational cannabis use and the therapeutic use of medicinal cannabinoids. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. A versatile stereoscopic visual display system for vestibular and oculomotor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, P D; Roberts, D C; Shelhamer, M; Zee, D S

    1998-01-01

    Testing of the vestibular system requires a vestibular stimulus (motion) and/or a visual stimulus. We have developed a versatile, low cost, stereoscopic visual display system, using "virtual reality" (VR) technology. The display system can produce images for each eye that correspond to targets at any virtual distance relative to the subject, and so require the appropriate ocular vergence. We elicited smooth pursuit, "stare" optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and after-nystagmus (OKAN), vergence for targets at various distances, and short-term adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), using both conventional methods and the stereoscopic display. Pursuit, OKN, and OKAN were comparable with both methods. When used with a vestibular stimulus, VR induced appropriate adaptive changes of the phase and gain of the angular VOR. In addition, using the VR display system and a human linear acceleration sled, we adapted the phase of the linear VOR. The VR-based stimulus system not only offers an alternative to more cumbersome means of stimulating the visual system in vestibular experiments, it also can produce visual stimuli that would otherwise be impractical or impossible. Our techniques provide images without the latencies encountered in most VR systems. Its inherent versatility allows it to be useful in several different types of experiments, and because it is software driven it can be quickly adapted to provide a new stimulus. These two factors allow VR to provide considerable savings in time and money, as well as flexibility in developing experimental paradigms.

  17. Uptake of Fluorescent Gentamicin by Peripheral Vestibular Cells after Systemic Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianping; Kachelmeier, Allan; Dai, Chunfu; Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In addition to cochleotoxicity, systemic aminoglycoside pharmacotherapy causes vestibulotoxicity resulting in imbalance and visual dysfunction. The underlying trafficking routes of systemically-administered aminoglycosides from the vasculature to the vestibular sensory hair cells are largely unknown. We investigated the trafficking of systemically-administered gentamicin into the peripheral vestibular system in C56Bl/6 mice using fluorescence-tagged gentamicin (gentamicin-Texas-Red, GTTR) imaged by scanning laser confocal microscopy to determine the cellular distribution and intensity of GTTR fluorescence in the three semicircular canal cristae, utricular, and saccular maculae at 5 time points over 4 hours. Results Low intensity GTTR fluorescence was detected at 0.5 hours as both discrete puncta and diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence. The intensity of cytoplasmic fluorescence peaked at 3 hours, while punctate fluorescence was plateaued after 3 hours. At 0.5 and 1 hour, higher levels of diffuse GTTR fluorescence were present in transitional cells compared to hair cells and supporting cells. Sensory hair cells typically exhibited only diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence at all time-points up to 4 hours in this study. In contrast, non-sensory cells rapidly exhibited both intense fluorescent puncta and weaker, diffuse fluorescence throughout the cytosol. The numbers and size of fluorescent puncta in dark cells and transitional cells increased over time. There is no preferential GTTR uptake by the five peripheral vestibular organs’ sensory cells. Control vestibular tissues exposed to Dulbecco’s phosphate-buffered saline or hydrolyzed Texas Red had negligible fluorescence. Conclusions All peripheral vestibular cells rapidly take up systemically-administered GTTR, reaching peak intensity 3 hours after injection. Sensory hair cells exhibited only diffuse fluorescence, while non-sensory cells displayed both diffuse and punctate fluorescence. Transitional cells may

  18. Sustained and Transient Vestibular Systems: A Physiological Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish G; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Otolithic afferents with regular resting discharge respond to gravity or low-frequency linear accelerations, and we term these the static or sustained otolithic system. However, in the otolithic sense organs, there is anatomical differentiation across the maculae and corresponding physiological differentiation. A specialized band of receptors called the striola consists of mainly type I receptors whose hair bundles are weakly tethered to the overlying otolithic membrane. The afferent neurons,...

  19. Systematic review of vestibular disorders related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, B; Swanepoel, D W; Hofmeyr, L M

    2011-09-01

    Disorders of the auditory and vestibular system are often associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the extent and nature of these vestibular manifestations are unclear. To systematically review the current peer-reviewed literature on vestibular manifestations and pathology related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Systematic review of peer-reviewed articles related to vestibular findings in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several electronic databases were searched. We identified 442 records, reduced to 210 after excluding duplicates and reviews. These were reviewed for relevance to the scope of the study. We identified only 13 reports investigating vestibular functioning and pathology in individuals affected by human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This condition can affect both the peripheral and central vestibular system, irrespective of age and viral disease stage. Peripheral vestibular involvement may affect up to 50 per cent of patients, and central vestibular involvement may be even more prevalent. Post-mortem studies suggest direct involvement of the entire vestibular system, while opportunistic infections such as oto- and neurosyphilis and encephalitis cause secondary vestibular dysfunction resulting in vertigo, dizziness and imbalance. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome should routinely be monitored for vestibular involvement, to minimise functional limitations of quality of life.

  20. Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance: possible relationship to microgravity-induced plasticity in the vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B. J.; Kerman, I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Even after short spaceflights, most astronauts experience at least some postflight reduction of orthostatic tolerance; this problem is severe in some subjects. The mechanisms leading to postflight orthostatic intolerance are not well-established, but have traditionally been thought to include the following: changes in leg hemodynamics, alterations in baroreceptor reflex gain, decreases in exercise tolerance and aerobic fitness, hypovolemia, and altered sensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors in the periphery. Recent studies have demonstrated that signals from vestibular otolith organs play an important role in regulating blood pressure during changes in posture in a 1-g environment. Because spaceflight results in plastic changes in the vestibular otolith organs and in the processing of inputs from otolith receptors, it is possible that another contributing factor to postflight orthostatic hypotension is alterations in the gain of vestibular influences on cardiovascular control. Preliminary data support this hypothesis, although controlled studies will be required to determine the relationship between changes in the vestibular system and orthostatic hypotension following exposure to microgravity. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about age related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing...

  2. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  3. A low-cost video-oculography system for vestibular function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihwan Park; Youngsun Kong; Yunyoung Nam

    2017-07-01

    In order to remain in focus during head movements, vestibular-ocular reflex causes eyes to move in the opposite direction to head movement. Disorders of vestibular system decrease vision, causing abnormal nystagmus and dizziness. To diagnose abnormal nystagmus, various studies have been reported including the use of rotating chair tests and videonystagmography. However, these tests are unsuitable for home use due to their high costs. Thus, a low-cost video-oculography system is necessary to obtain clinical features at home. In this paper, we present a low-cost video-oculography system using an infrared camera and Raspberry Pi board for tracking the pupils and evaluating a vestibular system. Horizontal eye movement is derived from video data obtained from an infrared camera and infrared light-emitting diodes, and the velocity of head rotation is obtained from a gyroscope sensor. Each pupil was extracted using a morphology operation and a contour detection method. Rotatory chair tests were conducted with our developed device. To evaluate our system, gain, asymmetry, and phase were measured and compared with System 2000. The average IQR errors of gain, phase and asymmetry were 0.81, 2.74 and 17.35, respectively. We showed that our system is able to measure clinical features.

  4. Vestibular rehabilitation using a wide field of view virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparto, P J; Furman, J M; Whitney, S L; Hodges, L F; Redfern, M S

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical justification for using a wide field of view (FOV) virtual reality display system for use in vestibular rehabilitation. A wide FOV environment offers some unique features that may be beneficial to vestibular rehabilitation. Primarily, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. If this hypothesis is correct, then wide FOV systems will have an advantage over narrow field of view input devices such as head mounted or desktop displays. Devices that we have incorporated into our system that are critical for monitoring improvement in this clinical population will also be described.

  5. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoceli, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  6. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-04-01

     The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation.  Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  7. Move it or lose it--is stimulation of the vestibular system necessary for normal spatial memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Darlington, Cynthia L; Zheng, Yiwen

    2010-01-01

    Studies in both experimental animals and human patients have demonstrated that peripheral vestibular lesions, especially bilateral lesions, are associated with spatial memory impairment that is long-lasting and may even be permanent. Electrophysiological evidence from animals indicates that bilateral vestibular loss causes place cells and theta activity to become dysfunctional; the most recent human evidence suggests that the hippocampus may cause atrophy in patients with bilateral vestibular lesions. Taken together, these studies suggest that self-motion information provided by the vestibular system is important for the development of spatial memory by areas of the brain such as the hippocampus, and when it is lost, spatial memory is impaired. This naturally suggests the converse possibility that activation of the vestibular system may enhance memory. Surprisingly, there is some human evidence that this may be the case. This review considers the relationship between the vestibular system and memory and suggests that the evolutionary age of this primitive sensory system as well as how it detects self-motion (i.e., detection of acceleration vs. velocity) may be the reasons for its unique contribution to spatial memory. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Estimation of Optimum Stimulus Amplitude for Balance Training using Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as posture and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts after gravitational transitions. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training can help alleviate decrements on exposure to novel sensorimotor environments based on the concept of 'learning to learn' by exposure to varying sensory challenges during posture and locomotion tasks (Bloomberg 2015). Supra-threshold Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation (SVS) can be used to provide one of many challenges by disrupting vestibular inputs. In this scenario, the central nervous system can be trained to utilize veridical information from other sensory inputs, such as vision and somatosensory inputs, for posture and locomotion control. The minimum amplitude of SVS to simulate the effect of deterioration in vestibular inputs for preflight training or for evaluating vestibular contribution in functional tests in general, however, has not yet been identified. Few studies (MacDougall 2006; Dilda 2014) have used arbitrary but fixed maximum current amplitudes from 3 to 5 mA in the medio-lateral (ML) direction to disrupt balance function in healthy adults. Giving this high level of current amplitude to all the individuals has a risk of invoking side effects such as nausea and discomfort. The goal of this study was to determine the minimum SVS level that yields an equivalently degraded balance performance. Thirteen subjects stood on a compliant foam surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in the ML direction. Duration of time they could stand on the foam surface was also measured. The minimum SVS dosage was defined to be that level which significantly degraded balance performance such that any further increase in stimulation level did not lead to further balance degradation. The minimum SVS level was determined by performing linear fits on the performance variable

  9. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP is a promising test for the evaluation of the cholic descending vestibular system. This reflex depends of the integrity from the saccular macula, from the inferior vestibular nerve, the vestibular nuclei, the vestibule-spinal tract and effectors muscles. Objective: Perform a systematic review of the pertinent literature by means of database (COCHRANE, MEDLINE, LILACS, CAPES. Conclusion: The clinical application of the VEMP has expanded in the last years, as goal that this exam is used as complementary in the otoneurological evaluation currently used. But, methodological issues must be clarified. This way, this method when combined with the standard protocol, can provide a more widely evaluation from the vestibular system. The standardization of the methodology is fundamental criterion for the replicability and sensibility of the exam.

  10. The challenge of vestibular migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Eric W

    2013-10-01

    Migraine is a common illness and migraine-related dizziness occurs in up to 3% of the population. Because the diagnosis is controversial and may be difficult, many patients go undiagnosed and untreated. This review summarizes current understanding of the taxonomy and diagnosis of vestibular migraine, the relation of vestibular migraine to labyrinthine disease, and the treatment of the condition in adults and children. The categories of migraine accepted by the International Headache Society do not reflect the complex presentations of patients suspected of having vestibular migraine. In clinical practice and research, criteria are increasingly accepted that divide patients suspected of vestibular migraine into 'definite vestibular migraine' and 'probable vestibular migraine.' Because vertigo itself may trigger migraine, patients with vestibular migraine should be suspected of having vestibular end-organ disease until proven otherwise. Treatment remains controversial because of a notable lack of randomized controlled studies of vestibular migraine treatment. For now, the best strategy for the treatment of suspected vestibular migraine patients is dietary/lifestyle modification, antinausea/antiemetics for acute vertigo, and preventive medication for patients who have continued disruptive symptoms. Patients with vestibular migraine should be monitored regularly for the development of latent audiovestibular end-organ disease.

  11. Pathologic Changes of the Peripheral Vestibular System Secondary to Chronic Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Monsanto, Rafael; Erdil, Mehmet; Pauna, Henrique F; Kwon, Geeyoun; Schachern, Patricia A; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the histopathologic changes of dark, transitional, and hair cells of the vestibular system in human temporal bones from patients with chronic otitis media. Comparative human temporal bone study. Otopathology laboratory. To compare the density of vestibular dark, transitional, and hair cells in temporal bones with and without chronic otitis media, we used differential interference contrast microscopy. In the chronic otitis media group (as compared with the age-matched control group), the density of type I and type II hair cells was significantly decreased in the lateral semicircular canal, saccule, and utricle (P otitis media group in the posterior semicircular canal (P = .005), but that of type II cells was not (P = .168). The mean number of dark cells was significantly decreased in the chronic otitis media group in the lateral semicircular canal (P = .014) and in the posterior semicircular canal (P = .002). We observed no statistically significant difference in the density of transitional cells between the 2 groups (P > .1). The findings of our study suggest that the decrease in the number of vestibular sensory cells and dark cells could be the cause of the clinical symptoms of imbalance of some patients with chronic otitis media. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  12. Flight Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will develop the Flight System Monitor which will use non-intrusive electrical monitoring (NEMO). The electronic system health of...

  13. Inductive Monitoring System (IMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMS: Inductive Monitoring System The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) is a tool that uses a data mining technique called clustering to extract models of normal...

  14. Systems analysis of the vestibulo-ocular system. [mathematical model of vestibularly driven head and eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular system is examined from the standpoint of system theory. The evolution of a mathematical model of the vestibulo-ocular system in an attempt to match more and more experimental data is followed step by step. The final model explains many characteristics of the eye movement in vestibularly induced nystagmus. The analysis of the dynamic behavior of the model at the different stages of its development is illustrated in time domain, mainly in a qualitative way.

  15. Significant vestibular system impairment is common in a cohort of elderly patients referred for assessment of falls risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gary P; McCaslin, Devin L; Grantham, Sarah L; Piker, Erin G

    2008-01-01

    Falls in elderly patients are associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare system. The development of falls risk assessment programs have represented a method of responding to what is known about injurious falls. The multidimensional assessments involve the comparison against normative data of a patient's performance on metrics known to influence the likelihood of future falls. The factors assessed usually include falls and medication history, measures of mentation, depression, orthostatic hypotension, simple or choice reaction time, gait stability, postural stability, and the integrity of the patient's vision, somesthetic, and vestibular senses. This investigation was conducted to measure the proportion of patients referred for falls risk assessment who have evidence of vestibular system impairment. Qualitative, retrospective review of data collected from 2003 to 2007. The cohort was 185 consecutive patients referred for multidimensional assessments of falls risk. Patients underwent quantitative assessments of peripheral and central vestibular system function consisting of electro- or videonystagmography (i.e., ENG/VNG), and sinusoidal harmonic acceleration testing. Results of these tests were compared to normative data. We found that 73% of the sample who underwent vestibular system assessment had quantitative evidence of either peripheral or central vestibular system impairment. Our results suggest that quantitative assessments of the vestibulo-ocular reflex should be conducted on patients who are evaluated for falls risk. These examinations should include at least caloric testing and, where available, rotational testing.

  16. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-12-16

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body's failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change--supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show--for the first time--a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth.

  17. Impact of electromagnetic fields on human vestibular system and standing balance: pilot results and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A.; Villard, S.; Corbacio, M.; Goulet, D.; Plante, M.; Souques, M.; Deschamps, F.; Ostiguy, G.; Lambrozo, J.; Thomas, A. W.; Legros, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have found that extremely low-frequency (ELF, displacement of their center of pressure will be collected and analyzed as an indicator of vestibular performance. During pilot testing (n=6), we found increased lateral sway with DC, and to a lesser extent, AC exposure. The ELFMF exposure system still needs to be adapted to allow meaningful results. Future protocol design will test for possible effects due to exposures in the radiofrequency range (i.e. above 3 kHz). These results will contribute to the literature documenting exposure guidelines aiming to protect workers and the general public.

  18. Models of the vestibular system and postural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. R.; Weiss, A.

    1974-01-01

    Applications of control theory and systems analysis to the problem of orientation and posture control are discussed, with the possible long range goals of contributing to the development of hardware for rehabilitation of the handicapped.

  19. Simplified Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Jelinskas, Adomas

    2013-01-01

    This project can be considered as a model for a simplified grid monitoring. In particular, I was creating a specific monitoring instance, which can be easily set up on a machine and, depending on an input information, automatically start monitoring services using Nagios software application. I had to automate the set up process and configuration of the monitoring system in order for the user to use it easily. I developed a script which automatically sets up the monitoring system, configures it and starts monitoring. I put the script, files and instructions in the repository 'https://git.cern.ch/web/?p=cosmic.git;a=summary' under the sub-directory called SNCG.

  20. The development of vestibular system and related function in mammals: Impact of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eJamon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This chapter reviews the knowledge about the adaptation to Earth gravity during the development of mammals. The impact of early exposure to altered gravity is evaluated at the level of the functions related to the vestibular system, including postural control, homeostatic regulation, and spatial memory. The hypothesis of critical periods in the adaptation to gravity is discussed. Demonstrating a critical period requires removing the gravity stimulus during delimited time windows, what is impossible to do on Earth surface. The Surgical destruction of the vestibular apparatus, and the use of mice strains with defective graviceptors have provided useful information on the consequences of missing gravity perception, and the possible compensatory mechanisms, but transitory suppression of the stimulus can only be operated during spatial flight. The rare studies on rat pups housed on board of space shuttle significantly contributed to this problem, but the use of hypergravity environment, produced by means of chronic centrifugation, is the only available tool when repeated experiments must be carried out on Earth. Even though hypergravity is sometimes considered as a mirror situation to microgravity, the two situations cannot be confused because a gravitational force is still present. The theoretical considerations that validate the paradigm of hypergravity to evaluate critical periods are discussed. The question of adaption of graviceptor is questioned from an evolutionary point of view. It is possible that graviception is hardwired, because life on Earth has evolved under the constant pressure of gravity. The rapid acquisition of motor programming by precocial mammals in minutes after birth is consistent with this hypothesis, but the slow development of motor skills in altricial species and the plasticity of vestibular perception in adults suggest that gravity experience is required for the tuning of graviceptors. The possible reasons for this

  1. Interaction of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is altered by vestibular otolith stimulation. This study examined interactive effects of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on MSNA in humans. In study 1, MSNA was measured during 4 min of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at either -10 or -30 mmHg with subjects in prone posture. During the 3rd min of LBNP, subjects lowered their head over the end of a table (head-down rotation, HDR) to engage the otolith organs. The head was returned to baseline upright position during the 4th min. LBNP increased MSNA above baseline during both trials with greater increases during the -30-mmHg trial. HDR increased MSNA further during the 3rd min of LBNP at -10 and -30 mmHg (Delta32% and Delta34%, respectively; P < 0.01). MSNA returned to pre-HDR levels during the 4th min of LBNP when the head was returned upright. In study 2, MSNA was measured during HDR, LBNP, and simultaneously performed HDR and LBNP. The sum of MSNA responses during individual HDR and LBNP trials was not significantly different from that observed during HDR and LBNP performed together (Delta131 +/- 28 vs. Delta118 +/- 47 units and Delta340 +/- 77 vs. Delta380 +/- 90 units for the -10 and -30 trials, respectively). These results demonstrate that vestibular otolith stimulation can increase MSNA during unloading of the cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflexes. Also, the interaction between the vestibulosympathetic reflex and baroreflexes is additive in humans. These studies indicate that the vestibulosympathetic reflex may help defend against orthostatic challenges in humans by increasing sympathetic outflow.

  2. The development of vestibular system and related functions in mammals: impact of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamon, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the knowledge about the adaptation to Earth gravity during the development of mammals. The impact of early exposure to altered gravity is evaluated at the level of the functions related to the vestibular system, including postural control, homeostatic regulation, and spatial memory. The hypothesis of critical periods in the adaptation to gravity is discussed. Demonstrating a critical period requires removing the gravity stimulus during delimited time windows, what is impossible to do on Earth surface. The surgical destruction of the vestibular apparatus, and the use of mice strains with defective graviceptors have provided useful information on the consequences of missing gravity perception, and the possible compensatory mechanisms, but transitory suppression of the stimulus can only be operated during spatial flight. The rare studies on rat pups housed on board of space shuttle significantly contributed to this problem, but the use of hypergravity environment, produced by means of chronic centrifugation, is the only available tool when repeated experiments must be carried out on Earth. Even though hypergravity is sometimes considered as a mirror situation to microgravity, the two situations cannot be confused because a gravitational force is still present. The theoretical considerations that validate the paradigm of hypergravity to evaluate critical periods are discussed. The question of adaption of graviceptor is questioned from an evolutionary point of view. It is possible that graviception is hardwired, because life on Earth has evolved under the constant pressure of gravity. The rapid acquisition of motor programming by precocial mammals in minutes after birth is consistent with this hypothesis, but the slow development of motor skills in altricial species and the plasticity of vestibular perception in adults suggest that gravity experience is required for the tuning of graviceptors. The possible reasons for this dichotomy are discussed.

  3. Neuroticism modulates brain visuo-vestibular and anxiety systems during a virtual rollercoaster task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Roberta; Indovina, Iole; Staab, Jeffrey P; Nigro, Salvatore; Augimeri, Antonio; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Passamonti, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Different lines of research suggest that anxiety-related personality traits may influence the visual and vestibular control of balance, although the brain mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. To our knowledge, this is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that investigates how individual differences in neuroticism and introversion, two key personality traits linked to anxiety, modulate brain regional responses and functional connectivity patterns during a fMRI task simulating self-motion. Twenty-four healthy individuals with variable levels of neuroticism and introversion underwent fMRI while performing a virtual reality rollercoaster task that included two main types of trials: (1) trials simulating downward or upward self-motion (vertical motion), and (2) trials simulating self-motion in horizontal planes (horizontal motion). Regional brain activity and functional connectivity patterns when comparing vertical versus horizontal motion trials were correlated with personality traits of the Five Factor Model (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion-introversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). When comparing vertical to horizontal motion trials, we found a positive correlation between neuroticism scores and regional activity in the left parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC). For the same contrast, increased functional connectivity between the left PIVC and right amygdala was also detected as a function of higher neuroticism scores. Together, these findings provide new evidence that individual differences in personality traits linked to anxiety are significantly associated with changes in the activity and functional connectivity patterns within visuo-vestibular and anxiety-related systems during simulated vertical self-motion. Hum Brain Mapp 38:715-726, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  5. The vestibular body: Vestibular contributions to bodily representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are integrated with signals from other sensory modalities. This convergence could reflect an important mechanism for maintaining the perception of the body. Here we review the current literature in order to develop a framework for understanding how the vestibular system contributes to body representation. According to recent models, we distinguish between three processes for body representation, and we look at whether vestibular signals might influence each process. These are (i) somatosensation, the primary sensory processing of somatic stimuli, (ii) somatoperception, the processes of constructing percepts and experiences of somatic objects and events and (iii) somatorepresentation, the knowledge about the body as a physical object in the world. Vestibular signals appear to contribute to all three levels in this model of body processing. Thus, the traditional view of the vestibular system as a low-level, dedicated orienting module tends to underestimate the pervasive role of vestibular input in bodily self-awareness.

  6. Characteristics of human gait related variables in association with vestibular system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Edo, M; Yokomizo, M; Togawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Gait analysis was performed in patients with vestibular system disorders, using foot switches and electromyography. They were divided into three groups: 11 cases with vestibular neuronitis (VN), 10 cases with large acoustic neuroma (LAN) who had central lesion evidenced by neurotological examinations, and 10 cases with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). A total of 14 healthy adults served as controls. Results showed that time from heel strike to forefoot strike was the most sensitive variable to indicate gait abnormality but had no specificity. As for the variables of stance, swing, and time to reach the initial peak of the tibialis anterior's activity from forefoot off, occurrence rate of abnormality was high in the OPCA group, followed by the LAN and VN groups. Concerning the double support period which is related with body weight transfer from one leg to the other, the LAN and OPCA groups showed higher occurrence rate of abnormality than the VN group. These differences among the three groups could reflect different effects to the gait control systems caused by lesion.

  7. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  8. Aerospace Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  9. Remote Maintenance Monitoring System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Remote Maintenance and Monitoring System (RMMS) is a collection of subsystems that includes telecommunication components, hardware, and software, which serve to...

  10. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Sasidharan, Chithra Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS) is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were above the damage risk criteria (DRC) compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01). Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  11. Effect of personal music system use on sacculocollic reflex assessed by cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential: A preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Listening to music through a portable personal music system (PMS is a growing trend, especially among the youth. The preferred listening level in such kinds of PMS has been reported to cross the safe levels and its impact on the auditory system was demonstrated in several previous investigations. Owing to the commonality in several aspects between the auditory and the vestibular systems, it appears likely that the deleterious effects of PMS use could also be impinging on the vestibular system, which has never been investigated. The present study therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of PMS use on the sacculocollic reflex assessed by the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP technique. Thirty-two regular PMS users and 32 nonregular PMS users underwent cVEMP testing using alternating polarity 500 Hz tone bursts. The results revealed no significant group difference in latencies and interaural asymmetry ratio. However, the cVEMP was significantly reduced in the group of individuals in whom the diffused field equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs were above the damage risk criteria (DRC compared to those with diffused field equivalent SPLs below it (P< 0.01. Therefore, the use of PMS at high levels of volume controls could be deleterious to the vestibular well-being of an individual.

  12. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Becklehimer, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Donovan, Matthew J [ORNL; Layton, Christopher C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  13. Common Vestibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios G. Balatsouras

    2017-01-01

    /vomiting. Vestibular rehabilitation hastens the recovery. The efficacy of topical and systemic steroids requires further validation.

  14. Safety system status monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  15. Effects of hypergravity on gene levels in anti-gravity muscle and bone through the vestibular system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Morita, Hironobu; Nishida, Kazuaki; Obata, Koji; Tatsumi, Kohei; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2017-09-07

    We recently reported that hypergravity with 3 g for 4 weeks affects muscle and bone through the vestibular system in mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity with 2 g, which had no influence on circulating glucocorticoid level, on the gene levels in muscle and bone, as well as the roles of the vestibular system in those changes using vestibular lesioned (VL) mice. Hypergravity for 2 and 8 weeks or VL exerted little effects on the mRNA levels of muscle differentiation factors and myokines in the soleus muscle. Although hypergravity for 2 weeks significantly elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and type I collagen mRNA levels in the tibia, VL significantly attenuated the levels of ALP mRNA enhanced by hypergravity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that a 2-g load for 2 weeks enhances osteoblast differentiation partly through the vestibular system in mice.

  16. Aging and vestibular system: specific tests and role of melatonin in cognitive involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpini, D; Cesarani, A; Fraschini, F; Kohen-Raz, R; Capobianco, S; Cornelio, F

    2004-01-01

    Balance disorders are frequent with aging. They are particularly important because they decrease social autonomy of the aged subjects and they often provoke falls. The cause is always multifactorial. There is evidence that aging affects multiple sensory inputs, as well as the muscoloskeletal system and central nervous system ability to perform sensorimotor integration. For the evaluation of decreased balance skills in elderly, a specific questionnaire has been prepared, in order to identify high risk of falling called falling risk inventory (FRI) questionnaire, and a complex psycho-sensory-motor test has been studied by means of posturography, in order to detect specific vestibular impairment. Regarding ethiopathogenesis of balance disorders in aged subjects, because the decline of behavioral and cognitive performances are due also to decline of biological rhythm control, the role of melatonin (the hormone regulating circadian rhythms, being strictly connected with cerebellar function, and it is well known that cerebellum acts in elderly both at motor and cognitive regulation. The goals of the present paper are: (i) To present a self-administered FRI questionnaire aimed at identifying possible causes of falls and quantifying falling risk in aged. (ii) To validate posturography as a specific test to investigate vestibular involvement in elderly in correlation with FRI. (iii) To present a complex behavioral test (NT) aimed at evaluating both spatial orientation and spatial memory in elderly, factors involved into the genesis of complex dizziness and unsteadiness. (iv) To evaluate the role of melatonin in cognitive involvement in dizzy, old subjects due to the functional correlations between circadian rhythms, cerebellum balance disturbances and cognitive disorders. General conclusions are: FRI correlates with falling risk. Posturography identifies specific vestibular impairments correlated to balance disorders and elderly falls. Spatial orientation is altered in

  17. Nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the axolotl vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Soto, E; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed using intracellular and multiunit extracellular recording techniques in order to characterize the role of nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the vestibular system of the axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Bath application of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (0.01microM to 10microM) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (0.1microM to 1000microM) elicited a dose-dependent decrease in the basal discharge of the semicircular canal afferent fibers. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine also diminished the response to mechanical stimuli. Moreover, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (1microM) produced a hyperpolarization associated with a decrease in the spike discharge and diminished the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials on afferent fibers recorded intracellularly. Nitric oxide donors were also tested: (i) S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (0.1microM to 100microM) increased the basal discharge and the response to mechanical stimuli. At the maximum effective concentration (100microM) this drug affected neither the amplitude nor the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials. However, it slightly depolarized the afferent neurons and decreased their input resistance. (ii) 3-Morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride did not significantly affect the basal discharge or the mechanically evoked peak response of afferent neurons at any of the concentrations used (1microM to 1000microM). However, after 10min of perfusion in the bath, 1microM and 10microM 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride significantly modified the baseline of the mechanically evoked response, producing an increase in the mean spike discharge of the afferent fibers. These results indicate that nitric oxide may have a facilitatory role on the basal discharge and on the response to mechanical stimuli of the vestibular afferent fibers. Thus, nitric oxide probably participates in the sensory coding and adaptative changes of vestibular input in

  18. Vestibular stimulation-induced facilitation of cervical premotoneuronal systems in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Shun; Ariyasu, Ryohei; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Ohki, Yukari

    2017-01-01

    It is unclear how descending inputs from the vestibular system affect the excitability of cervical interneurons in humans. To elucidate this, we investigated the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on the spatial facilitation of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by combined pyramidal tract and peripheral nerve stimulation. To assess the spatial facilitation, electromyograms were recorded from the biceps brachii muscles (BB) of healthy subjects. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the contralateral primary motor cortex and electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral ulnar nerve at the wrist were delivered either separately or together, with interstimulus intervals of 10 ms (TMS behind). Anodal/cathodal GVS was randomly delivered with TMS and/or ulnar nerve stimulation. The combination of TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation facilitated BB MEPs significantly more than the algebraic summation of responses induced separately by TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation (i.e., spatial facilitation). MEP facilitation significantly increased when combined stimulation was delivered with GVS (p < 0.01). No significant differences were found between anodal and cathodal GVS. Furthermore, single motor unit recordings showed that the short-latency excitatory peak in peri-stimulus time histograms during combined stimulation increased significantly with GVS. The spatial facilitatory effects of combined stimulation with short interstimulus intervals (i.e., 10 ms) indicate that facilitation occurred at the premotoneuronal level in the cervical cord. The present findings therefore suggest that GVS facilitates the cervical interneuron system that integrates inputs from the pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves and excites motoneurons innervating the arm muscles. PMID:28388686

  19. Reconfigurable Sensor Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Dutton, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A reconfigurable sensor monitoring system includes software tunable filters, each of which is programmable to condition one type of analog signal. A processor coupled to the software tunable filters receives each type of analog signal so-conditioned.

