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Sample records for vessels variance imaging

  1. Broadband Minimum Variance Beamforming for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    A minimum variance (MV) approach for near-field beamforming of broadband data is proposed. The approach is implemented in the frequency domain, and it provides a set of adapted, complex apodization weights for each frequency subband. The performance of the proposed MV beamformer is tested on simu...

  2. Broadband minimum variance beamforming for ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-02-01

    A minimum variance (MV) approach for near-field beamforming of broadband data is proposed. The approach is implemented in the frequency domain, and it provides a set of adapted, complex apodization weights for each frequency subband. The performance of the proposed MV beamformer is tested on simulated data obtained using Field II. The method is validated using synthetic aperture data and data obtained from a plane wave emission. Data for 13 point targets and a circular cyst with a radius of 5 mm are simulated. The performance of the MV beamformer is compared with delay-and-sum (DS) using boxcar weights and Hanning weights and is quantified by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the peak-side-lobe level (PSL). Single emission {DS boxcar, DS Hanning, MV} provide a PSL of {-16, -36, -49} dB and a FWHM of {0.79, 1.33, 0.08} mm. Using all 128 emissions, {DS boxcar, DS Hanning, MV} provides a PSL of {-32, -49, -65} dB, and a FWHM of {0.63, 0.97, 0.08} mm. The contrast of the beamformed single emission responses of the circular cyst was calculated as {-18, -37, -40} dB. The simulations have shown that the frequency subband MV beamformer provides a significant increase in lateral resolution compared with DS, even when using considerably fewer emissions. An increase in resolution is seen when using only one single emission. Furthermore, the effect of steering vector errors is investigated. The steering vector errors are investigated by applying an error of the sound speed estimate to the ultrasound data. As the error increases, it is seen that the MV beamformer is not as robust compared with the DS beamformer with boxcar and Hanning weights. Nevertheless, it is noted that the DS does not outperform the MV beamformer. For errors of 2% and 4% of the correct value, the FWHM are {0.81, 1.25, 0.34} mm and {0.89, 1.44, 0.46} mm, respectively.

  3. Nonlinear retinal image enhancement for vessel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xudong

    2017-07-01

    Retinal vessel detection is an essential part of the computer-aided diagnosis of eye diseases. Due to non-perfect imaging environment, retinal images often appear with intensity variations and artificial noises. This work proposes a two-step nonlinear retinal image enhancement to compensate for those imperfections of retinal images. The first step reduces intensity fluctuations of the image and the second step attenuates impulsive noise while preserving retinal vessels. Classification on the feature vector extracted from the enhanced retinal images is performed by using a linear SVM classifier. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method of two-step nonlinear image enhancement visibly improves the vessel detection performance, achieving better accuracy than that without enhancement process on the both DRIVE and STARE databases.

  4. Vessel detection in ultrasound images using deep convolutional neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Smistad, Erik; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks have achieved great results on image classification problems. In this paper, a new method using a deep convolutional neural network for detecting blood vessels in B-mode ultrasound images is presented. Automatic blood vessel detection may be useful in medical applications such as deep venous thrombosis detection, anesthesia guidance and catheter placement. The proposed method is able to determine the position and size of the vessels in images in real-time. 1...

  5. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  6. Imaging of pediatric great vessel stents: Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. den Harder (Annemarie); D. Suchá (Dominika); R.W. van Hamersvelt (Robbert W.); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo); P.A. de Jong (Pim); A. Schilham (Arnold); C. Bos (Clemens); J.M.P.J. Breur (Johannes M.P.J.); I. Leiner (Tim)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Complications might occur after great vessel stent implantation in children. Therefore follow- up using imaging is warranted. __Purpose:__ To determine the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of stents used to treat great vessel obstructions in children.

  7. Roi Detection and Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaz, F.; Atila, U.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes disrupts work by affecting the structure of the eye and afterwards leads to loss of vision. Depending on the stage of disease that called diabetic retinopathy, there are sudden loss of vision and blurred vision problems. Automated detection of vessels in retinal images is a useful study to diagnose eye diseases, disease classification and other clinical trials. The shape and structure of the vessels give information about the severity of the disease and the stage of the disease. Automatic and fast detection of vessels allows for a quick diagnosis of the disease and the treatment process to start shortly. ROI detection and vessel extraction methods for retinal image are mentioned in this study. It is shown that the Frangi filter used in image processing can be successfully used in detection and extraction of vessels.

  8. Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Fundus Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Oloumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of blood vessels in retinal fundus images is an important initial step in the development of systems for computer-aided diagnosis of pathologies of the eye. In this study, we perform multifeature analysis for the detection of blood vessels in retinal fundus images. The vessel detection techniques implemented include multiscale vesselness measures, Gabor filters, line operators, and matched filters. The selection of an appropriate threshold is crucial for accurate detection of retinal blood vessels. We evaluate an adaptive threshold selection method along with several others for this purpose. We also propose a postprocessing technique for removal of false-positive pixels around the optic nerve head. Values of the area under the receiver operating haracteristic curve of up to $0.961$ were obtained using the $20$ test images of the DRIVE database.

  9. Computer Analysis of Eye Blood-Vessel Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, R. J.; White, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    Technique rapidly diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Photographs of "whites" of patients' eyes scanned by computerized image analyzer programmed to quantify density of small blood vessels in conjuctiva. Comparison with data base of known normal and diabetic patients facilitates rapid diagnosis.

  10. Minimum Variance Beamforming for High Frame-Rate Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    emissions. An increase in resolution is seen when using only one single emission. Furthermore, it is seen that an increase of the number of emissions does not alter the FWHM. Thus, the MV beamformer introduces the possibility for high frame-rate imaging with increased resolution....

  11. Validation of the performance of a practical blood vessel imaging system to facilitate vessel punctures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Natascha J.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; de Roode, Rowland

    2009-02-01

    A practical system to visualize vessels underneath the skin has been developed, based on near-infrared (NIR) transillumination. A study in the clinical setting proved the system to be useful as a support in blood withdrawal in young children. During clinical application it was found that performance varied depending on vessel size, depth of vessels and surrounding lighting conditions. To gain more insight on the different variables that determine functioning of the system, we performed phantom studies. A combined liquid/solid phantom was fabricated with similar optical properties as the tissue layers of skin reported in literature at 850 nm. This phantom was used to estimate the depth of visibility in the relation to vessel size and darkness of the skin. Vessel contrast was determined analytically from images and evaluated by 3 independent observers. The knowledge gained from these experiments will be helpful to improve the imaging system and develop a solid phantom to be used as a gold standard to test the system under various clinical lighting conditions. The working range of the system was found to be appropriate to visualize the vessels used for the most procedures, such as blood withdrawal and placement of intravenous lines.

  12. Susceptibility-weighted imaging using inter-echo-variance channel combination for improved contrast at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Zahra; Liu, Junmin; Solovey, Igor; Menon, Ravi S; Drangova, Maria

    2017-04-01

    To implement and optimize a new approach for susceptibility-weighted image (SWI) generation from multi-echo multi-channel image data and compare its performance against optimized traditional SWI pipelines. Five healthy volunteers were imaged at 7 Tesla. The inter-echo-variance (IEV) channel combination, which uses the variance of the local frequency shift at multiple echo times as a weighting factor during channel combination, was used to calculate multi-echo local phase shift maps. Linear phase masks were combined with the magnitude to generate IEV-SWI. The performance of the IEV-SWI pipeline was compared with that of two accepted SWI pipelines-channel combination followed by (i) Homodyne filtering (HPH-SWI) and (ii) unwrapping and high-pass filtering (SVD-SWI). The filtering steps of each pipeline were optimized. Contrast-to-noise ratio was used as the comparison metric. Qualitative assessment of artifact and vessel conspicuity was performed and processing time of pipelines was evaluated. The optimized IEV-SWI pipeline (σ = 7 mm) resulted in continuous vessel visibility throughout the brain. IEV-SWI had significantly higher contrast compared with HPH-SWI and SVD-SWI (P IEV-SWI pipeline processed a six-echo 16-channel dataset in under 10 min. IEV-SWI benefits from channel-by-channel processing of phase data and results in high contrast images with an optimal balance between contrast and background noise removal, thereby presenting evidence of importance of the order in which postprocessing techniques are applied for multi-channel SWI generation. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1113-1124. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Prospects for discovering pulsars in future continuum surveys using variance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Johnston, S.; Hobbs, G.

    2017-12-01

    In our previous paper, we developed a formalism for computing variance images from standard, interferometric radio images containing time and frequency information. Variance imaging with future radio continuum surveys allows us to identify radio pulsars and serves as a complement to conventional pulsar searches that are most sensitive to strictly periodic signals. Here, we carry out simulations to predict the number of pulsars that we can uncover with variance imaging in future continuum surveys. We show that the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey can find ∼30 normal pulsars and ∼40 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) over and above the number known today, and similarly an all-sky continuum survey with SKA-MID can discover ∼140 normal pulsars and ∼110 MSPs with this technique. Variance imaging with EMU and SKA-MID will detect pulsars with large duty cycles and is therefore a potential tool for finding MSPs and pulsars in relativistic binary systems. Compared with current pulsar surveys at high Galactic latitudes in the Southern hemisphere, variance imaging with EMU and SKA-MID will be more sensitive, and will enable detection of pulsars with dispersion measures between ∼10 and 100 cm-3 pc.

  14. Novel Method for Vessel Cross-Sectional Shear Wave Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Li, Guo-Yang; Lee, Fu-Feng; Zhang, Qihao; Cao, Yanping; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-07-01

    Many studies have investigated the applications of shear wave imaging (SWI) to vascular elastography, mainly on the longitudinal section of vessels. It is important to investigate SWI in the arterial cross section when evaluating anisotropy of the vessel wall or complete plaque composition. Here, we proposed a novel method based on the coordinate transformation and directional filter in the polar coordinate system to achieve vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging. In particular, ultrasound radiofrequency data were transformed from the Cartesian to the polar coordinate system; the radial displacements were then estimated directly. Directional filtering was performed along the circumferential direction to filter out the reflected waves. The feasibility of the proposed vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging method was investigated through phantom experiments and ex vivo and in vivo studies. Our results indicated that the dispersion relation of the shear wave (i.e., the guided circumferential wave) within the vessel can be measured via the present method, and the elastic modulus of the vessel can be determined. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Time Reversal Migration for Passive Sources Using a Maximum Variance Imaging Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.

    2017-05-26

    The conventional time-reversal imaging approach for micro-seismic or passive source location is based on focusing the back-propagated wavefields from each recorded trace in a source image. It suffers from strong background noise and limited acquisition aperture, which may create unexpected artifacts and cause error in the source location. To overcome such a problem, we propose a new imaging condition for microseismic imaging, which is based on comparing the amplitude variance in certain windows, and use it to suppress the artifacts as well as find the right location for passive sources. Instead of simply searching for the maximum energy point in the back-propagated wavefield, we calculate the amplitude variances over a window moving in both space and time axis to create a highly resolved passive event image. The variance operation has negligible cost compared with the forward/backward modeling operations, which reveals that the maximum variance imaging condition is efficient and effective. We test our approach numerically on a simple three-layer model and on a piece of the Marmousi model as well, both of which have shown reasonably good results.

  16. Image registration error variance as a measure of overlay quality. [satellite data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgillem, C. D.; Svedlow, M.

    1976-01-01

    When one image (the signal) is to be registered with a second image (the signal plus noise) of the same scene, one would like to know the accuracy possible for this registration. This paper derives an estimate of the variance of the registration error that can be expected via two approaches. The solution in each instance is found to be a function of the effective bandwidth of the signal and the noise, and the signal-to-noise ratio. Application of these results to LANDSAT-1 data indicates that for most cases, registration variances will be significantly less than the diameter of one picture element.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of vessel wall morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröner, Eleanore Sophie Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    This thesis evaluates morphological and functional vessel wall properties measured by magnetic resonance imaging techniques in healthy volunteers and patients with various diseases (i.e. Marfan syndrome patients (MFS), patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm and patients with a previous myocardial

  18. Imaging of Small Vessels Using Photoacoustics: An In Vivo Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siphanto, Ronald I.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Huisjes, A.; Pilatou, M.H.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Adrichem, Leon N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objectives The ability to correctly visualize the architectural arrangement of microvasculature is valuable to many diverse fields in medicine. In this study, we applied photoacoustics (PA) to obtain high-resolution images of submillimeter blood vessels. - Study Design/Materials and

  19. Pattern Recognition Of Blood Vessel Networks In Ocular Fundus Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, K.; Kuga, H.

    1982-11-01

    We propose a computer method of recognizing blood vessel networks in color ocular fundus images which are used in the mass diagnosis of adult diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. A line detection algorithm is applied to extract the blood vessels, and the skeleton patterns of them are made to analyze and describe their structures. The recognition of line segments of arteries and/or veins in the vessel networks consists of three stages. First, a few segments which satisfy a certain constraint are picked up and discriminated as arteries or veins. This is the initial labeling. Then the remaining unknown ones are labeled by utilizing the physical level knowledge. We propose two schemes for this stage : a deterministic labeling and a probabilistic relaxation labeling. Finally the label of each line segment is checked so as to minimize the total number of labeling contradictions. Some experimental results are also presented.

  20. GPU-based minimum variance beamformer for synthetic aperture imaging of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2015-03-01

    Minimum variance (MV) beamforming has emerged as an adaptive apodization approach to bolster the quality of images generated from synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging methods that are based on unfocused transmission principles. In this article, we describe a new high-speed, pixel-based MV beamforming framework for synthetic aperture imaging to form entire frames of adaptively apodized images at real-time throughputs and document its performance in swine eye imaging case examples. Our framework is based on parallel computing principles, and its real-time operational feasibility was realized on a six-GPU (graphics processing unit) platform with 3,072 computing cores. This framework was used to form images with synthetic aperture imaging data acquired from swine eyes (based on virtual point-source emissions). Results indicate that MV-apodized image formation with video-range processing throughput (>20 fps) can be realized for practical aperture sizes (128 channels) and frames with λ/2 pixel spacing. Also, in a corneal wound detection experiment, MV-apodized images generated using our framework revealed apparent contrast enhancement of the wound site (10.8 dB with respect to synthetic aperture images formed with fixed apodization). These findings indicate that GPU-based MV beamforming can, in real time, potentially enhance image quality when performing synthetic aperture imaging that uses unfocused firings. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  2. An improved minimum variance beamforming applied to plane-wave imaging in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deylami, Ali Mohades; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Minimum variance beamformer (MVB) is an adaptive beamformer which provides images with higher resolution and contrast in comparison with non-adaptive beamformers like delay and sum (DAS). It finds weight vector of beamformer by minimizing output power while keeping the desired signal unchanged. We...... used the eigen-based MVB and generalized coherence factor (GCF) to further improve the quality of MVB beamformed images. The eigen-based MVB projects the weight vector with a transformation matrix constructed from eigen-decomposing of the array covariance matrix that increases resolution and contrast....... GCF is used to emphasis on coherence part of images that improves the resolution. Four different datasets provided by IUS 2016 beamforming challenge are used to evaluate the proposed method. In comparison with DAS with rectangular weight vector, our method improved contrast about 8.52 dB and 6.20 d...

  3. Estimating posterior image variance with sparsity-based object priors for MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujia; Lou, Yang; Eldeniz, Cihat; An, Hongyu; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    Point estimates, such as the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, are commonly computed in image re- construction tasks. However, such point estimates provide no information about the range of highly probable solutions, namely the uncertainty in the computed estimate. Bayesian inference methods that seek to compute the posterior probability distribution function (PDF) of the object can provide exactly this information, but are generally computationally intractable. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, which avoid explicit posterior computation by directly sampling from the PDF, require considerable expertise to run in a proper way. This work investigates a computationally efficient variational Bayesian inference approach for computing the posterior image variance with application to MRI. The methodology employs a sparse object prior model that is consistent with the model assumed in most sparse reconstruction methods. The posterior variance map generated by the proposed method provides valuable information that reveals how data-acquisition parameters and the specification of the object prior affect the reliability of a reconstructed MAP image. The proposed method is demonstrated by use of computer-simulated MRI data.

  4. Breast Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging: Semi-Automatic Detection of Vascular Map and Predominant Feeding Vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Vallone, Paolo; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Sansone, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To obtain breast vascular map and to assess correlation between predominant feeding vessel and tumor location with a semi-automatic method compared to conventional radiologic reading. 148 malignant and 75 benign breast lesions were included. All patients underwent bilateral MR imaging. Written informed consent was obtained from the patients before MRI. The local ethics committee granted approval for this study. Semi-automatic breast vascular map and predominant vessel detection was performed on MRI, for each patient. Semi-automatic detection (depending on grey levels threshold manually chosen by radiologist) was compared with results of two expert radiologists; inter-observer variability and reliability of semi-automatic approach were assessed. Anatomic analysis of breast lesions revealed that 20% of patients had masses in internal half, 50% in external half and the 30% in subareolar/central area. As regards the 44 tumors in internal half, based on radiologic consensus, 40 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (61% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 14% by lateral thoracic vessels, 16% by both thoracic vessels and 9% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (66% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 11% by lateral thoracic vessels, 9% by both thoracic vessels and 14% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (25% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 39% by lateral thoracic vessels, 18% by both thoracic vessels and 18% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (27% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 45% by lateral thoracic vessels, 4% by both thoracic vessels and 24% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel. An excellent reliability for semi-automatic assessment (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96) was reported. Predominant feeding vessel location was correlated with breast lesion location: internal thoracic artery supplied the highest proportion of breasts with tumor in internal half and lateral thoracic

  5. IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF IN VIVOBLOOD VESSELS USING IMAGE FUSION METHODS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Sørensen, Anders Stengaard

    2009-01-01

    of their capability of enhancing the blood vessels while preserving the spectral signature of the original color image. Furthermore, we investigate a possibility of removing hair in the images using a fusion rule based on the "a trous" stationary wavelet decomposition. The method with the best overall performance...... with both speed and quality in mind is the Intensity Injection method. Using the developed system and the methods presented in this article, it is possible to create images of high visual quality with highly emphasized blood vessels....

  6. Color filter array pattern identification using variance of color difference image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Jun; Jeon, Jong Ju; Eom, Il Kyu

    2017-07-01

    A color filter array is placed on the image sensor of a digital camera to acquire color images. Each pixel uses only one color, since the image sensor can measure only one color per pixel. Therefore, empty pixels are filled using an interpolation process called demosaicing. The original and the interpolated pixels have different statistical characteristics. If the image is modified by manipulation or forgery, the color filter array pattern is altered. This pattern change can be a clue for image forgery detection. However, most forgery detection algorithms have the disadvantage of assuming the color filter array pattern. We present an identification method of the color filter array pattern. Initially, the local mean is eliminated to remove the background effect. Subsequently, the color difference block is constructed to emphasize the difference between the original pixel and the interpolated pixel. The variance measure of the color difference image is proposed as a means of estimating the color filter array configuration. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective in identifying the color filter array pattern. Compared with conventional methods, our method provides superior performance.

  7. Medical image of the week: athersclerotic aneurysm of great vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffer F

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 60 year-old man with a 33 pack-year history of tobacco abuse, presented with difficulty speaking and voice change for several weeks. His review of systems was positive for fatigue, night sweats and weight loss. Physical exam of the oropharynx with flexible laryngoscopy demonstrated immobile bilateral true and false vocal cords fixed in the para-median position without laryngeal lesions. Concern for intra-thoracic process with recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement, a computed tomography (CT of the chest and thoracic vessels demonstrated unusual appearing arteries with multiple penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers versus saccular aneurysms scattered throughout the aorta and its major branches (Figures 1 and 2. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with contrast, demonstrated multiple foci of saccular outpouchings involving the arch vessels distal to their origins with the largest dilatation measuring 26 x 25 mm in the case of proximal innominate (Figure 3. Although imaging lacked resolution, it was specialist opinion that the ...

  8. Proximal Bright Vessel Sign on Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayumi; Shinohara, Yuki; Kuya, Keita; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kowa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-07-01

    The congestion of spin-labeled blood at large-vessel occlusion can present as hyperintense signals on perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (proximal bright vessel sign). The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference between proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign in acute cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Forty-two patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation territory underwent magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging, 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, T2*-weighted imaging, and 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. Visual assessments of proximal bright vessel sign and the susceptibility vessel sign were performed by consensus of 2 experienced neuroradiologists. The relationship between these signs and the occlusion site of magnetic resonance angiography was also investigated. Among 42 patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction, 24 patients showed proximal bright vessel sign (57.1%) and 25 showed susceptibility vessel sign (59.5%). There were 19 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-clear, 12 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear, and 11 mismatched cases. Four out of 6 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-unclear and susceptibility vessel sign-clear showed distal middle cerebral artery occlusion, and 2 out of 5 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-clear and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear showed no occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography. Proximal bright vessel sign is almost compatible with susceptibility vessel sign in patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sparse Array Imaging of Change-Detected Ultrasonic Signals by Minimum Variance Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, J. E.; Hall, J. S.; Hickman, G.; Krolik, J.

    2009-03-01

    Spatially distributed arrays of permanently attached ultrasonic sensors are being considered for structural health monitoring systems. Most algorithms for analyzing the received signals are based upon change detection whereby baselines from the undamaged structure are subtracted from current signals of interest, and the residual signals are analyzed. In particular, delay-and-sum algorithms applied to the residual signals have been shown to be effective for imaging damage in plate-like structures that support propagation of guided waves. Here we consider minimum variance processing of the residual signals, which is an adaptive beamforming method in common use for processing of radar signals where the weights are adjusted at each pixel location prior to summation based upon actual and expected signal amplitudes. Experimental results from a sparse sensor array show that this processing method can provide a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio by suppressing unwanted sidelobes in the image.

  10. Cerebral vessels segmentation for light-sheet microscopy image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoen; Hui, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Di; Liu, Xia; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is an important step in image analysis for brain function and brain disease studies. To extract all the cerebrovascular patterns, including arteries and capillaries, some filter-based methods are used to segment vessels. However, the design of accurate and robust vessel segmentation algorithms is still challenging, due to the variety and complexity of images, especially in cerebral blood vessel segmentation. In this work, we addressed a problem of automatic and robust segmentation of cerebral micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images acquired by light-sheet microscope for mouse. To segment micro-vessels in large-scale image data, we proposed a convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architecture trained by 1.58 million pixels with manual label. Three convolutional layers and one fully connected layer were used in the CNNs model. We extracted a patch of size 32x32 pixels in each acquired brain vessel image as training data set to feed into CNNs for classification. This network was trained to output the probability that the center pixel of input patch belongs to vessel structures. To build the CNNs architecture, a series of mouse brain vascular images acquired from a commercial light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) system were used for training the model. The experimental results demonstrated that our approach is a promising method for effectively segmenting micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images with vessel-dense, nonuniform gray-level and long-scale contrast regions.

  11. Multi-line transmission combined with minimum variance beamforming in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Adi; Feuer, Arie; Friedman, Zvi

    2015-05-01

    Increasing medical ultrasound imaging frame rate is important in several applications such as cardiac diagnostic imaging, where it is desirable to be able to examine the temporal behavior of fast phases in the cardiac cycle. This is particularly true in 3-D imaging, where current frame rate is still much slower than standard 2-D, B-mode imaging. Recently, a method that increases frame rate, labeled multi-line transmission (MLT), was reintroduced and analyzed. In MLT scanning, the transmission is simultaneously focused at several directions. This scan mode introduces artifacts that stem from the overlaps of the receive main lobe with the transmit side lobes of additional transmit directions besides the one of interest. Similar overlaps occur between the transmit main lobe with receive side lobes. These artifacts are known in the signal processing community as cross-talk. Previous studies have concentrated on proper transmit and receive apodization, as well as transmit directions arrangement in the transmit event, to reduce the cross-talk artifacts. This study examines the possibility of using adaptive beamforming, specifically, minimum variance (MV) and linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamforming, to reduce the cross-talk artifacts, and maintain or even improve image quality characteristics. Simulation results, as well as experimental phantom and in vivo cardiac data, demonstrate the feasibility of reducing cross-talk artifacts with MV beamforming. The MV and LCMV results achieve superior spatial resolution, not only over other MLT methods with data-independent apodization, but even over that of single-line transmission (SLT) without receive apodization. The MV beamformer is shown to be less sensitive to wider transmit profiles required to reduce the transmit crosstalk artifacts. MV beamforming, combined with the wider transmit profiles, can provide a good approach for MLT scanning with reduced cross-talk artifacts, without compromising spatial

  12. Outlier detection for particle image velocimetry data using a locally estimated noise variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Yang, Hua; Yin, ZhouPing

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an adaptive spatial variable threshold outlier detection algorithm for raw gridded particle image velocimetry data using a locally estimated noise variance. This method is an iterative procedure, and each iteration is composed of a reference vector field reconstruction step and an outlier detection step. We construct the reference vector field using a weighted adaptive smoothing method (Garcia 2010 Comput. Stat. Data Anal. 54 1167-78), and the weights are determined in the outlier detection step using a modified outlier detector (Ma et al 2014 IEEE Trans. Image Process. 23 1706-21). A hard decision on the final weights of the iteration can produce outlier labels of the field. The technical contribution is that the spatial variable threshold motivation is embedded in the modified outlier detector with a locally estimated noise variance in an iterative framework for the first time. It turns out that a spatial variable threshold is preferable to a single spatial constant threshold in complicated flows such as vortex flows or turbulent flows. Synthetic cellular vortical flows with simulated scattered or clustered outliers are adopted to evaluate the performance of our proposed method in comparison with popular validation approaches. This method also turns out to be beneficial in a real PIV measurement of turbulent flow. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method yields the competitive performance in terms of outlier under-detection count and over-detection count. In addition, the outlier detection method is computational efficient and adaptive, requires no user-defined parameters, and corresponding implementations are also provided in supplementary materials.

  13. Vessel involvement in giant cell arteritis : an imaging approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Pieter W.; Sandovici, Maria; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Rutgers, Abraham; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    Vasculitis is classified based on the size of the involved vessels. The two major forms are small vessel vasculitis and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Main forms of LVV are Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis (GCA), isolated aortitis and chronic periaortitis. This manuscript will focus on GCA,

  14. Segmentation of hepatic vessels from MRI images for planning of electroporation-based treatments in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcan, Marija; Pavliha, Denis; Music, Maja Marolt; Fuckan, Igor; Magjarevic, Ratko; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-09-01

    Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses delivered to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered by the sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient geometry. For the purpose of reconstruction of hepatic vessels from MRI images we searched for an optimal segmentation method that would meet the following initial criteria: identify major hepatic vessels, be robust and work with minimal user input. We tested the approaches based on vessel enhancement filtering, thresholding, and their combination in local thresholding. The methods were evaluated on a phantom and clinical data. Results show that thresholding based on variance minimization provides less error than the one based on entropy maximization. Best results were achieved by performing local thresholding of the original de-biased image in the regions of interest which were determined through previous vessel-enhancement filtering. In evaluation on clinical cases the proposed method scored in average sensitivity of 93.68%, average symmetric surface distance of 0.89 mm and Hausdorff distance of 4.04 mm. The proposed method to segment hepatic vessels from MRI images based on local thresholding meets all the initial criteria set at the beginning of the study and necessary to be used in treatment planning of electroporation-based treatments: it identifies the major vessels, provides results with consistent accuracy and works completely automatically. Whether the achieved accuracy is acceptable or not for treatment planning models remains to be verified through numerical modeling of effects of the segmentation error on the distribution of the electric field.

  15. High-low reflectivity enhancement based retinal vessel projection for SD-OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Niu, Sijie; Yuan, Songtao; Fan, Wen; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-10-01

    The retinal vessel visualization from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images is important for ocular disease diagnosis and multimodal retinal image processing. The purpose is to display the retinal vessel in a single projection image from 3D SD-OCT images by using the light absorption and shadow characteristics of the retinal vessel. The authors present a novel retinal vessel projection method for SD-OCT images, which utilizes the light absorption and shadow characteristics of the retinal vessel, called high-low reflectivity enhancement (HLRE) method. The reflectivity of the retinal vessel increases between the internal limiting membrane and inner nuclear layer-outer plexiform layer (INL-OPL) layers because of the light absorption, and the reflectivity below the retinal vessel decreases because of the influence of the retinal vessel shadow. A retinal vessel mask image generated based on the reflectivity characteristics of the retinal vessel is used to enhance the subvolume projection image restricted between the INL-OPL and Bruch's membrane layers. Experimental results with 22 SD-OCT cubes from 12 patients and 10 normal persons demonstrate that the authors' method is more effective in displaying the retinal vessel than the summed-voxel projection and other five region restriction based projection methods. The average of the mean difference between the retinal vessel and background regions based on their HLRE method is 0.1921. The proposed HLRE method was more effective for the visualization of the retinal vessels than the state-of-art methods because it provides higher contrast and distinction.

  16. Biomechanical deformable image registration of longitudinal lung CT images using vessel information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazoulat, Guillaume; Owen, Dawn; Matuszak, Martha M; Balter, James M; Brock, Kristy K

    2016-07-07

    Spatial correlation of lung tissue across longitudinal images, as the patient responds to treatment, is a critical step in adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this work is to expand a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm (Morfeus) to achieve accurate registration in the presence of significant anatomical changes. Six lung cancer patients previously treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Exhale CT scans were obtained at treatment planning and following three weeks of treatment. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the follow-up CT using Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm. To model the complex response of the lung, an extension to Morfeus has been developed: an initial deformation was estimated with Morfeus consisting of boundary conditions on the chest wall and incorporating a sliding interface with the lungs. It was hypothesized that the addition of boundary conditions based on vessel tree matching would provide a robust reduction of the residual registration error. To achieve this, the vessel trees were segmented on the two images by thresholding a vesselness image based on the Hessian matrix's eigenvalues. For each point on the reference vessel tree centerline, the displacement vector was estimated by applying a variant of the Demons registration algorithm between the planning CT and the deformed follow-up CT. An expert independently identified corresponding landmarks well distributed in the lung to compute target registration errors (TRE). The TRE was: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mm after rigid registration, Morfeus and Morfeus with boundary conditions on the vessel tree, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of boundary conditions on the vessels significantly improved the accuracy in modeling the response of the lung and tumor over the course of radiotherapy. Minimizing and modeling these geometrical

  17. Image Segmentation Based on Constrained Spectral Variance Difference and Edge Penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation, which is usually the first step in object-based image analysis (OBIA, greatly influences the quality of final OBIA results. In many existing multi-scale segmentation algorithms, a common problem is that under-segmentation and over-segmentation always coexist at any scale. To address this issue, we propose a new method that integrates the newly developed constrained spectral variance difference (CSVD and the edge penalty (EP. First, initial segments are produced by a fast scan. Second, the generated segments are merged via a global mutual best-fitting strategy using the CSVD and EP as merging criteria. Finally, very small objects are merged with their nearest neighbors to eliminate the remaining noise. A series of experiments based on three sets of remote sensing images, each with different spatial resolutions, were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Both visual and quantitative assessments were performed, and the results show that large objects were better preserved as integral entities while small objects were also still effectively delineated. The results were also found to be superior to those from eCongnition’s multi-scale segmentation.

  18. Phase variance optical coherence microscopy for label-free imaging of the developing vasculature in zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Trinh, Le A.; Fingler, Jeff; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-12-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to image blood flow in the microvasculature of zebrafish embryos, without the use of exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2.8 μm in tissue and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Images of 2 to 5 days postfertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed anatomical structure based on OCM intensity contrast. Phase variance contrast offered visualization of blood flow in the arteries, veins, and capillaries. The pvOCM images of the vasculature were confirmed by direct comparisons with fluorescence microscopy images of transgenic embryos in which the vascular endothelium is labeled with green fluorescent protein. The ability of pvOCM to capture activities of regional blood flow permits it to reveal functional information that is of great utility for the study of vascular development.

  19. Lung vessel segmentation in CT images using graph-cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiwei; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate lung vessel segmentation is an important operation for lung CT analysis. Filters that are based on analyzing the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix are popular for pulmonary vessel enhancement. However, due to their low response at vessel bifurcations and vessel boundaries, extracting lung vessels by thresholding the vesselness is not sufficiently accurate. Some methods turn to graph-cuts for more accurate segmentation, as it incorporates neighbourhood information. In this work, we propose a new graph-cuts cost function combining appearance and shape, where CT intensity represents appearance and vesselness from a Hessian-based filter represents shape. Due to the amount of voxels in high resolution CT scans, the memory requirement and time consumption for building a graph structure is very high. In order to make the graph representation computationally tractable, those voxels that are considered clearly background are removed from the graph nodes, using a threshold on the vesselness map. The graph structure is then established based on the remaining voxel nodes, source/sink nodes and the neighbourhood relationship of the remaining voxels. Vessels are segmented by minimizing the energy cost function with the graph-cuts optimization framework. We optimized the parameters used in the graph-cuts cost function and evaluated the proposed method with two manually labeled sub-volumes. For independent evaluation, we used 20 CT scans of the VESSEL12 challenge. The evaluation results of the sub-volume data show that the proposed method produced a more accurate vessel segmentation compared to the previous methods, with F1 score 0.76 and 0.69. In the VESSEL12 data-set, our method obtained a competitive performance with an area under the ROC curve of 0.975, especially among the binary submissions.

  20. An in situ optical imaging system for measuring lipid uptake, vessel contraction, and lymph flow in small animal lymphatic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Timothy; Weiler, Michael J.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    All dietary lipids are transported to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the underlying mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Understanding how the lymphatics functionally respond to changes in lipid load is important in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid and lymphatic related diseases such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and lymphedema. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. A custom-built optical set-up provides us with the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. This is achieved by dividing the light path into two optical bands. Utilizing high-speed and back-illuminated CCD cameras and post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we have the potential quantify correlations between vessel contraction, lymph flow and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. Local flow velocity is measured through lymphocyte tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel walls and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid analogue, Bodipy FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for both scientists studying lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatic system with orally delivered drugs.

  1. Detection of Blood Vessels in Color Fundus Images using a Local Radon Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourreza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper addresses a method for automatic detection of blood vessels in color fundus images which utilizes two main tools: image partitioning and local Radon transform. Material and Methods: The input images are firstly divided into overlapping windows and then the Radon transform is applied to each. The maximum of the Radon transform in each window corresponds to the probable available sub-vessel. To verify the detected sub-vessel, the maximum is compared with a predefined threshold. The verified sub-vessels are reconstructed using the Radon transform information. All detected and reconstructed sub-vessels are finally combined to make the final vessel tree. Results: The algorithm’s performance was evaluated numerically by applying it to 40 images of DRIVE database, a standard retinal image database. The vessels were extracted manually by two physicians. This database was used to test and compare the available and proposed algorithms for vessel detection in color fundus images. By comparing the output of the algorithm with the manual results, the two parameters TPR and FPR were calculated for each image and the average of TPRs and FPRs were used to plot the ROC curve. Discussion and Conclusion: Comparison of the ROC curve of this algorithm with other algorithms demonstrated the high achieved accuracy. Beside the high accuracy, the Radon transform which is integral-based makes the algorithm robust against noise.

  2. Robust vessel detection and segmentation in ultrasound images by a data-driven approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xiaotao; Hao, Zhihui; Xu, Kuanhong; Ren, Haibing; Kim, Jung Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a learning based vessel detection and segmentation method in real-patient ultrasound (US) liver images. We aim at detecting multiple shaped vessels robustly and automatically, including vessels with weak and ambiguous boundaries. Firstly, vessel candidate regions are detected by a data-driven approach. Multi-channel vessel enhancement maps with complement performances are generated and aggregated under a Conditional Random Field (CRF) framework. Vessel candidates are obtained by thresholding the saliency map. Secondly, regional features are extracted and the probability of each region being a vessel is modeled by random forest regression. Finally, a fast levelset method is developed to refine vessel boundaries. Experiments have been carried out on an US liver dataset with 98 patients. The dataset contains both normal and abnormal liver images. The proposed method in this paper is compared with a traditional Hessian based method, and the average precision is promoted by 56 percents and 7.8 percents for vessel detection and classification, respectively. This improvement shows that our method is more robust to noise, therefore has a better performance than the Hessian based method for the detection of vessels with weak and ambiguous boundaries.

  3. Vessel packaging effect in laser speckle contrast imaging and laser Doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Laser speckle-based techniques are frequently used to assess microcirculatory blood flow. Perfusion estimates are calculated either by analyzing the speckle fluctuations over time as in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), or by analyzing the speckle contrast as in laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). The perfusion estimates depend on the amount of blood and its speed distribution. However, the perfusion estimates are commonly given in arbitrary units as they are nonlinear and depend on the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the optical properties in the tissue under investigation. We describe how the spatial confinement of blood to vessels, called the vessel packaging effect, can be modeled in LDF and LSCI, which affect the Doppler power spectra and speckle contrast, and the underlying bio-optical mechanisms for these effects. As an example, the perfusion estimate is reduced by 25% for LDF and often more than 50% for LSCI when blood is located in vessels with an average diameter of 40 μm, instead of being homogeneously distributed within the tissue. This significant effect can be compensated for only with knowledge of the average diameter of the vessels in the tissue.

  4. Fourier cross-sectional profile for vessel detection on retinal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao

    2010-04-01

    Retinal blood vessels are important objects in ophthalmologic images. In spite of many attempts for vessel detection, it appears that existing methodologies are based on edge detection or modeling of vessel cross-sectional profiles in intensity. The application of these methodologies is hampered by the presence of a wide range of retinal vessels. In this paper we define a universal representation for upward and downward vessel cross-sectional profiles with varying boundary sharpness. This expression is used to define a new scheme of vessel detection based on symmetry and asymmetry in the Fourier domain. Phase congruency is utilized for measuring symmetry and asymmetry so that our scheme is invariant to vessel brightness variations. We have performed experiments on fluorescein images and color fundus images to show the efficiency of the proposed algorithm technique. We also have performed a width measurement study, using an optimal medial axis skeletonization scheme as a post-processing step, to compare the technique with the generalized Gaussian profile modeling. The new algorithm technique is promising for automated vessel detection where optimizing profile models is difficult and preserving vessel width information is necessary. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of approaches for microscopic imaging of skin lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Yu, Zheyuan; Liu, Ningfei

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of skin lymphatic vessels is of great significance in understanding their roles in many pathological conditions. Our aim was to identify the optimal approach for investigation of cutaneous lymphatic system. We performed comparative studies on skin lymphatic vessels using immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, computer graphic reconstruction method together with immunohistochemically stained serial sections and whole mount fluorescence in human lower limb. Lymphatic vessels were identified with podoplanin antibody. The relative merits and drawbacks of each method in evaluation of structure, spatial organization, and distribution of cutaneous lymphatic vessels were described. Immunohistology of tissue sections enabled the investigation of the structure and distribution of the whole cutaneous lymphatic system in two-dimensional slices, whereas three-dimensional morphology of only the most superficial lymph capillary network immediately under the epidermis could be evaluated with the whole mount technique. Meanwhile, only little segmentation of skin lymphatic vessel from five immunohistochemically stained serial sections was reconstructed and evaluated due to expense and special skills required using computer graphic three-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, a great number of artifacts and special skills required in its processes leaded to less accurate structure of skin lymphatic vessels. Our findings demonstrated that the use of either of the proposed techniques alone could not allow a comprehensive analysis of the skin lymphatic system due to their relative drawbacks. Combination of immunohistology of tissue sections and three-dimensional whole-mount preparations appears to be the best candidate for comprehensive evaluation of skin lymphatic system. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Quantitative Flow Imaging in Human Umbilical Vessels In Utero Using Nongated 2D Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Uday; Yadav, Brijesh K; Jella, Pavan K; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Mody, Swati; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto; Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    2017-12-23

    Volumetric assessment of afferent blood flow rate provides a measure of global organ perfusion. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) is a reliable tool for volumetric flow quantification, but given the challenges with motion and lack of physiologic gating signal, such studies, in vivo on the human placenta, are scant. To evaluate and apply a nongated (ng) PCMRI technique for quantifying blood flow rates in utero in umbilical vessels. Prospective study design. Twenty-four pregnant women with median gestational age (GA) 30 4/7 weeks and interquartile range (IQR) 8 1/7 weeks. All scans were performed on a 3.0T Siemens Verio system using the ng-PCMRI technique. The GA-dependent increase in umbilical vein (UV) and arterial (UA) flow was compared to previously published values. Systematic error to be expected from ng-PCMRI, in the context of pulsatile UA flow and partial voluming, was studied through Monte-Carlo simulations, as a function of resolution and number of averages. Correlation between the UA and UV was evaluated using a generalized linear model. Simulations showed that ng-PCMRI measurement variance reduced by increasing the number of averages. For vessels on the order of 2 voxels in radius, partial voluming led to 10% underestimation in the flow. In fetuses, the average flow rates in UAs and UV were measured to be 203 ± 80 ml/min and 232 ± 92 ml/min and the normalized average flow rates were 140 ± 59 ml/min/kg and 155 ± 57 ml/min/kg, respectively. Excellent correlation was found between the total arterial flow vs. corresponding venous flow, with a slope of 1.08 (P = 0.036). Ng-PCMRI can provide accurate volumetric flow measurements in utero in the human umbilical vessels. Care needs to be taken to ensure sufficiently high-resolution data are acquired to minimize partial voluming-related errors. 2 Technical Efficacy Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of water ascent in embolized xylem vessels of grapevine stem segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingtao Wang; Melvin T. Tyree; Roderick E. Wasylishen

    2013-01-01

    Temporal and spatial information about water refilling of embolized xylem vessels and the rate of water ascent in these vessels is critical for understanding embolism repair in intact living vascular plants. High-resolution 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments have been performed on embolized grapevine stem segments while they were...

  8. Timing-Invariant Imaging of Collateral Vessels in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.J.; Vonken, E.J.; Seeters, T. van; Dankbaar, J.W.; Schaaf, I.C. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Ginneken, B. van; Velthuis, B.K.; Prokop, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although collateral vessels have been shown to be an important prognostic factor in acute ischemic stroke, patients with lack of collaterals on standard imaging techniques may still have good clinical outcome. We postulate that in these cases collateral vessels are present

  9. Feasibility of speckle variance OCT for imaging cutaneous microvasculature regeneration during healing of wounds in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Kumawat, J.; Kumar, S.; Sahu, K.; Verma, Y.; Gupta, P. K.; Rao, K. D.

    2018-02-01

    We report on a study to assess the feasibility of a swept source-based speckle variance optical coherence tomography setup for monitoring cutaneous microvasculature. Punch wounds created in the ear pinnae of diabetic mice were monitored at different times post wounding to assess the structural and vascular changes. It was observed that the epithelium thickness increases post wounding and continues to be thick even after healing. Also, the wound size assessed by vascular images is larger than the physical wound size. The results show that the developed speckle variance optical coherence tomography system can be used to monitor vascular regeneration during wound healing in diabetic mice.

  10. Multiplane magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and major vessels: studies in normal volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.B.; Stark, D.; McNamara, M.; Lanzer, P.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging for defining anatomy of internal cardiac structures and major blood vessels was assessed in 14 normal subjects. Both electrocardiogram-gated and standard spin-echo images were obtained. Gated images provided better visualization of internal cardiac morphology and of upper mediastinal vessels than did nongated images. Trabecular detail and components of the mitral valve could be resolved. All segments of the left ventricular wall could be evaluated by combining axial, coronal, and sagittal images. Gated acquisition of magnetic resonance images did not increase imaging time; five transverse slices of the left ventricle were obtained in 6.0-8.5 min. The good image quality, ease of gated acquisition, large field of view, capability of direct imaging in multiple planes, and noninvasiveness of the technique suggest that it will be an important imaging method in cardiovascular disease.

