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Sample records for vessel wall response

  1. Vessel wall characterization using quantitative MRI: what's in a number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Calcagno, Claudia; van Ooij, Pim; Fayad, Zahi A; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed the rapid development of new MRI technology for vessel wall imaging. Today, with advances in MRI hardware and pulse sequences, quantitative MRI of the vessel wall represents a real alternative to conventional qualitative imaging, which is hindered by significant intra- and inter-observer variability. Quantitative MRI can measure several important morphological and functional characteristics of the vessel wall. This review provides a detailed introduction to novel quantitative MRI methods for measuring vessel wall dimensions, plaque composition and permeability, endothelial shear stress and wall stiffness. Together, these methods show the versatility of non-invasive quantitative MRI for probing vascular disease at several stages. These quantitative MRI biomarkers can play an important role in the context of both treatment response monitoring and risk prediction. Given the rapid developments in scan acceleration techniques and novel image reconstruction, we foresee the possibility of integrating the acquisition of multiple quantitative vessel wall parameters within a single scan session.

  2. Role of arginase in vessel wall remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eDurante

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vascular cell dysfunction and vessel wall remodeling in several diseases. Clinical and experimental studies have documented increases in the expression and/or activity of arginase I or II in blood vessels following arterial injury and in pulmonary and arterial hypertension, aging, and atherosclerosis. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of arginase in animals ameliorates abnormalities in vascular cells and normalizes blood vessel architecture and function in all of these pathological states. The detrimental effect of arginase in vascular remodeling is attributable to its ability to stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell proliferation, and collagen deposition by promoting the synthesis of polyamines and L-proline, respectively. In addition, arginase adversely impacts arterial remodeling by directing macrophages towards an inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, the proliferative, fibrotic, and inflammatory actions of arginase in the vasculature are further amplified by its capacity to inhibit nitric oxide synthesis by competing with nitric oxide synthase for substrate, L-arginine. Pharmacologic or molecular approaches targeting specific isoforms of arginase represent a promising strategy in treating obstructive fibroproliferative vascular disease.

  3. Coagulation and the vessel wall in thrombosis and atherosclerosis.

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    Kleinegris, Marie-Claire; Ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; Ten Cate, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The blood coagulation system is a key survival mechanism that has developed to protect man against lethal bleeding. A second function of blood coagulation is its close interaction with immunity. The immune-mediated coagulation responses may broadly be regarded as an element of response to injury. Pathological coagulation responses, including thromboembolism and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), could therefore be regarded as excessive immune responses to a vessel wall injury. Virchow's triad, which comprises changes in the components of the blood, the state of the vessel wall, and the blood flow, was originally proposed for venous thrombosis. However, lately it appears that the same principles can be applied to arterial thrombosis and even DIC. It has even been postulated that all forms of thrombosis may be part of a continuous spectrum of the same disease. Over the past few years, an accumulation of evidence has shown that the etiopathogenetic mechanisms behind venous and arterial thrombosis are quite similar. The traditional elements of Virchow's triad are found to apply to both arterial and venous thrombosis. Yet, nowadays more emphasis is placed on the vessel wall and vascular bed specificity and the interaction with inflammation and hypercoagulability. This narrative review will discuss recent advances in research on the possible interactions between coagulation, the vascular endothelium, and atherosclerosis as well as the consequences of such interactions for venous and arterial thrombosis.

  4. 2D Fast Vessel Visualization Using a Vessel Wall Mask Guiding Fine Vessel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Raptis

    2010-01-01

    and then try to approach the ridges and branches of the vasculature's using fine detection. Fine vessel screening looks into local structural inconsistencies in vessels properties, into noise, or into not expected intensity variations observed inside pre-known vessel-body areas. The vessels are first modelled sufficiently but not precisely by their walls with a tubular model-structure that is the result of an initial segmentation. This provides a chart of likely Vessel Wall Pixels (VWPs yielding a form of a likelihood vessel map mainly based on gradient filter's intensity and spatial arrangement parameters (e.g., linear consistency. Specific vessel parameters (centerline, width, location, fall-away rate, main orientation are post-computed by convolving the image with a set of pre-tuned spatial filters called Matched Filters (MFs. These are easily computed as Gaussian-like 2D forms that use a limited range sub-optimal parameters adjusted to the dominant vessel characteristics obtained by Spatial Grey Level Difference statistics limiting the range of search into vessel widths of 16, 32, and 64 pixels. Sparse pixels are effectively eliminated by applying a limited range Hough Transform (HT or region growing. Major benefits are limiting the range of parameters, reducing the search-space for post-convolution to only masked regions, representing almost 2% of the 2D volume, good speed versus accuracy/time trade-off. Results show the potentials of our approach in terms of time for detection ROC analysis and accuracy of vessel pixel (VP detection.

  5. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

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    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  6. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of vessel wall morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröner, Eleanore Sophie Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    This thesis evaluates morphological and functional vessel wall properties measured by magnetic resonance imaging techniques in healthy volunteers and patients with various diseases (i.e. Marfan syndrome patients (MFS), patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm and patients with a previous myocardial

  8. Vessel wall reactions to endovascular stent implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M.M. van Beusekom (Heleen)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn order to gain insight in the effects of stenting, we studied the process of wound healing and the short- and long-term effect of these permanently present foreign bodies. Both thrombogenic and less thrombogenic metals were evaluated with respect to thrombogenicity and tissue response.

  9. Walled Carotid Bifurcation Phantoms for Imaging Investigations of Vessel Wall Motion and Blood Flow Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Ho, Chung Kit; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-18

    As a major application domain of vascular ultrasound, the carotid artery has long been the subject of anthropomorphic phantom design. It is nevertheless not trivial to develop walled carotid phantoms that are compatible for use in integrative imaging of carotid wall motion and flow dynamics. In this paper, we present a novel phantom design protocol that can enable efficient fabrication of walled carotid bifurcation phantoms with: (i) high acoustic compatibility, (ii) artery-like vessel elasticity, and (iii) stenotic narrowing feature. Our protocol first involved direct fabrication of the vessel core and an outer mold using computer-aided design tools and 3-D printing technology; these built parts were then used to construct an elastic vessel tube through investment casting of a polyvinyl alcohol containing mixture, and an agar-gelatin tissue mimicking slab was formed around the vessel tube. For demonstration, we applied our protocol to develop a set of healthy and stenosed (25%, 50%, 75%) carotid bifurcation phantoms. Plane wave imaging experiments were performed on these phantoms using an ultrasound scanner with channel-level configurability. Results show that the wall motion dynamics of our phantoms agreed with pulse wave propagation in an elastic vessel (pulse wave velocity of 4.67±0.71 m/s measured at the common carotid artery), and their flow dynamics matched the expected ones in healthy and stenosed bifurcation (recirculation and flow jet formation observed). Integrative imaging of vessel wall motion and blood flow dynamics in our phantoms was also demonstrated, from which we observed fluid-structure interaction differences between healthy and diseased bifurcation phantoms. These findings show that the walled bifurcation phantoms developed with our new protocol are useful in vascular imaging studies that individually or jointly assess wall motion and flow dynamics.

  10. Force acting on spheres adhered to a vessel wall.

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    Sugihara-Seki, M; Skalak, R

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the force and torque acting on leukocytes attached to the vessel wall, we numerically study the flow field around the leukocytes by using rigid spherical particles adhered to the wall of a circular cylindrical tube as a model of adherent leukocytes. The adherent particles are assumed to be placed regularly in the flow direction with equal spacings, in one row or two rows. The flow field of the suspending fluid is analyzed by a finite element method applied to the Stokes equations, and the drag force and torque acting on each particle, as well as the apparent viscosity, are evaluated as a function of the particle to tube diameter ratio and the particle arrangements. For two-row arrangements of adhered particles where neighboring particles are placed alternately on opposite sides of the vessel, the drag and the torque exerted on each particle are higher than those for single-row arrangements, for constant particle to tube diameter ratio and axial spacing between neighboring particles. This is enhanced for larger particles and smaller axial spacings. The apparent viscosity of the flow through vessels with adhered particles is found to be significantly higher than that without adhered particles or when the particles are freely floating through the vessels.

  11. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and

  12. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Subclavian vein aneurysm secondary to a benign vessel wall hamartoma

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    Warren, Patrick [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Interventional Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Spaeth, Maya [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States); Prasad, Vinay [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Pathology, Columbus, OH (United States); McConnell, Patrick [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Venous aneurysms are rare clinical entities, particularly in children, and their presentation and natural history often depend on the anatomical location and underlying etiology. We present a single case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with a palpable right supraclavicular mass. Imaging evaluation with CT, conventional venography, MRI and sonography revealed a large fusiform subclavian vein aneurysm with an unusual, mass-like fibrofatty component incorporated into the vessel wall. The girl ultimately required complete resection of the right subclavian vein with placement of a synthetic interposition graft. This case provides a radiology/pathology correlation of an entity that has not previously been described as well as an example of the utility of multiple imaging modalities to aid diagnosis and preoperative planning. (orig.)

  14. In vivo and ex vivo vessel wall MRI of the circle of Willis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413650286

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several MRI sequences have been developed for direct evaluation of the intracranial vessel wall and its pathology in vivo. These MRI sequences enable detection of intracranial vessel wall abnormalities, including those that have not yet caused luminal narrowing. The research field

  15. Interplay between Inflammatory Responses and Lymphatic Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kihyuk; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2014-08-01

    Lymphatic vessels are routes for leukocyte migration and fluid drainage. In addition to their passive roles in migration of leukocytes, increasing evidence indicates their active roles in immune regulation. Tissue inflammation rapidly induces lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and chemokine production, thereby resulting in lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, lymphatic endothelial cells induce T cell tolerance through various mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on how inflammatory cytokines affect lymphangiogenesis and the roles of lymphatic vessels in modulating immune responses.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  17. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estrogen receptor expression and vessel density in the vagina wall in postmenopausal women with prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Lúcia Alves da Silva; Ribeiro da Silva, Alfredo; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio Cesar; Silva-de-Sá, Marcos Felipe; Rosa-e-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá

    2014-04-01

    After menopause, critically estrogen low levels result in modifications in vaginal wall. This cross-sectional study aims to determine whether there is a change in the number of vessels in the lamina propria of the vagina after menopause in parallel to the ER-alpha expression on the vaginal wall. Twelve women who underwent a genital surgery for genital prolapse up to grade II were selected. They were divided into two groups: a premenopausal group (PG) consisting of six women who were 18-40 years old with FSH levels =12 mIU/ml and regular cycles, and a menopausal group (MG) consisting of six women at least one year after menopause who were <65 years old with FSH levels =40 mIU/ml. Slides were stained for ER-alpha immunohistochemistry, and an endothelial cell marker CD3 was used to label vessels which were identified by using a system for morphometry. The number of vessels was significantly higher in the PG than in the MG both on the anterior wall (PG: 1.055 ± 145.8 vessels/mm(2), MG: 346.6 ± 209.9 vessels/mm(2), p<0.0001) and on the posterior wall (PG: 1064 ± 303.3 vessels/mm(2), MG: 348.6 ± 167.3 vessels/mm(2), p=0.0005). The ER-alpha score was significantly higher in the PG than the score for the MG on both the anterior and posterior walls (PG: 6.0 ± 0.52, MG: 2.5 ± 0.89, p=0.007; PG: 5.8 ± 0.79, MG: 2.7 ± 0.95, p=0.03, respectively). There was a positive correlation between the ER-alpha score and the vessel concentration on the anterior (r=0.6656, p=0.018) and posterior (r=0.6738, p=0.016) vaginal walls. Age was strongly negatively correlated with vessel concentration on the vaginal walls (respectively r=-0.9033, p<0.0001, r=-0.7440, p=0.0055). Therefore, postmenopausal women with genital prolapse have a smaller number of vessels on the vaginal wall compared to normoestrogenic controls with the same pathological condition. Hypoestrogenism and advancing age are factors that are associated to these changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Choke" vessels between vascular territories of the abdominal wall: literature review and rare case of Leriche's syndrome.

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    Ye, Xuan; Rozen, Warren M; Alonso-Burgos, Alberto; Ashton, Mark W

    2012-11-01

    We undertook a review of the anatomical changes of "choke" vessels between the internal thoracic artery (ITA) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA), as highlighted by a case of aortoiliac occlusive disease (Leriche's syndrome), and discuss the physiological concepts observed with regard to surgical delay procedures within the abdominal wall performed prior to abdominal cutaneous free flaps and coronary artery bypass grafting. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was undertaken on a patient with a rare case of Leriche's syndrome and a literature review of over 200 references on the anatomy, physiology and clinical uses of choke vessels in the abdominal wall was undertaken. The CTA demonstrated that in patients with Leriche's syndrome, there is a marked dilatation of all ITA-DIEA pathways and increased flow through choke vessels. If these changes can be surgically replicated in the form of a delay procedure for patients seeking to undergo autologous breast construction, this could improve the outcomes of abdominal cutaneous free flaps and coronary artery bypass grafting. We accordingly propose three surgical methods for augmenting blood flow to the abdominal wall: a) ligation of the DIEA; b) ligation of the distal ITA; and c) creation of an arterio-venous fistulae in the DIEA. Our review of the literature confirmed the viability of these propositions. The dilatation of choke vessels in response to increased haemodynamic stress may thus be utilised to enhance blood supply to tissues prior to transfer and can be achieved through simple and minimally invasive methods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. High-resolution intracranial vessel wall MRI in an elderly asymptomatic population: comparison of 3T and 7T

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    Harteveld, Anita A.; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Dieleman, Nikki; Siero, Jeroen C.W.; Luijten, Peter R.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Worp, H.B. van der; Frijns, Catharina J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kuijf, Hugo J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Several intracranial vessel wall sequences have been described in recent literature, with either 3-T or 7-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the current study, we compared 3-T and 7-T MRI in visualising both the intracranial arterial vessel wall and vessel wall lesions. Twenty-one elderly asymptomatic volunteers were scanned by 3-T and 7-T MRI with an intracranial vessel wall sequence, both before and after contrast administration. Two raters scored image quality, and presence and characteristics of vessel wall lesions. Vessel wall visibility was equal or significantly better at 7 T for the studied arterial segments, even though there were more artefacts hampering assessment. The better visualisation of the vessel wall at 7 T was most prominent in the proximal anterior cerebral circulation and the posterior cerebral artery. In the studied elderly asymptomatic population, 48 vessel-wall lesions were identified at 3 T, of which 7 showed enhancement. At 7 T, 79 lesions were identified, of which 29 showed enhancement. Seventy-one percent of all 3-T lesions and 59 % of all 7-T lesions were also seen at the other field strength. Despite the large variability in detected lesions at both field strengths, we believe 7-T MRI has the highest potential to identify the total burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions. (orig.)

  1. Could the heat sink effect of blood flow inside large vessels protect the vessel wall from thermal damage during RF-assisted surgical resection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Suárez, Ana; Trujillo, Macarena; Burdío, Fernando; Andaluz, Anna; Berjano, Enrique

    2014-08-01

    To assess by means of computer simulations whether the heat sink effect inside a large vessel (portal vein) could protect the vessel wall from thermal damage close to an internally cooled electrode during radiofrequency (RF)-assisted resection. First,in vivo experiments were conducted to validate the computational model by comparing the experimental and computational thermal lesion shapes created around the vessels. Computer simulations were then carried out to study the effect of different factors such as device-tissue contact, vessel position, and vessel-device distance on temperature distributions and thermal lesion shapes near a large vessel, specifically the portal vein. The geometries of thermal lesions around the vessels in the in vivo experiments were in agreement with the computer results. The thermal lesion shape created around the portal vein was significantly modified by the heat sink effect in all the cases considered. Thermal damage to the portal vein wall was inversely related to the vessel-device distance. It was also more pronounced when the device-tissue contact surface was reduced or when the vessel was parallel to the device or perpendicular to its distal end (blade zone), the vessel wall being damaged at distances less than 4.25 mm. The computational findings suggest that the heat sink effect could protect the portal vein wall for distances equal to or greater than 5 mm, regardless of its position and distance with respect to the RF-based device.

  2. Ex vivo blood vessel bioreactor for analysis of the biodegradation of magnesium stent models with and without vessel wall integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Liu, Lumei; Wu, Yifan; Maitz, Manfred F; Wang, Zhihong; Koo, Youngmi; Zhao, Ansha; Sankar, Jagannathan; Kong, Deling; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2017-03-01

    Current in vitro models fail in predicting the degradation rate and mode of magnesium (Mg) stents in vivo. To overcome this, the microenvironment of the stent is simulated here in an ex vivo bioreactor with porcine aorta and circulating medium, and compared with standard static in vitro immersion and with in vivo rat aorta models. In ex vivo and in vivo conditions, pure Mg wires were exposed to the aortic lumen and inserted into the aortic wall to mimic early- and long-term implantation, respectively. Results showed that: 1) Degradation rates of Mg were similar for all the fluid diffusion conditions (in vitro static, aortic wall ex vivo and in vivo); however, Mg degradation under flow condition (i.e. in the lumen) in vivo was slower than ex vivo; 2) The corrosion mode in the samples can be mainly described as localized (in vitro), mixed localized and uniform (ex vivo), and uniform (in vivo); 3) Abundant degradation products (MgO/Mg(OH)2 and Ca/P) with gas bubbles accumulated around the localized degradation regions ex vivo, but a uniform and thin degradation product layer was found in vivo. It is concluded that the ex vivo vascular bioreactor provides an improved test setting for magnesium degradation between static immersion and animal experiments and highlights its promising role in bridging degradation behavior and biological response for vascular stent research. Magnesium and its alloys are candidates for a new generation of biodegradable stent materials. However, the in vitro degradation of magnesium stents does not match the clinical degradation rates, corrupting the validity of conventional degradation tests. Here we report an ex vivo vascular bioreactor, which allows simulation of the microenvironment with and without blood vessel integration to study the biodegradation of magnesium implants in comparison with standard in vitro test conditions and with in vivo implantations. The bioreactor did simulate the corrosion of an intramural implant very well, but

  3. Increased coronary vessel wall thickness in HIV-infected young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Unsal, Aylin B; Eshera, Sarah; Matta, Jatin R; Muldoon, Nancy; McAreavey, Dorothea; Purdy, Julia B; Hazra, Rohan; Hadigan, Colleen; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2014-12-15

    Individuals with long-term human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at risk for premature vasculopathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated coronary vessel wall thickening, coronary plaque, and epicardial fat in patients infected with HIV early in life compared with healthy controls. This is a prospective cross-sectional study of 35 young adults who acquired HIV in early life and 11 healthy controls, free of CVD. Time resolved phase-sensitive dual inversion recovery black-blood vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (TRAPD) was used to measure proximal right coronary artery (RCA) wall thickness, and multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography was used to quantify coronary plaque and epicardial fat. RCA vessel wall thickness was significantly increased in HIV-infected patients compared with sex- and race-matched controls (1.32 ± 0.21 mm vs 1.09 ± 0.14 mm, P = .002). No subject had discrete plaque on CT sufficient to cause luminal narrowing, and plaque was not related to RCA wall thickness. In multivariate regression analyses, smoking pack-years (P = .004) and HIV infection (P = .007) were independently associated with thicker RCA vessel walls. Epicardial fat did not differ between groups. Among the HIV-infected group, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (P = .02), duration of stavudine exposure (P ART, hyperlipidemia, and smoking contributed to proximal RCA thickening, independent of atherosclerotic plaque quantified by CT. These modifiable risk factors appear to influence early atherogenesis as measured by coronary wall thickness and may be important targets for CVD risk reduction. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Coronary magnetic resonance angiography and vessel wall imaging in children with Kawasaki disease

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    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Seeger, Achim; Miller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    In patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) serial evaluation of the distribution and size of coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) is necessary for risk stratification and therapeutic management. To apply whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) and black-blood coronary vessel wall imaging in children with KD. Six children (mean age 4.6 years, range 2.5-7.8 years) with KD underwent CMRA using a free-breathing, T2-prepared, three-dimensional steady-state free-precession (3D-SSFP), whole-heart approach with navigator gating and tracking. Vessel walls were imaged with an ECG-triggered and navigator-gated double inversion recovery (DIR) black-blood segmented turbo spin-echo sequence. There was complete agreement between CMRA and conventional angiography (n=6) in the detection of CAA (n=15). Excellent agreement was found between the two techniques in determining the maximal diameter (mean difference 0.2{+-}0.7 mm), length (mean difference 0.1{+-}0.8 mm) and distance from the ostium (mean difference -0.8{+-}2.1 mm) of the CAAs. In all subjects with a CAA, abnormally thickened vessel walls were found (2.5{+-}0.5 mm). CMRA accurately defines CAA in free-breathing sedated children with KD using the whole-heart approach and detects abnormally thickened vessel walls. This technique may reduce the need for serial X-ray coronary angiography, and improve risk stratification and monitoring of therapy. (orig.)

  5. Learning-based automated segmentation of the carotid artery vessel wall in dual-sequence MRI using subdivision surface fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Shan; van't Klooster, Ronald; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Coolen, Bram F.; van den Berg, Alexandra M.; Smits, Loek P.; Shahzad, Rahil; Shamonin, Denis P.; de Koning, Patrick J. H.; Nederveen, Aart J.; van der Geest, Rob J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The quantification of vessel wall morphology and plaque burden requires vessel segmentation, which is generally performed by manual delineations. The purpose of our work is to develop and evaluate a new 3D model-based approach for carotid artery wall segmentation from dual-sequence MRI.

  6. Simulation of the electromagnetic wall response to plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes with application to ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasiu, Calin; Zakharov, Leonid; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls are necessary to understand plasma disruptions in tokamak. In large tokamaks like ITER, the wall-touching kink modes cause large sideway forces on the vacuum vessel determined by the sharing of asymmetric electric current between the plasma and the wall. Our model covers both eddy currents, excited inductively by vertical modes, and source/sink currents due to current sharing between the plasma and the thin conducting wall. The developed finite element approach calculates the electromagnetic wall response to perturbation of magnetic fields and to current sharing between the plasma and the wall. The current density entering/exiting the wall surface from the plasma and the time derivative of the magnetic vector potential of the plasma are the input values. The magnetic field and the vector potential from the wall currents are returned as output. Our model has been checked against analytical examples of a multiply-connected domain of a real ITER wall.

  7. Effect of Heat Flux on Creep Stresses of Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Davoudi Kashkoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the thermo-creep response of the material is governed by Norton’s law, an analytical solution is presented for the calculation of time-dependent creep stresses and displacements of homogeneous thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels. For the stress analysis in a homogeneous pressure vessel, having material creep behavior, the solutions of the stresses at a time equal to zero (i.e. the initial stress state are needed. This corresponds to the solution of materials with linear elastic behavior. Therefore, using equations of equilibrium, stress-strain and strain-displacement, a differential equation for displacement is obtained and then the stresses at a time equal to zero are calculated. Using Norton’s law in the multi-axial form in conjunction with the above-mentioned equations in the rate form, the radial displacement rate is obtained and then the radial, circumferential and axial creep stress rates are calculated. When the stress rates are known, the stresses at any time are calculated iteratively. The analytical solution is obtained for the conditions of plane strain and plane stress. The thermal loading is as follows: inner surface is exposed to a uniform heat flux, and the outer surface is exposed to an airstream. The heat conduction equation for the one-dimensional problem in polar coordinates is used to obtain temperature distribution in the cylinder. The pressure, inner radius and outer radius are considered constant. Material properties are considered as constant. Following this, profiles are plotted for the radial displacements, radial stress, circumferential stress and axial stress as a function of radial direction and time.

  8. Dynamic Response of Wall Backfill Retaining System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Alampalli

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ full-scale test is conducted to measure the dynamic response of a long cantilever wall that retains backfill soil. The recorded modal parameters of this retaining wall exhibited significant similarity to those of a clamped cantilever plate (rather than those of a cantilever beam or plane-strain analysis. Such a three-dimensional (3-D response pattern is not accounted for by current analysis procedures. A simple 3-D finite element model is employed to further analyze the observed resonant configurations. The results indicate that such configurations play an important role in the seismic response of wall backfill soil systems of variable height, such as wing walls supporting highway approach ramps.

  9. Influence of acquired obesity on coronary vessel wall late gadolinium enhancement in discordant monozygote twins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, Marcus R. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Christian H.P. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, Ullrich; Spector, Tim D. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Mangino, Massimo [King' s College London, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, London (United Kingdom); National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Greil, Gerald F. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of BMI on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the coronary artery wall in identical monozygous twins discordant for BMI. Coronary LGE represents a useful parameter for the detection and quantification of atherosclerotic coronary vessel wall disease. Thirteen monozygote female twin pairs (n = 26) with significantly different BMIs (>1.6 kg/m2) were recruited out of >10,000 twin pairs (TwinsUK Registry). A coronary 3D-T2prep-TFE MR angiogram and 3D-IR-TFE vessel wall scan were performed prior to and following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The number of enhancing coronary segments and contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of the coronary wall were quantified. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased number of enhancing coronary segments (5.3 ± 1.5 vs. 3.5 ± 1.6, p < 0.0001) and increased coronary wall enhancement (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.0027) compared to matched twins with lower BMI. This study in monozygous twins indicates that acquired factors predisposing to obesity, including lifestyle and environmental factors, result in increased LGE of the coronary arteries, potentially reflecting an increase in coronary atherosclerosis in this female study population. (orig.)

  10. Nanoparticle motion near a blood vessel wall in targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoshkin, Helena; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.