  20. Aerospace Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I STTR project will demonstrate the Aerospace System Monitor (ASM). This technology transforms the power distribution network in a spacecraft or aircraft...

  1. The dizzy patient: don't forget disorders of the central vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common complaints in neurology clinics, and they account for about 13% of the patients entering emergency units. In this Review, we focus on central vestibular disorders, which are mostly attributable to acute unilateral lesions of the bilateral vestibular circuitry in the brain. In a tertiary interdisciplinary outpatient dizziness unit, central vestibular disorders, including vestibular migraine, comprise about 25% of the established diagnoses. The signs and symptoms of these disorders can mimic those of peripheral vestibular disorders with sustained rotational vertigo. Bedside examinations, such as the head impulse test and ocular motor testing to determine spontaneous and gaze-evoked nystagmus or skew deviation, reliably differentiate central from peripheral syndromes. We also consider disorders of 'higher vestibular functions', which involve more than one sensory modality as well as cognitive domains (for example, orientation, spatial memory and navigation). These disorders include hemispatial neglect, the room tilt illusion, pusher syndrome, and impairment of spatial memory and navigation associated with hippocampal atrophy in cases of peripheral bilateral vestibular loss.

  2. Vestibular compensation following vestibular neurotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devèze, A; Montava, M; Lopez, C; Lacour, M; Magnan, J; Borel, L

    2015-09-01

    Four studies assessing vestibular compensation in Menière's disease patients undergoing unilateral vestibular neurotomy, using different analysis methods, are reviewed, with a focus on the different strategies used by patients according to their preoperative sensory preference. Four prospective studies performed in a university tertiary referral center were reviewed, measuring the pattern of vestibular compensation in Menière's disease patients before and after unilateral vestibular neurotomy on various assessment protocols: postural syndrome assessed on static posturography and gait analysis; perceptual syndrome assessed on subjective visual vertical perception; and oculomotor syndrome assessed on ocular cyclotorsion. Vestibular compensation occurred at variable intervals depending on the parameter investigated. Open-eye postural control and gait/walking returned to normal one month after neurotomy. Fine balance analysis found that visual perception of the vertical and ocular cyclotorsion impairment persisted at long-term follow-up. Clinical postural disturbance persisted only when visual afferents were cut off (eyes closed). These impairments were the expression of a postoperative change in postural strategy related to the new use of visual and non-visual references. Understanding pre-operative interindividual variation in balance strategy is critical to screening for postural instability and tailoring vestibular rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Aseyev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored.

  4. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseyev, Nikolay; Vinarskaya, Alia Kh; Roshchin, Matvey; Korshunova, Tatiana A; Malyshev, Aleksey Yu; Zuzina, Alena B; Ierusalimsky, Victor N; Lemak, Maria S; Zakharov, Igor S; Novikov, Ivan A; Kolosov, Peter; Chesnokova, Ekaterina; Volkova, Svetlana; Kasianov, Artem; Uroshlev, Leonid; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard D; Balaban, Pavel M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored.

  5. Maternal susceptibility to nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: is the vestibular system involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    2002-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy shares many characteristics with motion sickness, a vestibular dependent phenomenon. A number of physiologic changes that occur in normal pregnancy are also known to accompany nausea and vomiting in patients with motion sickness and certain vestibular disorders. This chapter summarizes some shared features of both phenomena. The unmasking of subclinical vestibular disorders may account for some cases of hyperemesis gravidarum. Hormonal effects on neurotransmitter function may also play a role in nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and in some vestibular disorders; however, the specific neural mechanisms of nausea and vomiting have not been identified. Until the neurochemical processes underlying these phenomena are understood, prevention and management will remain in the domain of astute, but so far limited, clinical observation.

  6. Nekton Interaction Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-15

    The software provides a real-time processing system for sonar to detect and track animals, and to extract water column biomass statistics in order to facilitate continuous monitoring of an underwater environment. The Nekton Interaction Monitoring System (NIMS) extracts and archives tracking and backscatter statistics data from a real-time stream of data from a sonar device. NIMS also sends real-time tracking messages over the network that can be used by other systems to generate other metrics or to trigger instruments such as an optical video camera. A web-based user interface provides remote monitoring and control. NIMS currently supports three popular sonar devices: M3 multi-beam sonar (Kongsberg), EK60 split-beam echo-sounder (Simrad) and BlueView acoustic camera (Teledyne).

  7. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eHitier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the vestibular cortical projections areas, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: 1 the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; 2 the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of the head direction; 3 the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and 4 a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex, which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition.

  8. Localisation of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP-pathway in the vestibular system of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A; Bloch, W; Su, J; Stennert, E; Addicks, K; Michel, O

    1998-07-31

    The exact distribution of nitric oxide-synthases (NOS) in the vestibular system has not been described satisfying yet. Immunostaining, using specific antibodies to the three known NOS-isoforms, to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC), the second messenger system of nitric oxide (NO), was performed on paraffin sections of temporal bone from guinea pigs. eNOS could be detected in vestibular ganglion cells and in nerve fibres, including the calyces, surrounding the type 1 hair cells (HC). bNOS was found in the sensory epithelium, ganglion cells and in bone, while iNOS could not be found. NOS-detection was accompanied by reactivity to sGC and to cGMP. This finding implies that b- and eNOS-generated NO is involved in regulative processes in neurotransmission and regulation of blood flow.

  9. Car monitoring information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica KALAŠOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this contribution is to characterize alternatives of information systems used for managing, processing and evaluation of information related to company vehicles. Especially we focus on logging, transferring and processing of on-road vehicle movement information in inland and international transportation. This segment of company information system has to monitor the car movement – actively or passively – according to demand of the company and after the processing it has to evaluate and give the complex monitoring of a situation of all the company vehicles to the controller.

  10. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    The shrinking size and weight of electronic circuitry has given rise to a new generation of smart clothing that enables biological data to be measured and transmitted. As the variation in the number and type of deployable devices and sensors increases, technology must allow their seamless integration so they can be electrically powered, operated, and recharged over a digital pathway. Nyx Illuminated Clothing Company has developed a lightweight health monitoring system that integrates medical sensors, electrodes, electrical connections, circuits, and a power supply into a single wearable assembly. The system is comfortable, bendable in three dimensions, durable, waterproof, and washable. The innovation will allow astronaut health monitoring in a variety of real-time scenarios, with data stored in digital memory for later use in a medical database. Potential commercial uses are numerous, as the technology enables medical personnel to noninvasively monitor patient vital signs in a multitude of health care settings and applications.

  12. The frog vestibular system as a model for lesion-induced plasticity: basic neural principles and implications for posture control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois M Lambert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the CNS to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the central nervous system include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims towards a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of

  13. Transforming the vestibular system one molecule at a time: the molecular and developmental basis of vertebrate auditory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeremy S; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    We review the molecular basis of auditory development and evolution. We propose that the auditory periphery (basilar papilla, organ of Corti) evolved by transforming a newly created and redundant vestibular (gravistatic) endorgan into a sensory epithelium that could respond to sound instead of gravity. Evolution altered this new epithelia's mechanoreceptive properties through changes of hair cells, positioned the epithelium in a unique position near perilymphatic space to extract sound moving between the round and the oval window, and transformed its otolith covering into a tympanic membrane. Another important step in the evolution of an auditory system was the evolution of a unique set of "auditory neurons" that apparently evolved from vestibular neurons. Evolution of mammalian auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons coincides with GATA3 being a transcription factor found selectively in the auditory afferents. For the auditory information to be processed, the CNS required a dedicated center for auditory processing, the auditory nuclei. It is not known whether the auditory nucleus is ontogenetically related to the vestibular or electroreceptive nuclei, two sensory systems found in aquatic but not in amniotic vertebrates, or a de-novo formation of the rhombic lip in line with other novel hindbrain structures such as pontine nuclei. Like other novel hindbrain structures, the auditory nuclei express exclusively the bHLH gene Atoh1, and loss of Atoh1 results in loss of most of this nucleus in mice. Only after the basilar papilla, organ of Corti evolved could efferent neurons begin to modulate their activity. These auditory efferents most likely evolved from vestibular efferent neurons already present. The most simplistic interpretation of available data suggest that the ear, sensory neurons, auditory nucleus, and efferent neurons have been transformed by altering the developmental genetic modules necessary for their development into a novel direction conducive for sound

  14. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Machine learning-based assessment tool for imbalance and vestibular dysfunction with virtual reality rehabilitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Huang, Ming-Chun; Wang, Pa-Chun; Fang, Te-Yung; Su, Mu-Chun; Tsai, Po-Yi; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Dizziness is a major consequence of imbalance and vestibular dysfunction. Compared to surgery and drug treatments, balance training is non-invasive and more desired. However, training exercises are usually tedious and the assessment tool is insufficient to diagnose patient's severity rapidly. An interactive virtual reality (VR) game-based rehabilitation program that adopted Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, and a sensor-based measuring system were introduced. To verify the therapeutic effect, a clinical experiment with 48 patients and 36 normal subjects was conducted. Quantified balance indices were measured and analyzed by statistical tools and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. In terms of balance indices, patients who completed the training process are progressed and the difference between normal subjects and patients is obvious. Further analysis by SVM classifier show that the accuracy of recognizing the differences between patients and normal subject is feasible, and these results can be used to evaluate patients' severity and make rapid assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vestibular Contributions to Human Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Laura; N/A,

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system is an ancient structure which supports the detection and control of self-motion. The pervasiveness of this sensory system is evidenced by the diversity of its anatomical projections and the profound impact it has on a range of higher level functions, particularly spatial memory. The aim of this thesis was to better characterise the association between the vestibular system and human memory; while many studies have explored this association from a biological perspective f...

  17. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eSmith; Cynthia eDarlington

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflex...

  18. CERN GSM monitoring system

    CERN Multimedia

    Ghabrous Larrea, C

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the tremendous development of GSM services over the last years, the number of related services used by organizations has drastically increased. Therefore, monitoring GSM services is becoming a business critical issue in order to be able to react appropriately in case of incident. In order to provide with GSM coverage all the CERN underground facilities, more than 50 km of leaky feeder cable have been deployed. This infrastructure is also used to propagate VHF radio signals for the CERN’s fire brigade. Even though CERN’s mobile operator monitors the network, it cannot guarantee the availability of GSM services, and for sure not VHF services, where signals are carried by the leaky feeder cable. So, a global monitoring system has become critical to CERN. In addition, monitoring this infrastructure will allow to characterize its behaviour over time, especially with LHC operation. Given that commercial solutions were not yet mature, CERN developed a system based on GSM probes and an application...

  19. The vestibular contribution to the head direction signal and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction (HD) cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on HD cells. We also examine the vestibular system's role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers.

  20. [Vestibular influences on human locomotion: results obtained using galvanic vestibular stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbkov, Iu K; Gerasimenko, Iu P

    2014-06-01

    Locomotion is the most important mode of our movement in space. The role of the vestibular system during human locomotion is not well studied, mainly due to problems associated with its isolation stimulation. It is difficult to stimulate this system in isolation during locomotion because the real movement of the head to activate the vestibular end-organs inevitably leads to the activation of other sensory inputs. Galvanic stimulation is not a natural way to stimulate the vestibular system, but it has the advantage providing an isolated stimulation of the vestibular inputs. This technique is relatively novel in the examination of vestibular contributions during human locomotion. In our review we consider the current data regarding the effect of vestibular signals on human locomotion by using galvanic vestibular stimulation.

  1. Sensitivity of Auditory and Vestibular Systems to Stimuli Other Than Sound and Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    obvious vestibular responses were induced by application of a physiotherapy vibrator to regions of the skull. With such treatments visual and postural...radiation by ♦he mammalian vestibulocochlear apparatus. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sei. 247: 182-193. Mason. R.K. 1968. Asthma and the h gh frequency

  2. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years. They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%, hearing difficulties (47.3%, dizziness (36.8%, headache (26.3%, intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%, and earache (15.7%. Seven musicians (37.0% showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%. There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  3. Vestibular findings in military band musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-04-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  4. Perspectives on aging vestibular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eAnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about age related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities like standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multi-sensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multi-sensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  5. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2015-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  6. The Danish Marine Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ærtebjerg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Indeholder abstracts fra Workshop on Marine Monitoring Systems and Technology, Risø, 17-18 April 1996.......Indeholder abstracts fra Workshop on Marine Monitoring Systems and Technology, Risø, 17-18 April 1996....

  7. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, William E [North Augusta, SC; Woskov, Paul P [Bedford, MA; Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K [Richland, WA

    2011-08-16

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  8. Storage monitoring system -- 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickelsen, B.; Nilsen, C.; Kinzel, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davidson, B.; Pollock, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has several ongoing projects in the area of nuclear materials management. These projects establish a core capability in monitoring stored nuclear materials. The overarching goal of these projects is to get the right sensor information to the right user to enhance the safety, security and to verify the legitimacy of use of stored nuclear materials. An effort has been initiated to merge these projects into a common system. This paper provides an overview of several of these projects and the integration activities between them.

  9. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2013-10-29

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalization and derealization symptoms such as feeling "spaced out", "body feeling strange" and "not feeling in control of self". We propose in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ).

  10. Personality Changes in Patients with Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalisation and derealisation symptoms such as feeling ‘spaced out’, ‘body feeling strange’ and ‘not feeling in control of self’. We suggest in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through the information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction.

  11. Mechanisms of vestibular compensation: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutia, Mayank B

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews recent studies that have provided experimental evidence for mechanisms of neural and synaptic plasticity in the brain during vestibular compensation, the behavioural recovery that takes place following peripheral vestibular lesions. First, experimental evidence from animal studies indicates that an unbalanced vestibular commissural system is a fundamental cause of the syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Second, recent studies suggest the involvement of both GABAergic and glycinergic commissural neurons. In addition gliosis and reactive neurogenesis in the ipsilesional vestibular nuclei appear to be involved in compensation. Third, evidence from cerebellar-deficient mutant mice demonstrates an important role for cerebellum-dependent motor learning in the longer term. Factors such as stress steroids and neuromodulators such as histamine influence these plasticity mechanisms and may thus contribute to the development of compensation in patients. Vestibular compensation involves multiple, parallel plastic processes at various sites in the brain. Experimental evidence suggests that adaptive changes in the sensitivity of ipsilesional vestibular neurons to the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine, changes in the electrophysiological excitability of vestibular neurons, changes in the inhibitory control of the brainstem vestibular networks by the cerebellum, gliosis and neurogenesis in the ipsilesional vestibular nuclei, and activity-dependent reorganization of the synaptic connectivity of the vestibular pathways are mechanisms involved in compensation.

  12. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, H C; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-07-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control, which is characterized by a retarded EMG development in postural muscles. Our results indicate that the developing nervous system cannot compensate for a vestibular deficit during the early phase of ontogeny.

  13. Vestibular insights into cognition and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvich, Caroline; Maller, Jerome J; Lithgow, Brian; Haghgooie, Saman; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2013-11-06

    The vestibular system has traditionally been thought of as a balance apparatus; however, accumulating research suggests an association between vestibular function and psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, even when balance is measurably unaffected. There are several brain regions that are implicated in both vestibular pathways and psychiatric disorders. The present review examines the anatomical associations between the vestibular system and various psychiatric disorders. Despite the lack of direct evidence for vestibular pathology in the key psychiatric disorders selected for this review, there is a substantial body of literature implicating the vestibular system in each of the selected psychiatric disorders. The second part of this review provides complimentary evidence showing the link between vestibular dysfunction and vestibular stimulation upon cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. In summary, emerging research suggests the vestibular system can be considered a potential window for exploring brain function beyond that of maintenance of balance, and into areas of cognitive, affective and psychiatric symptomology. Given the paucity of biological and diagnostic markers in psychiatry, novel avenues to explore brain function in psychiatric disorders are of particular interest and warrant further exploration. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical therapy for persons with vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Susan L; Alghwiri, Alia; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    Persons with vestibular disorders experience symptoms of dizziness and balance dysfunction, resulting in falls, as well as impairments of daily life. Various interventions provided by physical therapists have been shown to decrease dizziness and improve postural control. In the present review, we will focus on the role of physical therapy in the management of vestibular symptoms in patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Persons with both acute and chronic central and peripheral vestibular disorders improve with vestibular rehabilitation. New interventions during the past 5 years have been designed to enhance recovery from problems with balance and dizziness. Examples include the use of virtual reality, vibrotactile feedback, optokinetic flow, YouTube videos, and innovative methods to change the gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Patients with central and peripheral vestibular disorders benefit from physical therapy interventions. Advances in physical therapy interventions include new methods to stimulate adaptation of the VOR and the vestibulospinal systems.

  15. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have impaired balance function: involvement of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Selina B M; Pang, Marco Y C

    2009-08-01

    To compare standing balance performance and sensory organization of balance control in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (combined type) (ADHD-C) and typically developing children. School-aged children (n = 43) with ADHD-C and 50 age- and sex-matched typically developing children participated in the study. Sensory organization of standing balance was evaluated using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). In addition to the composite equilibrium score, somatosensory, vestibular, and visual ratios, which were indicators of the ability of the child to use information from the respective sensory systems to maintain balance, were computed. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups while controlling for physical activity level. MANCOVA revealed that children with ADHD-C had significantly lower composite equilibrium scores (P visual ratios (P = .001) than control children, by 10.3%, 2.1%, 15.6%, and 16.0%, respectively. Children with ADHD-C had significant deficits in standing balance performance in all conditions that included a disruption of sensory signals. The visual system tends to be more involved in contributing to the balance deficits in children with ADHD-C than the somatosensory and vestibular systems.

  16. Vestibular findings in fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM is a non-inflammatory musculoskeletal chronic syndrome, whose etiology is unknown, characterized by a diffuse pain, increase in palpation sensitivity and such symptoms as tiredness, insomnia, anxiety, depression, cold intolerance and otologic complaints. Objective: Evaluate the vestibular behavior in fibromyalgia patients. Method: A retrospective transversal study was performed. 25 patients aged between 26 and 65 (average age - 52.2 and standard deviation - 10.3 were evaluated and submitted to the following procedures: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngologic and vestibular evaluation by way of vector electronystamography. Results: a The most evident otoneurologic symptoms were: difficulty or pain when moving the neck and pain was spread to an arm or shoulder (92.0% in each, dizziness (84.0% and headache (76.0%. The different clinical symptoms mostly reported were: depression (80.0%, anxiety (76.0% and insomnia (72.0%; b vestibular examination showed an alteration in 12 patients (48.0% in the caloric test; c an alteration in the peripheral vestibular system prevailed, and d deficient peripheral vestibular disorders were prevalent. Conclusion: This study enabled the importance of the labyrinthic test to be verified, thus emphasizing that this kind of people must be studied better, since a range of rheumatologic diseases can cause severe vestibular changes as a result of their manifestations and impairment areas.

  17. Vestibular perception is slow: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Cowan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multisensory stimuli originating from the same event can be perceived asynchronously due to differential physical and neural delays. The transduction of and physiological responses to vestibular stimulation are extremely fast, suggesting that other stimuli need to be presented prior to vestibular stimulation in order to be perceived as simultaneous. There is, however, a recent and growing body of evidence which indicates that the perceived onset of vestibular stimulation is slow compared to the other senses, such that vestibular stimuli need to be presented prior to other sensory stimuli in order to be perceived synchronously. From a review of this literature it is speculated that this perceived latency of vestibular stimulation may reflect the fact that vestibular stimulation is most often associated with sensory events that occur following head movement, that the vestibular system rarely works alone, that additional computations are required for processing vestibular information, and that the brain prioritizes physiological response to vestibular stimulation over perceptual awareness of stimulation onset. Empirical investigation of these theoretical predictions is encouraged in order to fully understand this surprising result, its implications, and to advance the field.

  18. CERN Safety System Monitoring - SSM

    CERN Document Server

    Hakulinen, T; Valentini, F; Gonzalez, J; Salatko-Petryszcze, C

    2011-01-01

    CERN SSM (Safety System Monitoring) [1] is a system for monitoring state-of-health of the various access and safety systems of the CERN site and accelerator infrastructure. The emphasis of SSM is on the needs of maintenance and system operation with the aim of providing an independent and reliable verification path of the basic operational parameters of each system. Included are all network-connected devices, such as PLCs, servers, panel displays, operator posts, etc. The basic monitoring engine of SSM is a freely available system-monitoring framework Zabbix [2], on top of which a simplified traffic-light-type web-interface has been built. The web-interface of SSM is designed to be ultra-light to facilitate access from handheld devices over slow connections. The underlying Zabbix system offers history and notification mechanisms typical of advanced monitoring systems.

  19. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eSmith; Yiwen eZheng

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, espe...

  20. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  1. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Gunter P Siegmund; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwid...

  2. A review of the interrelationship between vestibular dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problems and dyslexia were also associated with dysfunction of the vestibular system. Different tests evaluating vestibular loss were identified of which some can be used successfully by practitionars. Various programmes and activities were identified to successfully rehabilitate vestibular function. For better understanding ...

  3. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  4. Arduino Based Infant Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhanah Mohamad Ishak, Daing Noor; Jamil, Muhammad Mahadi Abdul; Ambar, Radzi

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a system for monitoring infant in an incubator and records the relevant data into a computer. The data recorded by the system can be further referred by the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel for diagnostic or research purposes. The study focuses on designing the monitoring system that consists of an incubator equipped with humidity sensor to measure the humidity level, and a pulse sensor that can be attached on an infant placed inside the incubator to monitor infant’s heart pulse. The measurement results which are the pulse rate and humidity level are sent to the PC via Arduino microcontroller. The advantage of this system will be that in the future, it may also enable doctors to closely monitor the infant condition through local area network and internet. This work is aimed as an example of an application that contributes towards remote tele-health monitoring system.

  5. Extending the Functional Cerebral Systems Theory of Emotion to the Vestibular Modality: A Systematic and Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Joseph E.; Holland, Alissa K.; Harrison, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout history, vestibular and emotional dysregulation have often manifested together in clinical settings, with little consideration that they may have a common basis. Regarding vestibular mechanisms, the role of brainstem and cerebellar structures has been emphasized in the neurological literature, whereas emotion processing in the cerebral…

  6. In vitro release kinetics of gentamycin from a sodium hyaluronate gel delivery system suitable for the treatment of peripheral vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R M; Meyer, J D; Matsuura, J E; Shefter, E; Hart, M J; Malone, D J; Manning, M C

    1999-01-01

    For certain patients who experience intense vertigo arising from unilateral vestibular lesions, the primary therapy is a vestibular nerve section, an intracranial surgical procedure. One alternative to this treatment is therapeutic ablation of vestibular function on the unaffected side using an ototoxic agent. We prepared a biodegradable sustained-release gel delivery system using sodium hyaluronate that can be administered into the middle ear using only a local anesthetic. The gel contains gentamycin sulfate, the ototoxic agent of choice for treatment of unilateral vestibulopathy, and it exhibits diffusion-controlled release of the drug over a period of hours. The released gentamycin could then diffuse into the inner ear through the round membrane. This represents an important advance over previous formulations, which used only gentamycin sulfate solutions, in that it should allow more careful control of the dose, it should reduce loss of the drug from the middle ear site, and it should maintain intimate contact with the round membrane. By carefully controlling the dose, it should be possible to inhibit vestibular function while minimizing hearing loss. Herein we describe the in vitro release kinetics of gentamycin sulfate from sodium hyaluronate gels and find that the system obeys Fickian behavior.

  7. Aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury: maintaining a sense of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, Robert E; Zelenitsky, Sheryl A; Kassum, Diamond A

    2008-09-01

    To describe the mechanism and risk factors for the development of aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury and discuss their implications for therapeutic monitoring of aminoglycoside antibiotics. A MEDLINE search (1975-January 2008) was performed to identify literature on aminoglycoside-induced vestibular injury and risk factors associated with this outcome and their impact on therapeutic drug monitoring. Additional references were identified through review of bibliographies of identified articles. Data on the mechanisms of vestibular toxicity and its development in association with aminoglycoside exposure were extracted from identified references. The mechanism leading to the development of irreversible vestibular injury from exposure to aminoglycosides appears to be through the excessive production of oxidative free radicals. This production and subsequent toxicity appears to be a time-dependent process and is unrelated to dose or serum concentration. For similarly designed studies, the pooled incidence of vestibular toxicity is 10.9% for gentamicin, 7.4% for amikacin, 3.5% for tobramycin, and 1.1% for netilmicin. Current evidence suggests that this form of drug toxicity is not restricted to traditionally dosed systemic therapy, since intraperitoneal administration, high-dose once-daily administration, topical inhalation, and eardrop administration have all been associated with the development of this adverse outcome. Given the lack of association between serum concentrations and vestibulotoxicity, it is imperative for the pharmacist to interview the patient and not focus solely on maintaining target range drug concentrations. Minimizing the duration of exposure to aminoglycosides is recommended to reduce the risk from this form of drug toxicity.

  8. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  9. Engineering monitoring expert system's developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1991-01-01

    This research project is designed to apply artificial intelligence technology including expert systems, dynamic interface of neural networks, and hypertext to construct an expert system developer. The developer environment is specifically suited to building expert systems which monitor the performance of ground support equipment for propulsion systems and testing facilities. The expert system developer, through the use of a graphics interface and a rule network, will be transparent to the user during rule constructing and data scanning of the knowledge base. The project will result in a software system that allows its user to build specific monitoring type expert systems which monitor various equipments used for propulsion systems or ground testing facilities and accrues system performance information in a dynamic knowledge base.

  10. Radiation monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Farias, Marcos S. de; Lacerda, Fabio de; Heimlich, Adino [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Design of a portable low-power multichannel analyzer with wireless connectivity for remote radiation monitoring, powered from a solar panel with a internal battery to be operated in field. The multichannel analyzer is based on a single microcontroller which performs the digital functions and an analog signal processing board for implementing a Gaussian shaper preamplifier, a Gaussian stretcher, sample and hold, pile-up rejector and a 10 bit ADC. Now this design is to be used with a NaI(Ti) scintillator detector. This multichannel analyzer is designed to be a part of radiation monitoring network. All of them are connected, by radio in a radius of 10 kilometers, to a supervisor computer that collects data from the network of multichannel analyzers and numerically display the latest radiation measurements or graphically display measurements over time for all multichannel analyzers. Like: dose rate, spectra and operational status. Software also supports remotely configuring operating parameters (such as radiation alarm level) for each monitor independently. (author)

  11. The CUORE slow monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, L.; Biare, D.; Cappelli, L.; Cushman, J. S.; Del Corso, F.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Hickerson, K. P.; Moggi, N.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Schmidt, B.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Welliver, B.; Winslow, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    CUORE is a cryogenic experiment searching primarily for neutrinoless double decay in 130Te. It will begin data-taking operations in 2016. To monitor the cryostat and detector during commissioning and data taking, we have designed and developed Slow Monitoring systems. In addition to real-time systems using LabVIEW, we have an alarm, analysis, and archiving website that uses MongoDB, AngularJS, and Bootstrap software. These modern, state of the art software packages make the monitoring system transparent, easily maintainable, and accessible on many platforms including mobile devices.

  12. Vestibular implants studied in animal models: clinical and scientific implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F

    2016-12-01

    Damage to the peripheral vestibular system can result in debilitating postural, perceptual, and visual symptoms. A potential new treatment for this clinical problem is to replace some aspects of peripheral vestibular function with an implant that senses head motion and provides this information to the brain by stimulating branches of the vestibular nerve. In this review I consider animal studies performed at our institution over the past 15 years, which have helped elucidate how the brain processes information provided by a vestibular (semicircular canal) implant and how this information could be used to improve the problems experienced by patients with peripheral vestibular damage. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Vestibular Restoration and Adaptation in Vestibular Neuritis and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome With Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Rueda, Almudena; Esteban-Sanchez, Jonathan; Yanes, Joaquin; Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Sanz-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate vestibular restoration and the evolution of the compensatory saccades in acute severe inflammatory vestibular nerve paralysis, including vestibular neuritis and Ramsay Hunt syndrome with vertigo. Prospective. Tertiary referral center. Vestibular neuritis (n = 18) and Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients with vertigo (n = 13) were enrolled. After treatment with oral corticosteroids, patients were followed up for 6 months. Functional recovery of the facial nerve was scored according to the House-Brackman grading system. Caloric and video head impulse tests were performed in every patient at the time of enrolment. Subsequently, successive video head impulse test (vHIT) exploration was performed at the 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up. Eighteen patients with vestibular neuritis and 13 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and associated vertigo were included. Vestibular function was significantly worse in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome than in those with vestibular neuritis. Similar compensatory saccades velocity and latency values were observed in both groups, in both the caloric and initial vHIT tests. Successive vHIT results showed a significantly higher vestibulo-ocular reflex gain recovery in vestibular neuritis patients than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. A significantly faster reduction in the latency, velocity, and organization of the compensatory saccades was observed in neuritis than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. In addition to the recovery of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the reduction of latency, velocity and the organization of compensatory saccades play a role in vestibular compensation.

  14. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarise the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, can modulate cognitive function.

  15. From ear to uncertainty: vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2013-11-26

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), can modulate cognitive function.

  16. Receptors of glutamate and neurotrophin in vestibular neuronal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y S; Chen, L W; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Yung, K K L; Zhang, F X

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed advances in understanding the roles of receptors of neurotrophin and glutamate in the vestibular system. In the first section of this review, the biological actions of neurotrophins and their receptors in the peripheral and central vestibular systems are summarized. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of neurotrophins in developmental plasticity and in the maintenance of vestibular function in the adult animal. This is reviewed in relation to the developmental expression pattern of neurotrophins and their receptors within the vestibular nuclei. The second part is focused on the functional role of different glutamate receptors on central vestibular neurons. The developmental expression pattern of glutamate receptor subunits within the vestibular nuclei is reviewed in relation to the potential role of glutamate receptors in regulating the development of vestibular function. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a wearable health monitoring system for the human body that is functional, comfortable,...

  18. Bewegingsvolgsysteem = Monitor tracking system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slycke, P.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Roetenberg, D.

    2006-01-01

    A motion tracking system for tracking an object composed of object parts in a three-dimensional space. The system comprises a number of magnetic field transmitters; a number of field receivers for receiving the magnetic fields of the field transmitters; a number of inertial measurement units for

  19. Risk Monitoring for Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Peter

    2005-12-01

    The paper shows the idea, the drivers and some basics within the wide spread field of Risk Monitoring Systems (RMS) for nuclear power plants. Pros and cons are summarised and the status of last developments is touched. Based on these insights the adoption of RMS for space systems and installations is discussed with the aim to contribute to the advancement of space systems safety.

  20. A blade deflection monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A wind turbine blade comprising a system for monitoring the deflection of a wind turbine blade is described. The system comprises a wireless range-measurement system, having at least one wireless communication device located towards the root end of the blade and at least one wireless communication...