  11. Grading vascularity from histopathological images based on traveling salesman distance and vessel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Hemminger, Jessica; Kurt, Habibe; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin

    2014-03-01

    Vascularity represents an important element of tissue/tumor microenvironment and is implicated in tumor growth, metastatic potential and resistence to therapy. Small blood vessels can be visualized using immunohistochemical stains specific to vascular cells. However, currently used manual methods to assess vascular density are poorly reproducible and are at best semi quantitative. Computer based quantitative and objective methods to measure microvessel density are urgently needed to better understand and clinically utilize microvascular density information. We propose a new method to quantify vascularity from images of bone marrow biopsies stained for CD34 vascular lining cells protein as a model. The method starts by automatically segmenting the blood vessels by methods of maxlink thresholding and minimum graph cuts. The segmentation is followed by morphological post-processing to reduce blast and small spurious objects from the bone marrow images. To classify the images into one of the four grades, we extracted 20 features from the segmented blood vessel images. These features include first four moments of the distribution of the area of blood vessels, first four moments of the distribution of 1) the edge weights in the minimum spanning tree of the blood vessels, 2) the shortest distance between blood vessels, 3) the homogeneity of the shortest distance (absolute difference in distance between consecutive blood vessels along the shortest path) between blood vessels and 5) blood vessel orientation. The method was tested on 26 bone marrow biopsy images stained with CD34 IHC stain, which were evaluated by three pathologists. The pathologists took part in this study by quantifying blood vessel density using gestalt assessment in hematopoietic bone marrow portions of bone marrow core biopsies images. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was graded twice by each pathologist with two-week interval in between their readings. For each image, the ground

  12. Label-Free In Vivo Imaging of Corneal Lymphatic Vessels Using Microscopic Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Jens; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Bock, Felix; Siebelmann, Sebastian; Lankenau, Eva; Hüttmann, Gereon; Steven, Philipp; Cursiefen, Claus

    2017-11-01

    Corneal neovascularization, in particular lymphangiogenesis, is a limiting factor in corneal transplant survival. Novel treatment approaches focus on (selective) inhibition and regression of lymphatic vessels. Imaging clinically invisible corneal lymphatic vessels is a prerequisite for these strategies. Using a murine model, this study investigates whether corneal lymphatic vessels can be imaged using microscopic optical coherence tomography (mOCT). Corneal neovascularization was induced by intrastromal placement of 11.0 nylon sutures in one eye of BALB/c mice. After 2 weeks, cross-sectional images and volumes of the corneas with a 0.5 mm lateral and axial field of view were acquired using a custom-built mOCT system enabling a resolution of 1 μm at a B-scan rate of 165/s. Three of the six animals received an additional intrastromal injection of India ink 24 hours before the measurement to stain the corneal lymphatic system in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using CD31 and LYVE-1 was used to validate the mOCT findings. Using mOCT, lymphatic vessels were visible as dark vessel-like structures with the lumen lacking a hyperreflective wall and mostly lacking cells. However, individual, slowly moving particles, which most likely are immune cells, occasionally could be observed inside the lumen. In lymphatic vessels of ink-stained corneas, hyperreflection and shadowing underneath was observed. Ink-filled lymphatic vessels were colocalized in consecutive corneal flat mounts of the same specimen. Corneal lymphatic vessels can be imaged using mOCT. This novel approach opens new options for noninvasive clinical imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels for diagnostic and therapeutic indications.

  13. MR evaluation of vessel size imaging of human gliomas: Validation by histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elias; Breyer, Tobias; Gall, Peter; Müller, Klaus; Trippel, Michael; Staszewski, Ori; Stein, Florian; Saborowski, Olaf; Dyakova, Olga; Urbach, Horst; Kiselev, Valerij G; Mader, Irina

    2015-10-01

    To compare the vessel size and the cerebral blood volume in human gliomas with histopathology. Vessel size imaging (VSI) is a dynamic susceptibility contrast method for the assessment of the vessel size in normal and pathological tissue. Previous publications in rodents showed a satisfactory conformity with the vessel size derived from histopathology. To assess the clinical value, further, the progression-free interval was determined and correlated. Twenty-five gliomas (WHO grade °II [n = 10], °III [n = 3], °IV [n = 12]) were prospectively included and received a stereotaxic biopsy after VSI. The vessel size and the cerebral blood volume (CBV) were calculated in regions of interest at the tumor edge and correlated with the vessel size measured by histopathology. Both VSI and CBV showed a good correlation with the vessel size in histopathology (up to r = 0.84, P histopathology is in good accordance with the animal studies. The overestimation of small capillary sizes is also known from the animal trials. Vessel size and CBV showed similar results, both for the correlation with the histopathological vessel size and the progression-free interval. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and

  15. Ex-vivo imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels in conjunctiva using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Karnowski, Karol; Yu, Paula; An, Dong; Yu, Dao-Yi; Sampson, David D.

    2017-04-01

    Label-free imaging of the blood and lymphatic vessel networks of the conjunctiva of the eye is important in assessing the drainage pathways affected by glaucoma. We utilize the characteristically low signal in optical coherence tomography (OCT) provided by such vessels in ex vivo tissue to characterize their morphology in two and three dimensions. We demonstrate this method on conjunctiva from six porcine eyes, showing the ready visualization of both vessel networks. Such ex vivo characterization is a necessary precursor for future in vivo studies directed towards improving glaucoma surgery.

  16. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of kurtosis for locating deep blood vessels in raw speckle imaging using a homogeneity representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde; Perez-Corona, Elizabeth; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Chiu, Roger; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.

    2017-06-01

    Visualization of deep blood vessels in speckle images is an important task as it is used to analyze the dynamics of the blood flow and the health status of biological tissue. Laser speckle imaging is a wide-field optical technique to measure relative blood flow speed based on the local speckle contrast analysis. However, it has been reported that this technique is limited to certain deep blood vessels (about ρ=300 μm) because of the high scattering of the sample; beyond this depth, the quality of the vessel's image decreases. The use of a representation based on homogeneity values, computed from the co-occurrence matrix, is proposed as it provides an improved vessel definition and its corresponding diameter. Moreover, a methodology is proposed for automatic blood vessel location based on the kurtosis analysis. Results were obtained from the different skin phantoms, showing that it is possible to identify the vessel region for different morphologies, even up to 900 μm in depth.

  18. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J.; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  19. Comparative analysis of methods for extracting vessel network on breast MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaizer, Bence T.; Vassiou, Katerina G.; Lavdas, Eleftherios; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L.; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.; Glotsos, Dimitris T.

    2017-11-01

    Digital processing of MRI images aims to provide an automatized diagnostic evaluation of regular health screenings. Cancerous lesions are proven to cause an alteration in the vessel structure of the diseased organ. Currently there are several methods used for extraction of the vessel network in order to quantify its properties. In this work MRI images (Signa HDx 3.0T, GE Healthcare, courtesy of University Hospital of Larissa) of 30 female breasts were subjected to three different vessel extraction algorithms to determine the location of their vascular network. The first method is an experiment to build a graph over known points of the vessel network; the second algorithm aims to determine the direction and diameter of vessels at these points; the third approach is a seed growing algorithm, spreading selection to neighbors of the known vessel pixels. The possibilities shown by the different methods were analyzed, and quantitative measurements were performed. The data provided by these measurements showed no clear correlation with the presence or malignancy of tumors, based on the radiological diagnosis of skilled physicians.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of a small vessel hepatic hemangioma in a cirrhotic patient with histopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sara; Aljarallah, Badr; Trivedi, Anshu; Thung, Swan N

    2015-01-01

    The authors report and discuss a rare case of a small vessel hepatic hemangioma in a 59-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis, which was pre-procedurally characterized as indeterminate due to atypical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. This manuscript reviews the MRI features with pathologic correlation, emphasizes the importance of accurate characterization of liver lesions, and discusses the role of biopsy. We believe this is the first reported case of a small vessel hemangioma in liver cirrhosis with imaging and histopathologic correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Copy-move forgery detection through stationary wavelets and local binary pattern variance for forensic analysis in digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Toqeer; Irtaza, Aun; Mehmood, Zahid; Tariq Mahmood, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    The most common image tampering often for malicious purposes is to copy a region of the same image and paste to hide some other region. As both regions usually have same texture properties, therefore, this artifact is invisible for the viewers, and credibility of the image becomes questionable in proof centered applications. Hence, means are required to validate the integrity of the image and identify the tampered regions. Therefore, this study presents an efficient way of copy-move forgery detection (CMFD) through local binary pattern variance (LBPV) over the low approximation components of the stationary wavelets. CMFD technique presented in this paper is applied over the circular regions to address the possible post processing operations in a better way. The proposed technique is evaluated on CoMoFoD and Kodak lossless true color image (KLTCI) datasets in the presence of translation, flipping, blurring, rotation, scaling, color reduction, brightness change and multiple forged regions in an image. The evaluation reveals the prominence of the proposed technique compared to state of the arts. Consequently, the proposed technique can reliably be applied to detect the modified regions and the benefits can be obtained in journalism, law enforcement, judiciary, and other proof critical domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Automatic segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Machine Learning techniques have been useful in almost every field of concern. Data Mining, a branch of Machine Learning is one of the most extensively used techniques. The ever-increasing demands in the field of medicine are being addressed by computational approaches in which Big Data analysis, image ...

  3. Comparison of vessel enhancement algorithms applied to time-of-flight MRA images for cerebrovascular segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Forkert, Nils D

    2017-11-01

    Vessel enhancement algorithms are often used as a preprocessing step for vessel segmentation in medical images to improve the overall segmentation accuracy. Each algorithm uses different characteristics to enhance vessels, such that the most suitable algorithm may vary for different applications. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the accuracy gains in vessel segmentation generated by the use of nine vessel enhancement algorithms: Multiscale vesselness using the formulas described by Erdt (MSE), Frangi (MSF), and Sato (MSS), optimally oriented flux (OOF), ranking orientations responses path operator (RORPO), the regularized Perona-Malik approach (RPM), vessel enhanced diffusion (VED), hybrid diffusion with continuous switch (HDCS), and the white top hat algorithm (WTH). The filters were evaluated and compared based on time-of-flight MRA datasets and corresponding manual segmentations from 5 healthy subjects and 10 patients with an arteriovenous malformation. Additionally, five synthetic angiographic datasets with corresponding ground truth segmentation were generated with three different noise levels (low, medium, and high) and also used for comparison. The parameters for each algorithm and subsequent segmentation were optimized using leave-one-out cross evaluation. The Dice coefficient, Matthews correlation coefficient, area under the ROC curve, number of connected components, and true positives were used for comparison. The results of this study suggest that vessel enhancement algorithms do not always lead to more accurate segmentation results compared to segmenting nonenhanced images directly. Multiscale vesselness algorithms, such as MSE, MSF, and MSS proved to be robust to noise, while diffusion-based filters, such as RPM, VED, and HDCS ranked in the top of the list in scenarios with medium or no noise. Filters that assume tubular-shapes, such as MSE, MSF, MSS, OOF, RORPO, and VED show a decrease in accuracy when considering patients with an AVM

  4. Walled Carotid Bifurcation Phantoms for Imaging Investigations of Vessel Wall Motion and Blood Flow Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Ho, Chung Kit; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-18

    As a major application domain of vascular ultrasound, the carotid artery has long been the subject of anthropomorphic phantom design. It is nevertheless not trivial to develop walled carotid phantoms that are compatible for use in integrative imaging of carotid wall motion and flow dynamics. In this paper, we present a novel phantom design protocol that can enable efficient fabrication of walled carotid bifurcation phantoms with: (i) high acoustic compatibility, (ii) artery-like vessel elasticity, and (iii) stenotic narrowing feature. Our protocol first involved direct fabrication of the vessel core and an outer mold using computer-aided design tools and 3-D printing technology; these built parts were then used to construct an elastic vessel tube through investment casting of a polyvinyl alcohol containing mixture, and an agar-gelatin tissue mimicking slab was formed around the vessel tube. For demonstration, we applied our protocol to develop a set of healthy and stenosed (25%, 50%, 75%) carotid bifurcation phantoms. Plane wave imaging experiments were performed on these phantoms using an ultrasound scanner with channel-level configurability. Results show that the wall motion dynamics of our phantoms agreed with pulse wave propagation in an elastic vessel (pulse wave velocity of 4.67±0.71 m/s measured at the common carotid artery), and their flow dynamics matched the expected ones in healthy and stenosed bifurcation (recirculation and flow jet formation observed). Integrative imaging of vessel wall motion and blood flow dynamics in our phantoms was also demonstrated, from which we observed fluid-structure interaction differences between healthy and diseased bifurcation phantoms. These findings show that the walled bifurcation phantoms developed with our new protocol are useful in vascular imaging studies that individually or jointly assess wall motion and flow dynamics.

  5. Threshold segmentation algorithm for automatic extraction of cerebral vessels from brain magnetic resonance angiography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Li, Chao; Wang, Jie; Wei, Xiaoer; Li, Yuehua; Zhu, Yuemin; Zhang, Su

    2015-02-15

    Cerebrovascular segmentation plays an important role in medical diagnosis. This study was conducted to develop a threshold segmentation algorithm for automatic extraction and volumetric quantification of cerebral vessels on brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The MRA images of 10 individuals were acquired using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Intera-achieva SMI-2.1, Philips Medical Systems). Otsu's method was used to divide the brain MRA images into two parts, namely, foreground and background regions. To extract the cerebral vessels, we performed the threshold segmentation algorithm on the foreground region by comparing two different statistical distributions. Automatically segmented vessels were compared with manually segmented vessels. Different similarity metrics were used to assess the changes in segmentation performance as a function of a weighted parameter w used in segmentation algorithm. Varying w from 2 to 100 resulted in a false positive rate ranging from 117% to 3.21%, and a false negative rate ranging from 8.23% to 28.97%. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which reflected the segmentation accuracy, initially increased and then decreased as w increased. The suggested range of values for w is [10, 20] given that the maximum DSC (e.g., DSC=0.84) was obtained within this range. The performance of our method was validated by comparing with manual segmentation. The proposed threshold segmentation method can be used to accurately and efficiently extract cerebral vessels from brain MRA images. Threshold segmentation may be used for studies focusing on three-dimensional visualization and volumetric quantification of cerebral vessels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two

  7. Trainable COSFIRE filters for vessel delineation with application to retinal images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzopardi, G; Strisciuglio, N.; Vento, M.; Petkov, N.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal imaging provides a non-invasive opportunity for the diagnosis of several medical pathologies. The automatic segmentation of the vessel tree is an important pre-processing step which facilitates subsequent automatic processes that contribute to such diagnosis. We introduce a novel method for

  8. Image quality in intravenous digital subtraction angiography of renal vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Zanella, F.E.; Moedder, U.

    1984-07-01

    Visualisation of the renal arteries and image quality of intravenous DSA were evaluated in 62 patients. The left renal artery is visualized less well and overlying more frequently the right renal artery because of gas in the stomach and colon. IV DSA is not adequate for visualisation of the subsegmental arteries, and cannot be used for tumor angiography. It is not possible to prove that central venous injection technique is superior to peripheral venous injection. Patients must be carefully prepared as is necessary for the urogram. Examination is carried out using Buscopan and a compression device.

  9. Skeletonization algorithm-based blood vessel quantification using in vivo 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, K. M.; Nam, S. Y.; Chung, E.; Suggs, L. J.; Emelianov, S. Y.; Molinari, F.

    2016-11-01

    Blood vessels are the only system to provide nutrients and oxygen to every part of the body. Many diseases can have significant effects on blood vessel formation, so that the vascular network can be a cue to assess malicious tumor and ischemic tissues. Various imaging techniques can visualize blood vessel structure, but their applications are often constrained by either expensive costs, contrast agents, ionizing radiations, or a combination of the above. Photoacoustic imaging combines the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging, and image contrast depends on optical absorption. This enables the detection of light absorbing chromophores such as hemoglobin with a greater penetration depth compared to purely optical techniques. We present here a skeletonization algorithm for vessel architectural analysis using non-invasive photoacoustic 3D images acquired without the administration of any exogenous contrast agents. 3D photoacoustic images were acquired on rats (n  =  4) in two different time points: before and after a burn surgery. A skeletonization technique based on the application of a vesselness filter and medial axis extraction is proposed to extract the vessel structure from the image data and six vascular parameters (number of vascular trees (NT), vascular density (VD), number of branches (NB), 2D distance metric (DM), inflection count metric (ICM), and sum of angles metric (SOAM)) were calculated from the skeleton. The parameters were compared (1) in locations with and without the burn wound on the same day and (2) in the same anatomic location before (control) and after the burn surgery. Four out of the six descriptors were statistically different (VD, NB, DM, ICM, p  <  0.05) when comparing two anatomic locations on the same day and when considering the same anatomic location at two separate times (i.e. before and after burn surgery). The study demonstrates an

  10. Retina Image Vessel Segmentation Using a Hybrid CGLI Level Set Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a nonintrusive method, the retina imaging provides us with a better way for the diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases. Extracting the vessel profile automatically from the retina image is an important step in analyzing retina images. A novel hybrid active contour model is proposed to segment the fundus image automatically in this paper. It combines the signed pressure force function introduced by the Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (SBGFRLS model with the local intensity property introduced by the Local Binary fitting (LBF model to overcome the difficulty of the low contrast in segmentation process. It is more robust to the initial condition than the traditional methods and is easily implemented compared to the supervised vessel extraction methods. Proposed segmentation method was evaluated on two public datasets, DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction and STARE (Structured Analysis of the Retina (the average accuracy of 0.9390 with 0.7358 sensitivity and 0.9680 specificity on DRIVE datasets and average accuracy of 0.9409 with 0.7449 sensitivity and 0.9690 specificity on STARE datasets. The experimental results show that our method is effective and our method is also robust to some kinds of pathology images compared with the traditional level set methods.

  11. [Imaging Blood Flow and Pulsation of Retinal Vessels with Full-Field Swept-Source OCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, H; Hillmann, D; Hain, C; Pfäffle, C; Sudkamp, H; Franke, G; Koch, P; Hüttmann, G

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses interference to image the retina with high axial resolution. In the last 25 years, new technologies have permitted a steady increase in imaging speed, which made it possible to enlarge the imaged field and to avoid motion artefacts. The speed and precision of retinal imaging is now limited by photodamage of the retina caused by the focused OCT beam and by the speed of the scanning mechanics. Full-field swept-source (FF-SS)-OCT decreases irradiance on the retina and dispenses moving parts by using a camera to acquire the full volume of the retina in parallel. Here we show that FF-SS-OCT is rapid and precise enough to image pulsation in the retina induced by the heart beat. Series of OCT volumes 1.8 × 0.7 mm wide and 1.8 mm deep were recorded in young volunteers over a few cycles of the heart beat. Morphology of the retinal vessels, blood flow and tissue motion as caused by vessel pulsation were calculated from the OCT data. FF-SS-OCT was able to visualise the main structures of the neuronal retina, including vessels and small capillaries and without any motion artefacts. Information on three different dynamic processes was obtained from only one recorded series of OCT volumes: pulsation of blood flow and blood pressure in retinal vessels as well as pulsation of the choroid. Delays between arterial and venous pulse and delay between pulsation in retinal and choroidal vessels were calculated. With a time resolution of 0.5 ms, FF-SS-OCT is able to visualise previously unmeasurably fast changes in the retina, including the propagation of pulse waves. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Variance owing to observer, repeat imaging, and fundus camera type on cup-to-disc ratio estimates by stereo planimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young H; Adix, Michael; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Piette, Scott; Greenlee, Emily C; Alward, Wallace L M; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    To determine and compare variance components in linear cup-to-disc ratio (LCDR) estimates by computer-assisted planimetry by human experts, and automated machine algorithm (digital automated planimetry). Prospective case series for evaluation of planimetry. Forty-four eyes of 44 consecutive patients from the outpatient Glaucoma Service at University of Iowa with diagnosis of glaucoma or glaucoma suspect were studied. Six stereo pairs of optic nerve photographs were taken per eye: 3 repeat stereo pairs using simultaneous fixed-stereo base fundus camera (Nidek 3Dx) and another 3 repeat stereo pairs using sequential variable-stereo base fundus camera (Zeiss). Each optic disc stereo pair was digitized and segmented into cup and rim by 3 glaucoma specialists (computer-assisted planimetry) and using a computer algorithm (digital automated planimetry), and LCDR was calculated for each segmentation (either specialist or algorithm). A linear mixed model was used to estimate mean, SD, and variance components of measurements. Average LCDR, interobserver, interrepeat, intercamera coefficients of variation (CV) of LCDR and their 95% tolerance limits. There was a significant difference in LCDR estimates among the 3 glaucoma specialists. The interobserver CV of 10.65% was larger than interrepeat (6.7%) or intercamera CV (7.6%). For the algorithm, the LCDR estimate was significantly higher for simultaneous stereo fundus images (Nidek, mean: 0.66) than for sequential stereo fundus images (Zeiss, mean: 0.64), whereas interrepeat CV for Nidek (4.4%) was lower than Zeiss (6.36%); the algorithm's interrepeat and intercamera CV were 5.47% and 7.26%, respectively. Interobserver variability was the largest source of variation for glaucoma specialists, whereas their interrepeat and intercamera variability is comparable with that of the algorithm. DAP reduces variability on LCDR estimates from simultaneous stereo images, such as the Nidek 3Dx.

  13. Retinal vessel segmentation in colour fundus images using Extreme Learning Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhang; Zou, Beiji; Zhao, Rongchang; Cui, Jinkai; Duan, Xuanchu; Chen, Zailiang; Liang, Yixiong

    2017-01-01

    Attributes of the retinal vessel play important role in systemic conditions and ophthalmic diagnosis. In this paper, a supervised method based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is proposed to segment retinal vessel. Firstly, a set of 39-D discriminative feature vectors, consisting of local features, morphological features, phase congruency, Hessian and divergence of vector fields, is extracted for each pixel of the fundus image. Then a matrix is constructed for pixel of the training set based on the feature vector and the manual labels, and acts as the input of the ELM classifier. The output of classifier is the binary retinal vascular segmentation. Finally, an optimization processing is implemented to remove the region less than 30 pixels which is isolated from the retinal vascilar. The experimental results testing on the public Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction (DRIVE) database demonstrate that the proposed method is much faster than the other methods in segmenting the retinal vessels. Meanwhile the average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity are 0.9607, 0.7140 and 0.9868, respectively. Moreover the proposed method exhibits high speed and robustness on a new Retinal Images for Screening (RIS) database. Therefore it has potential applications for real-time computer-aided diagnosis and disease screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unique identification code for medical fundus images using blood vessel pattern for tele-ophthalmology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anushikha; Dutta, Malay Kishore; Sharma, Dilip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Identification of fundus images during transmission and storage in database for tele-ophthalmology applications is an important issue in modern era. The proposed work presents a novel accurate method for generation of unique identification code for identification of fundus images for tele-ophthalmology applications and storage in databases. Unlike existing methods of steganography and watermarking, this method does not tamper the medical image as nothing is embedded in this approach and there is no loss of medical information. Strategic combination of unique blood vessel pattern and patient ID is considered for generation of unique identification code for the digital fundus images. Segmented blood vessel pattern near the optic disc is strategically combined with patient ID for generation of a unique identification code for the image. The proposed method of medical image identification is tested on the publically available DRIVE and MESSIDOR database of fundus image and results are encouraging. Experimental results indicate the uniqueness of identification code and lossless recovery of patient identity from unique identification code for integrity verification of fundus images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Image-guided optical measurement of blood oxygen saturation within capillary vessels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akons, Kfir; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    Values of blood oxygenation levels are useful for assessing heart and lung conditions, and are frequently monitored during routine patient care. Independent measurement of the oxygen saturation in capillary blood, which is significantly different from that of arterial blood, is important for diagnosing tissue hypoxia and for increasing the accuracy of existing techniques that measure arterial oxygen saturation. Here, we developed a simple, non-invasive technique for measuring the reflected spectra from individual capillary vessels within a human lip, allowing local measurement of the blood oxygen saturation. The optical setup includes a spatially incoherent broadband light that was focused onto a specific vessel below the lip surface. Backscattered light was imaged by a camera for identifying a target vessel and pointing the illumination beam to its cross section. Scattered light from the vessel was then collected by a single-mode fiber and analyzed by a fast spectrometer. Spectra acquired from small capillary vessels within a volunteer lip showed the characteristic oxyhemoglobin absorption bands in real time and with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measuring capillary oxygen saturation using this technique would potentially be more accurate compared to existing pulse oximetry techniques due to its insensitivity to the patient's skin color, pulse rate, motion, and medical condition. It could be used as a standalone endoscopic technique for measuring tissue hypoxia or in conjunction with conventional pulse oximetry for a more accurate measurement of oxygen transport in the body.

  16. An Automatic Cognitive Graph-Based Segmentation for Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Al Shehhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hierarchical graph-based segmentation for blood vessel detection in digital retinal images. This segmentation employs some of perceptual Gestalt principles: similarity, closure, continuity, and proximity to merge segments into coherent connected vessel-like patterns. The integration of Gestalt principles is based on object-based features (e.g., color and black top-hat (BTH morphology and context and graph-analysis algorithms (e.g., Dijkstra path. The segmentation framework consists of two main steps: preprocessing and multiscale graph-based segmentation. Preprocessing is to enhance lighting condition, due to low illumination contrast, and to construct necessary features to enhance vessel structure due to sensitivity of vessel patterns to multiscale/multiorientation structure. Graph-based segmentation is to decrease computational processing required for region of interest into most semantic objects. The segmentation was evaluated on three publicly available datasets. Experimental results show that preprocessing stage achieves better results compared to state-of-the-art enhancement methods. The performance of the proposed graph-based segmentation is found to be consistent and comparable to other existing methods, with improved capability of detecting small/thin vessels.

  17. Optimal Viewing Angle Determination for Multiple Vessel Segments in Coronary Angiographic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuehu; Yang, Jian; Chen, Yang; Ai, Danni; Hu, Yining; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-06-01

    Angiographic image is the perspective projection of the whole body from a 3D space to a 2D imaging plane, in which X-ray is used. As such, topological vasculature information has been lost. In 2D angiograms, foreshortening and overlapping are commonly observed in tubular-like structures. Hence, an optimum viewing angle should be determined to observe an interesting vessel segment (IVS) or an interesting vessel bifurcation (IVB) with minimized foreshortening and overlapping from a limited number of angiographic images. In this study, a novel integrated optimization method is proposed to calculate the optimum viewing angle. In the proposed method, the irregular shape and inter-branch distance of vasculatures are considered. Furthermore, three optimized conditions, including projection foreshortening rate, projection stenosis rate, and projection overlapping rate, are designed and integrated to determine the optimum viewing angle in a single vessel segment. The three conditions, including projection foreshortening, projection stenosis, and projection adjacent spacing rates, are also designed to optimize the viewing angle of bifurcations. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we simulated an angiographic image based on X-ray propagating principle by integrating 3D coronary artery tree models and the respective CT volume data. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is very effective and robust; hence, this method can be used to determine the optimum viewing angle of IVS or IVB with irregular stenosis. The proposed method can also help physicians observe the branching structure or stenosis clearly in clinical practice.

  18. Coronary magnetic resonance angiography and vessel wall imaging in children with Kawasaki disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Seeger, Achim; Miller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    In patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) serial evaluation of the distribution and size of coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) is necessary for risk stratification and therapeutic management. To apply whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) and black-blood coronary vessel wall imaging in children with KD. Six children (mean age 4.6 years, range 2.5-7.8 years) with KD underwent CMRA using a free-breathing, T2-prepared, three-dimensional steady-state free-precession (3D-SSFP), whole-heart approach with navigator gating and tracking. Vessel walls were imaged with an ECG-triggered and navigator-gated double inversion recovery (DIR) black-blood segmented turbo spin-echo sequence. There was complete agreement between CMRA and conventional angiography (n=6) in the detection of CAA (n=15). Excellent agreement was found between the two techniques in determining the maximal diameter (mean difference 0.2{+-}0.7 mm), length (mean difference 0.1{+-}0.8 mm) and distance from the ostium (mean difference -0.8{+-}2.1 mm) of the CAAs. In all subjects with a CAA, abnormally thickened vessel walls were found (2.5{+-}0.5 mm). CMRA accurately defines CAA in free-breathing sedated children with KD using the whole-heart approach and detects abnormally thickened vessel walls. This technique may reduce the need for serial X-ray coronary angiography, and improve risk stratification and monitoring of therapy. (orig.)

  19. Advanced Image Enhancement Method for Distant Vessels and Structures in Capsule Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marius

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an advanced method for contrast enhancement of capsule endoscopic images, with the main objective to obtain sufficient information about the vessels and structures in more distant (or darker) parts of capsule endoscopic images. The proposed method (PM) combines two algorithms for the enhancement of darker and brighter areas of capsule endoscopic images, respectively. The half-unit weighted-bilinear algorithm (HWB) proposed in our previous work is used to enhance darker areas according to the darker map content of its HSV's component V. Enhancement of brighter areas is achieved thanks to the novel threshold weighted-bilinear algorithm (TWB) developed to avoid overexposure and enlargement of specular highlight spots while preserving the hue, in such areas. The TWB performs enhancement operations following a gradual increment of the brightness of the brighter map content of its HSV's component V. In other words, the TWB decreases its averaged weights as the intensity content of the component V increases. Extensive experimental demonstrations were conducted, and, based on evaluation of the reference and PM enhanced images, a gastroenterologist (Ø.H.) concluded that the PM enhanced images were the best ones based on the information about the vessels, contrast in the images, and the view or visibility of the structures in more distant parts of the capsule endoscopy images. PMID:29225668

  20. Three Dimensional Endoscopic Image of a Blood Vessel Using High Frequency Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Kamada, Kumi; Chihara, Kunihiro; Secomski, Wojciech; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a high frequency ultrasound (US) imaging system for observation of small tissues and a virtual endoscopic image of a blood vessel. This system consists of a US probe with a central frequency of 32 MHz, a microscope table designed to collect some slices of US brightness mode (B-mode) images, a transmitter containing control logic and a receiver circuit and a personal computer (PC) with an analog to digital (AD) converter. First, US B-mode images with high spatial resolution were obtained by shifting a measurement plane at a constant step of 0.075 mm. Second, three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction was performed with linear interpolation and a volume rendering technique. Finally, the point of view of the 3-D image was set in the human body and a virtual endoscopic image was presented. The experimental results present a blood vessel as if an ultrasound probe were inserted in it and reveal the anatomical structure under skin.

  1. Retinal vessel enhancement based on the Gaussian function and image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Obreja, Cristian Dragoş

    2017-01-01

    The Gaussian function is essential in the construction of the Frangi and COSFIRE (combination of shifted filter responses) filters. The connection of the broken vessels and an accurate extraction of the vascular structure is the main goal of this study. Thus, the outcome of the Frangi and COSFIRE edge detection algorithms are fused using the Dempster-Shafer algorithm with the aim to improve detection and to enhance the retinal vascular structure. For objective results, the average diameters of the retinal vessels provided by Frangi, COSFIRE and Dempster-Shafer fusion algorithms are measured. These experimental values are compared to the ground truth values provided by manually segmented retinal images. We prove the superiority of the fusion algorithm in terms of image quality by using the figure of merit objective metric that correlates the effects of all post-processing techniques.

  2. Finding an optimal method for imaging lymphatic vessels of the upper limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Susan; Purushotham, Arnie D. [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rose, Sarah L.; Chilvers, Alison J.; Ballinger, James R.; Solanki, Chandra K.; Barber, Robert W.; Peters, A. Michael [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mortimer, Peter S. [Department of Medicine, St George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy involves interstitial injection of radiolabelled particulate materials or radioproteins. Although several variations in the technique have been described, their place in clinical practice remains controversial. Traditional diagnostic criteria are based primarily on lymph node appearances but in situations such as breast cancer, where lymph nodes may have been excised, these criteria are of limited use. In these circumstances, lymphatic vessel morphology takes on greater importance as a clinical endpoint, so a method that gives good definition of lymphatic vessels would be useful. In patients with breast cancer, for example, such a method, used before and after lymph node resection, may assist in predicting the development of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. The aim of this study was to optimise a method for the visualisation of lymphatic vessels. Subcutaneous (sc) and intradermal (id) injection sites were compared, and technetium-99m nanocolloid, a particulate material, was compared with {sup 99m}Tc-human immunoglobulin (HIG), which is a soluble macromolecule. Twelve normal volunteers were each studied on two occasions. In three subjects, id {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-HIG, in three id {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, in three id {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with id {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid and in three sc {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid. Endpoints were quality of lymphatic vessel definition, the time after injection at which vessels were most clearly visualised, the rate constant of depot disappearance (k) and the systemic blood accumulation rate as measured by gamma camera imaging over the liver or cardiac blood pool. Excellent definition of lymphatic vessels was obtained following id injection of either radiopharmaceutical, an injection route that was clearly superior to sc. Differences between radiopharmaceuticals were less clear, although after id

  3. Construction and characterisation of MRI coils for vessel wall imaging at 7 tesla

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques in the bifurcation of the carotid artery vessels can pose a significant stroke risk from stenosis, thrombosis and emboli, or plaque rupture. However, the possibility of the latter depends on the structure of the plaque and its stability. So far, the assessment of such depositions, and the evaluation of the risk they pose, is not satisfactory with 3 Tesla black blood imaging. It is expected that the SNR increase at 7 Tesla, together with an appropriate and patient-safe ...

  4. Method for Separation of Blood Vessels on the Three-Color Images of Biological Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new technology was developed to improve the visibility of blood vessels on images of tissues of hollow human organs(the alimentary tract and respiratory system) based on the relation between the color components of the image, the scattering properties of the tissue, and its hemoglobin content. A statistical operator was presented to convert the three-color image of the tissue into a parametric map objectively characterizing the concentration of hemoglobin in the tissue regardless of the illumination and shooting conditions. An algorithm for obtaining conversion parameters for image systems with known spectral characteristics was presented. An image of a multilayer multiple-scattering medium modeling bronchial tissue was synthesized and was used to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed conversion system. It was shown that the conversion made it possible to increase the contrast of the blood vessels by almost two orders of magnitude, to significantly improve the clarity of the display of their borders, and to eliminate almost completely the influence of background and nonuniform illumination of the medium in comparison with the original image.

  5. OCT imaging detection of brain blood vessels in mouse, based on semiconducting polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaozhuang; Chen, Haobin; Liu, Liwei; Chen, Bingling; Yang, Zhigang; Wu, Changfeng; Hu, Siyi; Lin, Huiyun; Li, Buhong; Qu, Junle

    2017-11-20

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a valuable technology that has been used to obtain microstructure images of tissue, and has several advantages, though its applications are limited in high-scattering tissues. Therefore, semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) that possess strong absorption characteristics are applied to decrease light scattering in tissues and used as exogenous contrast agents for enhancing the contrast of OCT imaging detection. In this paper, we prepared two kinds of SPNs, termed PIDT-TBZ SPNs and PBDT-TBZ SPNs, as the contrast agents for OCT detection to enhance the signal. Firstly, we proved that they were good contrast agents for OCT imaging in agar-TiO 2 . After that, the contrast effects of these two SPNs were quantitatively analyzed, and then cerebral blood vessels were monitored by a home-made SD-OCT system. Finally, we created OCT images in vitro and in vivo with these two probes and performed quantitative analysis using the images. The results indicated that these SPNs created a clear contrast enhancement of small vessels in the OCT imaging process, which provides a basis for the application of SPNs as contrast agents for bioimaging studies.

  6. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: drsarahpower@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: sineadmcevoy@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Cunningham, Jane, E-mail: janecunningham0708@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Ti, Joanna P., E-mail: joannapearlyti@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Looby, Seamus, E-mail: seamuslooby@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); O' Hare, Alan, E-mail: alanohare@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David, E-mail: davidwilliams@rcsi.ie [Department of Geriatrics and Stroke Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Brennan, Paul, E-mail: paulbrennan@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Thornton, John, E-mail: johnthornton@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Site of occlusion determines potential collateralization routes and impacts outcome. • Multifocality of arterial occlusion is common, seen in approximately 20% of cases. • ICA false occlusion sign can be seen in setting of ICA stenosis or carotid T occlusion. • False patency sign: hyperdense thrombus/calcified occlusive plaque misinterpreted as patent vessel. • Additional abnormalities on CTA may infer stroke mechanism or alter decision making. - Abstract: Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome.

  7. Elliptical Local Vessel Density: a Fast and Robust Quality Metric for Fundus Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Meriaudeau, Fabrice [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abramoff, M.D. [University of Iowa

    2008-01-01

    A great effort of the research community is geared towards the creation of an automatic screening system able to promptly detect diabetic retinopathy with the use of fundus cameras. In addition, there are some documented approaches to the problem of automatically judging the image quality. We propose a new set of features independent of Field of View or resolution to describe the morphology of the patient's vessels. Our initial results suggest that they can be used to estimate the image quality in a time one order of magnitude shorter respect to previous techniques.

  8. Measurement of contrast of phantom and in vivo subsurface blood vessels using two near-infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Alkhaja, Aysha; Mahe, Laure; Powell, S.; Everdell, N. L.

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative comparison has been performed between two commercial near-infrared (NIR) vein-viewing systems which are designed to supplement the clinician's traditional skills in locating veins by means of visualization and palpation. The AccuVein AV300 and Novarix IV-eye real-time imaging systems employ very different imaging geometries; the former generates an image from reflected NIR light produced by a beam scanned across the surface, while the latter illuminates the viewed region at four points on the periphery and records the resulting distribution of diffusely transmitted light. The comparison involved measuring the contrast produced by absorbing rods (simulated blood vessels) in a cylindrical phantom with tissue-like optical properties, and the contrast of superficial blood vessels in the arms of healthy volunteers. The locations and sizes of the blood vessels were independently verified using a clinical ultrasound imaging system. The phantom measurements suggested that the AV300 displays the most superficial vessels with greater contrast, but the IV-eye is able to detect vessels when they are at a depth up to 2 mm greater than the limit observed for the AV300. The results for thirty healthy volunteers also indicated that the AV300 typically displays vessels with higher overall contrast, but the effectiveness of the IV-eye at visualizing deeper vessels was even more pronounced, with a maximum depth several millimeters greater than that achieved by the AV300, and more than ten times as many vessels observed at depths below 4 mm.

  9. Vessel segmentation in 4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography images of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Lindner, Thomas; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Forkert, Nils D.

    2017-03-01

    4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography (4D ASL MRA) is a non-invasive and safe modality for cerebrovascular imaging procedures. It uses the patient's magnetically labeled blood as intrinsic contrast agent, so that no external contrast media is required. It provides important 3D structure and blood flow information but a sufficient cerebrovascular segmentation is important since it can help clinicians to analyze and diagnose vascular diseases faster, and with higher confidence as compared to simple visual rating of raw ASL MRA images. This work presents a new method for automatic cerebrovascular segmentation in 4D ASL MRA images of the brain. In this process images are denoised, corresponding image label/control image pairs of the 4D ASL MRA sequences are subtracted, and temporal intensity averaging is used to generate a static representation of the vascular system. After that, sets of vessel and background seeds are extracted and provided as input for the image foresting transform algorithm to segment the vascular system. Four 4D ASL MRA datasets of the brain arteries of healthy subjects and corresponding time-of-flight (TOF) MRA images were available for this preliminary study. For evaluation of the segmentation results of the proposed method, the cerebrovascular system was automatically segmented in the high-resolution TOF MRA images using a validated algorithm and the segmentation results were registered to the 4D ASL datasets. Corresponding segmentation pairs were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). On average, a DSC of 0.9025 was achieved, indicating that vessels can be extracted successfully from 4D ASL MRA datasets by the proposed segmentation method.

  10. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  11. In vivo imaging of stepwise vessel occlusion in cerebral photothrombosis of mice by 19F MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Weise

    Full Text Available (19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared (19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation.Perfluorocarbons (PFC or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong (19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like (19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the (19F markers (infarct core/rim could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage.Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by (19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement.

  12. Extraction of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images Using Four Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asloob Ahmad Mudassar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of blood vessel extraction (BVE techniques exist in the literature, but they do not always lead to acceptable solutions especially in the presence of anomalies where the reported work is limited. Four techniques are presented for BVE: (1 BVE using Image Line Cross-Sections (ILCS, (2 BVE using Edge Enhancement and Edge Detection (EEED, (3 BVE using Modified Matched Filtering (MMF, and (4 BVE using Continuation Algorithm (CA. These four techniques have been designed especially for abnormal retinal images containing low vessel contrasts, drusen, exudates, and other artifacts. The four techniques were applied to 30 abnormal retinal images, and the success rate was found to be (95 to 99% for CA, (88–91% for EEED, (80–85% for MMF, and (74–78% for ILCS. Application of these four techniques to 105 normal retinal images gave improved results: (99-100% for CA, (96–98% for EEED, (94-95% for MMF, and (88–93% for ILCS. Investigations revealed that the four techniques in the order of increasing performance could be arranged as ILCS, MMF, EEED, and CA. Here we demonstrate these four techniques for abnormal retinal images only. ILCS, EEED, and CA are novel additions whereas MMF is an improved and modified version of an existing matched filtering technique. CA is a promising technique.

  13. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Wang Yanping, E-mail: hr.zheng@siat.ac.c [Medical School of Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  14. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Cognition, Mood, Daily Functioning, and Imaging Findings from a Small Pilot Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease, a leading cause of cognitive decline, is considered a relatively homogeneous disease process, and it can co-occur with Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical reports of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging and neuropsychology testing for a small pilot sample of 14 patients are presented to illustrate disease characteristics through findings from structural and functional imaging and cognitive assessment. Participants showed some decreases in executive functioning, attention, processing speed, and memory retrieval, consistent with previous literature. An older subgroup showed lower age-corrected scores at a single time point compared to younger participants. Performance on a computer-administered cognitive measure showed a slight overall decline over a period of 8–28 months. For a case study with mild neuropsychology findings, the MRI report was normal while the SPECT report identified perfusion abnormalities. Future research can test whether advances in imaging analysis allow for identification of cerebral small vessel disease before changes are detected in cognition.

  15. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cruz A, I., E-mail: hernandezdj.gto@gmail.com [CONACYT, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas, A. C., Jalisco s/n, Col. Valenciana, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  16. Added Value of Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Differentiation of Nonocclusive Intracranial Vasculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Shibata, Dean K; Hallam, Danial K; de Havenon, Adam; Hippe, Daniel S; Becker, Kyra J; Tirschwell, David L; Hatsukami, Thomas; Balu, Niranjan; Yuan, Chun

    2017-11-01

    Our goal is to determine the added value of intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (IVWI) in differentiating nonocclusive vasculopathies compared with luminal imaging alone. We retrospectively reviewed images from patients with both luminal and IVWI to identify cases with clinically defined intracranial vasculopathies: atherosclerosis (intracranial atherosclerotic disease), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and inflammatory vasculopathy. Two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical data reviewed the luminal imaging of defined luminal stenoses/irregularities and evaluated the pattern of involvement to make a presumed diagnosis with diagnostic confidence. Six weeks later, the 2 raters rereviewed the luminal imaging in addition to IVWI for the pattern of wall involvement, presence and pattern of postcontrast enhancement, and presumed diagnosis and confidence. Analysis was performed on per-lesion and per-patient bases. Thirty intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 12 inflammatory vasculopathies, and 12 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome patients with 201 lesions (90 intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 64 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and 47 inflammatory vasculopathy lesions) were included. For both per-lesion and per-patient analyses, there was significant diagnostic accuracy improvement with luminal imaging+IVWI when compared with luminal imaging alone (per-lesion: 88.8% versus 36.1%; Pimprove the differentiation of nonocclusive intracranial vasculopathies when combined with traditional luminal imaging modalities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments using quadric geometry and variance reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosio, Bruno; Schoonjans, Tom; Brunetti, Antonio; Oliva, Piernicola; Masala, Giovanni Luca

    2014-03-01

    The simulation of X-ray imaging experiments is often performed using deterministic codes, which can be relatively fast and easy to use. However, such codes are generally not suitable for the simulation of even slightly more complex experimental conditions, involving, for instance, first-order or higher-order scattering, X-ray fluorescence emissions, or more complex geometries, particularly for experiments that combine spatial resolution with spectral information. In such cases, simulations are often performed using codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In a simple Monte Carlo approach, the interaction position of an X-ray photon and the state of the photon after an interaction are obtained simply according to the theoretical probability distributions. This approach may be quite inefficient because the final channels of interest may include only a limited region of space or photons produced by a rare interaction, e.g., fluorescent emission from elements with very low concentrations. In the field of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, this problem has been solved by combining the Monte Carlo method with variance reduction techniques, which can reduce the computation time by several orders of magnitude. In this work, we present a C++ code for the general simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments, based on the application of the Monte Carlo method in combination with variance reduction techniques, with a description of sample geometry based on quadric surfaces. We describe the benefits of the object-oriented approach in terms of code maintenance, the flexibility of the program for the simulation of different experimental conditions and the possibility of easily adding new modules. Sample applications in the fields of X-ray imaging and X-ray spectroscopy are discussed. Catalogue identifier: AERO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland

  18. Combretastatin A-4 Phosphate Affects Tumor Vessel Volume and Size Distribution as Assessed Using MRI-Based Vessel Size Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, T.; Bentzen, L.; Pedersen, M.; Tramm, T.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Bussink, J.; Horsman, M.R.; Ostergaard, L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) is a promising vascular disrupting agent (VDA) in clinical trials. As CA4P acts on dividing endothelial cells, we hypothesize that CA4P affects vessels of certain sizes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CA4P by the MRI-based

  19. Spatiotemporal image correlation analysis of blood flow in branched vessel networks of zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceffa, Nicolo G.; Cesana, Ilaria; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Carra, Silvia; Cotelli, Franco; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Ramification of blood circulation is relevant in a number of physiological and pathological conditions. The oxygen exchange occurs largely in the capillary bed, and the cancer progression is closely linked to the angiogenesis around the tumor mass. Optical microscopy has made impressive improvements in in vivo imaging and dynamic studies based on correlation analysis of time stacks of images. Here, we develop and test advanced methods that allow mapping the flow fields in branched vessel networks at the resolution of 10 to 20 μm. The methods, based on the application of spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy and its extension to cross-correlation analysis, are applied here to the case of early stage embryos of zebrafish.