    2014-11-01

    A computational study of the motion of a spherical nanoparticle close to the bounding wall of a blood vessel in targeted drug delivery is presented. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian algorithm has been carried out, taking into account both the Brownian and the hydrodynamic effects. Pertinent to targeted drug delivery, we focus on the condition when the particle is in the lubrication layer. The velocity auto-correlation function (VACF) is seen to initially decay faster by a factor of particle radius divided by the fluid gap thickness compared to that in an unbounded medium. Long time decay is found to be algebraic. Focusing on hydrodynamic interaction between the particle and the wall, effects of wall curvature, particle size, and variations in density of the particle are investigated. We also study adhesive interactions of a nanoparticle with an endothelial cell located on the vessel wall by the modeling the nanoparticle tethered by a harmonic spring with varying spring constants. It is shown that the particle velocity is affected by hydrodynamic and harmonic spring forces leading to VACF oscillations which decay algebraically at long times. The results agree with those predicted by earlier theories for particle VACF near a wall. These findings have applications in medication administration and in the colloidal sciences. Supported by NIH Grant U01 EB016027.

  11. Preliminary electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical design for first wall and vacuum vessel of FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucca, F., E-mail: Flavio.Lucca@LTCalcoli.it [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Bertolini, C. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Labate, C. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Parthenope, Via Acton 38, 80133 Napoli (Italy); Manzoni, M.; Marconi, M.; Pagani, I. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Ramogida, G. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Renno, F. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Roccella, M. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Roccella, S. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Viganò, F. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The fusion advanced study torus (FAST), with its compact design, high toroidal field and plasma current, faces many of the problems met by ITER, and at the same time anticipates much of the DEMO relevant physics and technology. The conceptual design of the first wall (FW) and the vacuum vessel (VV) has been defined on the basis of FAST operative conditions and of “Snow Flakes” (SF) magnetic topology, which is also relevant for DEMO. The EM loads are one of the most critical load components for the FW and the VV during plasma disruptions and a first dimensioning of these components for such loads is mandatory. During this first phase of R&D activities the conceptual design of the FW and VV have been assessed estimating, by means of FE simulations, the EM loads due to a typical vertical disruption event (VDE) in FAST. EM loads were then transferred on a FE mechanical model of the FAST structures and the mechanical response of the FW and VV design for the analyzed VDE event was assessed. The results indicate that design criteria are not fully satisfied by the current drawing of the VV and FW components. The most critical regions have been individuated and the effect of some geometrical and material changes has been checked in order to improve the structure.

  12. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  13. Growth Description for Vessel Wall Adaptation: A Thick-Walled Mixture Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytsan, Andrii; Eriksson, Thomas S E; Watton, Paul N; Gasser, T Christian

    2017-08-25

    (1) Background: Vascular tissue seems to adapt towards stable homeostatic mechanical conditions, however, failure of reaching homeostasis may result in pathologies. Current vascular tissue adaptation models use many ad hoc assumptions, the implications of which are far from being fully understood; (2) Methods: The present study investigates the plausibility of different growth kinematics in modeling Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) evolution in time. A structurally motivated constitutive description for the vessel wall is coupled to multi-constituent tissue growth descriptions; Constituent deposition preserved either the constituent's density or its volume, and Isotropic Volume Growth (IVG), in-Plane Volume Growth (PVG), in-Thickness Volume Growth (TVG) and No Volume Growth (NVG) describe the kinematics of the growing vessel wall. The sensitivity of key modeling parameters is explored, and predictions are assessed for their plausibility; (3) Results: AAA development based on TVG and NVG kinematics provided not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively different results compared to IVG and PVG kinematics. Specifically, for IVG and PVG kinematics, increasing collagen mass production accelerated AAA expansion which seems counterintuitive. In addition, TVG and NVG kinematics showed less sensitivity to the initial constituent volume fractions, than predictions based on IVG and PVG; (4) Conclusions: The choice of tissue growth kinematics is of crucial importance when modeling AAA growth. Much more interdisciplinary experimental work is required to develop and validate vascular tissue adaption models, before such models can be of any practical use.

  14. Conditioning of the vacuum vessel walls of tokamaks, a preliminary look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sink, D.A.

    1976-03-01

    The main features and operating characteristics of the primary vacuum system of many of the presently operating tokamak devices are presented. Particular attention is paid to the methods used to condition and clean the vessel walls in situ. For the devices discussed, a combination of a high-temperature bakeout and/or discharge cleaning is employed. In addition, discussions of the vacuum systems and wall conditioning methods anticipated for the next generation of tokamaks are presented. Since this report was written during a limited time period, it should be considered as preliminary and is not intended to be a general review. Much of the information that is presented was obtained by private communication and there is no bibliography. This study was initiated to aid in the design of TFTR. As presently envisioned, the TFTR vacuum system and methods for wall conditioning are consistent with what is presently practiced.

  15. Primary Metabolism during Biosynthesis of Secondary Wall Polymers of Protoxylem Vessel Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Misato; Morisaki, Keiko; Sawada, Yuji; Sano, Ryosuke; Uy, Abigail Loren Tung; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurata, Tetsuya; Nakano, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Shiro; Matsuda, Mami; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Demura, Taku

    2016-11-01

    Xylem vessels, the water-conducting cells in vascular plants, undergo characteristic secondary wall deposition and programmed cell death. These processes are regulated by the VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN (VND) transcription factors. Here, to identify changes in metabolism that occur during protoxylem vessel element differentiation, we subjected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 suspension culture cells carrying an inducible VND7 system to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based wide-target metabolome analysis and transcriptome analysis. Time-course data for 128 metabolites showed dynamic changes in metabolites related to amino acid biosynthesis. The concentration of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, an important intermediate of the glycolysis pathway, immediately decreased in the initial stages of cell differentiation. As cell differentiation progressed, specific amino acids accumulated, including the shikimate-related amino acids and the translocatable nitrogen-rich amino acid arginine. Transcriptome data indicated that cell differentiation involved the active up-regulation of genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing fructose 6-phosphate biosynthesis from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate biosynthesis from oxaloacetate, and phenylalanine biosynthesis, which includes shikimate pathway enzymes. Concomitantly, active changes in the amount of fructose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate were detected during cell differentiation. Taken together, our results show that protoxylem vessel element differentiation is associated with changes in primary metabolism, which could facilitate the production of polysaccharides and lignin monomers and, thus, promote the formation of the secondary cell wall. Also, these metabolic shifts correlate with the active transcriptional regulation of specific enzyme genes. Therefore, our observations indicate that primary metabolism is actively regulated during protoxylem vessel element differentiation to alter the cell's metabolic

  16. Quantification and Statistical Analysis Methods for Vessel Wall Components from Stained Images with Masson's Trichrome: e0146954

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pablo Hernández-Morera; Irene Castaño-González; Carlos M Travieso-González; Blanca Mompeó-Corredera; Francisco Ortega-Santana

    2016-01-01

    ... (smooth muscle fibers and extracellular matrix) in the vessel wall stained with Masson's trichrome, and a statistical method suitable for small sample sizes to analyze the results previously obtained...

  17. Interplay between Inflammatory Responses and Lymphatic Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kihyuk; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are routes for leukocyte migration and fluid drainage. In addition to their passive roles in migration of leukocytes, increasing evidence indicates their active roles in immune regulation. Tissue inflammation rapidly induces lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and chemokine production, thereby resulting in lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, lymphatic endothelial cells induce T cell tolerance through various mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on h...

  18. Rôle of contrast media viscosity in altering vessel wall shear stress and relation to the risk of contrast extravasations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Sophia; Li, Wenguang; Paul, Manosh C; Roditi, Giles

    2016-12-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are the most commonly used injectables in radiology today. A range of different media are commercially available, combining various physical and chemical characteristics (ionic state, osmolality, viscosity) and thus exhibiting distinct in vivo behaviour and safety profiles. In this paper, numerical simulations of blood flow with contrast media were conducted to investigate the effects of contrast viscosity on generated vessel wall shear stress and vessel wall pressure to elucidate any possible relation to extravasations. Five different types of contrast for Iodine fluxes ranging at 1.5-2.2gI/s were modelled through 18G and 20G cannulae placed in an ideal vein at two different orientation angles. Results demonstrate that the least viscous contrast media generate the least maximum wall shear stress as well as the lowest total pressure for the same flow rate. This supports the empirical clinical observations and hypothesis that more viscous contrast media are responsible for a higher percentage of contrast extravasations. In addition, results support the clinical hypothesis that a catheter tip directed obliquely to the vein wall always produces the highest maximum wall shear stress and total pressure due to impingement of the contrast jet on the vessel wall. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recording of unexpectedly high frequency vibrations of blood vessel walls in experimental arteriovenous fistulae of rabbits using a laser vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehbens, W E; Liepsch, D W; Poll, A; Erhardt, W

    1995-01-01

    Because arteriovenous fistulae are associated with a palpable thrill and an audible murmur, the vibrational activity of the blood vessel walls about experimental arteriovenous fistulae in rabbits was investigated using, for the first time, a high-resolution laser vibrometer. Frequencies of mural vibrations up to 2200 Hz were recorded at different sites about the fistulae. The relationship of this vibratory activity of blood vessel walls to physiological and pathological conditions warrants further investigation.

  20. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity.

  1. A completely noninvasive method of dissolved oxygen monitoring in disposable small-scale cell culture vessels based on diffusion through permeable vessel walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka A; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2014-01-01

    Disposable cell culture vessels are extensively used at small scales for process optimization and validation, but they lack monitoring capabilities. Optical sensors that can be easily adapted for use in small-scale vessels are commercially available for pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved carbon dioxide (DCO2 ). However, their use has been limited due to the contamination and compatibility issues. We have developed a novel solution to these problems for DO monitoring. Oxygen diffusion through permeable vessel wall can be exploited for noninvasive monitoring. An optical oxygen sensor can be placed outside the oxygen permeable vessel wall thereby allowing oxygen diffusing through the vessel wall to be detected by the sensor. This way the sensor stays separate from the cell culture and there are no concerns about contaminants or leachants. Here we implement this method for two cell culture devices: polystyrene-made T-75 tissue culture flask and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)-made Vuelife(®) cell culture bag. Additionally, mammalian and microbial cell cultures were performed in Vuelife(®) cell culture bags, proving that a sensor placed outside can be used to track changes in cell cultures. This approach toward noninvasive monitoring will help in integrating cell culture vessels with sensors in a seamless manner. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Upper and Lower Bound Limit Loads for Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Used for Aerosol Cans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen John Hardy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic compensation method proposed by Mackenzie and Boyle is used to estimate the upper and lower bound limit (collapse loads for one-piece aluminium aerosol cans, which are thin-walled pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure loading. Elastic-plastic finite element predictions for yield and collapse pressures are found using axisymmetric models. However, it is shown that predictions for the elastic-plastic buckling of the vessel base require the use of a full three-dimensional model with a small unsymmetrical imperfection introduced. The finite element predictions for the internal pressure to cause complete failure via collapse fall within the upper and lower bounds. Hence the method, which involves only elastic analyses, can be used in place of complex elastic-plastic finite element analyses when upper and lower bound estimates are adequate for design purposes. Similarly, the lower bound value underpredicts the pressure at which first yield occurs.

  3. [The exogenous and genetic components of some vessel wall characteristics in the pig (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, W

    1975-01-01

    Insufficiencies of the circulatory system and increasing transport losses in pigs as well as analogies with respect to atherosclerosis of men and swine were the motives for a broad statistical investigation of important characteristics of the circulatory system in a big population of female German landrace pigs, fattened as progeny groups under identical conditions in a testing station and slaughtered at 100 kg weight. As the most essential results, highly significant seasonal and genetical influences on several traits are to be mentioned, and some meaningful correlations between them: Plasma cholesterol, ceruloplasmin and hematocrit showed markedly lower levels in the summer and increased values in the cold season; the thickness of the intima (aorta and arteria pulmonalis) was quite distinctly greatest in the spring, this phenomenon being almost exactly paralleled by augmented amounts of copper and iron in the aortic wall. Increased heart weights were again found in the cold, decreased ones in the warm seasons. On average, bigger hearts and vessels were accompanied by higher elastin contents of the aorta, but these contents stood in very significant negative correlation to the ash content and the amounts of certain mineral components (Ca, Mg and P) of the vessel wall, especially to the ash percentage of the elastic fibers. This indicates that calcifying and mineralizing processes in the wall obviously take place at the cost of the elastic components. The estimation of heritabilities in half and full sibs revealed with h2 = 60% high henetic influences on the elastin content of the aorta and equally so on the ash percentage of elastic fibers. Future investigations must correlate these findings with direct measurements of biomechanical and rheological properties of the vessels.

  4. Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage Imaging with Quantitative Vessel Wall T1 Mapping: Technical Development and Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haikun; Sun, Jie; Qiao, Huiyu; Chen, Shuo; Zhou, Zechen; Pan, Xinlei; Wang, Yishi; Zhao, Xihai; Li, Rui; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun

    2017-11-08

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution time-efficient sequence for use in quantitative vessel wall T1 mapping. Materials and Methods A previously described sequence, simultaneous noncontrast angiography and intraplaque hemorrhage (SNAP) imaging, was extended by introducing 3D golden angle radial k-space sampling (GOAL-SNAP). Sliding window reconstruction was adopted to reconstruct images at different inversion delay times (different T1 contrasts) for voxelwise T1 fitting. Phantom studies were performed to test the accuracy of T1 mapping with GOAL-SNAP against a two-dimensional inversion recovery (IR) spin-echo (SE) sequence. In vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers (mean age, 27.8 years ± 3.0 [standard deviation]; age range, 24-32 years; five male) and five patients with atherosclerosis (mean age, 66.4 years ± 5.5; range, 60-73 years; five male) to compare T1 measurements between vessel wall sections (five per artery) with and without intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH). Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test with data permutation by subject. Results Phantom T1 measurements with GOAL-SNAP and IR SE sequences showed excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.99), with a mean bias of -25.8 msec ± 43.6 and a mean percentage error of 4.3% ± 2.5. Minimum T1 was significantly different between sections with IPH and those without it (mean, 371 msec ± 93 vs 944 msec ± 120; P = .01). Estimated T1 of normal vessel wall and muscle were 1195 msec ± 136 and 1117 msec ± 153, respectively. Conclusion High-spatial-resolution (0.8 mm isotropic) time-efficient (5 minutes) vessel wall T1 mapping is achieved by using the GOAL-SNAP sequence. This sequence may yield more quantitative reproducible biomarkers with which to characterize IPH and monitor its progression. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  5. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R. [Magnox Electric, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to, and removing through-wall samples, from, welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfyndd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos-bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, it reviewed. The use of abrasive water jet cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (Author).

  6. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R. [Magnox Electric, Dartford (United Kingdom). Remote Operations

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarises the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to and removing through-wall samples from welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfynydd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles complete with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, is reviewed. The use of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (UK).

  7. Estimation of the radial force on the tokamak vessel wall during fast transient events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V. D., E-mail: pustovitov-vd@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The radial force balance in a tokamak during fast transient events with a duration much shorter than the resistive time of the vacuum vessel wall is analyzed. The aim of the work is to analytically estimate the resulting integral radial force on the wall. In contrast to the preceding study [Plasma Phys. Rep. 41, 952 (2015)], where a similar problem was considered for thermal quench, simultaneous changes in the profiles and values of the pressure and plasma current are allowed here. Thereby, the current quench and various methods of disruption mitigation used in the existing tokamaks and considered for future applications are also covered. General formulas for the force at an arbitrary sequence or combination of events are derived, and estimates for the standard tokamak model are made. The earlier results and conclusions are confirmed, and it is shown that, in the disruption mitigation scenarios accepted for ITER, the radial forces can be as high as in uncontrolled disruptions.

  8. Segmentation of elastic fibres in images of vessel wall sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Morera, Pablo; Travieso-González, Carlos M; Castaño-González, Irene; Mompeó-Corredera, Blanca; Ortega-Santana, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The elastic fibres are an essential component of the extracellular matrix in blood vessel walls that allows a long-range of deformability and passive recoil without energy input. The quantitative determination of elastic fibres will provide information on the state of the vascular wall and to determine the role and behaviour of this key structural element in different physiological and pathological vascular processes. We present a segmentation method to identify and quantify elastic fibres based on a local threshold technique and some morphological characteristics measured on the segmented objects that facilitate the discrimination between elastic fibres and other image components. The morphological characteristics analysed are the thickness and the length of an object. The segmentation method was evaluated using an image database of vein sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin. The performance results are based on a ground truth generated manually resulting in values of sensitivity greater than 80% with the exception in two samples, and specificity values above 90% for all samples. Medical specialists carried out a visual evaluation where the observations indicate a general agreement on the segmentation results' visual quality, and the consistency between the methodology proposed and the subjective observation of the doctors for the evaluation of pathological changes in vessel wall. The proposed methodology provides more objective measurements than the qualitative methods traditionally used in the histological analysis, with a significant potential for this method to be used as a diagnostic aid for many other vascular pathological conditions and in similar tissues such as skin and mucous membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sea State Estimation Using Vessel Response in Dynamic Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Brodtkorb, Astrid; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; J. Sørensen, Asgeir

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for estimating the sea state parameters based on the heave, roll and pitch response of a vessel in dynamic positioning (DP), i.e., without forward speed. The algorithm finds the wave spectrum estimate from the response measurements by directly solving a set...

  10. "Sausage-string" appearance of arteries and arterioles can be caused by an instability of the blood vessel wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Beierholm, Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Rene

    2002-01-01

    Vascular damage induced by acute hypertension is preceded by a peculiar pattern where blood vessels show alternating regions of constrictions and dilations ("sausages on a string"). The pattern occurs in the smaller blood vessels, and it plays a central role in causing the vascular damage....... A related vascular pattern has been observed in larger vessels from several organs during angiography. In the larger vessels the occurrence of the pattern does not appear to be related to acute hypertension. A unifying feature between the phenomenon in large and small vessels seems to be an increase...... observed experimentally. Most importantly, it suggests that the "sausaging" phenomenon is neither caused by a mechanical failure of the vessel wall due to a high blood pressure nor is it due to standing pressure waves caused by the beating of the heart. Rather, it is the expression of a general instability...

  11. Dynamic vessel wall properties and their reproducibility in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berkmortel, F; Wollersheim, H; van Langen, H; Thien, T

    1998-06-01

    To determine reproducibility figures of dynamic arterial wall properties such as cross-sectional compliance (CC) and distensibility (DC) in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk, in comparison with healthy adults. A total of 34 persons were divided into three groups with varying cardiovascular risk factors. Diameters (D) and diameter changes (deltaD) during the heart cycle of both common carotid (CCA) and right common femoral (CFA) arteries were measured by a vessel wall movement detector system. Blood pressures (BP) were recorded non-invasively by a semi-automated oscillometric device. CC (=piD(deltaD/2deltaP) in unit mm2/kPa) and DC (=2deltaD/D)/deltaP in unit 10(-3)/kPa) were calculated from the above-mentioned parameters. Measurements were performed twice during one visit and twice again with a time interval of at least 3 days to determine intra-observer intra- and intersession variability. Reproducibility figures of CC and DC of the CCA varied between 8 and 12%, and between 13 and 22% for the CFA. Intra-observer intra- and intersession variability were similar in the three groups. In our studies the reproducibility of dynamic vascular wall properties determined by ultrasound was good. Despite differences in the absolute values for CC and DC in groups with increased cardiovascular risk, mean reproducibility figures remained at a similar level (8-12%) as in healthy volunteers.

  12. Intra-specific trends of lumen and wall resistivities of vessels within the stem xylem vary among three woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooeda, Hiroki; Terashima, Ichiro; Taneda, Haruhiko

    2018-02-01

    Water flow through xylem vessels encounters hydraulic resistance when passing through the vessel lumen and end wall. Comparative studies have reported that lumen and end wall resistivities co-limit water flow through stem xylem in several angiosperm woody species that have vessels of different average diameter and length. This study examined the intra-specific relationship between the lumen and end wall resistivities (Rlumen and Rwall) for vessels within the stem xylem using three deciduous angiosperm woody species found in temperate forest. Morus australis Poir. and Acer rufinerve Siebold et Zucc. are early- and late-successional species, and Vitis coignetiae Pulliat ex Planch is a woody liana. According to the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, Rlumen is proportional to the fourth power of vessel diameter (D), whereas vessel length (L) and inter-vessel pit area (Apit) determine Rwall. To estimate Rlumen and Rwall, the scaling relationships between the L and D and between Apit and D were measured. The scaling exponents between L and D were 1.47, 3.19 and 2.86 for A. rufinerve, M. australis and V. coignetiae, respectively, whereas those between Apit and D were 0.242, 2.11 and 2.68, respectively. Unlike the inter-specific relationships, the wall resistivity fraction (Rwall/(Rlumen + Rwall)) within xylem changed depending on D. In M. australis and V. coignetiae, this fraction decreased with increasing D, while in A. rufinerve, it increased with D. Vessels with a high wall resistivity fraction have high Rwall and total resistivity but are expected to have low susceptibility to xylem cavitation due to a small cumulative Apit. In contrast, vessels with a low wall resistivity fraction have low Rwall and total resistivity but high susceptibility to xylem cavitation. Because the wall resistivity fraction varies with D, the stem xylem contains vessels with different hydraulic efficiencies and safety to xylem cavitation. These features produce differences in the hydraulic properties

  13. Histological study on the influences of an ultrasonic scalpel on skeletonized vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Yoshio; Horike, Kazuya; Kano, Masashi

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to histologically clarify the difference of vascular wall damage when an ultrasonic scalpel is used in varied ways in the vicinity of a vessel. 1) The surface of sodium carbonate-containing jelly was manually brushed with the edge of a dissecting hook type Harmonic Scalpel (HS), and the thickness of the air bubble layer was measured to investigate the range to which the vibrations of the instrument reached. 2) The internal thoracic artery (ITA), radial artery (RA) and vein skeletonized were cut bluntly or brushed using HS ex vivo, and tissue damages were observed histologically. 3) The depth of thermal degeneration (TD) of residual stumps of ITAs skeletonized by HS using an output power level (level) of 2 and the quick touch method at the time of coronary arterial bypass grafting (CABG) were investigated histologically. 1) The mean thickness of the air bubble layers by single brushing was 3.7, 3.7 and 3.1 mm at level 4, 3 and 2, and no significant difference. When brushed 5 times, it was 6.9, 5.5 and 6.7 mm, respectively, showing marked increases compared with single brushing. 2) A: One side of the RA stump cut with a dissecting hook at level 2 was nicely occluded by a degenerated protein coagulum, but the contralateral had no coagulum. An ITA cut by a shear type blade at level 3 showed that both stumps were nicely occluded, but the vessel wall was introverted and fragmented. B: ITAs brushed 5 or 10 times at level 2 showed that TD occurred in tunica externa, the mean depth of 100 or 203 microm, and never exceeded the external elastic lamella. RAs brushed 10 times at level 2 and 3 showed that TD and air bubble generation occurred in the tunica externa, and the mean depth was 203 and 203 microm. However, TD exceeded the external lamella in some cases at level 3. Veins brushed 10 times at level 3 showed that TD spread to all layers. 3) The depth of TD in ITAs skeletonized clinically by HS was 400 to 530 microm, and apart from the

  14. Evaluation of acoustic emission signals during monitoring of thick-wall vessels operating at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasopoulos, A.; Tsimogiannis, A. [Envirocoustics S.A., El. Venizelou 7 and Delfon, Athens (Greece)

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic Emission testing of thick wall vessels, operating at elevated temperatures is discussed and pattern recognition methodologies for AE data evaluation are presented. Two different types of testing procedures are addressed: Cool Down monitoring and semi-continuous periodic monitoring. In both types of tests, temperature variation is the driving force of AE as opposed to traditional AE testing where controlled pressure variation is used as AE stimulus. Representative examples of reactors cool down testing as well as in-process vessel monitoring are given. AE activity as a function of temperature and pressure variation is discussed. In addition to the real-time limited criteria application, unsupervised pattern recognition is applied as a post-processing tool for multidimensional sorting, noise discrimination, characterizing defects and/or damage. On the other hand, Supervised Pattern Recognition is used for data classification in repetitive critical tests, leading to an objective quantitative comparison between repeated tests. Results show that damage sustained by the equipment can be described by the plotting the cumulative energy of AE, from critical signal classes, versus temperature. Overall, the proposed methodology can reduce the complexity of AE tests in many cases leading to higher efficiency. The possibility for real time signals classification, during permanent AE installations and continuous monitoring is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. [National Defence Research Establishment, Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, W.; Engelbrektson, A.

    1998-01-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion at the rigid wall is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied, and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to about 40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (author)

  16. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. (Nat. Defence Res. Establ., Tumba (Sweden)); Frid, W. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SE-10658, Stockholm (Sweden)); Engelbrektson, A. (VBB/SWECO, Box 34044, SE-10026, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1999-05-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion, at the rigid wall, is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to [approx]40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (orig.) 5 refs.

  17. Rupture Properties of Blood Vessel Walls Measured by Pressure-Imposed Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Toshiro; Sugita, Syukei; Matsumoto, Takeo; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Akimoto, Hiroji; Tabayashi, Koichi; Sato, Masaaki

    It is expected to be clinically useful to know the mechanical properties of human aortic aneurysms in assessing the potential for aneurysm rupture. For this purpose, a newly designed experimental setup was fabricated to measure the rupture properties of blood vessel walls. A square specimen of porcine thoracic aortas is inflated by air pressure at a rate of 10mmHg/s (≈1.3MPa/s) until rupture occurs. Mean breaking stress was 1.8±0.4 MPa (mean±SD) for the specimens proximal to the heart and 2.3±0.8MPa for the distal specimens, which are not significantly different to those values obtained longitudinally from conventional tensile tests. Moreover, the local breaking stretch ratio in the longitudinal direction was significantly higher at the ruptured site (2.7±0.5) than at the unruptured site (2.2±0.4). This testing system for studying the rupture properties of aortic walls is expected to be applicable to aortic aneurysms. Experimental verification of the present technique for the homogeneous, isotropic material is also presented.