  1. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  2. Vestibular schwannoma and hearing preservation: Usefulness of level specific CE-Chirp ABR monitoring. A retrospective study on 25 cases with preoperative socially useful hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Di Scipio, Ettore; Cacciotti, Guglielmo; Roperto, Raffaelino

    2018-02-01

    Decision-making regarding the therapy of vestibular schwannoma (VS) changed over the last decades, during which curative microsurgery has been promoted. Goals of VS microsurgery are: extensive resection, facial nerve (FN) preservation and, in selected cases, hearing preservation (HP). The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative HP with reference to tumor size in patients operated on with Level Specific (LS)-CE-Chirp® ABR monitoring. Twentyfive consecutive patients with socially useful hearing (SUH) underwent VS microneurosurgery by retrosigmoid (RS) approach. Selection criteria were: pure tone audiogram 50% (50/50 criterion; AAO-HNS class A-B). In relation to maximum diameter, we identified 2 size-groups: A) ≤2cm (13 cases); B) >2cm (12 cases). HP attempt was assisted by intraoperative ABR evoked by LS CE-Chirp® acoustic stimuli. Mean age was 44,3 years (20-64); average maximum diameter 2,04cm (8 40mm). Total and nearly-total (>95%) resection was possible in all. Mortality and major morbidity were zero. In all, FN was anatomically and functionally preserved; in 10 an incomplete FN deficit (House-Brackmann II and III) was followed by complete recovery (House-Brackmann I). SUH preservation rate was 52%, with significant differences in relation to size: 61,5% group A and 41,7% group B (p = 0,014). Postoperative AAO-HNS C (serviceable) hearing was observed in 36%, deafness in 12%. Microsurgery represents a valid therapeutic option for small growing VS with SUH. Our data confirm that RS removal of VS with intraoperative ABR monitoring allows good rate of SUH preservation, especially if maximum diameter does not exceed 2cm. LS-CE-Chirp ABR represent a safe and effective method for monitoring cochlear nerve, with fast and clear intraoperative neurophysiological feedback. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Healthy Sport Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    ABBASOV, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Every individual responses differently to physical activity. Working out more than body endures can cause serious health problems. Rapid developments in information and communication technologies affects the whole area of health. Recently developed wearable wireless non-invasive health sensors allow us to create healthcare application. This research aims to give an idea for implementation of healthcare systems in sports area. This system will improve healthy and social life and encourage peop...

  4. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  5. A grid job monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; /Fermilab; Nowack, Andreas; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Padhi, Sanjay; /UC, San Diego; Sarkar, Subir; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components: (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  6. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D E; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders.

  7. Interactions between stress and vestibular compensation – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yougan eSaman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function, and plasticity have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders.

  8. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  9. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  10. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  11. ELECTRONIC FILE MONITORING SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GBUBEMI

    2014-11-06

    Nov 6, 2014 ... integrated seamlessly in a global electronic business environment that includes centralized storage of all documents and related content, with the flexibility to distribute any document in the system electronically or to print, fax, or mail it as a hard copy. Things to be considered for this upgrade are Document ...

  12. UAV Delivery Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Khin Thida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available UAV-based delivery systems are increasingly being used in the logistics field, particularly to achieve faster last-mile delivery. This study develops a UAV delivery system that manages delivery order assignments, autonomous flight operation, real time control for UAV flights, and delivery status tracking. To manage the delivery item assignments, we apply the concurrent scheduler approach with a genetic algorithm. The present paper describes real time flight data based on a micro air vehicle communication protocol (MAVLink. It also presents the detailed hardware components used for the field tests. Finally, we provide UAV component analysis to choose the suitable components for delivery in terms of battery capacity, flight time, payload weight and motor thrust ratio.

  13. Drought forecasting monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicino, G.; Senatore, A.; Versace, P.

    2003-04-01

    The main characteristics of an integrated system aimed to predict space-time variations of water deficit occurring in southern Italy are described in this note. The system, running since the year 2000, has been developed within the European INTERREG IIC Programme. It is based on an embedded coupling of GIS and models connected with a Data Acquisition System aimed at storing real time data recorded by the Regional tele-metering hydro-meteorological network (Centro Funzionale Meteo Idrologico della Regione Calabria). This network has been strengthened with a great number of stations, most of which are aimed at measuring specific quantities (rainfall, water level, groundwater level, temperature, solar radiation, evaporation, wind speed and direction, soil moisture and soil water matric potential) to be directly used for the estimate of water balance on the southern Italy regions. Geographic information are stored within a GIS according to raster and vector data structures; spatially distributed hydrological quantities are elaborated, managed and stored using a raster data structure, characterised by a 250 m square grid spatial resolution equal to that utilised for the southern Italy Digital Terrain Model. Hydrological coverages are directly obtained by linking GIS with hydrological databases. Specifically, hydro-meteorological information is managed considering two different data types. The first is based on daily hydro-meteorological values recorded by all gauge stations (historic DB) starting from 1925. The latter is based on real time data recorded by tele-metering stations with a 20-minute time step (real time DB). The interaction with databases has been improved realising some Windows-based software applications capable of guaranteeing a more simple and flexible data query, and allowing the user to extract synthetic graphs and reports. These user-DB interfaces can work both autonomously and directly inside the GIS by simple graphical selections on the gauge

  14. Recovery of vestibular ocular reflex function and balance control after a unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eAllum

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD on balance control as observed in stance and gait tests. Normally, a UPVD is defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR function. Therefore, we compare recovery observed in balance control over time with similar patterns of recovery or lack thereof in VOR function. Three types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis, vestibular loss prior to and after cerebellar pontine angle tumor (CPAT surgery during which a vestibular neurectomy was performed, and vestibular loss following neurectomy to eliminate disabling Ménière’s disease.To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes, mounted near the body’s centre of mass, were used for stance and gait tests. Measurement variables were the pitch (anterior-posterior and roll (lateral sway angles and angular velocities of the lower trunk-pelvis. All three groups showed balance deficits during stance tasks on foam, especially with eyes closed when stable control is highly dependent on vestibular inputs. Deficits in balance control during gait were present but were more profound for complex gait tasks such as tandem gait. Differences emerged between the groups concerning the severity of the deficit and its recovery. Generally, the effects of acute neuritis were more severe but recovered rapidly, deficits due to vestibular neurectomy were less severe but longer lasting. These results paralleled deficits in VOR function and raise questions about two modes of neural plasticity occurring in the vestibular system following vestibular loss: one mode being the limited central compensation for the loss, and the second mode being some restoration of peripheral vestibular function. Future work will need to correlate deficits in balance control during stance and gait more exactly with VOR deficits and carefully consider the differences between insufficient central compensation compared to inadequate peripheral

  15. Microgravity in the STS-29 space shuttle discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D.; Jones, T.; Vellinger, J.; Deuser, M.; Hester, P.; Hullinger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Out of 32 embryos flown (16 @ E2 + 16 @ E9) for 5 days, 16 survived. All sixteen E2 were dead at landing. Eight were opened and eight were incubated at 1.0G. Autopsy showed that 4 E2 survived over 24 hours in space. Eight E14 hatched without anatomical malformations, and 8 E14 were fixed. The height of the macular epithelia was 31 mu m (mean) in control and 26 mu m in flight chicks. The cross-sectional area of macular nuclei of control was 17 mu m(2) for hair cells and 14 mu m(2) in supporting cells. In flight, cross-sectional area was 17 mu m(2) in hair cells and 15 mu m(2) in supporting cells (n=250). The shape factor of cartilage cells (1.0 = perfect circle) between control (mean = 0.70) and flight (mean = 0.72), and the area of cartilaginous cells between controls (mean = 9 mu m(2)) and flight (mean = 9 mu m(2)) did not differ (n=300). The nuclei of support cells were closer to the basement membrane in flight than in control chicks. The immunoreactivity of otoconia with anti keratan, fibronectin or chrondroitin sulfate was not different between flight and control ears. There were more afferent fibers inside the macular epithelia of flight (p<0.05) than control. Three of 8 flight animals had elevated vestibular thresholds (VT), with normal mean response amplitudes and latencies. Modified afferent innervation patterns requiring weeks to compensate are sufficient to elevate VT, and should be investigated further. Other reversible (sublethal) microgravity effects on sensory epithelia (vacuoles, swelling, etc) require quantification.

  16. Common Vestibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G

    2017-01-01

    The three most common vestibular diseases, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease (MD) and vestibular neuritis (VN), are presented in this paper. BPPV, which is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder, can be defined as transient vertigo induced by a rapid head position change, associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. Canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal is considered the most convincing theory of its pathogenesis and the ...

  17. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  18. Static and dynamic body balance following provocation of the visual and vestibular systems in females with and without joint hypermobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridou, Katerina; Mandalidis, Dimitris; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Vagenas, George; Athanasopoulos, Spyros

    2014-04-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by excessive joint movement, musculoskeletal pain and neurophysiological deficits (i.e. decreased proprioceptive acuity, altered neuromuscular reflexes). Such deficits may affect body balance thus increasing the risk of injury. The present study aimed at examining static and dynamic body balance following challenge of the visual and vestibular systems in individuals with JHS. The sample consisted of 21 females with JHS and 20 controls without signs of JHS. Static body balance was assessed by the degree of anteroposterior and mediolateral deviation of the center of pressure, during 20-sec single-leg stances with eyes opened (EO), eyes closed (EC) and eyes opened with head extension (EO-HE) using a foot pressure platform. Dynamic body balance was assessed by the number of landing and balance errors committed during a multiple single-leg-hop-stabilization test. Nonparametric analysis showed that the JHS-group demonstrated significantly greater (a) mediolateral deviation during single-leg-stance with EO (p static balance following challenge of the vestibular system may be justified by vestibular deficiency and/or insufficient proprioceptive capabilities of the neck. Impairments of dynamic balance in individuals with JHS may be attributed to proprioceptive deficits, which can alter feedforward and feedback mechanisms. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-09-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.

  20. Phonocardiograph system monitors heart sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Phonocardiograph system monitors the mechanical activity of the heart in extreme environments. It uses a piezoelectric-crystal microphone with an integral preamplifier, and a signal conditioner having special frequency characteristics. The output signals can be recorded on tape, presented aurally, or transmitted telemetrically to a remote station.

  1. Visualization System for Monitoring Data Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Pinho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a Big Data system has a monitoring system for performance evaluation and error prevention. There are some disadvantages in the way that these tools display the information and its targeted approach to physical components. The main goal is to study visual and interactive mechanisms that allow the representation of monitoring data in grid computing environments, providing the end-user information, which can contribute objectively to the system analysis. This paper is an extension of the paper presented at (Pinho and Carvalho 2016 and has the purpose to present the state of the art, carries out the proposed solution and present the achieved goals.

  2. Culture media-based selection of endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes from the young mouse vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Cai, Jing; Hou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaohan; Kachelmeier, Allan; Shi, Xiaorui

    2017-03-01

    The vestibular blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) is comprised of perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms) and pericytes (PCs), in addition to endothelial cells (ECs) and basement membrane (BM), and bears strong resemblance to the cochlear BLB in the stria vascularis. Over the past few decades, in vitro cell-based models have been widely used in blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retina barrier (BRB) research, and have proved to be powerful tools for studying cell-cell interactions in their respective organs. Study of both the vestibular and strial BLB has been limited by the unavailability of primary culture cells from these barriers. To better understand how barrier component cells interact in the vestibular system to control BLB function, we developed a novel culture medium-based method for obtaining EC, PC, and PVM/M primary cells from tiny explants of the semicircular canal, sacculus, utriculus, and ampullae tissue of young mouse ears at post-natal age 8-12 d. Each phenotype is grown in a specific culture medium which selectively supports the phenotype in a mixed population of vestibular cell types. The unwanted phenotypes do not survive passaging. The protocol does not require additional equipment or special enzyme treatment. The harvesting process takes less than 2 h. Primary cell types are generated within 7-10 d. The primary culture ECs, PCs, and PVM/M shave consistent phenotypes more than 90% pure after two passages (∼ 3 weeks). The highly purified primary cell lines can be used for studying cell-cell interactions, barrier permeability, and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vestibular evaluation in children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkaila, E A; Emara, A A; Gabr, T A

    2015-04-01

    Fifty per cent of children with serous otitis media may have some balance disturbances. To evaluate vestibular function in children with otitis media with effusion. The control group comprised 25 children with bilateral normal hearing and middle-ear function. The study group consisted of 30 children with bilateral otitis media with effusion; these were divided into 2 subgroups according to air-bone gap size. Measures included the Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory, an imbalance evaluation sheet for children, vestibular bedside tests for children, and air- and bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing. Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores and some vestibular bedside test results were significantly abnormal, with normal video-nystagmography results, in children with otitis media with effusion. Air-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were recorded in 73 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion, with significantly delayed latencies. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were successfully detected in 100 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion with similar results to the control group. The Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory and vestibular bedside tests are valuable tools for detecting vestibular impairment in children. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials are useful for vestibular system evaluation.

  4. Portable water quality monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizar, N. B.; Ong, N. R.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Alcain, J. B.; Haimi, W. M. W. N.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Portable water quality monitoring system was a developed system that tested varied samples of water by using different sensors and provided the specific readings to the user via short message service (SMS) based on the conditions of the water itself. In this water quality monitoring system, the processing part was based on a microcontroller instead of Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) machines to receive the results. By using four main sensors, this system obtained the readings based on the detection of the sensors, respectively. Therefore, users can receive the readings through SMS because there was a connection between Arduino Uno and GSM Module. This system was designed to be portable so that it would be convenient for users to carry it anywhere and everywhere they wanted to since the processor used is smaller in size compared to the LCR machines. It was also developed to ease the user to monitor and control the water quality. However, the ranges of the sensors' detection still a limitation in this study.

  5. The NASA Carbon Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emission inventories, forest carbon sequestration programs (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+), cap-and-trade systems, self-reporting programs, and their associated monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) frameworks depend upon data that are accurate, systematic, practical, and transparent. A sustained, observationally-driven carbon monitoring system using remote sensing data has the potential to significantly improve the relevant carbon cycle information base for the U.S. and world. Initiated in 2010, NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) project is prototyping and conducting pilot studies to evaluate technological approaches and methodologies to meet carbon monitoring and reporting requirements for multiple users and over multiple scales of interest. NASA's approach emphasizes exploitation of the satellite remote sensing resources, computational capabilities, scientific knowledge, airborne science capabilities, and end-to-end system expertise that are major strengths of the NASA Earth Science program. Through user engagement activities, the NASA CMS project is taking specific actions to be responsive to the needs of stakeholders working to improve carbon MRV frameworks. The first phase of NASA CMS projects focused on developing products for U.S. biomass/carbon stocks and global carbon fluxes, and on scoping studies to identify stakeholders and explore other potential carbon products. The second phase built upon these initial efforts, with a large expansion in prototyping activities across a diversity of systems, scales, and regions, including research focused on prototype MRV systems and utilization of COTS technologies. Priorities for the future include: 1) utilizing future satellite sensors, 2) prototyping with commercial off-the-shelf technology, 3) expanding the range of prototyping activities, 4) rigorous evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and error characterization, 5) stakeholder

  6. 29 CFR 1954.2 - Monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring system. 1954.2 Section 1954.2 Labor Regulations...) PROCEDURES FOR THE EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF APPROVED STATE PLANS General § 1954.2 Monitoring system. (a... Act, the Assistant Secretary has established a State Program Performance Monitoring System. Evaluation...

  7. Slow Monitoring Systems for CUORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suryabrata; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). The experiment is comprised of 988 TeO2 bolometric crystals arranged into 19 towers and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. We have developed slow monitoring systems to monitor the cryostat during detector installation, commissioning, data taking, and other crucial phases of the experiment. Our systems use responsive LabVIEW virtual instruments and video streams of the cryostat. We built a website using the Angular, Bootstrap, and MongoDB frameworks to display this data in real-time. The website can also display archival data and send alarms. I will present how we constructed these slow monitoring systems to be robust, accurate, and secure, while maintaining reliable access for the entire collaboration from any platform in order to ensure efficient communications and fast diagnoses of all CUORE systems.

  8. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Talebi; Mohammad Taghi Karimi; Seyed Hamid Reza Abtahi; Niloofar Fereshtenejad

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50 ? 7). We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of ...

  9. The Moving History of Vestibular Stimulation as a Therapeutic Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Grabherr, Luzia; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Macauda, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Although the discovery and understanding of the function of the vestibular system date back only to the 19th century, strategies that involve vestibular stimulation were used long before to calm, soothe and even cure people. While such stimulation was classically achieved with various motion devices, like Cox’s chair or Hallaran’s swing, the development of caloric and galvanic vestibular stimulation has opened up new possibilities in the 20th century. With the increasing knowledge and recogni...

  10. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  11. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system's contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  12. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  13. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. METHOD: This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. RESULTS: For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. CONCLUSION: Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  14. Prediction in the Vestibular Control of Arm Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, Etienne; Simoneau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of vestibular signals to motor control has been evidenced in postural, locomotor, and oculomotor studies. Here, we review studies showing that vestibular information also contributes to the control of arm movements during whole-body motion. The data reviewed suggest that vestibular information is used by the arm motor system to maintain the initial hand position or the planned hand trajectory unaltered during body motion. This requires integration of vestibular and cervical inputs to determine the trunk motion dynamics. These studies further suggest that the vestibular control of arm movement relies on rapid and efficient vestibulomotor transformations that cannot be considered automatic. We also reviewed evidence suggesting that the vestibular afferents can be used by the brain to predict and counteract body-rotation-induced torques (e.g., Coriolis) acting on the arm when reaching for a target while turning the trunk.

  15. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Forbes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3. This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz. In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  16. Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Congress enacted the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) in response to growing awareness of a land loss crisis in Louisiana. Projects funded by CWPPRA require monitoring and evaluation of project effectiveness, and there is also a need to assess the cumulative effects of all projects to achieve a sustainable coastal environment. In 2003, the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration (OCPR) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received approval from the CWPPRA Task Force to implement the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) as a mechanism to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of CWPPRA projects at the project, region, and coastwide levels. The CRMS design implements a multiple reference approach by using aspects of hydrogeomorphic functional assessments and probabilistic sampling. The CRMS program is as dynamic as the coastal habitats it monitors. The program is currently funded through CWPPRA and provides data for a variety of user groups, including resource managers, academics, landowners, and researchers.

  17. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  18. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rine, Rosemarie M; Schubert, Michael C; Whitney, Susan L; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S; Musolino, Mark C; Roche, Jennica L; Steed, Daniel P; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P; Shepard, Neil P; Jacobson, Gary P; Wrisley, Diane M; Hoffman, Howard J; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-03-12

    Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41-0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%-73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42-0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = -0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system.

  19. Unilateral Vestibular Loss Impairs External Space Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Liliane; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Cauvin, Pierre; Dumitrescu, Michel; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Péruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal) and far (extrapersonal) spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation), and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss. PMID:24523916

  20. Unilateral vestibular loss impairs external space representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Borel

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal and far (extrapersonal spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation, and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss.

  1. Clinical vestibular testing assessed with machine-learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesol, Adrian J; Cao, Mengfei; Brodley, Carla E; Lewis, Richard F

    2015-04-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are common clinical problems, and accurate diagnosis depends on determining whether damage is localized to the peripheral vestibular system. Vestibular testing guides this determination, but the accuracy of the different tests is not known. To determine how well each element of the vestibular test battery segregates patients with normal peripheral vestibular function from those with unilateral reductions in vestibular function. Retrospective analysis of vestibular test batteries in 8080 patients. Clinical medical records were reviewed for a subset of individuals with the reviewers blinded to the vestibular test data. A group of machine-learning classifiers were trained using vestibular test data from persons who were "manually" labeled as having normal vestibular function or unilateral vestibular damage based on a review of their medical records. The optimal trained classifier was then used to categorize patients whose diagnoses were unknown, allowing us to determine the information content of each element of the vestibular test battery. The information provided by each element of the vestibular test battery to segregate individuals with normal vestibular function from those with unilateral vestibular damage. The time constant calculated from the rotational test ranked first in information content, and measures that were related physiologically to the rotational time constant were 10 of the top 12 highest-ranked variables. The caloric canal paresis ranked eighth, and the other elements of the test battery provided minimal additional information. The sensitivity of the rotational time constant was 77.2%, and the sensitivity of the caloric canal paresis was 59.6%; the specificity of the rotational time constant was 89.0%, and the specificity of the caloric canal paresis was 64.9%. The diagnostic accuracy of the vestibular test battery increased from 72.4% to 93.4% when the data were analyzed with the optimal machine-learning classifier

  2. The effects of vestibular lesions on hippocampal function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Horii, Arata; Russell, Noah; Bilkey, David K; Zheng, Yiwen; Liu, Ping; Kerr, D Steve; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2005-04-01

    Interest in interaction between the vestibular system and the hippocampus was stimulated by evidence that peripheral vestibular lesions could impair performance in learning and memory tasks requiring spatial information processing. By the 1990s, electrophysiological data were emerging that the brainstem vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) and the hippocampus were connected polysynaptically and that hippocampal place cells could respond to vestibular stimulation. The aim of this review is to summarise and critically evaluate research published in the last 5 years that has seen major progress in understanding the effects of vestibular damage on the hippocampus. In addition to new behavioural studies demonstrating that animals with vestibular lesions exhibit impairments in spatial memory tasks, electrophysiological studies have confirmed long-latency, polysynaptic pathways between the VNC and the hippocampus. Peripheral vestibular lesions have been shown to cause long-term changes in place cell function, hippocampal EEG activity and even CA1 field potentials in brain slices maintained in vitro. During the same period, neurochemical investigations have shown that some hippocampal subregions exhibit long-term changes in the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, arginase I and II, and the NR1 and NR2A N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits following peripheral vestibular damage. Despite the progress, a number of important issues remain to be resolved, such as the possible contribution of auditory damage associated with vestibular lesions, to the hippocampal effects observed. Furthermore, although these studies demonstrate that damage to the vestibular system does have a long-term impact on the electrophysiological and neurochemical function of the hippocampus, they do not indicate precisely how vestibular information might be used in hippocampal functions such as developing spatial representations of the environment. Understanding this will require detailed

  3. Sensorintegrative dysfunction underlying vestibular disorders after traumatic brain injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Laura M. Franke, PhD; William C. Walker, MD; David X. Cifu, MD; Alfred L. Ochs, PhD; Henry L. Lew, MD, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms are persistent and problematic sequelae of blast exposure. Several lines of evidence suggest that these symptoms often stem from injury to the central nervous system. Current methods of assessing the vestibular system have described vestibular deficits that follow traumatic brain injury and differentiate blunt and blast trauma but have not examined the full range of vestibular functions that depend on the cerebral structures above the midbrain. Damage to the central vestib...

  4. Sensorintegrative dysfunction underlying vestibular disorders after traumatic brain injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Laura M; Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Ochs, Alfred L; Lew, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms are persistent and problematic sequelae of blast exposure. Several lines of evidence suggest that these symptoms often stem from injury to the central nervous system. Current methods of assessing the vestibular system have described vestibular deficits that follow traumatic brain injury and differentiate blunt and blast trauma but have not examined the full range of vestibular functions that depend on the cerebral structures above the midbrain. Damage to the central vestibular circuits can lead to deficits in vital processes of spatial perception and navigation, in addition to dizziness and disequilibrium, and may also affect emotional functioning, particularly noradrenergically modulated states of anxiety. Perceptual functions can be assessed to determine the extent of central nervous system involvement in vestibular symptoms and to provide greater confidence when vestibular dysfunction is to be excluded. The ability to detect central vestibular dysfunction will significantly enhance our response to the dizziness and balance symptoms that are a common source of distress for Veterans.

  5. Biobehavioural analysis of the vestibular system and posture control in patients with cervicogenic dizziness. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande-Alonso, M; Moral Saiz, B; Mínguez Zuazo, A; Lerma Lara, S; La Touche, R

    2016-07-21

    Cervicogenic dizziness is a musculoskeletal disorder mainly characterised by dizziness and disequilibrium associated with neck pain. The pathophysiology is unclear and the neurophysiological basis remains to be ascertained. The aim of this study is to compare the vestibulo-ocular reflex and postural control between patients with cervicogenic dizziness and asymptomatic subjects, and to assess the association between debilitating dizziness and other psychosocial variables. A total of 20 patients and 22 asymptomatic subjects were selected. Vestibulo-ocular reflex was assessed by performing the head impulse test. Computerised dynamic posturography was used to evaluate the postural control by means of the sensory organisation test. In addition, subjects self-reported their degree of disability due to dizziness, cervical disability, kinesiophobia, and state of anxiety and depression. There were no differences in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (P>.05). However, we found differences with a medium-to-large effect size (d>0.60) in variables related to proprioception and visual information integration; the former variable set was related to disability due to dizziness. Disability due to dizziness presents strong-to-moderate associations with cervical disability, kinesiophobia, and anxiety. Our data rule out changes in the vestibular system in cervicogenic dizziness, but they do point to proprioceptive impairment. According to our results, the association between dizziness-related disability and other psychosocial factors in cervicogenic dizziness is very relevant for clinical medicine and for future research projects. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  7. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-13

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed. The month of June, 2004 was primarily occupied with the writing of the Phase I Final Report, the sole deliverable of Phase I, which will be submitted in the next quarter. Redesign of the laboratory prototype and design of the downhole (Phase II) prototype was

  8. Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Clement, Gilles R.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Taylor, Laura C..

    2015-01-01

    Control of vehicles and other complex systems is a high-level integrative function of the central nervous system (CNS). It requires well-functioning subsystem performance, including good visual acuity, eye-hand coordination, spatial and geographic orientation perception, and cognitive function. Evidence from space flight research demonstrates that the function of each of these subsystems is altered by removing gravity, a fundamental orientation reference, which is sensed by vestibular, proprioceptive, and haptic receptors and used by the CNS for spatial orientation, posture, navigation, and coordination of movements. The available evidence also shows that the degree of alteration of each subsystem depends on a number of crew- and mission-related factors. There is only limited operational evidence that these alterations cause functional impacts on mission-critical vehicle (or complex system) control capabilities. Furthermore, while much of the operational performance data collected during space flight has not been available for independent analysis, those that have been reviewed are somewhat equivocal owing to uncontrolled (and/or unmeasured) environmental and/or engineering factors. Whether this can be improved by further analysis of previously inaccessible operational data or by development of new operational research protocols remains to be seen. The true operational risks will be estimable only after we have filled the knowledge gaps and when we can accurately assess integrated performance in off-nominal operational settings (Paloski et al. 2008). Thus, our current understanding of the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight is limited primarily to extrapolation of scientific research findings, and, since there are limited ground-based analogs of the sensorimotor and vestibular changes associated with space flight, observation of their functional

  9. Vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan L; McDonnell, Michelle

    2011-02-16

    This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 4, 2007.Unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction (UPVD) can occur as a result of disease, trauma or postoperatively. The dysfunction is characterised by complaints of dizziness, visual or gaze disturbances and balance impairment. Current management includes medication, physical manoeuvres and exercise regimes, the latter known collectively as vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To assess the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation in the adult, community-dwelling population of people with symptomatic unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The most recent search was 1 July 2010, following a previous search in March 2007. Randomised trials of adults living in the community, diagnosed with symptomatic unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We sought comparisons of VR versus control (placebo etc.), other treatment (non-VR, e.g. pharmacological) or another form of VR. We considered the outcome measures of frequency and severity of dizziness or visual disturbance; changes in balance impairment, function or quality of life; and measure/s of physiological status with known functional correlation. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trials for risk of bias. We included 27 trials, involving 1668 participants, in the review. Trials addressed the effectiveness of VR against control/sham interventions, medical interventions or other forms of VR. Individual and pooled data showed a statistically significant effect in favour of VR over control or no intervention. The exception to this was when movement-based VR was compared to physical manoeuvres for benign

  10. Monitoring Systems for Hydropower Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damaschin Pepa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issue in hydro power industry is to determine the necessary degree of automation in order to improve the operation security. Depending upon the complexity of the system (the power plant equipment the automation specialist will build a philosophy of control following some general principals of security and operation. Helped by the modern digital equipment, today is relative easy to design a complete monitoring and supervising system including all the subparts of a hydro aggregate. A series of sensors and transducers specific for each auxiliary installation of the turbine and generator will be provided, together with a PLC or an industrial PC that will run an application software for implementing the security and control algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to offer a general view of these issues, providing a view of designing an automation & control and security system for hydro power plants of small, medium and big power.

  11. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  12. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, R.D.

    2000-03-30

    The goal of the project was to develop a wireless communications system, including communications, command, and control software, to remotely monitor the environmental state of a process or facility. Proof of performance would be tested and evaluated with a prototype demonstration in a functioning facility. AR Designs' participation provided access to software resources and products that enable network communications for real-time embedded systems to access remote workstation services such as Graphical User Interface (GUI), file I/O, Events, Video, Audio, etc. in a standardized manner. This industrial partner further provided knowledge and links with applications and current industry practices. FM and T's responsibility was primarily in hardware development in areas such as advanced sensors, wireless radios, communication interfaces, and monitoring and analysis of sensor data. This role included a capability to design, fabricate, and test prototypes and to provide a demonstration environment to test a proposed remote sensing system. A summary of technical accomplishments is given.

  14. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: What are vestibular aqueducts? How ... How are enlarged vestibular aqueducts related to childhood hearing loss? Research suggests that most children with enlarged vestibular ...

  15. [Therapy of vestibular vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, K F

    1993-05-01

    The non-surgical treatment of vestibular disorders must be based on current knowledge of vestibular pathophysiology. It is generally accepted that after vestibular lesions a self-repair mechanism exists that allows a more or less complete recovery. In cases of persisting vestibular complaints the physician's duty consists in stimulation of these pre-existing mechanisms. This can be done by physical exercises, as has been recommended since the work of Cawthorne and Cooksey in 1946. This concept is meanwhile supported by modern neurophysiological research. This article describes a short training program consisting of exercises for fixation during rotations, smooth pursuit, optokinetic nystagmus and motor learning mechanisms. Physical exercises can be reinforced by nootropic drugs.

  16. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study...

  17. Sensing External and Self-Motion with Hair Cells: A Comparison of the Lateral Line and Vestibular Systems from a Developmental and Evolutionary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagnaud, Boris P; Engelmann, Jacob; Fritzsch, Bernd; Glover, Joel C; Straka, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Detection of motion is a feature essential to any living animal. In vertebrates, mechanosensory hair cells organized into the lateral line and vestibular systems are used to detect external water or head/body motion, respectively. While the neuronal components to detect these physical attributes are similar between the two sensory systems, the organizational pattern of the receptors in the periphery and the distribution of hindbrain afferent and efferent projections are adapted to the specific functions of the respective system. Here we provide a concise review comparing the functional organization of the vestibular and lateral line systems from the development of the organs to the wiring from the periphery and the first processing stages. The goal of this review is to highlight the similarities and differences to demonstrate how evolution caused a common neuronal substrate to adapt to different functions, one for the detection of external water stimuli and the generation of sensory maps and the other for the detection of self-motion and the generation of motor commands for immediate behavioral reactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Instrumentation for Power System Disturbance Monitoring, Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the level of instrumentation for power system disturbance monitoring, data acquisition and control in Nigerian Electric Power System; National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) is presented. The need for accurate power system disturbance monitoring is highlighted. A feature of an adequate monitoring, data ...

  19. Evaluation of diagnostic tests of the otolith organs and their application in various vestibular pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current vestibular testing is limited. The general function of the vestibular system on both sides of the head can be tested, and one part of the peripheral vestibular organ, the horizontal semicircular canal, can be tested unilaterally. However, recently a test for the function of the otolith

  20. "Conflicting" motion cues to the visual and vestibular self-motion systems around 0.06 Hz evoke simulator sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Parker, Donald E; Philips, James O; Furness, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The basic question this research addressed was, how does simulator sickness vary with simulated motion frequency? Participants were 11 women and 19 men, 20 to 63 years of age. A visual self-motion frequency response curve was determined using a Chattecx posture platform with a VR4 head-mounted display (HMD) or a back-projected dome. That curve and one for vestibular self-motion specify a frequency range in which vestibular and visual motion stimuli could produce conflicting self-motion cues. Using a rotating chair and the HMD, a third experiment supported (p virtual reality sickness; for simulators intended to operate in this frequency range, appropriate simulator sickness interventions should be considered during the design process.