  20. Estimation of the variance of noise in digital imaging for quality control; Estimacion de la varianza del ruido en imagen digital para control de calidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soro Bua, M.; Otero Martinez, C.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Santamarina Vazquez, F.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this work is estimated variance kerma function pixel values for the real response curve nonlinear digital image system, without resorting to any approximation to the behavior of the detector. This result is compared with that obtained for the linearized version of the response curve.

  1. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariat, Masoud; Schantz, Daryl; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Seed, Mike; Alnafisi, Bahiyah; Chu, Leysia; Macgowan, Christopher K; van Amerom, Joshua; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2014-02-01

    Information about thoracic vascular sizes can crucially affect clinical decision-making in cardiovascular disease. A variety of imaging techniques such as catheter angiography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) are routinely used to measure vascular diameters. Traditionally, CMR black blood sequences were the main anatomical tool for visualization of vascular anatomy and still are in many centers. More recently, the vessel diameters are measured on multiplanar reconstructions derived from static magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). This study was performed to investigate the variation of vessel diameter measurements on different CMR techniques with respect to their data acquisition scheme. We recruited two groups of patients for this prospective study. One group included patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), with at least moderate pulmonary insufficiency and another group of patients who underwent CMR as part of a diagnostic work-up for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Additional images of the right pulmonary artery (RPA) were acquired in the double inversion recovery (DIR) black blood, cine steady state free precession (SSFP) and MRA. All images were reviewed by two CMR trained readers using the electronic caliper provided within the picture archiving and communication system package. The maximum diameter of each artery was recorded in millimeters with up to one decimal point. Paired t-tests and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparison of measurements between different sequences. A total of 52 patients were recruited for this study, 26 patients in the TOF group (15 males, age 12.55±2.9) and 26 patients in the ARVC group (15 males, age 15.6±2.3). In both groups, the RPA sizes were not significantly different between the DIR images and diastolic cine SSFP (p>0.05). Measurements on DIR were significantly smaller than those made on systolic cine SSFP or MRA in both groups

  2. A Retinal Vessel Detection Approach Based on Shearlet Transform and Indeterminacy Filtering on Fundus Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A fundus image is an effective tool for ophthalmologists studying eye diseases. Retinal vessel detection is a significant task in the identification of retinal disease regions. This study presents a retinal vessel detection approach using shearlet transform and indeterminacy filtering. The fundus image’s green channel is mapped in the neutrosophic domain via shearlet transform. The neutrosophic domain images are then filtered with an indeterminacy filter to reduce the indeterminacy information. A neural network classifier is employed to identify the pixels whose inputs are the features in neutrosophic images. The proposed approach is tested on two datasets, and a receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve are employed to evaluate experimental results quantitatively. The area under the curve values are 0.9476 and 0.9469 for each dataset respectively, and 0.9439 for both datasets. The comparison with the other algorithms also illustrates that the proposed method yields the highest evaluation measurement value and demonstrates the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  3. Imaging transient blood vessel fusion events in zebrafish by correlative volume electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E J Armer

    Full Text Available The study of biological processes has become increasingly reliant on obtaining high-resolution spatial and temporal data through imaging techniques. As researchers demand molecular resolution of cellular events in the context of whole organisms, correlation of non-invasive live-organism imaging with electron microscopy in complex three-dimensional samples becomes critical. The developing blood vessels of vertebrates form a highly complex network which cannot be imaged at high resolution using traditional methods. Here we show that the point of fusion between growing blood vessels of transgenic zebrafish, identified in live confocal microscopy, can subsequently be traced through the structure of the organism using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM and Serial Block Face/Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF/SEM. The resulting data give unprecedented microanatomical detail of the zebrafish and, for the first time, allow visualization of the ultrastructure of a time-limited biological event within the context of a whole organism.

  4. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariat, Masoud, E-mail: masoudshariat@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Schantz, Daryl, E-mail: daryl.schantz@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yoo, Shi-Joon, E-mail: shi-joon.yoo@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wintersperger, Bernd J., E-mail: bernd.wintersperger@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Seed, Mike, E-mail: mike.seed@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alnafisi, Bahiyah, E-mail: bahiyah.alnafisi@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Leysia, E-mail: leysia_99@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); MacGowan, Christopher K., E-mail: christopher.macgowan@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amerom, Joshua van, E-mail: Joshu.vanamerom@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grosse-Wortmann, Lars, E-mail: lars.grosse-wortmann@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Background: Information about thoracic vascular sizes can crucially affect clinical decision-making in cardiovascular disease. A variety of imaging techniques such as catheter angiography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) are routinely used to measure vascular diameters. Traditionally, CMR black blood sequences were the main anatomical tool for visualization of vascular anatomy and still are in many centers. More recently, the vessel diameters are measured on multiplanar reconstructions derived from static magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). This study was performed to investigate the variation of vessel diameter measurements on different CMR techniques with respect to their data acquisition scheme. Methods: We recruited two groups of patients for this prospective study. One group included patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), with at least moderate pulmonary insufficiency and another group of patients who underwent CMR as part of a diagnostic work-up for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Additional images of the right pulmonary artery (RPA) were acquired in the double inversion recovery (DIR) black blood, cine steady state free precession (SSFP) and MRA. All images were reviewed by two CMR trained readers using the electronic caliper provided within the picture archiving and communication system package. The maximum diameter of each artery was recorded in millimeters with up to one decimal point. Paired t-tests and Bland–Altman plots were used for comparison of measurements between different sequences. Results: A total of 52 patients were recruited for this study, 26 patients in the TOF group (15 males, age 12.55 ± 2.9) and 26 patients in the ARVC group (15 males, age 15.6 ± 2.3). In both groups, the RPA sizes were not significantly different between the DIR images and diastolic cine SSFP (p > 0.05). Measurements on DIR were significantly smaller than those made on

  5. Blood Vessel Extraction in Color Retinal Fundus Images with Enhancement Filtering and Unsupervised Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal blood vessels have a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. For this reason, retinal vasculature extraction is important in order to help specialists for the diagnosis and treatment of systematic diseases. In this paper, a novel approach is developed to extract retinal blood vessel network. Our method comprises four stages: (1 preprocessing stage in order to prepare dataset for segmentation; (2 an enhancement procedure including Gabor, Frangi, and Gauss filters obtained separately before a top-hat transform; (3 a hard and soft clustering stage which includes K-means and Fuzzy C-means (FCM in order to get binary vessel map; and (4 a postprocessing step which removes falsely segmented isolated regions. The method is tested on color retinal images obtained from STARE and DRIVE databases which are available online. As a result, Gabor filter followed by K-means clustering method achieves 95.94% and 95.71% of accuracy for STARE and DRIVE databases, respectively, which are acceptable for diagnosis systems.

  6. Variance Owing to Observer, Repeat Imaging, and Fundus Camera Type on Cup-to-disc Ratio Estimates by Stereo Planimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, Young H.; Adix, Michael; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Piette, Scott; Greenlee, Emily C.; Alward, Wallace L. M.; Abramoff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare variance components in linear cup-to-disc ratio (LCDR) estimates by computer-assisted planimetry by human experts, and automated machine algorithm (digital automated planimetry). Design: Prospective case series for evaluation of planimetry.

  7. Classification of Vessels in Single-Pol COSMO-SkyMed Images Based on Statistical and Structural Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vessel monitoring is one of the most important maritime applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data. Because of the dihedral reflections between the vessel hull and sea surface and the trihedral reflections among superstructures, vessels usually have strong backscattering in SAR images. Furthermore, in high-resolution SAR images, detailed information on vessel structures can be observed, allowing for vessel classification in high-resolution SAR images. This paper focuses on the feature analysis of merchant vessels, including bulk carriers, container ships and oil tankers, in 3 m resolution COSMO-SkyMed stripmap HIMAGE mode images and proposes a method for vessel classification. After preprocessing, a feature vector is estimated by calculating the average value of the kernel density estimation, three structural features and the mean backscattering coefficient. Support vector machine (SVM classifier is used for the vessel classification, and the results are compared with traditional methods, such as the K-nearest neighbor algorithm (K-NN and minimum distance classifier (MDC. In situ investigations are conducted during the SAR data acquisition. Corresponding Automatic Identification System (AIS reports are also obtained as ground truth to evaluate the effectiveness of the classifier. The preliminary results show that the combination of the average value of the kernel density estimation and mean backscattering coefficient has good ability for classifying the three types of vessels. When adding the three structural features, the results slightly improve. The result of the SVM classifier is better than that of K-NN and MDC. However, the SVM requires more time, when the parameters of the kernel are estimated.

  8. Single-vessel coronary artery stenosis: myocardial perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 first-pass MR imaging in a swine model of comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernhard L; Bluemke, David A; Chin, Bennett B; Boston, Raymond C; Heldman, Alan W; Lima, João A C; Kraitchman, Dara L

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of Gadomer-17 to depict perfusion defects in a closed-chest swine model of single-vessel coronary artery disease. Twelve pigs underwent closed-chest placement of a flow reducer for 70%-90% luminal stenosis in the proximal left anterior coronary artery. Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 and gadopentetate dimeglumine, microsphere blood flow (MBF) testing, and technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) 2 methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed during dipyridamole vasodilation. Comparisons of percentage signal intensity (SI) increase (PSIC) in remote and ischemic myocardium were made with repeated measurements analysis of variance after injection of both tracers. Perfusion defects and reduced PSIC in the anterior ischemic versus the inferior remote myocardium could be identified after injection of both Gadomer-17 (PSIC, 66% +/- 30 [mean +/- SD] vs 100% +/- 32, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 49% +/- 31 vs 81% +/- 43, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine) and with areas of reduced MBF (r = 0.70, P gadopentetate dimeglumine). PSIC also correlated with MBF (r = 0.89, P gadopentetate dimeglumine). Gadomer-17 allowed differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic myocardium, as demonstrated by reduced PSIC (PSIC, 48% +/- 38 vs 72% +/- 31, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 36% +/- 24 vs 56% +/- 27, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine.

  9. OPTIMAL RESOLUTION FOR AUTOMATIC QUANTIFICATION OF BLOOD VESSELS ON DIGITIZED IMAGES OF THE WHOLE CANCER SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Discrepancies concerning the prognostic significance of cancer vascularization can be partly explained by biases due to quantification protocols. We recently recommended a swift, inexpensive and automatic analysis of 2,700 dpi slide scanner images of the whole immunostained sections. Another team, proposed, quite at the same time, to work at 4,000 dpi. The aim of the present paper is to check if information contained in images scanned at 2,700 and 4,000 dpi are relevant and equivalent, when compared to the low magnification of the microscope, in order to propose the best compromise between precision and time expense. To evaluate precisely the amount of information gained or lost according to the resolution used, we compared the number and size of blood vessel profiles, manually detected, on twenty one Hodgkin lymphoma acquired with a scanner (2,700 and 4,000 dpi and with a microscope (16,000 dpi. Results obtained at 4,000 dpi were equivalent to the estimation performed at microscopical level either by a biologist or a pathologist, while tiny vessels were lost at 2,700 dpi. Scanning whole histological sections at 4,000 dpi provides a relevant method for evaluating tumour vascularization, which can be easily automated and standardized.

  10. Ultrasound Small Vessel Imaging With Block-Wise Adaptive Local Clutter Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Pengfei; Manduca, Armando; Trzasko, Joshua D; Chen, Shigao

    2017-01-01

    Robust clutter filtering is essential for ultrasound small vessel imaging. Eigen-based clutter filtering techniques have recently shown great improvement in clutter rejection over conventional clutter filters in small animals. However, for in vivo human imaging, eigen-based clutter filtering can be challenging due to the complex spatially-varying tissue and noise characteristics. To address this challenge, we present a novel block-wise adaptive singular value decomposition (SVD) based clutter filtering technique. The proposed method divides the global plane wave data into overlapped local spatial segments, within which tissue signals are assumed to be locally coherent and noise locally stationary. This, in turn, enables effective separation of tissue, blood and noise via SVD. For each block, the proposed method adaptively determines the singular value cutoff thresholds based on local data statistics. Processing results from each block are redundantly combined to improve both the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the small vessel perfusion image. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieved more than two-fold increase in SNR and more than three-fold increase in CNR in dB scale over the conventional global SVD filtering technique for an in vivo human native kidney study. The proposed method also showed substantial improvement in suppression of the depth-dependent background noise and better rejection of near field tissue clutter. The effects of different processing block size and block overlap percentage were systematically investigated as well as the tradeoff between imaging quality and computational cost.

  11. Ex vivo and in vivo label-free imaging of lymphatic vessels using OCT lymphangiography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Karnowski, Karol; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.; Yu, Dao-Yi; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing an automated method to image lymphatic vessels both ex vivo and in vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT), using their optical transparency. Our method compensates for the OCT signal attenuation for each A-scan in combination with the correction of the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off, enabling reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels from the OCT scans. Morphological image processing with a segment-joining algorithm is also incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume artifacts, which are particularly evident with small lymphatic vessels. Our method is demonstrated for two different clinical application goals: the monitoring of conjunctival lymphatics for surgical guidance and assessment of glaucoma treatment; and the longitudinal monitoring of human burn scars undergoing laser ablation treatment. We present examples of OCT lymphangiography ex vivo on porcine conjunctivas and in vivo on human burn scars, showing the visualization of the lymphatic vessel network and their longitudinal changes due to treatment.

  12. Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage Imaging with Quantitative Vessel Wall T1 Mapping: Technical Development and Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haikun; Sun, Jie; Qiao, Huiyu; Chen, Shuo; Zhou, Zechen; Pan, Xinlei; Wang, Yishi; Zhao, Xihai; Li, Rui; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun

    2017-11-08

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution time-efficient sequence for use in quantitative vessel wall T1 mapping. Materials and Methods A previously described sequence, simultaneous noncontrast angiography and intraplaque hemorrhage (SNAP) imaging, was extended by introducing 3D golden angle radial k-space sampling (GOAL-SNAP). Sliding window reconstruction was adopted to reconstruct images at different inversion delay times (different T1 contrasts) for voxelwise T1 fitting. Phantom studies were performed to test the accuracy of T1 mapping with GOAL-SNAP against a two-dimensional inversion recovery (IR) spin-echo (SE) sequence. In vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers (mean age, 27.8 years ± 3.0 [standard deviation]; age range, 24-32 years; five male) and five patients with atherosclerosis (mean age, 66.4 years ± 5.5; range, 60-73 years; five male) to compare T1 measurements between vessel wall sections (five per artery) with and without intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH). Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test with data permutation by subject. Results Phantom T1 measurements with GOAL-SNAP and IR SE sequences showed excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.99), with a mean bias of -25.8 msec ± 43.6 and a mean percentage error of 4.3% ± 2.5. Minimum T1 was significantly different between sections with IPH and those without it (mean, 371 msec ± 93 vs 944 msec ± 120; P = .01). Estimated T1 of normal vessel wall and muscle were 1195 msec ± 136 and 1117 msec ± 153, respectively. Conclusion High-spatial-resolution (0.8 mm isotropic) time-efficient (5 minutes) vessel wall T1 mapping is achieved by using the GOAL-SNAP sequence. This sequence may yield more quantitative reproducible biomarkers with which to characterize IPH and monitor its progression. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  13. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  14. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  15. Segmentation of elastic fibres in images of vessel wall sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Morera, Pablo; Travieso-González, Carlos M; Castaño-González, Irene; Mompeó-Corredera, Blanca; Ortega-Santana, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The elastic fibres are an essential component of the extracellular matrix in blood vessel walls that allows a long-range of deformability and passive recoil without energy input. The quantitative determination of elastic fibres will provide information on the state of the vascular wall and to determine the role and behaviour of this key structural element in different physiological and pathological vascular processes. We present a segmentation method to identify and quantify elastic fibres based on a local threshold technique and some morphological characteristics measured on the segmented objects that facilitate the discrimination between elastic fibres and other image components. The morphological characteristics analysed are the thickness and the length of an object. The segmentation method was evaluated using an image database of vein sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin. The performance results are based on a ground truth generated manually resulting in values of sensitivity greater than 80% with the exception in two samples, and specificity values above 90% for all samples. Medical specialists carried out a visual evaluation where the observations indicate a general agreement on the segmentation results' visual quality, and the consistency between the methodology proposed and the subjective observation of the doctors for the evaluation of pathological changes in vessel wall. The proposed methodology provides more objective measurements than the qualitative methods traditionally used in the histological analysis, with a significant potential for this method to be used as a diagnostic aid for many other vascular pathological conditions and in similar tissues such as skin and mucous membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Accuracy and initial clinical experience with measurement software (advanced vessel analysis) in three-dimensional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Toshi; Hirohata, Masaru [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tanigawa, Hitoshi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital] [and others

    2002-12-01

    Recently, the clinical benefits of three dimensional (3D) imaging, such as 3D-CTA and 3D-DSA, in cerebro-vascular disease have been widely recognized. Software for quantitative analysis of vascular structure in 3D imaging (advanced vessel analysis: AVA) has been developed. We evaluated AVA with both phantom studies and a few clinical cases. In spiral and curvy aluminum tube phantom studies, the accuracy of diameter measurements was good in 3D images produced from data set generated by multi-detector row CT or rotational angiography. The measurement error was less than 0.03 mm on aluminum tube phantoms that were 3 mm and 5 mm in diameter. In the clinical studies, the differences of carotid artery diameter measurements between 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA was less than 0.3 mm in. The measurement of length, diameter and angle by AVA should provide useful information for planning surgical and endovascular treatments of cerebro-vascular disease. (author)

  17. Detection and measurement of retinal vessels in fundus images using amplitude modified second-order Gaussian filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Luo; Chutatape, Opas; Krishnan, Shankar M

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, the fitness of estimating vessel profiles with Gaussian function is evaluated and an amplitude-modified second-order Gaussian filter is proposed for the detection and measurement of vessels. Mathematical analysis is given and supported by a simulation and experiments to demonstrate that the vessel width can be measured in linear relationship with the "spreading factor" of the matched filter when the magnitude coefficient of the filter is suitably assigned. The absolute value of vessel diameter can be determined simply by using a precalibrated line, which is typically required since images are always system dependent. The experiment shows that the inclusion of the width measurement in the detection process can improve the performance of matched filter and result in a significant increase in success rate of detection.

  18. Detailed features of palisade vessels as a marker of the esophageal mucosa revealed by magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Y; Yagi, M; Aida, J; Ishida, H; Suzuki, S; Hashimoto, T; Amanuma, Y; Kusano, M; Mukai, S; Yamazaki, S; Iida, M; Ochiai, T; Matsuura, M; Iwakiri, K; Kawano, T; Hoshihara, Y; Takubo, K

    2012-08-01

    The palisade vessels present at the distal end of the esophagus are considered to be a landmark of the esophagogastric junction and indispensable for diagnosis of columnar-lined esophagus on the basis of the Japanese criteria. Here we clarified the features of normal palisade vessels at the esophagogastric junction using magnifying endoscopy. We prospectively studied palisade vessels in 15 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using a GIF-H260Z instrument (Olympus Medical Systems Co., Tokyo, Japan). All views of the palisade vessels were obtained at the maximum magnification power in the narrow band imaging mode. We divided the area in which palisade vessels were present into three sections: the area from the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) to about 1 cm orad within the esophagus (Section 1); the area between sections 1 and 3 (Section 2); and the area from the upper limit of the palisade vessels to about 1 cm distal within the esophagus (Section 3). In each section, we analyzed the vessel density, caliber of the palisade vessels, and their branching pattern. The vessel density in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 9.1 ± 2.1, 8.0 ± 2.6, and 3.3 ± 1.3 per high-power field (mean ± standard deviation [SD]), respectively, and the differences were significant between Sections 1 and 2 (P= 0.0086) and between Sections 2 and 3 (P caliber in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 127.6 ± 52.4 µm, 149.6 ± 58.6 µm, and 199.5 ± 75.1 µm (mean ± SD), respectively, and the differences between Sections 1 and 2, and between Sections 2 and 3, were significant (P < 0.0001). With regard to branching form, the frequency of branching was highest in Section 1, and the 'normal Y' shape was observed more frequently than in Sections 2 and 3. Toward the oral side, the frequency of branching diminished, and the frequency of the 'upside down Y' shape increased. The differences in branching form were significant among the three sections (P < 0.0001). These results indicate that the density of

  19. A Three-Dimensional Image Of The Cerebral Blood Vessels And Tumor For Use In Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, P.; Gybels, J.; Oosterlinck, A.; Haegemans, A.; Dierckx, P.

    1983-12-01

    A useful method that makes stereotactic neurosurgery safer, is developed. It yields an integrated stereoscopic image of the cerebral blood vessels, CT view of tumor and simulated electrode trajectory, allowing the surgeon to choose any electrode direction that looks convenient to him, without imminent danger of causing a haemorrhage.

  20. Imaging of large vessel vasculitis with {sup 18}FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhocine, Tarik; Vandevivere, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, A.Z. Middelheim Hospital, 2020, Antwerp (Belgium); Blockmans, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine, Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Mortelmans, Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of {sup 18}FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the {sup 18}FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging. (orig.)

  1. Imaging of large vessel vasculitis with (18)FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, Tarik; Blockmans, Daniel; Hustinx, Roland; Vandevivere, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of (18)FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the (18)FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging.

  2. DR HAGIS-a fundus image database for the automatic extraction of retinal surface vessels from diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sven; Russell, Greg; Nourrit, Vincent; McLoughlin, Niall

    2017-01-01

    A database of retinal fundus images, the DR HAGIS database, is presented. This database consists of 39 high-resolution color fundus images obtained from a diabetic retinopathy screening program in the UK. The NHS screening program uses service providers that employ different fundus and digital cameras. This results in a range of different image sizes and resolutions. Furthermore, patients enrolled in such programs often display other comorbidities in addition to diabetes. Therefore, in an effort to replicate the normal range of images examined by grading experts during screening, the DR HAGIS database consists of images of varying image sizes and resolutions and four comorbidity subgroups: collectively defined as the diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, age-related macular degeneration, and Glaucoma image set (DR HAGIS). For each image, the vasculature has been manually segmented to provide a realistic set of images on which to test automatic vessel extraction algorithms. Modified versions of two previously published vessel extraction algorithms were applied to this database to provide some baseline measurements. A method based purely on the intensity of images pixels resulted in a mean segmentation accuracy of 95.83% ([Formula: see text]), whereas an algorithm based on Gabor filters generated an accuracy of 95.71% ([Formula: see text]).

  3. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Imaging in Small Vessel Disease: Microstructural Integrity and Microvascular Perfusion Related to Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C Eleana; Wong, Sau May; Uiterwijk, Renske; Staals, Julie; Backes, Walter H; Hoff, Erik I; Schreuder, Tobien; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Jansen, Jacobus F A; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is associated with cognitive impairment. This may be because of decreased microstructural integrity and microvascular perfusion, but data on these relationships are scarce. We determined the relationship between cognition and microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity in SVD patients, using intravoxel incoherent motion imaging-a diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique designed to determine microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity simultaneously. Seventy-three patients with SVD and 39 controls underwent intravoxel incoherent motion imaging and neuropsychological assessment. Parenchymal diffusivity D (a surrogate measure of microstructural integrity) and perfusion-related measure fD* were calculated for the normal appearing white matter, white matter hyperintensities, and cortical gray matter. The associations between cognitive performance and D and fD* were determined. In SVD patients, multivariable analysis showed that lower fD* in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter was associated with lower overall cognition (P=0.03 and P=0.002, respectively), lower executive function (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively), and lower information-processing speed (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively). D was not associated with cognitive function. In controls, no association was found between D, fD*, and cognition. In SVD patients, lower cognitive performance is associated with lower microvascular perfusion in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter. Our results support recent findings that both cortical gray matter and normal appearing white matter perfusion may play a role in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in SVD. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR3786. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A vessel length-based method to compute coronary fractional flow reserve from optical coherence tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Seo Ho; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2017-06-26

    Hemodynamic simulation for quantifying fractional flow reserve (FFR) is often performed in a patient-specific geometry of coronary arteries reconstructed from the images from various imaging modalities. Because optical coherence tomography (OCT) images can provide more precise vascular lumen geometry, regardless of stenotic severity, hemodynamic simulation based on OCT images may be effective. The aim of this study is to perform OCT-FFR simulations by coupling a 3D CFD model from geometrically correct OCT images with a LPM based on vessel lengths extracted from CAG data with clinical validations for the present method. To simulate coronary hemodynamics, we developed a fast and accurate method that combined a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of an OCT-based region of interest (ROI) with a lumped parameter model (LPM) of the coronary microvasculature and veins. Here, the LPM was based on vessel lengths extracted from coronary X-ray angiography (CAG) images. Based on a vessel length-based approach, we describe a theoretical formulation for the total resistance of the LPM from a three-dimensional (3D) CFD model of the ROI. To show the utility of this method, we present calculated examples of FFR from OCT images. To validate the OCT-based FFR calculation (OCT-FFR) clinically, we compared the computed OCT-FFR values for 17 vessels of 13 patients with clinically measured FFR (M-FFR) values. A novel formulation for the total resistance of LPM is introduced to accurately simulate a 3D CFD model of the ROI. The simulated FFR values compared well with clinically measured ones, showing the accuracy of the method. Moreover, the present method is fast in terms of computational time, enabling clinicians to provide solutions handled within the hospital.

  5. Dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging: A new marker of triple-vessel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeishi, Y.; Tono-oka, I.; Ikeda, K.; Komatani, A.; Tsuiki, K.; Yasui, S. (Yamagata Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    To investigate the significance and mechanism of dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging, we performed both dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging and dipyridamole radionuclide angiography on 83 patients with known angiograms. The dipyridamole/delayed ratio of the left ventricular dimension from the thallium-201 image was defined as the left ventricular dilatation ratio (LVDR). An LVDR greater than the mean + two standard deviations in patients without coronary artery disease was defined as abnormal. Twenty-two of 83 patients showed an abnormal LVDR, and 18 of the 22 patients (82%) had triple-vessel disease. By defect and washout analysis, the sensitivity and specificity for correctly identifying the patients as having triple-vessel disease was 72% and 76%, respectively, whereas LVDR had a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 93%. When LVDR was used in combination with the defect and washout criteria, sensitivity increased to 84% without a loss of specificity. In those 22 patients with abnormal LVDRs, end-diastolic volume measured by radionuclide angiography did not change after dipyridamole infusion. Dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging reflected relative subendocardial hypoperfusion induced by dipyridamole rather than actual chamber enlargement. The LVDR was moderately sensitive and highly specific for triple-vessel disease and provided complementary information to dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging.

  6. Local image variance of 7 Tesla SWI is a new technique for preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas: correlation with tumour grade and IDH1 mutational status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Günther; Kiesel, Barbara; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Millesi, Matthias; Wurzer, Aygül; Göd, Sabine; Mallouhi, Ammar; Knosp, Engelbert; Marosi, Christine; Trattnig, Siegfried; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Preusser, Matthias; Widhalm, Georg

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the value of local image variance (LIV) as a new technique for quantification of hypointense microvascular susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) structures at 7 Tesla for preoperative glioma characterization. Adult patients with neuroradiologically suspected diffusely infiltrating gliomas were prospectively recruited and 7 Tesla SWI was performed in addition to standard imaging. After tumour segmentation, quantification of intratumoural SWI hypointensities was conducted by the SWI-LIV technique. Following surgery, the histopathological tumour grade and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-R132H mutational status was determined and SWI-LIV values were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG), IDH1-R132H negative and positive tumours, as well as gliomas with significant and non-significant contrast-enhancement (CE) on MRI. In 30 patients, 9 LGG and 21 HGG were diagnosed. The calculation of SWI-LIV values was feasible in all tumours. Significantly higher mean SWI-LIV values were found in HGG compared to LGG (92.7 versus 30.8; p Tesla SWI-LIV might improve preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas and thus optimize patient management by quantification of hypointense microvascular structures. • 7 Tesla local image variance helps to quantify hypointense susceptibility-weighted imaging structures. • SWI-LIV is significantly increased in high-grade and IDH1-R132H negative gliomas. • SWI-LIV is a promising technique for improved preoperative glioma characterization. • Preoperative management of diffusely infiltrating gliomas will be optimized.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy and variance of individual pixels in a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera for computational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeo; Takahashi, Teruo; Bennett, Keith

    2017-02-01

    The"scientific" CMOS (sCMOS) camera architecture fundamentally differs from CCD and EMCCD cameras. In digital CCD and EMCCD cameras, conversion from charge to the digital output is generally through a single electronic chain, and the read noise and the conversion factor from photoelectrons to digital outputs are highly uniform for all pixels, although quantum efficiency may spatially vary. In CMOS cameras, the charge to voltage conversion is separate for each pixel and each column has independent amplifiers and analog-to-digital converters, in addition to possible pixel-to-pixel variation in quantum efficiency. The "raw" output from the CMOS image sensor includes pixel-to-pixel variability in the read noise, electronic gain, offset and dark current. Scientific camera manufacturers digitally compensate the raw signal from the CMOS image sensors to provide usable images. Statistical noise in images, unless properly modeled, can introduce errors in methods such as fluctuation correlation spectroscopy or computational imaging, for example, localization microscopy using maximum likelihood estimation. We measured the distributions and spatial maps of individual pixel offset, dark current, read noise, linearity, photoresponse non-uniformity and variance distributions of individual pixels for standard, off-the-shelf Hamamatsu ORCA-Flash4.0 V3 sCMOS cameras using highly uniform and controlled illumination conditions, from dark conditions to multiple low light levels between 20 to 1,000 photons / pixel per frame to higher light conditions. We further show that using pixel variance for flat field correction leads to errors in cameras with good factory calibration.

  8. A quantitative method to track protein translocation between intracellular compartments in real-time in live cells using weighted local variance image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Calmettes

    Full Text Available The genetic expression of cloned fluorescent proteins coupled to time-lapse fluorescence microscopy has opened the door to the direct visualization of a wide range of molecular interactions in living cells. In particular, the dynamic translocation of proteins can now be explored in real time at the single-cell level. Here we propose a reliable, easy-to-implement, quantitative image processing method to assess protein translocation in living cells based on the computation of spatial variance maps of time-lapse images. The method is first illustrated and validated on simulated images of a fluorescently-labeled protein translocating from mitochondria to cytoplasm, and then applied to experimental data obtained with fluorescently-labeled hexokinase 2 in different cell types imaged by regular or confocal microscopy. The method was found to be robust with respect to cell morphology changes and mitochondrial dynamics (fusion, fission, movement during the time-lapse imaging. Its ease of implementation should facilitate its application to a broad spectrum of time-lapse imaging studies.

  9. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  10. Structural network connectivity and cognition in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, A.M.; Dijk, E.; Zwiers, M.P.; van Norden, A.G.W.; de Laat, K.F.; Shumskaya, E.; Norris, David Gordon; de Leeuw, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including white matter hyperintensities (WMH), lacunes and microbleeds, and brain atrophy, are related to cognitive impairment. However, these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers for SVD do not account for all the clinical variances observed in subjects with

  11. Atherosclerosis: contrast-enhanced MR imaging of vessel wall in rabbit model--comparison of gadofosveset and gadopentetate dimeglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Miserus, Robbert-Jan J H M; Heeneman, Sylvia; Passos, Valeria Lima; Mutsaers, Peter H A; Debernardi, Nicola; Misselwitz, Bernd; Post, Mark; Daemen, Mat J A P; van Engelshoven, Jos M A; Leiner, Tim; Kooi, Marianne E

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the potential of gadofosveset for contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of plaque in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. All experiments were approved by the animal ethics committee. Thirty-one New Zealand White rabbits were included in one of four study groups: animals with atherosclerosis imaged with gadofosveset (n = 10) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7) and control animals imaged with gadofosveset (n = 7) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7). Aortic atherosclerosis was induced through endothelial denudation combined with a cholesterol-enriched diet. Control rabbits underwent a sham surgical procedure and received a regular diet. After 8 weeks, pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images of the aortic vessel wall were acquired. Relative signal enhancement was determined with dedicated software. Statistical analysis was performed by using a generalized linear mixed model. Immunohistochemical staining with CD31 and albumin was used to assess microvessel density and the albumin content of the vascular wall. Group differences were analyzed by using a chi(2) test. Gadofosveset spatial distribution and content within the vessel wall were determined with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Postcontrast signal enhancement was significantly greater for atherosclerotic than for control animals imaged with gadofosveset (P = .022). Gadopentetate dimeglumine could not enable discrimination between normal and atherosclerotic vessel walls (P = .428). PIXE analysis showed higher amounts of gadopentetate dimeglumine than gadofosveset in both atherosclerotic and normal rabbit aortas. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of albumin and increased microvessel density in the vascular walls of atherosclerotic rabbits. These results suggest that gadofosveset can be used to differentiate between atherosclerotic and normal rabbit vessel walls. http://radiology.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/250/3/682/DC1. RSNA, 2009

  12. Analytic quantification of bias and variance of coil sensitivity profile estimators for improved image reconstruction in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene; Afacan, Onur; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides a unique in-vivo capability of visualizing tissue in the human brain non-invasively, which has tremendously improved patient care over the past decades. However, there are still prominent artifacts, such as intensity inhomogeneities due to the use of an array of receiving coils (RC) to measure the MR signal or noise amplification due to accelerated imaging strategies. It is critical to mitigate these artifacts for both visual inspection and quantitative analysis. The cornerstone to address this issue pertains to the knowledge of coil sensitivity profiles (CSP) of the RCs, which describe how the measured complex signal decays with the distance to the RC. Existing methods for CSP estimation share a number of limitations: (i) they primarily focus on CSP magnitude, while it is known that the solution to the MR image reconstruction problem involves complex CSPs and (ii) they only provide point estimates of the CSPs, which makes the task of optimizing the parameters and acquisition protocol for their estimation difficult. In this paper, we propose a novel statistical framework for estimating complex-valued CSPs. We define a CSP estimator that uses spatial smoothing and additional body coil data for phase normalization. The main contribution is to provide detailed information on the statistical distribution of the CSP estimator, which yields automatic determination of the optimal degree of smoothing for ensuring minimal bias and provides guidelines to the optimal acquisition strategy.

  13. Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM): a novel approach to evaluate imaging signals in the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Robert; Scherzinger, Aaron; Kiefer, Friedemann; Hermann, Sven; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schäfers, Michael A

    2017-05-26

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. A prominent cause of cardiovascular events is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall that leads to the formation of so called atherosclerotic plaques. There is a strong clinical need to develop new, non-invasive vascular imaging techniques in order to identify high-risk plaques, which might escape detection using conventional methods based on the assessment of the luminal narrowing. In this context, molecular imaging strategies based on fluorescent tracers and fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) seem well suited to assess molecular and cellular activity. However, such an analysis demands a precise and standardized analysis method, which is orientated on reproducible anatomical landmarks, ensuring to compare equivalent regions across different subjects. We propose a novel method, Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM). Our approach is especially useful for the understanding of complex and heterogeneous regional processes during the course of atherosclerosis. Our method involves three steps, which are (I) standardisation with an additional intensity normalization, (II) permutation testing, and (III) cluster-enhancement. Although permutation testing and cluster enhancement are already well-established in functional magnetic resonance imaging, to the best of our knowledge these strategies have so far not been applied in cardiovascular molecular imaging. We tested our method using FRI images of murine aortic vessels in order to find recurring patterns in atherosclerotic plaques across multiple subjects. We demonstrate that our pixel-wise and cluster-enhanced testing approach is feasible and useful to analyse tracer distributions in FRI data sets of aortic vessels. We expect our method to be a useful tool within the field of molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques since cluster-enhanced permutation testing is a powerful approach for finding significant differences

  14. Hypoattenuation on CTA images with large vessel occlusion: timing affects conspicuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, Prasham [University of Ottawa, MD Program, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lum, Cheemun; Thornhill, Rebecca; Chakraborty, Santanu [University of Ottawa, Department of Radiology, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Dowlatshahi, Dar [Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Parenchymal hypoattenuation distal to occlusions on CTA source images (CTASI) is perceived because of the differences in tissue contrast compared to normally perfused tissue. This difference in conspicuity can be measured objectively. We evaluated the effect of contrast timing on the conspicuity of ischemic areas. We collected consecutive patients, retrospectively, between 2012 and 2014 with large vessel occlusions that had dynamic multiphase CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP). We identified areas of low cerebral blood volume on CTP maps and drew the region of interest (ROI) on the corresponding CTASI. A second ROI was placed in an area of normally perfused tissue. We evaluated conspicuity by comparing the absolute and relative change in attenuation between ischemic and normally perfused tissue over seven time points. The median absolute and relative conspicuity was greatest at the peak arterial (8.6 HU (IQR 5.1-13.9); 1.15 (1.09-1.26)), notch (9.4 HU (5.8-14.9); 1.17 (1.10-1.27)), and peak venous phases (7.0 HU (3.1-12.7); 1.13 (1.05-1.23)) compared to other portions of the time-attenuation curve (TAC). There was a significant effect of phase on the TAC for the conspicuity of ischemic vs normally perfused areas (P < 0.00001). The conspicuity of ischemic areas distal to a large artery occlusion in acute stroke is dependent on the phase of contrast arrival with dynamic CTASI and is objectively greatest in the mid-phase of the TAC. (orig.)

  15. Coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters as predictors for small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Tanaka, Eiji; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shigenobu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-05-01

    We correlated coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters with small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. One hundred and eleven patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic cerebral infarction were randomly selected for the study; 57 males and 54 females with an average age of 66.6{+-}9.6, age range 40 to 85, years old. Among them, 76 patients had a history of symptomatic cerebral infarction; 38 patients hypertension; and 24 patients diabetes mellitus. Patients with large cortical infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, demyelinating disease or mass lesions were excluded from the present study. The MRI scans were reviewed for areas with increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The small infarction was defined as a lesion less than 10 mm in diameter. The activity of von Willebrand factor (vWF) correlated significantly with the grade of caps at the anterior and posterior horns of the lateral ventricle, and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia, suggesting vWF could be a predictor for these small-vessel disease. The grade of caps at posterior horn of the lateral ventricle and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter were associated significantly with the concentration of plasma fibrinogen and reversely with the activity of antithrombin III, an inhibitory factor in coagulation system. These results indicate that hypercoagulable state may causatively relate with small-vessel disease in the territory of medullary artery branching from cortical artery. On the contrary, these coagulation parameters did not correlate significantly with small ischemic lesions in the territory of perforating artery. No correlation was observed between the level of marker proteins for platelet activation and the degree of small-vessel disease, indicating the activation of platelet could not associate with the etiology of small-vessel disease. (author)

  16. Platform image processing to study the structural properties of retinal vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabino VERDE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a technological platform specialized in assessing retinal vessel caliber and describing the relationship of the results obtained to cardiovascular risk. Retinal circulation is an area of active research by numerous groups, and there is general experimental agreement on the analysis of the patterns of the retinal blood vessels in the normal human retina. The development of automated tools designed to improve performance and decrease interobserver variability, therefore, appears necessary. 

  17. MRA Images Identification of the Artery Blood Vessel of the Knee with SOM LVQ Neural Networks as Auxiliary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Chun; Chien, Chia-Hung; Shih, Ting-Fang; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2005-01-01

    The ways of angiography are divided into two kinds at present: the invasive type and the non invasive type. Because the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has advantages of the non invasive type, thus people can accept MRA more easily. Presently, to diagnoses for the initial stage triage of the blood vessel on clinic by MRA mostly. We to be allowed to see clearly that the shape of lower limb artery which like the dendrite and the blood vessel is thick from the trunk to the thin branch, also we can see the narrow embolism and the blocked place through MRA. This study is aiming at the image of artery of blood vessel by MRA assay, and is attempting to use two-dimensional structure of SOM and LVQ to make out topologies for the shape of artery of blood vessel. We expect that MRA could be useful tools for earlier on the quick triage and auxiliary diagnosis of doctors. By actual examples truly prove that patients after peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) treatment can diagnose effectively, shorten the time of patients waiting for reports and improve the whole efficiency of the medical treatment system.

  18. Local image variance of 7 Tesla SWI is a new technique for preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas: correlation with tumour grade and IDH1 mutational status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabner, Guenther [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Carinthia University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Sciences and Social Work, Klagenfurt am Woerthersee (Austria); Kiesel, Barbara; Millesi, Matthias; Wurzer, Ayguel; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Widhalm, Georg [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, Adelheid [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Goed, Sabine [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Mallouhi, Ammar [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Marosi, Christine; Preusser, Matthias [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the value of local image variance (LIV) as a new technique for quantification of hypointense microvascular susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) structures at 7 Tesla for preoperative glioma characterization. Adult patients with neuroradiologically suspected diffusely infiltrating gliomas were prospectively recruited and 7 Tesla SWI was performed in addition to standard imaging. After tumour segmentation, quantification of intratumoural SWI hypointensities was conducted by the SWI-LIV technique. Following surgery, the histopathological tumour grade and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-R132H mutational status was determined and SWI-LIV values were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG), IDH1-R132H negative and positive tumours, as well as gliomas with significant and non-significant contrast-enhancement (CE) on MRI. In 30 patients, 9 LGG and 21 HGG were diagnosed. The calculation of SWI-LIV values was feasible in all tumours. Significantly higher mean SWI-LIV values were found in HGG compared to LGG (92.7 versus 30.8; p < 0.0001), IDH1-R132H negative compared to IDH1-R132H positive gliomas (109.9 versus 38.3; p < 0.0001) and tumours with significant CE compared to non-significant CE (120.1 versus 39.0; p < 0.0001). Our data indicate that 7 Tesla SWI-LIV might improve preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas and thus optimize patient management by quantification of hypointense microvascular structures. (orig.)