  18. Added Value of Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Differentiation of Nonocclusive Intracranial Vasculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Shibata, Dean K; Hallam, Danial K; de Havenon, Adam; Hippe, Daniel S; Becker, Kyra J; Tirschwell, David L; Hatsukami, Thomas; Balu, Niranjan; Yuan, Chun

    2017-11-01

    Our goal is to determine the added value of intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (IVWI) in differentiating nonocclusive vasculopathies compared with luminal imaging alone. We retrospectively reviewed images from patients with both luminal and IVWI to identify cases with clinically defined intracranial vasculopathies: atherosclerosis (intracranial atherosclerotic disease), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and inflammatory vasculopathy. Two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical data reviewed the luminal imaging of defined luminal stenoses/irregularities and evaluated the pattern of involvement to make a presumed diagnosis with diagnostic confidence. Six weeks later, the 2 raters rereviewed the luminal imaging in addition to IVWI for the pattern of wall involvement, presence and pattern of postcontrast enhancement, and presumed diagnosis and confidence. Analysis was performed on per-lesion and per-patient bases. Thirty intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 12 inflammatory vasculopathies, and 12 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome patients with 201 lesions (90 intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 64 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and 47 inflammatory vasculopathy lesions) were included. For both per-lesion and per-patient analyses, there was significant diagnostic accuracy improvement with luminal imaging+IVWI when compared with luminal imaging alone (per-lesion: 88.8% versus 36.1%; Pimprove the differentiation of nonocclusive intracranial vasculopathies when combined with traditional luminal imaging modalities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Distinct defects in collagen microarchitecture underlie vessel-wall failure in advanced abdominal aneurysms and aneurysms in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Ashcroft, B.A.; Beenakker, J.-W.M.; Es, M. van; Koekkoek, N.B.R.; Prins, F.A.; Tielemans, J.F.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; Bank, R.A.; Oosterkamp, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    An aneurysm of the aorta is a common pathology characterized by segmentalweakeningof the artery.Althoughit isgenerally accepted that the vessel-wall weakening is caused by an impaired collagen metabolism, a clear association has been demonstrated only for rare syndromes such as the vascular type

  20. Numerical modeling of the pulse wave propagation in large blood vessels based on liquid and wall interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rup, K.; Dróżdż, A.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop a non-linear, one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in the arterial cardiovascular system. The model includes partial differential equations resulting from the balance of mass and momentum for the fluid-filled area and the balance equation for the area of the wall and vessels. The considered mathematical model of pulse wave propagation in the thoracic aorta section takes into account the viscous dissipation of fluid energy, realistic values of parameters describing the physicochemical properties of blood and vessel wall. Boundary and initial conditions contain the appropriate information obtained from in vivo measurements. As a result of the numerical solution of the mass and momentum balance equations for the blood and the equilibrium equation for the arterial wall area, time- dependent deformation, respective velocity profiles and blood pressure were determined.

  1. Atherosclerosis: contrast-enhanced MR imaging of vessel wall in rabbit model--comparison of gadofosveset and gadopentetate dimeglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Miserus, Robbert-Jan J H M; Heeneman, Sylvia; Passos, Valeria Lima; Mutsaers, Peter H A; Debernardi, Nicola; Misselwitz, Bernd; Post, Mark; Daemen, Mat J A P; van Engelshoven, Jos M A; Leiner, Tim; Kooi, Marianne E

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the potential of gadofosveset for contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of plaque in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. All experiments were approved by the animal ethics committee. Thirty-one New Zealand White rabbits were included in one of four study groups: animals with atherosclerosis imaged with gadofosveset (n = 10) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7) and control animals imaged with gadofosveset (n = 7) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7). Aortic atherosclerosis was induced through endothelial denudation combined with a cholesterol-enriched diet. Control rabbits underwent a sham surgical procedure and received a regular diet. After 8 weeks, pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images of the aortic vessel wall were acquired. Relative signal enhancement was determined with dedicated software. Statistical analysis was performed by using a generalized linear mixed model. Immunohistochemical staining with CD31 and albumin was used to assess microvessel density and the albumin content of the vascular wall. Group differences were analyzed by using a chi(2) test. Gadofosveset spatial distribution and content within the vessel wall were determined with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Postcontrast signal enhancement was significantly greater for atherosclerotic than for control animals imaged with gadofosveset (P = .022). Gadopentetate dimeglumine could not enable discrimination between normal and atherosclerotic vessel walls (P = .428). PIXE analysis showed higher amounts of gadopentetate dimeglumine than gadofosveset in both atherosclerotic and normal rabbit aortas. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of albumin and increased microvessel density in the vascular walls of atherosclerotic rabbits. These results suggest that gadofosveset can be used to differentiate between atherosclerotic and normal rabbit vessel walls. http://radiology.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/250/3/682/DC1. RSNA, 2009

  2. Three-Dimensional Rotating Wall Vessel-Derived Cell Culture Models for Studying Virus-Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson K. Gardner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The key to better understanding complex virus-host interactions is the utilization of robust three-dimensional (3D human cell cultures that effectively recapitulate native tissue architecture and model the microenvironment. A lack of physiologically-relevant animal models for many viruses has limited the elucidation of factors that influence viral pathogenesis and of complex host immune mechanisms. Conventional monolayer cell cultures may support viral infection, but are unable to form the tissue structures and complex microenvironments that mimic host physiology and, therefore, limiting their translational utility. The rotating wall vessel (RWV bioreactor was designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA to model microgravity and was later found to more accurately reproduce features of human tissue in vivo. Cells grown in RWV bioreactors develop in a low fluid-shear environment, which enables cells to form complex 3D tissue-like aggregates. A wide variety of human tissues (from neuronal to vaginal tissue have been grown in RWV bioreactors and have been shown to support productive viral infection and physiological meaningful host responses. The in vivo-like characteristics and cellular features of the human 3D RWV-derived aggregates make them ideal model systems to effectively recapitulate pathophysiology and host responses necessary to conduct rigorous basic science, preclinical and translational studies.

  3. Manufacturing and maintenance technologies developed for a thick-wall structure of the ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. E-mail: onozukm@itereu.de; Alfile, J.P.; Aubert, Ph.; Dagenais, J.-F.; Grebennikov, D.; Ioki, K.; Jones, L.; Koizumi, K.; Krylov, V.; Maslakowski, J.; Nakahira, M.; Nelson, B.; Punshon, C.; Roy, O.; Schreck, G

    2001-09-01

    Development of welding, cutting and non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques, and development of remotized systems have been carried out for on-site manufacturing and maintenance of the thick-wall structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel (VV). Conventional techniques, including tungsten inert gas welding, plasma cutting, and ultrasonic inspection, have been improved and optimized for the application to thick austenitic stainless steel plates. In addition, advanced methods have been investigated, including reduced-pressure electron-beam and multi-pass neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (NdYAG) laser welding, NdYAG laser cutting, and electro-magnetic acoustic transducer inspection, to improve cost and technical performance. Two types of remotized systems with different payloads have been investigated and one of them has been fabricated and demonstrated in field joint welding, cutting, and NDT tests on test mockups and full-scale ITER VV sector models. The progress and results of this development to date provide a high level of confidence that the manufacturing and maintenance of the ITER VV is feasible.

  4. Human elastic cartilage engineering from cartilage progenitor cells using rotating wall vessel bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kan, H; Suzuki, H; Yabuki, Y; Mizuno, M; Adegawa, T; Yoshioka, T; Tanaka, J; Maegawa, J; Taniguchi, H

    2012-05-01

    Transplantation of bioengineered elastic cartilage is considered to be a promising approach for patients with craniofacial defects. We have previously shown that human ear perichondrium harbors a population of cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs). The aim of this study was to examine the use of a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor for CPCs to engineer 3-D elastic cartilage in vitro. Human CPCs isolated from ear perichondrium were expanded and differentiated into chondrocytes under 2-D culture conditions. Fully differentiated CPCs were seeded into recently developed pC-HAp/ChS (porous material consisted of collagen, hydroxyapatite, and chondroitinsulfate) scaffolds and 3-D cultivated utilizing a RWV bioreactor. 3-D engineered constructs appeared shiny with a yellowish, cartilage-like morphology. The shape of the molded scaffold was maintained after RWV cultivation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed engraftment of CPCs inside pC-HAp/ChS. Alcian blue and Elastica Van Gieson staining showed of proteoglycan and elastic fibers, which are unique extracellular matrices of elastic cartilage. Thus, human CPCs formed elastic cartilage-like tissue after 3-D cultivation in a RWV bioreactor. These techniques may assist future efforts to reconstruct complicate structures composed of elastic cartilage in vitro. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell culture for three-dimensional modeling in rotating-wall vessels: an application of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, R. P.; Goodwin, T. J.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    High-density, three-dimensional cell cultures are difficult to grow in vitro. The rotating-wall vessel (RWV) described here has cultured BHK-21 cells to a density of 1.1 X 10(7) cells/ml. Cells on microcarriers were observed to grow with enhanced bridging in this batch culture system. The RWV is a horizontally rotated tissue culture vessel with silicon membrane oxygenation. This design results in a low-turbulence, low-shear cell culture environment with abundant oxygenation. The RWV has the potential to culture a wide variety of normal and neoplastic cells.

  6. Lymphocyte trafficking and HIV infection of human lymphoid tissue in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L. B.; Fitzgerald, W.; Glushakova, S.; Hatfill, S.; Amichay, N.; Baibakov, B.; Zimmerberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection involves a complex interplay between both the infected and noninfected cells of human lymphoid tissue, the release of free viral particles, the de novo infection of cells, and the recirculatory trafficking of peripheral blood lymphocytes. To develop an in vitro model for studying these various aspects of HIV pathogenesis we have utilized blocks of surgically excised human tonsils and a rotating wall vessel (RWV) cell culture system. Here we show that (1) fragments of the surgically excised human lymphoid tissue remain viable and retain their gross cytoarchitecture for at least 3 weeks when cultured in the RWV system; (2) such lymphoid tissue gradually shows a loss of both T and B cells to the surrounding growth medium; however, this cellular migration is reversible as demonstrated by repopulation of the tissue by labeled cells from the growth medium; (3) this cellular migration may be partially or completely inhibited by embedding the blocks of lymphoid tissue in either a collagen or agarose gel matrix; these embedded tissue blocks retain most of the basic elements of a normal lymphoid cytoarchitecture; and (4) both embedded and nonembedded RWV-cultured blocks of human lymphoid tissue are capable of productive infection by HIV-1 of at least three various strains of different tropism and phenotype, as shown by an increase in both p24 antigen levels and free virus in the culture medium, and by the demonstration of HIV-1 RNA-positive cells inside the tissue identified by in situ hybridization. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that gel-embedded and nonembedded blocks of human lymphoid tissue, cocultured with a suspension of tonsillar lymphocytes in an RWV culture system, constitute a useful model for simulating normal lymphocyte recirculatory traffic and provide a new tool for testing the various aspects of HIV pathogenesis.

  7. Trabeculectomy Improves Vessel Response Measured by Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA) in Glaucoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Michael Selbach; Schallenberg, Maurice; Kramer, Sebastian; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Vilser, Walthard; Kremmer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of surgical IOP reduction (trabeculectomy) on retinal blood flow parameters in glaucoma patients using Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA). 26 eyes of 26 patients with progressive primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) despite maximal topical therapy were examined before and after trabeculectomy. The responses of the retinal vessels to flickering light provocation were measured with DVA the day before surgery and 4 to 6 weeks after trabeculectomy. Between 3 and 4 weeks before surgery all local therapies were stopped and a systemic therapy with acetazolamide and conservative free topic steroidal eye drops was started. In 19 patients (73%), an inadequate response to the flicker stimulation was measured preoperatively. In these patients, the maximum dilation of arteries and veins was reduced significantly as compared to healthy eyes. In this group, the maximum dilation of the arteries following the flicker provocation improved from 1.4% before to 3.8% following trabeculectomy (p<0.01). In retinal veins, this parameter increased from 3.1% to 4.6% (p<0.05). In the 7 patients whose arterial and venous reactions to flickering light provocation preoperatively did not differ from healthy eyes, there was no significant change after surgery. The initial baseline values of arteries and veins (MU) did not deviate significantly in both groups. POAG patients with progressive disease and impaired vascular regulation profit from IOP lowering trabeculectomy concerning vascular reactivity and dilative reserve, indicating a possible improvement of retinal perfusion following effective IOP control. Future studies with long-term follow-up must determine the clinical importance of these findings for the treatment of glaucoma patients.

  8. Suitability of pharmacokinetic models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of abdominal aortic aneurysm vessel wall: a comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lai Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (K(trans , which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV. Further, the relationship between K(trans and AAA size was investigated. RESULTS: DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4 with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for K(trans based on the Patlak model (17% were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37% and Extended Tofts model (42% (p<0.001. K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22% was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23% and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%. K(trans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman's ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02 using the Patlak model. CONCLUSION: Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility.

  9. Computerized flow and vessel wall analyses of coronary arteries for detection of non-calcified plaques in coronary CT angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Kazerooni, Ella

    2016-03-01

    The buildup of non-calcified plaques (NCP) that are vulnerable to rupture in coronary arteries is a risk for myocardial infarction. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system to assist radiologists in detecting NCPs in cCTA. A major challenge of NCP detection is the large number of false positives (FPs) caused by the small sized coronary arteries, image noise and artifacts. In this study, our purpose is to design new image features to reduce FPs. A data set of 98 cCTA scans was retrospectively collected from patient files. We first used vessel wall analysis, in which topological features were extracted from vessel wall and fused with a support-vector machine, to identify the NCP candidates from the segmented coronary tree. Computerized flow dynamic (CFD) features that characterize the change in blood flow due to the presence of plaques and a vascular cross-sectional (VCS) feature that quantifies the presence of low attenuation region at the vessel wall were designed for FP reduction. Using a leave-one-out resampling method, a support vector machine classifier was trained to merge the features into a NCP likelihood score using the vessel wall features alone or in combination with the new CDF and VCS features. The performance of the new features in classification of true NCPs and FPs was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Without the new CFD and VCS features, the test AUC was 0.84+/-0.01. The AUC was improved to 0.88+/-0.01 with the addition of the new features. The improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The study indicated that the new flow dynamic and vascular cross-sectional features were useful for differentiation of NCPs from FPs in cCTA.

  10. Vessel Wall Enhancement and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Disruption After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Tudela, Raúl; San-Roman, Luis; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Macho, Juan; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Less than half of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy obtain permanent clinical benefits. Consequently, there is an urgent need to identify mechanisms implicated in the limited efficacy of early reperfusion. We evaluated the predictors and prognostic significance of vessel wall permeability impairment and its association with blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) disruption after acute stroke treated with thrombectomy. A prospective cohort of acute stroke patients treated with stent retrievers was analyzed. Vessel wall permeability impairment was identified as gadolinium vessel wall enhancement (GVE) in a 24- to 48-hour follow-up contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and severe BCSFB disruption was defined as subarachnoid hemorrhage or gadolinium sulcal enhancement (present across >10 slices). Infarct volume was evaluated in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical outcome was evaluated with the modified Rankin Scale at day 90. A total of 60 patients (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 18) were analyzed, of whom 28 (47%) received intravenous alteplase before mechanical thrombectomy. Overall, 34 (57%) patients had GVE and 27 (45%) had severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was significantly associated with alteplase use before thrombectomy and with more stent retriever passes, along with the presence of severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was associated with poor clinical outcome, and both GVE and severe BCSFB disruption were associated with increased final infarct volume. These findings may support the clinical relevance of direct vessel damage and BCSFB disruption after acute stroke and reinforce the need for further improvements in reperfusion strategies. Further validation in larger cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  12. Protein-Bound Uremic Toxins Stimulate Crosstalk between Leukocytes and Vessel Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Griet; Schepers, Eva; Cohen, Gerald; Gondouin, Bertrand; Van Landschoot, Maria; Eloot, Sunny; Rops, Angelique; Van de Voorde, Johan; De Vriese, An; van der Vlag, Johan; Brunet, Philippe; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte activation and endothelial damage both contribute to cardiovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CKD. Experimental in vitro data link several protein-bound uremic retention solutes to the modulation of inflammatory stimuli, including endothelium and leukocyte responses and cardiovascular damage, corroborating observational in vivo data. However, the impact of these uremic toxins on the crosstalk between endothelium and leukocytes has not been assessed. This study evaluated the effects of acute and continuous exposure to uremic levels of indoxylsulfate (IS), p-cresylsulfate (pCS), and p-cresylglucuronide (pCG) on the recruitment of circulating leukocytes in the rat peritoneal vascular bed using intravital microscopy. Superfusion with IS induced strong leukocyte adhesion, enhanced extravasation, and interrupted blood flow, whereas pCS caused a rapid increase in leukocyte rolling. Superfusion with pCS and pCG combined caused impaired blood flow and vascular leakage but did not further enhance leukocyte rolling over pCS alone. Intravenous infusion with IS confirmed the superfusion results and caused shedding of heparan sulfate, pointing to disruption of the glycocalyx as the mechanism likely mediating IS-induced flow stagnation. These results provide the first clear in vivo evidence that IS, pCS, and pCG exert proinflammatory effects that contribute to vascular damage by stimulating crosstalk between leukocytes and vessels. PMID:24009240

  13. Transient Non-Newtonian Blood Flow under Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery in an Aneurysm Blood Vessel with Porous Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohamadi, Haleh; Imani, Mohsen

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation deals with numerical solution of blood flow patterns through an aneurysm artery under the applied magnetic field. Transient extended Navier-Stokes, Brinkman, continuity, and heat conduction equations govern this phenomenon and unsteady pulsatile inlet velocity varies by human heart-beating frequency. Our simulation demonstrates applying 105 magnetic field intensity (MnF) to recirculate flow and increase fluid flux and maximum blood temperature by 62.5x and 3.5%, respectively, in the aneurysm region. It is also shown that the vessel's wall porosity plays an important role in magnetic targeting of drug delivery performance, as this parameter can noticeably change maximum blood temperature and pressure.

  14. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye [Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Brain Disorders Research, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhao, Huilin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zechen [Philips Research China, Healthcare Department, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao, Xihai [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Stroke, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  15. A simulation environment for validating ultrasonic blood flow and vessel wall imaging based on fluid-structure interaction simulations: ultrasonic assessment of arterial distension and wall shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillens, Abigail; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Lovstakken, Lasse; Segers, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a commonly used vascular imaging tool when screening for patients at high cardiovascular risk. However, current blood flow and vessel wall imaging methods are hampered by several limitations. When optimizing and developing new ultrasound modalities, proper validation is required before clinical implementation. Therefore, the authors present a simulation environment integrating ultrasound and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations, allowing construction of synthetic ultrasound images based on physiologically realistic behavior of an artery. To demonstrate the potential of the model for vascular ultrasound research, the authors studied clinically relevant imaging modalities of arterial function related to both vessel wall deformation and arterial hemodynamics: Arterial distension (related to arterial stiffness) and wall shear rate (related to the development of atherosclerosis) imaging. An in-house code ("TANGO") was developed to strongly couple the flow solver FLUENT and structural solver ABAQUS using an interface quasi-Newton technique. FIELD II was used to model realistic transducer and scan settings. The input to the FSI-US model is a scatterer phantom on which the US waves reflect, with the scatterer displacement derived from the FSI flow and displacement fields. The authors applied the simulation tool to a 3D straight tube, representative of the common carotid artery (length: 5 cm; and inner and outer radius: 3 and 4 mm). A mass flow inlet boundary condition, based on flow measured in a healthy subject, was applied. A downstream pressure condition, based on a noninvasively measured pressure waveform, was chosen and scaled to simulate three different degrees of arterial distension (1%, 4%, and 9%). The RF data from the FSI-US coupling were further processed for arterial wall and flow imaging. Using an available wall tracking algorithm, arterial distensibility was assessed. Using an autocorrelation estimator, blood velocity and shear

  16. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  17. 78 FR 60099 - Nontank Vessel Response Plans and Other Response Plan Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... vrp@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Ms. Renee V. Wright, Program Manager...(g)(1) 15. MARPOL VRP requirements--Sec. 155.5030(h) 16. Protection and Indemnity (P&I) Club--Sec...), Fourth Edition, 2005 U.S.C. United States Code VRP Vessel response plan WCD Worst case discharge II...

  18. Optical coherence tomography assessment of vessel wall degradation in thoracic aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Eusebio; Eguizabal, Alma; Pontón, Alejandro; Díez, Marta Calvo; Fernando Val-Bernal, José; Mayorga, Marta; Revuelta, José M.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography images of human thoracic aorta from aneurysms reveal elastin disorders and smooth muscle cell alterations when visualizing the media layer of the aortic wall. These disorders can be employed as indicators for wall degradation and, therefore, become a hallmark for diagnosis of risk of aneurysm under intraoperative conditions. Two approaches are followed to evaluate this risk: the analysis of the reflectivity decay along the penetration depth and the textural analysis of a two-dimensional spatial distribution of the aortic wall backscattering. Both techniques require preprocessing stages for the identification of the air-sample interface and for the segmentation of the media layer. Results show that the alterations in the media layer of the aortic wall are better highlighted when the textural approach is considered and also agree with a semiquantitative histopathological grading that assesses the degree of wall degradation. The correlation of the co-occurrence matrix attains a sensitivity of 0.906 and specificity of 0.864 when aneurysm automatic diagnosis is evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic curve.

  19. Construction and characterisation of MRI coils for vessel wall imaging at 7 tesla

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques in the bifurcation of the carotid artery vessels can pose a significant stroke risk from stenosis, thrombosis and emboli, or plaque rupture. However, the possibility of the latter depends on the structure of the plaque and its stability. So far, the assessment of such depositions, and the evaluation of the risk they pose, is not satisfactory with 3 Tesla black blood imaging. It is expected that the SNR increase at 7 Tesla, together with an appropriate and patient-safe ...

  20. Distribution and natural course of intracranial vessel wall lesions in patients with ischemic stroke or TIA at 7.0 tesla MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brundel, Manon; Biessels, Geert Jan [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies using intracranial vessel wall MRI techniques showed that over 50 % of patients with ischemic stroke or TIA had one or more intracranial vessel wall lesions. In the current study, we assessed the preferential location of these lesions within the intracranial arterial tree and their potential changes over time in these patient groups. Forty-nine patients with ischemic stroke (n = 25) or TIA (n = 24) of the anterior cerebral circulation underwent 7.0 T MRI, including a T{sub 1}-weighted magnetization-preparation inversion recovery turbo-spin-echo (MPIR-TSE) sequence within one week and approximately one month after symptom onset. Intracranial vessel wall lesions were scored for multiple locations within the arterial tree and differences between one-week and one-month images. At baseline, 132 intracranial vessel wall lesions were found in 41 patients (84 %), located primarily in the anterior cerebral circulation (74 %), with a preferential location in the distal internal carotid artery and M1 and M2 segments of the middle cerebral artery. During follow-up, presence or enhancement patterns changed in 14 lesions (17 %). A large burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions was found in both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation. Most lesions were found to be relatively stable, possibly indicating a more generalized atherosclerotic process. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  2. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  3. Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM): a novel approach to evaluate imaging signals in the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Robert; Scherzinger, Aaron; Kiefer, Friedemann; Hermann, Sven; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schäfers, Michael A

    2017-05-26

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. A prominent cause of cardiovascular events is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall that leads to the formation of so called atherosclerotic plaques. There is a strong clinical need to develop new, non-invasive vascular imaging techniques in order to identify high-risk plaques, which might escape detection using conventional methods based on the assessment of the luminal narrowing. In this context, molecular imaging strategies based on fluorescent tracers and fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) seem well suited to assess molecular and cellular activity. However, such an analysis demands a precise and standardized analysis method, which is orientated on reproducible anatomical landmarks, ensuring to compare equivalent regions across different subjects. We propose a novel method, Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM). Our approach is especially useful for the understanding of complex and heterogeneous regional processes during the course of atherosclerosis. Our method involves three steps, which are (I) standardisation with an additional intensity normalization, (II) permutation testing, and (III) cluster-enhancement. Although permutation testing and cluster enhancement are already well-established in functional magnetic resonance imaging, to the best of our knowledge these strategies have so far not been applied in cardiovascular molecular imaging. We tested our method using FRI images of murine aortic vessels in order to find recurring patterns in atherosclerotic plaques across multiple subjects. We demonstrate that our pixel-wise and cluster-enhanced testing approach is feasible and useful to analyse tracer distributions in FRI data sets of aortic vessels. We expect our method to be a useful tool within the field of molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques since cluster-enhanced permutation testing is a powerful approach for finding significant differences

  4. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebeling, Robert M; Chase, Amos; White, Barry C

    2007-01-01

    This research report describes the engineering formulation and corresponding software developed for the translational response of rockfounded retaining walls buttressed at their toe by a reinforced...

  5. Endothelial junction regulation: a prerequisite for leukocytes crossing the vessel wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniel, Anna E.; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2013-01-01

    The leukocytes of the innate immune system, especially neutrophils and monocytes, exit the circulation early in the response to local inflammation and infection. This is necessary to control and prevent the spread of infections before an adaptive immune response can be raised. The endothelial cells

  6. Study on Inland River Vessel Fuel-oil Spillage and Emergency Response Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. C.; Shi, N.; Wang, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    by making statistics and conducting regression analysis on the carrying volume of vessels navigating on inland rivers and coastal waters, the linear relation between the oil volume carried by a vessel and its gross tonnage (GT) is found. Based on the linear relation, the possible spillage of a 10,000 GT vessel is estimated by using the empirical formula method which is commonly used to measure oil spillage from any vessel spill incident. In the waters downstream of Yangtze River, the trajectory and fates model is used to predict the drifting paths and fates of the spilled oil under three weather scenarios, and then, the emergency response strategies for vessel oil spills are put forth. The results of the research can be used to develop an empirical method to quickly estimate oil spillage and provide recommendations on oil spill emergency response strategies for decision-makers.