  1. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  2. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas; Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections-from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals-typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems-may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  3. Progression of changes in the sensorial elements of the cochlear and peripheral vestibular systems: The otitis media continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Schachern, Patricia; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate pathologic changes in the cochlear (inner and outer hair cells and stria vascularis) and vestibular (vestibular hair cells, dark, and transitional cells) sensorial elements in temporal bones from donors who had otitis media. We studied 40 temporal bones from such donors, which were categorized in serous otitis media (SOM), serous-purulent otitis media (SPOM), mucoid/mucoid-purulent otitis media (MOM/MPOM), and chronic otitis media (COM); control group comprised 10 nondiseased temporal bones. We found significant loss of inner and outer cochlear hair cells in the basal turn of the SPOM, MOM/MPOM and COM groups; significant loss of vestibular hair cells was observed in the MOM/MPOM and COM groups. All otitis media groups had smaller mean area of the stria vascularis in the basal turn of the cochlea when compared to controls. In conclusion, our study demonstrated more severe pathologic changes in the later stages of the continuum of otitis media (MOM/MPOM and COM). Those changes seem to progress from the basal turn of the cochlea (stria vascularis, then inner and outer hair cells) to the middle turn of the cochlea and to the saccule and utricle in the MOM/MPOM and COM stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trigeminal, Visceral and Vestibular Inputs May Improve Cognitive Functions by Acting through the Locus Coeruleus and the Ascending Reticular Activating System: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sensory signals sustain the background discharge of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS which includes the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC neurons and controls the level of attention and alertness. Moreover, LC neurons influence brain metabolic activity, gene expression and brain inflammatory processes. As a consequence of the sensory control of ARAS/LC, stimulation of a sensory channel may potential influence neuronal activity and trophic state all over the brain, supporting cognitive functions and exerting a neuroprotective action. On the other hand, an imbalance of the same input on the two sides may lead to an asymmetric hemispheric excitability, leading to an impairment in cognitive functions. Among the inputs that may drive LC neurons and ARAS, those arising from the trigeminal region, from visceral organs and, possibly, from the vestibular system seem to be particularly relevant in regulating their activity. The trigeminal, visceral and vestibular control of ARAS/LC activity may explain why these input signals: (1 affect sensorimotor and cognitive functions which are not directly related to their specific informational content; and (2 are effective in relieving the symptoms of some brain pathologies, thus prompting peripheral activation of these input systems as a complementary approach for the treatment of cognitive impairments and neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for...

  6. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cronin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections—from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals—typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems—may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  7. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental...

  8. Sensorial countermeasures for vestibular spatial disorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Aurore C; Quarck, Gaëlle; Denise, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Spatial disorientation is defined as an erroneous body orientation perceived by pilots during flights. Limits of the vestibular system provoke frequent spatial disorientation mishaps. Although vestibular spatial disorientation is experienced frequently in aviation, there is no intuitive countermeasure against spatial disorientation mishaps to date. The aim of this review is to describe the current sensorial countermeasures and to examine future leads in sensorial ergonomics for vestibular spatial disorientation. This work reviews: 1) the visual ergonomics, 2) the vestibular countermeasures, 3) the auditory displays, 4) the somatosensory countermeasures, and, finally, 5) the multisensory displays. This review emphasizes the positive aspects of auditory and somatosensory countermeasures as well as multisensory devices. Even if some aspects such as sensory conflict and motion sickness need to be assessed, these countermeasures should be taken into consideration for ergonomics work in the future. However, a recent development in aviation might offer new and better perspectives: unmanned aerial vehicles. Unmanned aerial vehicles aim to go beyond the physiological boundaries of human sensorial systems and would allow for coping with spatial disorientation and motion sickness. Even if research is necessary to improve the interaction between machines and humans, this recent development might be incredibly useful for decreasing or even stopping vestibular spatial disorientation.

  9. The ingestible thermal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Hogrefe, Arthur F.; Lesho, Jeffery C.

    1988-03-01

    A thermal monitoring system for measuring body core temperatures was developed that contains an ingestible pill which is both commandable and rechargeable, and which uses magnetic induction for command and telemetry as well as for recharging. The pill electronics consist of a battery power source, a crystal-controlled oscillator that drives a small air coil, and a command detection circuit. The resulting 262-kHz magnetilc field can be easily detected from a distance of 1 m. The pill oscillator functions at voltages less than 1 V, supplied by a single Ni-Cd battery, which must be recharged after 72 h of continuous transmission. The pill can be recalibrated periodically to compensate for long-term drift.

  10. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  11. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  12. A Multiagent System for Monitoring Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Moergestel, L.; van der Bijl, B.; Puik, E.; Telgen, D.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/380243350; Meyer, J.J.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07139656X

    2016-01-01

    By using agent technology, a versatile and modular monitoring system can be built. In this paper, such a multiagent-based monitoring system will be described. The system can be trained to detect several conditions in combination and react accordingly. Because of the distributed nature of the system,

  13. Adjustment of the dynamic weight distribution as a sensitive parameter for diagnosis of postural alteration in a rodent model of vestibular deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighilet, Brahim; Péricat, David; Frelat, Alais; Cazals, Yves; Rastoldo, Guillaume; Boyer, Florent; Dumas, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders, by inducing significant posturo-locomotor and cognitive disorders, can significantly impair the most basic tasks of everyday life. Their precise diagnosis is essential to implement appropriate therapeutic countermeasures. Monitoring their evolution is also very important to validate or, on the contrary, to adapt the undertaken therapeutic actions. To date, the diagnosis methods of posturo-locomotor impairments are restricted to examinations that most often lack sensitivity and precision. In the present work we studied the alterations of the dynamic weight distribution in a rodent model of sudden and complete unilateral vestibular loss. We used a system of force sensors connected to a data analysis system to quantify in real time and in an automated way the weight bearing of the animal on the ground. We show here that sudden, unilateral, complete and permanent loss of the vestibular inputs causes a severe alteration of the dynamic ground weight distribution of vestibulo lesioned rodents. Characteristics of alterations in the dynamic weight distribution vary over time and follow the sequence of appearance and disappearance of the various symptoms that compose the vestibular syndrome. This study reveals for the first time that dynamic weight bearing is a very sensitive parameter for evaluating posturo-locomotor function impairment. Associated with more classical vestibular examinations, this paradigm can considerably enrich the methods for assessing and monitoring vestibular disorders. Systematic application of this type of evaluation to the dizzy or unstable patient could improve the detection of vestibular deficits and allow predicting better their impact on posture and walk. Thus it could also allow a better follow-up of the therapeutic approaches for rehabilitating gait and balance. PMID:29112981

  14. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-01-17

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the testing of the rebuilt laboratory prototype and its conversion into a version that will be operable in the drilling tests at TerraTek Laboratories. In addition, formations for use in these tests were designed and constructed, and a test protocol was developed. The change in scope and no-cost extension of Phase II to January, 2006, described in our last report, were approved. The tests are scheduled to be run during the week of January 23, and should be completed before the end of the month.

  15. Making Sense of the Body: the Role of Vestibular Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The role of the vestibular system in posture and eye movement control has been extensively described. By contrast, how vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions is a more recent research area in the field of cognitive neuroscience. In the present review article, I will summarize recent findings showing that vestibular signals play a crucial role in making sense of the body. First, data will be presented showing that vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions ranging from low-level bodily perceptions, such as touch, pain, and the processing of the body's metric properties, to higher level bodily perceptions, such as the sense of owning a body, the sense of being located within this body (embodiment), and the anchoring of the visuo-spatial perspective to this body. In the second part of the review article, I will show that vestibular information seems to be crucially involved in the visual perception of biological motion and in the visual perception of human body structure. Reciprocally, observing human bodies in motion influences vestibular self-motion perception, presumably due to sensorimotor resonance between the self and others. I will argue that recent advances in the mapping of the human vestibular cortex afford neuroscientific models of the vestibular contributions to human bodily self-consciousness.

  16. Recent Evidence About the Effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Susan L; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-03-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation of persons with peripheral and central vestibular disorders requires a thorough evaluation and a customized plan of care. Collaboration of the various members of the treatment team optimizes outcomes. Early intervention appears to be better than referring patients who have developed chronic symptoms of balance loss, dizziness, anxiety, and depression. There is a body of emerging evidence that supports that the central nervous system has the capability to reweigh sensory inputs in order to improve function. There continues to be a dearth of knowledge related to how to treat persons with otolithic dysfunction as compared to those with semicircular canal damage. With the use of vestibular rehabilitation, patients are less likely to fall, are less dizzy, balance and gait improve, and quality of life is enhanced. Recent Cochrane reviews and a clinical practice guideline support the use of vestibular rehabilitation for persons with vestibular dysfunction. Typical symptoms and their management including dysregulated gait, falling, fear of falling, increased sway in standing, visual blurring, symptoms with complex visual scenes in the periphery, and weakness are all discussed with ideas for intervention. Any patient with a vestibular disorder may benefit from a trial of vestibular rehabilitation. A discussion of recent evidence and innovations related to vestibular rehabilitation is also included.

  17. A Study of Relationship between the Acoustic Sensitivity of Vestibular System and the Ability to Trigger Sound-Evoked Muscle Reflex of the Middle Ear in Adults with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Emami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The vestibular system is sound sensitive and the sensitivity is related to the saccule. The vestibular afferents are projected to the middle ear muscles (such as the stapedius. The goal of this research was studying the relationship between the vestibular hearing and the sound-evoked muscle reflex of the middle ear to 500 HZ. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross sectional-comparison done in audiology department of Sheikholreis C‍‍linic (Hamadan, Iran. The study groups consisted of thirty healthy people and thirty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Inclusion criteria of the present study were to have normal hearing on pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, and speech discrimination scores. Based on ipsilateral acoustic reflex test at 500HZ, they were divided to normal and abnormal groups. Then they were evaluated by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and finally classified in three groups (N Normal ear , (CVUA Contra lateral vertiginous ear with unaffected saccular sensitivity to sound,(IVA Ipsilateral vertiginous ear with affected saccular sensitivity to sound. Results: Thirty affected ears (IVA with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by ab-normal cVEMPs, revealed abnormal findings of acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Whereas, both un-affected (CVUA and normal ears (N had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs (p13,n23 and acoustic reflex at500HZ among the three groups were sig-nificant. The correlation between acoustic reflex at 500HZ and p13 latencies was significant. The n23 latencies showed significant correlation with acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Conclusion: The vestibular sensitivity to sound retains the ability to trigger sound-evoked re-flex of the middle ear at 500 HZ. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:99-104

  18. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system

  19. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 µm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle...... relation to the VDCs in the utricle and the crista ampullaris of the lateral semicircular canal in the vestibular apparatus. One major vein emanated from these networks, which emptied into the vein of the vestibular aqueduct. Veins draining the saccule and the common crus of the superior and posterior...

  20. Eye Movements as Indicators of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshikova, Galina Ya; Kovalev, Artem I; Klimova, Oxana A; Chernorizov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality technologies are in wide use in sport psychology. An advantage of this kind of technology is the possibility to assess sportspeople's readiness to perform complex movements. This study is aimed at developing a method for the evaluation of vestibular function disturbances in young skaters. Such disturbances may occur while skaters are performing rotation movements. To achieve this goal, we induced a vection illusion, accompanied by virtual environment rotation in a CAVE virtual reality system. Vestibular disturbances were tested for two groups-professional skaters and people who had very little or no skating experience. The quantitative evaluation of vestibular dysfunction was based on eye movement characteristics, which were recorded in subjects experiencing a vection illusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Active system monitoring applied on wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Parbo, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A concept for active system monitoring (ASM) applied on wind turbines is presented in this paper. The concept is based on an injection of a small periodic auxiliary signal in the system. An investigation of the signature from the auxiliary input in residual (error) signals can then be applied...... for an online monitoring of central parameters/elements of the system. Statistical tests are applied on the residual signals for obtaining a correct monitoring....

  2. Production monitoring system for understanding product robustness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boorla, Srinivasa Murthy; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    study is used to demonstrate how the monitoring system can be used to efficiently guide corrective action to improve product performance. It is claimed that the monitoring system can be used to dramatically cut the time taken to identify, planand execute corrective action related to typical quality...... to be seven days. Using the monitoring system for the PRECI‐IN case, similar corrective action would have been achieved almost immediately....

  3. Coma Patient Monitoring System Using Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankalp, Meenu

    2011-12-01

    COMA PATIENT MONITORING SYSTEM provides high quality healthcare services in the near future. To provide more convenient and comprehensive medical monitoring in big hospitals since it is tough job for medical personnel to monitor each patient for 24 hours.. The latest development in patient monitoring system can be used in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Critical Care Unit (CCU), and Emergency Rooms of hospital. During treatment, the patient monitor is continuously monitoring the coma patient to transmit the important information. Also in the emergency cases, doctor are able to monitor patient condition efficiently to reduce time consumption, thus it provides more effective healthcare system. So due to importance of patient monitoring system, the continuous monitoring of the coma patient can be simplified. This paper investigates about the effects seen in the patient using "Coma Patient Monitoring System" which is a very advanced product related to physical changes in body movement of the patient and gives Warning in form of alarm and display on the LCD in less than one second time. It also passes a sms to a person sitting at the distant place if there exists any movement in any body part of the patient. The model for the system uses Keil software for the software implementation of the developed system.

  4. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  5. Design and Development of Patient Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazwanie Azizulkarim, Azra; Jamil, Muhammad Mahadi Abdul; Ambar, Radzi

    2017-08-01

    Patient monitoring system allows continuous monitoring of patient vital signs, support decision making among medical personnel and help enhance patient care. This system can consist of devices that measure, display and record human’s vital signs, including body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure and other health-related criteria. This paper proposes a system to monitor the patient’s conditions by monitoring the body temperature and pulse rate. The system consists of a pulse rate monitoring software and a wearable device that can measure a subject’s temperature and pulse rate only by using a fingertip. The device is able to record the measurement data and interface to PC via Arduino microcontroller. The recorded data can be viewed as a historical file or can be archived for further analysis. This work also describes the preliminary experimental results of the selected sensors to show the usefulness of the sensors for the proposed patient monitoring system.

  6. Comparative analysis of solar photovoltaic monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeti, Siva Ramakrishna; Singh, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is focused on comparative analysis of photovoltaic (PV) monitoring system for observing the performance and stability of the system. The cost and complexity of existing PV monitoring systems restricted their use to large scale PV plants. Over the past decade, different aspects of the PV monitoring systems were reported in the wide range of literature. In this paper, a comparative analysis of various PV monitoring systems is presented for the first time. It is based on analyzing six main characteristics of PV monitoring system, such as data transfer mechanism, controller, monitoring parameters, sampling interval, program development software and monitoring methods. The comparison of methodologies and the description of implementation process are discussed in this context. The key findings of this study will contribute to the development of a new PV monitoring system. The acquaintance of all these aspects is crucial for the development of effective, low cost, and viable PV monitoring systems for the small and medium scale PV plants without compromising on the desired performance.

  7. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  8. Integrated Monitoring System of Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oborski Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrated monitoring system for discrete manufacturing processes is presented in the paper. The multilayer hardware and software reference model was developed. Original research are an answer for industry needs of the integration of information flow in production process. Reference model corresponds with proposed data model based on multilayer data tree allowing to describe orders, products, processes and save monitoring data. Elaborated models were implemented in the integrated monitoring system demonstrator developed in the project. It was built on the base of multiagent technology to assure high flexibility and openness on applying intelligent algorithms for data processing. Currently on the base of achieved experience an application integrated monitoring system for real production system is developed. In the article the main problems of monitoring integration are presented, including specificity of discrete production, data processing and future application of Cyber-Physical-Systems. Development of manufacturing systems is based more and more on taking an advantage of applying intelligent solutions into machine and production process control and monitoring. Connection of technical systems, machine tools and manufacturing processes monitoring with advanced information processing seems to be one of the most important areas of near future development. It will play important role in efficient operation and competitiveness of the whole production system. It is also important area of applying in the future Cyber-Physical-Systems that can radically improve functionally of monitoring systems and reduce the cost of its implementation.

  9. Distributed Monitoring System Based on ICINGA

    CERN Multimedia

    Haen, C; Neufeld, N

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb online system relies on a large and heterogeneous I.T. infrastructure : it comprises more than 2000 servers and embedded systems and more than 200 network devices. While for the control and monitoring of detectors, PLCs, and readout boards an industry standard SCADA system PVSSII has been put in production, we use a low level monitoring system to monitor the control infrastructure itself. While our previous system was based on a single central NAGIOS server, our current system uses a distributed ICINGA infrastructure.

  10. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Grot, Stephen Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

  11. Vestibular rehabilitation following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, James M; Hujsak, Bryan D; Kelly, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are a symptom complex that is commonly found following concussion. Early metabolic changes following concussion may lead to worsening of the injury and symptoms in individuals not properly managed from the outset. When symptoms do not recover spontaneously, skilled vestibular rehabilitation can be an effective modality in an attempt to normalize the individual's vestibular responses. The purpose of this review is to appraise the current and accepted methods available to the skilled clinician in quantifying and treating vestibular dysfunction following concussion. Incidence and prognostic indicators will be reviewed along with common barriers to recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation following concussion utilizes similar tools and techniques employed when treating those solely with peripheral pathology. The clinician must not only have a solid understanding of when and why certain exercises are required, but also be willing to accept that less exercise may be indicated in this population. As injury to the system following mild traumatic brain injury can include both peripheral and central structures, the duration of therapy and the time to recovery may be prolonged. Co-morbidities including cognitive and behavioral issues, visual-perceptual dysfunction, metabolic dysfunction, and autonomic dysfunction may hamper the effectiveness of the traditional Vestibular Rehabilitation approach. As successful treatment does not occur in a vacuum, working closely with other disciplines well versed in treating these co-morbid issues will help the individual to obtain optimal recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation is an effective modality for managing dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance following concussion. Careful consideration of the acuity of the injury, along with effective management of co-morbid conditions will optimize the result.

  12. Modernizing the monitoring of Mass Storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    Terrien, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of a system is essential to ensure its efficiency. On a computer system, this monitoring is partly done via the analysis of log messages. The monitoring of CASTOR, a mass-storage system responsible for the storage of 150Pb of scientific data at CERN, was being done with tools developed by the IT-ST-FDO section. Those tools recently encountered some performance limitations due to the increase in the quantity of data produced by CERN's experiments. In this paper, I will describe how I managed to modernize CASTOR's monitoring tools by leveraging services centrally managed by CERN's IT department.

  13. Apparatus, System, And Method For Roadway Monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Claudel, Christian G.

    2015-06-02

    An apparatus, system, and method for monitoring traffic and roadway water conditions. Traffic flow and roadway flooding is monitored concurrently through a wireless sensor network. The apparatus and system comprises ultrasound rangefinders monitoring traffic flow, flood water conditions, or both. Routing information may be calculated from the traffic conditions, such that routes are calculated to avoid roadways that are impassable or are slow due to traffic conditions.

  14. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  15. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnera, Cibele; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Greters, Mário Edvin; Basta, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard™ biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS) of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG), which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard™ for ten days, and a control group (CG), which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), were used. After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p=0.007) and C6 (p=0.01). On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p=0.04). The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p=0.04). The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard™ system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  17. Developing a system for AMB Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A monitoring system for the Associative Memory Boards (AMBs) of the Fast Tracker (FTK) is developed and tested. This system is able to read out status register values from AMBs and publish them to the Information Service (IS). The system is designed so as to be easily extensible to other boards of FTK, and this is demonstrated through an extension of the systems to be able to monitor FTK Auxiliary cards. Future work will involve extensions to other FTK boards and providing a system to read from IS and present the user with the monitoring data.

  18. Estudo do equilíbrio postural estático em pacientes com vestibulopatia mediante sistema de sensores eletromagnéticos tridimensionais Static postural balance study in patients with vestibular disorders using a three dimensional eletromagnetic sensor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greco Varela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação do reflexo vestíbulo ocular é importante; porém, insuficiente. Sistemas de sensores eletromagnéticos tridimensionais são uma nova opção para avaliação posturográfica. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a oscilação corporal em voluntários hígidos, com Manobras de Epley e Dix-Hallpike positivas e com outras disfunções vestibulares usando um sistema tridimensional. Forma de estudo: Prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Participaram: 23 mulheres saudáveis, 15 com disfunção vestibular periférica detectada à prova calórica e 10 com manobras de Epley e Dix-Hallpike positivas. Todas realizaram exames nas posições: olhos abertos e fechados em superfície estável e instável. RESULTADOS:Na condição Olhos Abertos e Superfície Estável, houve p The vestibular-ocular reflex assessment is important, but not enough. Tridimensional electromagnetic sensor systems represent a new method to assess posturography. AIM: To assess body sway in healthy subjects who had positive Dix Hallpike and Epley maneuvers and with other vestibular dysfunctions by means of a three-dimensional system. Study design: Prospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We had 23 healthy women, 15 with peripheral vestibular dysfunction found upon caloric test and 10 with positive Epley and Dix Hallpike maneuvers. All tests performed in the following positions: open and closed eyes on stable and unstable surfaces. RESULTS: With the Eyes Open and on a stable surface, p < 0.01 between the control group and the one with peripheral vestibular dysfunction in all variables, except the a-p maximum, full speed and mediolateral trajectory velocity, which had a p < 0.01 between the group with vestibular dysfunction and controls in all positions. The group with positive Epley and Dix Hallpike maneuvers had p < 0.01 at full speed and in its components in the x and y in positions with open and eyes closed on an unstable surface. CONCLUSION: The tridimensional electromagnetic sensors system was

  19. Configuration of Risk Monitor System by PLant Defense-In.Depth Monitor and Relability Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Lind, Morten; Yang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    A new method of risk monitor system of a nuclear power plant has been proposed from the aspect by what degree of safety functions incorporated in the plant system is maintained by multiple barriers of defense-in-depth (DiD). Wherein, the central idea is plant DiD risk monitor and reliability...... monitor derived from the four aspects of (i) design principle of nuclear safety to realize DiD concept, (ii) definition of risk and risk to be monitored, (iii) severe accident phenomena as major risk, (iv) scheme of risk ranking, and (v) dynamic risk display. In this paper, the overall frame...... of the proposed frame on risk monitor system is summarized and the detailed discussion is made on the definitions of major terminologies of risk, risk ranking, anatomy of fault occurrence, two-layer configuration of risk monitor, how to configure individual elements of plant DiD risk monitor and its example...

  20. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; "super entrainment" was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans.

  1. Sport monitoring with smart wearable system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Paolo; Moltani, Alessia; Andreoni, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a new system for sport monitoring. The system was composed of a t-shirt with two textile electrodes and two devices for the acquisition, storage, processing and visualization of the signals. The systems allows monitoring both ECG signal (raw and processed heart-rate) and 3 axial acceleration (raw and step counter). The systems were tested in different conditions during some races; we report the results on three subjects during a skyrunning race.

  2. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  3. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies.

  4. Treating vertigo with vestibular rehabilitation: results in 155 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, R S M; Pedalini, M E B; Lorenzi, M C; Formigoni, L G

    2002-01-01

    Balance is fundamental to our daily activities and the vestibular system, together with vision and proprioceptive functions, are the main structures involved in this process. Dizziness is the main clinical manifestation of malfunction of these systems. The mechanisms of vestibular compensation are one of the most studied aspects since they play an important role in the patient's everyday activities. In this retrospective description of a series of cases the authors present their results in 155 patients that underwent a program of vestibular rehabilitation (VR). The program, first described by Cawthorne and Coosey, is based on mechanisms of potentiation of the cervico-ocular reflex and substitution of the lost vestibular cues for visual and somatosensory cues. The results were satisfactory (remission or partial cure) in 75.5% of the patients, with an average treatment time of up to 2 months and 5 or fewer sessions performed in most of the cases. The results were somewhat inferior in those cases in which a central vestibular lesion or more than one etiologic factor was present. The results of a subgroup of elderly patients (age > 65 years) were similar to those of the total number of studied subjects. Vestibular rehabilitation, associated to the specific etiological treatment, appears to be a very useful tool in the management of patients suffering from dizziness of all ages, although different clinical responses to the therapy may vary according to the presence of a central or a peripheral vestibular lesion or multiple etiological factors.

  5. The design of remote temperature monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biqing; Li, Zhao; Wei, Liuren

    2017-08-01

    This design is made on the basis of the single-chip microcomputer remote temperature monitoring system. STC89C51RC is the main core part, this design use the sensor DHT11 of temperature or humidity and wireless transceiver NRF24L01 the temperature of the test site for long-range wireless measurement and monitoring. The design contains the main system and the small system, of which the main system can show the actual test site temperature and humidity values, voice broadcast, out of control and receive data alarm function; The small system has the function of temperature and humidity, temperature monitoring and sending data. After debugging, the user customizable alarm upper and lower temperature, when the temperature exceeds limit value, the main system of buzzer alarm immediately. The system has simple structure, complete functions and can alarm in time, it can be widely used remote temperature acquisition and monitoring of the site.

  6. Surveillance system for radiation monitoring in HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Takashi; Yasu, Katsuji; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ashikagaya, Yoshinobu; Kikuchi, Toshiki; Minowa, Yuuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sato, Kouichi; Nomura, Toshibumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR: thermal output of 30 MW) went critical for the first time on November 10, 1998. Radiation monitoring in the HTTR Rise-to-Power Test was carried out using the surveillance system. This report will be used in radiation monitoring in Rise-to-Power Tests and also in periodic inspection work etc. in HTTR. This report describes the design and specification of the surveillance system for the radiation monitoring which consists of radiation monitors, radiation measuring instruments and personal computers in HTTR. The outline of HTTR is also described. (author)

  7. The CERN GSM monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabrous, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the way CERN has approached the problem of monitoring its own GSM infrastructure, especially in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator tunnel and other underground facilities, where a leaky feeder cable carries mobile phone signals, and where this technology is the only means for inter-personnel communications

  8. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Entropy and gain analysis of HIT using wireless electro-oculography system could be used to detect the VOR dysfunctions of AUVL and may become effective methods for evaluating vestibular disorders.

  9. Upgrade of the LHCb ECAL monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Guz, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb ECAL is a shashlik calorimeter of 6016 cells, covering 7.68 x 6.24 m$^2$ area. To monitor the readout chain of each ECAL cell, the LHCb ECAL is equipped with a LED based monitoring system. During the LHC Run I (2009-2012) it was found that the precision of the monitoring suffers from the radiation degradation of transparency of polystyrene clear fibers used to transport the LED light to the ECAL photomultipliers. In order to improve the performance of the monitoring system, and especially in view of significant increase of LHCb working luminosity foreseen after 2018, the present plastic fibers have been replaced by radiation hard quartzfi bers. The performance of the old LHCb ECAL monitoring system during LHC Run I and the design of the upgraded system are discussed here.

  10. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vestibular schwannoma is key to preventing its serious consequences. There are three options for managing a vestibular ... Disorders Balance Problems and Disorders - National Institute on Aging Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss Genetics ...

  11. Isosorbide delays gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of isosorbide for protection from vestibular sensory cell damage was investigated. The effects of isosorbide on gentamicin-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied by means of the fluorescence indicators 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate and dihydrotetramethylrosamine. The effect on gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell damage was examined by using an in vitro LIVE/DEAD system. Isosorbide inhibited the production of both NO and ROS. Isosorbide limited the vestibular sensory cell damage caused by gentamicin. It is, therefore, suggested that isosorbide may help to treat inner ear disorders.

  12. Diagnosis of acute unilateral vestibular deficit by virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Renzo; Cesarani, Antonio; Meloni, Francesco; Passali, Francesco Maria; Mora, Francesco; Passali, Giulio Cesare; Barbieri, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to establish a new diagnostic approach, through the use of virtual reality, to the study of the subjective vertical bar in unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We subjected 174 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction (ages 18-82 years) to vestibular diagnosis with the virtual reality system. We changed the classic configuration of the subjective visual vertical into a subjective visual horizontal bar. This technique revealed values of the subjective visual horizontal outside the normal range in 91% of patients.

  13. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes.

  14. Vestibular syndrome: a change in internal spatial representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, L; Lopez, C; Péruch, P; Lacour, M

    2008-12-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions from reflexes to spatial representation. This paper reviews behavioral, perceptive, and cognitive data that highlight the role of changes in internal spatial representation on the vestibular syndrome. Firstly, we review how visual vertical perception and postural orientation depend on multiple reference frames and multisensory integration and how reference frames are selected according to the status of the peripheral vestibular system (i.e., unilateral or bilateral hyporeflexia), the environmental constraints (i.e., sensory cues), and the postural constraints (i.e., balance control). We show how changes in reference frames are able to modify vestibular lesion-induced postural and locomotor deficits and propose that fast changes in reference frame may be considered as fast-adaptive processes after vestibular loss. Secondly, we review data dealing with the influence of vestibular loss on higher levels of internal representation sustaining spatial orientation and navigation. Particular emphasis is placed on spatial performance according to task complexity (i.e., the required level of spatial knowledge) and to the sensory cues available to define the position and orientation within the environment (i.e., real navigation in darkness or visual virtual navigation without any actual self-motion). We suggest that vestibular signals are necessary for other sensory cues to be properly integrated and that vestibular cues are involved in extrapersonal space representation. In this respect, vestibular-induced changes would be based on a dynamic mental representation of space that is continuously updated and that supports fast-adaptive processes.

  15. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  16. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  17. The relationship between senile hearing loss and vestibular activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifi Kurtaran

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A considerable high number of SNHL patients also suffer from dizziness and related vestibular symptoms. Objective: To evaluate the association of vestibular dysfunction and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in adult patients. Methods: Prospective, double-blinded, controlled studies composed by 63 adult patients without any vestibular symptoms or diagnosed vestibular diseases. Audiological status was measured with pure tone audiometry and the vestibular system was tested with vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP. Patients were divided into two groups: a study group (patients with SNHL and a control group (patients without SNHL. VEMP results of the groups were calculated and compared. Results: Mean P1 (23.54 and N1 (30.70 latencies were prolonged in the study group (p < 0.001 and the amplitudes of the study group were significantly reduced (p < 0.001. Both parameters of the VEMP test were abnormal in the study group when compared to the control group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that age-related SNHL may be accompanied by vestibular weakness without any possible predisposing factors for vestibulopathy.