  19. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Total Magnetic Resonance Imaging Burden of Small Vessel Disease in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: An Imaging-Pathologic Study of Concept Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charidimou, Andreas; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Reijmer, Yael D; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Lauer, Arne; Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Frosch, Matthew; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Ayres, Alison; Rosand, Jonathan; Gurol, Mahmut Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characteristically associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of small vessel brain injury, including strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. Although these neuroimaging markers reflect distinct pathophysiologic aspects in CAA, no studies to date have combined these structural imaging features to gauge total brain small vessel disease burden in CAA. To investigate whether a composite score can be developed to capture the total brain MRI burden of small vessel disease in CAA and to explore whether this score contributes independent and complementary information about CAA severity, defined as intracerebral hemorrhage during life or bleeding-related neuropathologic changes. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined a single-center neuropathologic CAA cohort of eligible patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from January 2, 2015, to January 9, 2016. Patients with pathologic evidence of CAA (ie, any presence of CAA from routinely collected brain biopsy specimen, biopsy specimen at hematoma evacuation, or autopsy) and available brain MRI sequences of adequate quality, including T2-weighted, T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo, and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, were considered for the study. Brain MRIs were rated for lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. All 4 MRI lesions were incorporated into a prespecified ordinal total small vessel disease score, ranging from 0 to 6 points. Associations with severity of CAA-associated vasculopathic changes (fibrinoid necrosis and concentric splitting of the wall), clinical presentation, number of intracerebral hemorrhages, and other

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis of plus disease via measurement of vessel thickness in retinal fundus images of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloumi, Faraz; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Casti, Paola; Ells, Anna L

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the characteristics of retinal vessels such as width and tortuosity can be signs of the presence of several diseases such retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy. Plus disease is an indicator of ROP which requires treatment and is signified by an increase in posterior venular width. In this work, we present image processing techniques for the detection, segmentation, tracking, and measurement of the width of the major temporal arcade (MTA), which is the thickest venular branch in the retina. Several image processing techniques have been employed, including the use of Gabor filters to detect the MTA, morphological image processing to obtain its skeleton, Canny's method to detect and select MTA vessel-edge candidates, least-squares fitting to interpolate the MTA edges, and geometrical procedures to measure the width of the MTA. The results, obtained using 110 retinal fundus images of preterm infants, indicate a statistically highly significant difference in MTA width of normal cases as compared to cases with plus disease (pcomputer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of plus disease with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76. The proposed methods may be used in CAD of plus disease and timely treatment of ROP in a clinical or teleophthalmological setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative measurement of changes in retinal vessel diameter in ocular fundus images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Grunkin, Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2000-01-01

    The change in diameter of retinal vessels as a function of increasing distance to the optic disc is believed to be indicative of the risk level of various vascular diseases such as generalised arteriosclerosis and Diabetes Mellitus. In particular, focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN) is considered re...

  3. Quantitative Measurement of Changes in Retinal Vessel Diameter in Ocular Fundus Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Grunkin, Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    1999-01-01

    The Change in diameter of retinal vessels as a funcion of increasing distance to the optic disc is believed to be indicative of the risk level of various vascular diseases such as generalised arteriosclerosis and Diabetes Mellitus. In particular, Focal Arteriolar Narrowing (FAN) is considered...

  4. Comparison of vessel contrast measured with a scanning-beam digital x-ray system and an image intensifier/television system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, M A; Wilfley, B P; Heanue, J A; Betts, T D; Van Lysel, M S

    2001-02-01

    Vessel contrast was measured in the fluoroscopic images produced by a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system and an image intensifier/television (II/TV) based system. The SBDX system electronically scans a series of pencil x-ray beams across the patient, each of which is directed at a distant small-area detector array. The reduction in detected scatter achieved with this geometry was expected to provide an increase in image contrast. Vessel contrast was evaluated from images of a phantom containing iodinated tubes. The vessels were inserted into an acrylic stack to provide a patient-mimicking scattering medium. Vessel diameter ranged from 0.3 to 3.1 mm. Images were acquired at 100 kVp with the SBDX and II/TV systems and averaged to reduce x-ray noise. The II/TV system was operated in the 6-in. image intensifier mode with an anti-scatter grid. The increase in contrast in the SBDX images, expressed as a ratio of the measured SBDX and II/TV contrasts, ranged from 1.63 to 1.79 for individual vessels. This agreed well with a prediction of the contrast improvement ratio for this experiment, based on measurements of the scatter fraction, object-plane line spread functions, and consideration of the source spectrum and detector absorption properties. The predicted contrast improvement ratio for SBDX relative to II/TV images was 1.62 to 1.77.

  5. Automated Vessel Segmentation Using Infinite Perimeter Active Contour Model with Hybrid Region Information with Application to Retinal Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yitian; Rada, Lavdie; Chen, Ke; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-09-01

    Automated detection of blood vessel structures is becoming of crucial interest for better management of vascular disease. In this paper, we propose a new infinite active contour model that uses hybrid region information of the image to approach this problem. More specifically, an infinite perimeter regularizer, provided by using L(2) Lebesgue measure of the γ -neighborhood of boundaries, allows for better detection of small oscillatory (branching) structures than the traditional models based on the length of a feature's boundaries (i.e., H(1) Hausdorff measure). Moreover, for better general segmentation performance, the proposed model takes the advantage of using different types of region information, such as the combination of intensity information and local phase based enhancement map. The local phase based enhancement map is used for its superiority in preserving vessel edges while the given image intensity information will guarantee a correct feature's segmentation. We evaluate the performance of the proposed model by applying it to three public retinal image datasets (two datasets of color fundus photography and one fluorescein angiography dataset). The proposed model outperforms its competitors when compared with other widely used unsupervised and supervised methods. For example, the sensitivity (0.742), specificity (0.982) and accuracy (0.954) achieved on the DRIVE dataset are very close to those of the second observer's annotations.

  6. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  7. Implementation of 3D-Imaging technique for visual testing in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Tanco, André

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed by request of Dekra Industrial AB. Dekra Industrial AB is a Swedish subsidiary company of the German company Dekra and works for example with safety inspections within the nuclear power industry. The inspections performed by the company are often non-destructive testing (NDT) such as visual inspections of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The inspection methods used today are considered to be further developed and there is a strong demand of improving the...

  8. Quantification and visualization of injury and regeneration in the developing ciliated epithelium using quantitative flow imaging and speckle variance optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Ute A.; Huang, Brendan K.; Mis, Emily K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2017-02-01

    Premature infants are at a high risk for respiratory diseases owing to an underdeveloped respiratory system that is very susceptible to infection and inflammation. One aspect of respiratory health is the state of the ciliated respiratory epithelium which lines the trachea and bronchi. The ciliated epithelium is responsible for trapping and removing pathogens and pollutants from the lungs and an impairment of ciliary functionality can lead to recurring respiratory infections and subsequent lung damage. Mechanisms of cilia-driven fluid flow itself but also factors influenced by development like ciliary density and flow generation are incompletely understood. Furthermore, medical interventions like intubation and accidental aspiration can lead to focal or diffuse loss of cilia and disruption of flow. In this study we use two animal models, Xenopus embryo and ex vivo mouse trachea, to analyze flow defects in the injured ciliated epithelium. Injury is generated either mechanically with a scalpel or chemically by calcium chloride (CaCl2) shock, which efficiently but reversibly deciliates the embryo skin. In this study we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to quantify cilia driven fluid flow over the surface of the Xenopus embryo. We additionally visualized damage to the ciliated epithelium by capturing 3D speckle variance images that highlight beating cilia. Mechanical injury disrupted cilia-driven fluid flow over the injured site, which led to a reduction in cilia-driven fluid flow over the whole surface of the embryo (n=7). The calcium chloride shock protocol proved to be highly effective in deciliating embryos (n=6). 3D speckle variance images visualized a loss of cilia and cilia-driven flow was halted immediately after application. We also applied CaCl2-shock to cultured ex vivo mouse trachea (n=8) and found, similarly to effects in Xenopus embryo, an extensive loss of cilia with resulting cessation of flow. We

  9. Quantification and visualization of injury and regeneration to the ciliated epithelium using quantitative flow imaging and speckle variance optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Ute A.; Huang, Brendan K.; Mis, Emily K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Mucociliary flow is an important defense mechanism in the lung to remove inhaled pathogens and pollutants. A disruption of ciliary flow can lead to respiratory infections. Even though patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) either have or are very susceptible to respiratory infections, mucociliary flow is not well understood in the ICU setting. We recently demonstrated that hyperoxia, a consequence of administering supplemental oxygen to a patient in respiratory failure, can lead to a significant reduction of cilia-driven fluid flow in mouse trachea. There are other factors that are relevant to ICU medicine that can damage the ciliated tracheal epithelium, including inhalation injury and endotracheal tube placement. In this study we use two animal models, Xenopus embryo and ex vivo mouse trachea, to analyze flow defects in the injured ciliated epithelium. Injury is generated either mechanically with a scalpel or chemically by calcium chloride (CaCl2) shock, which efficiently but reversibly deciliates the embryo skin. In this study we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to quantify cilia driven fluid flow over the surface of the Xenopus embryo. We additionally visualized damage to the ciliated epithelium by capturing 3D speckle variance images that highlight beating cilia. Mechanical injury disrupted cilia-driven fluid flow over the injured site, which led to a reduction in cilia-driven fluid flow over the whole surface of the embryo (n=7). The calcium chloride shock protocol proved to be highly effective in deciliating embryos (n=6). 3D speckle variance images visualized a loss of cilia and cilia-driven flow was halted immediately after application. We also applied CaCl2-shock to cultured ex vivo mouse trachea (n=8) and found, similarly to effects in Xenopus embryo, an extensive loss of cilia with resulting cessation of flow. We investigated the regeneration of the ciliated epithelium after an 8 day incubation period

  10. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of vessels affected by transplant arteriosclerosis in an experimental mouse aortic allograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, J; Budinsky, L; Reulbach, U; Weyand, M; Hess, A; Ensminger, S M

    2011-03-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is still the leading cause of late mortality after heart transplantation despite advances in immunosuppression regimes. Experimental mouse models have substantially contributed to a better understanding of the multifactorial pathogenesis, but the major limitation of these studies is the difficulty in monitoring progression of transplant arteriosclerosis over time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether MR measurements are sensitive enough to detect characteristic vascular lesions in a small animal transplantation model. For this purpose we investigated 22 iso- and allogeneic aortic graft transplanted mice in vivo with a 4.7 T MR scanner using a 2D-RARE technique, 3D time-of-flight angiography and 3D phase contrast angiography as well as a special snake-based reconstruction algorithm. The MR lumen values of patency from native images and from 3D vessel reconstructions of the respective methods were correlated with conventional histological analysis. A comparison of the different techniques showed that angiographic MR modalities correlated well with histological measurements. 2D-RARE sequences were inferior to the sequences obtained by other ones. Superior correlations and the most accurate results were found for vessel reconstruction based on 3D angiographic time-of-flight data. These data demonstrate that mouse in vivo MR imaging is sensitive enough to detect and quantify vascular changes caused by transplant arteriosclerosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Boosted learned kernels for data-driven vesselness measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Common vessel centerline extraction methods rely on the computation of a measure providing the likeness of the local appearance of the data to a curvilinear tube-like structure. The most popular techniques rely on empirically designed (hand crafted) measurements as the widely used Hessian vesselness, the recent oriented flux tubeness or filters (e.g. the Gaussian matched filter) that are developed to respond to local features, without exploiting any context information nor the rich structural information embedded in the data. At variance with the previously proposed methods, we propose a completely data-driven approach for learning a vesselness measure from expert-annotated dataset. For each data point (voxel or pixel), we extract the intensity values in a neighborhood region, and estimate the discriminative convolutional kernel yielding a positive response for vessel data and negative response for non-vessel data. The process is iterated within a boosting framework, providing a set of linear filters, whose combined response is the learned vesselness measure. We show the results of the general-use proposed method on the DRIVE retinal images dataset, comparing its performance against the hessian-based vesselness, oriented flux antisymmetry tubeness, and vesselness learned with a probabilistic boosting tree or with a regression tree. We demonstrate the superiority of our approach that yields a vessel detection accuracy of 0.95, with respect to 0.92 (hessian), 0.90 (oriented flux) and 0.85 (boosting tree).

  12. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP1-01: Bias and Computational Efficiency of Variance Reduction Methods for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Imaging Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, D; Badano, A [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics and Software Reliability, OSEL/CDRH, Food & Drug Administration, MD (United States); Sempau, J [Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Variance reduction techniques (VRTs) are employed in Monte Carlo simulations to obtain estimates with reduced statistical uncertainty for a given simulation time. In this work, we study the bias and efficiency of a VRT for estimating the response of imaging detectors. Methods: We implemented Directed Sampling (DS), preferentially directing a fraction of emitted optical photons directly towards the detector by altering the isotropic model. The weight of each optical photon is appropriately modified to maintain simulation estimates unbiased. We use a Monte Carlo tool called fastDETECT2 (part of the hybridMANTIS open-source package) for optical transport, modified for VRT. The weight of each photon is calculated as the ratio of original probability (no VRT) and the new probability for a particular direction. For our analysis of bias and efficiency, we use pulse height spectra, point response functions, and Swank factors. We obtain results for a variety of cases including analog (no VRT, isotropic distribution), and DS with 0.2 and 0.8 optical photons directed towards the sensor plane. We used 10,000, 25-keV primaries. Results: The Swank factor for all cases in our simplified model converged fast (within the first 100 primaries) to a stable value of 0.9. The root mean square error per pixel for DS VRT for the point response function between analog and VRT cases was approximately 5e-4. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that DS VRT does not affect the estimate of the mean for the Swank factor. Our findings indicate that it may be possible to design VRTs for imaging detector simulations to increase computational efficiency without introducing bias.

  13. The optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomographic imaging plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm can improve the superior mesenteric vessel image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zuo, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Jia-Ning; Liu, Huai-Jun; Liang, Guang-Lu; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the improvement of the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The gemstone spectral CT angiographic data of 25 patients were reconstructed in the following three groups: 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic imaging, and the optimal monochromatic plus 40%iterative reconstruction mode. The CT value, image noises (IN), background CT value and noises, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image scores of the vessels and surrounding tissues were analyzed. In the 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic images plus 40% iterative reconstruction group, the mean scores of image quality were 3.86, 4.24 and 4.25 for the superior mesenteric artery and 3.46, 3.78 and 3.81 for the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The image quality scores for the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction groups were significantly greater than for the 70KeV group (Piterative reconstruction group than in the 70KeV group. The optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction group had significantly (Piterative reconstruction using low-contrast agent dosage and low injection rate can significantly improve the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term safety and feasibility of three-vessel multimodality intravascular imaging in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Masanori; Radu, Maria D; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M

    2015-01-01

    in the setting of IBIS-4 study. IBIS4 (NCT00962416) is a prospective cohort study conducted at five European centers including 103 STEMI patients who underwent serial three-vessel coronary imaging during primary PCI and at 13 months. The feasibility parameter was successful imaging, defined as the number......-modality three-vessel i.c. imaging in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI is consistent a high degree of success and can be performed safely without impact on cardiovascular events at long-term follow-up....

  15. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a pulsed laser diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2006-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that is based on the detection of acoustic waves generated by absorption of pulsed light by tissue chromophores such as hemoglobin in blood. For this technique, usually large and costly Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers are used. These lasers provide a pulse

  16. Non-uniform object counting method in large-format pyramid images applied to CD31 vessel counting in whole-mount digital pathology sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mayan; Hill, Melissa L.; Liu, Kela; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Whole-mount pathology imaging has the potential to revolutionize clinical practice by preserving context lost when tissue is cut to fit onto conventional slides. Whole-mount digital images are very large, ranging from 4GB to greater than 50GB, making concurrent processing infeasible. Block-processing is a method commonly used to divide the image into smaller blocks and process them individually. This approach is useful for certain tasks, but leads to over-counting objects located on the seams between blocks. This issue is exaggerated as the block size decreases. In this work we apply a novel technique to enumerate vessels, a clinical task that would benefit from automation in whole-mount images. Whole-mount sections of rabbit VX2 tumors were digitized. Color thresholding was used to segment the brown CD31- DAB stained vessels. This vessel enumeration was applied to the entire whole-mount image in two distinct phases of block-processing. The first (whole-processing) phase used a basic grid and only counted objects that did not intersect the block's borders. The second (seam-processing) phase used a shifted grid to ensure all blocks captured the block-seam regions from the original grid. Only objects touching this seam-intersection were counted. For validation, segmented vessels were randomly embedded into a whole-mount image. The technique was tested on the image using 24 different block-widths. Results indicated that the error reaches a minimum at a block-width equal to the maximum vessel length, with no improvement as the block-width increases further. Object-density maps showed very good correlation between the vessel-dense regions and the pathologist outlined tumor regions.

  17. Imaging large vessel vasculitis with fully integrated PET/MRI: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einspieler, Ingo; Pyka, Thomas; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Thuermel, Klaus; Wolfram, Sabine; Moog, Philipp [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nephrology, Munich (Germany); Reeps, Christian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of hybrid [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI in patients with large vessel vasculitis (LVV) by comparing visual and quantitative parameters to that of PET/CT. Furthermore, the value of PET/MRI in disease activity and extent of LVV was assessed. A total of 16 [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI and 12 [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/CT examinations were performed in 12 patients with LVV. MRI of the vessel wall by T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences was used for anatomical localization of FDG uptake and identification of morphological changes associated with LVV. In addition, contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed. The vascular FDG uptake in the vasculitis group was compared to a reference group of 16 patients using a four-point visual score. Visual scores and quantitative parameters [maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background ratio (TBR)] were compared between PET/MRI and PET/CT. Furthermore, correlations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and quantitative PET results, as well the extent of vasculitis in PET, MRI/CE-MRA and combined PET/MRI, were analysed. TBRs, SUV{sub max} values and visual scores correlated well between PET/MRI and PET/CT (r = 0.92, r = 0.91; r = 0.84, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between both modalities concerning SUV{sub max} measurements and visual scores. In PET/MRI, PET alone revealed abnormal FDG uptake in 86 vascular regions. MRI/CE-MRA indicated 49 vessel segments with morphological changes related to vasculitis, leading to a total number of 95 vasculitis regions in combination with PET. Strong and significant correlations between CRP and disease extent in PET alone (r = 0.75, p = 0.0067) and PET/MRI (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001) in contrast to MRI/CE-MRA only were observed. Regarding disease activity, no significant correlations were seen between quantitative PET results and CRP, although there

  18. Reporting explained variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron; Fletcher, Harold J.

    The importance of reporting explained variance (sometimes referred to as magnitude of effects) in ANOVA designs is discussed in this paper. Explained variance is an estimate of the strength of the relationship between treatment (or other factors such as sex, grade level, etc.) and dependent variables of interest to the researcher(s). Three methods that can be used to obtain estimates of explained variance in ANOVA designs are described and applied to 16 studies that were reported in recent volumes of this journal. The results show that, while in most studies the treatment accounts for a relatively small proportion of the variance in dependent variable scores., in., some studies the magnitude of the treatment effect is respectable. The authors recommend that researchers in science education report explained variance in addition to the commonly reported tests of significance, since the latter are inadequate as the sole basis for making decisions about the practical importance of factors of interest to science education researchers.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray imaging for nondestructive monitoring of sap flow dynamics through xylem vessel elements in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Koo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties is essential to unravel the functional features of water transport from roots to shoots in vascular plants. To evaluate quantitatively the safety and efficiency of this system, nondestructive methods to assess the interactions between sap ascent kinetics and xylem structure are required. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was employed to observe anatomical structures and sap flow dynamics in rice (Oryza sativa) xylem simultaneously. The phase-contrast imaging technique allowed nondestructive observation of the xylem structural characteristics and the air-water interfaces generated by dehydration-rehydration cycles in excised leaves. This X-ray microimaging method provided a unique tool to characterize the perforated end walls of vessel elements and to evaluate their influence on hydraulic resistance during the refilling of embolized vessels. The real-time monitoring of the axial and radial sap flow under various environmental conditions highlighted the important role of perforation plates. In summary, we report a new methodology to study the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties with μm spatial and ms temporal resolution using X-ray microscopy. The experimental procedure described herein provides a useful handle to understand key sap transport phenomena in xylem. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  20. [Ultrasound imaging of bridge vessel transplant used to reconstruct the tributary of middle hepatic vein in living donor liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan; Yuan, Chao-xin; Yan, Lü-nan; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Zhong-wei

    2007-06-01

    To discuss the application of color Doppler ultrasound in the imaging of bridge vein transplant used to reconstruct the tributary of the middle hepatic vein in adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). From December 2005 to July 2006, 25 patients underwent the adult living donor liver transplantation with right lobe grafts without middle hepatic vein. Tributaries of middle hepatic vein larger than 5 mm were reconstructed with great saphenous vein. Types and numbers of reconstructed tributaries of middle hepatic vein were listed below: single V5 (n=8), double V5 (n=2), the V5 and V8 (n=9), V8 (n=6). The successive investigation of the vein grafts was performed by color Doppler ultrasound in the period of from postoperative 7 days to 8 months. All vein transplants were detected by color Doppler ultrasound. Among them, 34 vein transplants of 24 cases undergoing adult LDLT appeared patent, but one case was suspected to have reconstructed finally the bypass vessels for blood circle regardless of the grafted bridge vein probably occurring the thrombosis. Color Doppler ultrasound can precisely detect and appear the postoperative bridge vessel grafted, and also measure the blood flow velocity in grafted vein used to reconstruct the tributaries of the middle hepatic vein in LDLT.

  1. Removal of Arterial Vessel Contributions in Susceptibility-Weighted Images for Quantification of Normalized Visible Venous Volume in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Winchell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate a new postprocessing framework that eliminates arterial vessel signal contributions in the quantification of normalized visible venous volume (NVVV, a ratio between venous and brain volume in susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI exams in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. Materials and Methods. We conducted a retrospective study and qualitatively reviewed for hypointense arterial vessel contamination in SWI exams from 21 children with SCD. We developed a postprocessing framework using magnetic resonance angiography in combination with SWI to provide a more accurate quantification of NVVV. NVVV was calculated before and after removing arterial vessel contributions to determine the error from hypointense arterial vessels in quantifying NVVV. Results. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination was observed in 86% SWI exams and was successfully corrected by the proposed method. The contributions of hypointense arterial vessels in the original SWI were significant and accounted for approximately 33% of the NVVV [uncorrected NVVV = 0.012 ± 0.005 versus corrected NVVV = 0.008 ± 0.003 (mean ± SD, P<0.01]. Conclusion. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination occurred in the majority of SWI exams and led to a sizeable overestimation of the visible venous volume. A prospective longitudinal study is needed to evaluate if quantitation of NVVV was improved and to assess the role of NVVV as a biomarker of SCD severity or stroke risk.

  2. Computerized assessment of vessel morphological changes during treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: report of a case imaged serially by MRA over four years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Ewend, Matthew; Vredenburgh, James; Friedman, Allan; Lin, Weili; Wilber, Kathy; Zeng, Donglin; Aylward, Stephen R; Reardon, David

    2009-08-01

    A patient with glioblastoma multiforme underwent serial computerized analysis of tumor-associated vasculature defined from magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) scans obtained over almost a four year period. The clinical course included tumor resection with subsequent radiation therapy, a long symptom-free interval, emergence of a new malignant focus, resection of that focus, a stroke, and treatment with chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. Image analysis methods included segmentation of vessels from each MRA and statistical comparison of vessel morphology over 4 regions of interest (the initial tumor site, the second tumor site, a distant control region, and the entire brain) to the same 4 regions of interest in 50 healthy volunteers (26 females and 24 males; mean age 39 years). Results suggested that following completion of focal radiation therapy (RT) vessel shape abnormalities, if elevated at the time of RT completion, may progressively normalize for months in focal regions, that progressively severe vessel shape abnormalities can precede the emergence of a gadolinium enhancing lesion by months, that lesion resection can produce a dramatic but highly transient drop in abnormal vessel tortuosity both focally and globally, and that treatment with anti-angiogenic agents does not necessarily normalize vessel shape. Quantitative measurements of vessel morphology as defined from MRA may provide useful insights into tumor development and response to therapy.

  3. Spectral diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence imaging can perform early prediction of blood vessel occlusion in skin flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Caigang; Hoe-Kong Chui, Christopher; Sheoran, Gyanendra; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-11-17

    Flap transfer has become a common technique in reconstructive surgery. However, a significant number of compromised skin flaps are not successfully salvaged because the current clinical method for flap assessment relies heavily on the clinician's experience. Vascular occlusion is the major reason for flap failure, thus the accurate and objective early prediction of blood vessel occlusion is vitally important. Our parallel point measurement study has demonstrated the great potential of joint diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy in the early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps. Unfortunately, the technique of point measurements is not suitable to examine a large skin flap when a high spatial resolution is required. In this study, we attempted to overcome this problem by performing spectral diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence imaging on a rat skin flap model. Both imaging data and reconstructed spectra were used to statistically differentiate control flaps, arterially occluded flaps and venously occluded flaps. Our preliminary results suggest that the technique of joint diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopic imaging can achieve high classification accuracy thus could be used to detect and differentiate flaps with venous and arterial occlusion accurately at an early time point in a large skin flap. Typical reconstructed spectra of (a) diffuse reflectance and (b) autofluorescence after normalization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Alexei V [Chicago, IL; Zelepouga, Serguei A [Hoffman Estates, IL; Rue, David M [Chicago, IL

    2012-01-10

    A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

  5. Differential transport function of lymphatic vessels in the rat tail model and the long-term effects of Indocyanine Green as assessed with near-infrared imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWeiler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Near-infrared (NIR imaging has emerged as a novel imaging modality for assessing lymphatic function in vivo. While the technique has provided quantitative data previously unavailable, questions remain in regards to the spatiotemporal capabilities of the approach. We address three of the more important issues here using the rodent tail, one of the most widely utilized in vivo model systems in the lymphatic literature. Specifically we demonstrate 1 the transient vs. steady state response of lymphatics to tracer injection, 2 the functional characteristics of multiple collecting vessels draining the same tissue space in parallel, and 3 the long-term consequences of fluorescent tracers on lymphatic function to repeated functional measurements.Methods: Rat tails were imaged with NIR and metrics of function were calculated for both collecting vessels that drain the tail. A nitric oxide donor cream (GTNO was applied to the tail. Additionally, two different NIR dyes, indocyanine green (ICG and LI-COR IRDye 800CW PEG, were utilized for function imaging at the time of initial injection and at 1, 2, and 4 week follow-up time points after which both draining lymph nodes were harvested.Results and Discussion: Significant differences were found between the two collecting vessels such that the vessel first showing fluorescence (dominant produced enhanced functional metrics compared to the second vessel (non-dominant. GTNO significantly reduced lymphatic function in the non-dominant vessel compared to the dominant. ICG remained visible in the tail for 2 weeks after injection and was accompanied by significant losses in lymphatic function and enlarged draining lymph nodes. The Licor tracer also remained visible for 2 weeks. However, the dye produced significantly lower effects on lymphatic function than ICG, and lymph nodes were not enlarged at any time point, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate contrast agent for longitudinal lymphatic

  6. Differential transport function of lymphatic vessels in the rat tail model and the long-term effects of Indocyanine Green as assessed with near-infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Michael; Dixon, J Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging has emerged as a novel imaging modality for assessing lymphatic function in vivo. While the technique has provided quantitative data previously unavailable, questions remain in regards to the spatiotemporal capabilities of the approach. We address three of the more important issues here using the rodent tail, one of the most widely utilized in vivo model systems in the lymphatic literature. Specifically we demonstrate (1) the transient vs. steady state response of lymphatics to tracer injection, (2) the functional characteristics of multiple collecting vessels draining the same tissue space in parallel, and (3) the long-term consequences of fluorescent tracers on lymphatic function to repeated functional measurements. Rat tails were imaged with NIR and metrics of function were calculated for both collecting vessels that drain the tail. A nitric oxide donor cream (GTNO) was applied to the tail. Additionally, two different NIR dyes, indocyanine green (ICG) and LI-COR IRDye 800CW PEG, were utilized for function imaging at the time of initial injection and at 1, 2, and 4 week follow-up time points after which both draining lymph nodes were harvested. Significant differences were found between the two collecting vessels such that the vessel first showing fluorescence (dominant) produced enhanced functional metrics compared to the second vessel (non-dominant). GTNO significantly reduced lymphatic function in the non-dominant vessel compared to the dominant. ICG remained visible in the tail for 2 weeks after injection and was accompanied by significant losses in lymphatic function and enlarged draining lymph nodes. The Licor tracer also remained visible for 2 weeks. However, the dye produced significantly lower effects on lymphatic function than ICG, and lymph nodes were not enlarged at any time point, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate contrast agent for longitudinal lymphatic imaging.

  7. Automatic detection and segmentation of vascular structures in dermoscopy images using a novel vesselness measure based on pixel redness and tubularness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Pegah; Lui, Harvey; Stoecker, William V.; Lee, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Vascular structures are one of the most important features in the diagnosis and assessment of skin disorders. The presence and clinical appearance of vascular structures in skin lesions is a discriminating factor among different skin diseases. In this paper, we address the problem of segmentation of vascular patterns in dermoscopy images. Our proposed method is composed of three parts. First, based on biological properties of human skin, we decompose the skin to melanin and hemoglobin component using independent component analysis of skin color images. The relative quantities and pure color densities of each component were then estimated. Subsequently, we obtain three reference vectors of the mean RGB values for normal skin, pigmented skin and blood vessels from the hemoglobin component by averaging over 100000 pixels of each group outlined by an expert. Based on the Euclidean distance thresholding, we generate a mask image that extracts the red regions of the skin. Finally, Frangi measure was applied to the extracted red areas to segment the tubular structures. Finally, Otsu's thresholding was applied to segment the vascular structures and get a binary vessel mask image. The algorithm was implemented on a set of 50 dermoscopy images. In order to evaluate the performance of our method, we have artificially extended some of the existing vessels in our dermoscopy data set and evaluated the performance of the algorithm to segment the newly added vessel pixels. A sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 87% were achieved.

  8. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels using a homodyne interferometer with zero-crossing triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiao; Gao, Yingzhe; Ma, Zhenhe; Zhou, Hongxian; Wang, Ruikang K.; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a quasinoncontact photoacoustic imaging method using a homodyne interferometer with a long coherence length laser. The generated photoacoustic signal is detected by a system that is locked at its maximum sensitivity through the use of balanced detection and zero-crossing triggering. The balanced detector is substantially equalized, so its output is zero when the system reaches the maximum sensitivity. The synchronization approach is used to trigger the excitation and detection of the photoacoustic signal. The system is immune to ambient vibrations. A thin water layer on the sample surface is used to reduce the effect of the rough tissue surface. The performance of the system is demonstrated by in vivo imaging of the microvasculature in mouse ears.

  9. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  10. Association of Collateral Blood Vessels Detected by Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Neurological Outcome After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Havenon, Adam; Haynor, David R; Tirschwell, David L; Majersik, Jennifer J; Smith, Gordon; Cohen, Wendy; Andre, Jalal B

    2017-04-01

    Robust collateral blood vessels have been associated with better neurologic outcome following acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The most commonly used methods for identifying collaterals are contrast-based angiographic imaging techniques, which are not possible in all patients after AIS. To assess the association between the presence of collateral vessels identified using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, a technique that does not require exogenous administration of contrast, and neurologic outcome in patients after AIS. This retrospective cohort study examined 38 patients after AIS admitted to a tertiary academic medical center between 2012 and 2014 who underwent MRI with ASL. According to a prespecified hypothesis, ASL images were graded for the presence of collaterals by 2 neuroradiologists. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at discharge and other composite data were abstracted from the medical record by a neurologist blinded to radiologic data. Of the 38 patients, 19 (50.0%) were male, and the mean (SD) age was 61 (20) years. In 25 of 38 patients (65.8%), collaterals were detected using ASL, which were significantly associated with both a good outcome (mRS score of 0-2 at discharge; P = .02) and a 1-point decrease in mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7-23.4; P = .005). In a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model, controlling for admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, history of atrial fibrillation, premorbid mRS score, and stroke parent artery status, there was a strong association between the presence of ASL collaterals and a 1-point decrease in the mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.2-22.1; P = .03). Following AIS, the presence of ASL collaterals is strongly associated with better neurological outcome at hospital discharge. This novel association between ASL collaterals and improved neurologic outcome may help guide prognosis and management, particularly in patients

  11. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dental School

    1999-09-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  12. Automated method for identification and artery-venous classification of vessel trees in retinal vessel networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Joshi

    Full Text Available The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44% correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42%.

  13. Remote non-invasive stereoscopic imaging of blood vessels: first in-vivo results of a new multispectral contrast enhancement technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Mastik, F.; Cate, F.J. ten; Neumann, H.A.M.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    We describe a contactless optical technique selectively enhancing superficial blood vessels below variously pigmented intact human skin by combining images in different spectral bands. Two CMOS-cameras, with apochromatic lenses and dual-band LED-arrays, simultaneously streamed Left (L) and Right (R)

  14. Genetic variants of the NOTCH3 gene in the elderly and magnetic resonance imaging correlates of age-related cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Zeginigg (Marion); M. Wiltgen (Marco); P. Freudenberger (Paul); K. Petrovic (Katja); M. Cavalieri (Margherita); P. Gider (Pierre); C. Enzinger (Christian); M. Fornage (Myriam); S. Debette (Stéphanie); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); L.J. Launer (Lenore)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebral small vessel disease-related brain lesions such as white matter lesions and lacunes are common findings of magnetic resonance imaging in the elderly. These lesions are thought to be major contributors to disability in old age, and risk factors that include age and hypertension

  15. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  16. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  17. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  18. The egg, the vessels and the words. From Izdubar to Answer to Job for an imaging thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Christian

    2012-06-01

    This essay on The Red Book seeks to underscore a characteristic specific to Jung's approach to psychoanalysis. In this book, and more generally, in all of his writings, Jung's thinking is based on his personal experience of the unconscious, in which he leaves himself open to progressive encounters. Some of them, in the years 1913-14 and 1929-30, particularly his meeting with the giant Izdubar, were quite threatening. As a result, he forged an original way of thinking that is qualified here as 'imaging' and 'emergent'. The Red Book served as the first vessel for theories Jung would later express. His way of thinking, with its failures and semi-successes, all of which are always temporary, of course, is compared to the art of the potter. The author shows the kinship between the formation of the main Jungian concepts and the teachings of the French poet, professor, and art critic Yves Bonnefoy. He also considers certain recurrent formal themes in the work of contemporary German painter and sculptor Anselm Kiefer. Lastly, this epistemological study, constantly aware of the demands of Jungian clinical practice, demonstrates the continuity in Jung's work, from The Red Book to Answer to Job, where Jung ultimately elaborated a conception of history that defines our ethical position today. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  19. Quantification of microvascular response to ionizing radiation with speckle variance Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Leigh

    Cancer cells require access to blood vessels for oxygen and nutrients to enable growth and metastasis, making the tumour vasculature an attractive potential target for cancer therapies. Recent evidence suggests that the tumour vasculature plays a significant role in tumour response to high dose radiation therapy; however this effect is not well characterized due to limitations in quantitative imaging of the microvasculature. Speckle variance optical coherence tomography is an emerging imaging modality capable of 3D, non-invasive imaging of in vivo microvasculature. This thesis outlines the work done to test the hypothesis that svOCT imaging can be used to quantitatively monitor the vascular effects of high dose radiotherapy in a preclinical model. This was achieved through the development of a quantification pipeline for longitudinal 3-D svOCT images of microvascular radioresponse.

  20. Use of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Enhanced Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Mean Vessel Density Imaging to Monitor Antiangiogenic Effects of Sorafenib on Experimental Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuohui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effectiveness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide enhanced susceptibility weighted imaging (USPIO-enhanced SWI and mean vessel density imaging (Q in monitoring antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thirty-five HCC xenografts were established. USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q were performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner at baseline, 7, 14, and 21 days after Sorafenib treatment. Intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS and Q were serially measured and compared between the treated (n = 15 and control groups (n = 15. Both ITSS and Q were significantly lower in the treated group at each time point (P < 0.05. Measurements in the treated group showed that ITSS persisted at 7 days (P = 0.669 and increased at 14 and 21 days (P < 0.05, while Q significantly declined at 7 days (P = 0.028 and gradually increased at 14 and 21 days. In the treated group, significant correlation was found between Q and histologic microvessel density (MVD (r = 0.753, P < 0.001, and ITSS correlated well with MVD (r = 0.742, P = 0.002 after excluding the data from baseline. This study demonstrated that USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q could provide novel biomarkers for evaluating antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on HCC.

  1. CT angiography of the head-and-neck vessels acquired with low tube voltage, low iodine, and iterative image reconstruction: clinical evaluation of radiation dose and image quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-lan Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of head-and-neck Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA with low tube voltage and low concentration contrast media combined with iterative reconstruction algorithm. METHODS: 92 patients were randomly divided into group A and B: patients in group A received a conventional scan with 120 kVp and contrast media of 320 mgI/ml. Patients in group B, 80 kVp and contrast media of 270 mgI/ml were used along with iterative reconstruction algorithm techniques. Image quality, radiation dose and the effectively consumed iodine amount between two groups were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: Image quality of CTA of head-and-neck vessels obtained from patients in group B was significantly improved quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, CT attenuation values in group B were also significantly higher than that in group A (p<0.001. Furthermore, compared with the protocol whereby 120 kVp and 320 mgI/dl were administrated, the mean radiation dose and consumed iodine amount in protocol B were also reduced by 50% and 15.6%, respectively (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: With the help of iterative reconstruction algorithm techniques, the head-and-neck CTA with diagnostic quality can be adequately acquired with low tube voltage and low concentration contrast media. This method could be potentially extended to include any part of the body to reduce the risks related to ionizing radiation.

  2. Normalizing Tumor Vessels To Increase the Enzyme-Induced Retention and Targeting of Gold Nanoparticle for Breast Cancer Imaging and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Ruan, Shaobo; Yu, Wenqi; Wang, Ranran; Hu, Chuan; Liu, Rui; Gao, Huile

    2017-10-02

    Abnormal tumor vessels impede the transport and distribution of chemotherapeutics, resulting in low drug concentration at tumor sites and compromised drug efficacy. Normalizing tumor vessels can modulate tumor vascular permeability, alleviate tumor hypoxia, increase blood perfusion, attenuate interstitial fluid pressure, and improve drug delivery. Herein, a novel strategy combining cediranib, a tumor vessel normalizing agent, with an enzyme responsive size-changeable gold nanoparticle (AuNPs-A&C) was developed. In vivo photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging showed that oral pretreatment with 6 mg/kg/day of cediranib for two consecutive days significantly enhanced the retention of AuNPs-A&C in 4T1 tumor. In vivo photoacoustic imaging for hemoglobin (Hb) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), Evans blue assay, and immunofluorescence assay showed that cediranib pretreatment markedly increased tumor vascular permeability and tumor oxygenation, while distinctly decreased the tumor microvessel density, demonstrating normalized tumor vessels and favorably altered microenvironment. Additionally, the combination strategy considerably elevated the tumor targeting capacity of different nanoparticle formulations (AuNPs-PEG, AuNPs-A&C), while coadministration of cediranib and AuNPs-A&C achieved prevailing tumor targeting and antitumor efficacy in 4T1 tumor bearing mouse model. In conclusion, we report a novel combined administration strategy to further improve tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Spectral Ambiguity of Allan Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the extent to which knowledge of Allan variance and other finite-difference variances determines the spectrum of a random process. The variance of first differences is known to determine the spectrum. We show that, in general, the Allan variance does not. A complete description of the ambiguity is given.

  4. Novel images extraction model using improved delay vector variance feature extraction and multi-kernel neural network for EEG detection and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced intelligent methodologies could help detect and predict diseases from the EEG signals in cases the manual analysis is inefficient available, for instance, the epileptic seizures detection and prediction. This is because the diversity and the evolution of the epileptic seizures make it very difficult in detecting and identifying the undergoing disease. Fortunately, the determinism and nonlinearity in a time series could characterize the state changes. Literature review indicates that the Delay Vector Variance (DVV) could examine the nonlinearity to gain insight into the EEG signals but very limited work has been done to address the quantitative DVV approach. Hence, the outcomes of the quantitative DVV should be evaluated to detect the epileptic seizures. To develop a new epileptic seizure detection method based on quantitative DVV. This new epileptic seizure detection method employed an improved delay vector variance (IDVV) to extract the nonlinearity value as a distinct feature. Then a multi-kernel functions strategy was proposed in the extreme learning machine (ELM) network to provide precise disease detection and prediction. The nonlinearity is more sensitive than the energy and entropy. 87.5% overall accuracy of recognition and 75.0% overall accuracy of forecasting were achieved. The proposed IDVV and multi-kernel ELM based method was feasible and effective for epileptic EEG detection. Hence, the newly proposed method has importance for practical applications.

  5. Simultaneous assessment of vessel size index, relative blood volume, and vessel permeability in a mouse brain tumor model using a combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence and viable tumor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kording, Fabian; Weidensteiner, Claudia; Zwick, Stefan; Osterberg, Nadja; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Staszewski, Ori; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Reichardt, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Combining multiple imaging biomarkers in one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) session would be beneficial to gain more data pertaining to tumor vasculature under therapy. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of perfusion, permeability, and vessel size imaging (VSI) using a gradient echo spin echo (GE-SE) sequence with injection of a clinically approved gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent was assessed in an orthotopic glioma model. A combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence was implemented using a single contrast agent Gd diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). This sequence was tested in a mouse brain tumor model (U87_MG), also under treatment with an antiangiogenic agent (bevacizumab). T2 maps and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were used to differentiate regions of cell death and viable tumor tissue. In viable tumor tissue regional blood volume was 5.7 ± 0.6% in controls and 5.2 ± 0.3% in treated mice. Vessel size was 18.1 ± 2.4 μm in controls and 12.8 ± 2.0 μm in treated mice, which correlated with results from immunohistochemistry. Permeability (K(trans) ) was close to zero in treated viable tumor tissue and 0.062 ± 0.024 min(-1) in controls. Our MRI method allows simultaneous assessment of several physiological and morphological parameters and extraction of MRI biomarkers for vasculature. These could be used for treatment monitoring of novel therapeutic agents such as antiangiogenic drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Doppler imaging of orbital vessels in the assessment of the activity and severity of thyroid-associated orbitopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Walasik-Szemplińska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of thyroid-associated orbitopathy are classifi ed on the basis of the clinical activity score (CAS proposed by Mourits in 1989. Despite its undoubted clinical usefulness, it has several limitations which can decide about the success or failure of the implemented treatment. Numerous reports mention the presence of hemodynamic changes in orbital and bulbar vessels in the course of an orbitopathy called Graves’ disease. The usage of Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of numerous ophthalmologic vascular diseases suggests that changes in thyroid-associated orbitopathy can correlate with the activity and severity of the disease. This paper presents the overview of the state-of-the-art concerning the usefulness of Doppler imaging in patient selection for the treatment of thyroid-associated orbitopathy. It has been shown that the velocity of blood fl ow in the superior ophthalmic vein, which is the most susceptible to changes in anatomical conditions in the enclosed orbital space, decreases in a statistically signifi cant way. A decrease in blood fl ow velocity is closely associated with the active stage of the disease whereas reverse fl ow or its absence attest to severe orbitopathy and constitute a risk factor of ocular neuropathy. The activity of the infl ammatory process in the eyeball is also confi rmed by an increase in peak systolic velocity (PSV in the ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery as well as end-diastolic velocity (EDV in the ophthalmic artery. Resistance index values decrease in the ophthalmic artery and increase in the central retinal artery mainly in cases with considerable expansion of the extraocular muscles.