  7. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of radial shear in the wall-base juncture of a 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R. [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Construction of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model is underway as part of a cooperative containment research program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work is co-sponsored by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Preliminary analyses of the Sandia 1:4 Scale PCCV Model have determined axisymmetric global behavior and have estimated the potential for failure in several areas, including the wall-base juncture and near penetrations. Though the liner tearing failure mode has been emphasized, the assumption of a liner tearing failure mode is largely based on experience with reinforced concrete containments. For the PCCV, the potential for shear failure at or near the liner tearing pressure may be considerable and requires detailed investigation. This paper examines the behavior of the PCCV in the region most susceptible to a radial shear failure, the wall-basemat juncture region. Prediction of shear failure in concrete structures is a difficult goal, both experimentally and analytically. As a structure begins to deform under an applied system of forces that produce shear, other deformation modes such as bending and tension/compression begin to influence the response. Analytically, difficulties lie in characterizing the decrease in shear stiffness and shear stress and in predicting the associated transfer of stress to reinforcement as cracks become wider and more extensive. This paper examines existing methods for representing concrete shear response and existing criteria for predicting shear failure, and it discusses application of these methods and criteria to the study of the 1:4 scale PCCV.

  9. Accelerated and Improved Differentiation of Retinal Organoids from Pluripotent Stem Cells in Rotating-Wall Vessel Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler DiStefano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells can be differentiated into 3D retinal organoids, with major cell types self-patterning into a polarized, laminated architecture. In static cultures, organoid development may be hindered by limitations in diffusion of oxygen and nutrients. Herein, we report a bioprocess using rotating-wall vessel (RWV bioreactors to culture retinal organoids derived from mouse pluripotent stem cells. Organoids in RWV demonstrate enhanced proliferation, with well-defined morphology and improved differentiation of neurons including ganglion cells and S-cone photoreceptors. Furthermore, RWV organoids at day 25 (D25 reveal similar maturation and transcriptome profile as those at D32 in static culture, closely recapitulating spatiotemporal development of postnatal day 6 mouse retina in vivo. Interestingly, however, retinal organoids do not differentiate further under any in vitro condition tested here, suggesting additional requirements for functional maturation. Our studies demonstrate that bioreactors can accelerate and improve organoid growth and differentiation for modeling retinal disease and evaluation of therapies.

  10. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  11. Structural Properties of EB-Welded AlSi10Mg Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Produced by AM-SLM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmany, Moshe; Stern, Adin; Aghion, Eli; Frage, Nachum

    2017-09-01

    Additive manufacturing of metals by selective laser melting (AM-SLM) is hampered by significant limitations in product size due to the limited dimensions of printing trays. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a well-established process that results in relatively minor metallurgical modifications in workpieces due to the ability of EBW to pass high-density energy to the related substance. The present study aims to evaluate structural properties of EB-welded AlSi10Mg thin-walled pressure vessels produced from components prepared by SLM technology. Following the EB welding process, leak and burst tests were conducted, as was fractography analysis. The welded vessels showed an acceptable holding pressure of 30 MPa, with a reasonable residual deformation up to 2.3% and a leak rate better than 1 × 10-8 std-cc s-1 helium. The failures that occurred under longitudinal stresses reflected the presence of two weak locations in the vessels, i.e., the welded joint region and the transition zone between the vessel base and wall. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces of broken vessels displayed the ductile mode of the rupture, with dimples of various sizes, depending on the failure location.

  12. Structural Properties of EB-Welded AlSi10Mg Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Produced by AM-SLM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmany, Moshe; Stern, Adin; Aghion, Eli; Frage, Nachum

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing of metals by selective laser melting (AM-SLM) is hampered by significant limitations in product size due to the limited dimensions of printing trays. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a well-established process that results in relatively minor metallurgical modifications in workpieces due to the ability of EBW to pass high-density energy to the related substance. The present study aims to evaluate structural properties of EB-welded AlSi10Mg thin-walled pressure vessels produced from components prepared by SLM technology. Following the EB welding process, leak and burst tests were conducted, as was fractography analysis. The welded vessels showed an acceptable holding pressure of 30 MPa, with a reasonable residual deformation up to 2.3% and a leak rate better than 1 × 10-8 std-cc s-1 helium. The failures that occurred under longitudinal stresses reflected the presence of two weak locations in the vessels, i.e., the welded joint region and the transition zone between the vessel base and wall. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces of broken vessels displayed the ductile mode of the rupture, with dimples of various sizes, depending on the failure location.

  13. Regulation of coronary resistance vessel tone in response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne

    2012-04-01

    Exercise is a primary stimulus for increased myocardial oxygen demand. The ~6-fold increase in oxygen demand of the left ventricle during heavy exercise is met principally by augmenting coronary blood flow (~5-fold), as hemoglobin concentration and oxygen extraction (which is already ~70% at rest) increase only modestly in most species. As a result, coronary blood flow is tightly coupled to myocardial oxygen consumption over a wide range of physical activity. This tight coupling has been proposed to depend on periarteriolar oxygen tension, signals released from cardiomyocytes and the endothelium as well as neurohumoral influences, but the contribution of each of these regulatory pathways, and their interactions, to exercise hyperemia in the heart remain incompletely understood. In humans, nitric oxide, adenosine and K(ATP) channels each appear to contribute to resting coronary resistance vessel tone, but evidence for a critical contribution to exercise hyperemia is lacking. In dogs K(ATP)-channel activation together with adenosine and nitric oxide contribute to exercise hyperemia in a non-linear redundant fashion. In contrast, in swine nitric oxide, adenosine and K(ATP) channels contribute to resting coronary resistance vessel tone control in a linear additive manner, but do not appear to be mandatory for exercise hyperemia. Rather, exercise hyperemia in swine appears to involve β-adrenergic activation in conjunction with exercise-induced blunting of an endothelin-mediated vasoconstrictor influence. In view of these remarkable species differences in coronary vasomotor control during exercise, future studies are required to determine the system of vasodilator components that mediate exercise hyperemia in humans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Coronary Blood Flow". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  15. Differentiation of deep subcortical infarction using high-resolution vessel wall MR imaging of middle cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Sunwoo, Leonard; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Hee Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the utility of high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) of middle cerebral artery (MCA), and to compare HR-VWI findings between striatocapsular infarction (SC-I) and lenticulostriate infarction (LS-I). This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. From July 2009 to February 2012, 145 consecutive patients with deep subcortical infarctions (SC-I, n = 81; LS-I, n = 64) who underwent HR-VWI were included in this study. The degree of MCA stenosis and the characteristics of MCA plaque (presence, eccentricity, location, extent, T2-high signal intensity [T2-HSI], and plaque enhancement) were analyzed, and compared between SC-I and LS-I, using Fisher's exact test. Stenosis was more severe in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.040). MCA plaque was more frequent in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.028), having larger plaque extent (p = 0.001), more T2-HSI (p = 0.001), and more plaque enhancement (p = 0.002). The eccentricity and location of the plaque showed no significant difference between the two groups.Both SC-I and LS-I have similar HR-VWI findings of the MCA plaque, but SC-I had more frequent, larger plaques with greater T2-HSI and enhancement. This suggests that HR-VWI may have a promising role in assisting the differentiation of underlying pathophysiological mechanism between SC-I and LS-I.

  16. Deterministic Predictions of Vessel Responses Based on Past Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with a prediction procedure from which global wave-induced responses can be deterministically predicted a short time, 10-50 s, ahead of current time. The procedure relies on the autocorrelation function and takes into account prior measurements only; i.e. knowledge about wave cond...

  17. Behavioural responses of dusky dolphin groups (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) to tour vessels off Kaikoura, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, David; Gemmell, Neil J; Würsig, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Commercial viewing and swimming with dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) near Kaikoura, New Zealand began in the late 1980s and researchers have previously described changes in vocalisation, aerial behaviour, and group spacing in the presence of vessels. This study was conducted to assess the current effects that tourism has on the activity budget of dusky dolphins to provide wildlife managers with information for current decision-making and facilitate development of quantitative criteria for management of this industry in the future. First-order time discrete Markov chain models were used to assess changes in the behavioural state of dusky dolphin pods targeted by tour vessels. Log-linear analysis was conducted on behavioural state transitions to determine whether the likelihood of dolphins moving from one behavioural state to another changed based on natural and anthropogenic factors. The best-fitting model determined by Akaike Information Criteria values included season, time of day, and vessel presence within 300 m. Interactions with vessels reduced the proportion of time dolphins spent resting in spring and summer and increased time spent milling in all seasons except autumn. Dolphins spent more time socialising in spring and summer, when conception occurs and calves are born, and the proportion of time spent resting was highest in summer. Resting decreased and traveling increased in the afternoon. Responses to tour vessel traffic are similar to those described for dusky dolphins elsewhere. Disturbance linked to vessels may interrupt social interactions, carry energetic costs, or otherwise affect individual fitness. Research is needed to determine if increased milling is a result of acoustic masking of communication due to vessel noise, and to establish levels at which changes to behavioural budgets of dusky dolphins are likely to cause long-term harm. Threshold values from these studies would allow managers to set appropriate operational conditions based

  18. Behavioural responses of dusky dolphin groups (Lagenorhynchus obscurus to tour vessels off Kaikoura, New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lundquist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commercial viewing and swimming with dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus near Kaikoura, New Zealand began in the late 1980s and researchers have previously described changes in vocalisation, aerial behaviour, and group spacing in the presence of vessels. This study was conducted to assess the current effects that tourism has on the activity budget of dusky dolphins to provide wildlife managers with information for current decision-making and facilitate development of quantitative criteria for management of this industry in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First-order time discrete Markov chain models were used to assess changes in the behavioural state of dusky dolphin pods targeted by tour vessels. Log-linear analysis was conducted on behavioural state transitions to determine whether the likelihood of dolphins moving from one behavioural state to another changed based on natural and anthropogenic factors. The best-fitting model determined by Akaike Information Criteria values included season, time of day, and vessel presence within 300 m. Interactions with vessels reduced the proportion of time dolphins spent resting in spring and summer and increased time spent milling in all seasons except autumn. Dolphins spent more time socialising in spring and summer, when conception occurs and calves are born, and the proportion of time spent resting was highest in summer. Resting decreased and traveling increased in the afternoon. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Responses to tour vessel traffic are similar to those described for dusky dolphins elsewhere. Disturbance linked to vessels may interrupt social interactions, carry energetic costs, or otherwise affect individual fitness. Research is needed to determine if increased milling is a result of acoustic masking of communication due to vessel noise, and to establish levels at which changes to behavioural budgets of dusky dolphins are likely to cause long-term harm. Threshold

  19. Dilated thin-walled blood and lymphatic vessels in human endometrium: a potential role for VEGF-D in progestin-induced break-through bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline F Donoghue

    Full Text Available Progestins provide safe, effective and cheap options for contraception as well as the treatment of a variety of gynaecological disorders. Episodes of irregular endometrial bleeding or breakthrough bleeding (BTB are a major unwanted side effect of progestin treatment, such that BTB is the leading cause for discontinued use of an otherwise effective and popular medication. The cellular mechanisms leading to BTB are poorly understood. In this study, we make the novel finding that the large, dilated, thin walled vessels characteristic of human progestin-treated endometrium include both blood and lymphatic vessels. Increased blood and lymphatic vessel diameter are features of VEGF-D action in other tissues and we show by immunolocalisation and Western blotting that stromal cell decidualisation results in a significant increase in VEGF-D protein production, particularly of the proteolytically processed 21 kD form. Using a NOD/scid mouse model with xenografted human endometrium we were able to show that progestin treatment causes decidualisation, VEGF-D production and endometrial vessel dilation. Our results lead to a novel hypothesis to explain BTB, with stromal cell decidualisation rather than progestin treatment per se being the proposed causative event, and VEGF-D being the proposed effector agent.

  20. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Deletion of hypothetical wall teichoic acid ligases in Staphylococcus aureus activates the cell wall stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Vanina; Meier, Patricia Stutzmann; Heusser, Ronald; Kupferschmied, Peter; Fazekas, Judit; Friebe, Sarah; Staufer, Sibylle Burger; Majcherczyk, Paul A; Moreillon, Philippe; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; McCallum, Nadine

    2012-08-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS) is activated by cell envelope-targeting antibiotics or depletion of essential cell wall biosynthesis enzymes. The functionally uncharacterized S. aureus LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) proteins, MsrR, SA0908 and SA2103, all belong to the CWSS. Although not essential, deletion of all three LCP proteins severely impairs cell division. We show here that VraSR-dependent CWSS expression was up to 250-fold higher in single, double and triple LCP mutants than in wild type S. aureus in the absence of external stress. The LCP triple mutant was virtually depleted of wall teichoic acids (WTA), which could be restored to different degrees by any of the single LCP proteins. Subinhibitory concentrations of tunicamycin, which inhibits the first WTA synthesis enzyme TarO (TagO), could partially complement the severe growth defect of the LCP triple mutant. Both of the latter findings support a role for S. aureus LCP proteins in late WTA synthesis, as in Bacillus subtilis where LCP proteins were recently proposed to transfer WTA from lipid carriers to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Intrinsic activation of the CWSS upon LCP deletion and the fact that LCP proteins were essential for WTA-loading of the cell wall, highlight their important role(s) in S. aureus cell envelope biogenesis. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug and light dose responses to focal photodynamic therapy of single blood vessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Samkoe, Kimberley; Cramb, David; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    As part of an ongoing program to develop two-photon (2-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treatment of wet-form age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other vascular pathologies, we have evaluated the reciprocity of drug-light doses in focal-PDT. We targeted individual arteries in a murine window chamber model, using primarily the clinical photosensitizer Visudyne/liposomal-verteporfin. Shortly after administration of the photosensitizer, a small region including an arteriole was selected and irradiated with varying light doses. Targeted and nearby vessels were observed for a maximum of 17 to 25 h to assess vascular shutdown, tapering, and dye leakage/occlusion. For a given end-point metric, there was reciprocity between the drug and light doses, i.e., the response correlated with the drug-light product (DLP). These results provide the first quantification of photosensitizer and light dose relationships for localized irradiation of a single blood vessel and are compared to the DLP required for vessel closure between 1-γ and 2-γ activation, between focal and broad-beam irradiation, and between verteporfin and a porphyrin dimer with high 2-γ cross section. Demonstration of reciprocity over a wide range of DLP is important for further development of focal PDT treatments, such as the targeting of feeder vessels in 2-γ PDT of AMD.

  3. Vessel Noise Affects Beaked Whale Behavior: Results of a Dedicated Acoustic Response Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    frequencies, overlapping with toothed whale vocalizations and hearing sensitivity, with potential behavioral or physiological consequences (e.g. [8–11...whales (Orcinus orca ) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise. J Acoust Soc Am 125: 27–32. 12. Tyack PL, Johnson M, Aguilar de Soto N...fast should I swim? Behavioral implications of diving physiology . Sym Zool S Lond 66: 349–368. 37. Thompson D, Fedak MA (2001) How long should a dive

  4. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  5. Electromagnetic dynamic response of HL-2M vacuum vessel under plasma disruption considering the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Hongwei; Yuan, Zhensheng; Li, Weixin; Pei, Cuixiang; Xie, Shejuan [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Pan, Yudong; Cai, Lijun; Li, Jiaxian [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A 1/5 numerical model is established and validated for HL-2M vacuum vessel. • The Lagrangian approach used for treating the EM-mechanical coupling problem is introduced. • The EM field and structural dynamic response of HL-2M VV during plasma disruptions are simulated by using the Lagrangian strategy. • The dynamic responses of the VV of HL-2M are compared to clarify the effect of the EM-mechanical coupling under the MD and VED conditions. • The results present a basis for the safe operation of the HL-2M VV device. - Abstract: During plasma disruptions (PDs), transient eddy currents are induced in the HL-2M vacuum vessel (VV) which is a D-shaped, double thin-wall structure. Under the circumstance of high magnetic field, the resulting electromagnetic (EM) forces during PDs are large and the dynamic response of related structures may be violent. In this complicated EM circumstance, the EM-mechanical coupling effect may also have a great influence on the dynamic response of VV structure. In this paper, the EM field and structural dynamic response of HL-2M VV during PDs are simulated by adopting a numerical code of the Lagrangian approach. The Lagrangian approach is on the basis of the Maxwell equations in the Lagrangian description, which treats the coupling behavior of magnetic damping effect without explicitly using the velocity term. This approach can be easily applied to actual structures by updating FEM meshes and reforming coefficient matrices before calculating EM field at each time step. In this work, the disruption plasma currents of operating conditions are simulated by using the DINA code and then the dynamic responses of displacements and stresses of the VV of HL-2M are obtained for both cases with and without considering the coupling effect. The numerical results show that stresses under the disruptions (MD and VDE) are not significant and the coupling effect does not significantly affect the peak dynamic response for the HL-2M

  6. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155... equipment, including— (1) Sonar, sampling equipment, or other methods for locating the oil on the bottom or...

  7. Utilizing the Foreign Body Response to Grow Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, Wouter J; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rotmans, Joris I

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the number of patients requiring a vascular grafts for use as vessel replacement in cardiovascular diseases, or as vascular access site for hemodialysis is ever increasing. The development of tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBV's) is a promising method to meet this increasing demand vascular grafts, without having to rely on poorly performing synthetic options such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron. The generation of in vivo TEBV's involves utilizing the host reaction to an implanted biomaterial for the generation of completely autologous tissues. Essentially this approach to the development of TEBV's makes use of the foreign body response to biomaterials for the construction of the entire vascular replacement tissue within the patient's own body. In this review we will discuss the method of developing in vivo TEBV's, and debate the approaches of several research groups that have implemented this method.

  8. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooue Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Methods Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB and without (EX vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein was calculated using both variables. Results Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P P vein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P vein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P vein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Conclusion Diminished central command induced by tendon

  9. Vascular wall-resident CD44+ multipotent stem cells give rise to pericytes and smooth muscle cells and contribute to new vessel maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klein

    Full Text Available Here, we identify CD44(+CD90(+CD73(+CD34(-CD45(- cells within the adult human arterial adventitia with properties of multipotency which were named vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells (VW-MPSCs. VW-MPSCs exhibit typical mesenchymal stem cell characteristics including cell surface markers in immunostaining and flow cytometric analyses, and differentiation into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes under culture conditions. Particularly, TGFß1 stimulation up-regulates smooth muscle cell markers in VW-MPSCs. Using fluorescent cell labelling and co-localisation studies we show that VW-MPSCs differentiate to pericytes/smooth muscle cells which cover the wall of newly formed endothelial capillary-like structures in vitro. Co-implantation of EGFP-labelled VW-MPSCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells into SCID mice subcutaneously via Matrigel results in new vessels formation which were covered by pericyte- or smooth muscle-like cells generated from implanted VW-MPSCs. Our results suggest that VW-MPSCs are of relevance for vascular morphogenesis, repair and self-renewal of vascular wall cells and for local capacity of neovascularization in disease processes.

  10. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooue, Anna; Sato, Kohei; Hirasawa, Ai; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    2012-11-07

    The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB) and without (EX) vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein) and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein) was calculated using both variables. Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Diminished central command induced by tendon vibration may attenuate the superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during sustained static arm exercise.

  11. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  12. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2017-02-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  13. Human responses to wave slamming vibration on a polar supply and research vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, H; Bekker, A

    2018-02-01

    A polar supply and research vessel is pre-disposed to wave slamming which has caused complaints among crew and researchers regarding interference with sleep, equipment use and research activities. The present work undertook to survey passenger claims of sleep interference, disturbed motor tasks and equipment damage as a result of wave slamming during normal operations of this vessel. The hypothesis was investigated that whole-body vibration metrics from ISO 2631-1 are potentially suitable for the prediction of human slamming complaints. Full-scale acceleration measurements were performed and wave slamming events were subsequently identified from the human weighted acceleration time histories. A daily diary survey was also conducted to gather the human response. The vibration caused by wave slamming was found to be strongly correlated with sleep disturbances and activity interference. Sleep and equipment use were found to be the most affected parameters by slamming. Daily vibration dose values were determined by accumulating the vibration as a result of slamming over 24 h periods. This metric accounted for increased magnitudes and frequency of slamming incidents and proved to be the best metric to represent human responses to slamming vibration. The greatest percentage of activities affected by slamming related to sleep regardless of daily cumulative VDV magnitude. More than 50% of the recorded responses related to sleep when the daily cumulative VDV ranged between 8.0 m/s1.75-10.0 m/s1.75. The peak vertical vibration levels recorded on the vessel reach magnitudes which are associated with sleep disturbance in environments where acoustic noise is present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In-vessel calibration of the imaging diagnostics for the real-time protection of the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, V., E-mail: V.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Supercomputing Centre, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Sergienko, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung—Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kinna, D.; Balboa, I.; Collins, S.; Conway, N.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Price, M.; Silburn, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Wynn, A. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The in situ absolute calibration of the JET real-time protection imaging system has been performed for the first time by means of radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel and operated by remote handling. High accuracy of the calibration is confirmed by cross-validation of the near infrared (NIR) cameras against each other, with thermal IR cameras, and with the beryllium evaporator, which lead to successful protection of the JET first wall during the last campaign. The operation temperature ranges of NIR protection cameras for the materials used on JET are Be 650-1600 °C, W coating 600-1320 °C, and W 650-1500 °C.

  15. {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine uptake in arterial vessel walls and cardiovascular risk factors. Correlation in a PET-CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Stefan; Rominger, A.; Cumming, P.; Bartenstein, P.; Hacker, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (TUM) (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Saam, T.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.F. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology; Wolpers, S. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (TUM) (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology

    2010-07-01

    Fluorine-labelled choline derivatives were recently suggested as agents for visualizing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between {sup 18}F-fluorethylcholine (FEC) uptake in the wall of large arteries, where calcification was also measured, with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and occurrence of prior cardiovascular events. Detailed clinical information, including common cardiovascular risk factors, was obtained retrospectively in 60 prostate cancer patients examined with whole-body FEC PET-CT. In each patient, we calculated the mean blood pool-corrected SUV, as well as the mean target-to-background ratio (TBR), in addition to the sum of calcified plaques (CP{sub sum}) from six major vessels: ascending and descending aorta, aortic arch, abdominal aorta, and both iliac arteries. As reported previously, the CP{sub sum} correlated significantly with cardiovascular risk factors, in contrast to mean SUV or TBR scores, which did not show any significance with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. There was no correlation between CP{sub sum}, mean TBR or SUV, nor was there any significant association of CP{sub sum}, mean TBR or SUV with the prior occurrence of cardio- or cerebrovascular events. Contrary to a recent report, we found in our rather large cohort of elderly prostate cancer patients no significant association between FEC uptake in large vessels and atherosclerotic plaque burden, or the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. In line with prior reports on structural changes in vessels, increased calcified atherosclerotic plaque burden was strongly associated with the occurrence of common cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  16. Plastic Response of Thin-Walled Tubes to Detonation

    OpenAIRE

    Karnesky, J.; Damazo, J.; Shepherd, J. E.; Rusinek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformation of tubes to internal detonations and the shock waves produced by their reflection were investigated. The study included experimental measurements as well as computational modeling. Tests with stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixtures were performed at various initial pressures and strain was measured on thin-walled mild-steel tubes. The range of initial pressures covered the span from entirely elastic to fully plastic deformation modes. A mod...

  17. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebeling, Robert M; White, Barry C

    2006-01-01

    This research report describes the engineering formulation and corresponding software developed for the rotational response of rock-founded, toe-restrained Corps retaining walls to earthquake ground motions...

  18. Whole-brain vessel wall MRI: A parameter tune-up solution to improve the scan efficiency of three-dimensional variable flip-angle turbo spin-echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Deng, Zixin; Bi, Xiaoming; Song, Shlee S; Schlick, Konrad H; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Li, Debiao; Fan, Zhaoyang

    2017-09-01

    To propose and evaluate a parameter tune-up solution to expedite a three-dimensional (3D) variable-flip-angle turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall (IVW) imaging. Elliptical k-space sampling and prolonged echo train length (ETL), were used to expedite a 3D variable-flip-angle TSE-based sequence. To compensate for the potential loss in vessel wall signal, optimal combination of prescribed T 2 and ETL was experimentally investigated on 22 healthy volunteers at 3 Tesla. The optimized protocol (7-8 min) was then compared with a previous protocol (reference protocol, 11-12 min) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), vessel wall sharpness, and wall delineation quality on a 4-point scale (0:poor; 3:excellent) in 10 healthy volunteers. A pilot study of five patients was performed and lesion delineation score was used to demonstrate the diagnostic quality. A protocol with ETL = 52 and prescribed T 2  = 170 ms was deemed an optimized one, which, compared with the reference protocol, provided significantly improved wall SNR (12.0 ± 1.3 versus 10.0 ± 1.1; P = 0.002), wall-lumen CNR (9.7 ± 1.2 versus 8.0 ± 0.9; P = 0.002), wall-CSF CNR (2.8 ± 1.0 versus 1.7 ± 1.0; P = 0.026), similar vessel wall sharpness at both inner (1.59 ± 0.18 versus 1.58 ± 0.14, P = 0.87) and outer (1.71 ± 0.25 versus 1.83 ± 0.30; P = 0.18) boundaries, and comparable vessel wall delineation score for individual segments (1.95-3; P > 0.06). In all patients, atherosclerotic plaques (10) or wall dissection (5) were identified with a delineation score of 3 or 2. A parameter tune-up solution can accelerate 3D variable-flip-angle TSE acquisitions, particularly allowed for expedited whole-brain IVW imaging with preserved wall delineation quality. 2. Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:751-757. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic

  19. Thermophysiological responses and work strain in fishermen on deep-sea fishing vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Erik Ulvolden; Sandsund, Mariann; Heidelberg, Cecilie Thon; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo

    2016-01-01

    Fishermen working on deep-sea vessels in the Barents and Norwegian Sea are exposed to low air temperatures, strong winds, high humidity, rain, snow and work at different intensities. Few studies have investigated the effect of environmental work factors on the physiology of this occupational group. The aim of the study was to investigate work strain and thermophysiological responses of fishermen on the trawl and factory decks of deep-sea vessels. Twenty-five professional male fishermen (age 39 ± 13 years) were recruited to the study which was performed on three trawlers in the Norwegian Sea in April, June and August 2014. During a six-hour shift, heart rate (HR), core (Tc) and mean skin (Ts) temperatures were recorded, and questions about subjective thermal sensation and comfort were answered. Short periods of hard (above 86% of HRmax) work raised Tc by 0.8°C to 37.8°C and decreased Ts by 2.3°C to 29.8°C during work on the trawl deck, and subjects reported being warm and sweaty. On the factory deck long periods of fairly light (between 52% and 66% HRmax) work, Tc of 37.4°C and Ts of 30.9°C were measured. Fishermen experience intermittent periods of heavy work on the trawl deck shown with elevated core temperature and HR. Work on the factory deck includes long periods of repetitive work with light to moderate work strain. A better understanding of work strain and environmental challenges during work on Norwegian deep-sea vessels will help identify exposure risks during work in the cold and heat.