  18. The relationship between senile hearing loss and vestibular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtaran, Hanifi; Acar, Baran; Ocak, Emre; Mirici, Emre

    A considerable high number of SNHL patients also suffer from dizziness and related vestibular symptoms. To evaluate the association of vestibular dysfunction and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in adult patients. Prospective, double-blinded, controlled studies composed by 63 adult patients without any vestibular symptoms or diagnosed vestibular diseases. Audiological status was measured with pure tone audiometry and the vestibular system was tested with vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Patients were divided into two groups: a study group (patients with SNHL) and a control group (patients without SNHL). VEMP results of the groups were calculated and compared. Mean P1 (23.54) and N1 (30.70) latencies were prolonged in the study group (p<0.001) and the amplitudes of the study group were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Both parameters of the VEMP test were abnormal in the study group when compared to the control group. These findings suggest that age-related SNHL may be accompanied by vestibular weakness without any possible predisposing factors for vestibulopathy. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Luigi; Iorio, Giuseppina; Salafia, Francesca; Mazzone, Salvatore; Califano, Maria

    2015-02-01

    To determine the utility of the hyperventilation test (HVT) in the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma (VS). A retrospective analysis of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVIN) in 45 patients with unilateral VS. A tertiary referral center. Forty-five patients with VS; 30 patients with chronic vestibular neuritis; 20 healthy subjects with normal hearing and without symptoms or a history of vertigo, migraine, or neurological diseases (control group). Audiological and vestibular examination; "side-stream" measurement of end-tidal CO2 pressure (P(EtCO2)) to standardize the procedure; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centered on the cerebellopontine angle. An analysis of HVIN, its patterns, and its appearance threshold via the measurement of P(EtCO2) correlations with the tumor size. HVIN was observed in 40 of 45 cases (88.9%) in the schwannoma group and in 12 of 30 cases (40%) in the chronic vestibular neuritis group; HVIN was not observed in the control group (0/20 cases) (p hyperventilation event causes metabolic changes in the vestibular system and reveals a latent vestibular asymmetry. The presence of an excitatory pattern is the major criterion that suggests VS in patients with signs of unilateral vestibular deficit.

  20. Intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Daniel; Idoux, Erwin; Beraneck, Mathieu; Moore, L E; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies in rodents have shown that the functional efficacy of several neurotransmitter receptors and the intrinsic membrane excitability of central vestibular neurons, as well as the organization of synaptic connections within and between vestibular nuclei can be modified during postnatal development, after a lesion of peripheral vestibular organs or in vestibular-deficient mutant animals. This review mainly focuses on the intrinsic membrane properties of neurons of the medial vestibular nuclei of rodents, their postnatal maturation, and changes following experimental or congenital alterations in vestibular inputs. It also presents the concomitant modifications in the distribution of these neurons into different neuron types, which has been based on their membrane properties in relation to their anatomical, biochemical, or functional properties. The main points discussed in this review are that (1) the intrinsic membrane properties can be used to distinguish between two dominant types of neurons, (2) the system remains plastic throughout the whole life of the animal, and finally, (3) the intracellular calcium concentration has a major effect on the intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons.

  1. Image detection monitoring system (IDMS) for landslide monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Giorgio; Allasia, Paolo; Baldo, Marco; Giordan, Daniele

    2010-05-01

    In the field of topographic displacement monitoring systems, the CNR IRPI of Turin has developed and patented a new instrumentation, named Image Detection For Monitoring System (IDMS). The IDMS is constituted by a digital reflex camera that, according to different needs, can be combined to a long range reflectorless laser distantiometer . The resulting assembly is automatically moved by an high accuracy sophisticated positioning mechanism managed by a low-consumption pc. The principle of operation is based on the analysis of a time series of pictures of an area that, processed using particular algorithms, allow to obtain topographic displacements. If necessary, with the long range laser integration it is also possible to get the displacement values in three-dimensions. The system, initially experimented with the use of a cam, has been improved using a reflex camera, developing a special software that allowed to improve performances and to set algorithms to seek the monitored areas. These implementations, in addition to the freedom from the needs of reflecting targets, increase the system flexibility that can operate in dynamic contexts where the phenomenon morphology can quickly change. With this characteristics , the IDMS can preserve the topographic total station accuracy, but it hasn't the necessity to use expensive reflecting targets, often characterized by the difficulty of their installation and maintenance. These characteristics make the system most flexible allowing to modify the investigated areas without particular logistic difficulties and without further costs.

  2. Prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Duarte, Juliana Antoniolli; Morganti, Lígia Oliveira Golçalves; Brandão, Priscila Valéria Caus; Nakao, Bruno Higa; Villa, Thais Rodrigues; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is now accepted as a common cause of episodic vertigo. Treatment of VM involves two situations: the vestibular symptom attacks and the period between attacks. For the latter, some prophylaxis methods can be used. The current recommendation is to use the same prophylactic drugs used for migraines, including β-blockers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The recent diagnostic definition of vestibular migraine makes the number of studies on its ...

  3. A Framework for Remote Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crysdian, Cahyo

    2017-04-01

    Remote monitoring system becomes an important facility to support observation activities for various natural disasters. In many incidents of natural disaster such as volcano eruptions, the available monitoring systems installed closely to disaster area were damaged due to extreme condition raised by the event. The temperature of disaster site could suddenly increase to hundred degrees of Celsius, drowned in a water flood or even trapped in a toxic heating gas. Therefore, it is important to have observation facility that is installed far away from disaster area. This research is an exploratory study to develop the framework for remote monitoring system. It includes hardware requirement and algorithm definition that cover system lenses and a set of image processing algorithm. The framework delivers a promising preliminary result towards the effort for remote monitoring system development.

  4. Blood monitoring systems and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Jose (Inventor); Zander, Dennis (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A blood monitoring system is capable of monitoring the blood of a subject in vivo. The blood monitoring system comprises: 1) an array of movable microneedle micromachined within associated wells; 2) array of motion actuators able to move each needle in and out of their associated wells; 3) array of microvalves associated with each microneedle able to control the flow of air around the microneedle; 4) an array of chemical sensors inserted into patient by movable microneedles; 5) an array of inductors able to measure chemical concentration in the vicinity of inserted chemical sensors; 6) conducting vias that provide timed actuating signal signals from a control system to each motion actuator; 7) conducting vias that transmit signal produced by array of chemical sensors to the control system for processing, although the blood monitoring system can comprise other numbers and types of elements in other configurations.

  5. Performance Monitoring Applied to System Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertille Somon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, automation is present in every aspect of our daily life and has some benefits. Nonetheless, empirical data suggest that traditional automation has many negative performance and safety consequences as it changed task performers into task supervisors. In this context, we propose to use recent insights into the anatomical and neurophysiological substrates of action monitoring in humans, to help further characterize performance monitoring during system supervision. Error monitoring is critical for humans to learn from the consequences of their actions. A wide variety of studies have shown that the error monitoring system is involved not only in our own errors, but also in the errors of others. We hypothesize that the neurobiological correlates of the self-performance monitoring activity can be applied to system supervision. At a larger scale, a better understanding of system supervision may allow its negative effects to be anticipated or even countered. This review is divided into three main parts. First, we assess the neurophysiological correlates of self-performance monitoring and their characteristics during error execution. Then, we extend these results to include performance monitoring and error observation of others or of systems. Finally, we provide further directions in the study of system supervision and assess the limits preventing us from studying a well-known phenomenon: the Out-Of-the-Loop (OOL performance problem.

  6. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel J. Brown; Christopher J. Pastras; Ian S. Curthoys

    2017-01-01

    .... Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort...

  7. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  8. Latent nystagmus: vestibular nystagmus with a twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Michael C; Tusa, Ronald J

    2004-02-01

    Latent nystagmus is a horizontal binocular oscillation that is evoked by unequal visual input to the 2 eyes. It develops primarily in humans with congenital esotropia. To investigate the interrelationship between latent and peripheral vestibular nystagmus and their corollary neuroanatomical pathways. Examination of subcortical neuroanatomical pathways producing latent nystagmus and review of the neurophysiological mechanisms by which they become activated in congenital esotropia. The vestibular nucleus presides over motion input from the eyes and labyrinths. Latent nystagmus corresponds to the optokinetic component of ocular rotation that is driven monocularly by nasal optic flow during a turning movement of the body in lateral-eyed animals. Congenital esotropia alters visual pathway development from the visual cortex to subcortical centers that project to the vestibular nucleus, allowing this primitive subcortical motion detection system to generate latent nystagmus under conditions of monocular fixation. Latent nystagmus is the ocular counterpart of peripheral vestibular nystagmus. Its clinical expression in humans proclaims the evolutionary function of the eyes as sensory balance organs.

  9. A plasma process monitor/control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  10. Sleep Monitoring System Using Kinect Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jaehoon; Hong, Min; Ryu, Sungyong

    2015-01-01

    .... In this paper, we proposed and implemented the sleep monitoring system which can detect the sleep movement and posture during sleep using a Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor without any body attached devices...

  11. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  12. Influence of Caloric Vestibular Stimulation on Body Experience in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas eSchönherr; Christian-Albrecht eMay

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system has more connections with and influence on higher cortical centers than previously thought. These interactions with higher cortical centers and the phenomena that they elicit require a structural intact cerebral cortex. To date, little is known about the role and influence of the vestibular system on one’s body experience. In this study we show that caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) in healthy participants has an effect on the perceptive component of one’s body experi...

  13. Optimized Temporal Monitors for SystemC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakov, Deian; Rozier, Kristin Y.; Vardi, Moshe Y.

    2012-01-01

    SystemC is a modeling language built as an extension of C++. Its growing popularity and the increasing complexity of designs have motivated research efforts aimed at the verification of SystemC models using assertion-based verification (ABV), where the designer asserts properties that capture the design intent in a formal language such as PSL or SVA. The model then can be verified against the properties using runtime or formal verification techniques. In this paper we focus on automated generation of runtime monitors from temporal properties. Our focus is on minimizing runtime overhead, rather than monitor size or monitor-generation time. We identify four issues in monitor generation: state minimization, alphabet representation, alphabet minimization, and monitor encoding. We conduct extensive experimentation and identify a combination of settings that offers the best performance in terms of runtime overhead.

  14. Class 3 Tracking and Monitoring System Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safely, Eugene; Salamy, S. Phillip

    1999-11-29

    The objective of Class 3 tracking system are to assist DOE in tracking and performance and progress of these projects and to capture the technical and financial information collected during the projects' monitoring phase. The captured information was used by DOE project managers and BDM-Oklahoma staff for project monitoring and evaluation, and technology transfer activities. The proposed tracking system used the Class Evaluation Executive Report (CLEVER), a relation database for storing and disseminating class project data; GeoGraphix, a geological and technical analysis and mapping software system; the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) database; and MS-Project, a project management software system.

  15. Monitoring System for ALICE Surface Areas

    CERN Document Server

    Demirbasci, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    I have been at CERN for 12 weeks within the scope of Summer Student Programme working on a monitoring system project for surface areas of the ALICE experiment during this period of time. The development and implementation of a monitoring system for environmental parameters in the accessible areas where a cheap hardware setup can be deployed were aim of this project. This report explains how it was developed by using Arduino, Raspberry PI, WinCC OA and DIM protocol.

  16. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; Cavuscens, Samuel; Ranieri, Maurizio; Schwarz, Konrad; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; van den Boogert, Thomas; Lucieer, Floor; van Hoof, Marc; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman; Micera, Silvestro; Perez Fornos, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no

  17. BABY MONITORING SYSTEM USING WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is marked by the sudden death of an infant during sleep that is not predicted by the medical history and remains unexplained even after thorough forensic autopsy and detailed death investigation. In this we developed a system that provides solutions for the above problems by making the crib smart using the wireless sensor networks (WSN and smart phones. The system provides visual monitoring service through live video, alert services by crib fencing and awakens alert, monitoring services by temperature reading and light intensity reading, vaccine reminder and weight monitoring.

  18. Monitoring the CMS data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G [MIT, Cambridge (United States); Behrens, U; Hatton, D [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Biery, K; Cheung, H [FNAL, Chicago (United States); Branson, J; Coarasa, J A; Dusinberre, E [UCSD, San Diego (United States); Cano, E; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; Deldicque, C; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gutleber, J; Laurens, J F; Perez, J A Lopez [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Rodrigues, F Fortes, E-mail: Luciano.Orsini@cern.c [CEFET/RJ (Brazil)

    2010-04-01

    The CMS data acquisition system comprises O(20000) interdependent services that need to be monitored in near real-time. The ability to monitor a large number of distributed applications accurately and effectively is of paramount importance for robust operations. Application monitoring entails the collection of a large number of simple and composed values made available by the software components and hardware devices. A key aspect is that detection of deviations from a specified behaviour is supported in a timely manner, which is a prerequisite in order to take corrective actions efficiently. Given the size and time constraints of the CMS data acquisition system, efficient application monitoring is an interesting research problem. We propose an approach that uses the emerging paradigm of Web-service based eventing systems in combination with hierarchical data collection and load balancing. Scalability and efficiency are achieved by a decentralized architecture, splitting up data collections into regions of collections. An implementation following this scheme is deployed as the monitoring infrastructure of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. All services in this distributed data acquisition system are providing standard web service interfaces via XML, SOAP and HTTP. Continuing on this path we adopted WS-* standards implementing a monitoring system layered on top of the W3C standards stack. We designed a load-balanced publisher/subscriber system with the ability to include high-speed protocols for efficient data transmission and serving data in multiple data formats.

  19. Data center equipment location and monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A data center equipment location system includes both hardware and software to provide for location, monitoring, security and identification of servers and other equipment in equipment racks. The system provides a wired alternative to the wireless RFID tag system by using electronic ID tags...

  20. Data Center Equipment Location and Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Data center equipment location systems include hardware and software to provide information on the location, monitoring, and security of servers and other equipment in equipment racks. The systems provide a wired alternative to the wireless RFID tag system by using electronic ID tags...

  1. Monitoring systems for community water supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Brooks, R. R.; Jeffers, E. L.; Linton, A. T.; Poel, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Water monitoring system includes equipment and techniques for waste water sampling sensors for determining levels of microorganisms, oxygen, chlorine, and many other important parameters. System includes data acquisition and display system that allows computation of water quality information for real time display.

  2. A proactive system for maritime environment monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Davide; Pieri, Gabriele; Tampucci, Marco; Salvetti, Ovidio

    2016-01-30

    The ability to remotely detect and monitor oil spills is becoming increasingly important due to the high demand of oil-based products. Indeed, shipping routes are becoming very crowded and the likelihood of oil slick occurrence is increasing. In this frame, a fully integrated remote sensing system can be a valuable monitoring tool. We propose an integrated and interoperable system able to monitor ship traffic and marine operators, using sensing capabilities from a variety of electronic sensors, along with geo-positioning tools, and through a communication infrastructure. Our system is capable of transferring heterogeneous data, freely and seamlessly, between different elements of the information system (and their users) in a consistent and usable form. The system also integrates a collection of decision support services providing proactive functionalities. Such services demonstrate the potentiality of the system in facilitating dynamic links among different data, models and actors, as indicated by the performed field tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research inclu...

  4. New Insights into Pathophysiology of Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory–inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM

  5. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  6. Monitoring in educational development projects : the development of a monitoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.; Huijsman, Hari; Kluyfhout, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Monitoring in education is usually focused on the monitoring of educational systems at different levels. Monitoring of educational projects receives only recently explicit attention. The paper discusses first the concepts of educational monitoring and evaluation. After that, the experience with

  7. Monitoring the CMS Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Biery, K; Branson, J; Cano, E; Cheung, H; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; Coarasa, J A; Deldicque, C; Dusinberre, E; Erhan, S; Fortes Rodrigues, F; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gutleber, J; Hatton, D; Laurens, J F; Lopez Perez, J A; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Meyer, A; Mommsen, R; Moser, R; O'Dell, V; Oh, A; Orsini, L B; Patras, V; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Shpakov, D; Simon, S; Sumorok, K; Zanetti, M.

    2010-01-01

    The CMS data acquisition system comprises O(20000) interdependent services that need to be monitored in near real-time. The ability to monitor a large number of distributed applications accurately and effectively is of paramount importance for robust operations. Application monitoring entails the collection of a large number of simple and composed values made available by the software components and hardware devices. A key aspect is that detection of deviations from a specified behaviour is supported in a timely manner, which is a prerequisite in order to take corrective actions efficiently. Given the size and time constraints of the CMS data acquisition system, efficient application monitoring is an interesting research problem. We propose an approach that uses the emerging paradigm of Web-service based eventing systems in combination with hierarchical data collection and load balancing. Scalability and efficiency are achieved by a decentralized architecture, splitting up data collections into regions of col...

  8. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  9. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  10. Remote monitoring system workshop and technical cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Kwack, E. H.; Yoon, W. K.; Kim, J. S.; Cha, H. Y.; Na, W.W

    2000-06-01

    RMS workshop at the year focus on installing the material monioring system at technology lab. within TCNC. This system was developed by cooperative monitoring center(CMC) belonging to Sandia national lab. MMS consisted of data storage computer, data collection computer and easily connet to DCM-14 camera using monitoring the NPP by IAEA. The system run when the motion is catching and stroes the event data to MMS server. Also, the system communicate with the internet and then they access to check the event data only if the authencated person.

  11. Tritium monitor and collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Gary L.; Meikrantz, David H.; Ely, Walter E.; Tuggle, Dale G.; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Wickham, Keith L.; Maltrud, Herman R.; Baker, John D.

    1992-01-01

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  12. The vestibular contribution to the head direction cells signal and navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Taube

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on head direction cells. We also examine the vestibular system’s role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers.

  13. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc J P

    2017-10-01

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied, the role of the vestibular system in higher level sensorimotor functions is less clear. This review covers new research on the vestibular influence on perceptual judgments, motor decisions, and the ability to learn multiple motor actions. Guided by concepts such as optimization, inference, estimation and control, we focus on how the brain determines causal relationships between memorized and visual representations in the updating of visual space, and how vestibular, visual and efferent motor information are integrated in the estimation of body motion. We also discuss evidence that these computations involve multiple coordinate representations, some of which can be probed in parietal cortex using neuronal oscillations derived from EEG. In addition, we describe work on decision making during self-motion, showing a clear modulation of bottom-up acceleration signals on decisions in the saccadic system. Finally, we consider the importance of vestibular signals as contextual cues in motor learning and recall. Taken together, these results emphasize the impact of vestibular information on high-level sensorimotor functions, and identify future directions for theoretical, behavioral, and neurophysiological investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Presbyastasis and application of vestibular rehabilitation in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa de Araujo, P; Demanez, L; Lechien, J; Bauvir, P; Petermans, J

    2011-03-01

    Balance disorders can have a major functional impact among the elderly. The main risk is falling. Three elements are implicated in the loss of balance: vision, proprioception and the vestibular system. This article will discuss mainly vestibular damage and its implications. The assessment of balance disorders, particularly in geriatric patients, is based on validated scales composed of several items. These provide scores and are based on the results of chronometric measurements. They can be useful for the application of Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR), a technique improving the adaptation and autonomy of these patients. Vestibular rehabilitation is therefore part of an overall support, the goal of therapy being to improve daily life and to reduce the risk of falls.

  15. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  16. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  17. True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Thomsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.......The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging....

  18. Vestibular involvement in cognition: Visuospatial ability, attention, executive function, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests the inner ear vestibular system has a substantial impact on cognitive function. The strongest evidence exists in connecting vestibular function to the cognitive domain of visuospatial ability, which includes spatial memory, navigation, mental rotation, and mental representation of three-dimensional space. Substantial evidence also exists suggesting the vestibular system has an impact on attention and cognitive processing ability. The cognitive domains of memory and executive function are also implicated in a number of studies. We will review the current literature, discuss possible causal links between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive performance, and suggest areas of future research.

  19. [Present situation and development of ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Juan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Myogenic potentials evoked by air conducted sound (ACS), bone conducted vibration (BCV) or galvanic pulses can be recorded with surface electrodes over contracted muscles. These myogenic potentials are of vestibular origin (utricle and saccule) and so these potentials are called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). Since the vestibular system has projections to many muscle systems, there are many such VEMPs. In this review, we discuss the generated origin, response pathway, waveform characteristics and clinical application of ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP).

  20. Evaluation of the influence of vestibular system in the young adults balance through dynamic posturografy foam-laser and platform of power Avaliação da influência do sistema vestibular no equilíbrio de adultos jovens através de posturografia dinâmica foam-laser e plataforma de força

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alexandre Loth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tasks for the human postural control system is to maintain body balance on a small support base provided by the feet. As a gravity sensor, the vestibular system is one of the most important nervous system tools in posture control . The objective of this work was to study the influence of the vestibular system on the young adults’ balance control through Dynamic Posturografy Foam-laser (FLS. Participated in the study 30 young adults from the UFSM’s physical education undergraduate course, who volunteered to go under postural control evaluation through the FLP and platform of power, simultaneously, during the Sensorial Organization Test (TOS I and V. Results showed that there was a moderate and strong rate of correlation between TOS I and V values and the area of displacement of the pressure center (CP registered by the platform of power. They also showed that the FLP is a very useful method for balance evaluation, showing a good correlation with the CP displacement area . Uma das tarefas mais importantes do sistema do controle postural humano é o equilíbrio do corpo sobre a pequena base de apoio fornecida pelos pés. Como um sensor de gravidade, o sistema vestibular é uma das ferramentas mais importantes do sistema nervoso no controle da postura. O presente estudo teve como objetivo estudar a influencia do sistema vestibular no equilíbrio de adultos jovens, por meio da Posturografia Dinâmica Foam-laser (FLP. Para a realização do estudo, foram convidados 30 voluntários adultos jovens, acadêmicos do curso de educação física da UFSM, que foram submetidos à avaliação do controle postural através de FLP e plataforma de força simultaneamente, durante o Teste de Organização Sensorial (TOS I e V. Os resultados revelaram que houve moderado e forte índice de correlação entre os valores obtidos nos TOS I e V e a área de deslocamento do centro de pressão (CP registrada pela plataforma de força. Conclui

  1. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate vestibular compensation. Adequate vestibular compensation allows a patient to get rid of dizziness and unsteadiness even though vestibular system injury is irreversible. Some medications are able to enhance the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation. At the same time, the optimal duration of treatment for the most common vestibular disorders has not beenadequately explored. The paper gives the results of an observational program, whose purpose was to determine the optimal duration of vestibular rehabilitation in combination with the use of tanakan in patients with non-progressive unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder.Patients and methods. Data on 46 patients aged 19 to 70 years who underwent vestibular rehabilitation and took tanakan for vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis (n = 44, labyrinthitis (n =1, or Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1 were analyzed. All the patients were examined four times. The symptoms were recorded and the histories of disease were considered. The degree of vestibular disorders, including vertigo, was assessed when collecting complaints. The symptoms of vertigo were objectivized using its vertigo rating scale and five-point subjective rating scale for vertigo. All the patients underwent standard somatic and neurological examinations and videonystagmography. During the first visit after diagnosis, vestibular exercises were chosen for the patients and tanakan was used in a dose of 40 mg thrice daily to accelerate

  2. Well Monitoring System For EGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States); Glowka, Dave [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States); Normann, Charles [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States); Parker, James [Electrochemical Systems Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Caja, Josip [Electrochemical Systems Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dustan, Don [Electrochemical Systems Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Caja, Mario [Electrochemical Systems Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sariri, Kouros [Frequency Management Int. Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Beal, Craig [MajiQ Technologies Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2017-02-26

    This grant is a collection of projects designed to move aircraft high temperature electronics technology into the geothermal industry. Randy Normann is the lead. He licensed the HT83SNL00 chip from Sandia National Labs. This chip enables aircraft developed electronics for work within a geothermal well logging tool. However, additional elements are needed to achieve commercially successful logging tools. These elements are offered by a strong list of industrial partners on this grant as: Electrochemical Systems Inc. for HT Rechargeable Batteries, Frequency Management Systems for 300C digital clock, Sandia National Labs for experts in high temperature solder, Honeywell Solid-State Electronics Center for reprogrammable high temperature memory. During the course of this project MagiQ Technologies for high temperature fiber optics.

  3. The vestibular contribution to the head direction cells signal and navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Yoder, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we r...

  4. Reabilitação vestibular: tendências e indicações

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira,Clarissa Stefani; Pereira, Érico Felden; Rossi, Angela Garcia; Daronco, Luciane Sanchotene Etchepare

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular rehabilitation, generally recommended for the treatment of dysfunctions in the vestibular system, has been prescribed for people with other problems related to balance and to spacial orientation. This study, with a bibliographic basis, had as objective to make a synthesis of the studies about vestibular rehabilitation that are focused in other morbidities besides the vestibulopathies, pointing out the tendencies of investigations and the main results, specially the ones with in...

  5. Vertigo and the processing of vestibular information: A review in the context of predictive coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Axer, Hubertus; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates the processing of vestibular information by interpreting current experimental knowledge in the framework of predictive coding. We demonstrate that this theoretical framework give us insights into several important questions regarding specific properties of the vestibular system. Particularly, we discuss why the vestibular network is more spatially distributed than other sensory networks, why a mismatch in the vestibular system is more clinically disturbing than in other sensory systems, why the vestibular system is only marginally affected by most cerebral lesions, and whether there is a primary vestibular cortex. The use of predictive coding as a theoretical framework further points to some problems with the current interpretation of results that are gained from vestibular stimulation studies. In particular, we argue that cortical responses of vestibular stimuli cannot be interpreted in the same way as responses of other sensory modalities. Finally, we discuss the implications of the new insights, hypotheses and problems that were identified in this review on further directions of research of vestibular information processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and clinical applications of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, C; Gürkov, R

    2012-12-01

    Recently, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) have been described and added to the neuro-otologic test battery as a new measure for the vestibulo-ocular reflex. oVEMPs represent extraocular muscle activity in response to otolith stimulation e.g. by air-conducted sound or bone-conducted vibration. In response to vestibular stimulation, electromyographic activity of the extraocular muscles can be recorded by means of surface electrodes placed beneath the contralateral eye. oVEMPs are likely to reflect predominantly utricular function, while the widely established cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) assess saccular function. Thus, measuring oVEMPs and cVEMPs in addition to caloric and head impulse testing provides further evaluation of the vestibular system and enables quick and cost-effective assessment of otolith function. This review summarizes the neurophysiological properties of oVEMPs, gives recommendations for recording conditions and discusses oVEMP alterations in various disorders of the vestibular system. With increasing insight into oVEMP characteristics in vestibular disorders, e.g. Menière's disease and superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome, oVEMPs are becoming a promising new diagnostic tool for evaluating utricular function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins E Silva, Diandra Caroline; Bastos, Victor Hugo; de Oliveira Sanchez, Mariana; Nunes, Monara Kedma Gomes; Orsini, Marco; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Teixeira, Silmar Silva

    2016-08-01

    Aging is characterized by gradual physiological changes in body systems. Changes in the vestibular system can occur and cause dizziness, vertigo and imbalance, symptoms that are common in the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is a therapeutic resource that has been widely used to improve this condition. To complete a systematic review of the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on the elderly. A search for relevant publications was conducted in SCIELO, PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE and LILACS databases. Clinical trials and cohort studies that were written in the English language and published over the course of the last 10 years were selected. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the PEDro scale. A critical analysis of the studies was composed. Eight studies that involved subjects who were over the age of 60 were selected for inclusion in the systematic review. The most common vestibular dysfunction identified was complaints about dizziness and imbalance. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory was the most frequently used assessment instrument, and the treatment protocol that prevailed was that suggested by Cawthorne and Cooksey. The PEDro scale showed that only one article was of an acceptable methodological quality and presented satisfactory outcome measures. This was due, in part, to a lack of a hidden randomization, masking of the subject, evaluators and therapists, and lack of outcome measures, which can reduce the quality of the evidence presented in this study. Clinical trials indicate that vestibular rehabilitation represents an effective means of treating elderly patients with vestibular disorders; however, evidence of its effectiveness remains lacking.

  8. Neuropharmacological Targets for Drug Action in Vestibular Sensory Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongheon; Jones, Timothy A

    2017-09-01

    The use of pharmacological agents is often the preferred approach to the management of vestibular dysfunction. In the vestibular sensory pathways, the sensory neuroepithelia are thought to be influenced by a diverse number of neuroactive substances that may act to enhance or inhibit the effect of the primary neurotransmitters [i.e., glutamate (Glu) and acetylcholine (ACh)] or alter their patterns of release. This review summarizes various efforts to identify drug targets including neurotransmitter and neuromodulator receptors in the vestibular sensory pathways. Identifying these receptor targets provides a strategic basis to use specific pharmacological tools to modify receptor function in the treatment and management of debilitating balance disorders. A review of the literature reveals that most investigations of the neuropharmacology of peripheral vestibular function have been performed using in vitro or ex vivo animal preparations rather than studying drug action on the normal intact vestibular system in situ. Such noninvasive approaches could aid the development of more accurate and effective intervention strategies for the treatment of dizziness and vertigo. The current review explores the major neuropharmacological targets for drug action in the vestibular system.

  9. Hypervascular vestibular Schwannoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Most vestibular schwannoma is hypovascular with well known poor tumor staining in cerebral angiography. However, hypervascular vestibular schwannoma might be observed as a rare subtype with increased risk of bleeding during surgery. Multimodal imaging features which represent hypervascularity of the tumor can be observed in hypervascular vestibular schwannoma. Here we report a case of hypervascular vestibular schwannoma with brief literature review.

  10. Decision support system for structure synthesis of monitoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skatkov A. V.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with a structure synthesis of monitoring systems. In the article a decision support system for such synthesis was proposed and described. In the first phase of the process, the proposed classification of monitoring systems is used. Then adaptive algorithms, simulation and analytic modeling are used. The results of studies carried out by means of the proposed program are represented. The topicality of proposed approach was demonstrated. It should be mentioned, that algorithms were thoroughly described, the computing experiments were carried out. The authors believe that the proposed decision support system has many advantages and, consequently, is very useful in structure synthesis of monitoring systems.

  11. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) – Enteric Bacteria is a national public health surveillance system in the United States that tracks changes in the susceptibility of certain enteric bacteria to antimicrobial agents of human and veterinary medical importance. The NARMS ...

  12. Phytosanitary monitoring and surveillance system for integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses a phytosanitary monitoring and surveillance system as a component of an integrated pest management strategy. The main stages of the system are alert, census and action. The education and training of farmers, plantation personnel, and extension workers to recognise the main pests, early damage ...

  13. instrumentation for power system disturbance monitoring, data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1996-09-01

    Sep 1, 1996 ... acquisition and control in Nigerian Electric Power System; National Electric Power Authority. (NEPA) is presented. The need for ... feature of an adequate monitoring, data acquisition and control system is discussed. The state of the ... resulting data used to switch on adequate V. AR support. In this paper ...

  14. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2012-07-24

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU comprises: a plurality of performance counters each for counting signals representing occurrences of events from one or more the plurality of processor units in the multiprocessor system; and, a plurality of input devices for receiving the event signals from one or more processor devices of the plurality of processor units, the plurality of input devices programmable to select event signals for receipt by one or more of the plurality of performance counters for counting, wherein the PMU is shared between multiple processing units, or within a group of processors in the multiprocessing system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  15. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in the elderly with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-11-01

    Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

  16. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  17. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  18. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: sergioanat.morf@epm.br; Smith, Ricardo Luiz [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isotani, Sadao [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Alonso, Luis Garcia [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Anadao, Carlos Augusto [Otorhinolaryngology Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prates, Jose Carlos [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm{sup 2} of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm{sup 2}, 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant.