  7. Differentiation of deep subcortical infarction using high-resolution vessel wall MR imaging of middle cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Sunwoo, Leonard; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Hee Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the utility of high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) of middle cerebral artery (MCA), and to compare HR-VWI findings between striatocapsular infarction (SC-I) and lenticulostriate infarction (LS-I). This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. From July 2009 to February 2012, 145 consecutive patients with deep subcortical infarctions (SC-I, n = 81; LS-I, n = 64) who underwent HR-VWI were included in this study. The degree of MCA stenosis and the characteristics of MCA plaque (presence, eccentricity, location, extent, T2-high signal intensity [T2-HSI], and plaque enhancement) were analyzed, and compared between SC-I and LS-I, using Fisher's exact test. Stenosis was more severe in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.040). MCA plaque was more frequent in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.028), having larger plaque extent (p = 0.001), more T2-HSI (p = 0.001), and more plaque enhancement (p = 0.002). The eccentricity and location of the plaque showed no significant difference between the two groups.Both SC-I and LS-I have similar HR-VWI findings of the MCA plaque, but SC-I had more frequent, larger plaques with greater T2-HSI and enhancement. This suggests that HR-VWI may have a promising role in assisting the differentiation of underlying pathophysiological mechanism between SC-I and LS-I.

  8. Quantification and Statistical Analysis Methods for Vessel Wall Components from Stained Images with Masson's Trichrome: e0146954

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pablo Hernández-Morera; Irene Castaño-González; Carlos M Travieso-González; Blanca Mompeó-Corredera; Francisco Ortega-Santana

    2016-01-01

    ... (smooth muscle fibers and extracellular matrix) in the vessel wall stained with Masson's trichrome, and a statistical method suitable for small sample sizes to analyze the results previously obtained...

  9. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Superficial Macular Retinal Vessel Density Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography En Face Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianqin; Durbin, Mary K; Shi, Yue; Uji, Akihito; Balasubramanian, Siva; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Al-Sheikh, Mayss; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    was highest for the 3 × 3-mm pattern in the inner ring (ICC range, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.96] to 0.96 [95% CI, 0.93-0.98]) and 6 × 6-mm pattern in the outer ring (ICC range, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.86-0.97] to 0.96 [95% CI, 0.92-0.98]). Vessel length density and PD of the superficial retinal vasculature can be obtained from OCTA images with high levels of repeatability and reproducibility but can vary with scan pattern and location.

  10. Introduction to variance estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, Kirk M

    2007-01-01

    We live in the information age. Statistical surveys are used every day to determine or evaluate public policy and to make important business decisions. Correct methods for computing the precision of the survey data and for making inferences to the target population are absolutely essential to sound decision making. Now in its second edition, Introduction to Variance Estimation has for more than twenty years provided the definitive account of the theory and methods for correct precision calculations and inference, including examples of modern, complex surveys in which the methods have been used successfully. The book provides instruction on the methods that are vital to data-driven decision making in business, government, and academe. It will appeal to survey statisticians and other scientists engaged in the planning and conduct of survey research, and to those analyzing survey data and charged with extracting compelling information from such data. It will appeal to graduate students and university faculty who...

  11. Microbubble Void Imaging: A Non-invasive Technique for Flow Visualisation and Quantification of Mixing in Large Vessels Using Plane Wave Ultrasound and Controlled Microbubble Contrast Agent Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Chee Hau; Iori, Francesco; Corbett, Richard; Duncan, Neill; Caro, Colin; Vincent, Peter; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the influence of the flow field on the physiology of blood vessels and their development of pathology. Preliminary work is reported on a novel non-invasive technique, microbubble void imaging, which is based on ultrasound and controlled destruction of microbubble contrast agents, permitting flow visualisation and quantification of flow-induced mixing in large vessels. The generation of microbubble voids can be controlled both spatially and temporally using ultrasound parameters within the safety limits. Three different model vessel geometries-straight, planar-curved and helical-with known effects on the flow field and mixing were chosen to evaluate the technique. A high-frame-rate ultrasound system with plane wave transmission was used to acquire the contrast-enhanced ultrasound images, and an entropy measure was calculated to quantify mixing. The experimental results were cross-compared between the different geometries and with computational fluid dynamics. The results indicated that the technique is able to quantify the degree of mixing within the different configurations, with a helical geometry generating the greatest mixing, and a straight geometry, the lowest. There is a high level of concordance between the computational fluid dynamics and experimental results. The technique could also serve as a flow visualisation tool. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Eating Disturbance and Body Image Dissatisfaction in Young Girls: An Examination of the Variance across Racial and Socioeconomic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeel, Marissa L.; Hughes, Tammy L.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Hipwell, Alison; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    Eating disorder research has predominantly focused on White adolescent females. More recent research suggests that eating disorders occur in various racial and age groups. The current study examines prevalence and stability of body image dissatisfaction and eating disturbance in 9- and 10-year-old girls and whether there is variability by racial…

  13. Parametric, bootstrap, and jackknife variance estimators for the k-Nearest Neighbors technique with illustrations using forest inventory and satellite image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Steen Magnussen; Erkki O. Tomppo; Gherardo. Chirici

    2011-01-01

    Nearest neighbors techniques have been shown to be useful for estimating forest attributes, particularly when used with forest inventory and satellite image data. Published reports of positive results have been truly international in scope. However, for these techniques to be more useful, they must be able to contribute to scientific inference which, for sample-based...

  14. Effect of a novel motion correction algorithm (SSF) on the image quality of coronary CTA with intermediate heart rates: Segment-based and vessel-based analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianwen, E-mail: qianwen18@126.com; Li, Pengyu, E-mail: lipyu818@gmail.com; Su, Zhuangzhi, E-mail: suzhuangzhi@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn; Yao, Xinyu, E-mail: 314985151@qq.com; Wang, Yan, E-mail: wy19851121@126.com; Wang, Chen, E-mail: fskwangchen@gmail.com; Du, Xiangying, E-mail: duxying_xw@163.com; Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • SSF provided better image quality than single-sector and bi-sector reconstruction among the intermediate heart rates (65–75 bpm). • Evidence for the application of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA with SSF onto an expanded heart rate range. • Information about the inconsistent effectiveness of SSF among the segments of coronary artery. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effect of SnapShot Freeze (SSF) reconstruction at an intermediate heart-rate (HR) range (65–75 bpm) and compare this method with single-sector reconstruction and bi-sector reconstruction on segmental and vessel bases in retrospective coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Materials and methods: Retrospective electrocardiogram-gated CCTA was performed on 37 consecutive patients with HR between 65 and 75 bpm using a 64-row CT scanner. Retrospective single-sector reconstruction, bi-sector reconstruction, and SSF were performed for each patient. Multi-phase single-sector reconstruction was performed to select the optimal phase. SSF and bi-sector images were also reconstructed at the optimal phase. The images were interpreted in an intent-to-diagnose fashion by two experienced readers using a 5-point scale, with 3 points as diagnostically acceptable. Image quality among the three reconstruction groups were compared on per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment bases. Results: The average HR of the enrolled patients was 69.4 ± 2.7 bpm. A total of 111 vessels and 481 coronary segments were assessed. SSF provided significantly higher interpretability of the coronary segments than bi-sector reconstructions. The qualified and excellent rates of SSF (97.9% and 82.3%) were significantly higher than those of single-sector (92.9% and 66.3%) and bi-sector (90.9% and 64.7%) reconstructions. The image quality score (IQS) using SSF was also significantly higher than those of single-sector and bi-sector reconstructions both on per-patient and per-vessel bases. On per

  15. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    by the research vessels RV Gaveshani and ORV Sagar Kanya are reported. The work carried out by the three charted ships is also recorded. A short note on cruise plans for the study of ferromanganese nodules is added...

  16. Selecting suitable coherent processing time window lengths for ground-based ISAR imaging of cooperative sea vessels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ) where mod(a, b) is the modulus operation of a with b, θb,t(n) denotes the bearing of the vessel obtained from GPS position data, and θh,t(n) represents the heading measured from an inertial navigation system. The head- ing that is used in the system...

  17. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  18. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ningning Di,1,2,* Ning Mao,3,* Wenna Cheng,4 Haopeng Pang,1 Yan Ren,1 Ning Wang,2 Xinjiang Liu,2 Bin Wang5 1Department of Radiology, Affiliated Huashan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Radiology, Binzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou, 3Department of Radiology, Yantai Yuhangding Hospital, Yantai, 4Department of Pharmacy, Binzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou, 5Department of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH.Patients and methods: BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19 and BPH (22 responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2. The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels, were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD and microvessel pericyte density (MPD. The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI.Results: After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05. PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002; however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or

  19. Widespread Myocardial Delivery of Heart-Derived Stem Cells by Nonocclusive Triple-Vessel Intracoronary Infusion in Porcine Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Superior Attenuation of Adverse Remodeling Documented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseliou, Eleni; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Dawkins, James; Gallet, Romain; Kreke, Michelle; Smith, Rachel; Middleton, Ryan; Valle, Jackelyn; Marbán, Linda; Kar, Saibal; Makkar, Rajendra; Marbán, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Single-vessel, intracoronary infusion of stem cells under stop-flow conditions has proven safe but achieves only limited myocardial coverage. Continuous flow intracoronary delivery to one or more coronary vessels may achieve broader coverage for treating cardiomyopathy, but has not been investigated. Using nonocclusive coronary guiding catheters, we infused allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) either in a single vessel or sequentially in all three coronary arteries in porcine ischemic cardiomyopathy and used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess structural and physiological outcomes. Vehicle-infused animals served as controls. Single-vessel stop-flow and continuous-flow intracoronary infusion revealed equivalent effects on scar size and function. Sequential infusion into each of the three major coronary vessels under stop-flow or continuous-flow conditions revealed equal efficacy, but less elevation of necrotic biomarkers with continuous-flow delivery. In addition, multi-vessel delivery resulted in enhanced global and regional tissue function compared to a triple-vessel placebo-treated group. The functional benefits after global cell infusion were accompanied histologically by minimal inflammatory cellular infiltration, attenuated regional fibrosis and enhanced vessel density in the heart. Sequential multi-vessel non-occlusive delivery of CDCs is safe and provides enhanced preservation of left ventricular function and structure. The current findings provide preclinical validation of the delivery method currently undergoing clinical testing in the Dilated cardiomYopathy iNtervention With Allogeneic MyocardIally-regenerative Cells (DYNAMIC) trial of CDCs in heart failure patients.

  20. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Maximum Variance Hashing via Column Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Luo

    2013-01-01

    item search. Recently, a number of data-dependent methods have been developed, reflecting the great potential of learning for hashing. Inspired by the classic nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithm—maximum variance unfolding, we propose a novel unsupervised hashing method, named maximum variance hashing, in this work. The idea is to maximize the total variance of the hash codes while preserving the local structure of the training data. To solve the derived optimization problem, we propose a column generation algorithm, which directly learns the binary-valued hash functions. We then extend it using anchor graphs to reduce the computational cost. Experiments on large-scale image datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art hashing methods in many cases.

  2. Fixed effects analysis of variance

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Lloyd; Birnbaum, Z W; Lukacs, E

    1978-01-01

    Fixed Effects Analysis of Variance covers the mathematical theory of the fixed effects analysis of variance. The book discusses the theoretical ideas and some applications of the analysis of variance. The text then describes topics such as the t-test; two-sample t-test; the k-sample comparison of means (one-way analysis of variance); the balanced two-way factorial design without interaction; estimation and factorial designs; and the Latin square. Confidence sets, simultaneous confidence intervals, and multiple comparisons; orthogonal and nonorthologonal designs; and multiple regression analysi

  3. High frequency transducer for vessel imaging based on lead-free Mn-doped (K0.44Na0.56)NbO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinpeng; Xue, Saidong; Zhao, Xiangyong; Wang, Feifei; Tang, Yanxue; Duan, Zhihua; Wang, Tao; Shi, Wangzhou; Yue, Qingwen; Zhou, Huifang; Luo, Haosu; Fang, Bijun

    2017-08-01

    We report a high frequency ultrasonic transducer up to 50 MHz for vessel imaging based on a lead-free (K0.44Na0.56)NbO3-0.5 mol. % Mn (Mn-KNN) single crystal, which has a high electromechanical coupling coefficient kt of 0.64 and a large thickness frequency constant Nt of 3210 kHz . mm. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Mattaei (KLM) equivalent circuit model was utilized to simulate and optimize the pulse-echo response combined with PiezoCAD software. Theoretically, a high -6 dB bandwidth of 74.94% was obtained at a center frequency of 50.47 MHz and optimized matching conditions. The experimental results showed a center frequency of 51.8 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 70.2%. The excellent global performance makes this lead-free single-crystal transducer quite potential in an environmentally friendly vessel imaging transducer.

  4. Quantitative ex-vivo micro-computed tomographic imaging of blood vessels and necrotic regions within tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M Downey

    Full Text Available Techniques for visualizing and quantifying the microvasculature of tumors are essential not only for studying angiogenic processes but also for monitoring the effects of anti-angiogenic treatments. Given the relatively limited information that can be gleaned from conventional 2-D histological analyses, there has been considerable interest in methods that enable the 3-D assessment of the vasculature. To this end, we employed a polymerizing intravascular contrast medium (Microfil and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT in combination with a maximal spheres direct 3-D analysis method to visualize and quantify ex-vivo vessel structural features, and to define regions of hypoperfusion within tumors that would be indicative of necrosis. Employing these techniques we quantified the effects of a vascular disrupting agent on the tumor vasculature. The methods described herein for quantifying whole tumor vascularity represent a significant advance in the 3-D study of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics, and will also find potential application in other fields where quantification of blood vessel structure and necrosis are important outcome parameters.

  5. Directional variance analysis of annual rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, P.; Marjanen, K.

    2010-07-01

    The wood quality measurement methods are of increasing importance in the wood industry. The goal is to produce more high quality products with higher marketing value than is produced today. One of the key factors for increasing the market value is to provide better measurements for increased information to support the decisions made later in the product chain. Strength and stiffness are important properties of the wood. They are related to mean annual ring width and its deviation. These indicators can be estimated from images taken from the log ends by two-dimensional power spectrum analysis. The spectrum analysis has been used successfully for images of pine. However, the annual rings in birch, for example are less distinguishable and the basic spectrum analysis method does not give reliable results. A novel method for local log end variance analysis based on Radon-transform is proposed. The directions and the positions of the annual rings can be estimated from local minimum and maximum variance estimates. Applying the spectrum analysis on the maximum local variance estimate instead of the original image produces more reliable estimate of the annual ring width. The proposed method is not limited to log end analysis only. It is usable in other two-dimensional random signal and texture analysis tasks.

  6. Vessel segmentation in screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordang, J. J.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Blood vessels are a major cause of false positives in computer aided detection systems for the detection of breast cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a framework for the segmentation of blood vessels in screening mammograms. The proposed framework is based on supervised learning using a cascade classifier. This cascade classifier consists of several stages where in each stage a GentleBoost classifier is trained on Haar-like features. A total of 30 cases were included in this study. In each image, vessel pixels were annotated by selecting pixels on the centerline of the vessel, control samples were taken by annotating a region without any visible vascular structures. This resulted in a total of 31,000 pixels marked as vascular and over 4 million control pixels. After training, the classifier assigns a vesselness likelihood to the pixels. The proposed framework was compared to three other vessel enhancing methods, i) a vesselness filter, ii) a gaussian derivative filter, and iii) a tubeness filter. The methods were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristics curves, the Az values. The Az value of the cascade approach is 0:85. This is superior to the vesselness, Gaussian, and tubeness methods, with Az values of 0:77, 0:81, and 0:78, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that our proposed framework is a promising method for the detection of vessels in screening mammograms.

  7. Small Drinking Water System Variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small system variances allow a small system to install and maintain technology that can remove a contaminant to the maximum extent that is affordable and protective of public health in lieu of technology that can achieve compliance with the regulation.

  8. In-vessel calibration of the imaging diagnostics for the real-time protection of the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, V., E-mail: V.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Supercomputing Centre, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Sergienko, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung—Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kinna, D.; Balboa, I.; Collins, S.; Conway, N.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Price, M.; Silburn, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Wynn, A. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The in situ absolute calibration of the JET real-time protection imaging system has been performed for the first time by means of radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel and operated by remote handling. High accuracy of the calibration is confirmed by cross-validation of the near infrared (NIR) cameras against each other, with thermal IR cameras, and with the beryllium evaporator, which lead to successful protection of the JET first wall during the last campaign. The operation temperature ranges of NIR protection cameras for the materials used on JET are Be 650-1600 °C, W coating 600-1320 °C, and W 650-1500 °C.

  9. Rationale, design and methodology of the image analysis protocol for studies of patients with cerebral small vessel disease and mild stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Armitage, Paul A; Thrippleton, Michael J; Chappell, Francesca; Sandeman, Elaine; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Shuler, Kirsten; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is common in ageing and patients with dementia and stroke. Its manifestations on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, microbleeds, perivascular spaces, small subcortical infarcts, and brain atrophy. Many studies focus only on one of these manifestations. A protocol for the differential assessment of all these features is, therefore, needed. To identify ways of quantifying imaging markers in research of patients with SVD and operationalize the recommendations from the STandards for ReportIng Vascular changes on nEuroimaging guidelines. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methodology of a brain image analysis protocol based on our experience from observational longitudinal studies of patients with nondisabling stroke. The MRI analysis protocol is designed to provide quantitative and qualitative measures of disease evolution including: acute and old stroke lesions, lacunes, tissue loss due to stroke, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, macrohemorrhages, iron deposition in basal ganglia, substantia nigra and brain stem, brain atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities, with the latter separated into intense and less intense. Quantitative measures of tissue integrity such as diffusion fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and the longitudinal relaxation time are assessed in regions of interest manually placed in anatomically and functionally relevant locations, and in others derived from feature extraction pipelines and tissue segmentation methods. Morphological changes that relate to cognitive deficits after stroke, analyzed through shape models of subcortical structures, complete the multiparametric image analysis protocol. Final outcomes include guidance for identifying ways to minimize bias and confounds in the assessment of SVD and stroke imaging biomarkers. It is intended that this information will inform the design of studies to examine the underlying pathophysiology of SVD

  10. A simulation environment for validating ultrasonic blood flow and vessel wall imaging based on fluid-structure interaction simulations: ultrasonic assessment of arterial distension and wall shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillens, Abigail; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Lovstakken, Lasse; Segers, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a commonly used vascular imaging tool when screening for patients at high cardiovascular risk. However, current blood flow and vessel wall imaging methods are hampered by several limitations. When optimizing and developing new ultrasound modalities, proper validation is required before clinical implementation. Therefore, the authors present a simulation environment integrating ultrasound and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations, allowing construction of synthetic ultrasound images based on physiologically realistic behavior of an artery. To demonstrate the potential of the model for vascular ultrasound research, the authors studied clinically relevant imaging modalities of arterial function related to both vessel wall deformation and arterial hemodynamics: Arterial distension (related to arterial stiffness) and wall shear rate (related to the development of atherosclerosis) imaging. An in-house code ("TANGO") was developed to strongly couple the flow solver FLUENT and structural solver ABAQUS using an interface quasi-Newton technique. FIELD II was used to model realistic transducer and scan settings. The input to the FSI-US model is a scatterer phantom on which the US waves reflect, with the scatterer displacement derived from the FSI flow and displacement fields. The authors applied the simulation tool to a 3D straight tube, representative of the common carotid artery (length: 5 cm; and inner and outer radius: 3 and 4 mm). A mass flow inlet boundary condition, based on flow measured in a healthy subject, was applied. A downstream pressure condition, based on a noninvasively measured pressure waveform, was chosen and scaled to simulate three different degrees of arterial distension (1%, 4%, and 9%). The RF data from the FSI-US coupling were further processed for arterial wall and flow imaging. Using an available wall tracking algorithm, arterial distensibility was assessed. Using an autocorrelation estimator, blood velocity and shear

  11. Identification of intraplaque haemorrhage in carotid artery by simultaneous non-contrast angiography and intraPlaque haemorrhage (SNAP) imaging: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongye; Zhao, Huilin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Chen, Shuo; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui; Xu, Jianrong; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Xihai

    2017-11-02

    To investigate the usefulness of Simultaneous Non-contrast Angiography and intraPlaque haemorrhage (SNAP) imaging in characterising carotid intraplaque haemorrhage (IPH) compared with magnetisation-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) sequence. Fifty-four symptomatic patients (mean age: 63.1 ± 5.7 years, 38 males) with carotid atherosclerosis were recruited and underwent carotid MR imaging. The presence and area of IPH on SNAP and MP-RAGE images were determined. The agreement in identifying IPH and its area between SNAP and MP-RAGE was analysed. Of 1368 slices with acceptable image quality in 54 patients, 13% and 22.6% were found to have IPH on MP-RAGE and SNAP images, respectively. There was moderate agreement between MP-RAGE and SNAP sequences in identifying IPH (κ = 0.511, p = 0.029). The area of IPH on SNAP images was significantly larger than that on MP-RAGE images (17.9 ± 18.2 mm 2 vs. 9.2 ± 10.5 mm 2 , p SNAP imaging, the area of IPHs also detected by the MP-RAGE sequence was significantly larger than that of IPHs not detected by the MP-RAGE sequence (17.9 ± 19.2 mm 2 vs. 6.4 ± 6.2 mm 2 , p SNAP imaging detects more IPHs, particularly for smaller IPHs, suggesting that SNAP imaging might be a more sensitive tool for identification of carotid haemorrhagic plaques. • Moderate agreement was found between SNAP and MP-RAGE in identification of IPH • SNAP imaging might be a more sensitive tool to detect carotid IPHs • Compared with the MP-RAGE sequence, SNAP imaging can detect carotid IPHs with smaller size • SNAP imaging can help clinicians to optimise the treatment strategy.

  12. Revision: Variance Inflation in Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Jensen

    2013-01-01

    the intercept; and (iv variance deflation may occur, where ill-conditioned data yield smaller variances than their orthogonal surrogates. Conventional VIFs have all regressors linked, or none, often untenable in practice. Beyond these, our models enable the unlinking of regressors that can be unlinked, while preserving dependence among those intrinsically linked. Moreover, known collinearity indices are extended to encompass angles between subspaces of regressors. To reaccess ill-conditioned data, we consider case studies ranging from elementary examples to data from the literature.

  13. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  14. Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Incident Small Vessel Disease on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Jennifer L; Schneider, Andrea L C; Sharrett, A Richey; Mosley, Thomas H; Bezerra, Daniel C; Knopman, David S; Selvin, Elizabeth; Jack, Clifford R; Coker, Laura H; Alonso, Alvaro; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Windham, Beverly G; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2015-11-01

    The term metabolic syndrome describes the clustering of risk factors found in many individuals with obesity. Because of their pathophysiology, we hypothesized that 2 features of metabolic syndrome, central obesity and insulin resistance (IR), would be associated with cerebrovascular changes on magnetic resonance imaging, and specifically with incident lacunar disease and not white matter hyperintensity (WMH) progression. Risk factors were defined at study baseline in 934 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, who completed 2 brain magnetic resonance imagings≈10 years apart. WMH progression and incident lacunes between the 2 magnetic resonance imagings were determined. An IR score for each participant was created using principal component analysis of 11 risk factors, including (among others): insulin, homeostatic model assessment-IR, body mass index, and waist circumference. Metabolic syndrome (presence/absence), using standard clinical definitions, and IR score at the first magnetic resonance imaging, were independent variables, evaluated in multivariate logistic regression to determine odds of WMH progression (Q5 versus Q1-Q4) and incident lacunes. Metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.05) and IR score (adjusted odds ratio per 1-SD increase, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.68) were associated with incident lacunes but not with WMH progression. Insulin, homeostatic model assessment-IR, and body mass index were not associated with incident lacunes or WMH progression in separate models. The IR score and central obesity are associated with incident lacunar disease but not WMH progression in individuals. Central obesity and IR may be important risk factors to target to prevent lacunar disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Dynamic lymph flow imaging in patients with oedema of the lower limb for evaluation of the functional outcome after autologous lymph vessel transplantation: an 8-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Mayo; Hahn, Klaus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Ziemssenstrasse 1, 80335 Munich (Germany); Baumeister, Ruediger G.H. [Department of Micro-, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the functional outcome of microsurgical intervention on lymph drainage by means of non-invasive, readily available lymphoscintigraphy. Eight patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb were investigated before and for 8 years after autologous lymph vessel transplantation. For scintigraphy, technetium-99m labelled nanocolloid was subcutaneously injected into the first interdigital space of the affected limb. Sequential images were acquired up to 6 h p.i.; for semiquantitative evaluation a numerical transport index was established by assigning scores of up to 9 on each of five criteria: lymphatic transport kinetics, distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, time to appearance of lymph nodes, visualisation of lymph nodes and visualisation of lymph vessels/grafts. Ti values <10 were considered normal. In all eight patients, lymphatic function significantly (P{<=}0.01) improved after microsurgical treatment. Permanent function of vessel grafts was indicated by persistently low Ti values during the entire observation period, impressively demonstrating the success of this complex microsurgical technique. Patients with scintigraphic visualisation of the vessel graft (n=2/8) showed a substantially better postoperative outcome than those without visualisation of the vessel graft. The findings indicate that lymph vessel transplantation significantly improves lymph drainage in patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy is helpful not only in planning microsurgical treatment but also in monitoring the postoperative outcome. (orig.)

  16. Validation of planning-free vessel-encoded pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MR imaging as territorial-ASL strategy by comparison to super-selective p-CASL MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Helle, Michael; Chappell, Michael A; Okell, Thomas W; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2014-06-01

    Vessel-encoded (VE) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (p-CASL) is a territorial ASL (T-ASL) technique to identify the perfusion territories of cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to validate the output of three Vessel-encoded p-CASL image processing methods, k-means clustering with and without subsequent linear analysis and a Bayesian framework, by comparison with the perfusion maps acquired with super-selective p-CASL. The comparison was done quantitatively using the Hausdorff distance and Dice similarity coefficient in the territories of the right and left internal carotid arteries, the basilar artery, and the right and left vertebral arteries. A qualitative comparison was done in the areas of the anterior and posterior circulation, and the deep gray matter. The overall agreement between the Vessel-encoded p-CASL image processing methods and super-selective p-CASL was good; with the difference that the linear analysis and the Bayesian framework were able to detect mixed perfusion. Planning-free Vessel-encoded p-CASL with k-means clustering appears suitable as a general purpose T-ASL strategy, but to determine mixed perfusion a combination with linear analysis, or the Bayesian framework is preferable, which are superior in this regard. To accurately determine the perfusion territory of a single vessel, super-selective p-CASL is still recommended. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Angiographic correlations of patients with small vessel disease diagnosed by adenosine-stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Roland

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR with adenosine-stress myocardial perfusion is gaining importance for the detection and quantification of coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little knowledge about patients with CMR-detected ischemia, but having no relevant stenosis as seen on coronary angiography (CA. The aims of our study were to characterize these patients by CMR and CA and evaluate correlations and potential reasons for the ischemic findings. 73 patients with an indication for CA were first scanned on a 1.5T whole-body CMR-scanner including adenosine-stress first-pass perfusion. The images were analyzed by two independent investigators for myocardial perfusion which was classified as subendocardial ischemia (n = 22, no perfusion deficit (n = 27, control 1, or more than subendocardial ischemia (n = 24, control 2. All patients underwent CA, and a highly significant correlation between the classification of CMR perfusion deficit and the degree of coronary luminal narrowing was found. For quantification of coronary blood flow, corrected Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI frame count (TFC was evaluated for the left anterior descending (LAD, circumflex (LCX and right coronary artery (RCA. The main result was that corrected TFC in all coronaries was significantly increased in study patients compared to both control 1 and to control 2 patients. Study patients had hypertension or diabetes more often than control 1 patients. In conclusion, patients with CMR detected subendocardial ischemia have prolonged coronary blood flow. In connection with normal resting flow values in CAD, this supports the hypothesis of underlying coronary microvascular impairment. CMR stress perfusion differentiates non-invasively between this entity and relevant CAD.

  18. 2D Fast Vessel Visualization Using a Vessel Wall Mask Guiding Fine Vessel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Raptis

    2010-01-01

    and then try to approach the ridges and branches of the vasculature's using fine detection. Fine vessel screening looks into local structural inconsistencies in vessels properties, into noise, or into not expected intensity variations observed inside pre-known vessel-body areas. The vessels are first modelled sufficiently but not precisely by their walls with a tubular model-structure that is the result of an initial segmentation. This provides a chart of likely Vessel Wall Pixels (VWPs yielding a form of a likelihood vessel map mainly based on gradient filter's intensity and spatial arrangement parameters (e.g., linear consistency. Specific vessel parameters (centerline, width, location, fall-away rate, main orientation are post-computed by convolving the image with a set of pre-tuned spatial filters called Matched Filters (MFs. These are easily computed as Gaussian-like 2D forms that use a limited range sub-optimal parameters adjusted to the dominant vessel characteristics obtained by Spatial Grey Level Difference statistics limiting the range of search into vessel widths of 16, 32, and 64 pixels. Sparse pixels are effectively eliminated by applying a limited range Hough Transform (HT or region growing. Major benefits are limiting the range of parameters, reducing the search-space for post-convolution to only masked regions, representing almost 2% of the 2D volume, good speed versus accuracy/time trade-off. Results show the potentials of our approach in terms of time for detection ROC analysis and accuracy of vessel pixel (VP detection.

  19. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maître, O. P.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  20. Variance based OFDM frame synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new frame synchronization scheme for OFDM systems and calculates the complexity of this scheme. The scheme is based on the computing of the detection window variance. The variance is computed in two delayed times, so a modified Early-Late loop is used for the frame position detection. The proposed algorithm deals with different variants of OFDM parameters including guard interval, cyclic prefix, and has good properties regarding the choice of the algorithm's parameters since the parameters may be chosen within a wide range without having a high influence on system performance. The verification of the proposed algorithm functionality has been performed on a development environment using universal software radio peripheral (USRP hardware.

  1. Monitoring structural change in variance

    OpenAIRE

    Carsoule, F.; Franses, Ph.H.B.F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we propose a sequential testing approach for a structural change in the variance of a time series, which amounts to a procedure with a controlled asymptotic size as we repeat the test. Our approach builds on that taken in Chu, Stinchcombe and White (1996) for structural change in the parameters of a linear regression model. We provide simulation evidence to examine the empirical size and power of our procedure. We apply our approach to 14 weekly observed European exchange rates ...

  2. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  3. Improving pulmonary vessel image quality with a full model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm in 80kVp low-dose chest CT for pediatric patients aged 0-6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jihang; Zhang, Qifeng; Hu, Di; Duan, Xiaomin; Peng, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm decreasing image noise and improving spatial resolution significantly, combined with low voltage scan may improve image and vessels quality. To evaluate the image quality improvement of pulmonary vessels using a full MBIR in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) for children. This study was institutional review board approved. Forty-one children (age range, 28 days-6 years, mean age, 2.0 years) who underwent 80 kVp low-dose CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI) for a 5-mm slice thickness image was used for the acquisition: NI = 11 for 0-12 months old, NI = 13 for 1-2 years old, and NI = 15 for 3-6 years old. Images were retrospectively reconstructed into thin slice thickness of 0.625 mm using the MBIR and a conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. Two radiologists independently evaluated images subjectively focusing on the ability to display small arteries and diagnosis confidence on a 5-point scale with 3 being clinically acceptable. CT value and image noise in the descending aorta, muscle and fat were measured and statistically compared between the two reconstruction groups. The ability to display small vessels was significantly improved with the MBIR reconstruction. The subjective scores of displaying small vessels were 5.0 and 3.7 with MBIR and FBP, respectively, while the respective diagnosis confidence scores were 5.0 and 3.8. Quantitative image noise for the 0.625 mm slice thickness images in the descending aorta was 15.8 ± 3.8 HU in MBIR group, 57.3% lower than the 37.0 ± 7.3 HU in FBP group. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio for the descending aorta were 28.3 ± 7.9 and 24.05 ± 7.5 in MBIR group, and 12.1 ± 3.7 and 10.6 ± 3.5 in FBP group, respectively. These values were improved by 133.9% and 132.1%, respectively, with MBIR reconstruction compared to FBP reconstruction. Compared to the conventional FBP reconstruction, the image quality and

  4. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  5. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of ischaemic burden in angiographic three-vessel coronary artery disease with high-resolution myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Manish; Maredia, Neil; Fairbairn, Timothy A.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Greenwood, John P.; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study compared the myocardial ischaemic burden (MIB) in patients with angiographic three-vessel coronary artery disease (3VD) using high-resolution and standard-resolution myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (perfusion CMR) imaging. Methods and results One hundred and five patients undergoing coronary angiography had two separate stress/rest perfusion CMR studies, one with standard-resolution (2.5 mm in-plane) and another with high-resolution (1.6 mm in-plane). Quantitative coronary angiography was used to define patients with angiographic 3VD. Perfusion CMR images were anonymized, randomly ordered and visually reported by two observers acting in consensus and blinded to all clinical and angiographic data. Perfusion was graded in each segment on a four-point scale and summed to produce a perfusion score and estimate of MIB for each patient. In patients with angiographic 3VD (n = 35), high-resolution acquisition identified more abnormal segments (7.2 ± 3.8 vs. 5.3 ± 4.0; P = 0.004) and territories (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.6 ± 1.1; P = 0.002) and a higher overall perfusion score (20.1 ± 7.7 vs. 11.9 ± 9.4; P subendocardial ischaemia was greater with high-resolution acquisition (195 vs. 101; P subendocardial ischaemia. High-resolution perfusion CMR may therefore be preferred for risk stratification and management of this high-risk patient group. PMID:24493156

  7. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye [Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Brain Disorders Research, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhao, Huilin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zechen [Philips Research China, Healthcare Department, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao, Xihai [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Stroke, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  8. Dynamic lymph flow imaging in patients with oedema of the lower limb for evaluation of the functional outcome after autologous lymph vessel transplantation: an 8-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mayo; Baumeister, Rüdiger G H; Hahn, Klaus

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the functional outcome of microsurgical intervention on lymph drainage by means of non-invasive, readily available lymphoscintigraphy. Eight patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb were investigated before and for 8 years after autologous lymph vessel transplantation. For scintigraphy, technetium-99m labelled nanocolloid was subcutaneously injected into the first interdigital space of the affected limb. Sequential images were acquired up to 6 h p.i.; for semiquantitative evaluation a numerical transport index was established by assigning scores of up to 9 on each of five criteria: lymphatic transport kinetics, distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, time to appearance of lymph nodes, visualisation of lymph nodes and visualisation of lymph vessels/grafts. Ti values success of this complex microsurgical technique. Patients with scintigraphic visualisation of the vessel graft (n=2/8) showed a substantially better postoperative outcome than those without visualisation of the vessel graft. The findings indicate that lymph vessel transplantation significantly improves lymph drainage in patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy is helpful not only in planning microsurgical treatment but also in monitoring the postoperative outcome.

  9. Visual SLAM Using Variance Grid Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Marks, Tim K.

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm denoted Gamma-SLAM performs further processing, in real time, of preprocessed digitized images acquired by a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard an off-road robotic ground vehicle to build accurate maps of the terrain and determine the location of the vehicle with respect to the maps. Part of the name of the algorithm reflects the fact that the process of building the maps and determining the location with respect to them is denoted simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Most prior real-time SLAM algorithms have been limited in applicability to (1) systems equipped with scanning laser range finders as the primary sensors in (2) indoor environments (or relatively simply structured outdoor environments). The few prior vision-based SLAM algorithms have been feature-based and not suitable for real-time applications and, hence, not suitable for autonomous navigation on irregularly structured terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm incorporates two key innovations: Visual odometry (in contradistinction to wheel odometry) is used to estimate the motion of the vehicle. An elevation variance map (in contradistinction to an occupancy or an elevation map) is used to represent the terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm makes use of a Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) from Bayesian estimation theory for maintaining a distribution over poses and maps. The core idea of the RBPF approach is that the SLAM problem can be factored into two parts: (1) finding the distribution over robot trajectories, and (2) finding the map conditioned on any given trajectory. The factorization involves the use of a particle filter in which each particle encodes both a possible trajectory and a map conditioned on that trajectory. The base estimate of the trajectory is derived from visual odometry, and the map conditioned on that trajectory is a Cartesian grid of elevation variances. In comparison with traditional occupancy or elevation grid maps, the grid elevation variance

  10. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Mencl, Stine; Garz, Cornelia; Niklass, Solveig; Braun, Holger; Göb, Eva; Homola, György; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reymann, Klaus G; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Background Human cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) has distinct histopathologic and imaging findings in its advanced stages. In spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP), a well-established animal model of CSVD, we recently demonstrated that cerebral microangiopathy is initiated by early microvascular dysfunction leading to the breakdown of the blood–brain barrier and an activated coagulatory state resulting in capillary and arteriolar erythrocyte accumulations (stases). In ...

  11. A Wavelet Perspective on the Allan Variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B

    2016-04-01

    The origins of the Allan variance trace back 50 years ago to two seminal papers, one by Allan (1966) and the other by Barnes (1966). Since then, the Allan variance has played a leading role in the characterization of high-performance time and frequency standards. Wavelets first arose in the early 1980s in the geophysical literature, and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) became prominent in the late 1980s in the signal processing literature. Flandrin (1992) briefly documented a connection between the Allan variance and a wavelet transform based upon the Haar wavelet. Percival and Guttorp (1994) noted that one popular estimator of the Allan variance-the maximal overlap estimator-can be interpreted in terms of a version of the DWT now widely referred to as the maximal overlap DWT (MODWT). In particular, when the MODWT is based on the Haar wavelet, the variance of the resulting wavelet coefficients-the wavelet variance-is identical to the Allan variance when the latter is multiplied by one-half. The theory behind the wavelet variance can thus deepen our understanding of the Allan variance. In this paper, we review basic wavelet variance theory with an emphasis on the Haar-based wavelet variance and its connection to the Allan variance. We then note that estimation theory for the wavelet variance offers a means of constructing asymptotically correct confidence intervals (CIs) for the Allan variance without reverting to the common practice of specifying a power-law noise type a priori. We also review recent work on specialized estimators of the wavelet variance that are of interest when some observations are missing (gappy data) or in the presence of contamination (rogue observations or outliers). It is a simple matter to adapt these estimators to become estimators of the Allan variance. Finally we note that wavelet variances based upon wavelets other than the Haar offer interesting generalizations of the Allan variance.

  12. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  13. Generalized analysis of molecular variance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M Nievergelt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Many studies in the fields of genetic epidemiology and applied population genetics are predicated on, or require, an assessment of the genetic background diversity of the individuals chosen for study. A number of strategies have been developed for assessing genetic background diversity. These strategies typically focus on genotype data collected on the individuals in the study, based on a panel of DNA markers. However, many of these strategies are either rooted in cluster analysis techniques, and hence suffer from problems inherent to the assignment of the biological and statistical meaning to resulting clusters, or have formulations that do not permit easy and intuitive extensions. We describe a very general approach to the problem of assessing genetic background diversity that extends the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA strategy introduced by Excoffier and colleagues some time ago. As in the original AMOVA strategy, the proposed approach, termed generalized AMOVA (GAMOVA, requires a genetic similarity matrix constructed from the allelic profiles of individuals under study and/or allele frequency summaries of the populations from which the individuals have been sampled. The proposed strategy can be used to either estimate the fraction of genetic variation explained by grouping factors such as country of origin, race, or ethnicity, or to quantify the strength of the relationship of the observed genetic background variation to quantitative measures collected on the subjects, such as blood pressure levels or anthropometric measures. Since the formulation of our test statistic is rooted in multivariate linear models, sets of variables can be related to genetic background in multiple regression-like contexts. GAMOVA can also be used to complement graphical representations of genetic diversity such as tree diagrams (dendrograms or heatmaps. We examine features, advantages, and power of the proposed procedure and showcase its flexibility by

  14. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  15. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  16. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  17. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencl, Stine; Garz, Cornelia; Niklass, Solveig; Braun, Holger; Göb, Eva; Homola, György; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reymann, Klaus G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Human cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) has distinct histopathologic and imaging findings in its advanced stages. In spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP), a well-established animal model of CSVD, we recently demonstrated that cerebral microangiopathy is initiated by early microvascular dysfunction leading to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an activated coagulatory state resulting in capillary and arteriolar erythrocyte accumulations (stases). In the present study, we investigated whether initial microvascular dysfunction and other stages of the pathologic CSVD cascade can be detected by serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fourteen SHRSP and three control (Wistar) rats (aged 26-44 weeks) were investigated biweekly by 3.0 Tesla (3 T) MRI. After perfusion, brains were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and histology was correlated with MRI data. Three SHRSP developed terminal CSVD stages including cortical, hippocampal, and striatal infarcts and macrohemorrhages, which could be detected consistently by MRI. Corresponding histology showed small vessel thromboses and increased numbers of small perivascular bleeds in the infarcted areas. However, 3 T MRI failed to visualize intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, even in those brain regions with the highest densities of affected vessels and the largest vessels affected by stases, as well as failing to detect small perivascular bleeds. Serial MRI at a field strength of 3 T failed to detect the initial microvascular dysfunction and subsequent small perivascular bleeds in SHRSP; only terminal stages of cerebral microangiopathy were reliably detected. Further investigations at higher magnetic field strengths (7 T) using blood- and flow-sensitive sequences are currently underway.

  18. Asymptotic variance of grey-scale surface area estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Anne Marie

    Grey-scale local algorithms have been suggested as a fast way of estimating surface area from grey-scale digital images. Their asymptotic mean has already been described. In this paper, the asymptotic behaviour of the variance is studied in isotropic and sufficiently smooth settings, resulting...... in a general asymptotic bound. For compact convex sets with nowhere vanishing Gaussian curvature, the asymptotics can be described more explicitly. As in the case of volume estimators, the variance is decomposed into a lattice sum and an oscillating term of at most the same magnitude....

  19. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  20. Liver vessel segmentation based on extreme learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ye Zhan; Zhao, Yu Qian; Liao, Miao; Zou, Bei Ji; Wang, Xiao Fang; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Liver-vessel segmentation plays an important role in vessel structure analysis for liver surgical planning. This paper presents a liver-vessel segmentation method based on extreme learning machine (ELM). Firstly, an anisotropic filter is used to remove noise while preserving vessel boundaries from the original computer tomography (CT) images. Then, based on the knowledge of prior shapes and geometrical structures, three classical vessel filters including Sato, Frangi and offset medialness filters together with the strain energy filter are used to extract vessel structure features. Finally, the ELM is applied to segment liver vessels from background voxels. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively segment liver vessels from abdominal CT images, and achieves good accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Noise variance estimation for Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniak, Ryszard; Gudzenko, Oleksandr; Pyka, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm that evaluates noise variance with a numerical integration method. For noise variance estimation, we use Krogh method with a variable integration step. In line with common practice, we limit our study to fourth-order method. First, we perform simulation tests for randomly generated signals, related to the transition state and steady state. Next, we formulate three methodologies (research hypotheses) of noise variance estimation, and then compare their efficiency.

  2. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained ge...... capturing pure noise. Therefore it is necessary to use both criteria, high likelihood ratio in favor of a more complex genetic model and proportion of genetic variance explained, to identify biologically important gene groups...

  3. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of a... enforcement responsibility by submitting a request for a variance in writing to the Administrator. Suppliers... and evidence of the best available treatment technology and techniques. (2) Economic and legal factors...

  4. Nonlinear Epigenetic Variance: Review and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Ploeger, Annemie; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Dolan, Conor V.; van Der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of empirical evidence that suggests that a substantial portion of phenotypic variance is due to nonlinear (epigenetic) processes during ontogenesis. The role of such processes as a source of phenotypic variance in human behaviour genetic studies is not fully appreciated. In addition to our review, we present simulation studies…

  5. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained...

  6. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  7. Variance Risk Premia on Stocks and Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Philippe; Sabtchevsky, Petar; Vedolin, Andrea

    : First, exposure to bond market volatility is strongly priced with a Sharpe ratio of -1.8, 20% higher than what is observed in the equity market. Second, while there is strong co-movement between equity and bond market variance risk, there are distinct periods when the bond variance risk premium...... is different from the equity variance risk premium. Third, the conditional correlation between stock and bond market variance risk premium switches sign often and ranges between -60% and +90%. We then show that these stylized facts pose a challenge to standard consumption-based asset pricing models.......Investors in fixed income markets are willing to pay a very large premium to be hedged against shocks in expected volatility and the size of this premium can be studied through variance swaps. Using thirty years of option and high-frequency data, we document the following novel stylized facts...