  20. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-01-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g., the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate "point-particle" analysis, we show analytically that -- owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall -- such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial "swimmers" exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change ...

  1. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Nahid, E-mail: nsedighi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmard, Amir Reza, E-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmehr, Ali, E-mail: radmehr@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Pari, E-mail: phtums@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Abdolmahmoud, E-mail: mroomezi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Amir Pejman Hashemi, E-mail: hashemip@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT < 0.6 mm without plaque, medium-risk: 0.6 mm {<=} IMT {<=} 0.8 mm without plaque and high-risk: IMT > 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT < 0.6 mm, those with 0.6 mm {<=} IMT{<=} 0.8 mm and IMT > 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  2. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS) in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315), which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes. Conclusion CWSS induction

  3. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315, which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes

  4. Reciprocal Interactions between Cadmium-Induced Cell Wall Responses and Oxidative Stress in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loix, Christophe; Huybrechts, Michiel; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gielen, Marijke; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution renders many soils across the world unsuited or unsafe for food- or feed-orientated agriculture. The main mechanism of Cd phytotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress, amongst others through the depletion of glutathione. Oxidative stress can damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to growth inhibition or even cell death. The plant cell has a variety of tools to defend itself against Cd stress. First and foremost, cell walls might prevent Cd from entering and damaging the protoplast. Both the primary and secondary cell wall have an array of defensive mechanisms that can be adapted to cope with Cd. Pectin, which contains most of the negative charges within the primary cell wall, can sequester Cd very effectively. In the secondary cell wall, lignification can serve to immobilize Cd and create a tougher barrier for entry. Changes in cell wall composition are, however, dependent on nutrients and conversely might affect their uptake. Additionally, the role of ascorbate (AsA) as most important apoplastic antioxidant is of considerable interest, due to the fact that oxidative stress is a major mechanism underlying Cd toxicity, and that AsA biosynthesis shares several links with cell wall construction. In this review, modifications of the plant cell wall in response to Cd exposure are discussed. Focus lies on pectin in the primary cell wall, lignification in the secondary cell wall and the importance of AsA in the apoplast. Regarding lignification, we attempt to answer the question whether increased lignification is merely a consequence of Cd toxicity, or rather an elicited defense response. We propose a model for lignification as defense response, with a central role for hydrogen peroxide as substrate and signaling molecule. PMID:29163592

  5. Reciprocal Interactions between Cadmium-Induced Cell Wall Responses and Oxidative Stress in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Loix

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd pollution renders many soils across the world unsuited or unsafe for food- or feed-orientated agriculture. The main mechanism of Cd phytotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress, amongst others through the depletion of glutathione. Oxidative stress can damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to growth inhibition or even cell death. The plant cell has a variety of tools to defend itself against Cd stress. First and foremost, cell walls might prevent Cd from entering and damaging the protoplast. Both the primary and secondary cell wall have an array of defensive mechanisms that can be adapted to cope with Cd. Pectin, which contains most of the negative charges within the primary cell wall, can sequester Cd very effectively. In the secondary cell wall, lignification can serve to immobilize Cd and create a tougher barrier for entry. Changes in cell wall composition are, however, dependent on nutrients and conversely might affect their uptake. Additionally, the role of ascorbate (AsA as most important apoplastic antioxidant is of considerable interest, due to the fact that oxidative stress is a major mechanism underlying Cd toxicity, and that AsA biosynthesis shares several links with cell wall construction. In this review, modifications of the plant cell wall in response to Cd exposure are discussed. Focus lies on pectin in the primary cell wall, lignification in the secondary cell wall and the importance of AsA in the apoplast. Regarding lignification, we attempt to answer the question whether increased lignification is merely a consequence of Cd toxicity, or rather an elicited defense response. We propose a model for lignification as defense response, with a central role for hydrogen peroxide as substrate and signaling molecule.

  6. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Pirotta

    Full Text Available Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas. A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  7. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  8. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In Vivo Clearance of Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein Is Influenced by the Extent of Its N-Linked Glycosylation and by Its Interaction with the Vessel Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. McCurdy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP is a highly glycosylated plasma protein that exerts vasoprotective effects. We hypothesized that AGP’s N-linked glycans govern its rate of clearance from the circulation, and followed the disappearance of different forms of radiolabeled human AGP from the plasma of rabbits and mice. Enzymatic deglycosylation of human plasma-derived AGP (pdAGP by Peptide: N-Glycosidase F yielded a mixture of differentially deglycosylated forms (PNGase-AGP, while the introduction of five Asn to Gln mutations in recombinant Pichia pastoris-derived AGP (rAGP-N(5Q eliminated N-linked glycosylation. PNGase-AGP was cleared from the rabbit circulation 9-fold, and rAGP-N(5Q, 46-fold more rapidly than pdAGP, primarily via a renal route. Pichia pastoris-derived wild-type rAGP differed from pdAGP in expressing mannose-terminated glycans, and, like neuraminidase-treated pdAGP, was more rapidly removed from the rabbit circulation than rAGP-N(5Q. Systemic hyaluronidase treatment of mice transiently decreased pdAGP clearance. AGP administration to mice reduced vascular binding of hyaluronic acid binding protein in the liver microcirculation and increased its plasma levels. Our results support a critical role of N-linked glycosylation of AGP in regulating its in vivo clearance and an influence of a hyaluronidase-sensitive component of the vessel wall on its transendothelial passage.

  10. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  11. Experimental and analytical investigation of the lateral load response of confined masonry walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Okail

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behavior of confined masonry walls subjected to lateral loads. Six full-scale wall assembles, consisting of a clay masonry panel, two confining columns and a tie beam, were tested under a combination of vertical load and monotonic pushover up to failure. Wall panels had various configurations, namely, solid and perforated walls with window and door openings, variable longitudinal and transverse reinforcement ratios for the confining elements and different brick types, namely, cored clay and solid concrete masonry units. Key experimental results showed that the walls in general experienced a shear failure at the end of the lightly reinforced confining elements after the failure of the diagonal struts formed in the brick wall due to transversal diagonal tension. Stepped bed joint cracks formed in the masonry panel either diagonally or around the perforations. A numerical model was built using the finite element method and was validated in light of the experimental results. The model showed acceptable correlation and was used to conduct a thorough parametric study on various design configurations. The conducted parametric study involved the assessment of the load/displacement response for walls with different aspect ratios, axial load ratios, number of confining elements as well as the size and orientation of perforations. It was found that the strength of the bricks and the number of confining elements play a significant role in increasing the walls’ ultimate resistance and displacement ductility.

  12. Differential responses of cell wall bound phenolic compounds in sensitive and tolerant varieties of rice in response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Poulami; De, Bratati

    2017-10-03

    In plants, cell wall bound phenolics change in response to stress. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of NaCl induced stress on wall bound phenolics in four rice varieties, of which two (Bhutnath, Nonabokra) were salt tolerant and two (MTU 7029, Sujala) were salt sensitive. After germination, seedlings were grown in hydroponic solution and subjected to salinity stress (25 mM, 50 mM, 100 mM and 150 mM NaCl) on day 12. Wall bound phenolic compounds were determined by GC-MS based metabolite analysis. Total seven wall bound phenols were identified from the leaf tissues and eight from the root tissues. Ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid were found in all the four varieties. After NaCl treatment, these two wall bound phenols increased in the leaves of tolerant varieties only. Significant inverse correlation between leaf length and leaf fresh weight with wall bound ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid in Nonabokra suggests the positive role of these wall bound phenolics in salt tolerance.

  13. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yeob Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs, has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of low-level in the open area and high-level in the enclosed area. The main objectives of this paper are to study the effects of applying different load applications and compare the dynamic responses of the blast wall. To do so, various kinds of blast pressures were measured by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations on the target area. Nonlinear finite element analyses of the blast wall under two types of identified dynamic loadings were also conducted.

  14. Lymphangiogenic growth factor responsiveness is modulated by postnatal lymphatic vessel maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpanen, Terhi; Wirzenius, Maria; Mäkinen, Taija; Veikkola, Tanja; Haisma, Hidde J; Achen, Marc G; Stacker, Steven A; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Alitalo, Kari

    Lymphatic vessel plasticity and stability are of considerable importance when attempting to treat diseases associated with the lymphatic vasculature. Development of lymphatic vessels during embryogenesis is dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C but not VEGF-D. Using a recombinant

  15. Asymmetric Response of Ferroelastic Domain-Wall Motion under Applied Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Michael L; Liu, Shi; Winkler, Christopher R; Damodaran, Anoop R; Grinberg, Ilya; Martin, Lane W; Rappe, Andrew M; Taheri, Mitra L

    2016-02-10

    The switching of domains in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials plays a central role in their application to next-generation computer systems, sensing applications, and memory storage. A detailed understanding of the response to electric fields and the switching behavior in the presence of complex domain structures and extrinsic effects (e.g., defects and dislocations) is crucial for the design of improved ferroelectrics. In this work, in situ transmission electron microscopy is coupled with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore the response of 71° ferroelastic domain walls in BiFeO3 with various orientations under applied electric-field excitation. We observe that 71° domain walls can have intrinsically asymmetric responses to opposing biases. In particular, when the electric field has a component normal to the domain wall, forward and backward domain-wall velocities can be dramatically different for equal and opposite fields. Additionally, the presence of defects and dislocations can strongly affect the local switching behaviors through pinning or nucleation of the domain walls. These results offer insight for controlled ferroelastic domain manipulation via electric-field engineering.

  16. Simulated Microgravity Regulates Gene Transcript Profiles of 2T3 Preosteoblasts: Comparison of the Random Positioning Machine and the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mamta J.; Liu, Wenbin; Sykes, Michelle C.; Ward, Nancy E.; Risin, Semyon A.; Risin, Diana; Hanjoong, Jo

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity of spaceflight induces bone loss due in part to decreased bone formation by osteoblasts. We have previously examined the microgravity-induced changes in gene expression profiles in 2T3 preosteoblasts using the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) to simulate microgravity conditions. Here, we hypothesized that exposure of preosteoblasts to an independent microgravity simulator, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), induces similar changes in differentiation and gene transcript profiles, resulting in a more confined list of gravi-sensitive genes that may play a role in bone formation. In comparison to static 1g controls, exposure of 2T3 cells to RWV for 3 days inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, and downregulated 61 genes and upregulated 45 genes by more than two-fold as shown by microarray analysis. The microarray results were confirmed with real time PCR for downregulated genes osteomodulin, bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), runx2, and parathyroid hormone receptor 1. Western blot analysis validated the expression of three downregulated genes, BMP4, peroxiredoxin IV, and osteoglycin, and one upregulated gene peroxiredoxin I. Comparison of the microarrays from the RPM and the RWV studies identified 14 gravi-sensitive genes that changed in the same direction in both systems. Further comparison of our results to a published database showing gene transcript profiles of mechanically loaded mouse tibiae revealed 16 genes upregulated by the loading that were shown to be downregulated by RWV and RPM. These mechanosensitive genes identified by the comparative studies may provide novel insights into understanding the mechanisms regulating bone formation and potential targets of countermeasure against decreased bone formation both in astronauts and in general patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

  17. The CWI Pathway: Regulation of the Transcriptional Adaptive Response to Cell Wall Stress in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Sanz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are surrounded by an essential structure, the cell wall, which not only confers cell shape but also protects cells from environmental stress. As a consequence, yeast cells growing under cell wall damage conditions elicit rescue mechanisms to provide maintenance of cellular integrity and fungal survival. Through transcriptional reprogramming, yeast modulate the expression of genes important for cell wall biogenesis and remodeling, metabolism and energy generation, morphogenesis, signal transduction and stress. The yeast cell wall integrity (CWI pathway, which is very well conserved in other fungi, is the key pathway for the regulation of this adaptive response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the yeast transcriptional program elicited to counterbalance cell wall stress situations, the role of the CWI pathway in the regulation of this program and the importance of the transcriptional input received by other pathways. Modulation of this adaptive response through the CWI pathway by positive and negative transcriptional feedbacks is also discussed. Since all these regulatory mechanisms are well conserved in pathogenic fungi, improving our knowledge about them will have an impact in the developing of new antifungal therapies.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Structural Response of Corrugated Blast Wall Depending on Blast Load Pulse Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Min Sohn

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrocarbon explosions are one of most hazardous events for workers on offshore platforms. To protect structures against explosion loads, corrugated blast walls are typically installed. However, the profiles of real explosion loads are quite different depending on the congestion and confinement of Topside structures. As the level of congestion and confinement increases, the explosion load increases by up to 8 bar, and the rising time of the load decreases. This study primarily aims to investigate the structural behavior characteristics of corrugated blast walls under different types of explosion loadings. Four loading shapes were applied in the structural response analysis, which utilized a dynamic nonlinear finite element method.

  19. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  20. Nonlinear response analysis and experimental verification for thin-walled plates to thermal-acoustic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundong SHA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For large deflection strongly nonlinear response problem of thin-walled structure to thermal-acoustic load, thermal-acoustic excitation test and corresponding simulation analysis for clamped metallic thin-walled plate have been implemented. Comparing calculated values with experimental values shows the consistency and verifies the effectiveness of calculation method and model for thin-walled plate subjected to thermal-acoustic load. Then this paper further completes dynamic response calculation for the cross reinforcement plate under different thermal-acoustic load combinations. Based on the obtained time-domain displacement response, analyses about structure vibration forms are mainly focused on three typical motions of post-buckled plate, indicating that the relative strength between thermal load and acoustic load determines jump forms of plate. The Probability spectrum Density Functions (PDF of displacement response were drawn and analyzed by employing statistical analysis method, and it clearly shows that the PDF of post-buckled plate exhibits bimodal phenomena. Then the Power Spectral Density (PSD functions were used to analyze variations of response frequencies and corresponding peaks with the increase of temperatures, as well as how softening and hardening areas of the plate are determined. In the last section, this paper discusses the change laws of tensile stress and compressive stress in pre/post buckling areas, and gives the reasons for N glyph trend of the stress Root Mean Square (RMS. Keywords: Buckling, Experimental verification, Nonlinear response, Power spectral density, Probability spectrum density, Snap-through, Thermal-acoustic load, Thin-walled structure

  1. The role of beneficial bacteria wall elasticity in regulating innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Мokrozub, Viktoria V; Lazarenko, Liudmyla M; Sichel, Liubov M; Babenko, Lidia P; Lytvyn, Petro M; Demchenko, Olga M; Melnichenko, Yulia O; Boyko, Nadiya V; Biavati, Bruno; DiGioia, Diana; Bubnov, Rostyslav V; Spivak, Mykola Ya

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have great potential to contribute to development of healthy dietary regimes, preventive care, and an integrated approach to immunity-related disease management. The bacterial wall is a dynamic entity, depending on many components and playing an essential role in modulating immune response. The impact of cell wall elasticity on the beneficial effects of probiotic strains has not been sufficiently studied. The aim was to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria strains on phagocytic system cells (macrophages) as related to bacterial wall elasticity, estimated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We conducted studies on Balb/c line mice 18-20 g in weight using lyophilized strains of LAB-Lactobacillus acidophilus IMV B-7279, Lactobacillus casei IMV B-7280, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMV B-7281, and bifidobacteria-Bifidobacterium animalis VKL and Bifidobacterium animalis VKB. We cultivated the macrophages obtained from the peritoneal cavity of mice individually with the strains of LAB and bifidobacteria and evaluated their effect on macrophages, oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity, nitric oxide production, and immunoregulatory cytokines. We used AFM scanning to estimate bacterial cell wall elasticity. All strains had a stimulating effect on the functional activity of macrophages and ability to produce NO/NO2 in vitro. Lactobacilli strains increased the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ in vitro. The AFM demonstrated different cell wall elasticity levels in various strains of LAB and bifidobacteria. The rigidity of the cell walls among lactobacilli was distributed as follows: Lactobacillus acidophilus IMV B-7279 > Lactobacillus casei IMV B-7280 > Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMV B-7281; among the strains of bifidobacteria: B. animalis VKB > B. animalis VKL. Probiotic strain survival in the macrophages depended on the bacterial cell wall elasticity and on the time of their joint cultivation. LAB

  2. Control of the C. albicans cell wall damage response by transcriptional regulator Cas5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both response and regulation may be conserved in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. We have tested this hypothesis by using a new C. albicans genetic resource: we have screened mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes for sensitivity to the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor caspofungin. We find that the zinc finger protein CaCas5, which lacks a unique ortholog in S. cerevisiae, governs expression of many CWI genes. CaRlm1 has a modest role in this response. The transcriptional coactivator CaAda2 is also required for expression of many CaCas5-dependent genes, as expected if CaCas5 recruits CaAda2 to activate target gene transcription. Many caspofungin-induced C. albicans genes specify endoplasmic reticulum and secretion functions. Such genes are not induced in S. cerevisiae, but promote its growth in caspofungin. We have used a new resource to identify a key C. albicans transcriptional regulator of CWI genes and antifungal sensitivity. Our gene expression findings indicate that both divergent and conserved response genes may have significant functional roles. Our strategy may be broadly useful for identification of pathogen-specific regulatory pathways and critical response genes.

  3. Speaking up: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Veirs, Val; Emmons, Candice K; Veirs, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of anthropogenic sound exposure on the vocal behavior of free-ranging killer whales. Endangered Southern Resident killer whales inhabit areas including the urban coastal waters of Puget Sound near Seattle, WA, where anthropogenic sounds are ubiquitous, particularly those from motorized vessels. A calibrated recording system was used to measure killer whale call source levels and background noise levels (1-40 kHz). Results show that whales increased their call amplitude by 1 dB for every 1 dB increase in background noise levels. Furthermore, nearby vessel counts were positively correlated with these observed background noise levels.

  4. The Role of Plant Cell Wall Proteins in Response to Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyuben Zagorchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary agriculture is facing new challenges with the increasing population and demand for food on Earth and the decrease in crop productivity due to abiotic stresses such as water deficit, high salinity, and extreme fluctuations of temperatures. The knowledge of plant stress responses, though widely extended in recent years, is still unable to provide efficient strategies for improvement of agriculture. The focus of study has been shifted to the plant cell wall as a dynamic and crucial component of the plant cell that could immediately respond to changes in the environment. The investigation of plant cell wall proteins, especially in commercially important monocot crops revealed the high involvement of this compartment in plants stress responses, but there is still much more to be comprehended. The aim of this review is to summarize the available data on this issue and to point out the future areas of interest that should be studied in detail.

  5. Characteristics of the response of the iliac artery to wall shear stress in the anaesthetized pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R F; Snow, H M

    2007-07-15

    The functional significance of shear stress-induced vasodilatation in large conduit arteries is unclear since changes in the diameter have little effect on the resistance to blood flow. However, changes in diameter have a relatively large effect on wall shear stress which suggests that the function of flow-mediated dilatation is to reduce wall shear stress. The mean and pulsatile components of shear stress vary widely throughout the arterial system and areas of low mean and high amplitude of wall shear stress are prone to the development of atheroma. In this study, using an in vivo model with the ability to control flow rate and amplitude of flow independently, we investigated the characteristics of the response of the iliac artery to variations in both the mean and amplitude of wall shear stress. The results of this study confirm that increases in mean wall shear stress are an important stimulus for the release of nitric oxide by the endothelium as indicated by changes in arterial diameter and show for the first time, in vivo, that increases in the amplitude of the pulsatile component of shear stress have a small but significant inhibitory effect on this response. A negative feedback mechanism was identified whereby increases in shear stress brought about by increases in blood flow are reduced by the release of nitric oxide from the endothelium causing dilatation of the artery, thus decreasing the stimulus to cell adhesion and, through a direct action of nitric oxide, inhibiting the process of cell adhesion. The results also provide an explanation for the uneven distribution of atheroma throughout the arterial system, which is related to the ratio of pulsatile to mean shear stress and consequent variability in the production of NO.

  6. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the mole...

  7. Bilateral carotid artery injury response in side impact using a vessel model integrated with a human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Yu, Mao M; Martin, R Shayn; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2009-10-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant's neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  8. The Aspergillus niger MADS-box transcription factor RlmA is required for cell wall reinforcement in response to cell wall stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damveld, R.A.; Arentshorst, M.; Franken, A.; Kuyk, P.A. van; Klis, F.M.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Ram, A.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    In Aspergillus niger, the genes coding for glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (gfaA) and α-1,3-glucan synthase (agsA) are induced in response to cell wall stress. In silico analysis of the promoter region of the two genes revealed the presence of putative DNA binding sites for

  9. Cell wall modifications in maize pulvini in response to gravitational stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qisen; Pettolino, Filomena A; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Rafalski, J Antoni; Tingey, Scott; Taylor, Jillian; Shirley, Neil J; Hayes, Kevin; Beatty, Mary; Abrams, Suzanne R; Zaharia, L Irina; Burton, Rachel A; Bacic, Antony; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2011-08-01

    Changes in cell wall polysaccharides, transcript abundance, metabolite profiles, and hormone concentrations were monitored in the upper and lower regions of maize (Zea mays) pulvini in response to gravistimulation, during which maize plants placed in a horizontal position returned to the vertical orientation. Heteroxylan levels increased in the lower regions of the pulvini, together with lignin, but xyloglucans and heteromannan contents decreased. The degree of substitution of heteroxylan with arabinofuranosyl residues decreased in the lower pulvini, which exhibited increased mechanical strength as the plants returned to the vertical position. Few or no changes in noncellulosic wall polysaccharides could be detected on the upper side of the pulvinus, and crystalline cellulose content remained essentially constant in both the upper and lower pulvinus. Microarray analyses showed that spatial and temporal changes in transcript profiles were consistent with the changes in wall composition that were observed in the lower regions of the pulvinus. In addition, the microarray analyses indicated that metabolic pathways leading to the biosynthesis of phytohormones were differentially activated in the upper and lower regions of the pulvinus in response to gravistimulation. Metabolite profiles and measured hormone concentrations were consistent with the microarray data, insofar as auxin, physiologically active gibberellic acid, and metabolites potentially involved in lignin biosynthesis increased in the elongating cells of the lower pulvinus.

  10. Cell Wall Modifications in Maize Pulvini in Response to Gravitational Stress1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qisen; Pettolino, Filomena A.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Rafalski, J. Antoni; Tingey, Scott; Taylor, Jillian; Shirley, Neil J.; Hayes, Kevin; Beatty, Mary; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Zaharia, L. Irina; Burton, Rachel A.; Bacic, Antony; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in cell wall polysaccharides, transcript abundance, metabolite profiles, and hormone concentrations were monitored in the upper and lower regions of maize (Zea mays) pulvini in response to gravistimulation, during which maize plants placed in a horizontal position returned to the vertical orientation. Heteroxylan levels increased in the lower regions of the pulvini, together with lignin, but xyloglucans and heteromannan contents decreased. The degree of substitution of heteroxylan with arabinofuranosyl residues decreased in the lower pulvini, which exhibited increased mechanical strength as the plants returned to the vertical position. Few or no changes in noncellulosic wall polysaccharides could be detected on the upper side of the pulvinus, and crystalline cellulose content remained essentially constant in both the upper and lower pulvinus. Microarray analyses showed that spatial and temporal changes in transcript profiles were consistent with the changes in wall composition that were observed in the lower regions of the pulvinus. In addition, the microarray analyses indicated that metabolic pathways leading to the biosynthesis of phytohormones were differentially activated in the upper and lower regions of the pulvinus in response to gravistimulation. Metabolite profiles and measured hormone concentrations were consistent with the microarray data, insofar as auxin, physiologically active gibberellic acid, and metabolites potentially involved in lignin biosynthesis increased in the elongating cells of the lower pulvinus. PMID:21697508

  11. The Influence of Infill Wall Topology and Seismic Characteristics on the Response and Damage Distribution in Frame Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Nanos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the effects of infill wall existence and arrangement in the seismic response of frame structures utilising the global structural damage index after Park/Ang (GDIPA and the maximum interstorey drift ratio (MISDR to express structural seismic response. Five different infill wall topologies of a 10-storey frame structure have been selected and analysed presenting an improved damage distribution model for infill wall bearing frames, hence promoting the use of nonstructural elements as a means of improving frame structural seismic behaviour and highlighting important aspects of structural response, demonstrating the suitability of such element implementation beyond their intended architectural scope.