  19. LHCb: Monitoring the DIRAC Distribution System

    CERN Multimedia

    Nandakumar, R; Santinelli, R

    2009-01-01

    DIRAC is the LHCb gateway to any computing grid infrastructure (currently supporting WLCG) and is intended to reliably run large data mining activities. The DIRAC system consists of various services (which wait to be contacted to perform actions) and agents (which carry out periodic activities) to direct jobs as required. An important part of ensuring the reliability of the infrastructure is the monitoring and logging of these DIRAC distributed systems. The monitoring is done collecting information from two sources - one is from pinging the services or by keeping track of the regular heartbeats of the agents, and the other from the analysis of the error messages generated by both agents and services and collected by the logging system. This allows us to ensure that he components are running properly and to collect useful information regarding their operations. The process status monitoring is displayed using the SLS sensor mechanism which also automatically allows one to plot various quantities and also keep ...

  20. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Bernal Valls; Víctor Faus Cuñat; Raquel Bernal Valls

    2006-01-01

    El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a represent...

  1. Smart Sensor Network System For Environment Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ali Baloch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available SSN (Smart Sensor Network systems could be used to monitor buildings with modern infrastructure, plant sites with chemical pollution, horticulture, natural habitat, wastewater management and modern transport system. To sense attributes of phenomena and make decisions on the basis of the sensed value is the primary goal of such systems. In this paper a Smart Spatially aware sensor system is presented. A smart system, which could continuously monitor the network to observe the functionality and trigger, alerts to the base station if a change in the system occurs and provide feedback periodically, on demand or even continuously depending on the nature of the application. The results of the simulation trials presented in this paper exhibit the performance of a Smart Spatially Aware Sensor Networks.

  2. Visuo-vestibular contributions to anxiety and fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carlos M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-01-01

    The interactive roles of the visual and vestibular systems allow for postural control within boundaries of perceived safety. In specific circumstances, visual vestibular and postural interactions act as a cue that trigger fear, similarly to what occurs in motion sickness. Unusual patterns of visuo-vestibular interaction that emerge without warning can elicit fear, which can then become associated to a certain stimuli or situation, creating a CS-US association, (i.e., phobia), or can emerge without warning but also without becoming associated to a particular concomitant event (i.e., panic). Depending on the individual sensitivity to visuo-vestibular unusual patterns and its impact in postural control, individuals will be more or less vulnerable to develop these disorders. As such, the mechanism we here propose is also sufficient to explain the lack of certain fears albeit exposure. Following this rationale, a new subcategory of anxiety disorders, named visuo-vestibular fears can be considered. This model brings important implications for developmental and evolutionary psychological science, and invites to place visuo-vestibular fears in a particular subtype or specification within the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. The Moving History of Vestibular Stimulation as a Therapeutic Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabherr, Luzia; Macauda, Gianluca; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2015-01-01

    Although the discovery and understanding of the function of the vestibular system date back only to the 19th century, strategies that involve vestibular stimulation were used long before to calm, soothe and even cure people. While such stimulation was classically achieved with various motion devices, like Cox's chair or Hallaran's swing, the development of caloric and galvanic vestibular stimulation has opened up new possibilities in the 20th century. With the increasing knowledge and recognition of vestibular contributions to various perceptual, motor, cognitive, and emotional processes, vestibular stimulation has been suggested as a powerful and non-invasive treatment for a range of psychiatric, neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions. Yet, the therapeutic interventions were, and still are, often not hypothesis-driven as broader theories remain scarce and underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are often vague. We aim to critically review the literature on vestibular stimulation as a form of therapy in various selected disorders and present its successes, expectations, and drawbacks from a historical perspective.

  5. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  6. Vestibular telemedicine and rehabilitation. Applications for virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viirre, E

    1996-01-01

    This paper will discuss the use of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies in the rehabilitation of patients with vestibular disorders and in the provision of remote medical consultations for those patients. Patients with a vestibular problem are very common (vertigo is the second most common neurological complaint after headache) and yet there are very few vestibular neurotologists: specialists in their diagnosis and treatment. New treatments for various disorders causing vertigo now exist. This means that appropriate diagnosis can significantly improve patients' well-being. Remote medical diagnosis and treatment facilities could make the few vestibular disorder specialists much more available to patients. An analysis of the technological and economic factors influencing the provision of this service is necessary. The main long term effect of many vestibular disorders is damage to the sensing apparatus of the inner ear. The damage can lead to inappropriate interaction between visually driven orientation sensing and sensing of orientation by the inner ear. The consequence for the patient is vertigo (a sensation of turning), motion sickness and imbalance. Current rehabilitation efforts are intended to drive the nervous system to adapt to the disordered vestibular input. Adaptation appears to occur slowly in many subjects, even those within rehabilitation programs. An appropriately designed VR experience could greatly increase the rate of adaptation in these patients.

  7. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic); Lee, Woo Jin [Dept. of Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Sciences Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Heon Young [School of Computer Science Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose.

  8. Execution monitoring for a mobile robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Due to sensor errors, uncertainty, incomplete knowledge, and a dynamic world, robot plans will not always be executed exactly as planned. This paper describes an implemented robot planning system that enhances the traditional sense-think-act cycle in ways that allow the robot system monitor its behavior and react in emergencies in real-time. A proposal on how robot systems can completely break away from the traditional three-step cycle is also made.

  9. Trends in monitoring of waste water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard-Jensen, A

    1999-11-15

    A review of the trends in monitoring of waste water systems is given - with the focus on the use of sensors for on-line real-time monitoring and control. The paper formed a basis for discussion at the workshop on Methodologies for Wastewater Quality Monitoring, Nimes, 29-30 October 1998, organised by the European Commission and Ecoles des Mines d'Alès. The basic structure of the typical organisation of monitoring and control based on sensors and the handling of the sensor data are discussed and the different types of sensors are classified according to the method used for their introduction into the structure. Existing and new sensor technologies are briefly described, and the possibilities of how standardisation of on-line in-situ sensors can encourage further developments and use of sensors are presented.

  10. Transformation of Vestibular Signals for the Control of Standing in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Luu, Billy L; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-11-09

    During standing balance, vestibular signals encode head movement and are transformed into coordinates that are relevant to maintaining upright posture of the whole body. This transformation must account for head-on-body orientation as well as the muscle actions generating the postural response. Here, we investigate whether this transformation is dependent upon a muscle's ability to stabilize the body along the direction of a vestibular disturbance. Subjects were braced on top of a robotic balance system that simulated the mechanics of standing while being exposed to an electrical vestibular stimulus that evoked a craniocentric vestibular error of head roll. The balance system was limited to move in a single plane while the vestibular error direction was manipulated by having subjects rotate their head in yaw. Vestibular-evoked muscle responses were greatest when the vestibular error was aligned with the balance direction and decreased to zero as the two directions became orthogonal. This demonstrates that muscles respond only to the component of the error that is aligned with the balance direction and thus relevant to the balance task, not to the cumulative afferent activity, as expected for vestibulospinal reflex loops. When we reversed the relationship between balancing motor commands and associated vestibular sensory feedback, the direction of vestibular-evoked ankle compensatory responses was also reversed. This implies that the nervous system quickly reassociates new relationships between vestibular sensory signals and motor commands related to maintaining balance. These results indicate that vestibular-evoked muscle activity is a highly flexible balance response organized to compensate for vestibular disturbances. The postural corrections critical to standing balance and navigation rely on transformation of sensory information into reference frames that are relevant for the required motor actions. Here, we demonstrate that the nervous system transforms

  11. Remote System of Temperature Monitoring and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Carvalho

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system capable of monitoring and control remotely the temperature of a physical space. This work was part of a final year graduation of the Industrial Informatics Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave. It was developed by an undergraduate student using a LabVIEW custom application with a methodology of on-off control. The local user can use a touch screen display to configure the system setpoint temperature and for overall monitoring. For remote access it can be used any device supporting LabVIEW environment.

  12. Design of Wind Turbine Vibration Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubin Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure safety of wind turbine operation and to reduce the occurrence of faults as well as to improve the reliability of wind turbine operation, a vibration monitoring for wind turbine is developed. In this paper, it analyses the enlargement of all the parts of the structure and the working mechanism, the research method of wind turbine operation vibration is introduced, with the focus being the use of the sensor principle. Finally the hardware design and software of this system is introduced and the main function of this system is described, which realizes condition monitoring of the work state of wind turbines.

  13. Air Quality Monitoring System and Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    2017-01-01

    Air quality monitoring has become an integral part of smart city solutions. This paper presents an air quality monitoring system based on Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, and establishes a cloud-based platform to address the challenges related to IoT data management and processing...... capabilities, including data collection, storage, analysis, and visualization. In addition, this paper also benchmarks four state-of-the-art database systems to investigate the appropriate technologies for managing large-scale IoT datasets....

  14. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system for SNM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumeier, S.; Brush, B.; Ewing, T.; Gross, K.; Kotter, D.; Laurin-Kovitz, K.; Walters, G.; Wegerich, S.

    1999-08-04

    Complex special nuclear material (SNM) storage systems can benefit from automated monitoring and data integration systems that maximize safety and security and optimize system maintainability. Current methods of verification, which rely on physical access, are costly and labor intensive. A prototype data analysis. system for nuclear material monitoring is being developed through a joint effort by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). The system synthesizes information from various sources and applies advanced data analysis to predict sensor faults and detect material instabilities and security/safeguards problems. The system makes use of Argonne's Multivariate State Estimation Technique, or MSET, to provide an early warning system for the performance of sensors and processes, The system is being implemented and tested at the Safeguard Technology Evaluation Laboratory (STEL) at ANL-W. The STEL was installed at a Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF) special nuclear materials vault at ANL-W in 1997 as part of a DOE Plutonium Focus Area Project. The STEL provides the infrastructure for the demonstration and integration of technologies for monitoring plutonium-bearing materials in various storage configurations. Real sensors located within the STEL are being used to ''calibrate'' and validate. software while simulated sensors are used to mockup larger-scale problems. Preliminary system design and testing results are discussed.

  15. Is the Headache in Patients with Vestibular Migraine Attenuated by Vestibular Rehabilitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Sugaya, Nagisa; ARAI, Miki; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background Vestibular rehabilitation is the most effective treatment for dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction. Given the biological relationship between vestibular symptoms and headache, headache in patients with vestibular migraine (VM) could be improved by vestibular rehabilitation that leads to the improvement of dizziness. This study aimed to compare the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on headache and other outcomes relating to dizziness, and the psychological factors in patien...

  16. Effects of weightlessness on the development of the vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The chronic 2g centrifuge was constructed for testing weightlessness effects on development of vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat. Both the stationary and rotating rail tests were performed. A physiological review is presented on vestibular apparatus, along with a system analysis. Time constants and input threshold level of the system are also considered.

  17. Decision Fusion System for Bolted Joint Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bolted joint is widely used in mechanical and architectural structures, such as machine tools, industrial robots, transport machines, power plants, aviation stiffened plate, bridges, and steel towers. The bolt loosening induced by flight load and environment factor can cause joint failure leading to a disastrous accident. Hence, structural health monitoring is critical for the bolted joint detection. In order to realize a real-time and convenient monitoring and satisfy the requirement of advanced maintenance of the structure, this paper proposes an intelligent bolted joint failure monitoring approach using a developed decision fusion system integrated with Lamb wave propagation based actuator-sensor monitoring method. Firstly, the basic knowledge of decision fusion and classifier selection techniques is briefly introduced. Then, a developed decision fusion system is presented. Finally, three fusion algorithms, which consist of majority voting, Bayesian belief, and multiagent method, are adopted for comparison in a real-world monitoring experiment for the large aviation aluminum plate. Based on the results shown in the experiment, a big potential in real-time application is presented that the method can accurately and rapidly identify the bolt loosening by analyzing the acquired strain signal using proposed decision fusion system.

  18. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  19. A Case of Psychogenic Dizziness Mimicking Vestibular Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Baek, In Chul; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old patient presented with frequent episodes of clockwise whirling vertigo, with no ear symptoms or anxiety. He had a previous history of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis from Moyamoya disease 3 years ago. We assumed that the ictus was a manifestation of vestibular epilepsy. Although the patient was monitored continuously with video and computerized electroencephalography equipment for 24 hours, his vertigo was not accompanied by electroencephalographic discharges. And thorough vestibular evaluation was normal. His symptom was alleviated by psychological support. Psychogenic dizziness may also manifest as recurrent whirling vertigo with unilateral directionality. PMID:24649463

  20. Wireless remote monitoring system for sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Sleep plays the important role of rejuvenating the body, especially the central nervous system. However, more than thirty million people suffer from sleep disorders and sleep deprivation. That can cause serious health consequences by increasing the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and so on. Apart from the physical health risk, sleep disorders can lead to social problems when sleep disorders are not diagnosed and treated. Currently, sleep disorders are diagnosed through sleep study in a sleep laboratory overnight. This involves large expenses in addition to the inconvenience of overnight hospitalization and disruption of daily life activities. Although some systems provide home based diagnosis, most of systems record the sleep data in a memory card, the patient has to face the inconvenience of sending the memory card to a doctor for diagnosis. To solve the problem, we propose a wireless sensor system for sleep apnea, which enables remote monitoring while the patient is at home. The system has 5 channels to measure ECG, Nasal airflow, body position, abdominal/chest efforts and oxygen saturation. A wireless transmitter unit transmits signals with Zigbee and a receiver unit which has two RF modules, Zigbee and Wi-Fi, receives signals from the transmitter unit and retransmits signals to the remote monitoring system with Zigbee and Wi-Fi, respectively. By using both Zigbee and Wi-Fi, the wireless sensor system can achieve a low power consumption and wide range coverage. The system's features are presented, as well as continuous monitoring results of vital signals.

  1. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. K. Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no viable treatment option. Vestibular implants could eventually restore vestibular function. Most vestibular implant prototypes to date are modified cochlear implants to fast-track development. These use various objective measurements, such as the electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP, to supplement behavioral information. We investigated whether eCAPs could be recorded in patients with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. Specifically, eCAPs were successfully recorded for cochlear and vestibular setups, as well as for mixed cochlear-vestibular setups. Similarities and slight differences were found for the recordings of the three setups. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of eCAP recording with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. They could be used in the short term to reduce current spread and avoid activation of non-targeted neurons. More research is warranted to better understand the neural origin of vestibular eCAPs and to utilize them for clinical applications.

  2. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  3. Rescue of peripheral vestibular function in Usher syndrome mice using a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Depreux, Frederic F; Jodelka, Francine M; Lentz, Jennifer J; Rigo, Frank; Jones, Timothy A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2017-09-15

    Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C/harmonin) is associated with profound retinal, auditory and vestibular dysfunction. We have previously reported on an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-29) that dramatically improves auditory function and balance behavior in mice homozygous for the harmonin mutation Ush1c c.216G > A following a single systemic administration. The findings were suggestive of improved vestibular function; however, no direct vestibular assessment was made. Here, we measured vestibular sensory evoked potentials (VsEPs) to directly assess vestibular function in Usher mice. We report that VsEPs are absent or abnormal in Usher mice, indicating profound loss of vestibular function. Strikingly, Usher mice receiving ASO-29 treatment have normal or elevated vestibular response thresholds when treated during a critical period between postnatal day 1 and 5, respectively. In contrast, treatment of mice with ASO-29 treatment at P15 was minimally effective at rescuing vestibular function. Interestingly, ASO-29 treatment at P1, P5 or P15 resulted in sufficient vestibular recovery to support normal balance behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit to balance with ASO-29 treatment at P15 despite the profound vestibular functional deficits that persist with treatment at this later time. These findings provide the first direct evidence of an effective treatment of peripheral vestibular function in a mouse model of USH1C and reveal the potential for using antisense technology to treat vestibular dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Web Based Room Monitoring System Using Webcam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tole Sutikno

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A security has become very important along with the increasing number of crime cases. If some security system fails, there is a need for a mechanism that capable in recording the criminal act. Therefore, it can be used for investigation purpose of the authorities. The objective of this research is to develop a security system using video streaming that able to monitor in real-time manner, display movies in a browser, and record a video as triggered by a sensor. This monitoring system comprises of two security level camera as a video recorder of special events based on infrared sensor that is connected to a microcontroller via serial communication and camera as a real-time room monitor. The hardware system consists of infrared sensor circuit to detect special events that is serially communicated to an AT89S51 microcontroller that controls the system to perform recording process, and the software system consists of a server that displaying video streaming in a webpage and a video recorder. The software for video recording and server camera uses Visual Basic 6.0 and for video streaming uses PHP 5.1.6. As the result, the system can be used to record special events that it is wanted, and can displayed video streaming in a webpage using LAN infrastructure.

  5. Normal pressure hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas are not uncommon, and gamma knife radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for symptomatic tumors. Hydrocephalus is a complication of gamma knife treatment of vestibular schwannoma, though the mechanism of the development of hydrocephalus remains controversial. We present an unusual case of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH after gamma knife radiosurgery of a vestibular schwannoma in which the timeline of events strongly suggests that gamma knife played a contributory role in the development of the hydrocephalus. This is probably the first case of NPH post radiosurgery with normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Communicating hydrocephalus should be treated with placement of shunt while non-communicating hydrocephalus can be treated with third ventriculostomy. Frequent monitoring and early intervention post radiosurgery is highly recommended to prevent irreversible cerebral damage.

  6. Microsensor Technologies for Plant Growth System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Soo

    2004-01-01

    This document covered the following: a) demonstration of feasibility of microsensor for tube and particulate growth systems; b) Dissolved oxygen; c)Wetness; d) Flexible microfluidic substrate with microfluidic channels and microsensor arrays; e)Dynamic root zone control/monitoring in microgravity; f)Rapid prototyping of phytoremediation; and g) A new tool for root physiology and pathology.

  7. A hand-hygiene behaviour monitoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schie, M.; Wiesman, R.F.F.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a hand-hygiene behaviour monitoring system, comprising: means for detecting the occurrence of an event specified in a hand-hygiene rule, wherein the event involves a person; means for updating behaviour data that is related to acts according to the hand-hygiene rule, wherein

  8. Mobile Patient Monitoring: The Mobihealth System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halteren, Aart; Bults, Richard G.A.; Wac, K.E.; Konstantas, D.; Widya, I.A.; Dokovski, N.T.; Koprinkov, G.T.; Jones, Valerie M.; Herzog, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    The forthcoming wide availability of high bandwidth public wireless networks will give rise to new mobile healthcare services. To this end, the MobiHealth project has developed and trialed a highly customisable vital signs monitoring system based on a body area network (BAN) and a mobile-health

  9. Wireless battery management control and monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumstein, James M.; Chang, John T.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Kovotsky, Jack; Lavietes, Anthony; Trebes, James Edward

    2018-01-16

    A battery management system using a sensor inside of the battery that sensor enables monitoring and detection of various events in the battery and transmission of a signal from the sensor through the battery casing to a control and data acquisition module by wireless transmission. The detection of threshold events in the battery enables remedial action to be taken to avoid catastrophic events.

  10. Multipurpose ROV system for underwater monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, T. [Technical Univ. of Szczecin (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents achievements of the Underwater Team at the Faculty of Maritime Technology of the Szczecin Technical University in the field of designing the equipment destined for the underwater monitoring. The multipurpose remotely operated vehicle system is described. Technical specification, some laboratory tank test results, research techniques, operational range, experience and development trends have been discussed.

  11. Beam Loss Monitoring System for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, E B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Ferioli, G; González, J L; Gschwendtner, E; Guaglio, G; Hodgson, M; Kramer, Daniel; Leitner, R; Ponce, L; Prieto, V; Stockner, M; Zamantzas, C

    2005-01-01

    One of the most critical elements for the protection of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is its beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. It must prevent the superconducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damages, as a result of critical beam losses. By measuring the loss pattern, the BLM system helps to identify the loss mechanism. Special monitors will be used for the setup and control of the collimators. The specification for the BLM system includes a very high reliability (tolerable failure rate of 10.-7 per hour) and a high dynamic range of 10.8 (10.13 at certain locations) of the particle fluencies to be measured. In addition, a wide range of integration times (40 micro/s to 84s) and a fast (one turn) trigger generation for the dump signal are required. This paper describes the complete design of the BLM system, including the monitor types (ionization chambers and secondary emission monitors), the design of the analogue and digital readout electronics as well as the data links...

  12. A monitoring system for gypsy moth management

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. William Ravlin; S. J. Fleischer; M. R. Carter; E. A. Roberts; M. L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Within the last ten years considerable research has been directed toward the development of a gypsy moth monitoring system for project planning at a regional level and for making control decisions at a local level. Pheromones and pheromone-baited traps have been developed and widely used and several egg mass sampling techniques have also been developed. Recently these...

  13. REAL TIME WIRELESS AIR POLLUTION MONITORING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Vara Prasad Y

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution has significant influence on the concentration of constituents in the atmosphere leading to effects like global warming and acid rains. To avoid such adverse imbalances in the nature, an air pollution monitoring system is utmost important. This paper attempts to develop an effective solution for pollution monitoring using wireless sensor networks (WSN on a real time basis namely real time wireless air pollution monitoring system. Commercially available discrete gas sensors for sensing concentration of gases like CO2, NO2, CO and O2 are calibrated using appropriate calibration technologies. These pre-calibrated gas sensors are then integrated with the wireless sensor motes for field deployment at the campus and the Hyderabad city using multi hop data aggregation algorithm. A light weight middleware and a web interface to view the live pollution data in the form of numbers and charts from the test beds was developed and made available from anywhere on the internet. Other parameters like temperature and humidity were also sensed along with gas concentrations to enable data analysis through data fusion techniques. Experimentation carried out using the developed wireless air pollution monitoring system under different physical conditions show that the system collects reliable source of real time fine-grain pollution data.

  14. System specification for the integrated monitoring and surveillance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This System Specification establishes the requirements for the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS). In this document, ``Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System`` is used to describe the concept of integrated sensors, computers, personnel, and systems that perform the functions of sensing conditions, acquiring data, monitoring environmental safety and health, controlling and accounting for materials, monitoring material stability, monitoring container integrity, transferring data, and analyzing, reporting, and storing data. This concept encompasses systems (e.g. sensors, personnel, databases, etc.) that are already in place at the sites but may require modifications or additions to meet all identified surveillance requirements. The purpose of this System Specification is to provide Department of Energy (DOE) sites that store plutonium materials with a consolidation of all known requirements for the storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides. This compilation may be used (1) as a baseline for surveillance system design specifications where 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides will be stored and monitored; (2) as a checklist for evaluating existing surveillance systems to ensure that all requirements are met for the storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides; and (3) as a baseline for preparing procurement specifications tailored for site specific storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides.

  15. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes, located in the outer part of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two photomultiplier in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator based readout system. Combined information from all systems allows to monitor and equalise the calorimeter r...

  16. Vestibular Function in the Temporal and Parietal Cortex: Distinct Velocity and Inertial Processing Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne eVentre-Dominey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of behavioural and neuroimaging studies have reported converging data in favour of a cortical network for vestibular function, distributed between the temporo-parietal cortex and the prefrontal cortex in the primate. In this review, we focus on the role of the cerebral cortex in visuo-vestibular integration including the motion sensitive temporo-occipital areas i.e. the middle superior temporal area (MST and the parietal cortex. Indeed these two neighbouring cortical regions, though they both receive combined vestibular and visual information, have distinct implications in vestibular function. In sum, this review of the literature leads to the idea of two separate cortical vestibular sub-systems forming (1 a velocity pathway including MST and direct descending pathways on vestibular nuclei. As it receives well defined visual and vestibular velocity signals, this pathway is likely involved in heading perception and rapid top-down regulation of eye/head coordination and (2 an inertial processing pathway involving the parietal cortex in connection with the subcortical vestibular nuclei complex responsible for velocity storage integration. This vestibular cortical pathway would be implicated in high order multimodal integration and cognitive functions, including world space and self- referential processing.

  17. Vestibular function in the temporal and parietal cortex: distinct velocity and inertial processing pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    A number of behavioral and neuroimaging studies have reported converging data in favor of a cortical network for vestibular function, distributed between the temporo-parietal cortex and the prefrontal cortex in the primate. In this review, we focus on the role of the cerebral cortex in visuo-vestibular integration including the motion sensitive temporo-occipital areas i.e., the middle superior temporal area (MST) and the parietal cortex. Indeed, these two neighboring cortical regions, though they both receive combined vestibular and visual information, have distinct implications in vestibular function. In sum, this review of the literature leads to the idea of two separate cortical vestibular sub-systems forming (1) a velocity pathway including MST and direct descending pathways on vestibular nuclei. As it receives well-defined visual and vestibular velocity signals, this pathway is likely involved in heading perception and rapid top-down regulation of eye/head coordination and (2) an inertial processing pathway involving the parietal cortex in connection with the subcortical vestibular nuclei complex responsible for velocity storage integration. This vestibular cortical pathway would be implicated in high-order multimodal integration and cognitive functions, including world space and self-referential processing. PMID:25071481

  18. Advanced Virus Monitoring and Analysis System

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi Adi Rafrastara; Faizal M. A.

    2011-01-01

    This research proposed an architecture and a system which able to monitor the virus behavior and classify them as a traditional or polymorphic virus. Preliminary research was conducted to get the current virus behavior and to find the certain parameters which usually used by virus to attack the computer target. Finally, “test bed environment” is used to test our system by releasing the virus in a real environment, and try to capture their behavior, and followed by generating the conclusion th...

  19. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental group) or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p>0.005) regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p<0.05) in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p<0.05) in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Manso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD (experimental group or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p > 0.005 regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p < 0.05 in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p < 0.05 in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  1. Distributed Monitoring System Based on ICINGA

    CERN Document Server

    Haen, C; Neufeld, N

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb online system relies on a large and heterogeneous IT infrastructure: it comprises more than 2000 servers and embedded systems and more than 200 network devices. Many of these equipments are critical in order to run the experiment, and it is important to have a monitoring solution performant enough so that the experts can diagnose and act quickly. While our previous system was based on a central Nagios server, our current system uses a distributed Icinga infrastructure. The LHCb installation schema will be presented here, as well some performance comparisons and custom tools.

  2. Weight monitoring system for newborn incubator application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widianto, Arif; Nurfitri, Intan; Mahatidana, Pradipta; Abuzairi, Tomy; Poespawati, N. R.; Purnamaningsih., Retno W.

    2018-02-01

    We proposed weight monitoring system using load cell sensor for newborn incubator application. The weight sensing system consists of a load cell, conditioning signal circuit, and microcontroller Arduino Uno R3. The performance of the sensor was investigated by using the various weight from 0 up to 3000 g. Experiment results showed that this system has a small error of 4.313% and 12.5 g of threshold and resolution value. Compared to the typical baby scale available in local market, the proposed system has a lower error value and hysteresis.

  3. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Falter, Diedre D.; Falter, Kelly G.

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

  4. Neural network model of vestibular nuclei reaction to onset of vestibular prosthetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eDigiovanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of ‘optimal’ stimulation configurations for humans. Here we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time-point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate and pulse amplitude modulation. Pulse amplitude modulation was more effective than pulse rate modulation for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost pulse amplitude modulation. Co-modulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both

  5. Guided and unguided internet based vestibular rehabilitation versus usual care for dizzy adults of 50 years and older: a protocol for a three armed randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Vugt, V; van der Wouden, C; Bosmans, J; Smallbrugge, M; van Diest, W; Essery, Rosie; Yardley, Lucy; H Horst; Maarsingh, O

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dizziness is a common symptom in general practice with a high prevalence among older adults. The most common cause of dizziness in general practice is peripheral vestibular disease. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a safe and effective treatment for peripheral vestibular disease that entails specific exercises to maximise the central nervous system compensation for the effects of vestibular pathology. An internet-based VR intervention has recently been shown to be safe and effec...

  6. Age-Related Vestibular Loss: Current Understanding and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system sub-serves a number of reflex and perceptual functions, comprising the peripheral apparatus, the vestibular nerve, the brainstem and cerebellar processing circuits, the thalamic relays, and the vestibular cerebral cortical network. This system provides signals of self-motion, important for gaze and postural control, and signals of traveled distance, for spatial orientation, especially in the dark. Current evidence suggests that certain aspects of this multi-faceted system may deteriorate with age and sometimes with severe consequences, such as falls. Often the deterioration in vestibular functioning relates to how the signal is processed by brain circuits rather than an impairment in the sensory transduction process. We review current data concerning age-related changes in the vestibular system, and how this may be important for clinicians dealing with balance disorders.

  7. Age-Related Vestibular Loss: Current Understanding and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Allen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system sub-serves a number of reflex and perceptual functions, comprising the peripheral apparatus, the vestibular nerve, the brainstem and cerebellar processing circuits, the thalamic relays, and the vestibular cerebral cortical network. This system provides signals of self-motion, important for gaze and postural control, and signals of traveled distance, for spatial orientation, especially in the dark. Current evidence suggests that certain aspects of this multi-faceted system may deteriorate with age and sometimes with severe consequences, such as falls. Often the deterioration in vestibular functioning relates to how the signal is processed by brain circuits rather than an impairment in the sensory transduction process. We review current data concerning age-related changes in the vestibular system, and how this may be important for clinicians dealing with balance disorders.

  8. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  9. Networked Biomedical System for Ubiquitous Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan Durresi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a distributed system that enables global and ubiquitous health monitoring of patients. The biomedical data will be collected by wearable health diagnostic devices, which will include various types of sensors and will be transmitted towards the corresponding Health Monitoring Centers. The permanent medical data of patients will be kept in the corresponding Home Data Bases, while the measured biomedical data will be sent to the Visitor Health Monitor Center and Visitor Data Base that serves the area of present location of the patient. By combining the measured biomedical data and the permanent medical data, Health Medical Centers will be able to coordinate the needed actions and help the local medical teams to make quickly the best decisions that could be crucial for the patient health, and that can reduce the cost of health service.

  10. Process query systems for network security monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Vincent; Fox, Naomi

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we present the architecture of our network security monitoring infrastructure based on a Process Query System (PQS). PQS offers a new and powerful way of efficiently processing data streams, based on process descriptions that are submitted as queries. In this case the data streams are familiar network sensors, such as Snort, Netfilter, and Tripwire. The process queries describe the dynamics of network attacks and failures, such as worms, multistage attacks, and router failures. Using PQS the task of monitoring enterprise class networks is simplified, offering a priority-based GUI to the security administrator that clearly outlines events that require immediate attention. The PQS-Net system is deployed on an unsecured production network; the system has successfully detected many diverse attacks and failures.

  11. A Resilient Condition Assessment Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov

    2012-08-01

    An architecture and supporting methods are presented for the implementation of a resilient condition assessment monitoring system that can adaptively accommodate both cyber and physical anomalies to a monitored system under observation. In particular, the architecture includes three layers: information, assessment, and sensor selection. The information layer estimates probability distributions of process variables based on sensor measurements and assessments of the quality of sensor data. Based on these estimates, the assessment layer then employs probabilistic reasoning methods to assess the plant health. The sensor selection layer selects sensors so that assessments of the plant condition can be made within desired time periods. Resilient features of the developed system are then illustrated by simulations of a simplified power plant model, where a large portion of the sensors are under attack.

  12. System for monitoring microclimate conditions in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dušan B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring microclimate parameters in different kind of environments has significant contribution to many areas of human activity and production processes. One of them is vegetable production in greenhouses where measurement of its microclimate parameters may influence the decision on taking appropriate action and protect crops. It is also important to preserve optimal condition in greenhouses to facilitate the process of transpiration, plant mineral nutrition and prevent of a variety physiological damage caused by a deficit of some specific nutrients. Systems for monitoring have wide application in the last years thanks to development of modern computer technology. In this paper model of the monitoring system based on smart transducer concept was introduced. Within the system components are based on MSP430 ultra low power micro controllers. They are using wireless communication to exchange data within the system that was structured according to smart transducer concept. User applications from the network could access to system interface using HTTP protocol where web server could be running on the computer or it could be an embedded web server running on micro controller based device.