  8. Portfolio optimization with mean-variance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Lam Weng; Siew, Lam Weng

    2016-06-01

    Investors wish to achieve the target rate of return at the minimum level of risk in their investment. Portfolio optimization is an investment strategy that can be used to minimize the portfolio risk and can achieve the target rate of return. The mean-variance model has been proposed in portfolio optimization. The mean-variance model is an optimization model that aims to minimize the portfolio risk which is the portfolio variance. The objective of this study is to construct the optimal portfolio using the mean-variance model. The data of this study consists of weekly returns of 20 component stocks of FTSE Bursa Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (FBMKLCI). The results of this study show that the portfolio composition of the stocks is different. Moreover, investors can get the return at minimum level of risk with the constructed optimal mean-variance portfolio.

  9. A model based method for retinal blood vessel detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K. A.; Vos, F. M.; Lemij, H. G.; Vossepoel, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Retinal blood vessels are important structures in ophthalmological images. Many detection methods are available, but the results are not always satisfactory. In this paper, we present a novel model based method for blood vessel detection in retinal images. It is based on a Laplace and thresholding

  10. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  11. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  12. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner

  13. Containment vessel drain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  14. Grammatical and lexical variance in English

    CERN Document Server

    Quirk, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Written by one of Britain's most distinguished linguists, this book is concerned with the phenomenon of variance in English grammar and vocabulary across regional, social, stylistic and temporal space.

  15. Bias/Variance Analysis for Relational Domains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neville, Jennifer; Jensen, David

    2007-01-01

    .... To date, the impact of inference error on model performance has not been investigated. In this paper, we propose a new bias/variance framework that decomposes loss into errors due to both the learning and inference process...

  16. Importance Sampling Variance Reduction in GRESS ATMOSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeford, Daniel Tyler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-26

    This document is intended to introduce the importance sampling method of variance reduction to a Geant4 user for application to neutral particle Monte Carlo transport through the atmosphere, as implemented in GRESS ATMOSIM.

  17. Recent Advancements in Retinal Vessel Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Srinidhi, Chetan; Aparna, P; Rajan, Jeny

    2017-04-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation is a key step towards the accurate visualization, diagnosis, early treatment and surgery planning of ocular diseases. For the last two decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated in developing automated methods for segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images. Despite the fact, segmentation of retinal vessels still remains a challenging task due to the presence of abnormalities, varying size and shape of the vessels, non-uniform illumination and anatomical variability between subjects. In this paper, we carry out a systematic review of the most recent advancements in retinal vessel segmentation methods published in last five years. The objectives of this study are as follows: first, we discuss the most crucial preprocessing steps that are involved in accurate segmentation of vessels. Second, we review most recent state-of-the-art retinal vessel segmentation techniques which are classified into different categories based on their main principle. Third, we quantitatively analyse these methods in terms of its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under the curve and discuss newly introduced performance metrics in current literature. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the existing segmentation techniques. Finally, we provide an insight into active problems and possible future directions towards building successful computer-aided diagnostic system.

  18. The Variance Composition of Firm Growth Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Artur Ledur Brito

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Firms exhibit a wide variability in growth rates. This can be seen as another manifestation of the fact that firms are different from one another in several respects. This study investigated this variability using the variance components technique previously used to decompose the variance of financial performance. The main source of variation in growth rates, responsible for more than 40% of total variance, corresponds to individual, idiosyncratic firm aspects and not to industry, country, or macroeconomic conditions prevailing in specific years. Firm growth, similar to financial performance, is mostly unique to specific firms and not an industry or country related phenomenon. This finding also justifies using growth as an alternative outcome of superior firm resources and as a complementary dimension of competitive advantage. This also links this research with the resource-based view of strategy. Country was the second source of variation with around 10% of total variance. The analysis was done using the Compustat Global database with 80,320 observations, comprising 13,221 companies in 47 countries, covering the years of 1994 to 2002. It also compared the variance structure of growth to the variance structure of financial performance in the same sample.

  19. A fast analysis method for non-invasive imaging of blood flow in individual cerebral arteries using vessel-encoded arterial spin labelling angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Chappell, Michael A.; Okell, Thomas W.; Payne, Stephen J.; Jezzard, Peter; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) MRI offers a non-invasive means to create blood-borne contrast in vivo for dynamic angiographic imaging. By spatial modulation of the ASL process it is possible to uniquely label individual arteries over a series of measurements, allowing each to be separately identified in the resulting angiographic images. This separation requires appropriate analysis for which a general Bayesian framework has previously been proposed. Here this framework is adapted for clinica...

  20. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  1. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  2. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  4. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  5. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  6. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  7. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  8. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  9. 2011 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. 2011 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  12. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  14. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Paolo, E-mail: passoni.paolo@hsr.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Reni, Michele [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni M. [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Slim, Najla [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cereda, Stefano [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Longobardi, Barbara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Gusmini, Simone [Department of Radiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Staudacher, Carlo [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  15. Integrating Variances into an Analytical Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    For this project, I enrolled in numerous SATERN courses that taught the basics of database programming. These include: Basic Access 2007 Forms, Introduction to Database Systems, Overview of Database Design, and others. My main job was to create an analytical database that can handle many stored forms and make it easy to interpret and organize. Additionally, I helped improve an existing database and populate it with information. These databases were designed to be used with data from Safety Variances and DCR forms. The research consisted of analyzing the database and comparing the data to find out which entries were repeated the most. If an entry happened to be repeated several times in the database, that would mean that the rule or requirement targeted by that variance has been bypassed many times already and so the requirement may not really be needed, but rather should be changed to allow the variance's conditions permanently. This project did not only restrict itself to the design and development of the database system, but also worked on exporting the data from the database to a different format (e.g. Excel or Word) so it could be analyzed in a simpler fashion. Thanks to the change in format, the data was organized in a spreadsheet that made it possible to sort the data by categories or types and helped speed up searches. Once my work with the database was done, the records of variances could be arranged so that they were displayed in numerical order, or one could search for a specific document targeted by the variances and restrict the search to only include variances that modified a specific requirement. A great part that contributed to my learning was SATERN, NASA's resource for education. Thanks to the SATERN online courses I took over the summer, I was able to learn many new things about computers and databases and also go more in depth into topics I already knew about.

  16. Helping financial analysts communicate variance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, H G; Forthman, T

    1995-04-01

    Healthcare organizations often use variance analysis to explain variation between planned and actual costs and charges. This type of analysis is becoming even more common as healthcare executives work to improve efficiency, to set priorities for organizational improvement as part of strategic planning, and to explain costs and charges to interested groups such as purchasers and payers. Variance analysis produces data that must be presented in a format useful to senior executives. An effective format would express the data in a visual summary that is simple enough to be readily understood and detailed enough to provide valuable information.

  17. Vessel wall characterization using quantitative MRI: what's in a number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Calcagno, Claudia; van Ooij, Pim; Fayad, Zahi A; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed the rapid development of new MRI technology for vessel wall imaging. Today, with advances in MRI hardware and pulse sequences, quantitative MRI of the vessel wall represents a real alternative to conventional qualitative imaging, which is hindered by significant intra- and inter-observer variability. Quantitative MRI can measure several important morphological and functional characteristics of the vessel wall. This review provides a detailed introduction to novel quantitative MRI methods for measuring vessel wall dimensions, plaque composition and permeability, endothelial shear stress and wall stiffness. Together, these methods show the versatility of non-invasive quantitative MRI for probing vascular disease at several stages. These quantitative MRI biomarkers can play an important role in the context of both treatment response monitoring and risk prediction. Given the rapid developments in scan acceleration techniques and novel image reconstruction, we foresee the possibility of integrating the acquisition of multiple quantitative vessel wall parameters within a single scan session.

  18. An image-segmentation-based framework to detect oil slicks from moving vessels in the Southern African oceans using SAR imagery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mdakane, Lizwe W

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oil slick events caused due to bilge leakage/dumps from ships and from other anthropogenic sources pose a threat to the aquatic ecosystem and need to be monitored on a regular basis. An automatic image-segmentation-based framework to detect oil...

  19. Osteoid osteoma - the CT vessel sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaniv, Gal; Shabshin, Noga; Sharon, Michal; Garniack, Alex [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Liberman, Boaz [Sheba Medical Center, Division of Orthopedics, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rimon, Uri [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Eshed, Iris [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate whether the presence of a feeding vessel in proximity to osteoid osteomas of long bones on multidetector CT (MDCT) can be an adjuvant clue for the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. Forty-nine CT scans of patients with radiological and clinical diagnosis of osteoid osteoma of long bones and a control group of 20 CT scans of patients with cortical-based lesions other then osteoid osteoma were analyzed. Two radiologists evaluated the CT images in consensus for the presence of a blood vessel in the same axial slices in which the nidus of osteoid osteoma was seen and to determine the incidence. In 39 cases (79.6%) of osteoid osteoma, a blood vessel either entered the nidus (23 patients) or was seen in proximity to it (16 patients). This was significantly different (P<0.05) from the cortical-based lesions, in which only two CT scans (10%) showed a blood vessel in the lesion's proximity. In the majority of osteoid osteoma lesions in long bones, a blood vessel can be seen on MDCT either entering the nidus itself or in its proximity. The role of this vessel in the lesion pathogenesis and whether it improves diagnostic accuracy need further evaluation. (orig.)

  20. The passive biomechanics of human pelvic collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitrios; Edgar, Lowell T; Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Nixon, Katherine; Duarte, Delfim; Hawkins, Edwin D; Jamalian, Samira; Cunnea, Paula; Lo Celso, Cristina; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Fotopoulou, Christina; Moore, James E

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system has a major significance in the metastatic pathways in women's cancers. Lymphatic pumping depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, and the mechanical behavior of lymphatic vessels regulates the function of the system. However, data on the mechanical properties and function of human lymphatics are lacking. Our aim is to characterize, for the first time, the passive biomechanical behavior of human collecting lymphatic vessels removed at pelvic lymph node dissection during primary debulking surgeries for epithelial ovarian cancer. Isolated vessels were cannulated and then pressurized at varying levels of applied axial stretch in a calcium-free Krebs buffer. Pressurized vessels were then imaged using multi-photon microscopy for collagen-elastin structural composition and fiber orientation. Both pressure-diameter and force-elongation responses were highly nonlinear, and axial stretching of the vessel served to decrease diameter at constant pressure. Pressure-diameter behavior for the human vessels is very similar to data from rat mesenteric vessels, though the human vessels were approximately 10× larger than those from rats. Multiphoton microscopy revealed the vessels to be composed of an inner layer of elastin with an outer layer of aligned collagen fibers. This is the first study that successfully described the passive biomechanical response and composition of human lymphatic vessels in patients with ovarian cancer. Future work should expand on this knowledge base with investigations of vessels from other anatomical locations, contractile behavior, and the implications on metastatic cell transport.

  1. Vessel Sampling and Blood Flow Velocity Distribution With Vessel Diameter for Characterizing the Human Bulbar Conjunctival Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Wentao; Cintrón-Colón, Hector R; Perez, Victor L; DeBuc, Delia C; Feuer, William J; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    This study determined (1) how many vessels (i.e., the vessel sampling) are needed to reliably characterize the bulbar conjunctival microvasculature and (2) if characteristic information can be obtained from the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter. Functional slitlamp biomicroscope was used to image hundreds of venules per subject. The bulbar conjunctiva in five healthy human subjects was imaged on six different locations in the temporal bulbar conjunctiva. The histograms of the diameter and velocity were plotted to examine whether the distribution was normal. Standard errors were calculated from the standard deviation and vessel sample size. The ratio of the standard error of the mean over the population mean was used to determine the sample size cutoff. The velocity was plotted as a function of the vessel diameter to display the distribution of the diameter and velocity. The results showed that the sampling size was approximately 15 vessels, which generated a standard error equivalent to 15% of the population mean from the total vessel population. The distributions of the diameter and velocity were not only unimodal, but also somewhat positively skewed and not normal. The blood flow velocity was related to the vessel diameter (r=0.23, P<0.05). This was the first study to determine the sampling size of the vessels and the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter, which may lead to a better understanding of the human microvascular system of the bulbar conjunctiva.

  2. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  3. T1 weighted brain images at 7 Tesla unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF coil receive B1 sensitivity with simultaneous vessel visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-06-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as "intensity field bias". Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B(1) profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T(1)-weighted (T(1)w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T(1) weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T(1) contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B(1) variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B(1) profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T(1)w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T(1)w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 T, provide higher T(1) contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help in identifying small brain structures and that T(2)(*) induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T(1)w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T(1)w structural images. In addition

  4. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  5. 21 CFR 1010.4 - Variances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS: GENERAL General Provisions § 1010.4 Variances. (a) Criteria for... provisions of any performance standard under subchapter J of this chapter for an electronic product subject... purposes of Subchapter C—Electronic Product Radiation Control of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act...

  6. 7 CFR 205.290 - Temporary variances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temporary variances. 205.290 Section 205.290 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Organic...

  7. Expected Stock Returns and Variance Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Zhou, Hao

    We find that the difference between implied and realized variation, or the variance risk premium, is able to explain more than fifteen percent of the ex-post time series variation in quarterly excess returns on the market portfolio over the 1990 to 2005 sample period, with high (low) premia predi...... to daily, data. Our findings suggest that temporal variation in both risk-aversion and volatility-risk play an important role in determining stock market returns.......We find that the difference between implied and realized variation, or the variance risk premium, is able to explain more than fifteen percent of the ex-post time series variation in quarterly excess returns on the market portfolio over the 1990 to 2005 sample period, with high (low) premia...... predicting high (low) future returns. The magnitude of the return predictability of the variance risk premium easily dominates that afforded by standard predictor variables like the P/E ratio, the dividend yield, the default spread, and the consumption-wealth ratio (CAY). Moreover, combining the variance...

  8. Variance decomposition using an IRT measurement model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie Martine; van den Berg, Stephanie M.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2007-01-01

    Large scale research projects in behaviour genetics and genetic epidemiology are often based on questionnaire or interview data. Typically, a number of items is presented to a number of subjects, the subjects’ sum scores on the items are computed, and the variance of sum scores is decomposed into a

  9. Estimating quadratic variation using realized variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper looks at some recent work on estimating quadratic variation using realized variance (RV) - that is, sums of M squared returns. This econometrics has been motivated by the advent of the common availability of high-frequency financial return data. When the underlying process...

  10. Data Sparseness and Variance in Accounting Profitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stavropoulos (Spyridon); M.J. Burger (Martijn); D. Skuras (Dimitris)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ A central question in strategic management is why some firms perform better than others. One approach to addressing this question empirically is to decompose the variance in firm-level profitability into firm, industry, location, and year components. Although it is

  11. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models with addit...

  12. (co)variances for growth and efficiency

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    42, 295. CANTET, R.J.C., KRESS, D.D., ANDERSON, D.C., DOORNBOS, D.E., BURFENING, P.J. &. BLACKWELL, R.L., 1988. Direct and maternal variances and covariances and maternal phenotypic effects on preweaning growth of beef cattle. J. Anim. Sci. 66, 648. CUNNINGHAM. E.P., MOON, R.A. & GJEDREN, T., 1970.

  13. Biological Variance in Agricultural Products. Theoretical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Konopacki, P.

    2003-01-01

    The food that we eat is uniform neither in shape or appearance nor in internal composition or content. Since technology became increasingly important, the presence of biological variance in our food became more and more of a nuisance. Techniques and procedures (statistical, technical) were

  14. Estimation of noise-free variance to measure heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Winkler

    Full Text Available Variance is a statistical parameter used to characterize heterogeneity or variability in data sets. However, measurements commonly include noise, as random errors superimposed to the actual value, which may substantially increase the variance compared to a noise-free data set. Our aim was to develop and validate a method to estimate noise-free spatial heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET scans. On theoretical grounds, we demonstrate a linear relationship between the total variance of a data set derived from averages of n multiple measurements, and the reciprocal of n. Using multiple measurements with varying n yields estimates of the linear relationship including the noise-free variance as the constant parameter. In PET images, n is proportional to the number of registered decay events, and the variance of the image is typically normalized by the square of its mean value yielding a coefficient of variation squared (CV(2. The method was evaluated with a Jaszczak phantom as reference spatial heterogeneity (CV(r(2 for comparison with our estimate of noise-free or 'true' heterogeneity (CV(t(2. We found that CV(t(2 was only 5.4% higher than CV(r2. Additional evaluations were conducted on 38 PET scans of pulmonary perfusion using (13NN-saline injection. The mean CV(t(2 was 0.10 (range: 0.03-0.30, while the mean CV(2 including noise was 0.24 (range: 0.10-0.59. CV(t(2 was in average 41.5% of the CV(2 measured including noise (range: 17.8-71.2%. The reproducibility of CV(t(2 was evaluated using three repeated PET scans from five subjects. Individual CV(t(2 were within 16% of each subject's mean and paired t-tests revealed no difference among the results from the three consecutive PET scans. In conclusion, our method provides reliable noise-free estimates of CV(t(2 in PET scans, and may be useful for similar statistical problems in experimental data.

  15. Enhancing supply vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    A supply-vessel bridge installation consists of a navigating bridge and a control position aft, from which operators control the ship when close to rigs or platforms, and operate winches and other loading equipment. The international Convention for Safety of I Ale at Sea (SOLAS) does not regulate the layout, so design varies to a large degree, often causing an imperfect working environment. As for other types of ships, more than half the offshore service vessel accidents at sea are caused by bridge system failures. A majority can be traced back to technical design, and operational errors. The research and development project NAUT-OSV is a response to the offshore industry's safety concerns. Analysis of 24 incidents involving contact or collision between supply vessels and offshore installations owned or operated by Norwegian companies indicated that failures in the bridge system were often the cause.

  16. Blood vessel segmentation in magnetic resonance angiography imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaitis, S. P.; Chandramohan, R.

    2011-06-01

    Small blood vessels may be difficult to detect in magnetic resonance angiography due to the lack of blood flow caused by disease or injury. Our method, which uses a block-matching denoising approach to segment blood vessels, works well in the presence of noise. We examined extended regions of an image to determine whether they contained blood vessels by fitting a Gaussian mixture model to a region's histogram. Then, dissimilar regions were denoised separately. This approach was beneficial in low-contrast settings. It can be used to detect higher-order blood vessels that may be difficult to detect under normal conditions.

  17. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Silole-Based Red Fluorescent Organic Dots for Bright Two-Photon Fluorescence In vitro Cell and In vivo Blood Vessel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Feng, Guangxue; He, Bairong; Goh, Chiching; Xu, Shidang; Ramos-Ortiz, Gabriel; Aparicio-Ixta, Laura; Zhou, Jian; Ng, Laiguan; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-10

    Robust luminescent dyes with efficient two-photon fluorescence are highly desirable for biological imaging applications, but those suitable for organic dots fabrication are still rare because of aggregation-caused quenching. In this work, a red fluorescent silole, 2,5-bis[5-(dimesitylboranyl)thiophen-2-yl]-1-methyl-1,3,4-triphenylsilole ((MesB)2 DTTPS), is synthesized and characterized. (MesB)2 DTTPS exhibits enhanced fluorescence efficiency in nanoaggregates, indicative of aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE). The organic dots fabricated by encapsulating (MesB)2 DTTPS within lipid-PEG show red fluorescence peaking at 598 nm and a high fluorescence quantum yield of 32%. Upon excitation at 820 nm, the dots show a large two-photon absorption cross section of 3.43 × 10(5) GM, which yields a two-photon action cross section of 1.09 × 10(5) GM. These (MesB)2 DTTPS dots show good biocompatibility and are successfully applied to one-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging of MCF-7 cells and two-photon in vivo visualization of the blood vascular of mouse muscle in a high-contrast and noninvasive manner. Moreover, the 3D blood vasculature located at the mouse ear skin with a depth of over 100 μm can also be visualized clearly, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Freehand diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for intraoperative identification of major venous and arterial vessels underlying peritoneal fat: an in vivo demonstration in a pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Ramadan, Mohammad; Park, Aaron; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Patel, Sanjay G.

    2017-10-01

    Inadvertent injury to important anatomic structures is a significant risk in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) that potentially requires conversion to an open procedure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality. Surgeons operating minimal-invasively currently do not have an easy-to-use, real-time device to aid in intraoperative identification of important anatomic structures that underlie tissue planes. We demonstrate freehand diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) imaging for intraoperatively identifying major underlying veins and arteries. An applicator probe that can be affixed to and detached from an 8-mm laparoscopic instrument has been developed. The 10-mm DOS source-detector separation renders sampling of tissue heterogeneities a few millimeters deep. DOS spectra acquired consecutively during freehand movement of the applicator probe on the tissue surface are displayed as a temporal and spectral image to assist in spatially resolved identification of the underlying structures. Open surgery identifications of the vena cava and aorta underlying peritoneal fat of ˜4 mm in thickness using the applicator probe under room light were demonstrated repeatedly in multiple pigs in vivo.

  20. Source Characterization by the Allan Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattano, C.; Lambert, S.

    2016-12-01

    Until now, the main criteria for selecting geodetic sources were based on astrometric stability and structure at 8 GHz te{Fey2015}. But with more observations and the increase of accuracy, the statistical tools used to determine this stability become inappropriate with regards to sudden motions of the radiocenter. In this work, we propose to replace these tools by the Allan Variance te{Allan1966}, first used on VLBI sources by M. Feissel-Vernier te{Feissel2003}, leading to a new classification of sources into three groups according to the shape of the Allan Variance. In parallel, we combine two catalogs, the Large Quasar Astrometric Catalogue te{Souchay2015} and the Optical Characteristics of Astrometric Radio Sources te{Malkin2013}, in order to gather most physical characteristics known about these VLBI targets. By doing so, we may reveal physical criteria that may be useful in the selection of new targets for future VLBI observations.

  1. Fundamentals of exploratory analysis of variance

    CERN Document Server

    Hoaglin, David C; Tukey, John W

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of variance is presented as an exploratory component of data analysis, while retaining the customary least squares fitting methods. Balanced data layouts are used to reveal key ideas and techniques for exploration. The approach emphasizes both the individual observations and the separate parts that the analysis produces. Most chapters include exercises and the appendices give selected percentage points of the Gaussian, t, F chi-squared and studentized range distributions.

  2. The value of travel time variance

    OpenAIRE

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Engelson, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the value of travel time variability under scheduling preferences that are de�fined in terms of linearly time-varying utility rates associated with being at the origin and at the destination. The main result is a simple expression for the value of travel time variability that does not depend on the shape of the travel time distribution. The related measure of travel time variability is the variance of travel time. These conclusions apply equally to travellers ...

  3. An automated method for accurate vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Liu, Chaoyue; Le Minh, Hung; Wang, Zhiwei; Chien, Aichi; (Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting

    2017-05-01

    Vessel segmentation is a critical task for various medical applications, such as diagnosis assistance of diabetic retinopathy, quantification of cerebral aneurysm’s growth, and guiding surgery in neurosurgical procedures. Despite technology advances in image segmentation, existing methods still suffer from low accuracy for vessel segmentation in the two challenging while common scenarios in clinical usage: (1) regions with a low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and (2) at vessel boundaries disturbed by adjacent non-vessel pixels. In this paper, we present an automated system which can achieve highly accurate vessel segmentation for both 2D and 3D images even under these challenging scenarios. Three key contributions achieved by our system are: (1) a progressive contrast enhancement method to adaptively enhance contrast of challenging pixels that were otherwise indistinguishable, (2) a boundary refinement method to effectively improve segmentation accuracy at vessel borders based on Canny edge detection, and (3) a content-aware region-of-interests (ROI) adjustment method to automatically determine the locations and sizes of ROIs which contain ambiguous pixels and demand further verification. Extensive evaluation of our method is conducted on both 2D and 3D datasets. On a public 2D retinal dataset (named DRIVE (Staal 2004 IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging 23 501-9)) and our 2D clinical cerebral dataset, our approach achieves superior performance to the state-of-the-art methods including a vesselness based method (Frangi 1998 Int. Conf. on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention) and an optimally oriented flux (OOF) based method (Law and Chung 2008 European Conf. on Computer Vision). An evaluation on 11 clinical 3D CTA cerebral datasets shows that our method can achieve 94% average accuracy with respect to the manual segmentation reference, which is 23% to 33% better than the five baseline methods (Yushkevich 2006 Neuroimage 31 1116-28; Law and Chung 2008

  4. The Genealogical Consequences of Fecundity Variance Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jesse E.

    2009-01-01

    The genealogical consequences of within-generation fecundity variance polymorphism are studied using coalescent processes structured by genetic backgrounds. I show that these processes have three distinctive features. The first is that the coalescent rates within backgrounds are not jointly proportional to the infinitesimal variance, but instead depend only on the frequencies and traits of genotypes containing each allele. Second, the coalescent processes at unlinked loci are correlated with the genealogy at the selected locus; i.e., fecundity variance polymorphism has a genomewide impact on genealogies. Third, in diploid models, there are infinitely many combinations of fecundity distributions that have the same diffusion approximation but distinct coalescent processes; i.e., in this class of models, ancestral processes and allele frequency dynamics are not in one-to-one correspondence. Similar properties are expected to hold in models that allow for heritable variation in other traits that affect the coalescent effective population size, such as sex ratio or fecundity and survival schedules. PMID:19433628

  5. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  6. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  7. Network of endocardial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Hong Bae; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Ki Woo; Sohn, Jamin; Son, Boram; Chang, Byung-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been reports on threadlike structures inside the heart, they have received little attention. We aimed to develop a method for observing such structures and to reveal their ultrastructures. An in situ staining method, which uses a series of procedures of 0.2-0.4% trypan blue spraying and washing, was applied to observe threadlike structures on the surfaces of endocardia. The threadlike structures were isolated and observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Networks of endocardial vessels (20 μm in thickness) with expansions (40-100 μm in diameter) were visualized; they were movable on the endocardium of the bovine atrium and ventricle. CLSM showed that (1) rod-shaped nuclei were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel and (2) there were many cells inside the expansion. TEM on the endocardial vessel revealed that (1) there existed multiple lumens (1-7 μm in diameter) and (2) the extracellular matrices mostly consisted of collagen fibers, which were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel or were locally organized in reticular structures. We investigated the endocardial circulatory system in bovine cardiac chambers and its ultrastructures, such as nucleic distributions, microlumens, and collagenous extracellular matrices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  9. On the potential of a new IVUS elasticity modulus imaging approach for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques: in vitro vessel phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floc'h, Simon; Cloutier, Guy; Finet, Gérard; Tracqui, Philippe; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Ohayon, Jacques

    2010-10-07

    Peak cap stress amplitude is recognized as a good indicator of vulnerable plaque (VP) rupture. However, such stress evaluation strongly relies on a precise, but still lacking, knowledge of the mechanical properties exhibited by the plaque components. As a first response to this limitation, our group recently developed, in a previous theoretical study, an original approach, called iMOD (imaging modulography), which reconstructs elasticity maps (or modulograms) of atheroma plaques from the estimation of strain fields. In the present in vitro experimental study, conducted on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel arterial phantoms, we investigate the benefit of coupling the iMOD procedure with the acquisition of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements for detection of VP. Our results show that the combined iMOD-IVUS strategy: (1) successfully detected and quantified soft inclusion contours with high positive predictive and sensitivity values of 89.7 ± 3.9% and 81.5 ± 8.8%, respectively, (2) estimated reasonably cap thicknesses larger than ∼300 µm, but underestimated thinner caps, and (3) quantified satisfactorily Young's modulus of hard medium (mean value of 109.7 ± 23.7 kPa instead of 145.4 ± 31.8 kPa), but overestimated the stiffness of soft inclusions (mean Young`s moduli of 31.4 ± 9.7 kPa instead of 17.6 ± 3.4 kPa). All together, these results demonstrate a promising benefit of the new iMOD-IVUS clinical imaging method for in vivo VP detection.

  10. On the potential of a new IVUS elasticity modulus imaging approach for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques: in vitro vessel phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floc' h, Simon Le; Tracqui, Philippe; Ohayon, Jacques [Laboratory TIMC-DynaCell, UJF, CNRS UMR 5525, In3S, Grenoble (France); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Finet, Gerard [Department of Hemodynamics and Interventional Cardiology, Hospices Civils de Lyon and Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, INSERM Unit 886, Lyon (France); Pettigrew, Roderic I, E-mail: Guy.Cloutier@umontreal.c, E-mail: Jacques.Ohayon@imag.f [Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular Imaging Science, National Institute of Diabetes Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2010-10-07

    Peak cap stress amplitude is recognized as a good indicator of vulnerable plaque (VP) rupture. However, such stress evaluation strongly relies on a precise, but still lacking, knowledge of the mechanical properties exhibited by the plaque components. As a first response to this limitation, our group recently developed, in a previous theoretical study, an original approach, called iMOD (imaging modulography), which reconstructs elasticity maps (or modulograms) of atheroma plaques from the estimation of strain fields. In the present in vitro experimental study, conducted on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel arterial phantoms, we investigate the benefit of coupling the iMOD procedure with the acquisition of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements for detection of VP. Our results show that the combined iMOD-IVUS strategy: (1) successfully detected and quantified soft inclusion contours with high positive predictive and sensitivity values of 89.7 {+-} 3.9% and 81.5 {+-} 8.8%, respectively, (2) estimated reasonably cap thicknesses larger than {approx}300 {mu}m, but underestimated thinner caps, and (3) quantified satisfactorily Young's modulus of hard medium (mean value of 109.7 {+-} 23.7 kPa instead of 145.4 {+-} 31.8 kPa), but overestimated the stiffness of soft inclusions (mean Young's moduli of 31.4 {+-} 9.7 kPa instead of 17.6 {+-} 3.4 kPa). All together, these results demonstrate a promising benefit of the new iMOD-IVUS clinical imaging method for in vivo VP detection.

  11. Genetic heterogeneity of residual variance - estimation of variance components using double hierarchical generalized linear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikse Freddy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sensitivity to microenvironmental changes varies among animals and may be under genetic control. It is essential to take this element into account when aiming at breeding robust farm animals. Here, linear mixed models with genetic effects in the residual variance part of the model can be used. Such models have previously been fitted using EM and MCMC algorithms. Results We propose the use of double hierarchical generalized linear models (DHGLM, where the squared residuals are assumed to be gamma distributed and the residual variance is fitted using a generalized linear model. The algorithm iterates between two sets of mixed model equations, one on the level of observations and one on the level of variances. The method was validated using simulations and also by re-analyzing a data set on pig litter size that was previously analyzed using a Bayesian approach. The pig litter size data contained 10,060 records from 4,149 sows. The DHGLM was implemented using the ASReml software and the algorithm converged within three minutes on a Linux server. The estimates were similar to those previously obtained using Bayesian methodology, especially the variance components in the residual variance part of the model. Conclusions We have shown that variance components in the residual variance part of a linear mixed model can be estimated using a DHGLM approach. The method enables analyses of animal models with large numbers of observations. An important future development of the DHGLM methodology is to include the genetic correlation between the random effects in the mean and residual variance parts of the model as a parameter of the DHGLM.

  12. A proxy for variance in dense matching over homogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altena, Bas; Cockx, Liesbet; Goedemé, Toon

    2014-05-01

    Automation in photogrammetry and avionics have brought highly autonomous UAV mapping solutions on the market. These systems have great potential for geophysical research, due to their mobility and simplicity of work. Flight planning can be done on site and orientation parameters are estimated automatically. However, one major drawback is still present: if contrast is lacking, stereoscopy fails. Consequently, topographic information cannot be obtained precisely through photogrammetry for areas with low contrast. Even though more robustness is added in the estimation through multi-view geometry, a precise product is still lacking. For the greater part, interpolation is applied over these regions, where the estimation is constrained by uniqueness, its epipolar line and smoothness. Consequently, digital surface models are generated with an estimate of the topography, without holes but also without an indication of its variance. Every dense matching algorithm is based on a similarity measure. Our methodology uses this property to support the idea that if only noise is present, no correspondence can be detected. Therefore, the noise level is estimated in respect to the intensity signal of the topography (SNR) and this ratio serves as a quality indicator for the automatically generated product. To demonstrate this variance indicator, two different case studies were elaborated. The first study is situated at an open sand mine near the village of Kiezegem, Belgium. Two different UAV systems flew over the site. One system had automatic intensity regulation, and resulted in low contrast over the sandy interior of the mine. That dataset was used to identify the weak estimations of the topography and was compared with the data from the other UAV flight. In the second study a flight campaign with the X100 system was conducted along the coast near Wenduine, Belgium. The obtained images were processed through structure-from-motion software. Although the beach had a very low

  13. Cholinergic innervation of human mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Bianchi, E; Taurone, S; Mignini, F; Cavallotti, C; Artico, M

    2013-11-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmission within the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels has been poorly studied. Therefore, our aim is to analyse the cholinergic nerve fibres of lymphatic vessels using the traditional enzymatic techniques of staining, plus the biochemical modifications of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Specimens obtained from human mesenteric lymphatic vessels were subjected to the following experimental procedures: 1) drawing, cutting and staining of tissues; 2) staining of total nerve fibres; 3) enzymatic staining of cholinergic nerve fibres; 4) homogenisation of tissues; 5) biochemical amount of proteins; 6) biochemical amount of AChE activity; 6) quantitative analysis of images; 7) statistical analysis of data. The mesenteric lymphatic vessels show many AChE positive nerve fibres around their wall with an almost plexiform distribution. The incubation time was performed at 1 h (partial activity) and 6 h (total activity). Moreover, biochemical dosage of the same enzymatic activity confirms the results obtained with morphological methods. The homogenates of the studied tissues contain strong AChE activity. In our study, the lymphatic vessels appeared to contain few cholinergic nerve fibres. Therefore, it is expected that perivascular nerve stimulation stimulates cholinergic nerves innervating the mesenteric arteries to release the neurotransmitter AChE, which activates muscarinic or nicotinic receptors to modulate adrenergic neurotransmission. These results strongly suggest, that perivascular cholinergic nerves have little or no effect on the adrenergic nerve function in mesenteric arteries. The cholinergic nerves innervating mesenteric arteries do not mediate direct vascular responses.

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of absolute blood flow velocity and blood vessel position under low blood flow velocity based on Doppler signal information included in scattered light from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Tajiri, Tomoki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    The development of a system for in vivo visualization of occluded distal blood vessels for diabetic patients is the main target of our research. We herein describe two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (MLDV), which measures the instantaneous multipoint flow velocity and can be used to observe the blood flow velocity in peripheral blood vessels. By including a motorized stage to shift the measurement points horizontally and in the depth direction while measuring the velocity, the path of the blood vessel in the skin could be observed using blood flow velocity in three-dimensional space. The relationship of the signal power density between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissues was shown and helped us identify the position of the blood vessel. Two-beam MLDV can be used to simultaneously determine the absolute blood flow velocity distribution and identify the blood vessel position in skin.

  15. The application of total vertical projections for the unbiased estimation of the length of blood vessels and other structures by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N; Howard, C V; Cruz-Orive, L M; Edwards, R H

    1991-01-01

    A new stereological method has recently been developed to estimate the total length of a bounded curve in 3D from a sample of projections about a vertical axis. Unlike other methods based on serial section reconstructions, the new method is unbiased (i.e., it has zero systematic error). A basic requirement, not difficult to fulfill in many cases, is that the masking of one structure by another is not appreciable. The application of the new method to real curvilinear structures using a clinical magnetic resonance (MR) imager is illustrated. The first structure measured was a twisted water-filled glass tube of known length. The accuracy of the method was assessed: With six vertical projections, the tube length was measured to within 2% of the true value. The second example was a living bonsai tree, and the third was a clinical application of MR angiography. The possibility of applying the method to other scientific disciplines, for example, the monitoring of plant root growth, is discussed.

  16. Segmentation of vessels: the corkscrew algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Firle, Evelyn A.

    2004-05-01

    Medical imaging is nowadays much more than only providing data for diagnosis. It also links 'classical' diagnosis to modern forms of treatment such as image guided surgery. Those systems require the identification of organs, anatomical regions of the human body etc., i. e. the segmentation of structures from medical data sets. The algorithms used for these segmentation tasks strongly depend on the object to be segmented. One structure which plays an important role in surgery planning are vessels that are found everywhere in the human body. Several approaches for their extraction already exist. However, there is no general one which is suitable for all types of data or all sorts of vascular structures. This work presents a new algorithm for the segmentation of vessels. It can be classified as a skeleton-based approach working on 3D data sets, and has been designed for a reliable segmentation of coronary arteries. The algorithm is a semi-automatic extraction technique requiring the definition of the start and end the point of the (centerline) path to be found. A first estimation of the vessel's centerline is calculated and then corrected iteratively by detecting the vessel's border perpendicular to the centerline. We used contrast enhanced CT data sets of the thorax for testing our approach. Coronary arteries have been extracted from the data sets using the 'corkscrew algorithm' presented in this work. The segmentation turned out to be robust even if moderate breathing artifacts were present in the data sets.

  17. Measuring the Reliability of Geometries in Magnet Resonance Angiography A Reference for Multimodal Image Registration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudnek, M. André; Hess, Andreas; Obermayer, Klaus; Sibila, Michael

    Magnet Resonance Angiography (MRA) can be used to register MR images of other types (e.g. functional MRI) acquired in the same imaging session as the angiogram since blood vessels are spatially closely confined features. This is only possible if MRA delivers reliable, reproducible images and does not show major random distortions. Therefore, we examine the reliability of MRA over subsequent scanning sessions using an appropriate distance measure on geometric vasculature models obtained from MR angiograms. Additionally we examine the variance between different specimens in order to value the possibility of interspecimen registration.

  18. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Kauai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Kauai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  19. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Tinian

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Tinian. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  20. Puerto Rico Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Puerto Rico. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  1. American Samoa Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for American Samoa. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  2. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Oahu, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  3. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Molokai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Molokai, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  4. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Rota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Rota. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  5. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Lanai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Lanai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  6. For-Hire Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Directory is maintained as the sample frame for the For-Hire Survey. I contains data on for-hire vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Data include...

  7. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Saipan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Saipan. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  8. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Maui. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  9. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  10. Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter R.; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    estimation based on high-frequency data. Finally, we apply cointegration techniques to decompose transaction prices and bid-ask quotes into an estimate of the efficient price and noise. This framework enables us to study the dynamic effects on transaction prices and quotes caused by changes in the efficient......We study market microstructure noise in high-frequency data and analyze its implications for the realized variance (RV) under a general specification for the noise. We show that kernel-based estimators can unearth important characteristics of market microstructure noise and that a simple kernel...

  11. Pressure vessel design manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of the book covers types of loadings, failures, and stress theories, and how they apply to pressure vessels. The book delineates the procedures for designing typical components as well as those for designing large openings in cylindrical shells, ring girders, davits, platforms, bins and elevated tanks. The techniques for designing conical transitions, cone-cylinder intersections, intermediate heads, flat heads, and spherically dished covers are also described. The book covers the design of vessel supports subject to wind and seismic loads and one section is devoted to the five major ways of analyzing loads on shells and heads. Each procedure is detailed enough to size all welds, bolts, and plate thicknesses and to determine actual stresses.

  12. New research vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Two “new” ocean-going research vessels operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Science Foundation (NSF) will soon begin full-time scientific duties off the coast of California and in the Antarctic, respectively. The 37.5-m Scripps vessel, named Robert Gordon Sprout in honor of the ex-president of the University of California, replaces the smaller ship Ellen B. Scripps, which had served the institution since 1965. The new ship is a slightly modified Gulf Coast workboat. Under the name of Midnight Alaskan, it had been used for high-resolution geophysical surveys in American and Latin American waters by such firms as Arco Oil & Gas, Exxon, Pennzoil, and Racal-Decca before its purchase by Scripps from a Lousiana chartering firm last summer.

  13. Large vessel vasculitides

    OpenAIRE

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Pukšić, Silva; Gudelj Gračanin, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in y...

  14. Very Versatile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    data. This source provides information on aluminum hydrofoil vessels without the added weight of foil structures. The composite armor around the...seating compartment. The sides should also limit wave splash on the deck. The freeboard should contribute reserve buoyancy , increasing large-angle and...Resistance, Powering, and Propulsion Savitsky’s Method Since model testing data or other reliable performance data was unavailable for the proposed

  15. LQG Dynamic Positioning for a Supply Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott Ron

    The purpose of this study is to merge my on the job marine experience and the control knowledge gathered throughout my studies at University of California San Diego into a practical control design. This thesis creates a Dynamic Positioning (DP) control loop for a supply vessel which utilizes two azimuthal thrusters as actuators. The control loop is designed to also account for external environmental disturbances and sensor measurement noise. The control loop is accomplished using modern control theory which makes use of known vessel dynamics and assumptions associated with the environment and sensor measurement variances. During this thesis research and design period, a testing platform for the control loop was required. Without the ability to retrofit a physical vessel with the proposed azimuthal thrusters it was determined that a simulation model would be required and was designed and implemented in Matlab Simulink to allow for control loop testing and validation. This simulation model is presented as part of the thesis research and design flow as it was a required element of the design and encompasses the knowledge acquired in my marine work and during my period at UCSD. Control loop performance results were obtained through testing on the generated simulation model. These results allowed for validation and optimization during the design phases of the vessel control loop. The principal conclusions were that the simulation model provided sufficient dynamics to properly execute the required tests to the control loop and that the implemented control loop was capable of operating within the determined parameters set forth in the design validation testing.

  16. Variance-based Salt Body Reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Ovcharenko, Oleg

    2017-05-26

    Seismic inversions of salt bodies are challenging when updating velocity models based on Born approximation- inspired gradient methods. We propose a variance-based method for velocity model reconstruction in regions complicated by massive salt bodies. The novel idea lies in retrieving useful information from simultaneous updates corresponding to different single frequencies. Instead of the commonly used averaging of single-iteration monofrequency gradients, our algorithm iteratively reconstructs salt bodies in an outer loop based on updates from a set of multiple frequencies after a few iterations of full-waveform inversion. The variance among these updates is used to identify areas where considerable cycle-skipping occurs. In such areas, we update velocities by interpolating maximum velocities within a certain region. The result of several recursive interpolations is later used as a new starting model to improve results of conventional full-waveform inversion. An application on part of the BP 2004 model highlights the evolution of the proposed approach and demonstrates its effectiveness.