  12. Experimental, numerical, and analytical studies on the seismic response of steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epackachi, Siamak

    The seismic performance of rectangular steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls is assessed for application to buildings and mission-critical infrastructure. The SC walls considered in this study were composed of two steel faceplates and infill concrete. The steel faceplates were connected together and to the infill concrete using tie rods and headed studs, respectively. The research focused on the in-plane behavior of flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. An experimental program was executed in the NEES laboratory at the University at Buffalo and was followed by numerical and analytical studies. In the experimental program, four large-size specimens were tested under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. The design variables considered in the testing program included wall thickness, reinforcement ratio, and slenderness ratio. The aspect ratio (height-to-length) of the four walls was 1.0. Each SC wall was installed on top of a re-usable foundation block. A bolted baseplate to RC foundation connection was used for all four walls. The walls were identified to be flexure- and flexure-shear critical. The progression of damage in the four walls was identical, namely, cracking and crushing of the infill concrete at the toes of the walls, outward buckling and yielding of the steel faceplates near the base of the wall, and tearing of the faceplates at their junctions with the baseplate. A robust finite element model was developed in LS-DYNA for nonlinear cyclic analysis of the flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. The DYNA model was validated using the results of the cyclic tests of the four SC walls. The validated and benchmarked models were then used to conduct a parametric study, which investigated the effects of wall aspect ratio, reinforcement ratio, wall thickness, and uniaxial concrete compressive strength on the in-plane response of SC walls. Simplified analytical models, suitable for preliminary analysis and design of SC walls, were

  13. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 155 - Determining and Evaluating Required Response Resources for Vessel Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... significant wave heights listed for the applicable operating environment. The Coast Guard may require...,360 Since the requirements for Tier 1 for inland and nearshore exceed the caps, the vessel owner would... Operating Environment Significant Wave Height 1 (feet) Sea State Rivers & Canals ≤1 1 Inland ≤3 2 Great...

  14. Influence of Transient Thermal Response of Solid Wall on Bubble Dynamics in Pool Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of single bubble pool boiling process including transient thermal response of solid wall is performed using the ghost fluid method and the level set method for the sharp interface representation. The results show that non-physical initial condition in the numerical simulation deeply affects the process of bubble growth, and then multi-cycle simulation is necessary to eliminate its influence. It is shown by the present results that two nucleate criteria, i.e. constant waiting time and constant nucleate superheat, for determining the appearance time for the subsequent bubble lead to the same quasi-steady process of bubble growth if they are matched with each other. A periodically expanding and receding thermal “hollow” can be observed inside solid wall underneath the growing bubble. The recovery of the temperature on the nucleate site and the thermal boundary layer near the heating surface is influenced by transient heat conduction inside solid wall, which can affect evidently bubble thermal dynamics and heat transfer.

  15. Influence of Transient Thermal Response of Solid Wall on Bubble Dynamics in Pool Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of single bubble pool boiling process including transient thermal response of solid wall is performed using the ghost fluid method and the level set method for the sharp interface representation. The results show that non-physical initial condition in the numerical simulation deeply affects the process of bubble growth, and then multicycle simulation is necessary to eliminate its influence. It is shown by the present results that two nucleate criteria, i.e. constant waiting time and constant nucleate superheat, for determining the appearance time for the subsequent bubble lead to the same quasi-steady process of bubble growth if they are matched with each other. A periodically expanding and receding thermal “hollow” can be observed inside solid wall underneath the growing bubble. The recovery of the temperature on the nucleate site and the thermal boundary layer near the heating surface is influenced by transient heat conduction inside solid wall, which can affect evidently bubble thermal dynamics and heat transfer.

  16. Response reduction methods for base isolated buildings with collision to retaining walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Akiko; Nishimura, Nao; Yamashita, Yuki; Taga, Kenzo; Fujitani, Hideo; Mukai, Yoichi

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes a new damper that can change the damping force depending on the response displacement and response velocity. The proposed damper reduces the damage of seismic-isolated structures which undergo excessive deformation during huge earthquakes, without lowering the performance of the seismic-isolation system during medium to small magnitude earthquakes. We investigate the effects of using the proposed attenuator on the responses of a superstructure model to seismic motion that causes collision with retaining walls. An experiment using a shaking table is conducted, and the results from the test are compared with those from numerical analyses. The test results agree approximately with the numerical analysis results except for the absolute acceleration results in collision cases.

  17. Single walled carbon nanotube/Si heterojunctions for high responsivity photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, M.; Scagliotti, M.; De Crescenzi, M.; Crivellari, M.; Prosposito, P.; Cacciotti, I.; Castrucci, P.

    2017-10-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube/n-Si (SWCNT/n-Si) hetero-junctions have been obtained by depositing SWCNT ultra-thin films on the surface of an n-Si substrate by dry transfer method. The as obtained junctions are photo sensitive in the measured wavelength range (300-1000 nm) and show zero bias responsivity and detectivity values of the order of 1 A W-1 and 1014 Jones respectively, which are higher than those previously observed in carbon based devices. Moreover, under on-off light excitation, the junctions show response speed as fast as 1 μs or better and noise equivalent powers comparable to commercial Si photomultipliers. Current-voltage measurements in dark and under illumination suggest that the devices consist of Schottky and semiconductor/semiconductor junctions both contributing to the fast and high responses observed.

  18. Immune responses of a wall lizard to whole-body exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Despoina; Sagonas, Kostas; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Margaritis, Lukas H; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E; Valakos, Efstratios D

    2016-01-01

    During the last three decades, the number of devices that emit non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the wireless communication spectrum has rapidly increased and possible effects on living organisms have become a major concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of radiofrequency EMR emitted by a widely used wireless communication device, namely the Digital Enhanced Communication Telephony (DECT) base, on the immune responses of the Aegean wall lizard (Podarcis erhardii). Adult male lizards were exposed 24 h/day for 8 weeks to 1880-1900 MHz DECT base radiation at average electric field intensity of 3.2 V/m. Immune reactivity was assessed using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin swelling and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) tests. Our results revealed a noticeable suppression (approximately 45%) of inflammatory responses in EMR-exposed lizards compared to sham-exposed animals. T cell-mediated responses were marginally affected. Daily radiofrequency EMR exposure seems to affect, at least partially, the immunocompetence of the Aegean wall lizard.

  19. An in vivo pilot study of a microporous thin film nitinol-covered stent to assess the effect of porosity and pore geometry on device interaction with the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Youngjae; Kealey, Colin P; Levi, Daniel S; Rigberg, David A; Chen, Yanfei; Tillman, Bryan W; Mohanchandra, K P; Shayan, Mahdis; Carman, Gregory P

    2017-03-01

    Sputter-deposited thin film nitinol constructs with various micropatterns were fabricated to evaluate their effect on the vessel wall in vivo when used as a covering for commercially available stents. Thin film nitinol constructs were used to cover stents and deployed in non-diseased swine arteries. Swine were sacrificed after approximately four weeks and the thin film nitinol-covered stents were removed for histopathologic evaluation. Histopathology revealed differences in neointimal thickness that correlated with the thin film nitinol micropattern. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with a lateral × vertical length = 20 × 40 µm diamond pattern had minimal neointimal growth with well-organized cell architecture and little evidence of ongoing inflammation. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with smaller fenestrations exhibited a relatively thick neointimal layer with inflammation and larger fenestrations showed migration of inflammatory and smooth muscle cells through the micro fenestrations. This "proof-of-concept" study suggests that there may be an ideal thin film nitinol porosity and pore geometry to encourage endothelialization and incorporation of the device into the vessel wall. Future work will be needed to determine the optimal pore size and geometry to minimize neointimal proliferation and in-stent stenosis.

  20. Use of response envelopes for seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete walls and slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ile, Nicolas; Frau, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.frau@cea.fr

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Proposal of a method for application of the elliptical envelope to RC shell elements. • Proposal of new algorithms for the seismic margin evaluation for RC shell elements. • Verification of a RC wall 3D structure, using the proposed assessment approach. - Abstract: Seismic safety evaluations of existing nuclear facilities are usually based on the assumption of structural linearity. For the design basis earthquake (DBE), it is reasonable to apply a conventional evaluation of the seismic safety of building structures and carry out a linear elastic analysis to assess the load effects on structural elements. Estimating the seismic capacity of a structural element requires an estimation of the critical combination of responses acting in this structural element and compare this combination with the capacity of the element. By exploiting the response-spectrum-based procedure for predicting the response envelopes in linear structures formulated by Menun and Der Kiureghian (2000a), algorithms are developed for the seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete shell finite elements. These algorithms facilitate the comparison of the response-spectrum-based envelopes to prescribed capacity surfaces for the purpose of assessing the safety margin of this kind of structures. The practical application of elliptical response envelopes in case of shell finite elements is based on the use of layer models such as those developed by Marti (1990), which transfer the generalized stress field to three layers under the assumption that the two outer layers carry membrane forces and the internal layer carries only the out-of-plane shears. The utility of the assessment approach is discussed with reference to a case study of a 3D structure made of reinforced concrete walls.

  1. Development of a dynamic in vitro model of a stented blood vessel to evaluate the effects of stent strut material selection and surface coating on smooth muscle cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Bradley Huegh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in The United States and Europe, accounting for approximately half of all deaths. The most common form of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis, which is characterized by the formation of fatty atheromatous plaques that can grow to occlude the vessel lumen, thus causing ischemia distal to the occlusion. This is commonly treated using balloon angioplasty, which is usually done in conjunction with the deployment of a stent. Stent deployment helps hold the vessel open following the local injury caused by balloon inflation and prevents elastic recoil and subsequent negative remodeling. Stenting has been shown to significantly reduce restenosis rates from approximately 20-50% without a stent to about 10-30% with stent deployment. However, restenosis still remains the main cause of long-term stent failure. In basic terms, a balloon angioplasty procedure is a forceful displacement of an atherosclerotic lesion serving to widen the vessel lumen to increase blood flow. This procedure causes stretching of the vessel wall, tears in the atherosclerotic plaques, and general damage to the vessel in turn signaling a complex cascade of thrombosis, inflammation, intimal thickening, and vascular remodeling. Stent deployment also further complicates the immunological response by triggering a foreign body response from the implantation of a biomaterial into the body. When performing an angioplasty procedure, particularly in conjunction with stent deployment, a certain degree of vascular injury is inevitable. However, the initial injury can be further complicated by the body's local reaction to the implanted biomaterial, the severity of which can ultimately dictate the degree of restenosis and subsequently affect procedural success. The proliferative response of VSMCs to the various afore mentioned stimuli results in the formation of often copious amounts of neointimal tissue, generally known as intimal hyperplasia. The

  2. Innovative Seismic Response-Controlled System with Shear Wall and Concentrated Dampers in Lower Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Tani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new structural control system using damper-installed shear walls in lower stories with reduced stiffness is proposed for vibration control of high-rise RC buildings. That system has some design variables, i.e., height of shear wall, degree of stiffness reduction at lower stories, and quantity of dampers. In this paper, some parametric studies on the shear-beam model with a stiff beam against two kinds of ground motion, a pulse-type sinusoidal wave and a resonant sinusoidal wave, are conducted to clarify the vibration characteristics of the proposed structural control system. It is shown that the optimal combination of design parameters depends on the input ground motion. It is also shown that it is possible to prevent from increasing the response under the one-cycle sinusoidal input resonant to the lowest mode and reduce the steady-state response under the harmonic input with the resonant fundamental period by reducing the stiffness in the lower structure and increasing the damper deformation.

  3. Glycosylation of Candida albicans cell wall proteins is critical for induction of innate immune responses and apoptosis of epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Wagener

    Full Text Available C. albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen of humans, causing local and superficial mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Given that the key structure mediating host-C. albicans interactions is the fungal cell wall, we aimed to identify features of the cell wall inducing epithelial responses and be associated with fungal pathogenesis. We demonstrate here the importance of cell wall protein glycosylation in epithelial immune activation with a predominant role for the highly branched N-glycosylation residues. Moreover, these glycan moieties induce growth arrest and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Using an in vitro model of oral candidosis we demonstrate, that apoptosis induction by C. albicans wild-type occurs in early stage of infection and strongly depends on intact cell wall protein glycosylation. These novel findings demonstrate that glycosylation of the C. albicans cell wall proteins appears essential for modulation of epithelial immunity and apoptosis induction, both of which may promote fungal pathogenesis in vivo.

  4. Tuning the nonlinear response of (6,5)-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aréstegui, O. S.; Silva, E. C. O.; Baggio, A. L.; Gontijo, R. N.; Hickmann, J. M.; Fantini, C.; Alencar, M. A. R. C.; Fonseca, E. J. S.

    2017-04-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear optical properties of (6,5)-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersions are investigated using the thermally managed Z-scan technique. As the (6,5) SWCNTs presented a strong resonance in the range of 895-1048 nm, the nonlinear refractive index (n2) and the absorption coefficients (β) measurements were performed tuning the laser exactly around absorption peak of the (6,5) SWCNTs. It is observed that the nonlinear response is very sensitive to the wavelength and the spectral behavior of n2 is strongly correlated to the tubes one-photon absorption band, presenting also a peak when the laser photon energy is near the tube resonance energy. This result suggests that a suitable selection of nanotubes types may provide optimized nonlinear optical responses in distinct regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Analysis of the figures of merit indicated that this material is promising for ultrafast nonlinear optical applications under near infrared excitation.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction analysis on the effect of vessel wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the blood flow in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2012-11-01

    The effect of artery wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the flow field is investigated using three-dimensional finite element method for simulating the blood flow. To avoid the complexity due to the necessity of additional mechanical constraints, we use the combined formulation which includes both the fluid and structural equations of motion into single coupled variational equation. A P2P1 Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to achieve mesh movement. The Newmark method is employed for solving the dynamic equilibrium equations for linear elastic solid mechanics. The pulsatile, incompressible flows of Newtonian fluids constrained in the flexible wall are analyzed with Womersley velocity profile at the inlet and constant pressure at the outlet. The study shows that the stiffness of carotid artery wall affects significantly the flow phenomena during the pulse cycle. Similarly, it is found that the flow field is also strongly influenced by wall hypertrophy. This work was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program and Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0079936 & 2011-0029613).

  6. Analytical Prediction of the Seismic Response of a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.; Tsurumaki, S.

    1999-03-19

    Under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) is investigating the seismic behavior of a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV) through scale-model testing using the high-performance shaking table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory. A series of tests representing design-level seismic ground motions was initially conducted to gather valuable experimental measurements for use in design verification. Additional tests will be conducted with increasing amplifications of the seismic input until a structural failure of the test model occurs. In a cooperative program with NUPEC, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), is conducting analytical research on the seismic behavior of RCCV structures. As part of this program, pretest analytical predictions of the model tests are being performed. The dynamic time-history analysis utilizes a highly detailed concrete constitutive model applied to a three-dimensional finite element representation of the test structure. This paper describes the details of the analysis model and provides analysis results.

  7. Computational analysis of the effect of the control model of intraaorta pump on ventricular unloading and vessel response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Kaiyun; Chang, Yu; Gao, Bin; Liu, Youjun

    2012-01-01

    The intraaorta pump is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) whose hemodynamic effects on the circulatory system is unknown. This article aims to evaluate the different effects on the circulatory system supported by the intraaorta pump. In this article, the pump is controlled by three control strategies, including the continuous flow method, the constant rotational speed, and the constant pressure head. A cardiovascular pump system, which includes cardiovascular circulation, intraaorta pump, and regulating mechanisms of systemic circulation, has been proposed. Left ventricle pressure (LVP), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and left ventricular external work (LVEW) were used to evaluate the degree of ventricular unloading. The pulsatile index (PI), which is defined as a ratio of pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure (MAP), was used to evaluate the effect of the vessel response by three control strategies. The comparison results showed that LVP and EDV were lower than those measured before the intraaorta pump was implanted. For LVEW, the constant pressure head strategy provided a superior ventricular unloading compared with other strategies. Support of the pump led to the lower pulsatility by the three models. However, the PI of the constant pressure head was the most at 0.37. In conclusion, these results indicate that the intraaorta pump controlled by constant pressure head strategy provides superior ventricular unloading and pulsatility of the vessel.

  8. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  9. Do quantitative vessel and pit characters account for ion-mediated changes in the hydraulic conductance of angiosperm xylem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Steven; Gortan, Emmanuelle; Lens, Frederic; Lo Gullo, Maria Assunta; Salleo, Sebastiano; Scholz, Alexander; Stein, Anke; Trifilò, Patrizia; Nardini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    • The hydraulic conductance of angiosperm xylem has been suggested to vary with changes in sap solute concentrations because of intervessel pit properties. • The magnitude of the 'ionic effect' was linked with vessel and pit dimensions in 20 angiosperm species covering 13 families including six Lauraceae species. • A positive correlation was found between ionic effect and vessel grouping parameters, especially the portion of vessel walls in contact with neighbouring vessels. Species with intervessel contact fraction (F(C)) values 0.1 exhibited a response between 10% and 32%. The ionic effect increased linearly with the mean fraction of the total vessel wall area occupied by intervessel pits as well as with the intervessel contact length. However, no significant correlation occurred between the ionic effect and total intervessel pit membrane area per vessel, vessel diameter, vessel length, vessel wall area, and intervessel pit membrane thickness. • Quantitative vessel and pit characters are suggested to contribute to interspecific variation of the ionic effect, whereas chemical properties of intervessel pit membranes are likely to play an additional role. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  10. Target or barrier? The cell wall of early- and later- diverging plants vs cadmium toxicity: differences in the response mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eParrotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialization and urbanization result in emission of pollutants in the environment including toxic heavy metals, as cadmium and lead. Among the different heavy metals contaminating the environment, cadmium raises great concern, as it is ecotoxic and as such can heavily impact ecosystems. The cell wall is the first structure of plant cells to come in contact with heavy metals. Its composition, characterized by proteins, polysaccharides and in some instances lignin and other phenolic compounds, confers the ability to bind non-covalently and/or covalently heavy metals via functional groups. A strong body of evidence in the literature has shown the role of the cell wall in heavy metal response: it sequesters heavy metals, but at the same time its synthesis and composition can be severely affected. The present review analyzes the dual property of plant cell walls, i.e. barrier and target of heavy metals, by taking Cd toxicity as example. Following a summary of the known physiological and biochemical responses of plants to Cd, the review compares the wall-related mechanisms in early- and later-diverging land plants, by considering the diversity in cell wall composition. By doing so, common as well as unique response mechanisms to metal/cadmium toxicity are identified among plant phyla and discussed. After discussing the role of hyperaccumulators’ cell walls as a particular case, the review concludes by considering important aspects for plant engineering.

  11. Flexible Infrared Responsive Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Form-Stable Phase Change Material Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunming; Mi, Hongyi; Zheng, Qifeng; Ma, Zhenqiang; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-09-30

    Flexible infrared (IR)-responsive materials, such as polymer nanocomposites, that exhibit high levels of IR responses and short response times are highly desirable for various IR sensing applications. However, the IR-induced photoresponses of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer nanocomposites are typically limited to 25%. Herein, we report on a family of unique nanocomposite films consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) uniformly distributed in a form-stable phase change material (PCM) that exhibited rapid, dramatic, reversible, and cyclic IR-regulated responses in air. The 3 wt % MWCNT/PCM nanocomposite films demonstrated cyclic, IR-regulated on/off electrical conductivity ratios of 11.6 ± 0.6 and 570.0 ± 70.5 times at IR powers of 7.3 and 23.6 mW/mm(2), respectively. The excellent performances exhibited by the MWCNT/PCM nanocomposite films were largely attributed to the IR-regulated cyclic and reversible form-stable phase transitions occurring in the PCM matrix due to MWCNT's excellent photoabsorption and thermal conversion capabilities, which subsequently affected the thickness of the interfacial PCM between adjacent conductive MWCNTs and thus the electron tunneling efficiency between the MWCNTs. Our findings suggest that these unique MWCNT/PCM nanocomposites offer promising new options for high-performance and flexible optoelectronic devices, including thermal imaging, IR sensing, and optical communication.

  12. Cell wall pectic arabinans influence the mechanical properties of Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems and their response to mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Marcus, Susan E; Chen, Jianshe; Knox, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Little is known of the dynamics of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides in response to the impact of mechanical stress on plant organs. The capacity of the imposition of a mechanical stress (periodic brushing) to reduce the height of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been used to study the role of pectic arabinans in the mechanical properties and stress responsiveness of a plant organ. The arabinan-deficient-1 (arad1) mutation that affects arabinan structures in epidermal cell walls of inflorescence stems is demonstrated to reduce the impact on inflorescence stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The arabinan-deficient-2 (arad2) mutation, that does not have detectable impact on arabinan structures, is also shown to reduce the impact on stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The LM13 linear arabinan epitope is specifically detected in epidermal cell walls of the younger, flexible regions of inflorescence stems and increases in abundance at the base of inflorescence stems in response to an imposed mechanical stress. The strain (percentage deformation) of stem epidermal cells in the double mutant arad1 × arad2 is lower in unbrushed plants than in wild-type plants, but rises to wild-type levels in response to brushing. The study demonstrates the complexity of arabinan structures within plant cell walls and also that their contribution to cell wall mechanical properties is a factor influencing responsiveness to mechanical stress.

  13. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Oath for Documentation of Vessels for Use by a Not-For-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 68 Shipping COAST GUARD...: EXCEPTIONS TO COASTWISE QUALIFICATION Documentation of Certain Vessels for Oil Spill Cleanup Pt. 68, Subpt. B...-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard Oath for...

  14. Primary Response Assessment Method for Concept Design of Monotonous Thin-Walled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zanic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept design methodology for monotonous, tapered thin-walled structures (wing/fuselage/ship/bridge is presented including modules for: model generation; loads; primary (longitudinal and secondary (transverse strength calculations; structural feasibility (buckling/fatigue/ultimate strength criteria; design optimization modules based on ES/GA/FFE; graphics. A method for primary strength calculation is presented in detail. It provides the dominant response field for design feasibility assessment. Bending and torsion of the structure are modelled with the accuracy required for concept design. A ‘2.5D-FEM’ model is developed by coupling a 1D-FEM model along the ‘monotonity’ axis and a 2D-FEM model(s transverse to it. The shear flow and stiffness characteristics of the cross-section for bending and pure/restrained torsion are given, based upon the warping field of the cross-section. Examples: aircraft wing and ship hull. 

  15. Cell response to single-walled carbon nanotubes in hybrid porous collagen sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous collagen sponges incorporated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared and used for 3D culture of bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). The pore structures of the sponges were controlled by using ice particulates as a porogen material. The responses of cells to SWCNTs were investigated in this 3D cell culture system by evaluation of cell functions and cellular uptake of SWCNTs. The results showed that cells adhered and spatially distributed in the porous sponges. The incorporation of SWCNTs in the porous sponges promoted cell proliferation and production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG). Confocal Raman imaging revealed that SWCNTs could be internalized by cells. The hybrid porous sponges not only provided nanostructured pore surfaces to facilitate cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion but also supplied nanomaterials for cellular uptake which may be useful for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of High-sugar and High-fat Diet on Fat Deposition and Blood Vessel Wall on Sprague Dawley Rats Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Citra Setiawan Hoei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available People nowadays tend to consume more fast food and sweetened beverages. These foods usually contain high amount sugar and fat that have effects on the body including liver.This study was conducted to explore the effects of extensive intake of sugar and fat on blood glucose and  cholesterol level as well as changes in liver. Research was conducted with experimental method using 20 Sprague Dawley rats which were divided into 4 groups; 2 controls and 2 treatments. Rats were given 5 ml sugar or lard alternatively every 2 consecutive days for 1-month and 2-month respectively. Data was retrieved include blood glucose and cholesterol level, fatty liver percentage and blood vessel thickening after intervention through HE staining. The results showed that both 1-month and 2-month intervention group has significant increase in blood glucose and cholesterol level. However, the enhancement of fatty liver percentage and number of thickened blood vessels (p<0.05 were only foundsignificant (p<0.05 in 1-month intervention group.  We concluded that high intake of sugar and fat within 1-monthintervention have significant effects on the rat body including liver. Nevertheless, it was not found significant in 2-months intervention. Further studies are still needed to analyze this incongruent result.Key words: high-sugar diet, high-fat diet, fatty liver, atherosclerosis 

  17. Cholinergic innervation of human mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Bianchi, E; Taurone, S; Mignini, F; Cavallotti, C; Artico, M

    2013-11-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmission within the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels has been poorly studied. Therefore, our aim is to analyse the cholinergic nerve fibres of lymphatic vessels using the traditional enzymatic techniques of staining, plus the biochemical modifications of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Specimens obtained from human mesenteric lymphatic vessels were subjected to the following experimental procedures: 1) drawing, cutting and staining of tissues; 2) staining of total nerve fibres; 3) enzymatic staining of cholinergic nerve fibres; 4) homogenisation of tissues; 5) biochemical amount of proteins; 6) biochemical amount of AChE activity; 6) quantitative analysis of images; 7) statistical analysis of data. The mesenteric lymphatic vessels show many AChE positive nerve fibres around their wall with an almost plexiform distribution. The incubation time was performed at 1 h (partial activity) and 6 h (total activity). Moreover, biochemical dosage of the same enzymatic activity confirms the results obtained with morphological methods. The homogenates of the studied tissues contain strong AChE activity. In our study, the lymphatic vessels appeared to contain few cholinergic nerve fibres. Therefore, it is expected that perivascular nerve stimulation stimulates cholinergic nerves innervating the mesenteric arteries to release the neurotransmitter AChE, which activates muscarinic or nicotinic receptors to modulate adrenergic neurotransmission. These results strongly suggest, that perivascular cholinergic nerves have little or no effect on the adrenergic nerve function in mesenteric arteries. The cholinergic nerves innervating mesenteric arteries do not mediate direct vascular responses.