  13. Spatial cognition, body representation and affective processes: the role of vestibular information beyond ocular reflexes and control of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W; Preuss, Nora; Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: (1) Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths), body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals), in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. (2) Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. (3) Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are-at least in part-associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  14. Spatial Cognition, Body Representation and Affective Processes: The Role of Vestibular Information beyond Ocular Reflexes and Control of Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred W Mast

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: 1 Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths, body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals, in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. 2 Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. 3 Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are – at least in part – associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  15. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of changes in perilymphatic K+ on the vestibular evoked potential in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect on the functioning of the vestibular system of a rupture of Reissner's membrane, artificial endolymph was injected in scala media of ten guinea pigs and vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs), evoked by vertical acceleration pulses, were measured. Directly after injection of

  17. Knowledge based systems for condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.R.; Burt, G.M.; Moyes, A.

    1997-12-31

    A key issue in the operation of power system plant is deriving maximum financial benefit while staying within technical, contractual and regulatory constraints. Moreover, the capital investment required for much power system plant necessitates high levels of plant availability to make a reasonable rate-of-return. Thus, the minimisation of operational costs resulting from unplanned plant outages, unnecessary maintenance and under-utilisation of plant capabilities has become a core objective of power system plant operation. Rationalisation of power system control functions has resulted in the use of centralised control rooms from which large and complex power systems are operated. Extensive measurement, monitoring and control systems have been developed which provide operators with data from which power system plant behaviour can be evaluated. However, in the event of a serious operational incident, significant amounts of data are generated. Under such circumstances it has been found that operators are inhibited in assessing the situation, and hence the effectiveness of the subsequent operational response can be reduced. The role of knowledge based systems (KBSs) in condition monitoring is to support operational decision making through the provision of timely and focused information. (Author)

  18. Non Invasive Glucose Monitoring System Using Nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran C.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The most existing future technology is an outcome of the fields of computer science, electronics and Biology. Health inequalities have become the focus of a number of descriptive and analytical studies. One of the health related problem is diabetes. Diabetes at its serious stage leads to blindness. Monitoring glucose level in blood is one preventive measure to check diabetes. Increase in Glucose is a common risk factor which leads to hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, heart attack, stokes and aneurysms. A glucose monitoring system continuously measures and monitors the glucose level in a patient’s blood. Normal blood glucose level of human is 70-110 milligram/deciliter. The level is maintained by using the secretion of insulin inside the body. When the insulin level gets increased it leads to hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia when the level gets decreased. Hyperglycemia disease includes cataract,edema, hypertension, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypoglycemaia disease includes confusion, giddiness, unconsciousness, coma and death. The proposed system finds a new way for measuring the glucose level. The work uses Nanopellets which measure’s the glucose level, when the glucose level gets increased or decreased, it will be automatically get monitored and processed using microcontroller (MSP430G2553. The information is then send to the doctor through GSM.

  19. The role of stereo vision in visual-vestibular integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John S; Campos, Jennifer L; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Smith, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    Self-motion through an environment stimulates several sensory systems, including the visual system and the vestibular system. Recent work in heading estimation has demonstrated that visual and vestibular cues are typically integrated in a statistically optimal manner, consistent with Maximum Likelihood Estimation predictions. However, there has been some indication that cue integration may be affected by characteristics of the visual stimulus. Therefore, the current experiment evaluated whether presenting optic flow stimuli stereoscopically, or presenting both eyes with the same image (binocularly) affects combined visual-vestibular heading estimates. Participants performed a two-interval forced-choice task in which they were asked which of two presented movements was more rightward. They were presented with either visual cues alone, vestibular cues alone or both cues combined. Measures of reliability were obtained for both binocular and stereoscopic conditions. Group level analyses demonstrated that when stereoscopic information was available there was clear evidence of optimal integration, yet when only binocular information was available weaker evidence of cue integration was observed. Exploratory individual analyses demonstrated that for the stereoscopic condition 90% of participants exhibited optimal integration, whereas for the binocular condition only 60% of participants exhibited results consistent with optimal integration. Overall, these findings suggest that stereo vision may be important for self-motion perception, particularly under combined visual-vestibular conditions.

  20. Valve Health Monitoring System Utilizing Smart Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L.; Drouant, George J.

    2006-01-01

    The valve monitoring system is a stand alone unit with network capabilities for integration into a higher level health management system. The system is designed for aiding in failure predictions of high-geared ball valves and linearly actuated valves. It performs data tracking and archiving for identifying degraded performance. The data collection types are cryogenic cycles, total cycles, inlet temperature, body temperature torsional strain, linear bonnet strain, preload position, total travel and total directional changes. Events are recorded and time stamped in accordance with the IRIG B True Time. The monitoring system is designed for use in a Class 1 Division II explosive environment. The basic configuration consists of several instrumentation sensor units and a base station. The sensor units are self contained microprocessor controlled and remotely mountable in three by three by two inches. Each unit is potted in a fire retardant substance without any cavities and limited to low operating power for maintaining safe operation in a hydrogen environment. The units are temperature monitored to safeguard against operation outside temperature limitations. Each contains 902-928 MHz band digital transmitters which meet Federal Communication Commission's requirements and are limited to a 35 foot transmission radius for preserving data security. The base-station controller correlates data from the sensor units and generates data event logs on a compact flash memory module for database uploading. The entries are also broadcast over an Ethernet network. Nitrogen purged National Electrical Manufactures Association (NEMA) Class 4 enclosures are used to house the base-station

  1. Honey Bee Colonies Remote Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Gil-Lebrero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bees are very important for terrestrial ecosystems and, above all, for the subsistence of many crops, due to their ability to pollinate flowers. Currently, the honey bee populations are decreasing due to colony collapse disorder (CCD. The reasons for CCD are not fully known, and as a result, it is essential to obtain all possible information on the environmental conditions surrounding the beehives. On the other hand, it is important to carry out such information gathering as non-intrusively as possible to avoid modifying the bees’ work conditions and to obtain more reliable data. We designed a wireless-sensor networks meet these requirements. We designed a remote monitoring system (called WBee based on a hierarchical three-level model formed by the wireless node, a local data server, and a cloud data server. WBee is a low-cost, fully scalable, easily deployable system with regard to the number and types of sensors and the number of hives and their geographical distribution. WBee saves the data in each of the levels if there are failures in communication. In addition, the nodes include a backup battery, which allows for further data acquisition and storage in the event of a power outage. Unlike other systems that monitor a single point of a hive, the system we present monitors and stores the temperature and relative humidity of the beehive in three different spots. Additionally, the hive is continuously weighed on a weighing scale. Real-time weight measurement is an innovation in wireless beehive—monitoring systems. We designed an adaptation board to facilitate the connection of the sensors to the node. Through the Internet, researchers and beekeepers can access the cloud data server to find out the condition of their hives in real time.

  2. An integrated system for pipeline condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, Andrew P.; Lees, Gareth; Hartog, Arthur; Twohig, Richard; Kader, Kamal; Hilton, Graeme; Mullens, Stephen; Khlybov, Artem [Schlumberger, Southampton (United Kingdom); Sanderson, Norman [BP Exploration, Sunbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present the unique and innovative 'Integriti' pipeline and flow line integrity monitoring system developed by Schlumberger in collaboration with BP. The system uses optical fiber distributed sensors to provide simultaneous distributed measurements of temperature, strain and vibration for the detection, monitoring, and location of events including: Third Party Interference (TPI), including multiple simultaneous disturbances; geo-hazards and landslides; gas and oil leaks; permafrost protection. The Integriti technology also provides a unique means for tracking the progress of cleaning and instrumented pigs using existing optical telecom and data communications cables buried close to pipelines. The Integriti solution provides a unique and proactive approach to pipeline integrity management. It performs analysis of a combination of measurands to provide the pipeline operator with an event recognition and location capability, in effect providing a hazard warning system, and offering the operator the potential to take early action to prevent loss. Through the use of remote, optically powered amplification, an unprecedented detection range of 100 km is possible without the need for any electronics and therefore remote power in the field. A system can thus monitor 200 km of pipeline when configured to monitor 100 km upstream and downstream from a single location. As well as detecting conditions and events leading to leaks, this fully integrated system provides a means of detecting and locating small leaks in gas pipelines below the threshold of present online leak detection systems based on monitoring flow parameters. Other significant benefits include: potential reductions in construction costs; enhancement of the operator's existing integrity management program; potential reductions in surveillance costs and HSE risks. In addition to onshore pipeline systems this combination of functionality and range is available for practicable

  3. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scin...

  4. Older adults demonstrate superior vestibular perception for virtual rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ryan M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Dalton, Brian H; Inglis, J Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Adult ageing results in a progressive loss of vestibular hair cell receptors and afferent fibres. Given the robustness of vestibulo-ocular and vestibular-evoked whole-body responses to age-related deterioration, it was proposed that the vestibular system compensates centrally. Here we examine the potential for central compensation in vestibular sensitivity with adult ageing by using a combination of real and virtual rotation-based psychophysical testing at two stimulus frequencies (0.1 & 1Hz). Real rotations activate semi-circular canal hair cell receptors naturally via mechanotransduction, while electrical current used to evoke virtual rotations does not rely on mechanical deformation of hair cell receptors to activate vestibular afferents. This two-pronged approach allows us to determine the independent effects of age-related peripheral afferent receptor loss and potential compensatory mechanisms. Older adults had thresholds for discriminating real rotations that were significantly greater than young adults at 0.1Hz (7.2 vs. 3°/s), but the effect of age was weaker (non-significant) at 1Hz (2.4 vs. 1.3°/s). For virtual rotations, older adults had greater thresholds than young adults at 0.1Hz (1.2 vs. 0.5mA), however, older adults outperformed young adults at 1Hz (0.6 vs. 1.1mA). Based on these thresholds, we argue that central vestibular processing gain is enhanced in older adults for 1Hz real and virtual rotations, partially offsetting the negative impact of normal age-related hair cell receptor and primary afferent loss. We propose that the frequency dependence of this compensation reflects the physiological importance of the 1-5Hz range in natural vestibular input. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function-A Review of Electrovestibulography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J; Pastras, Christopher J; Curthoys, Ian S

    2017-01-01

    Electrocochleography (EcochG), incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM), the Summating Potential (SP), and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP), has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC) and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG), incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system.

  6. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J.; Pastras, Christopher J.; Curthoys, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    Electrocochleography (EcochG), incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM), the Summating Potential (SP), and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP), has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC) and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG), incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system. PMID:28620284

  7. Electrophysiological Measurements of Peripheral Vestibular Function—A Review of Electrovestibulography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrocochleography (EcochG, incorporating the Cochlear Microphonic (CM, the Summating Potential (SP, and the cochlear Compound Action Potential (CAP, has been used to study cochlear function in humans and experimental animals since the 1930s, providing a simple objective tool to assess both hair cell (HC and nerve sensitivity. The vestibular equivalent of ECochG, termed here Electrovestibulography (EVestG, incorporates responses of the vestibular HCs and nerve. Few research groups have utilized EVestG to study vestibular function. Arguably, this is because stimulating the cochlea in isolation with sound is a trivial matter, whereas stimulating the vestibular system in isolation requires significantly more technical effort. That is, the vestibular system is sensitive to both high-level sound and bone-conducted vibrations, but so is the cochlea, and gross electrical responses of the inner ear to such stimuli can be difficult to interpret. Fortunately, several simple techniques can be employed to isolate vestibular electrical responses. Here, we review the literature underpinning gross vestibular nerve and HC responses, and we discuss the nomenclature used in this field. We also discuss techniques for recording EVestG in experimental animals and humans and highlight how EVestG is furthering our understanding of the vestibular system.

  8. PRODUCTION MONITORING SYSTEM WITH PREDICTIVE FUNCTIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANEL EISKOP

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current study is to analyse and develop production monitoring system (PMS for small and medium enterprises (SME with predictive functionality. The development of planned PMS covers design of hardware architecture, building data analysis and prediction tools. New tool wear forecast model has been developed. The proposed model extends traditional widely used models by introducing the effects of working regimes and multiple passes on tool/component wear.

  9. The normal distribution and projections of constitutive NADPH-d/NOS neurons in the brainstem vestibular complex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, D W; Beitz, A J

    2000-09-11

    The vestibular system is a highly conserved sensory system in vertebrates that is largely responsible for maintenance of one's orientation in space, posture, and balance and for visual fixation of objects during motion. In light of the considerable literature indicating an involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in sensory systems, it is important to determine whether NO is associated with vestibular pathways. To study the relationship of NO to vestibular pathways, we first examined the normal distribution of constitutive NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in the vestibular complex (VC) and then examined its association with selected vestibular projection neurons. Survey of the four major vestibular nuclei revealed that only the medial vestibular nucleus contained significant numbers of perikarya stained for NADPH-d/NOS. By contrast, all the vestibular nuclei contained a network of fine processes that stained positive for NADPH-d, although the density of this network varied among the individual nuclei. To determine whether NADPH-d/NOS neurons project to vestibular efferent targets, injections of the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold were made into known targets of second-order vestibular neurons. Vestibular neurons containing constitutive NADPH-d/NOS were found to project predominantly to the oculomotor nucleus. A small number of neurons also participate in vestibulothalamic and intrinsic vestibular connections. These results indicate that NADPH-d/NOS neurons are prevalent in the MVN and that a subpopulation of these neurons project to the oculomotor complex. Nitric oxide is probably released locally from axons located throughout the vestibular complex but may play a particularly important role in vestibulo-ocular pathways. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. 3M Personal Air Monitoring Systems

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    3M monitors are made to allow sample desorption directly in the monitor itself. The monitor comes with a snap-on elution cap that permits the desorbing solvent to be injected into the monitor. The solution is then poured into sample vials for analysis. 3M monitors use standard analytical methods: gas chromatography for the organic vapor monitor and ethylene oxide monitor, and colorimetry for the formaldehyde monitor.

  11. A system approach to nuclear facility monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argo, P.E.; Doak, J.E.; Howse, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    Sensor technology for use in nuclear facility monitoring has reached and advanced stage of development. Research on where to place these sensors in a facility and how to combine their outputs in a meaningful fashion does not appear to be keeping pace. In this paper, we take a global view of the problem where sensor technology is viewed as only one piece of a large puzzle. Other pieces of this puzzle include the optimal location and type of sensors used in a specific facility, the rate at which sensors record information, and the risk associated with the materials/processes at a facility. If the data are analyzed off-site, how will they be transmitted? Is real-time analysis necessary? Are we monitoring only the facility itself, or might we also monitor the processing that occurs there? How are we going to combine the output from the various sensors to give us an accurate picture of the state of the facility? This paper will not try to answer all these questions, but rather it will attempt to stimulate thought in this area by formulating a systems approach to the problem demonstrated by a prototype system and a systems proposed for an actual facility. Our focus will be on the data analysis aspect of the problem.

  12. A remote drip infusion monitoring system employing Bluetooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hikaru; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a remote drip infusion monitoring system for use in hospitals. The system consists of several infusion monitoring devices and a central monitor. The infusion monitoring device employing a Bluetooth module can detect the drip infusion rate and an empty infusion solution bag, and then these data are sent to the central monitor placed at the nurses' station via the Bluetooth. The central monitor receives the data from several infusion monitoring devices and then displays graphically them. Therefore, the developed system can monitor intensively the drip infusion situation of the several patients at the nurses' station.

  13. Vestibular information is necessary for maintaining metric properties of representational space: evidence from mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péruch, Patrick; Lopez, Christophe; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Escoffier, Guy; Zeitoun, Alain; Sanjuan, Mélanie; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2011-09-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions, from postural and oculomotor reflexes to spatial representation and cognition. Vestibular signals are important to maintain an internal, updated representation of the body position and movement in space. However, it is not clear to what extent they are also necessary to mentally simulate movement in situations that do not involve displacements of the body, as in mental imagery. The present study assessed how vestibular loss can affect object-based mental transformations (OMTs), i.e., imagined rotations or translations of objects relative to the environment. Participants performed one task of mental rotation of 3D-objects and two mental scanning tasks dealing with the ability to build and manipulate mental images that have metric properties. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (1 week and 1 month). They were compared to healthy participants tested at similar time intervals and to bilateral vestibular-defective patients tested after the recovery period. Vestibular loss impaired all mental imagery tasks. Performance varied according to the extent of vestibular loss (bilateral patients were frequently the most impaired) and according to the time elapsed after unilateral vestibular neurotomy (deficits were stronger at the early stage after neurotomy and then gradually compensated). These findings indicate that vestibular signals are necessary to perform OMTs and provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in processing metric properties of mental representations. They suggest that vestibular loss disorganizes brain structures commonly involved in mental imagery, and more generally in mental representation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  15. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Hammam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans.

  16. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans. PMID:28798718

  17. Implantable intraocular pressure monitoring systems: Design considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Arsalan, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Design considerations and limitations of implantable Intraocular Pressure Monitoring (IOPM) systems are presented in this paper. Detailed comparison with the state of the art is performed to highlight the benefits and challenges of the proposed design. The system-on-chip, presented here, is battery free and harvests energy from incoming RF signals. This low-cost design, in standard CMOS process, does not require any external components or bond wires to function. This paper provides useful insights to the designers of implantable wireless sensors in terms of design choices and associated tradeoffs. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. [Effect of nitric oxide in vestibular compensation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zi-dong; Zhang, Lian-shan

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of nitric oxide (NO) in vestibular compensation after unilateral vestibular deafferentation. Eighteen animals were divided into two groups, 6 of group a as control, 12 of group b received gentamicin intratympanic injection in the left ear. Half of the animals were killed respectively after 5 days and 10 days. Vestibular endorgan and brainstem tissue sections were subjected to NADPH-d reactive test of NOS for histochemical examination. In group a, NOS-like reactivity in both sides of vestibular endorgan and nucli. In group b during 5 days, NOS-like reactivity in right side of vestibular endorgan and nucli, those of the left side were negative. During 10 days, NOS-like reactivity only in the right side of vestibular endorgan. Changes of NOS expression in the contralateral vestibular nucli might have played a role in vestibular compensation.

  19. System for Collecting Biosignal Data from Multiple Patient Monitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dukyong; Lee, Sukhoon; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, JeongGil; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Rae Woong

    2017-10-01

    Biosignal data include important physiological information. For that reason, many devices and systems have been developed, but there has not been enough consideration of how to collect and integrate raw data from multiple systems. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a system for collecting and integrating biosignal data from two patient monitoring systems. We developed an interface to extract biosignal data from Nihon Kohden and Philips monitoring systems. The Nihon Kohden system has a central server for the temporary storage of raw waveform data, which can be requested using the HL7 protocol. However, the Philips system used in our hospital cannot save raw waveform data. Therefore, our system was connected to monitoring devices using the RS232 protocol. After collection, the data were transformed and stored in a unified format. From September 2016 to August 2017, we collected approximately 117 patient-years of waveform data from 1,268 patients in 79 beds of five intensive care units. Because the two systems use the same data storage format, the application software could be run without compatibility issues. Our system collects biosignal data from different systems in a unified format. The data collected by the system can be used to develop algorithms or applications without the need to consider the source of the data.

  20. Monitoring system and methods for a distributed and recoverable digital control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Kent (Inventor); Hess, Richard (Inventor); Kelley, Gerald B (Inventor); Rogers, Randy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A monitoring system and methods are provided for a distributed and recoverable digital control system. The monitoring system generally comprises two independent monitoring planes within the control system. The first monitoring plane is internal to the computing units in the control system, and the second monitoring plane is external to the computing units. The internal first monitoring plane includes two in-line monitors. The first internal monitor is a self-checking, lock-step-processing monitor with integrated rapid recovery capability. The second internal monitor includes one or more reasonableness monitors, which compare actual effector position with commanded effector position. The external second monitor plane includes two monitors. The first external monitor includes a pre-recovery computing monitor, and the second external monitor includes a post recovery computing monitor. Various methods for implementing the monitoring functions are also disclosed.

  1. Age-Related Change in Vestibular Ganglion Cell Populations in Individuals With Presbycusis and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Nelson, Erik G

    2017-04-01

    We sought to establish that the decline of vestibular ganglion cell counts uniquely correlates with spiral ganglion cell counts, cochlear hair cell counts, and hearing phenotype in individuals with presbycusis. The relationship between aging in the vestibular system and aging in the cochlea is a topic of ongoing investigation. Histopathologic age-related changes the vestibular system may mirror what is seen in the cochlea, but correlations with hearing phenotype and the impact of presbycusis are not well understood. Vestibular ganglion cells, spiral ganglion cells, and cochlear hair cells were counted in specimens from individuals with presbycusis and normal hearing. These were taken from within a large collection of processed human temporal bones. Correlations between histopathology and hearing phenotype were investigated. Vestibular ganglion cell counts were positively correlated with spiral ganglion cell counts and cochlear hair cell counts and were negatively correlated with hearing phenotype. There was no statistical evidence on linear regression to suggest that the relationship between age and cell populations differed significantly according to whether presbycusis was present or not. Superior vestibular ganglion cells were more negatively correlated with age than inferior ganglion cells. No difference in vestibular ganglion cells was noted based on sex. Vestibular ganglion cell counts progressively deteriorate with age, and this loss correlates closely with changes in the cochlea, as well as hearing phenotype. However, these correlations do not appear to be unique in individuals with presbycusis as compared with those with normal hearing.

  2. Nutrient Film Technique (NFT Hydroponic Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmy Helmy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant cultivation using hydroponic is very popular today. Nutrient Film Technique (NFT hydroponic system is commonly used by people. It can be applied indoor or outdoor. Plants in this systemneed nutrient solution to grow well. pH, TDS and temperature of the nutrient solution must be check to ensure plant gets sufficient nutrients. This research aims todevelop monitoring system of NFT hydroponic. Farmer will be able to monitor pH, TDS and temperature online. It will ease farmer to decide which plant is suitable to be cultivated and time to boost growth.Delay of the system will be measured to know system performance. Result shows that pH is directly proportional with TDS. Temperature value has no correlation with pH and TDS. System has highest delay during daylight and afternoon but it will decline in the night and morning. Average of delay in the morning is 11 s, 28.5 s in daylight, 32 s in the afternoon and 17.5 s in the night.

  3. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE

  4. Global integrated drought monitoring and prediction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Nakhjiri, Navid; Farahmand, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Drought is by far the most costly natural disaster that can lead to widespread impacts, including water and food crises. Here we present data sets available from the Global Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS), which provides drought information based on multiple drought indicators. The system provides meteorological and agricultural drought information based on multiple satellite-, and model-based precipitation and soil moisture data sets. GIDMaPS includes a near real-time monitoring component and a seasonal probabilistic prediction module. The data sets include historical drought severity data from the monitoring component, and probabilistic seasonal forecasts from the prediction module. The probabilistic forecasts provide essential information for early warning, taking preventive measures, and planning mitigation strategies. GIDMaPS data sets are a significant extension to current capabilities and data sets for global drought assessment and early warning. The presented data sets would be instrumental in reducing drought impacts especially in developing countries. Our results indicate that GIDMaPS data sets reliably captured several major droughts from across the globe. PMID:25977759

  5. Global integrated drought monitoring and prediction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Nakhjiri, Navid; Farahmand, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Drought is by far the most costly natural disaster that can lead to widespread impacts, including water and food crises. Here we present data sets available from the Global Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS), which provides drought information based on multiple drought indicators. The system provides meteorological and agricultural drought information based on multiple satellite-, and model-based precipitation and soil moisture data sets. GIDMaPS includes a near real-time monitoring component and a seasonal probabilistic prediction module. The data sets include historical drought severity data from the monitoring component, and probabilistic seasonal forecasts from the prediction module. The probabilistic forecasts provide essential information for early warning, taking preventive measures, and planning mitigation strategies. GIDMaPS data sets are a significant extension to current capabilities and data sets for global drought assessment and early warning. The presented data sets would be instrumental in reducing drought impacts especially in developing countries. Our results indicate that GIDMaPS data sets reliably captured several major droughts from across the globe.

  6. Radiation portal monitor system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos, NM; Borozdin, Konstantin N [Los Alamos, NM; Green, J Andrew [Los Alamos, NM; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos, NM; Makela, Mark F [Los Alamos, NM; Priedhorsky, William C [Los Alamos, NM; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos, NM; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos, NM; Sossong, Michael J [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-12-15

    A portal monitoring system has a cosmic ray charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray muons, whilst also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  7. Cardiomed System for Medical Monitoring Onboard ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, J. C.; Aubry, P.; Nguyen, L.; Kozharinov, V.; Grachev, V.; Temnova, E.

    2008-06-01

    Cardiomed system was developed with two main objectives: (1) cardiovascular medical monitoring of cosmonauts onboard ISS together with LBNP countermeasure; (2) scientific study of the cardio-vascular system in micro-gravity. Cardiomed is an integrated end-to-end system, from the onboard segment operating different medical instruments, to the ground segment which provides real-time telemetry of on-board experiments and off-line analysis of physiological measurements. In the first part of the paper, Cardiomed is described from an architecture point of view together with some typical uses. In the second part, the most constraining requirements with respect to system design are introduced. Some requirements are generic; some are specific to medical follow-up, others to scientific objectives. In the last part, the main technical challenges which were addressed during the development and the qualification of Cardiomed and the lessons learnt are presented.

  8. Recovery of Vestibular Ocular Reflex Function and Balance Control after a Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    John eAllum

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery ...

  9. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to per...

  10. Interaction between vestibular compensation mechanisms and vestibular rehabilitation therapy: ten recommendations for optimal functional recovery

    OpenAIRE

    LACOUR eMichel; BERNARD DEMANZE eLaurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalogue of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to p...

  11. Wireless Nde Sensor System for Continuous Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, G.; Mhamdi, L.; Khan, T.; Udpa, L.; Lajnef, N.; Hong, J.-W.; Udpa, S.; Ramuhalli, P.; Balasubramaniam, K.

    2011-06-01

    For continuous monitoring of power-plant components, the use of in-situ sensors (i.e., sensors that are permanently mounted on the structure) is necessary. In-situ wired sensors require an unrealistic amount of cabling for power and data transfer, which can drive up costs of installation and maintenance. In addition, the use of cabling in hostile environments (high temperature/pressure environments) is not a viable option. This paper presents a wireless system for continuous monitoring, identification of anomalous events, NDE data acquisition and data transfer. NDE sensors are integrated with a wireless radio unit such as a MICA mote. Measurements from the sensors are typically acquired at prescribed intervals, encoded and compressed, and transmitted to a central processing server, where appropriate signal processing techniques may be used to filter out noise in the measurements, enhance the desired signal and quantify the damage in terms of severity.

  12. [Ecological monitoring in agro-ecological systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭkov, B D

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental principles of the ecologic monitoring in the antropogenic ecosystems are dealt with. Analyzed are the structure and function of the agroecologic systems, and, on the basis of the particular aspects established a concept is developed of the ecologic control at autoecologic and biocoenologic level. An analysis is likewise made of the ecologic sequelae resulting from the chemical war launched by the American aggressors in Vietnam and the specific trends therefrom in the substantiation of the ecologic monitoring. Stated is the necessity of profound investigations to establish the bioaccumulation of dioxine, a poisonous agent which was contained in herbicides and defoliants used in the war, and which was distinguished by exclusively high toxicity, producing teratogenic and cancerogenic effects and possessing high resistance in the environment.

  13. Clinical romberg testing does not detect vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longridge, Neil S; Mallinson, Arthur I

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of tandem Romberg and tandem walking testing at detecting vestibular disease and to increase the difficulty of these standard screening assessments in an attempt to try and make them more effective in the clinical office setting. A prospective study in a tertiary and quaternary care neuro-otology clinic comparing performance on tandem Romberg and tandem walking between patients with vestibular disease and controls matched for age and sex. Making the tandem Romberg test and tandem walking tests more difficult for patients was not helpful because it also made the tests more difficult to perform for controls with no symptoms of vestibular disease. When comparing a young and an old cohort, there was a significant difference in performance. Our techniques of sharpening and sensitizing tandem Romberg and tandem walking tests were not useful at delineating vestibular disease, and age itself may be a confound that mimics the effects of balance system disease. The tandem Romberg and tandem walking tests, despite being in widespread clinical use as office screening tests, may not be effective at determining the presence of newly developed vestibular disease.

  14. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment must provide an automatic monitor system that transmits a warning to designated local and remote...

  15. 14 CFR 171.263 - Localizer automatic monitor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Localizer automatic monitor system. 171.263... System (ISMLS) § 171.263 Localizer automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS localizer equipment must provide an automatic monitor system that transmits a warning to designated local and remote control points...

  16. Applied Data Analysis in Energy Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kychkin А.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Software and hardware system organization is presented as an example for building energy monitoring of multi-sectional lighting and climate control / conditioning needs. System key feature is applied office energy data analysis that allows to provide each type of hardware localized work mode recognition. It is based on general energy consumption profile with following energy consumption and workload evaluation. Applied data analysis includes primary data processing block, smoothing filter, time stamp identification block, clusterization and classification blocks, state change detection block, statistical data calculation block. Time slot consumed energy value and slot time stamp are taken as work mode classification main parameters. Energy data applied analysis with HIL and OpenJEVis visualization system usage experimental research results for chosen time period has been provided. Energy consumption, workload calculation and eight different states identification has been executed for two lighting sections and one climate control / conditioning emulating system by integral energy consumption profile. Research has been supported by university internal grant №2016/PI-2 «Methodology development of monitoring and heat flow utilization as low potential company energy sources».

  17. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill J Yates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that nonlabyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  18. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Andrew A; Yates, Bill J

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  19. An adaptive vestibular rehabilitation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Benjamin T; Schubert, Michael C

    2017-05-23

    There is a large variation in vestibular rehabilitation (VR) results depending on type of therapy, adherence, and the appropriateness for the patient's level of function. A novel adaptive vestibular rehabilitation (AVR) program was developed and evaluated. Technology and procedure development, and prospective multicenter trial. Those with complete unilateral vestibular hypofunction and symptomatic at least 3 months with a Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) >30 were eligible. Patients were given a device to use with their own computer. They were instructed to use the program daily, with each session lasting about 10 minutes. The task consisted of reporting orientation of the letter C, which appeared when their angular head velocity exceeded a threshold. The letter size and head velocity required were adjusted based on prior performance. Performance on the task was remotely collected by the investigator as well as a weekly DHI score. Four patients aged 31 to 74 years (mean = 51 years) were enrolled in this feasibility study to demonstrate efficacy. Two had treated vestibular schwannomas and two had vestibular neuritis. Starting DHI was 32 to 56 (mean = 42), which was reduced to 0 to 16 (mean = 11.5) after a month of therapy, a clinically and statistically significant (P VR in terms of cost and customization for patient ability and obtained a major improvement in symptoms. This study demonstrated a clinically and statistically significant decrease in symptoms after 4 weeks of therapy. 2b Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications.