  17. Dynamic stroma reorganization drives blood vessel dysmorphia during glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathivet, Thomas; Bouleti, Claire; Van Woensel, Matthias; Stanchi, Fabio; Verschuere, Tina; Phng, Li-Kun; Dejaegher, Joost; Balcer, Marly; Matsumoto, Ken; Georgieva, Petya B; Belmans, Jochen; Sciot, Raf; Stockmann, Christian; Mazzone, Massimiliano; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-10-16

    Glioma growth and progression are characterized by abundant development of blood vessels that are highly aberrant and poorly functional, with detrimental consequences for drug delivery efficacy. The mechanisms driving this vessel dysmorphia during tumor progression are poorly understood. Using longitudinal intravital imaging in a mouse glioma model, we identify that dynamic sprouting and functional morphogenesis of a highly branched vessel network characterize the initial tumor growth, dramatically changing to vessel expansion, leakage, and loss of branching complexity in the later stages. This vascular phenotype transition was accompanied by recruitment of predominantly pro-inflammatory M1-like macrophages in the early stages, followed by in situ repolarization to M2-like macrophages, which produced VEGF-A and relocate to perivascular areas. A similar enrichment and perivascular accumulation of M2 versus M1 macrophages correlated with vessel dilation and malignancy in human glioma samples of different WHO malignancy grade. Targeting macrophages using anti-CSF1 treatment restored normal blood vessel patterning and function. Combination treatment with chemotherapy showed survival benefit, suggesting that targeting macrophages as the key driver of blood vessel dysmorphia in glioma progression presents opportunities to improve efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that vessel dysfunction is not simply a general feature of tumor vessel formation, but rather an emergent property resulting from a dynamic and functional reorganization of the tumor stroma and its angiogenic influences. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Jackknife variance of the partial area under the empirical receiver operating characteristic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandos, Andriy I; Guo, Ben; Gur, David

    2017-04-01

    Receiver operating characteristic analysis provides an important methodology for assessing traditional (e.g., imaging technologies and clinical practices) and new (e.g., genomic studies, biomarker development) diagnostic problems. The area under the clinically/practically relevant part of the receiver operating characteristic curve (partial area or partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) is an important performance index summarizing diagnostic accuracy at multiple operating points (decision thresholds) that are relevant to actual clinical practice. A robust estimate of the partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is provided by the area under the corresponding part of the empirical receiver operating characteristic curve. We derive a closed-form expression for the jackknife variance of the partial area under the empirical receiver operating characteristic curve. Using the derived analytical expression, we investigate the differences between the jackknife variance and a conventional variance estimator. The relative properties in finite samples are demonstrated in a simulation study. The developed formula enables an easy way to estimate the variance of the empirical partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, thereby substantially reducing the computation burden, and provides important insight into the structure of the variability. We demonstrate that when compared with the conventional approach, the jackknife variance has substantially smaller bias, and leads to a more appropriate type I error rate of the Wald-type test. The use of the jackknife variance is illustrated in the analysis of a data set from a diagnostic imaging study.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  20. A Vessel Active Contour Model for Vascular Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a vessel active contour model based on local intensity weighting and a vessel vector field. Firstly, the energy function we define is evaluated along the evolving curve instead of all image points, and the function value at each point on the curve is based on the interior and exterior weighted means in a local neighborhood of the point, which is good for dealing with the intensity inhomogeneity. Secondly, a vascular vector field derived from a vesselness measure is employed to guide the contour to evolve along the vessel central skeleton into thin and weak vessels. Thirdly, an automatic initialization method that makes the model converge rapidly is developed, and it avoids repeated trails in conventional local region active contour models. Finally, a speed-up strategy is implemented by labeling the steadily evolved points, and it avoids the repeated computation of these points in the subsequent iterations. Experiments using synthetic and real vessel images validate the proposed model. Comparisons with the localized active contour model, local binary fitting model, and vascular active contour model show that the proposed model is more accurate, efficient, and suitable for extraction of the vessel tree from different medical images.

  1. Robust shape regression for supervised vessel segmentation and its application to coronary segmentation in CTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaap, Michiel; van Walsum, Theo; Neefjes, Lisan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a vessel segmentation method which learns the geometry and appearance of vessels in medical images from annotated data and uses this knowledge to segment vessels in unseen images. Vessels are segmented in a coarse-to-fine fashion. First, the vessel boundaries are estimated...... with multivariate linear regression using image intensities sampled in a region of interest around an initialization curve. Subsequently, the position of the vessel boundary is refined with a robust nonlinear regression technique using intensity profiles sampled across the boundary of the rough segmentation...... and using information about plausible cross-sectional vessel shapes. The method was evaluated by quantitatively comparing segmentation results to manual annotations of 229 coronary arteries. On average the difference between the automatically obtained segmentations and manual contours was smaller than...

  2. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  3. Retinal vessel detection and measurement for computer-aided medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokun; Wee, William G

    2014-02-01

    Since blood vessel detection and characteristic measurement for ocular retinal images is a fundamental problem in computer-aided medical diagnosis, automated algorithms/systems for vessel detection and measurement are always demanded. To support computer-aided diagnosis, an integrated approach/solution for vessel detection and diameter measurement is presented and validated. In the proposed approach, a Dempster-Shafer (D-S)-based edge detector is developed to obtain initial vessel edge information and an accurate vascular map for a retinal image. Then, the appropriate path and the centerline of a vessel of interest are identified automatically through graph search. Once the vessel path has been identified, the diameter of the vessel will be measured accordingly by the algorithm in real time. To achieve more accurate edge detection and diameter measurement, mixed Gaussian-matched filters are designed to refine the initial detection and measures. Other important medical indices of retinal vessels can also be calculated accordingly based on detection and measurement results. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was validated by the retinal images obtained from different public databases. Experimental results show that the vessel detection rate of the algorithm is 100 % for large vessels and 89.9 % for small vessels, and the error rate on vessel diameter measurement is less than 5 %, which are all well within the acceptable range of deviation among the human graders.

  4. Power Estimation in Multivariate Analysis of Variance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean François Allaire

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Power is often overlooked in designing multivariate studies for the simple reason that it is believed to be too complicated. In this paper, it is shown that power estimation in multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA can be approximated using a F distribution for the three popular statistics (Hotelling-Lawley trace, Pillai-Bartlett trace, Wilk`s likelihood ratio. Consequently, the same procedure, as in any statistical test, can be used: computation of the critical F value, computation of the noncentral parameter (as a function of the effect size and finally estimation of power using a noncentral F distribution. Various numerical examples are provided which help to understand and to apply the method. Problems related to post hoc power estimation are discussed.

  5. Variance in faking across noncognitive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, L A; Ryan, A M

    2000-10-01

    There are discrepant findings in the literature regarding the effects of applicant faking on the validity of noncognitive measures. One explanation for these mixed results may be the failure of some studies to consider individual differences in faking. This study demonstrates that there is considerable variance across individuals in the extent of faking 3 types of noncognitive measures (i.e., personality test, biodata inventory, and integrity test). Participants completed measures honestly and with instructions to fake. Results indicated some measures were more difficult to fake than others. The authors found that integrity, conscientiousness, and neuroticism were related to faking. In addition, individuals faked fairly consistently across the measures. Implications of these results and a model of faking that includes factors that may influence faking behavior are provided.

  6. A comparison between temporal and subband minimum variance adaptive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben Holfort; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    for the temporal approach. The same numbers for the subband approach are 0.62 109 for the point and 1.33 109 for the cystphantom. The comparison demonstrates similar resolution but slightly lower side-lobes and higher contrast for the subband approach at the expense of increased computation time.......This paper compares the performance between temporal and subband Minimum Variance (MV) beamformers for medical ultrasound imaging. Both adaptive methods provide an optimized set of apodization weights but are implemented in the time and frequency domains respectively. Their performance is evaluated...... with simulated synthetic aperture data obtained from Field II and is quantified by the Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak-Side-Lobe level (PSL) and the contrast level. From a point phantom, a full sequence of 128 emissions with one transducer element transmitting and all 128 elements receiving each time...

  7. Further results on variances of local stereological estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    2006-01-01

    in the particle population. It turns out that these two variance components can be estimated separately, from sectional data. We present further results on the variances that can be used to determine the variance by numerical integration for particular choices of particle shapes.......In the present paper the statistical properties of local stereological estimators of particle volume are studied. It is shown that the variance of the estimators can be decomposed into the variance due to the local stereological estimation procedure and the variance due to the variability...

  8. Dynamics of Variance Risk Premia, Investors' Sentiment and Return Predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jerome V.K.; Stentoft, Lars; Violante, Francesco

    We develop a joint framework linking the physical variance and its risk neutral expectation implying variance risk premia that are persistent, appropriately reacting to changes in level and variability of the variance and naturally satisfying the sign constraint. Using option market data and real......We develop a joint framework linking the physical variance and its risk neutral expectation implying variance risk premia that are persistent, appropriately reacting to changes in level and variability of the variance and naturally satisfying the sign constraint. Using option market data...

  9. A Monte Carlo Study of Seven Homogeneity of Variance Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Howard B. Lee; Gary S. Katz; Alberto F. Restori

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The decision by SPSS (now PASW) to use the unmodified Levene test to test homogeneity of variance was questioned. It was compared to six other tests. In total, seven homogeneity of variance tests used in Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) were compared on robustness and power using Monte Carlo studies. The homogeneity of variance tests were (1) Levene, (2) modified Levene, (3) Z-variance, (4) Overall-Woodward Modified Z-variance, (5) OBrien, (6) Samiuddin Cube Root and (7) F-Max....

  10. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, Takenori, E-mail: takenori@med.kagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Burford, James L. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Department of Medicine, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Hong, Young-Kwon [Department of Surgery and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa [Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Department of Medicine, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Mori, Nozomu [Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Peti-Peterdi, Janos [Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Department of Medicine, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  11. Vessel Traffic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Yorker" articles titled Silent Spring by Rachel Carson in 1963 produced a unifying effect, "the sort of rallying point of the movement to protect the...6232, 92d Cong., 1st. sess., 1971, p. 2. 15. Carson , Rachel L. , The Sea Around Us, New York: Oxford Univesity Press, 195-, p. IV. 16. U.S., Congress...Government Printing Office, 1974. 63. Buhler, L. and Geiger, J., Vessel Traffic Data Extraction MethodoloqX, Silver Spring , Maryland, O6erFae-tns

  12. Vanishing corneal vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Luke; Chana, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    We wish to highlight the importance of acknowledging the accompanying effects of topical phenylephrine drops on the eye other than its intended mydriasis. We reported a case of a 92-year-old woman with a corneal graft who was noted to have superficial corneal vascularisation which was not documented previously. After the instillation of topical tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5%, for funduscopy, the corneal vascularisation was not visible. When reassessed on another visit, tropicamide had no effect on the vessels and only phenylephrine did. We wish to highlight that when reviewing patients in cornea clinics, instilling phenylephrine prior to being seen may mask important corneal vascularisation. PMID:24121816

  13. Minimum variance beamformers for coherent plane-wave compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nghia Q.; Prager, Richard W.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we present and analyse a technique for applying minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming to a coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) acquisition system. In the past, this has been done using a spatial smoothing approach that reduces the effective size of the receive aperture and degrades the image resolution. In this paper, we apply the MVDR algorithms in a novel way to the acquired data from the individual transducer elements, before any summation or other compounding. This enables us to propose a new approach for estimation of the covariance matrix that decorrelates the coherence among the components at all the different acquisition angles. This results in a new approach to receive beamforming for CPWC acquisition. The new beamformer is demonstrated on imaging data acquired with a research scanner. We find the new beamformer offers substantial improvements over the DAS method. It also significantly outperforms the previously published MVDR/CPWC beamformer on phantom studies where the signal from the main target is dominated by noise and interference. These improvements motivate further study in this new approach for enhancing image quality.

  14. The Parabolic Variance (PVAR): A Wavelet Variance Based on the Least-Square Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernotte, Francois; Lenczner, Michel; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces the parabolic variance (PVAR), a wavelet variance similar to the Allan variance (AVAR), based on the linear regression (LR) of phase data. The companion article arXiv:1506.05009 [physics.ins-det] details the Ω frequency counter, which implements the LR estimate. The PVAR combines the advantages of AVAR and modified AVAR (MVAR). PVAR is good for long-term analysis because the wavelet spans over 2τ, the same as the AVAR wavelet, and good for short-term analysis because the response to white and flicker PM is 1/τ(3) and 1/τ(2), the same as the MVAR. After setting the theoretical framework, we study the degrees of freedom and the confidence interval for the most common noise types. Then, we focus on the detection of a weak noise process at the transition-or corner-where a faster process rolls off. This new perspective raises the question of which variance detects the weak process with the shortest data record. Our simulations show that PVAR is a fortunate tradeoff. PVAR is superior to MVAR in all cases, exhibits the best ability to divide between fast noise phenomena (up to flicker FM), and is almost as good as AVAR for the detection of random walk and drift.

  15. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. VIVA (from virus variance), a library to reconstruct icosahedral viruses based on the variance of structural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantele, Francesca; Lanzavecchia, Salvatore; Bellon, Pier Luigi

    2004-11-01

    VIVA is a software library that obtains low-resolution models of icosahedral viruses from projections observed at the electron microscope. VIVA works in a fully automatic way without any initial model. This feature eliminates the possibility of bias that could originate from the alignment of the projections to an external preliminary model. VIVA determines the viewing direction of the virus images by computation of sets of single particle reconstruction (SPR) followed by a variance analysis and classification of the 3D models. All structures are reduced in size to speed up computation. This limits the resolution of a VIVA reconstruction. The models obtained can be subsequently refined at best with use of standard libraries. Up today, VIVA has successfully solved the structure of all viruses tested, some of which being considered refractory particles. The VIVA library is written in 'C' language and is devised to run on widespread Linux computers.

  17. Liver vessel segmentation and identification based on oriented flux symmetry and graph cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ye-Zhan; Zhao, Yu-Qian; Tang, Ping; Liao, Miao; Liang, Yi-Xiong; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Zou, Bei-Ji

    2017-10-01

    Accurate segmentation of liver vessels from abdominal computer tomography angiography (CTA) volume is very important for liver-vessel analysis and living-related liver transplants. This paper presents a novel liver-vessel segmentation and identification method. Firstly, an anisotropic diffusion filter is used to smooth noise while preserving vessel boundaries. Then, based on the gradient symmetry and antisymmetry pattern of vessel structures, optimal oriented flux (OOF) and oriented flux antisymmetry (OFA) measures are respectively applied to detect liver vessels and their boundaries, and further to slenderize vessels. Next, according to vessel geometrical structure, a centerline extraction measure based on height ridge traversal and leaf node line-growing (LNLG) is proposed for the extraction of liver-vessel centerlines, and an intensity model based on fast marching is integrated into graph cuts (GCs) for effective segmentation of liver vessels. Finally, a distance voting mechanism is applied to separate the hepatic vein and portal vein. The experiment results on abdominal CTA images show that the proposed method can effectively segment liver vessels, achieving an average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 97.7%, 79.8%, and 98.6%, respectively, and has a good performance on thin-vessel extraction. The proposed method does not require manual selection of the centerlines and vessel seeds, and can effectively segment liver vessels and identify hepatic vein and portal vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS, OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS AND OF VESSELS SOLD OR ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the provisions of this part are: (a) All vessels which may in the future be constructed or sold with construction...

  19. Heterogeneity of variance and its implications on dairy cattle breeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and evaluated for within herd variation using univariate animal model procedures. Variance components were estimated by derivative free REML algorithm, and significance tests done using the Fmax procedure. Phenotypic, additive genetic and residual variances were heterogeneous across production environments.

  20. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  1. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vicente, Andres; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate-specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow.

  2. Tracking blood vessels in human forearms using visual servoing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Hansen, Morten

    compensation. By using images taken with near-infrared light to locate the blood vessels in a human forearm and using the same images to detects movements of the arm, this paper shows that it is possible make a robot arm, potentially equipped with a needle for drawing the blood, compensate for the movements...

  3. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  4. Optic Disc Identification Methods for Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Rotaru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented are the methods proposed by authors to identify and model the optic disc in colour retinal images. The first three our approaches localized the optic disc in two steps: a in the green component of RGB image the optic disc area is detected based on texture indicators and pixel intensity variance analysis; b on the segmented area the optic disc edges are extracted and the resulted boundary is approximated by a Hough transform. The last implemented method identifies the optic disc area by analysis of blood vessels network extracted in the green channel of the original image. In the segmented area the optic disc edges are obtained by an iterative Canny algorithm and are approximated by a circle Hough transform.

  5. Adjustment for heterogeneous variances due to days in milk and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARC-IRENE

    models for national genetic evaluation of dairy cattle in South Africa ... Test-Day Model (FRTDM), which assumes equal variances of the response variable at different .... adjusted for heterogeneous variances, BLUEs are the best linear unbiased .... This makes sense as part of the residual variance has already been taken ...

  6. Hidden Item Variance in Multiple Mini-Interview Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nikki L.; Swoboda, Christopher M.; Kelcey, Benjamin M.; Manuel, R. Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The extant literature has largely ignored a potentially significant source of variance in multiple mini-interview (MMI) scores by "hiding" the variance attributable to the sample of attributes used on an evaluation form. This potential source of hidden variance can be defined as rating items, which typically comprise an MMI evaluation…

  7. A New Nonparametric Levene Test for Equal Variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstokke, David W.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the equality of variances are sometimes used on their own to compare variability across groups of experimental or non-experimental conditions but they are most often used alongside other methods to support assumptions made about variances. A new nonparametric test of equality of variances is described and compared to current "gold…

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  9. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  10. Visualization of simulated small vessels on computed tomography using a model-based iterative reconstruction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Fujioka, Chikako; Sakane, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Yuko; Baba, Yasutaka; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    This article describes a quantitative evaluation of visualizing small vessels using several image reconstruction methods in computed tomography. Simulated vessels with diameters of 1-6 mm made by 3D printer was scanned using 320-row detector computed tomography (CT). Hybrid iterative reconstruction (hybrid IR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) were performed for the image reconstruction.

  11. Visualization of simulated small vessels on computed tomography using a model-based iterative reconstruction technique

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Higaki; Fuminari Tatsugami; Chikako Fujioka; Hiroaki Sakane; Yuko Nakamura; Yasutaka Baba; Makoto Iida; Kazuo Awai

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a quantitative evaluation of visualizing small vessels using several image reconstruction methods in computed tomography. Simulated vessels with diameters of 1?6?mm made by 3D printer was scanned using 320-row detector computed tomography (CT). Hybrid iterative reconstruction (hybrid IR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) were performed for the image reconstruction.

  12. Visualization of simulated small vessels on computed tomography using a model-based iterative reconstruction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Higaki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a quantitative evaluation of visualizing small vessels using several image reconstruction methods in computed tomography. Simulated vessels with diameters of 1–6 mm made by 3D printer was scanned using 320-row detector computed tomography (CT. Hybrid iterative reconstruction (hybrid IR and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR were performed for the image reconstruction.

  13. [Large vessel vasculitides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Puksić, Silva; Gracanin, Ana Gudelj

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in young ages. Although all large arteries can be affected, the aorta, subclavian and carotid arteries are most commonly involved. The most common symptoms included upper extremity claudication, hypertension, pain over the carotid arteries (carotidynia), dizziness and visual disturbances. Early diagnosis and treatment has improved the outcome in patients with TA.

  14. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  15. Meta-analysis of SNPs involved in variance heterogeneity using Levene's test for equal variances

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Wei Q; Asma, Senay; Paré, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a commonly used approach to increase the sample size for genome-wide association searches when individual studies are otherwise underpowered. Here, we present a meta-analysis procedure to estimate the heterogeneity of the quantitative trait variance attributable to genetic variants using Levene's test without needing to exchange individual-level data. The meta-analysis of Levene's test offers the opportunity to combine the considerable sample size of a genome-wide meta-analys...

  16. Vessel-guided airway tree segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2010-01-01

    method is evaluated on 250 low dose computed tomography images from a lung cancer screening trial. Our experiments showed that applying the region growing algorithm on the airway appearance model produces more complete airway segmentations, leading to on average 20% longer trees, and 50% less leakage......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. We propose a voxel classification approach for the appearance model, which uses a classifier that is trained...... to differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. This is in contrast to previous works that use either intensity alone or hand crafted models of airway appearance. We show that the appearance model can be trained with a set of easily acquired, incomplete, airway tree segmentations. A vessel orientation...

  17. Retinal vessel centerline extraction using multiscale matched filters, confidence and edge measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofka, Michal; Stewart, Charles V

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of improving detection of low-contrast and narrow vessels and eliminating false detections at nonvascular structures, a new technique is presented for extracting vessels in retinal images. The core of the technique is a new likelihood ratio test that combines matched-filter responses, confidence measures and vessel boundary measures. Matched filter responses are derived in scale-space to extract vessels of widely varying widths. A vessel confidence measure is defined as a projection of a vector formed from a normalized pixel neighborhood onto a normalized ideal vessel profile. Vessel boundary measures and associated confidences are computed at potential vessel boundaries. Combined, these responses form a six-dimensional measurement vector at each pixel. A training technique is used to develop a mapping of this vector to a likelihood ratio that measures the "vesselness" at each pixel. Results comparing this vesselness measure to matched filters alone and to measures based on the Hessian of intensities show substantial improvements, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Hessian can be used in place of the matched filter to obtain similar but less-substantial improvements or to steer the matched filter by preselecting kernel orientations. Finally, the new vesselness likelihood ratio is embedded into a vessel tracing framework, resulting in an efficient and effective vessel centerline extraction algorithm.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a clear picture of the internal organs and blood vessels within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a ...

  19. Semi-automated retinal vessel analysis in nonmydriatic fundus photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Alexander Karl-Georg; Fischer, Joachim Ernst; Vossmerbaeumer, Urs

    2014-02-01

    Funduscopic assessment of the retinal vessels may be used to assess the health status of microcirculation and as a component in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. Typically, the evaluation is restricted to morphological appreciation without strict quantification. Our purpose was to develop and validate a software tool for semi-automated quantitative analysis of retinal vasculature in nonmydriatic fundus photography. matlab software was used to develop a semi-automated image recognition and analysis tool for the determination of the arterial-venous (A/V) ratio in the central vessel equivalent on 45° digital fundus photographs. Validity and reproducibility of the results were ascertained using nonmydriatic photographs of 50 eyes from 25 subjects recorded from a 3DOCT device (Topcon Corp.). Two hundred and thirty-three eyes of 121 healthy subjects were evaluated to define normative values. A software tool was developed using image thresholds for vessel recognition and vessel width calculation in a semi-automated three-step procedure: vessel recognition on the photograph and artery/vein designation, width measurement and calculation of central retinal vessel equivalents. Mean vessel recognition rate was 78%, vessel class designation rate 75% and reproducibility between 0.78 and 0.91. Mean A/V ratio was 0.84. Application on a healthy norm cohort showed high congruence with prior published manual methods. Processing time per image was one minute. Quantitative geometrical assessment of the retinal vasculature may be performed in a semi-automated manner using dedicated software tools. Yielding reproducible numerical data within a short time leap, this may contribute additional value to mere morphological estimates in the clinical evaluation of fundus photographs. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Deep learning for anomaly detection in maritime vessels using AIS-cued camera imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yi; Mukherjee, Abir; Fei, Chuhong; Liu, Ting; Lampropoulos, George

    2017-05-01

    The presented work is an extension of previous work carried out at A.U.G. Signals Ltd. The problem is approached herein for vessel identification/verification using Deep Learning Neural Networks in a persistent surveillance scenario. Using images with vessels in the scene, Deep Learning Neural Networks were set up to detect vessels from still imagery (visible wavelength). Different neural network designs were implemented for vessel detection and compared based on learning performance (speed and demanded training sets) and estimation accuracy. Unique features from these designs were taken to create an optimized solution. This paper presents a comparison of the deep learning approaches implemented and their relative capabilities in vessel verification.

  1. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  2. Feasibility study: protein denaturation and coagulation monitoring with speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changho; Cheon, Gyeongwoo; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-12-01

    We performed the feasibility study using speckle variance optical coherence tomography (SvOCT) to monitor the thermally induced protein denaturation and coagulation process as a function of temperature and depth. SvOCT provided the depth-resolved image of protein denaturation and coagulation with microscale resolution. This study was conducted using egg white. During the heating process, as the temperature increased, increases in the speckle variance signal was observed as the egg white proteins coagulated. Additionally, by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient in specific areas, denaturized egg white conditions were successfully estimated. These results indicate that SvOCT could be used to monitor the denaturation process of various proteins.

  3. Dual-wavelength retinal images denoising algorithm for improving the accuracy of oxygen saturation calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yong-Li; Dai, Yun; Gao, Chun-Ming; Du, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in retinal vessels is based on spectrophotometry and spectral absorption characteristics of tissue. Retinal images at 570 and 600 nm are simultaneously captured by dual-wavelength retinal oximetry based on fundus camera. SO2 is finally measured after vessel segmentation, image registration, and calculation of optical density ratio of two images. However, image noise can dramatically affect subsequent image processing and SO2 calculation accuracy. The aforementioned problem remains to be addressed. The purpose of this study was to improve image quality and SO2 calculation accuracy by noise analysis and denoising algorithm for dual-wavelength images. First, noise parameters were estimated by mixed Poisson-Gaussian (MPG) noise model. Second, an MPG denoising algorithm which we called variance stabilizing transform (VST) + dual-domain image denoising (DDID) was proposed based on VST and improved dual-domain filter. The results show that VST + DDID is able to effectively remove MPG noise and preserve image edge details. VST + DDID is better than VST + block-matching and three-dimensional filtering, especially in preserving low-contrast details. The following simulation and analysis indicate that MPG noise in the retinal images can lead to erroneously low measurement for SO2, and the denoised images can provide more accurate grayscale values for retinal oximetry.

  4. ANOVA and the variance homogeneity assumption: Exploring a better gatekeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosun Jamie; Cribbie, Robert A

    2018-02-01

    Valid use of the traditional independent samples ANOVA procedure requires that the population variances are equal. Previous research has investigated whether variance homogeneity tests, such as Levene's test, are satisfactory as gatekeepers for identifying when to use or not to use the ANOVA procedure. This research focuses on a novel homogeneity of variance test that incorporates an equivalence testing approach. Instead of testing the null hypothesis that the variances are equal against an alternative hypothesis that the variances are not equal, the equivalence-based test evaluates the null hypothesis that the difference in the variances falls outside or on the border of a predetermined interval against an alternative hypothesis that the difference in the variances falls within the predetermined interval. Thus, with the equivalence-based procedure, the alternative hypothesis is aligned with the research hypothesis (variance equality). A simulation study demonstrated that the equivalence-based test of population variance homogeneity is a better gatekeeper for the ANOVA than traditional homogeneity of variance tests. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  5. 50 CFR 648.8 - Vessel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel identification. 648.8 Section 648.8... identification. (a) Vessel name and official number. Each fishing vessel subject to this part and over 25 ft (7.6... or ocean quahog vessels licensed under New Jersey law may use the appropriate vessel identification...

  6. Robust hepatic vessel segmentation using multi deep convolution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitrungrotsakul, Titinunt; Han, Xian-Hua; Iwamoto, Yutaro; Foruzan, Amir Hossein; Lin, Lanfen; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of blood vessels of the organ is a challenging task in the area of medical image processing. It is really difficult to get accurate vessel segmentation results even with manually labeling by human being. The difficulty of vessels segmentation is the complicated structure of blood vessels and its large variations that make them hard to recognize. In this paper, we present deep artificial neural network architecture to automatically segment the hepatic vessels from computed tomography (CT) image. We proposed novel deep neural network (DNN) architecture for vessel segmentation from a medical CT volume, which consists of three deep convolution neural networks to extract features from difference planes of CT data. The three networks have share features at the first convolution layer but will separately learn their own features in the second layer. All three networks will join again at the top layer. To validate effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method, we conduct experiments on 12 CT volumes which training data are randomly generate from 5 CT volumes and 7 using for test. Our network can yield an average dice coefficient 0.830, while 3D deep convolution neural network can yield around 0.7 and multi-scale can yield only 0.6.

  7. Retinal vessel extraction by matched filter with first-order derivative of Gaussian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bob; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Karray, Fakhri

    2010-04-01

    Accurate extraction of retinal blood vessels is an important task in computer aided diagnosis of retinopathy. The matched filter (MF) is a simple yet effective method for vessel extraction. However, a MF will respond not only to vessels but also to non-vessel edges. This will lead to frequent false vessel detection. In this paper we propose a novel extension of the MF approach, namely the MF-FDOG, to detect retinal blood vessels. The proposed MF-FDOG is composed of the original MF, which is a zero-mean Gaussian function, and the first-order derivative of Gaussian (FDOG). The vessels are detected by thresholding the retinal image's response to the MF, while the threshold is adjusted by the image's response to the FDOG. The proposed MF-FDOG method is very simple; however, it reduces significantly the false detections produced by the original MF and detects many fine vessels that are missed by the MF. It achieves competitive vessel detection results as compared with those state-of-the-art schemes but with much lower complexity. In addition, it performs well at extracting vessels from pathological retinal images. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. First-order variance of travel time in nonstationary formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olaf A. Cirpka; Wolfgang Nowak

    2004-01-01

    ... is the variance of travel time, i.e., the time it takes for a solute particle to be transported from the release point to an observation plane [ Shapiro and Cvetkovic , 1988 ; Dagan et al. , 1992 ]. The travel time is also given by the first temporal moment of a concentration breakthrough curve normalized by its zeroth moment [ Harvey and Gorelick , 1995 ]. Together with the variance of lateral displacement, the travel time variance has been used in solute‐flux approaches to macrod...

  9. A New Nonparametric Levene Test for Equal Variances

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno D. Zumbo; David W. Nordstokke

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the equality of variances are sometimes used on their own to compare variability across groups of experimental or non-experimental conditions but they are most often used alongside other methods to support assumptions made about variances. A new nonparametric test of equality of variances is described and compared to current 'gold standard' method, the median-based Levene test, in a computer simulation study. The simulation results show that when sampling from either symmetric or ske...

  10. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  11. Southeast Region Headboat Survey-Vessel list/Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of vessels that have been on the SRHS through time, their owners/operators, marinas/docks and their contact information. This assists in...

  12. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton M Verdery

    Full Text Available This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS. Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network.

  13. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdery, Ashton M; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network.

  14. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  15. Thermal noise variance of a receive radiofrequency coil as a respiratory motion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreychenko, A; Raaijmakers, A J E; Sbrizzi, A; Crijns, S P M; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2017-01-01

    Development of a passive respiratory motion sensor based on the noise variance of the receive coil array. Respiratory motion alters the body resistance. The noise variance of an RF coil depends on the body resistance and, thus, is also modulated by respiration. For the noise variance monitoring, the noise samples were acquired without and with MR signal excitation on clinical 1.5/3 T MR scanners. The performance of the noise sensor was compared with the respiratory bellow and with the diaphragm displacement visible on MR images. Several breathing patterns were tested. The noise variance demonstrated a periodic, temporal modulation that was synchronized with the respiratory bellow signal. The modulation depth of the noise variance resulting from the respiration varied between the channels of the array and depended on the channel's location with respect to the body. The noise sensor combined with MR acquisition was able to detect the respiratory motion for every k-space read-out line. Within clinical MR systems, the respiratory motion can be detected by the noise in receive array. The noise sensor does not require careful positioning unlike the bellow, any additional hardware, and/or MR acquisition. Magn Reson Med 77:221-228, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A sparse embedding and least variance encoding approach to hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Zi

    2014-09-01

    Hashing is becoming increasingly important in large-scale image retrieval for fast approximate similarity search and efficient data storage. Many popular hashing methods aim to preserve the kNN graph of high dimensional data points in the low dimensional manifold space, which is, however, difficult to achieve when the number of samples is big. In this paper, we propose an effective and efficient hashing approach by sparsely embedding a sample in the training sample space and encoding the sparse embedding vector over a learned dictionary. To this end, we partition the sample space into clusters via a linear spectral clustering method, and then represent each sample as a sparse vector of normalized probabilities that it falls into its several closest clusters. This actually embeds each sample sparsely in the sample space. The sparse embedding vector is employed as the feature of each sample for hashing. We then propose a least variance encoding model, which learns a dictionary to encode the sparse embedding feature, and consequently binarize the coding coefficients as the hash codes. The dictionary and the binarization threshold are jointly optimized in our model. Experimental results on benchmark data sets demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Immunolocalization of lymphatic vessels in human fetal knee joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2010-08-01

    We immunolocalized lymphatic and vascular blood vessels in 12- and 14-week-old human fetal knee joint tissues using a polyclonal antibody to a lymphatic vascular endothelium specific hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and a monoclonal antibody to podoplanin (mAb D2-40). A number of lymphatic vessels were identified in the stratified connective tissues surrounding the cartilaginous knee joint femoral and tibial rudiments. These tissues also contained small vascular vessels with entrapped red blood cells which were imaged using Nomarsky DIC microscopy. Neither vascular nor lymphatic vessels were present in the knee joint cartilaginous rudiments. The menisci in 12-week-old fetal knees were incompletely demarcated from the adjacent tibial and femoral cartilaginous rudiments which was consistent with the ongoing joint cavitation process at the femoral-tibial junction. At 14 weeks of age the menisci were independent structural entities; they contained a major central blood vessel containing red blood cells and numerous communicating vessels at the base of the menisci but no lymphatic vessels. In contrast to the 12-week-old menisci, the 14-week meniscal rudiments contained abundant CD-31 and CD-34 positive but no lymphatic vessels. Isolated 14-week-old meniscal cells also were stained with the CD-31 and CD 34 antibodies; CD-68 +ve cells, also abundant in the 14-week-old menisci, were detectable to a far lesser degree in the 12-week menisci and were totally absent from the femoral and tibial rudiments. The distribution of lymphatic vessels and tissue macrophages in the fetal joint tissues was consistent with their roles in the clearance of metabolic waste and extracellular matrix breakdown products arising from the rapidly remodelling knee joint tissues.

  18. Vessel segmentation and microaneurysm detection using discriminative dictionary learning and sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza; Harati, Ahad

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major cause of visual impairment, and the analysis of retinal image can assist patients to take action earlier when it is more likely to be effective. The accurate segmentation of blood vessels in the retinal image can diagnose DR directly. In this paper, a novel scheme for blood vessel segmentation based on discriminative dictionary learning (DDL) and sparse representation has been proposed. The proposed system yields a strong representation which contains the semantic concept of the image. To extract blood vessel, two separate dictionaries, for vessel and non-vessel, capable of providing reconstructive and discriminative information of the retinal image are learned. In the test step, an unseen retinal image is divided into overlapping patches and classified to vessel and non-vessel patches. Then, a voting scheme is applied to generate the binary vessel map. The proposed vessel segmentation method can achieve the accuracy of 95% and a sensitivity of 75% in the same range of specificity 97% on two public datasets. The results show that the proposed method can achieve comparable results to existing methods and decrease false positive vessels in abnormal retinal images with pathological regions. Microaneurysm (MA) is the earliest sign of DR that appears as a small red dot on the surface of the retina. Despite several attempts to develop automated MA detection systems, it is still a challenging problem. In this paper, a method for MA detection, which is similar to our vessel segmentation approach, is proposed. In our method, a candidate detection algorithm based on the Morlet wavelet is applied to identify all possible MA candidates. In the next step, two discriminative dictionaries with the ability to distinguish MA from non-MA object are learned. These dictionaries are then used to classify the detected candidate objects. The evaluations indicate that the proposed MA detection method achieves higher average sensitivity about 2

  19. Modeling the tortuosity of retinal vessels: does caliber play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Emanuele; Azegrouz, Hind; Dhillon, Baljean

    2010-09-01

    The tortuosity of retinal blood vessels is a diagnostic parameter assessed by ophthalmologists on the basis of examples and experience; no quantitative model is specified in clinical practice. All quantitative measures proposed to date for automatic image analysis purposes are functions of the curvature of the vessel skeleton. We suggest in this paper that curvature may not be the only quantity involved in modeling tortuosity, and that vessel thickness, or caliber, may also play a role. To support this statement, we devise a novel measure of tortuosity, depending on both curvature and thickness, and test it with 200 vessels selected by our clinical author from the public digital retinal images for vessel extraction database. Results are in good accordance with clinical judgment. Comparative experiments show performance similar to or better than that of four measures reported in the literature. We conclude that there is reasonable evidence supporting the investigation of tortuosity models incorporating more measurements than just skeleton curvature, and specifically vessel caliber.

  20. 2013 East Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  1. SC/OQ Vessel Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data tables holding information for the Surf Clam/Ocean Quahog vessel and dealer/processor logbooks (negative and positive), as well as individual tag information...

  2. 2011 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. 2011 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  4. 2013 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  5. 2011 East Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  6. Integrin binding: Sticking around vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchley, Michael R.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-09-01

    A study demonstrates that controlled integrin binding on a biomaterial was capable of promoting vascular cell sprouting and formation of a non-leaky blood vessel network in a healthy and diseased state.

  7. Transposition of the great vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessel called the ductus arteriosus open, allowing some mixing of the 2 blood circulations. A procedure using ... they are not already immune. Eating well, avoiding alcohol, and controlling diabetes both before and during pregnancy ...

  8. 2013 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  9. Vessel Permit System Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GARFO issues federal fishing permits annually to owners of fishing vessels who fish in the Greater Atlantic region, as required by federal regulation. These permits...

  10. 2011 Tug Towing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. Caribbean PR Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels fishing in Puerto Rico. The catch and effort data for the entire trip are...

  12. Coastal Discard Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data on the type and amount of marine resources that are discarded or interacted with by vessels that are selected to report to the Southeast...

  13. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Xu

    Full Text Available The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  14. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiayu; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Hu, Qiao; Bakall, Benjamin; Tlucek, Paul S; Bertelsen, Geir; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  15. Prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior had the form of beakers varying in outline but similar in size. They were wheel-thrown, mould-made or manufactured by using a combination of wheel-throwing and mould-made appliqués. Given that face vessels are considerably scarcer than other kinds of pottery, more than fifty finds from Moesia Superior make an enviable collection. In this and other provinces face vessels have been recovered from military camps, civilian settlements and necropolises, which suggests that they served more than one purpose. It is generally accepted that the faces-masks gave a protective role to the vessels, be it to protect the deceased or the family, their house and possessions. More than forty of all known finds from Moesia Superior come from Viminacium, a half of that number from necropolises. Although tangible evidence is lacking, there must have been several local workshops producing face vessels. The number and technological characteristics of the discovered vessels suggest that one of the workshops is likely to have been at Viminacium, an important pottery-making centre in the second and third centuries.

  16. Bounds for the variance of an inverse binomial estimator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Sahai; J.M. Buhrman

    1979-01-01

    textabstractSummary  Best [1] found the variance of the minimum variance unbiased estimator of the parameter p of the negative binomial distribution. Mikulski and Sm [2] gave an upper bound to it, easier to calculate than Best's expression and a good approximation for small values of p and large

  17. Variation of the ulnar variance with powerful grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, M; Turaçlar, U T; Taş, F; Sabancioğullari, V

    2002-01-01

    Causal relationships between ulnar variance and wrist disorders are known. Gripping and pronation cause proximal translation of the radius with respect to the ulna, leading to a statistically significant increase in ulnar variance. The purpose of this study was to investigate variation of the ulnar variance with powerful grip. A total of 41 male volunteers aged between 19 and 25 years (mean, 21.2+/-1.7 years) were studied. Posteroanterior X-ray films of all wrists were taken in the standardized position. After neutral posteroanterior X-ray films had been taken, subjects were asked to grip a Takei hand dynamometer with maximum force while repeated standardized posteroanterior X-ray films were obtained. Ulnar variance values were measured using the perpendicular method. Mean maximum grip force was 38.1 kg (range, 26.6-47.9 kg). Mean values of force-free (neutral) and forced ulnar variances were 0.06+/-0.21 mm and 1.87+/-0.23 mm, respectively. The difference in ulnar variance between the two groups was statistically significant ( P<0.001). The increase in ulnar variance with grip observed varied between 0.00 mm (minimum) and 3.97 mm (maximum), with a mean of 1.81 mm. Gaining an understanding of normal limits of ulnar variance modification with grip may be helpful in planning surgical treatment.

  18. Direct and maternal variance component estimates for clean fleece ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... -3.17o en -2.47o vir LG, SVG en GVD, respektiewelik. Daar word tot die gevolgtrekking gekom dat die maternale komponent weens die relatiewe klein effek op hierdie eienskappe, geigno- reer kan word. Keywords: Merino sheep, maternal variance, variance components. *To whom correspondence should be addressed.

  19. Capturing option anomalies with a variance-dependent pricing kernel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoffersen, P.; Heston, S.; Jacobs, K.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a GARCH option model with a variance premium by combining the Heston-Nandi (2000) dynamic with a new pricing kernel that nests Rubinstein (1976) and Brennan (1979). While the pricing kernel is monotonic in the stock return and in variance, its projection onto the stock return is

  20. Gender Variance and Educational Psychology: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The area of gender variance appears to be more visible in both the media and everyday life. Within educational psychology literature gender variance remains underrepresented. The positioning of educational psychologists working across the three levels of child and family, school or establishment and education authority/council, means that they are…

  1. Determining Sample Sizes for Precise Contrast Analysis with Heterogeneous Variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Show-Li; Shieh, Gwowen

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of variance (ANOVA) is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in practical applications. Accordingly, the single and multiple comparison procedures are frequently applied to assess the differences among mean effects. However, the underlying assumption of homogeneous variances may not always be tenable. This study…

  2. Evidence of Heterogeneity of Variance in Milk Yield among Holstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three thousand, nine hundred and seventy five lactation records of Holstein- Friesian cows between 1968 and 1984 were used to investigate the existence of heterogeneity of variance in milk yield in Kenya. Coefficient of variation and standard deviations across herds were used to test heterogeneity of variance. Average ...

  3. Using transformation algorithms to estimate (co)variance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to multiple traits by the use of canonical transformations. A computing strategy is developed for use on large data sets employing two different REML algorithms for the estimation of (co)variance components. Results from a simulation study indicate that (co)variance components can be estimated efficiently at a low cost on ...

  4. Conceptual Complexity and the Bias/Variance Tradeoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Erica; Feldman, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose that the conventional dichotomy between exemplar-based and prototype-based models of concept learning is helpfully viewed as an instance of what is known in the statistical learning literature as the "bias/variance tradeoff". The bias/variance tradeoff can be thought of as a sliding scale that modulates how closely any…

  5. A Cautionary Tale about Levene's Tests for Equal Variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstokke, David W.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2007-01-01

    The central messages of this paper are that (a) unequal variances may be more prevalent than typically imagined in educational and policy research, and (b) when considering tests of equal variances one needs to be cautious about what is being referred to as "Levene's test" because Levene's test is actually a family of techniques. Depending on…

  6. Minimum Variance Portfolios in the Brazilian Equity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rubesam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate minimum variance portfolios in the Brazilian equity market using different methods to estimate the covariance matrix, from the simple model of using the sample covariance to multivariate GARCH models. We compare the performance of the minimum variance portfolios to those of the following benchmarks: (i the IBOVESPA equity index, (ii an equally-weighted portfolio, (iii the maximum Sharpe ratio portfolio and (iv the maximum growth portfolio. Our results show that the minimum variance portfolio has higher returns with lower risk compared to the benchmarks. We also consider long-short 130/30 minimum variance portfolios and obtain similar results. The minimum variance portfolio invests in relatively few stocks with low βs measured with respect to the IBOVESPA index, being easily replicable by individual and institutional investors alike.

  7. Novel Method to Detect Corneal Lymphatic Vessels In Vivo by Intrastromal Injection of Fluorescein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Viet Nhat Hung; Hou, Yanhong; Horstmann, Jens; Bock, Felix; Cursiefen, Claus

    2017-11-09

    Corneal lymphatic vessels are clinically invisible because of their thin walls and clear lymph fluid. There is no easy and established method for in vivo imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels so far. In this study, we present a novel approach to visualize corneal lymphatic vessels in vivo by injecting intrastromal fluorescein sodium. Six- to eight-week-old female BALB/c mice were used in the mouse model of suture-induced corneal neovascularization. Two weeks after the suture placement, fluorescein sodium was injected intrastromally. The fluorescein, taken up by the presumed lymphatic vessels, was then tracked using a clinically used Spectralis HRA + OCT device. Immunohistochemistry staining with specific lymphatic marker LYVE-1 and pan-endothelial marker CD31 was used to confirm the indirect lymphangiography findings. By injecting fluorescein intrastromally, both corneal blood and lymphatic vessels were detected. While the lymphatic vessels were visible as bright vessel-like structures using HRA, the blood vessels appeared as dark networks. Fluorescein-labeled lymphatic vessels were colocalized with LYVE-1 in immunohistochemically stained sections of the same specimen. Corneal lymphatic vessels can be easily imaged in vivo in the murine model using intrastromal fluorescein injection.

  8. Automatic Segmentation of Vessels in In-Vivo Ultrasound Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamimi-Sarnikowski, Philip; Brink-Kjær, Andreas; Moshavegh, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    presents a fully automatic segmentation algorithm, for robustly segmenting the vessel lumen in longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. The automatic segmentation is performed using a combination of B-mode and power Doppler images. The proposed algorithm includes a series of preprocessing steps, and performs...... a vessel segmentation by use of the marker-controlled watershed transform. The ultrasound images used in the study were acquired using the bk3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark) with two transducers ”8L2 Linear” and ”10L2w Wide Linear” (BK Ultrasound, Herlev, Denmark). The algorithm...... was evaluated empirically and applied to a dataset of in-vivo 1770 images recorded from 8 healthy subjects. The segmentation results were compared to manual delineation performed by two experienced users. The results showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90.41 ± 11.2 % and 97.93 ± 5.7 % (mean ± standard...