  18. Integral experiments on in-vessel coolability and vessel creep: results and analysis of the FOREVER-C1 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas Vaeg., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of REactor VEssel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The paper presents the experimental results and analysis of the first FOREVER-C1 test. During this experiment, the 1/10th scale pressure vessel, heated to about 900degC and pressurized to 26 bars, was subjected to creep deformation in a non-stop 24-hours test. The vessel wall displacement data clearly shows different stages of the vessel deformation due to thermal expansion, elastic, plastic and creep processes. The maximum displacement was observed at the lowermost region of the vessel lower plenum. Information on the FOREVER-C1 measured thermal characteristics and analysis of the observed thermal and structural behavior is presented. The coupled nature of thermal and mechanical processes, as well as the effect of other system conditions (such as depressurization) on the melt pool and vessel temperature responses are analyzed. (author)

  19. Pittsburgh Response to Endovascular therapy (PRE) score: optimizing patient selection for endovascular therapy for large vessel occlusion strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Aghaebrahim, Amin; Streib, Christopher; Sun, Chung-Huan; Ribo, Marc; Muchada, Marion; Nogueira, Raul; Frankel, Michael; Gupta, Rishi; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Jovin, Tudor G

    2015-11-01

    Endovascular therapy seems to benefit a subset of patients with large vessel occlusion strokes. We aimed to develop a clinically useful tool to identify patients who are likely to benefit from endovascular therapy. In a derivation cohort of consecutively treated patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion (Grady Memorial Hospital, N=247), independent predictors (pPittsburgh Response to Endovascular therapy (PRE) score as a predictor of good outcome. The PRE score was validated in two institutional cohorts (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC): N=393; Unitat d'Ictus Vall d'Hebron: N=204) and its discriminative power for good outcome was compared with other validated tools. Benefit of successful recanalization was assessed in PRE score groups. Independent predictors of good outcome in the derivation cohort (age, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS)) were used in the model: PRE score=age (years)+2×NIHSS-10 × ASPECTS. PRE score was highly predictive of good outcome in the derivation cohort (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79) and validation cohorts (UPMC: AUC=0.79; UIVH: AUC=0.72) with comparable rates of good outcome in all PRE risk quartiles. PRE was superior to Totaled Health Risks In Vascular Events (THRIVE) (p=0.03) and Stroke Prognostication using Age and NIHSS (SPAN) (p=0.007), with a trend towards superiority to Houston Intra-Arterial Therapy 2 (HIAT2) (p=0.06) and iSCORE (p=0.051) in predicting good outcomes. Better outcomes were associated with successful recanalization in patients with PRE scores -24 to +49 but not in patients with PRE scores <-24 or ≥ 50. The PRE score is a validated tool that predicts outcomes and may facilitate patient selection for endovascular therapy in anterior circulation large vessel occlusions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  1. Seismic In-Plane Response of Reinforced Concrete Frames with Masonry Infill Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Al Louzi, Rabab Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Field data gathered after destructive earthquakes indicate that infill walls interact with reinforced concrete (RC) frames in buildings during an earthquake and could cause failure mechanism different than what the frames are originally designed for. A new method to identify the failure modes of RC frames with infill walls is developed. The method requires only the simple geometric and material properties of the elements involved in the frame- wall assembly. The approach checks various possib...

  2. QUANTITATIVE INVIVO ASSESSMENT OF THE TISSUE-RESPONSE TO DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN IN ABDOMINAL-WALL DEFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUNT, JA; VANDERLAAN, JS; SCHAKENRAAD, J; WILLIAMS, DF

    We quantified the tissue response, tissue organization and patency of biodegradable patches for the repair of abdominal wall defects. We used dermal sheep collagen, cross-linked with hexamethylenediisocyanate in a model. The collagen patches were implanted either untreated or plasma polymerized with

  3. Immune responses of BALB/c mice to subcutaneously injected multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Yang, Man; Jia, Fumin; Xu, Zhen; Kong, Hua; Xu, Haiyan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been shown to have the ability to transport therapeutic and detective reagents into cells. However, the rapid advances in new carbon nanotube-based materials and technologies have raised concerns about their safety. Such concerns require a fundamental understanding of the toxicological properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the use of carbon nanotubes as drug or probe delivery platforms may depend on the prevention of stimulatory side-effects to the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immunological properties of oxidized water dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in healthy BALB/c mice. We injected the MWCNTs subcutaneously, and the immune responses of the mice were monitored over time. We show that the MWCNTs induce complement activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines early after injection of the mice, and that the levels of complement and cytokines return to normal levels over time. With the exception of the lymph nodes, there was no obvious accumulation of MWCNTs observed in the liver, spleen, kidney, or heart. In addition, we did not observe injury in the organs or lymph nodes. Our results indicate that local, subcutaneous administration of MWCNTs induces obvious short-term immunological reactions, which can be eliminated over time.

  4. Simplified Dynamic Structural Time History Response Analysis of Flexible Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck In fo rm at io n an d Te ch no lo gy L ab or at or y Barry C. White, José...Time-History Response Analysis of Flexible Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck Barry C. White and Robert M. Ebeling...clustered pile groups and subjected to barge train impact events. This software tool, Impact_Deck, is used to perform a dynamic, time- domain

  5. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  6. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Design and Implementation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano D. [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-18

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1- to 2-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. We have developed a neutron assay system for the purposes of Materials Control and Accountability (MC&A) measurements of the vessel prior to and after cleanout. We present our approach to confronting the challenges in designing, building, and testing such a system. The system was designed to meet a set of functional and operational requirements. A Monte Carlo model was developed to aid in optimizing the detector design as well as to predict the systematic uncertainty associated with confinement vessel measurements. Initial testing was performed to optimize and determine various measurement parameters, and then the system was characterized using {sup 252}Cf placed a various locations throughout the measurement system. Measurements were also performed with a {sup 252}Cf source placed inside of small steel and HDPE shells to study the effect of moderation. These measurements compare favorably with their MCNPX model equivalent, making us confident that we can rely on the Monte Carlo simulation to predict the systematic uncertainty due to variations in response to material that may be localized at different points within a vessel.

  7. The importance of connections between the cell wall integrity pathway and the unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavazi, Iran; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2014-11-01

    In the external environment, or within a host organism, filamentous fungi experience sudden changes in nutrient availability, osmolality, pH, temperature and the exposure to toxic compounds. The fungal cell wall represents the first line of defense, while also performing essential roles in morphology, development and virulence. A polarized secretion system is paramount for cell wall biosynthesis, filamentous growth, nutrient acquisition and interactions with the environment. The unique ability of filamentous fungi to secrete has resulted in their industrial adoption as fungal cell factories. Protein maturation and secretion commences in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains ER functionality during exposure to secretion and cell wall stress. UPR, therefore, influences secretion and cell wall homeostasis, which in turn impacts upon numerous fungal traits important to pathogenesis and biotechnology. Subsequently, this review describes the relevance of the cell wall and UPR systems to filamentous fungal pathogens or industrial microbes and then highlights interconnections between the two systems. Ultimately, the possible biotechnological applications of an enhanced understanding of such regulatory systems in combating fungal disease, or the removal of natural bottlenecks in protein secretion in an industrial setting, are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Vascular Mechanobiology Endothelial Cell Responses to Fluid Shear Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ando, Joji; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessel walls respond to shear stress, a fluid mechanical force generated by flowing blood, and the EC responses play an important role in the homeostasis of the circulatory system...

  9. Preliminary Structural Design of Wall-Frame Systems for Optimum Torsional Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Georgoussis, George K

    ... to any strength assignment, is incorrect. A strength allocation strategy, suitable for preliminary structural design of medium height wall-frame dual systems, is presented for allocating strength in such buildings and estimating the dependable rigidities...

  10. Thermal Response Of An Aerated Concrete Wall With Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halúzová, Dušana

    2015-06-01

    For many years Phase Change Materials (PCM) have attracted attention due to their ability to store large amounts of thermal energy. This property makes them a candidate for the use of passive heat storage. In many applications, they are used to avoid the overheating of the temperature of an indoor environment. This paper describes the behavior of phase change materials that are inbuilt in aerated concrete blocks. Two building samples of an aerated concrete wall were measured in laboratory equipment called "twin-boxes". The first box consists of a traditional aerated concrete wall; the second one has additional PCM micro-encapsulated in the wall. The heat flux through the wall was measured and compared to simulation results modeled in the ESP-r program. This experimental measurement provides a foundation for a model that can be used to analyze further building constructions.

  11. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    by the research vessels RV Gaveshani and ORV Sagar Kanya are reported. The work carried out by the three charted ships is also recorded. A short note on cruise plans for the study of ferromanganese nodules is added...

  12. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ki-Yeob; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Jae Woong; Ryu, Yong Hee; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs), has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of...

  13. Lymphatic vessels: an emerging actor in atherosclerotic plaque development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkut, Issa; Meens, Merlijn J; McKee, Thomas A; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Kwak, Brenda R

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large- to medium-sized arteries and is the main underlying cause of death worldwide. The lymphatic vasculature is critical for processes that are intimately linked to atherogenesis such as the immune response and cholesterol metabolism. However, whether lymphatic vessels truly contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is less clear despite increasing research efforts in this field. PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases were searched. In addition, key review articles were screened for relevant original publications. Current knowledge about lymphatic vessels in the arterial wall came from studies that examined the presence and location of such vessels in human atherosclerotic plaque specimens, as well as in a variety of arteries in animal models for atherosclerosis (e.g. rabbits, dogs, rats and mice). Generally, three experimental approaches have been used to investigate the functional role of plaque-associated lymphatic vessels; experimental lymphostasis was used to investigate lymphatic drainage of the arterial wall, and more recently, studies with genetic interventions and/or surgical transplantation have been performed. Lymphatic vessels seem to be mostly present in the adventitial layer of the arterial walls of animals and humans. They are involved in reverse cholesterol transport from atherosclerotic lesions, and arteries with a dense lymphatic network seem naturally protected against atherosclerosis. Lymphangiogenesis is a process that is an important part of the inflammatory loop in atherosclerosis. However, how augmenting or impeding the distribution of lymphatic vessels impacts disease progression remains to be investigated in future studies. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. The contribution of cell wall composition in the expansion of Camellia sinensis seedlings roots in response to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Masoumeh; Ghanati, Faezeh; Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Chashmi, Najmeh Ahmadian

    2017-10-11

    Treatment with aluminum triggers a unique response in tea seedlings resulting in biochemical modification of the cell wall, regulation of the activity of the loosening agents, and elongation of root. Unlike most terrestrial plants, tea (Camellia sinensis L.) responds to aluminum (Al) through the promotion of its root elongation; but the real mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon is not well understood. A plausible relationship between the modifications of the cell wall and the promotion of root elongation was examined in tea seedlings treated for 8 days with 400 µM Al. The mechanical properties of the cell wall, the composition of its polysaccharides and their capacity to absorb Al, the expression of genes, and the activities of the wall-modifying proteins were studied. With 6 h of the treatment, about 40% of the absorbed Al was bound to the cell wall; however, the amount did not increase thereafter. Meanwhile, the activity of pectin methylesterase, the level of pectin demethylation, the amounts and the average molecular mass of xyloglucan in the root apices significantly decreased upon exposure to Al, resulting in the reduction of Al binding sites. On the other hand, the activity and the gene expression of peroxidase decreased, whereas the activity and gene expression of xyloglucan-degrading enzymes, the expression of expansin A and the H (+)-ATPase4 genes increased in the Al-treated plants. Interestingly, it was accompanied by the increase of elastic and viscous extensibility of the root apices. From the results, it can be suggested that the biochemical modification of the cell walls reduces sites of Al binding to roots and triggers the activity of the loosening agents, thereby increasing the length of tea roots.

  15. C. albicans increases cell wall mannoprotein, but not mannan, in response to blood, serum and cultivation at physiological temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Michael; Greene, Rachel R; Noss, Ilka; Lowman, Douglas W; Williams, David L

    2011-09-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans is central to the yeasts ability to withstand osmotic challenge, to adhere to host cells, to interact with the innate immune system and ultimately to the virulence of the organism. Little is known about the effect of culture conditions on the cell wall structure and composition of C. albicans. We examined the effect of different media and culture temperatures on the molecular weight (Mw), polymer distribution and composition of cell wall mannan and mannoprotein complex. Strain SC5314 was inoculated from frozen stock onto yeast peptone dextrose (YPD), blood or 5% serum agar media at 30 or 37°C prior to mannan/mannoprotein extraction. Cultivation of the yeast in blood or serum at physiologic temperature resulted in an additive effect on Mw, however, cultivation media had the greatest impact on Mw. Mannan from a yeast grown on blood or serum at 30°C showed a 38.9 and 28.6% increase in Mw, when compared with mannan from YPD-grown yeast at 30°C. Mannan from the yeast pregrown on blood or serum at 37°C showed increased Mw (8.8 and 26.3%) when compared with YPD mannan at 37°C. The changes in Mw over the entire polymer distribution were due to an increase in the amount of mannoprotein (23.8-100%) and a decrease in cell wall mannan (5.7-17.3%). We conclude that C. albicans alters the composition of its cell wall, and thus its phenotype, in response to cultivation in blood, serum and/or physiologic temperature by increasing the amount of the mannoprotein and decreasing the amount of the mannan in the cell wall.

  16. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Verweij, Simone L; Schnitzler, Johan G; Stiekema, Lotte C A; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Stroes, Erik S G; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation, circulating monocytes, and bone marrow in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Arterial wall inflammation and bone marrow activity were measured using 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Monocyte phenotype was assessed with flow cytometry. The correlation between remnant levels and hematopoietic activity was validated in the CGPS (Copenhagen General Population Study). We found a 1.2-fold increase of 18 F-FDG uptake in the arterial wall in patients with FD (n=17, age 60±8 years, remnant cholesterol: 3.26 [2.07-5.71]) compared with controls (n=17, age 61±8 years, remnant cholesterol 0.29 [0.27-0.40]; P cholesterol accumulates in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells coinciding with myeloid skewing. Patients with FD have increased arterial wall and cellular inflammation. These findings imply an important inflammatory component to the atherogenicity of remnant cholesterol, contributing to the increased cardiovascular disease risk in patients with FD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2015 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  18. Vibroacoustic Response of a Double-Walled Cylindrical FGM Shell with a Porous Sandwiched Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, H.; Talebitooti, R.

    2015-11-01

    The transmission loss of sound through a cylindrical structure whose walls sandwich a layer of porous material is predicted on the basis of the classical shell theory for shells made of functionally graded materials (FGMs). FGM shells composed of metal and ceramic, with three different distributions (power-law, sigmoid, or exponential) of their volume fractions across the wall thickness, are considered. The porous layer is modeled as a fluid with equivalent properties. The transmission loss through the multilayered structure is obtained analytically in a broad frequency band. To validate the results found, they are compared with some known ones. The effects of variation in the volume fractions of materials are also studied.

  19. Full-scale Blast Test Response of Partially Grouted Masonry Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    walls, precast/ prestressed panels, tilt-up panels, masonry components, autoclaved concrete components, cast-in-place forming systems, etc...included: the Portland Cement Association (PCA), Precast/ prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI), Tilt-Up Concrete Association (TCA), Insulating Concrete ...collaborative research program among the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the Portland Cement Association (PCA), and the National Concrete Masonry

  20. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    the Internet . The major disadvantage of FLUSH is that it does not allow for permanent displacement of the wall (although strain softening associated...and ( )2 tan sin cosA Su u uCONSTANT S L S Lα α− α= + • • • + • • A.30 The dynamic active earth pressure force, PAE, is equal to the maximum value

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Jackson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in addition to the well-documented physicochemical-dependent adverse lung effects. A proposed mechanism is through a strong and sustained pulmonary secretion...... of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2) and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saal and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater...

  2. The two-component response regulator LiaR regulates cell wall stress responses, pili expression and virulence in group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinzing, David C; Ishmael, Nadeeza; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Tettelin, Hervé; Shields, Kelly R; Madoff, Lawrence C; Puopolo, Karen M

    2013-07-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) remains the leading cause of early onset sepsis among term infants. Evasion of innate immune defences is critical to neonatal GBS disease pathogenesis. Effectors of innate immunity, as well as numerous antibiotics, frequently target the peptidoglycan layer of the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall. The intramembrane-sensing histidine kinase (IM-HK) class of two-component regulatory systems has been identified as important to the Gram-positive response to cell wall stress. We have characterized the GBS homologue of LiaR, the response regulator component of the Lia system, to determine its role in GBS pathogenesis. LiaR is expressed as part of a three-gene operon (liaFSR) with a promoter located upstream of liaF. A LiaR deletion mutant is more susceptible to cell wall-active antibiotics (vancomycin and bacitracin) as well as antimicrobial peptides (polymixin B, colistin, and nisin) compared to isogenic wild-type GBS. LiaR mutant GBS are significantly attenuated in mouse models of both GBS sepsis and pneumonia. Transcriptional profiling with DNA microarray and Northern blot demonstrated that LiaR regulates expression of genes involved in microbial defence against host antimicrobial systems including genes functioning in cell wall synthesis, pili formation and cell membrane modification. We conclude that the LiaFSR system, the first member of the IM-HK regulatory systems to be studied in GBS, is involved in sensing perturbations in the integrity of the cell wall and activates a transcriptional response that is important to the pathogenesis of GBS infection.

  3. Smooth Muscle Specific Overexpression of p22phox Potentiates Carotid Artery Wall Thickening in Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Manogue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that transgenic mice overexpressing the p22phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase selectively in smooth muscle (Tgp22smc would exhibit an exacerbated response to transluminal carotid injury compared to wild-type mice. To examine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of vascular injury, the injury response was quantified by measuring wall thickness (WT and cross-sectional wall area (CSWA of the injured and noninjured arteries in both Tgp22smc and wild-type animals at days 3, 7, and 14 after injury. Akt, p38 MAPK, and Src activation were evaluated at the same time points using Western blotting. WT and CSWA following injury were significantly greater in Tgp22smc mice at both 7 and 14 days after injury while noninjured contralateral carotids were similar between groups. Apocynin treatment attenuated the injury response in both groups and rendered the response similar between Tgp22smc mice and wild-type mice. Following injury, carotid arteries from Tgp22smc mice demonstrated elevated activation of Akt at day 3, while p38 MAPK and Src activation was elevated at day 7 compared to wild-type mice. Both increased activation and temporal regulation of these signaling pathways may contribute to enhanced vascular growth in response to injury in this transgenic model of elevated vascular ROS.

  4. 33 CFR 155.1035 - Response plan requirements for manned vessels carrying oil as a primary cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... notification, as much as possible of the information essential for the protection of the marine environment as... discharge or substantial threat of a discharge of oil. If the notifications vary due to vessel location, the... estimate of oil discharged or threat of discharge; (J) Weather and sea conditions on scene; (K) Ship size...

  5. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER... manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module. The Sea Carrier's Module is a component of... information will be transmitted to Customs via AES for each shipment as far in advance of departure as...

  6. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  7. Identification of microscopic domain wall motion from temperature dependence of nonlinear dielectric response.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokrý, Pavel; Sluka, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 16 (2017), č. článku 162906. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-32228S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : microscopic domain wall * electric fields * temperature dependence Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4981874

  8. PROLIFERATION RESPONSES IN PREIMMUNIZED MICE LYMPHOCYTES BY BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS CELL WALL COMPONENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Mohabbati Mobarez; U. Hosseini Donst; A Zavaran Hosseini; B Tabaraie

    2003-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis infects the respiratory tract of the human host and causes whooping cough in children. The nature of immunity against Bordetella pertussis infection and disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate cell mediated immunity in mice immunized with outer membrane component of cell wall, of B. Pertussis.A group of mice were immunized with outer membrane complex (OMC) and killed whole cell (WCV) of B. pertussis, with an interval of 2 weeks. During a per...

  9. Wall-associated kinase-like polypeptide mediates nutritional status perception and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Karr, Stephen

    2014-02-11

    The disclosure relates to methods for modulating plant growth and organogenesis using dominant-negative receptor-like kinases. The disclosure further provides a method for increasing plant yield relative to corresponding wild type plants comprising modulating the expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a Wall-Associated Kinase-like 14 polypeptide or a homolog thereof, and selecting for plants having increased yield or growth on a nutrient deficient substrate.

  10. Enhancing supply vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    A supply-vessel bridge installation consists of a navigating bridge and a control position aft, from which operators control the ship when close to rigs or platforms, and operate winches and other loading equipment. The international Convention for Safety of I Ale at Sea (SOLAS) does not regulate the layout, so design varies to a large degree, often causing an imperfect working environment. As for other types of ships, more than half the offshore service vessel accidents at sea are caused by bridge system failures. A majority can be traced back to technical design, and operational errors. The research and development project NAUT-OSV is a response to the offshore industry's safety concerns. Analysis of 24 incidents involving contact or collision between supply vessels and offshore installations owned or operated by Norwegian companies indicated that failures in the bridge system were often the cause.

  11. Effect of Thin Cement-Based Renders on the Structural Response of Masonry Wall Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corradi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available URM (Unreinforced Masonry historic buildings can be generally arranged into three categories: adobe, brick and stone masonry. However, a common feature of URM structures is typically the low mechanical properties of the masonry material, especially in terms of shear strength. URM buildings are not amenable to seismic analysis, and the relatively low strength of stone and brickwork masonry often requires expensive and invasive retrofitting intervention. Hard, intractable stones broke artificially or naturally into random shapes were often used for construction in many parts of Europe and constitute the main material of historic buildings. Thin, cement or lime-based renders are often employed to protect masonry construction, but these are frequently ignored in analysis and design. This paper shows how standard, thin, cement-based renderings can highly enhance the lateral load-capacity and shear stiffness of wall panels. An experimental campaign was carried out on-site to assess the effect of cement-based renders. In detail, compression and shear tests were conducted on twelve full-scale wall panels up to failure, and comparisons are presented to study the effect of cement-based renders on the structural behavior of stone and brickwork masonry panels.

  12. Changes of wood cell walls in response to hygro-mechanical steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Song, Kunlin; Salmén, Lennart; Yin, Yafang

    2015-01-22

    The effects of compression combined with steam treatment (CS-treatment), i.e. a hygro-mechanical steam treatment on Spruce wood were studied on a cell-structure level to understand the chemical and physical changes of the secondary cell wall occurring under such conditions. Specially, imaging FT-IR microscopy, nanoindentation and dynamic vapour absorption were used to track changes in the chemical structure, in micromechanical and hygroscopic properties. It was shown that CS-treatment resulted in different changes in morphological, chemical and physical properties of the cell wall, in comparison with those under pure steam treatment. After CS-treatment, the cellular structure displayed significant deformations, and the biopolymer components, e.g. hemicellulose and lignin, were degraded, resulting in decreased hygroscopicity and increased mechanical properties of the wood compared to both untreated and steam treated wood. Moreover, CS-treatment resulted in a higher degree of degradation especially in earlywood compared to a more uniform behaviour of wood treated only by steam. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Fleur M; Bekkering, Siroon; Kroon, Jeffrey; Yeang, Calvin; Van den Bossche, Jan; van Buul, Jaap D; Ravandi, Amir; Nederveen, Aart J; Verberne, Hein J; Scipione, Corey; Nieuwdorp, Max; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Riksen, Niels P; Stroes, Erik S G

    2016-08-23

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its atherothrombosis might be mediated through this pathway. In vivo imaging techniques including magnetic resonance imaging, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake positron emission tomography/computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography were used to measure subsequently atherosclerotic burden, arterial wall inflammation, and monocyte trafficking to the arterial wall. Ex vivo analysis of monocytes was performed with fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, inflammatory stimulation assays, and transendothelial migration assays. In vitro studies of the pathophysiology of Lp(a) on monocytes were performed with an in vitro model for trained immunity. We show that subjects with elevated Lp(a) (108 mg/dL [50-195 mg/dL]; n=30) have increased arterial inflammation and enhanced peripheral blood mononuclear cells trafficking to the arterial wall compared with subjects with normal Lp(a) (7 mg/dL [2-28 mg/dL]; n=30). In addition, monocytes isolated from subjects with elevated Lp(a) remain in a long-lasting primed state, as evidenced by an increased capacity to transmigrate and produce proinflammatory cytokines on stimulation (n=15). In vitro studies show that Lp(a) contains OxPL and augments the proinflammatory response in monocytes derived from healthy control subjects (n=6). This effect was markedly attenuated by inactivating OxPL on Lp(a) or removing OxPL on apolipoprotein(a). These findings demonstrate that Lp(a) induces monocyte trafficking to the arterial wall and mediates proinflammatory responses through its OxPL content. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which Lp(a) mediates cardiovascular disease. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR

  14. Roles of the plasma membrane and the cell wall in the responses of plant cells to freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoyoshi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Jitsuyama, Yutaka; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2002-09-01

    In an effort to clarify the responses of a wide range of plant cells to freezing, we examined the responses to freezing of the cells of chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant tropical and subtropical plants. Among the cells of the plants that we examined, those of African violet ( Saintpaulia grotei Engl.) leaves were most chilling-sensitive, those of hypocotyls in mungbean [ Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilcz.] seedlings were moderately chilling-sensitive, and those of orchid [ Paphiopedilum insigne (Wallich ex Lindl.) Pfitz.] leaves were chilling-resistant, when all were chilled at -2 degrees C. By contrast, all these plant cells were freezing-sensitive and suffered extensive damage when they were frozen at -2 degrees C. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) confirmed that, upon chilling at -2 degrees C, both chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant plant cells were supercooled. Upon freezing at -2 degrees C, by contrast, intracellular freezing occurred in Saintpaulia leaf cells, frost plasmolysis followed by intracellular freezing occurred in mungbean seedling cells, and extracellular freezing (cytorrhysis) occurred in orchid leaf cells. We postulate that chilling-related destabilization of membranes might result in the loss of the ability of the plasma membrane to act as a barrier against the propagation of extracellular ice in chilling-sensitive plant cells. We also examined the role of cell walls in the response to freezing using cells in which the plasma membrane had been disrupted by repeated freezing and thawing. In chilling-sensitive Saintpaulia and mungbean cells, the cells with a disrupted plasma membrane responded to freezing at -2 degrees C by intracellular freezing. By contrast, in chilling-resistant orchid cells, as well as in other cells of chilling-resistant and freezing-resistant plant tissues, including leaves of orchard grass ( Dactylis glomerata L.), leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and cortical tissues of mulberry ( Morus

  15. Preliminary Results Of Hydrodynamic Responses To Ship Movements And Weather Conditions Along The Coastal Walls Of Shallow Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Cagatay, Namık; Ozeren, Sinan; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Vardar, Denizhan; Arslan, Tugce; Basegmez, Koray

    2016-04-01

    Water-level variations in coastal areas and shallow channels take place under the influence of more complex factors, compared to those in deeper areas. Atmospheric pressure, wind, and wave interactions with bottom morphological characteristics are some important natural features while human-induced factors are usually maritime traffic and manoeuvres the ships. While weather conditions cause long-term changes in water level, water level interactions in near shore areas, can occur very quickly depending on the ship manoeuvres and squat characteristics, and these rapid changes can lead to unpredictable water level lowering. Such rapid changes may cause various dangerous incidents and ship accidents, particularly in areas where rapid water oscillations occur. Improper calculations of propulsion power or orientation of the ship body, especially in the areas where geological and morphological characteristics permit fast water movements, are the most important additional causes of accidents due to sudden water level decreases. For an example, even though a 200-m-long vessel can complete its 35° rotation in a circular area with radius of 250 m, if it is calm and sufficiently deep, this diameter increases 5 times at the shallow waters also depending on the hydrodynamic flow conditions. In 2005, "Gerardus Mercator" has bumped into the inside bottom wall of the channel with a low speed (4 knots) turn of when she had just made a 200° turn. Seven years later the cruise ship "Costa Concordia" struck a rock, before she drifted and grounded, in the calm seas of the coast of Isola del Giglio in Italy, due to a combined effects of waves generated by side waves of ship manoeuvres, atmospheric pressure and squat specifications as well. The waves reflected from the seawalls complicate the navigation problems which should be examined in detail. Thus, three prototype models with various angular seawall features were prepared, simple in shape with perpendicular and sloped seawalls with

  16. Analysis of the response of a reinforced concrete shear wall structure during earthquakes using the transfer matrix method of multibody systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ding

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although reinforced concrete shear wall structures are widely used in high-rise buildings, the methods used to analyze the seismic response of such a structure during an earthquake generally have low calculation efficiencies. In this article, the transfer matrix method of multibody systems is first established as a mechanical model of a regular reinforced concrete shear wall structure with both bifurcated and closed transfer paths to analyze the seismic responses of structures. By separating the shear wall legs, establishing a state vector relationship between the two endpoints of the coupling beams, and combining all state vectors of the inputs or outputs of each shear wall leg, the total transfer between shear wall legs is realized, and the overall transfer equation and overall transfer matrix of a shear wall structure are obtained. Applying the transfer matrix method of multibody systems, a 15-story shear wall structure is used as an engineering example to analyze seismic responses for frequent and rare earthquakes using MATLAB software. The findings show that the transfer matrix method of multibody systems provides similar results to ANSYS but that the transfer matrix method of multibody systems greatly increases calculation efficiency while maintaining accuracy.