  1. Embedded multiparametric system for volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, David; Torres, Pedro A.; Meletlidis, Stavros; Lopez, Carmen; José Blanco, María

    2014-05-01

    A low cost and low power consumption multiparametric system designed for volcano monitoring is presented. Once tested with various sensors, at present it is installed in two locations in Tenerife, Canary Islands, acquiring and transmitting data in real time. The system is based on a commercial board (Raspberry Pi®, RPi®) that uses an embedded ARMTM processor with a Debian (Wheezy-Raspbian) Linux Operating System. This configuration permits different standard communication systems between devices as USB and ETHERNET, and also communication with integrated circuits is possible. The whole system includes this platform and self-developed hardware and software. Analog signals are acquired at an expansion board with an ADC converter with three 16 bits channels. This board, which is powered directly from the RPi®, provides timing to the sampling data using a Real Time Clock (RTC). Two serial protocols (I2C and SPI) are responsible for communications. Due to the influence of atmospheric phenomena on the volcano monitoring data, the system is complemented by a self-developed meteorological station based on ArduinoCC and low cost commercial sensors (atmospheric pressure, humidity and rainfall). It is powered with the RPi® and it uses a serial protocol for communications. Self-developed software run under Linux OS and handles configuration, signal acquisition, data storage (USB storage or SD card) and data transmission (FTP, web server). Remote configuration, data plotting and downloading is available through a web interface tool. Nowadays, the system is used for gravimetric and oceanic tides data acquisition in Tenerife and soon it will be applied for clinometric data.

  2. Smart Garbage Monitoring System for Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Yusof Norfadzlia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piles of rubbish are one of the major problems faced by most people in Malaysia, especially those who live in flats, as the number of bins is limited and shared among all residents. It may cause pollutions, which may lead to sanitary issues and diseases. This project presents the development of a smart garbage monitoring system in order to measure waste level in the garbage bin in real-time and to alert the municipality, in particular cases, via SMS. The proposed system is consisted by the ultrasonic sensor to measure the waste level, the GSM module to send the SMS, and an Arduino Uno which controls the system operation. It supposes to generate and send the warning messages to the municipality via SMS when the waste bin is full or almost full, so the garbage can be collected immediately. Furthermore, it is expected to contribute to improving the efficiency of the solid waste disposal management.

  3. Process monitoring using ultrasonic sensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Bernd; Rautenberg, Jens

    2006-12-22

    Continuous in-line measurement of substance concentration in liquid mixtures is valuable in improving industrial processes in terms of material properties, energy efficiency and process safety. Ultrasonic sensor systems meet the practical requirements of a chemical sensor quite well. Currently ultrasonic sensor systems are widely used as acoustic chemical sensors to measure concentration of selected substances or to monitor the course of polymerisation, crystallisation or fermentation processes. Useable acoustic properties for the characterisation of liquid mixtures are sound velocity, sound absorption and acoustic impedance. This contribution will give a short overview of the state of the art and several trends for the use of ultrasonic sensor systems in process applications. Novel investigations show the very promising possibility to analyse liquid multi-phase mixtures like suspensions, emulsions and dispersions.

  4. Monitoring the LHCb data quality system

    CERN Multimedia

    Baranov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the quality of the data, DQM, is crucial in a high-energy physics experiment to ensure the correct functioning of the apparatus during the data taking. DQM at LHCb is carried out in two phase. The first one is performed on-site, in real time, using unprocessed data directly from the LHCb detector, while the second, also performed on-site, requires the reconstruction of the data selected by the LHCb trigger system and occurs with some delay. For the Run II data taking the LHCb collaboration has re-engineered the DQM protocols and the DQM graphical interface, moving the latter to a web-based monitoring system, called Monet, thus allowing researchers to perform the second phase off-site. In order to support the operator's task, Monet is also equipped with an automated, fully configurable, alarm system, thus allowing its use not only for DQM purposes, but also to track and assess the quality of LHCb software and simulation.

  5. Automatic outdoor monitoring system for photovoltaic panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefancich, Marco; Simpson, Lin; Chiesa, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Long-term acquisition of solar panel performance parameters, for panels operated at maximum power point in their real environment, is of critical importance in the photovoltaic research sector. However, few options exist for the characterization of non-standard panels such as concentrated photovoltaic systems, heavily soiled or shaded panels or those operating under non-standard spectral illumination; certainly, it is difficult to find such a measurement system that is flexible and affordable enough to be adopted by the smaller research institutes or universities. We present here an instrument aiming to fill this gap, autonomously tracking and maintaining any solar panel at maximum power point while continuously monitoring its operational parameters and dissipating the produced energy without connection to the power grid. The instrument allows periodic acquisition of current-voltage curves to verify the employed maximum power point tracking approach. At the same time, with hardware schematics and software code being provided, it provides a flexible open development environment for the monitoring of non-standard generators like concentrator photovoltaic systems and to test novel power tracking approaches. The key issues, and the corresponding solutions, encountered in the design are analyzed in detail and the relevant schematics presented.

  6. Prometheus: a next-generation monitoring system

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Prometheus is an open eco-system that provides an end-to-end approach to infrastructure and application monitoring. It covers all levels beginning with easy instrumentation based on a flexible, multi-dimensional data model. The Prometheus server itself collects and stores time series while trying to maintain operational simplicity while being adaptable to varying scales and layouts of infrastructure. By integrating with a wide range of service discovery systems, it always stays in sync with the world it is monitoring. The powerful query language allows us to ask complex questions and can be applied seamlessly between ad-hoc investigation and static dashboarding. It is also directly applied in the eco-system's alerting layer, which favors a time-series based over and event driven approach. In this talk we will look at all aspects of Prometheus from the high-level philosophy behind its design to its practical concerns of implementation and operation. About the speaker Fabian Reinartz is a software eng...

  7. Automatic outdoor monitoring system for photovoltaic panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefancich, Marco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerce, Istituto dei Materiali per l’Elettronica ed il Magnetismo (CNR-IMEM), Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma, Italy; Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA; Chiesa, Matteo [Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 54224, Masdar City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    2016-05-01

    Long-term acquisition of solar panel performance parameters, for panels operated at maximum power point in their real environment, is of critical importance in the photovoltaic research sector. However, few options exist for the characterization of non-standard panels such as concentrated photovoltaic systems, heavily soiled or shaded panels or those operating under non-standard spectral illumination; certainly, it is difficult to find such a measurement system that is flexible and affordable enough to be adopted by the smaller research institutes or universities. We present here an instrument aiming to fill this gap, autonomously tracking and maintaining any solar panel at maximum power point while continuously monitoring its operational parameters and dissipating the produced energy without connection to the power grid. The instrument allows periodic acquisition of current-voltage curves to verify the employed maximum power point tracking approach. At the same time, with hardware schematics and software code being provided, it provides a flexible open development environment for the monitoring of non-standard generators like concentrator photovoltaic systems and to test novel power tracking approaches. The key issues, and the corresponding solutions, encountered in the design are analyzed in detail and the relevant schematics presented.

  8. The Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, F. T.; Schultz, A.; Gupta, M.; Powers, L.; Klinkhammer, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System (MSMS) is a technology development project that is designed to enable fundamental research into understanding the potential for and limits to chemolithoautotrophic life. This is life within which inorganic carbon is converted to organic carbon and where only inorganic compounds serve as electron acceptors and electron donors. Such life forms are postulated to be capable of surviving in a Europan ocean. If we can prove that such life forms exist on Earth it would provide credence to the hypothesis that they might exist on other planets or moons in our Solar System. It has been hypothesized that one environment which might foster such life is associated with sub-seafloor hydrothermal vent structures. The goal of the MSMS project is to develop an instrument capable of testing this hypothesis. The MSMS instrument is an evolution of a sea floor monitoring system developed by Dr. Adam Schultz. Its design is the result of many generations of hardware and dive programs. Medusa provides the capability to measure and sample effluent and influent sea floor hydraulic flows associated with hydrothermal vent structures, active sea mounds, and sea floor bore holes. Through this proposal we are developing the next generation Medusa system and initiating the integration of several select chemical and biological sensors into the Medusa backbone. These sensors are an in situ flow-through spectral chemistry system, a cavity ringdown 12C/13C system, and an intrinsic fluorescence instrument. der way. This instrument can be used to target and discriminate between biological samples for automated sample collection

  9. Underwater Animal Monitoring Magnetic Sensor System

    KAUST Repository

    Kaidarova, Altynay

    2017-10-01

    Obtaining new insights into the behavior of free-living marine organisms is fundamental for conservation efforts and anticipating the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems. Despite the recent advances in biotelemetry, collecting physiological and behavioral parameters of underwater free-living animals remains technically challenging. In this thesis, we develop the first magnetic underwater animal monitoring system that utilizes Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors, the most sensitive solid-state sensors today, coupled with flexible magnetic composites. The TMR sensors are composed of CoFeB free layers and MgO tunnel barriers, patterned using standard optical lithography and ion milling procedures. The short and long-term stability of the TMR sensors has been studied using statistical and Allan deviation analysis. Instrumentation noise has been reduced using optimized electrical interconnection schemes. We also develop flexible NdFeB-PDMS composite magnets optimized for applications in corrosive marine environments, and which can be attached to marine animals. The magnetic and mechanical properties are studied for different NdFeB powder concentrations and the performance of the magnetic composites for different exposure times to sea water is systematically investigated. Without protective layer, the composite magnets loose more than 50% of their magnetization after 51 days in seawater. The durability of the composite magnets can be considerably improved by using polymer coatings which are protecting the composite magnet, whereby Parylene C is found to be the most effective solution, providing simultaneously corrosion resistance, flexibility, and enhanced biocompatibility. A Parylene C film of 2μm thickness provides the sufficient protection of the magnetic composite in corrosive aqueous environments for more than 70 days. For the high level performance of the system, the theoretically optimal position of the composite magnets with respect to the sensing

  10. Locomotive monitoring system using wireless sensor networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Croucamp, PL

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN), 27-30 July 2014 Locomotive monitoring system using wireless sensor networks P. L. Croucamp1, S. Rimer1 and C. Kruger2 1Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering University of Johannesburg... Johannesburg, South Africa Email: suvendic@uj.ac.za 2Advanced Sensor Networks, Meraka. CSIR Pretoria, South Africa Email: ckruger1@csir.co.za Abstract Theft of cables used for powering a locomotive not only stops the train from functioning but also...

  11. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  12. airborne data analysis/monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephison, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    An Airborne Data Analysis/Monitor System (ADAMS), a ROLM 1666 computer based system installed onboard test airplanes used during experimental testing is evaluated. In addition to the 1666 computer, the ADAMS hardware includes a DDC System 90 fixed head disk and a Miltape DD400 floppy disk. Boeing designed a DMA interface to the data acquisition system and an intelligent terminal to reduce system overhead and simplify operator commands. The ADAMS software includes RMX/RTOS and both ROLM FORTRAN and assembly language are used. The ADAMS provides real time displays that enable onboard test engineers to make rapid decisions about test conduct thus reducing the cost and time required to certify new model airplanes, and improved the quality of data derived from the test, leading to more rapid development of improvements resulting in quieter, safer, and more efficient airplanes. The availability of airborne data processing removes most of the weather and geographical restrictions imposed by telemetered flight test data systems. A data base is maintained to describe the airplane, the data acquisition system, the type of testing, and the conditions under which the test is performed.

  13. [Vestibular rehabilitation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Karina; Marangoni, Bruna E M; Schmidt, Kizi B; Cobe, Fernanda A; Matuti, Gabriela S; Nishino, Lúcia K; Thomaz, Rodrigo B; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Lianza, Sérgio; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2007-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory illness, that attack the white matter of the central nervous system, and abnormal vestibular sensations (vertigo, disequilibrium) are frequent. The vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is determined by mechanisms of adaptations, neural substitutions and compensations. This study evaluated the improvement of the central or peripheral vertigo in patients with relapsing-remitting MS submitted to the VR (exercises of Cawthorne-Cooksey), through the scale of Berg and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). In this sample of 4 cases the VR, carried through in a period of 2 months, demonstrated the improvement in 3 patients according to the Berg scale and in 2 patients considering that of the DHI.

  14. 30 CFR 27.21 - Methane-monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.21 Methane-monitoring system. (a) A methane-monitoring system shall be so designed that any machine or equipment, which.... (d) An enclosure shall be equipped with a lock, seal, or acceptable equivalent when MSHA deems such...

  15. Beam Position Monitor System for PEP II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen R.; Aiello, G.Roberto; Hendrickson, Linda J.; Johnson, Ronald G.; Mills, Mark R.; Olsen, Jeff J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12

    We describe the beam position monitor system built for PEP-II, the B-factory at SLAC. The system reports beam position for bunches of between 5 x 10{sup 8} and 8 x 10{sup 10} electron charges, either singly or as continuous streams of bunches every 4.2 ns. Resolution at full charge is to be better than 10 microns in a single turn. Higher resolution is available via on-board multi-turn averaging. The position signal is processed in a 20 MHz bandwidth around 952 MHz. This bandwidth, rather broader than that typical of RF position monitors, allows good resolution for low charge single bunches. Additional novel features include stringent control of return losses in order to minimize cross-talk between nearby bunches which may contain very different charges. The digitizing electronics is multiplexed between the two PEP-II storage rings. Design, construction, and installation experience, as well as first results with beam are presented.

  16. MST radar transmitter control and monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnahan, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    A generalized transmitter control and monitor card was developed using the Intel 8031 (8051 family) microprocessor. The design was generalized so that this card can be utilized for virtually any control application with only firmware changes. The block diagram appears in Figure 2. The card provides for local control using a 16 key keypad (up to 64 keys are supported). The local display is four digits of 7 segment LEDs. The display can indicate the status of all major system parameters and provide voltage readout for the analog signal inputs. The card can be populated with only the chips required for a given application. Fully populated, the card has two RS-232 serial ports for computer communications. It has a total of 48 TTL parallel lines that can define as either inputs or outputs in groups of four. A total of 32 analog inputs with a 0-5 volt range are supported. In addition, a real-time clock/calendar is available if required. A total of 16 k bytes of ROM and 16 k bytes of RAM is available for programming. This card can be the basis of virtually any monitor or control system with appropriate software.

  17. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  18. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40 MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  19. Inductive monitoring system constructed from nominal system data and its use in real-time system monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, David L. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), its software implementations, hardware embodiments and applications. Training data is received, typically nominal system data acquired from sensors in normally operating systems or from detailed system simulations. The training data is formed into vectors that are used to generate a knowledge database having clusters of nominal operating regions therein. IMS monitors a system's performance or health by comparing cluster parameters in the knowledge database with incoming sensor data from a monitored-system formed into vectors. Nominal performance is concluded when a monitored-system vector is determined to lie within a nominal operating region cluster or lies sufficiently close to a such a cluster as determined by a threshold value and a distance metric. Some embodiments of IMS include cluster indexing and retrieval methods that increase the execution speed of IMS.

  20. Performance improvement clarification for refrigeration system using active system monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of determining whether a refrigeration plant has the possibility of delivering a better performance of the operation. The controllers are wellknown but detailed knowledge about the underlying dynamics of the refrigeration plant is not available. Thus, the question...... is if it is possible to achieve a better performance by changing the controller parameter. An approach to active system monitoring, based on active fault diagnosis techniques, is employed in order to evaluate changes in the system performance under operation....

  1. Evaluation of Cervical Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Subjects with Chronic Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Salam, Nehal Mamdouh; Ismail, Elshahat Ibrahem; El Saeed El Sharabasy, Ayman

    2017-12-14

    Noise has been recognized as a major cause of cochlear damage resulting in both tinnitus and hearing loss. On the other hand, damage to the vestibular system, especially the saccule, can be considered as a potential problem. The cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) have been established as a clinical test of measuring both sac-cular and inferior vestibular nerve function. Therefore, it is thought to be sensitive to the noise-induced damage to the vestibular system. Accordingly, this study was designed to assess the vestibular system in subjects exposed to noise during work by using cVEMPs. This study was performed in over 60 adult males who were divided into a study group (consisting of 40 adult males) with history of chronic occupational noise exposure and with variable degree of hearing levels and a control group consisting of 20 healthy adults with normal peripheral hearing, with no history of noise exposure and no vestibular complaints. cVEMP recordings were elicited using 95dB nHL click stimuli. There was statistically significant prolonged cVEMP latency of the P13 and N23 waves of the study versus the control groups. As regard to the sense of imbalance, there were significant prolonged cVEMPs latencies in present versus absent sense of imbalance. However, there were statistically insignificant reduced cVEMP amplitudes in present versus absent sense of imbalance. Chronic noise exposure damages the vestibular system especially the saccule in addition to cochlear damage.

  2. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Byron K.

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1- g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1- g

  3. Indirect Tire Monitoring System - Machine Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, O.; Thelin, S.; Byttner, S.; Fan, Y.

    2017-10-01

    The heavy vehicle industry has today no requirement to provide a tire pressure monitoring system by law. This has created issues surrounding unknown tire pressure and thread depth during active service. There is also no standardization for these kind of systems which means that different manufacturers and third party solutions work after their own principles and it can be hard to know what works for a given vehicle type. The objective is to create an indirect tire monitoring system that can generalize a method that detect both incorrect tire pressure and thread depth for different type of vehicles within a fleet without the need for additional physical sensors or vehicle specific parameters. The existing sensors that are connected communicate through CAN and are interpreted by the Drivec Bridge hardware that exist in the fleet. By using supervised machine learning a classifier was created for each axle where the main focus was the front axle which had the most issues. The classifier will classify the vehicles tires condition and will be implemented in Drivecs cloud service where it will receive its data. The resulting classifier is a random forest implemented in Python. The result from the front axle with a data set consisting of 9767 samples of buses with correct tire condition and 1909 samples of buses with incorrect tire condition it has an accuracy of 90.54% (0.96%). The data sets are created from 34 unique measurements from buses between January and May 2017. This classifier has been exported and is used inside a Node.js module created for Drivecs cloud service which is the result of the whole implementation. The developed solution is called Indirect Tire Monitoring System (ITMS) and is seen as a process. This process will predict bad classes in the cloud which will lead to warnings. The warnings are defined as incidents. They contain only the information needed and the bandwidth of the incidents are also controlled so incidents are created within an

  4. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of electrotactile vestibular substitution on rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Camila Giacomo Carneiro; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Danilov, Yuri

    2010-06-07

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of electrotactile tongue biofeedback (BrainPort((R))) as a sensory substitute for the vestibular apparatus in patients with bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) who did not have a good response to conventional vestibular rehabilitation (VR). Seven patients with BVL were trained to use the device. Stimulation on the surface of the tongue was created by a dynamic pattern of electrical pulses and the patient was able to adjust the intensity of stimulation and spatially centralize the stimulus on the electrode array. Patients were directed to continuously adjust head orientation and to maintain the stimulus pattern at the center of the array. Postural tasks that present progressive difficulties were given during the use of the device. Pre- and post-treatment distribution of the sensory organization test (SOT) composite score showed an average value of 38.3+/-8.7 and 59.9+/-11.3, respectively, indicating a statistically significant improvement (p=0.01). Electrotactile tongue biofeedback significantly improved the postural control of the study group, even if they had not improved with conventional VR. The electrotactile tongue biofeedback system was able to supply additional information about head position with respect to gravitational vertical orientation in the absence of vestibular input, improving postural control. Patients with BVL can integrate electrotactile information in their postural control in order to improve stability after conventional VR. These results were obtained and verified not only by the subjective questionnaire but also by the SOT composite score. The limitations of the study are the small sample size and short duration of the follow-up. The current findings show that the sensory substitution mediated by electrotactile tongue biofeedback may contribute to the improved balance experienced by these patients compared to VR. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) related with recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzari, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal related to the bony labyrinth of the inner ear and represents the non-sensory components of the endolymph-filled, closed, membranous labyrinth. The association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss with a large or enlarged vestibular aqueduct is well known as the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). The enlarged VA (EVA) comprises abnormalities not only in the structure of the inner ear, but also in the physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems. The clinical picture of this clinical entity is variable [Yetiser S, Kertment M, Ozkaptan Y. Vestibular disturbance in patients with Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS). Acta Otolaryngol (StochK) 1999;119: 641-646]. Signs and symptoms of the auditory impairment are more commonly described in the literature: hearing loss ranges from mild to profound, arising from fluctuating to stepwise progressive or sudden. Vestibular disturbances, ranging from mild imbalance to episodic vertigo, are rarely described in the literature. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a labyrinthine disorder with a typical behavior: intense crises of rotational vertigo induced by postural changes of the head, with short duration and usually good responsiveness to rehabilitative maneuvers. These maneuvers are effective in about 80% of patients with BPPV. BPPV often recurs. About 1/3 of patients have a recurrence in the first year after treatment, and by five years, about half of all patients have a recurrence. Vestibular aqueduct has been demonstrated by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT), however, CT scans cannot show the membranous labyrinth itself. On MR images it is not the vestibular aqueduct that is visualized but its contents, the endolymphatic duct and sac, and can show the abnormalities of the fluid spaces related to the membranous labyrinth. It is proposed that recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is related with volumetric abnormalities

  7. Vestibular Loss Predicts Poorer Spatial Cognition in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Eric X; Oh, Esther S; Harun, Aisha; Ehrenburg, Matthew; Agrawal, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    The vestibular system is an important contributor to balance control, spatial orientation, and falls risk. Recent evidence has shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have a higher prevalence of vestibular impairment relative to healthy controls. We sought to evaluate whether vestibular loss is specifically associated with poor spatial cognitive skills among patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. We enrolled 50 patients (22 MCI and 28 AD) from an interdisciplinary Memory Clinic and measured vestibular physiologic function in all patients. Spatial cognitive function was assessed using the Money Road Map Test (MRMT) and the Trail Making Test Part B (TMT-B). General cognitive function was assessed with the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE). In multivariable linear regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, education level, and MMSE, MCI and AD patients with vestibular loss made significantly more errors on the MRMT relative to patients with normal vestibular function (β= 7.3, 95% CI 2.4, 12.1 for unilateral vestibular loss and β= 6.4, 95% CI 1.9, 10.9 for bilateral vestibular loss). We further stratified AD patients into "spatially normal" and "spatially impaired" groups based on MRMT performance, and found that the prevalence of vestibular loss was significantly higher in the spatially impaired AD group relative to the spatially normal AD group. These findings support the hypothesis that vestibular loss contributes specifically to a decline in spatial cognitive ability in MCI and AD patients, independently of general cognitive decline, and may predict a "spatially impaired" subtype of AD.

  8. Novel OSNR Monitoring Technique in Dense WDM Systems using Inherently Generated CW Monitoring Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple, yet effective OSNR monitoring technique based on an inherent effect in the optical modulator. Highly accurate OSNR monitoring is demonstrated in a 40 Gb/s dense WDM system with 50 GHz channel spacing.......We present a simple, yet effective OSNR monitoring technique based on an inherent effect in the optical modulator. Highly accurate OSNR monitoring is demonstrated in a 40 Gb/s dense WDM system with 50 GHz channel spacing....

  9. Condition monitoring system of wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdusamad, Khaled B.

    The development and implementation of the condition monitoring systems (CMS) play a significant role in overcoming the number of failures in the wind turbine generators that result from the harsh operation conditions, such as over temperature, particularly when turbines are deployed offshore. In order to increase the reliability of the wind energy industry, monitoring the operation conditions of wind generators is essential to detect the immediate faults rapidly and perform appropriate preventative maintenance. CMS helps to avoid failures, decrease the potential shutdowns while running, reduce the maintenance and operation costs and maintain wind turbines protected. The knowledge of wind turbine generators' faults, such as stator and rotor inter-turn faults, is indispensable to perform the condition monitoring accurately, and assist with maintenance decision making. Many techniques are utilized to avoid the occurrence of failures in wind turbine generators. The majority of the previous techniques that are applied to monitor the wind generator conditions are based on electrical and mechanical concepts and theories. An advanced CMS can be implemented by using a variety of different techniques and methods to confirm the validity of the obtained electrical and mechanical condition monitoring algorithms. This thesis is focused on applying CMS on wind generators due to high temperature by contributing the statistical, thermal, mathematical, and reliability analyses, and mechanical concepts with the electrical methodology, instead of analyzing the electrical signal and frequencies trends only. The newly developed algorithms can be compared with previous condition monitoring methods, which use the electrical approach in order to establish their advantages and limitations. For example, the hazard reliability techniques of wind generators based on CMS are applied to develop a proper maintenance strategy, which aims to extend the system life-time and reduce the potential

  10. Optical performance monitoring in coherent optical OFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, William; Tucker, Rodney S; Chen, Wei; Yi, Xingwen; Pendock, Graeme

    2007-01-22

    Optical performance monitoring is an indispensable feature for optical systems and networks. In this paper, we propose the concept of optical performance monitoring through channel estimation by receiver signal processing. We show that in coherent-optical-orthogonal-frequency-division- multiplexed (CO-OFDM) systems, critical optical system parameters including fiber chromatic dispersion, Q value, and optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) can be accurately monitored without resorting to separate monitoring devices.

  11. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  12. Ethical, anatomical and physiological issues in developing vestibular implants for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Gay, Annietta; Kos, Maria Izabel; Pelizzone, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Effort towards the development of a vestibular implant for human use are being made. This paper will summarize the first important steps conducted in Geneva towards this ambitious goal. Basically, we have faced three major issues. First, an ethical issue. While it was clear that such development would require the collaboration of human volunteers, it was also clear that stimulation of the vestibular system may produce periods of significant incomfort. We know today how to minimize (and potentially eliminate) this type of incomfort. The second issue was anatomical. The anatomical topology of the vestibular system is complex, and of potentially dangerous access (i.e. facial nerve damage). We choose not to place the electrodes inside the ampullae but close the vestibular nerve branches, to avoid any opening of the inner ear and limit the risk of hearing loss. Work on cadaver heads, confirmed by acute stimulations trials on patients undergoing ear surgery under local anesthesia, demonstrated that it is possible to stimulate selectively both the posterior and lateral ampullary nerves, and elicit the expected vertical and horizontal nystagmic responses. The third issue was physiological. One of the goal of a vestibular implant will be to produce smooth eye movements to stabilize gaze direction when the head is moving. Indeed, after restoring a baseline or "rest" activity in the vestibular pathways with steady-state electrical stimulation, we demonstrated that modulation of this stimulation is producing smooth eye movements. In conclusion, humans can adapt to electrical stimulation of the vestibular system without too much discomfort. Surgical access to the posterior and lateral ampullary nerves have been developed and, electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can be used to artificially elicit smooth eye movements of different speeds and directions, once the system is in adapted state. Therefore, the major prerequisites to develop a prototype vestibular implant

  13. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.; Selen, L.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied,

  14. Altered auditory and vestibular functioning in individuals with low bone mineral density: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Jha, Raghav Hira; Gargeshwari, Aditi; Kumar, Prawin

    2018-01-01

    Alteration in the process of bone remodelling is associated with falls and fractures due to increased bone fragility and altered calcium functioning. The auditory system consists of skeletal structures and is, therefore, prone to getting affected by altered bone remodelling. In addition, the vestibule consists of huge volumes of calcium (CaCO3) in the form of otoconia crystals and alteration in functioning calcium levels could, therefore, result in vestibular symptoms. Thus, the present study aimed at compiling information from various studies on assessment of auditory or vestibular systems in individuals with reduced bone mineral density (BMD). A total of 1977 articles were searched using various databases and 19 full-length articles which reported auditory and vestibular outcomes in persons with low BMD were reviewed. An intricate relationship between altered BMD and audio-vestibular function was evident from the studies; nonetheless, how one aspect of hearing or balance affects the other is not clear. Significant effect of reduced bone mineral density could probably be due to the metabolic changes at the level of cochlea, secondary to alterations in BMD. One could also conclude that sympathetic remodelling is associated with vestibular problems in individual; however, whether vestibular problems lead to altered BMD cannot be ascertained with confidence. The studies reviewed in the article provide an evidence of possible involvement of hearing and vestibular system abnormalities in individuals with reduced bone mineral density. Hence, the assessment protocol for these individuals must include hearing and balance evaluation as mandatory for planning appropriate management.

  15. IAA RAS Radio Telescope Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, A.; Lavrov, A.

    2007-07-01

    Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAA RAS) has three identical radio telescopes, the receiving complex of which consists of five two-channel receivers of different bands, six cryogen systems, and additional devices: four local oscillators, phase calibration generators and IF commutator. The design, hardware and data communication protocol are described. The most convenient way to join the devices of the receiving complex into the common monitoring system is to use the interface which allows to connect numerous devices to the data bus. For the purpose of data communication regulation and to exclude conflicts, a data communication protocol has been designed, which operates with complex formatted data sequences. Formation of such sequences requires considerable data processing capability. That is provided by a microcontroller chip in each slave device. The test version of the software for the central computer has been developed in IAA RAS. We are developing the Mark IV FS software extension modules, which will allow us to control the receiving complex of the radio telescope by special SNAP commands from both operator input and schedule files. We are also developing procedures of automatic measurements of SEFD, system noise temperature and other parameters, available both in VLBI and single-dish modes of operation. The system described has been installed on all IAA RAS radio telescopes at "Svetloe", "Zelenchukskaya" and "Badary" observatories. It has proved to be working quite reliably and to show the perfonmance expected.

  16. Wireless Remote Monitoring System for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing systems to collect temperature and relative humidity data at cultural heritage buildings require technical knowledge by people who are working with it, which is very seldom that they do have. The systems available today also require manual downloading of the collected data from the sensor to a computer for central storage and for further analysis. In this paper a wireless remote sensor network based on the ZigBee technology together with a simplified data collection system is presented. The system does not require any knowledge by the building administrator after the network is deployed. The wireless sensor device will automatically join available network when the user wants to expand the network. The collected data will be automatically and periodically synchronized to a remote main server via an Internet connection. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purpose. The power consumption of the sensor module is also minimized and the battery lifetime is estimated up to 10 years.

  17. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  18. In Quest of the Bottleneck - Monitoring Parallel Database Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Manegold (Stefan); F. Waas; D. Gudlat

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMonitoring query processing has proven to be an effective technique to detect bottlenecks in sequential query execution systems' components. Monitoring distributed execution in parallel systems, however, is a difficult task. The monitoring data of all nodes must be collected at the same

  19. Network-Oriented Radiation Monitoring System (NORMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; David F. Spencer

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a multi-functional pocket radiation monitoring system capable of detecting and storing gamma ray and neutron data and then sending the data through a wireless connection to a remote central facility upon request. The device has programmable alarm trigger levels that can be modified for specific applications. The device could be used as a stand-alone device or in conjunction with an array to cover a small or large area. The data is stored with a date/time stamp. The device may be remotely configured. Data can be transferred and viewed on a PDA via direct connection or wirelessly. Functional/bench tests have been completed successfully. The device detects low-level neutron and gamma sources within a shielded container in a radiation field of 10 uR/hr above the ambient background level.

  20. Achados vestibulares em usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Vestibular findings in hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Paulin

    2009-01-01

    patients, 18 (90% showed tinnitus complaint, 15 (75% dizziness complaint and eight (40% headache complaint; b There was a prevalence of alterations in the caloric test and in the peripheral vestibular system; c the results of the vestibular exam showed alterations in 14 patients (70% being, eight cases (40% of peripheral vestibular irritative syndromes and six cases (30% of peripheral vestibular deficiency syndromes; d we verified significant difference between the vestibular exam results and how long the patient had use the hearing aid; e from the five patients that did not related vestibular symptoms four (80% showed alterations in the vestibular exam. CONCLUSION: the importance and sensibility of the functional study regarding the balance system in this type of population must be emphasized because same disorders may occur in the vestibular exam in spite of symptom presence.