  9. Speckle variance full-field optical coherence microscopy for high-resolution microvasculature mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogien, Jonas; Dubois, Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the feasibility of dynamic imaging using conventional reflectivity-based tomographic images obtained with full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM). Implementation of speckle variance for flow mapping with an imaging rate of 180 Hz is demonstrated by mapping 20% intralipid flowing into 100-μm-diameter microcapillary tubes at speeds up to 50 mm/s. This constitutes a significant advance in high-resolution, real-time microvasculature mapping, using FF-OCM. The acquisition scheme in FF-OCM is particularly appropriate for en face visualization of the microvasculature, as FF-OCM directly acquires en face tomographic images unlike conventional OCT which usually requires reslicing of a three-dimensional data set to get en face images.

  10. Color doppler in diagnosis of pathological changes in blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Saša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Color Doppler ultrasound is a method that allows noninvasive imaging of blood flow through a blood vessel and analysis of blood vessels, which can be made to flow disturbance and the presence of plaque and narrowing of the blood vessel. Color Doppler ultrasonography allows early detection of pathological changes in blood vessels, which contributes to adequate preventive and therapeutic procedures in the prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of color Doppler ultrasound blood vessels in the diagnosis of pathological changes in the blood vessels of the neck. To create a work used the material of the Cabinet of color Doppler ultrasonography of the Health Center in Donja Gusterica in a prospective study of a random sample of 60 patients were reviewed in January 2014. Gender analysis examined patients, women were 32 (53.33% and 28 men (46.67%. Looking at the age of examined patients, we have found that most of them 43 (71.67% over the age of 50 years, while we found 17 (28.33% patients under 50 years. Atherosclerotic plaques were diagnosed in 36, a change in the shape of the carotid arteries in 29 patients. Atherosclerotic plaque, we usually find the bifurcation ACC and the Origin ACI in 23 (63.89%. Duplex sonography shows what angioneurologists and vascular surgeons are most interested in: the morphology of arterial lesions and hemodynamic effects.

  11. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  12. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  13. 50 CFR 697.8 - Vessel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel identification. 697.8 Section 697.8 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION....8 Vessel identification. (a) Vessel name and official number. Each fishing vessel issued a limited...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  15. Mechanosensing in developing lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Paz, Lara; Lammert, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is responsible for fluid homeostasis, transport of immune cells, inflammatory molecules, and dietary lipids. It is composed of a network of lymphatic capillaries that drain into collecting lymphatic vessels and ultimately bring fluid back to the blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) that line lymphatic capillaries present loose overlapping intercellular junctions and anchoring filaments that support fluid drainage. When interstitial fluid accumulates within tissues, the extracellular matrix (ECM) swells and pulls the anchoring filaments. This results in opening of the LEC junctions and permits interstitial fluid uptake. The absorbed fluid is then transported within collecting lymphatic vessels, which exhibit intraluminal valves that prevent lymph backflow and smooth muscle cells that sequentially contract to propel lymph.Mechanotransduction involves translation of mechanical stimuli into biological responses. LECs have been shown to sense and respond to changes in ECM stiffness, fluid pressure-induced cell stretch, and fluid flow-induced shear stress. How these signals influence LEC function and lymphatic vessel growth can be investigated by using different mechanotransduction assays in vitro and to some extent in vivo.In this chapter, we will focus on the mechanical forces that regulate lymphatic vessel expansion during embryonic development and possibly secondary lymphedema. In mouse embryos, it has been recently shown that the amount of interstitial fluid determines the extent of lymphatic vessel expansion via a mechanosensory complex formed by β1 integrin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR3). This model might as well apply to secondary lymphedema.

  16. Variance inflation in high dimensional Support Vector Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Trine Julie; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    is not the full input space. Hence, when applying the model to future data the model is effectively blind to the missed orthogonal subspace. This can lead to an inflated variance of hidden variables estimated in the training set and when the model is applied to test data we may find that the hidden variables...... follow a different probability law with less variance. While the problem and basic means to reconstruct and deflate are well understood in unsupervised learning, the case of supervised learning is less well understood. We here investigate the effect of variance inflation in supervised learning including...

  17. On the relationship between epistasis and genetic variance heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Carlborg, Örjan

    2017-11-28

    Epistasis and genetic variance heterogeneity are two non-additive genetic inheritance patterns that are often, but not always, related. Here we use theoretical examples and empirical results from earlier analyses of experimental data to illustrate the connection between the two. This includes an introduction to the relationship between epistatic gene action, statistical epistasis, and genetic variance heterogeneity, and a brief discussion about how genetic processes other than epistasis can also give rise to genetic variance heterogeneity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Meta-analysis of SNPs involved in variance heterogeneity using Levene's test for equal variances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei Q; Asma, Senay; Paré, Guillaume

    2014-03-01

    Meta-analysis is a commonly used approach to increase the sample size for genome-wide association searches when individual studies are otherwise underpowered. Here, we present a meta-analysis procedure to estimate the heterogeneity of the quantitative trait variance attributable to genetic variants using Levene's test without needing to exchange individual-level data. The meta-analysis of Levene's test offers the opportunity to combine the considerable sample size of a genome-wide meta-analysis to identify the genetic basis of phenotypic variability and to prioritize single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. The use of Levene's test has several advantages, including robustness to departure from the normality assumption, freedom from the influence of the main effects of SNPs, and no assumption of an additive genetic model. We conducted a meta-analysis of the log-transformed body mass index of 5892 individuals and identified a variant with a highly suggestive Levene's test P-value of 4.28E-06 near the NEGR1 locus known to be associated with extreme obesity.

  19. Grounding Damage to Conventional Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Marie; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    regulations for design of bottom compartment layout with regard to grounding damages are largely based on statistical damage data. New and updated damage statistics holding 930 grounding accident records has been investigated. The bottom damage statistics is compared to current regulations for the bottom......The present paper is concerned with rational design of conventional vessels with regard to bottom damage generated in grounding accidents. The aim of the work described here is to improve the design basis, primarily through analysis of new statistical data for grounding damage. The current...... for the relation between the amount of deformed structure and the energy absorption. Finally, the paper shows how damage statistics for existing, conventional vessels can be used together with theoretical prediction methods for determining grounding damage distributions for new vessel types not included...

  20. 19 CFR 4.5 - Government vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government vessels. 4.5 Section 4.5 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Arrival and Entry of Vessels § 4.5 Government vessels. (a) No... that is the property of, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) will be treated as a Government vessel...

  1. Interactive 3D Analysis of Blood Vessel Trees and Collateral Vessel Volumes in Magnetic Resonance Angiograms in the Mouse Ischemic Hindlimb Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Peter C; Preda, Marilena; Henderson, Terry; Liaw, Lucy; Lindner, Volkhard; Friesel, Robert E; Pinz, Ilka M

    2013-10-31

    The quantitative analysis of blood vessel volumes from magnetic resonance angiograms (MRA) or μCT images is difficult and time-consuming. This fact, when combined with a study that involves multiple scans of multiple subjects, can represent a significant portion of research time. In order to enhance analysis options and to provide an automated and fast analysis method, we developed a software plugin for the ImageJ and Fiji image processing frameworks that enables the quick and reproducible volume quantification of blood vessel segments. The novel plugin named Volume Calculator (VolCal), accepts any binary (thresholded) image and produces a three-dimensional schematic representation of the vasculature that can be directly manipulated by the investigator. Using MRAs of the mouse hindlimb ischemia model, we demonstrate quick and reproducible blood vessel volume calculations with 95 - 98% accuracy. In clinical settings this software may enhance image interpretation and the speed of data analysis and thus enhance intervention decisions for example in peripheral vascular disease or aneurysms. In summary, we provide a novel, fast and interactive quantification of blood vessel volumes for single blood vessels or sets of vessel segments with particular focus on collateral formation after an ischemic insult.

  2. Vessel-guided airway segmentation based on voxel classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method for improving airway tree segmentation using vessel orientation information. We use the fact that an airway branch is always accompanied by an artery, with both structures having similar orientations. This work is based on a  voxel classification airway segmentation...... of the surroundings of a voxel, estimated based on a tube model, is to that of a neighboring vessel. The proposed method is tested on 20 CT images from different subjects selected randomly from a lung cancer screening study. Length of the airway branches from the results of the proposed method are significantly...

  3. Fine-grained visual marine vessel classification for coastal surveillance and defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Berkan; Gundogdu, Erhan; Karaman, Kaan; Yücesoy, Veysel; Koç, Aykut

    2017-10-01

    The need for capabilities of automated visual content analysis has substantially increased due to presence of large number of images captured by surveillance cameras. With a focus on development of practical methods for extracting effective visual data representations, deep neural network based representations have received great attention due to their success in visual categorization of generic images. For fine-grained image categorization, a closely related yet a more challenging research problem compared to generic image categorization due to high visual similarities within subgroups, diverse applications were developed such as classifying images of vehicles, birds, food and plants. Here, we propose the use of deep neural network based representations for categorizing and identifying marine vessels for defense and security applications. First, we gather a large number of marine vessel images via online sources grouping them into four coarse categories; naval, civil, commercial and service vessels. Next, we subgroup naval vessels into fine categories such as corvettes, frigates and submarines. For distinguishing images, we extract state-of-the-art deep visual representations and train support-vector-machines. Furthermore, we fine tune deep representations for marine vessel images. Experiments address two scenarios, classification and verification of naval marine vessels. Classification experiment aims coarse categorization, as well as learning models of fine categories. Verification experiment embroils identification of specific naval vessels by revealing if a pair of images belongs to identical marine vessels by the help of learnt deep representations. Obtaining promising performance, we believe these presented capabilities would be essential components of future coastal and on-board surveillance systems.

  4. A comparison between temporal and subband minimum variance adaptive beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben H.; Greenaway, Alan H.; Anderson, Tom; Jensen, Jørgen A.; Sboros, Vassilis

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares the performance between temporal and subband Minimum Variance (MV) beamformers for medical ultrasound imaging. Both adaptive methods provide an optimized set of apodization weights but are implemented in the time and frequency domains respectively. Their performance is evaluated with simulated synthetic aperture data obtained from Field II and is quantified by the Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak-Side-Lobe level (PSL) and the contrast level. From a point phantom, a full sequence of 128 emissions with one transducer element transmitting and all 128 elements receiving each time, provides a FWHM of 0.03 mm (0.14λ) for both implementations at a depth of 40 mm. This value is more than 20 times lower than the one achieved by conventional beamforming. The corresponding values of PSL are -58 dB and -63 dB for time and frequency domain MV beamformers, while a value no lower than -50 dB can be obtained from either Boxcar or Hanning weights. Interestingly, a single emission with central element #64 as the transmitting aperture provides results comparable to the full sequence. The values of FWHM are 0.04 mm and 0.03 mm and those of PSL are -42 dB and -46 dB for temporal and subband approaches. From a cyst phantom and for 128 emissions, the contrast level is calculated at -54 dB and -63 dB respectively at the same depth, with the initial shape of the cyst being preserved in contrast to conventional beamforming. The difference between the two adaptive beamformers is less significant in the case of a single emission, with the contrast level being estimated at -42 dB for the time domain and -43 dB for the frequency domain implementation. For the estimation of a single MV weight of a low resolution image formed by a single emission, 0.44 * 109 calculations per second are required for the temporal approach. The same numbers for the subband approach are 0.62 * 109 for the point and 1.33 * 109 for the cyst phantom. The comparison demonstrates similar

  5. RISK ANALYSIS, ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE: GETTING MORE FROM OUR DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression are common statistical techniques used to analyze agronomic experimental data and determine significant differences among yields due to treatments or other experimental factors. Risk analysis provides an alternate and complimentary examination of the same...

  6. Weighted Quantile Regression for AR model with Infinite Variance Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Li, Runze; Wu, Yaohua

    2012-09-01

    Autoregressive (AR) models with finite variance errors have been well studied. This paper is concerned with AR models with heavy-tailed errors, which is useful in various scientific research areas. Statistical estimation for AR models with infinite variance errors is very different from those for AR models with finite variance errors. In this paper, we consider a weighted quantile regression for AR models to deal with infinite variance errors. We further propose an induced smoothing method to deal with computational challenges in weighted quantile regression. We show that the difference between weighted quantile regression estimate and its smoothed version is negligible. We further propose a test for linear hypothesis on the regression coefficients. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation study to assess the finite sample performance of the proposed procedures. We illustrate the proposed methodology by an empirical analysis of a real-life data set.

  7. Capturing Option Anomalies with a Variance-Dependent Pricing Kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Heston, Steven; Jacobs, Kris

    2013-01-01

    We develop a GARCH option model with a new pricing kernel allowing for a variance premium. While the pricing kernel is monotonic in the stock return and in variance, its projection onto the stock return is nonmonotonic. A negative variance premium makes it U shaped. We present new semiparametric...... evidence to confirm this U-shaped relationship between the risk-neutral and physical probability densities. The new pricing kernel substantially improves our ability to reconcile the time-series properties of stock returns with the cross-section of option prices. It provides a unified explanation...... for the implied volatility puzzle, the overreaction of long-term options to changes in short-term variance, and the fat tails of the risk-neutral return distribution relative to the physical distribution....

  8. Some variance reduction methods for numerical stochastic homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, X; Le Bris, C; Legoll, F

    2016-04-28

    We give an overview of a series of recent studies devoted to variance reduction techniques for numerical stochastic homogenization. Numerical homogenization requires that a set of problems is solved at the microscale, the so-called corrector problems. In a random environment, these problems are stochastic and therefore need to be repeatedly solved, for several configurations of the medium considered. An empirical average over all configurations is then performed using the Monte Carlo approach, so as to approximate the effective coefficients necessary to determine the macroscopic behaviour. Variance severely affects the accuracy and the cost of such computations. Variance reduction approaches, borrowed from other contexts in the engineering sciences, can be useful. Some of these variance reduction techniques are presented, studied and tested here. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. On-Line Estimation of Allan Variance Parameters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, J

    1999-01-01

    ... (Inertial Measurement Unit) gyros and accelerometers. The on-line method proposes a state space model and proposes parameter estimators for quantities previously measured from off-line data techniques such as the Allan variance graph...

  10. Comparison of variance estimators for metaanalysis of instrumental variable estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A. F.; Hingorani, A. D.; Jefferis, B. J.; White, J.; Groenwold, R. H H; Dudbridge, F.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Chaturvedi, N.; Engmann, J.; Hughes, A.; Humphries, S.; Hypponen, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Kuh, D.; Kumari, M.; Menon, U.; Morris, R.; Power, C.; Price, J.; Wannamethee, G.; Whincup, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mendelian randomization studies perform instrumental variable (IV) analysis using genetic IVs. Results of individual Mendelian randomization studies can be pooled through meta-analysis. We explored how different variance estimators influence the meta-analysed IV estimate. Methods: Two

  11. [Pulmonary blood vessels in goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, H; Hegner, K; Vollmerhaus, B

    1999-05-01

    The blood vessels in the lung of the goat, which until now have received little attention, are described in detail for the first time. With regard to the segments of the lung, blood vessels are bronchovascular units in the lobi craniales, lobus medius and lobus accessorius, but bronchoartery units in the lobi caudales. We investigated the types of branches of the Aa. pulmonales dextra et sinistra, the inter- and intraspecific principles of the outlet of the pulmonary veins and the importance of bronchopulmonary segmentation of the lungs.

  12. Potential Coefficient and Anomaly Degree Variance Modelling Revisited,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    using least squares collocation . Moritz (1977) suggested an Improved model for the anomaly degree variances that was investigated by Jekeli (1978...KEY WORDOS (Continue ont ,r.ve aide it ne’-entev and identify by block nool.ber) Geodesy, gray itY, collocation , cova rialncts. 20. AS 4-&CT (Continue...provided one Is willing to accept a high gradient variance. Excellent fit to all data types is obtained with the two com- ponent model suggested by Moritz

  13. Bias-variance tradeoff of soft decision trees

    OpenAIRE

    Olaru, Cristina; Wehenkel, Louis

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the error composition of a fuzzy decision tree induction method recently proposed by the authors, called soft decision trees. This error may be expressed as a sum of three types of error: residual error, bias and variance. The paper studies empirically the tradeoff between bias and variance in a soft decision tree method and compares it with the tradeoff of classical crisp regression and classification trees. The m...

  14. Global Variance Risk Premium and Forex Return Predictability

    OpenAIRE

    Aloosh, Arash

    2014-01-01

    In a long-run risk model with stochastic volatility and frictionless markets, I express expected forex returns as a function of consumption growth variances and stock variance risk premiums (VRPs)—the difference between the risk-neutral and statistical expectations of market return variation. This provides a motivation for using the forward-looking information available in stock market volatility indices to predict forex returns. Empirically, I find that stock VRPs predict forex returns at a ...

  15. The Durbin-Watson Ratio Under Infinite Variance Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Peter C.B.; Mico Loretan

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies the properties of the von Neumann ratio for time series with infinite variance. The asymptotic theory is developed using recent results on the weak convergence of partial sums of time series with infinite variance to stable processes and of sample serial correlations to functions of stable variables. Our asymptotics cover the null of iid variates and general moving average (MA) alternatives. Regression residuals are also considered. In the static regression model the Durbin...

  16. Estimation of the additive and dominance variances in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimates of additive genetic variance were 0.669, 43.46 d2 and 9.02 kg2 for NBA, FI and LWT21, respectively. Corresponding estimates of dominance variance were 0.439, 123.68 d2 and 2.52 kg2, respectively. Dominance effects were important for NBA and FI. Permanent environmental effects were significant for FI and ...

  17. Variance and covariance estimates for weaning weight of Senepol cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D W; Johnson, Z B; Brown, C J; Wildeus, S

    1991-10-01

    Variance and covariance components were estimated for weaning weight from Senepol field data for use in the reduced animal model for a maternally influenced trait. The 4,634 weaning records were used to evaluate 113 sires and 1,406 dams on the island of St. Croix. Estimates of direct additive genetic variance (sigma 2A), maternal additive genetic variance (sigma 2M), covariance between direct and maternal additive genetic effects (sigma AM), permanent maternal environmental variance (sigma 2PE), and residual variance (sigma 2 epsilon) were calculated by equating variances estimated from a sire-dam model and a sire-maternal grandsire model, with and without the inverse of the numerator relationship matrix (A-1), to their expectations. Estimates were sigma 2A, 139.05 and 138.14 kg2; sigma 2M, 307.04 and 288.90 kg2; sigma AM, -117.57 and -103.76 kg2; sigma 2PE, -258.35 and -243.40 kg2; and sigma 2 epsilon, 588.18 and 577.72 kg2 with and without A-1, respectively. Heritability estimates for direct additive (h2A) were .211 and .210 with and without A-1, respectively. Heritability estimates for maternal additive (h2M) were .47 and .44 with and without A-1, respectively. Correlations between direct and maternal (IAM) effects were -.57 and -.52 with and without A-1, respectively.

  18. Variance estimation in the analysis of microarray data

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuedong

    2009-04-01

    Microarrays are one of the most widely used high throughput technologies. One of the main problems in the area is that conventional estimates of the variances that are required in the t-statistic and other statistics are unreliable owing to the small number of replications. Various methods have been proposed in the literature to overcome this lack of degrees of freedom problem. In this context, it is commonly observed that the variance increases proportionally with the intensity level, which has led many researchers to assume that the variance is a function of the mean. Here we concentrate on estimation of the variance as a function of an unknown mean in two models: the constant coefficient of variation model and the quadratic variance-mean model. Because the means are unknown and estimated with few degrees of freedom, naive methods that use the sample mean in place of the true mean are generally biased because of the errors-in-variables phenomenon. We propose three methods for overcoming this bias. The first two are variations on the theme of the so-called heteroscedastic simulation-extrapolation estimator, modified to estimate the variance function consistently. The third class of estimators is entirely different, being based on semiparametric information calculations. Simulations show the power of our methods and their lack of bias compared with the naive method that ignores the measurement error. The methodology is illustrated by using microarray data from leukaemia patients.

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of residual variance in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill William G

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims were to estimate the extent of genetic heterogeneity in environmental variance. Data comprised 99 535 records of 35-day body weights from broiler chickens reared in a controlled environment. Residual variance within dam families was estimated using ASREML, after fitting fixed effects such as genetic groups and hatches, for each of 377 genetically contemporary sires with a large number of progeny (> 100 males or females each. Residual variance was computed separately for male and female offspring, and after correction for sampling, strong evidence for heterogeneity was found, the standard deviation between sires in within variance amounting to 15–18% of its mean. Reanalysis using log-transformed data gave similar results, and elimination of 2–3% of outlier data reduced the heterogeneity but it was still over 10%. The correlation between estimates for males and females was low, however. The correlation between sire effects on progeny mean and residual variance for body weight was small and negative (-0.1. Using a data set bigger than any yet presented and on a trait measurable in both sexes, this study has shown evidence for heterogeneity in the residual variance, which could not be explained by segregation of major genes unless very few determined the trait.

  20. Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessel Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the logbook data from U.S.A. Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels (CPFV) fishing in the U.S.A. EEZ and in waters off of Baja California, from...

  1. Pressure vessel and method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Timothy

    2017-09-05

    A pressure vessel includes a pump having a passage that extends between an inlet and an outlet. A duct at the pump outlet includes at least one dimension that is adjustable to facilitate forming a dynamic seal that limits backflow of gas through the passage.

  2. BPC 157 and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwerth, Sven; Brcic, Luka; Vuletic, Lovorka Batelja; Kolenc, Danijela; Aralica, Gorana; Misic, Marija; Zenko, Anita; Drmic, Domagoj; Rucman, Rudolf; Sikiric, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the described effects of BPC 157 on blood vessels after different types of damage, and elucidate by investigating different aspects of vascular response to injury (endothelium damage, clotting, thrombosis, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasculoneogenesis and edema formation) especially in connection to the healing processes. In this respect, BPC 157 was concluded to be the most potent angiomodulatory agent, acting through different vasoactive pathways and systems (e.g. NO, VEGF, FAK) and leading to optimization of the vascular response followed, as it has to be expected, by optimization of the healing process. Formation of new blood vessels involves two main, partly overlapping mechanisms, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The additional mechanism of arteriogenesis is involved in the formation of collaterals. In conjunction with blood vessel function, we at least have to consider leakage of fluid/proteins/plasma, resulting in edema/exudate formation as well as thrombogenesis. Blood vessels are also strongly involved in tumor biology. In this aspect, we have neoangiogenesis resulting in pathological vascularization, vascular invasion resulting in release of metastatic cells and the phenomenon of homing resulting in formation of secondary tumors--metastases.

  3. The determinants of fishing vessel accident severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Di

    2014-05-01

    The study examines the determinants of fishing vessel accident severity in the Northeastern United States using vessel accident data from the U.S. Coast Guard for 2001-2008. Vessel damage and crew injury severity equations were estimated separately utilizing the ordered probit model. The results suggest that fishing vessel accident severity is significantly affected by several types of accidents. Vessel damage severity is positively associated with loss of stability, sinking, daytime wind speed, vessel age, and distance to shore. Vessel damage severity is negatively associated with vessel size and daytime sea level pressure. Crew injury severity is also positively related to the loss of vessel stability and sinking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Speckle variance optical coherence tomography of blood flow in the beating mouse embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, Olga A; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V

    2017-05-01

    Efficient separation of blood and cardiac wall in the beating embryonic heart is essential and critical for experiment-based computational modelling and analysis of early-stage cardiac biomechanics. Although speckle variance optical coherence tomography (SV-OCT) relying on calculation of intensity variance over consecutively acquired frames is a powerful approach for segmentation of fluid flow from static tissue, application of this method in the beating embryonic heart remains challenging because moving structures generate SV signal indistinguishable from the blood. Here, we demonstrate a modified four-dimensional SV-OCT approach that effectively separates the blood flow from the dynamic heart wall in the beating mouse embryonic heart. The method takes advantage of the periodic motion of the cardiac wall and is based on calculation of the SV signal over the frames corresponding to the same phase of the heartbeat cycle. Through comparison with Doppler OCT imaging, we validate this speckle-based approach and show advantages in its insensitiveness to the flow direction and velocity as well as reduced influence from the heart wall movement. This approach has a potential in variety of applications relying on visualization and segmentation of blood flow in periodically moving structures, such as mechanical simulation studies and finite element modelling. Picture: Four-dimensional speckle variance OCT imaging shows the blood flow inside the beating heart of an E8.5 mouse embryo. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  6. Human and nonhuman primate meninges harbor lymphatic vessels that can be visualized noninvasively by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Absinta, Martina; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Nair, Govind; Sati, Pascal; Luciano, Nicholas J; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Louveau, Antoine; Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Kipnis, Jonathan; Reich, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the existence of meningeal lymphatic vessels in human and nonhuman primates (common marmoset monkeys) and the feasibility of noninvasively imaging and mapping them in vivo with high-resolution, clinical MRI. On T2-FLAIR and T1-weighted black-blood imaging, lymphatic vessels enhance with gadobutrol, a gadolinium-based contrast agent with high propensity to extravasate across a permeable capillary endothelial barrier, but not with gadofosveset, a blood-pool contrast agent. The t...

  7. Gamma radiography of refractory-lined vessels and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapinski, N. P.

    1978-08-01

    Materials used in coal-conversion systems are exposed to high pressure, high temperature, corrosive and erosive gases, and liquids containing particulate matter. These severe environments necessitate an assessment of the integrity of components to prevent premature failures. Gamma radiography was evaluated as a viable technique for testing such components in the laboratory or after operation in situ. Penetrameters (image-quality indicators) were developed for refractory-lined vessels and transfer lines, and exposure times for various combinations of refractory-steel thicknesses were determined. Radiography with /sup 60/Co was performed on gasifier vessels, combustor vessels, and critical transfer lines in existing pilot plants using the experience gained through laboratory experiments. The results show that gamma radiography is a practical and effective method to detect critical conditions in coal-conversion system components. 18 figures, 3 tables.

  8. An Axial Array for Volumetric Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alles, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a medical imaging modality aimed at imaging blood vessel walls from within the vessel. Current commercial IVUS catheters are designed to yield two-dimensional cross-sectional images perpendicular to the vessel wall. By pulling the catheter back through the artery

  9. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  10. CMB-S4 and the hemispherical variance anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Márcio; Copi, Craig J.; Knox, Lloyd; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2017-09-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) full-sky temperature data show a hemispherical asymmetry in power nearly aligned with the Ecliptic. In real space, this anomaly can be quantified by the temperature variance in the Northern and Southern Ecliptic hemispheres, with the Northern hemisphere displaying an anomalously low variance while the Southern hemisphere appears unremarkable [consistent with expectations from the best-fitting theory, Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM)]. While this is a well-established result in temperature, the low signal-to-noise ratio in current polarization data prevents a similar comparison. This will change with a proposed ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. With that in mind, we generate realizations of polarization maps constrained by the temperature data and predict the distribution of the hemispherical variance in polarization considering two different sky coverage scenarios possible in CMB-S4: full Ecliptic north coverage and just the portion of the North that can be observed from a ground-based telescope at the high Chilean Atacama plateau. We find that even in the set of realizations constrained by the temperature data, the low Northern hemisphere variance observed in temperature is not expected in polarization. Therefore, observing an anomalously low variance in polarization would make the hypothesis that the temperature anomaly is simply a statistical fluke more unlikely and thus increase the motivation for physical explanations. We show, within ΛCDM, how variance measurements in both sky coverage scenarios are related. We find that the variance makes for a good statistic in cases where the sky coverage is limited, however, full northern coverage is still preferable.

  11. 46 CFR 42.05-63 - Ship(s) and vessel(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship(s) and vessel(s). 42.05-63 Section 42.05-63... BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-63 Ship(s) and vessel(s). The terms ship(s) and vessel(s) are interchangeable or synonymous words, and include every description of watercraft...

  12. Vessel tree extraction using locally optimal paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; van Ginneken, Bram; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to extract vessel trees by continually extending detected branches with locally optimal paths. Our approach uses a cost function from a multi scale vessel enhancement filter. Optimal paths are selected based on rules that take into account the geometric characteristics...... of the vessel tree. Experiments were performed on 10 low dose chest CT scans for which the pulmonary vessel trees were extracted. The proposed method is shown to extract a better connected vessel tree and extract more of the small peripheral vessels in comparison to applying a threshold on the output...

  13. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  14. Brain blood vessel segmentation using line-shaped profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Danilo; Pižurica, Aleksandra; De Vylder, Jonas; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-11-01

    Segmentation of cerebral blood vessels is of great importance in diagnostic and clinical applications, especially for embolization of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In order to perform embolization of the AVM, the structural and geometric information of blood vessels from 3D images is of utmost importance. For this reason, the in-depth segmentation of cerebral blood vessels is usually done as a fusion of different segmentation techniques, often requiring extensive user interaction. In this paper we introduce the idea of line-shaped profiling with an application to brain blood vessel and AVM segmentation, efficient both in terms of resolving details and in terms of computation time. Our method takes into account both local proximate and wider neighbourhood of the processed pixel, which makes it efficient for segmenting large blood vessel tree structures, as well as fine structures of the AVMs. Another advantage of our method is that it requires selection of only one parameter to perform segmentation, yielding very little user interaction.

  15. Estimation of retinal vessel caliber using model fitting and random forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Teresa; Mendonça, Ana Maria; Campilho, Aurélio

    2017-03-01

    Retinal vessel caliber changes are associated with several major diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension. These caliber changes can be evaluated using eye fundus images. However, the clinical assessment is tiresome and prone to errors, motivating the development of automatic methods. An automatic method based on vessel crosssection intensity profile model fitting for the estimation of vessel caliber in retinal images is herein proposed. First, vessels are segmented from the image, vessel centerlines are detected and individual segments are extracted and smoothed. Intensity profiles are extracted perpendicularly to the vessel, and the profile lengths are determined. Then, model fitting is applied to the smoothed profiles. A novel parametric model (DoG-L7) is used, consisting on a Difference-of-Gaussians multiplied by a line which is able to describe profile asymmetry. Finally, the parameters of the best-fit model are used for determining the vessel width through regression using ensembles of bagged regression trees with random sampling of the predictors (random forests). The method is evaluated on the REVIEW public dataset. A precision close to the observers is achieved, outperforming other state-of-the-art methods. The method is robust and reliable for width estimation in images with pathologies and artifacts, with performance independent of the range of diameters.

  16. Fingerprint segmentation: an investigation of various techniques and a parameter study of a variance-based method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Msiza, IS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available fingerprint segmentation approaches, this manuscript focuses on a block-wise method that is based on the gray-level variance of the image. Because the method of interest is subjected to a number of variable parameters, this document then presents a formal...

  17. Thermography based breast cancer detection using texture features and minimum variance quantization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Marina; Jankovic, Dragan; Peulic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system based on feature extraction techniques and image segmentation techniques for detecting and diagnosing abnormal patterns in breast thermograms. The proposed system consists of three major steps: feature extraction, classification into normal and abnormal pattern and segmentation of abnormal pattern. Computed features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices are used to evaluate the effectiveness of textural information possessed by mass regions. A total of 20 GLCM features are extracted from thermograms. The ability of feature set in differentiating abnormal from normal tissue is investigated using a Support Vector Machine classifier, Naive Bayes classifier and K-Nearest Neighbor classifier. To evaluate the classification performance, five-fold cross validation method and Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed. The verification results show that the proposed algorithm gives the best classification results using K-Nearest Neighbor classifier and a accuracy of 92.5%. Image segmentation techniques can play an important role to segment and extract suspected hot regions of interests in the breast infrared images. Three image segmentation techniques: minimum variance quantization, dilation of image and erosion of image are discussed. The hottest regions of thermal breast images are extracted and compared to the original images. According to the results, the proposed method has potential to extract almost exact shape of tumors.

  18. Genetic Variance in Homophobia: Evidence from Self- and Peer Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapko-Willmes, Alexandra; Kandler, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The present twin study combined self- and peer assessments of twins' general homophobia targeting gay men in order to replicate previous behavior genetic findings across different rater perspectives and to disentangle self-rater-specific variance from common variance in self- and peer-reported homophobia (i.e., rater-consistent variance). We hypothesized rater-consistent variance in homophobia to be attributable to genetic and nonshared environmental effects, and self-rater-specific variance to be partially accounted for by genetic influences. A sample of 869 twins and 1329 peer raters completed a seven item scale containing cognitive, affective, and discriminatory homophobic tendencies. After correction for age and sex differences, we found most of the genetic contributions (62%) and significant nonshared environmental contributions (16%) to individual differences in self-reports on homophobia to be also reflected in peer-reported homophobia. A significant genetic component, however, was self-report-specific (38%), suggesting that self-assessments alone produce inflated heritability estimates to some degree. Different explanations are discussed.

  19. Extinction risk, coloured noise and the scaling of variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Matthias C; Johst, Karin; Schwager, Monika; Blasius, Bernd; Jeltsch, Florian

    2005-07-01

    The impact of temporally correlated fluctuating environments (coloured noise) on the extinction risk of populations has become a main focus in theoretical population ecology. In this study we particularly focus on the extinction risk in strongly correlated environments. Here, we found that, in contrast to moderate auto-correlation, the extinction risk was highly dependent on the process of noise generation, in particular on the method of variance scaling. Such scaling is commonly applied to avoid variance-driven biases when comparing the extinction risk under white and coloured noise. We show that for strong auto-correlation often-used scaling techniques lead to a high variability in the variances of the resulting time series and thus to deviations in the subsequent extinction risk. Therefore, we present an alternative scaling method that always delivers the target variance, even in the case of strong auto-correlation. In contrast to earlier techniques, our very intuitive method is not bound to auto-regressive processes but can be applied to all types of coloured noises. We strongly recommend our method to generate time series when the target of interest is the effect of noise colour on extinction risk not obscured by any variance effects.

  20. Application of variance components estimation to calibrate geoid error models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-Mei; Xu, Hou-Ze

    2015-01-01

    The method of using Global Positioning System-leveling data to obtain orthometric heights has been well studied. A simple formulation for the weighted least squares problem has been presented in an earlier work. This formulation allows one directly employing the errors-in-variables models which completely descript the covariance matrices of the observables. However, an important question that what accuracy level can be achieved has not yet to be satisfactorily solved by this traditional formulation. One of the main reasons for this is the incorrectness of the stochastic models in the adjustment, which in turn allows improving the stochastic models of measurement noises. Therefore the issue of determining the stochastic modeling of observables in the combined adjustment with heterogeneous height types will be a main focus point in this paper. Firstly, the well-known method of variance component estimation is employed to calibrate the errors of heterogeneous height data in a combined least square adjustment of ellipsoidal, orthometric and gravimetric geoid. Specifically, the iterative algorithms of minimum norm quadratic unbiased estimation are used to estimate the variance components for each of heterogeneous observations. Secondly, two different statistical models are presented to illustrate the theory. The first method directly uses the errors-in-variables as a priori covariance matrices and the second method analyzes the biases of variance components and then proposes bias-corrected variance component estimators. Several numerical test results show the capability and effectiveness of the variance components estimation procedure in combined adjustment for calibrating geoid error model.

  1. FRACTIONAL TREND OF THE VARIANCE IN CAVALIERI SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Fiñana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cavalieri sampling is often used to estimate the volume of an object with systematic sections a constant distance T apart. The variance of the corresponding estimator can be expressed as the sum of the extension term (which gives the overall trend of the variance and is used to estimate it, the 'Zitterbewegung' (which oscillates about zero and higher order terms. The extension term is of order T2m+2 for small T, where m is the order of the first non-continuous derivative of the measurement function f, (namely of the area function if the target is the volume. A key condition is that the jumps of the mth derivative f (m of f are finite. When this is not the case, then the variance exhibits a fractional trend, and the current theory fails. Indeed, in practice the mentioned trend is often of order T2q+2, typically with 0 variance, and thereby of the extension term, by means of a new Euler-MacLaurin formula involving fractional derivatives of f. We also present a new and general estimator of the variance, see Eq. 26a, b, and apply it to real data (white matter of a human brain.

  2. Evolutionary algorithm for automatic detection of blood vessel shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutics, Andrea

    1996-04-01

    Automatic detection of blood vessel shapes locating in the skin has a great diagnostic importance. In this work, an evolutionary approach operating on morphological operator and operation structures is proposed for the determination of the shape and network of blood vessels located in upper skin layers. A population of individuals comprising morphological structures is generated. A two-dimensional queue like data representation of individuals is applied in order to provide an appropriate representation of the connectivity constraints originated in the two dimensional nature of the structuring elements. Two-dimensional crossover and mutation type manipulation operations are carried out on selected elements of the population. Unlike the usual techniques, in our approach no constraints are used for background and smoothness as no matched filter or linear operator is applied. Also no a priori knowledge of the vessel shape is necessary due to the evolutionary method. Unlike the usual imaging techniques, that mainly use angiograms as input, in this work infrared filtered images taken by CCD camera are applied to investigate the blood vessels of broad skin areas. The method is implemented parallel on a lattice network of transputers resulting in a significantly decreased processing time compared to the usual techniques.

  3. Variance swap payoffs, risk premia and extreme market conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jeroen V.K.; Stentoft, Lars; Violante, Francesco

    This paper estimates the Variance Risk Premium (VRP) directly from synthetic variance swap payoffs. Since variance swap payoffs are highly volatile, we extract the VRP by using signal extraction techniques based on a state-space representation of our model in combination with a simple economic...... constraint. Our approach, only requiring option implied volatilities and daily returns for the underlying, provides measurement error free estimates of the part of the VRP related to normal market conditions, and allows constructing variables indicating agents' expectations under extreme market conditions....... The latter variables and the VRP generate different return predictability on the major US indices. A factor model is proposed to extract a market VRP which turns out to be priced when considering Fama and French portfolios....

  4. A New Nonparametric Levene Test for Equal Variances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno D. Zumbo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tests of the equality of variances are sometimes used on their own to compare variability across groups of experimental or non-experimental conditions but they are most often used alongside other methods to support assumptions made about variances. A new nonparametric test of equality of variances is described and compared to current 'gold standard' method, the median-based Levene test, in a computer simulation study. The simulation results show that when sampling from either symmetric or skewed population distributions both the median based and nonparametric Levene tests maintain their nominal Type I error rate; however, when one is sampling from skewed population distributions the nonparametric test has more statistical power.

  5. AFSC/FMA/Vessel Assessment Logging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Vessels fishing trawl gear, vessels fishing hook-and-line and pot gear that are also greater than 57.5 feet overall, and shoreside and floating processing facilities...

  6. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Hawaii Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Hawaii Island. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  7. US Virgin Islands Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for US Virgin Islands. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of...

  8. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Midway Island, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Midway Island, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of...

  9. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Kure, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Kure, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  10. Actemra Approved for Certain Blood Vessel Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 165836.html Actemra Approved for Certain Blood Vessel Inflammation Drug will treat adults with a condition called ... to treat adults with giant cell arteritis, an inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis). In a media ...

  11. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Maro Reef, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Maro Reef, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  12. PCs and networking for oceanographic research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Desa, E.; Vithayathil, G.

    This paper, first describes briefly the evolution of data acquisition techniques and different system implementation, on board research vessels. A data acquisition system being developed for a coastal research vessel is then described which is based...

  13. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Lisianski Island, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Lisianski Island, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction...

  14. Assessment of heterogeneity of residual variances using changepoint techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Miguel A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies using test-day models show clear heterogeneity of residual variance along lactation. A changepoint technique to account for this heterogeneity is proposed. The data set included 100 744 test-day records of 10 869 Holstein-Friesian cows from northern Spain. A three-stage hierarchical model using the Wood lactation function was employed. Two unknown changepoints at times T1 and T2, (0 T1 T2 tmax, with continuity of residual variance at these points, were assumed. Also, a nonlinear relationship between residual variance and the number of days of milking t was postulated. The residual variance at a time t( in the lactation phase i was modeled as: for (i = 1, 2, 3, where λι is a phase-specific parameter. A Bayesian analysis using Gibbs sampling and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for marginalization was implemented. After a burn-in of 20 000 iterations, 40 000 samples were drawn to estimate posterior features. The posterior modes of T1, T2, λ1, λ2, λ3, , , were 53.2 and 248.2 days; 0.575, -0.406, 0.797 and 0.702, 34.63 and 0.0455 kg2, respectively. The residual variance predicted using these point estimates were 2.64, 6.88, 3.59 and 4.35 kg2 at days of milking 10, 53, 248 and 305, respectively. This technique requires less restrictive assumptions and the model has fewer parameters than other methods proposed to account for the heterogeneity of residual variance during lactation.

  15. Stable limits for sums of dependent infinite variance random variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkiewicz, Katarzyna; Jakubowski, Adam; Mikosch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide conditions which ensure that the affinely transformed partial sums of a strictly stationary process converge in distribution to an infinite variance stable distribution. Conditions for this convergence to hold are known in the literature. However, most of these......The aim of this paper is to provide conditions which ensure that the affinely transformed partial sums of a strictly stationary process converge in distribution to an infinite variance stable distribution. Conditions for this convergence to hold are known in the literature. However, most...

  16. A Broadband Beamformer Using Controllable Constraints and Minimum Variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimian-Azari, Sam; Benesty, Jacob; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2014-01-01

    The minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) and the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformers are two optimal approaches in the sense of noise reduction. The LCMV beamformer can also reject interferers using linear constraints at the expense of reducing the degree of freedom...... in a limited number of microphones. However, it may magnify noise that causes a lower output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the MVDR beamformer. Contrarily, the MVDR beamformer suffers from interference in output. In this paper, we propose a controllable LCMV (C-LCMV) beamformer based on the principles...

  17. Why analysis of variance is inappropriate for multiclinic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsburg, D

    1999-10-01

    Violations of the assumptions behind analysis of variance (ANOVA) models do not tend to affect the alpha-level but can greatly decrease the power of a clinical trial to detect treatment effects. The very nature of multiclinic studies guarantees the violation of some of these assumptions. In this article, I explore the reduction in power that results from two of these violations--heterogeneity of variance across sites and the existence of "floor" and "ceiling" effects. I propose other methods of statistical analysis that avoid this loss of power.

  18. Multivariate Variance Targeting in the BEKK-GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard; Rahbek, Anders

    This paper considers asymptotic inference in the multivariate BEKK model based on (co-)variance targeting (VT). By de…nition the VT estimator is a two-step estimator and the theory presented is based on expansions of the modi…ed likelihood function, or estimating function, corresponding to these ......This paper considers asymptotic inference in the multivariate BEKK model based on (co-)variance targeting (VT). By de…nition the VT estimator is a two-step estimator and the theory presented is based on expansions of the modi…ed likelihood function, or estimating function, corresponding...

  19. A multi-variance analysis in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Todd

    1993-01-01

    Recently a new technique for characterizing the noise processes affecting oscillators was introduced. This technique minimizes the difference between the estimates of several different variances and their values as predicted by the standard power law model of noise. The method outlined makes two significant advancements: it uses exclusively time domain variances so that deterministic parameters such as linear frequency drift may be estimated, and it correctly fits the estimates using the chi-square distribution. These changes permit a more accurate fitting at long time intervals where there is the least information. This technique was applied to both simulated and real data with excellent results.

  20. Bias-Variance Tradeoffs in Recombination Rate Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Eric A; Singh, Nadia D

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, we and coauthors published a paper characterizing rates of recombination within the 2.1-megabase garnet-scalloped (g-sd) region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome. To extract the signal of recombination in our high-throughput sequence data, we adopted a nonparametric smoothing procedure, reducing variance at the cost of biasing individual recombination rates. In doing so, we sacrificed accuracy to gain precision-precision that allowed us to detect recombination rate heterogeneity. Negotiating the bias-variance tradeoff enabled us to resolve significant variation in the frequency of crossing over across the garnet-scalloped region. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.