  17. Kinetics of 90° domain wall motions and high frequency mesoscopic dielectric response in strained ferroelectrics: a phase-field simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, P; Chen, D P; Wang, Y L; Xie, Y L; Yan, Z B; Wan, J G; Liu, J-M; Li, J Y

    2014-05-21

    The dielectric and ferroelectric behaviors of a ferroelectric are substantially determined by its domain structure and domain wall dynamics at mesoscopic level. A relationship between the domain walls and high frequency mesoscopic dielectric response is highly appreciated for high frequency applications of ferroelectrics. In this work we investigate the low electric field driven motion of 90°-domain walls and the frequency-domain spectrum of dielectric permittivity in normally strained ferroelectric lattice using the phase-field simulations. It is revealed that, the high-frequency dielectric permittivity is spatially inhomogeneous and reaches the highest value on the 90°-domain walls. A tensile strain favors the parallel domains but suppresses the kinetics of the 90° domain wall motion driven by electric field, while the compressive strain results in the opposite behaviors. The physics underlying the wall motions and thus the dielectric response is associated with the long-range elastic energy. The major contribution to the dielectric response is from the polarization fluctuations on the 90°-domain walls, which are more mobile than those inside the domains. The relevance of the simulated results wth recent experiments is discussed.

  18. Dynamical response of multi-walled carbon nanotube resonators based on continuum mechanics modeling for mass sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myungseok; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Kilho [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Kwanwoong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dai, Mai Duc [Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology and Education, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam)

    2017-05-15

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has recently received much attention due to its excellent electromechanical properties, indicating that CNT can be employed for development of Nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) such as nanomechanical resonators. For effective design of CNT-based resonators, it is required to accurately predict the vibration behavior of CNT resonators as well as their frequency response to mass adsorption. In this work, we have studied the vibrational behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators by using a continuum mechanics modeling that was implemented in Finite element method (FEM). In particular, we consider a transversely isotropic hollow cylinder solid model with Finite element (FE) implementation for modeling the vibration behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators. It is shown that our continuum mechanics model provides the resonant frequencies of various MWCNTs being comparable to those obtained from experiments. Moreover, we have investigated the frequency response of MWCNT resonators to mass adsorption by using our continuum model with FE implementation. Our study sheds light on our continuum mechanics model that is useful in predicting not only the vibration behavior of MWCNT resonators but also their sensing performance for further effective design of MWCNT- based NEMS devices.

  19. Recoordination of opposing walls drives the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy: a longitudinal study using a strain discoordination index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Guido; Iengo, Raffaele; Sordelli, Chiara; Martiniello, Alfonso Roberto; Ascione, Raffaele; Severino, Sergio; Caso, Pio; Ascione, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    Intraventricular dyssynchrony has traditionally been studied by means of contraction delays between different myocardial segments. Recently, the discoordination of opposing wall contraction throughout the cardiac cycle has been proposed as a more faithful predictor of response. Aim of the current study was to evaluate which parameters - mechanical dyssynchrony or discoordination - normalize with left ventricular response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Cardiac mechanics were analysed before and after 6 months of CRT in 53 patients with left bundle branch block and advanced heart failure. Discoordination was quantified by means of the transverse strain discoordination index (TSDI) at basal and mid-ventricular segments; this index takes into account the percentage of time in the cardiac cycle in which cardiac deformation (transverse strain) of the two opposing walls occurs in noncoordinated directions. Dyssynchrony indices included septal to lateral peak-to-peak transverse strain delay and the standard deviation of time to peak tissue velocity in 12 mid-basal segments (Yu index). Around 63% of patients met the response criteria. Several baseline indices were predictive of reverse remodelling; TSDI at the mid-ventricular level demonstrated the best accuracy. Time from Q to peak velocity and strain tended to increase in all explored myocardial segments; despite a trend towards a decrease in septal-to-lateral strain delay, the latter decreased equally in responders and in nonresponding patients. Yu index decreased in responders more than in nonresponders, with borderline significance. Basal and medium TSDI remained unchanged in nonresponders and consistently normalized in patients who responded to CRT. The changes in TSDI were significantly correlated with improvements in left ventricular end-systolic volume and ejection fraction; the strongest correlation was observed for changes in TSDI measured at the mid-ventricular level. Left ventricular reverse

  20. Inflammation response at the transcriptional level of HepG2 cells induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piret, Jean-Pascal; Vankoningsloo, Sebastien; Noel, Florence; Saout, Christelle; Toussaint, Olivier [Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC), Narilis, University of Namur, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Mendoza, Jorge Mejia; Lucas, Stephane, E-mail: olivier.toussaint@fundp.ac.be [Research Center for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Narilis, University of Namur, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2011-07-06

    Poor information are currently available about the biological effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on the liver. In this study, we evaluated the effects of MWCNT at the transcriptional level on the classical in vitro model of HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. The expression levels of 96 transcript species implicated in the inflammatory and immune responses was studied after a 24h incubation of HepG2 cells in presence of raw MWCNT dispersed in water by stirring. Among the 46 transcript species detected, only a few transcripts including mRNA coding for interleukine-7, chemokines receptor of the C-C families CCR7, as well as Endothelin-1, were statistically more abundant after treatment with MWCNT. Altogether, these data indicate that MWCNT can only induce a weak inflammatory response in HepG2 cells.

  1. Inflammation response at the transcriptional level of HepG2 cells induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piret, Jean-Pascal; Vankoningsloo, Sébastien; Noël, Florence; Mejia Mendoza, Jorge; Lucas, Stéphane; Saout, Christelle; Toussaint, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Poor information are currently available about the biological effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on the liver. In this study, we evaluated the effects of MWCNT at the transcriptional level on the classical in vitro model of HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. The expression levels of 96 transcript species implicated in the inflammatory and immune responses was studied after a 24h incubation of HepG2 cells in presence of raw MWCNT dispersed in water by stirring. Among the 46 transcript species detected, only a few transcripts including mRNA coding for interleukine-7, chemokines receptor of the C-C families CCR7, as well as Endothelin-1, were statistically more abundant after treatment with MWCNT. Altogether, these data indicate that MWCNT can only induce a weak inflammatory response in HepG2 cells.

  2. The chemical and physical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube film impact on osteoblastic cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutak, Wojtek; Chhowalla, Manish; Sesti, Federico

    2010-08-06

    Carbon-nanotube-based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different cell types and, as such, have raised considerable interest in view of their possible use in biomedical applications. Nanotube matrices are embedded in polymers which cause inherent changes in nanotube chemical and physical film properties. Thus, it is critical to understand how the physical properties of the film affect the biology of the host tissue. Here, we investigated how the physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) films impact the response of MC3T3-E1 bone osteoblasts. We found that two fundamental steps in cell growth-initial attachment to the substrate and proliferation-are strongly dependent on, respectively, the energy and roughness of the surface. Thus, fine-tuning the properties of the film may represent a valid strategy to optimize the response of the biological host.

  3. Modeling the microclimate inside a vessel in in vitro culture : vessel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical simulations show that variations in vessel internal humidity was sensitive to transfer coefficient, climatic conditions within the growth chamber, evaporation and condensation of water vapor on the walls of the vessel. The variations in water vapor pressure deficits (VPD) (low during the nyctiperiod and high during ...

  4. Bidomain Predictions of Virtual Electrode-Induced Make and Break Excitations around Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Adam J; Vigmond, Edward; Bishop, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Virtual electrodes formed by field stimulation during defibrillation of cardiac tissue play an important role in eliciting activations. It has been suggested that the coronary vasculature is an important source of virtual electrodes, especially during low-energy defibrillation. This work aims to further the understanding of how virtual electrodes from the coronary vasculature influence defibrillation outcomes. Using the bidomain model, we investigated how field stimulation elicited activations from virtual electrodes around idealized intramural blood vessels. Strength-interval curves, which quantify the stimulus strength required to elicit wavefront propagation from the vessels at different states of tissue refractoriness, were computed for each idealized geometry. Make excitations occurred at late diastolic intervals, originating from regions of depolarization around the vessel. Break excitations occurred at early diastolic intervals, whereby the vessels were able to excite surrounding refractory tissue due to the local restoration of excitability by virtual electrode-induced hyperpolarizations. Overall, strength-interval curves had similar morphologies and underlying excitation mechanisms compared with previous experimental and numerical unipolar stimulation studies of cardiac tissue. Including the presence of the vessel wall increased the field strength required for make excitations but decreased the field strength required for break excitations, and the field strength at which break excitations occurred was generally greater than 5 V/cm. Finally, in a more realistic ventricular slice geometry, the proximity of virtual electrodes around subepicardial vessels was seen to cause break excitations in the form of propagating unstable wavelets to the subepicardial layer. Representing the blood vessel wall microstructure in computational bidomain models of defibrillation is recommended as it significantly alters the electrophysiological response of the vessel to

  5. Behavior of platelets stained by 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes after laser irradiation of vessel wall: an in-vivo model for studying site-selective delivery of diagnostic or therapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Buys, Bruno; Tourne-Peteilh, Corine; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie

    2001-05-01

    Vascular endothelium serves as an extensive interface between circulating blood and various tissues and organs of the body. As such, it offers an accessible target for blood-borne pharmacological and genetic manipulations that can mediate both local and systemic effects. Thus, targeting of liposomes to activated vascular endothelial cells may provide a strategy for site-selective delivery in the vascular system with broad therapeutic applicability. This study aimed to evaluate an intravital fluorescence imaging technique to visualize in-situ and in real-time the activation of platelets after staining by 5,6-CF- encapsulated PEGylated liposomes injected intravenously. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. The skin micro circulation was observed with an intravital microscope (using x25 and x40 magnification) fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for play-back analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An inflammatory response was induced by an Argon laser emitting at 514.5nm. The 80micrometers laser beam was focused on a vessel and its position was controlled with the microscope imaging system, it was possible to see individual platelets flowing in blood vessels. As liposomes were labeled with a fluorescent probe which was hydrophilic (located in the aqueous phase), the fluorescence of platelets was due only to the uptake of liposomes. After laser irradiation, platelets activation at sites of vascular injury was obtained. Tethering, translocation of some platelets inside the irradiated zone were clearly seen. At last, detachment and extravasation of platelets were observed. A perivascular fluorescence confirmed that platelets migrated across the basal lamina into the dermal connective tissue. In conclusion, staining of

  6. Long-term anisotropic mechanical response of surgical meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2012-01-01

    Routine hernia repair surgery involves the implant of synthetic mesh. However, this type of procedure may give rise to pain and bowel incarceration and strangulation, causing considerable patient disability. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term behaviour of three commercial meshes used to repair the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits: the heavyweight (HW) mesh, Surgipro(®) and lightweight (LW) mesh, Optilene(®), both made of polypropylene (PP), and a mediumweight (MW) mesh, Infinit(®), made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The implanted meshes were mechanical and histological assessed at 14, 90 and 180 days post-implant. This behaviour was compared to the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the unrepaired abdominal wall in control non-operated rabbits. Both uniaxial mechanical tests conducted in craneo-caudal and perpendicular directions and histological findings revealed substantial collagen growth over the repaired hernial defects causing stiffness in the repair zone, and thus a change in the original properties of the meshes. The mechanical behaviour of the healthy tissue in the craneo-caudal direction was not reproduced by any of the implanted meshes after 14 days or 90 days of implant, whereas in the perpendicular direction, SUR and OPT achieved similar behaviour. From a mechanical standpoint, the anisotropic PP-lightweight meshes may be considered a good choice in the long run, which correlates with the structure of the regenerated tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Effect of Saline Solution on the Electrical Response of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Younes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saline solution on the electrical resistance of single wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally. Ultrasonic assisted fabricated 1.0% and 0.5 W/W% SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites are integrated into a Kelvin structure by smear cast the nanocomposites on a glass wafer. Four metal pads are deposited on the nanocomposites using the beam evaporator and wires are tethered using soldering. The effect of saline solution on the electrical resistance of the nanocomposites is studied by adding drop of saline solution to the surface of the fabricated nanocomposites and measuring electrical resistance. Moreover, the nanocomposites are soaked completely into 3 wt.% saline solution and real-time measurement of the electrical resistance is conducted. It is found that a drop of saline solution on the surface of the nanocomposites film increases the resistance by 50%. Furthermore, the real-time measurement reveals a 40% increase in the resistance of the nanocomposites film. More importantly, the nanocomposites are successfully reset by soaking in DI water for four hours. This study may open the door for using SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites as scale sensors in oil and gas industry.

  9. Electrical response of liquid crystal cells doped with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of nanoparticles modifies a number of fundamental properties of many materials. Doping of nanoparticles in self-organized materials such as liquid crystals may be of interest for the reciprocal interaction between the matrix and the nanoparticles. Elongated nanoparticles and nanotubes can be aligned and reoriented by the liquid crystal, inducing noticeable changes in their optical and electrical properties. In this work, cells of liquid crystal doped with high aspect ratio multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared, and their characteristic impedance has been studied at different frequencies and excitation voltages. The results demonstrate alterations in the anisotropic conductivity of the samples with the applied electric field, which can be followed by monitoring the impedance evolution with the excitation voltage. Results are consistent with a possible electric contact between the coated substrates of the LC cell caused by the reorientation of the nanotubes. The reversibility of the doped system upon removal of the electric field is quite low.

  10. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant...... acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis....

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  12. Optimization of sulfate removal from wastewater using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Vahid; Sedighi, Mehdi; Jabbari, Ehsan

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports a facile method for removal of sulfate from wastewater by magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs). Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and MMWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results of the analysis indicated that MMWCNTs were synthesized successfully. The MMWCNTs can be easily manipulated in a magnetic field for the desired separation, leading to the removal of sulfate from wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design was applied to evaluate the effects of D/C (adsorbent dosage per initial concentration of pollutant (mgadsorbent/(mg/l)initial)) and pH on sulfate removal (%). Using RSM methodology, a quadratic polynomial equation was obtained, for removal of sulfate, by multiple regression analysis. The optimum combination for maximum sulfate removal of 93.28% was pH = 5.96 and D/C = 24.35. The experimental data were evaluated by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The adsorption capacity of sulfate in the studied concentration range was 56.94 (mg/g). It was found out that the MMWCNTs could be considered as a promising adsorbent for the removal of sulfate from wastewater.

  13. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  15. The cellular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle L. Phillips

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs especially those of carbon nanotubes (CNTs have remarkable properties that are very desirable in various biological and biomedical applications. This has necessitated the rapid study of CNT toxicities, to augment their safe use, particularly, in yeast cells. The yeast cell; Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used industrial and biological organism with very limited data regarding their cellular behaviour in NPs. The current study examines the cellular response of S. cerevisiae to MWCNTs. The CNTs were produced by the swirled floating catalytic chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD method and covalently functionalised using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The CNT properties such as size, surface area, quality and surface vibrations were characterized using TEM, SEM, BET, TGA and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The cellular uptake was confirmed with a FITC functionalised MWCNTs using 1H NMR, SEM and TEM. The CNT concentrations of 2–40 μg/ml were used to determine the cellular response through cell growth phases and cell viability characteristics. The TEM and SEM analyses showed the production of MWCNTs with an average diameter of 53 ± 12 nm and a length of 2.5 ± 0.5 μm. The cellular uptake of FITC-MWCNTs showed 100% internalisation in the yeast cells. The growth curve responses to the MWCNT doses showed no significant differences at P > 0.05 on the growth rate and viability of the S. cerevisiae cells.

  16. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  17. Field emission response from multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on electrochemically engineered copper foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Jain, Vaibhav [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Saini, Krishna [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Centre of Excellence: Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Lahiri, Indranil, E-mail: indrafmt@iitr.ac.in [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Centre of Excellence: Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2017-02-01

    Exciting properties of carbon nanotube has proven it to be a promising candidate for field emission applications, if its processing cost can be reduced effectively. In this research, a new electrochemical technique is proposed for growing carbon nanotubes in selective areas by thermal chemical vapour deposition. In this process, electrochemical processing is used to create localized pits and deposition of catalysts, which act as roots to support growth and alignment of the CNTs on copper substrate. CNTs grown thus were characterized and studied using scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy, elucidating presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). These CNT emitters have comparatively lower turn-on field and higher field enhancement factor. - Highlights: • Electrochemical pitting for localized carbon nanotube growth is proposed. • Electrochemical pitting method shows patterning effect on the substrate. • Size and density of pits depend on voltage, pH and temperature. • CNTs thus grown shows good field emission response.

  18. Excitonic optical response of carbon chains confined in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonabi, Farzad; Brun, Søren J.; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2017-10-01

    It has been recently shown that long linear carbon chains (carbyne) can be formed inside multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Encapsulation of carbyne inside the CNT affects the electronic structure of the chain by the long-range Coulomb interaction. This introduces an indirect band gap in the combined CNT-chain system and results in a change in the optical band gap. We study the excitonic optical response of the combined system using the Bethe-Salpeter and Wannier equations based on density functional theory and tight-binding band structures. The optical properties of isolated CNTs and chains are strongly affected by excitonic effects and the CNT-chain system follows a similar trend. The interaction between the CNT and chain results in new bright excitons as well as charge transfer excitons, where electrons are localized on the CNT and holes on the chain, yielding new dark excitons in the combined system.

  19. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  20. Responses of endothelial cells from different vessels to inflammatory cytokines and shear stress: evidence for the pliability of endothelial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, N Thin; Rahman, Mahbub; Stone, Phil C; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2010-01-01

    Local haemodynamic and stromal microenvironments may determine the phenotype of endothelial cells (EC) and regulate their inflammatory responses. We compared neutrophil recruitment by EC from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) or arteries (HUAEC) or from human coronary arteries (HCAEC) after 'static' culture or exposure to shear stress (2 Pa for 24 h) and treatment with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Static cultures of each type of EC recruited flowing neutrophils efficiently after treatment with TNF-alpha or IL-1beta; differences in culture media caused minor variations. After shear conditioning, the response of HUVEC to TNF-alpha (but not IL-1beta) was much reduced, while the responses of HUAEC and HCAEC to both cytokines were reduced. However, swapping the culture media suggested that the differences in the shear response arose largely from medium constituents, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor. When gene expression profiles for HUVEC were examined immediately after isolation, after 5 days in static culture and after re-exposure to shear, variations in gene expression were only partially attributable to the effects of changes in shear stress. The behaviour of cultured EC may depend as much on the physico-chemical culture conditions as on their origins. The EC phenotype appears to be highly pliable, with environmental factors, such as shear stress and growth factors, modifying responses in an inter-linked manner.

  1. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  2. The Arabidopsis leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase MIK2/LRR-KISS connects cell wall integrity sensing, root growth and response to abiotic and biotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Boutrot, Freddy; Engelsdorf, Timo; Rhodes, Jack; McKenna, Joseph F; Vernhettes, Samantha; Koevoets, Iko; Tintor, Nico; Veerabagu, Manikandan; Miedes, Eva; Segonzac, Cécile; Roux, Milena; Breda, Alice S; Hardtke, Christian S; Molina, Antonio; Rep, Martijn; Testerink, Christa; Mouille, Grégory; Höfte, Herman; Hamann, Thorsten; Zipfel, Cyril

    2017-06-01

    Plants actively perceive and respond to perturbations in their cell walls which arise during growth, biotic and abiotic stresses. However, few components involved in plant cell wall integrity sensing have been described to date. Using a reverse-genetic approach, we identified the Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase MIK2 as an important regulator of cell wall damage responses triggered upon cellulose biosynthesis inhibition. Indeed, loss-of-function mik2 alleles are strongly affected in immune marker gene expression, jasmonic acid production and lignin deposition. MIK2 has both overlapping and distinct functions with THE1, a malectin-like receptor kinase previously proposed as cell wall integrity sensor. In addition, mik2 mutant plants exhibit enhanced leftward root skewing when grown on vertical plates. Notably, natural variation in MIK2 (also named LRR-KISS) has been correlated recently to mild salt stress tolerance, which we could confirm using our insertional alleles. Strikingly, both the increased root skewing and salt stress sensitivity phenotypes observed in the mik2 mutant are dependent on THE1. Finally, we found that MIK2 is required for resistance to the fungal root pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Together, our data identify MIK2 as a novel component in cell wall integrity sensing and suggest that MIK2 is a nexus linking cell wall integrity sensing to growth and environmental cues.

  3. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  4. Reactivity of blood vessels in response to prostaglandin E2 in placentas from pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Oded; Bar, Jacob; Barnea, Ofer; Golan, Abraham; Kovo, Michal

    2012-05-01

    The authors aimed to study the contractility responses of normal and fetal growth restriction (FGR) placentas to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) and to correlate the results to subsequent placental histological analysis. A dual-perfused single cotyledon model was used. Placentas from pregnancies complicated by FGR and from normal pregnancies were obtained. Selected cotyledons were cannulated and dually perfused. Following stabilization, three concentrations of PGE(2) (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 mg/mL) were administered to the fetal arterial side causing contraction/relaxation response. Fetal perfusion pressure was measured continuously during these contraction and relaxation phases. Following the perfusion experiments, the placentas were analyzed for fetal or maternal origin vascular lesions. A total of 21 complete experiments were performed (16 normal, 5 FGR). In response to PGE(2) , FGR placentas exhibited lower change in the perfusion pressure and lower relaxation time constant. Basal perfusion pressure did not differ significantly between the two groups. Placental histopathology lesions, fetal or maternal origin, were more common in the FGR compared with the controls placentas, 80% versus 25%, respectively, P=  0.047. The lower vascular reactivity in response to PGE(2) and the presence of fetal and maternal vascular placental lesions suggest a mechanism explaining the altered vascular supply in FGR. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  6. The Mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 Contributes to the Cell Wall Stress Response and Invasive Growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are crucial for maintaining proper mitochondrial morphology, function and dynamics. This enables cells to utilize their mitochondria optimally for energy production and anabolism, and it further provides for metabolic control over developmental decisions. In fungi, a key mechanism by which ER and mitochondria interact is via a membrane tether, the protein complex ERMES (ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure. In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 interacts with ERMES, and it has been proposed to regulate its activity. Here we report on the first characterization of Gem1 in a human fungal pathogen. We show that in Candida albicans Gem1 has a dominant role in ensuring proper mitochondrial morphology, and our data is consistent with Gem1 working with ERMES in this role. Mitochondrial respiration and steady state cellular phospholipid homeostasis are not impacted by inactivation of GEM1 in C. albicans. There are two major virulence-related consequences of disrupting mitochondrial morphology by GEM1 inactivation: C. albicans becomes hypersusceptible to cell wall stress, and is unable to grow invasively. In the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, it is specifically the invasive capacity of hyphae that is compromised, not the ability to transition from yeast to hyphal morphology, and this phenotype is shared with ERMES mutants. As a consequence of the hyphal invasion defect, the gem1Δ/Δ mutant is drastically hypovirulent in the worm infection model. Activation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP kinase Cek1 is reduced in the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, and this function could explain both the susceptibility to cell wall stress and lack of invasive growth. This result establishes a new, respiration-independent mechanism of mitochondrial control over stress signaling and hyphal functions in C. albicans. We propose that ER-mitochondria interactions and the ER

  7. Pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes does not affect the early immune response against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swedin Linda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT trigger pronounced inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs of mice following administration via pharyngeal aspiration or inhalation. Human exposure to SWCNT in an occupational setting may occur in conjunction with infections and this could yield enhanced or suppressed responses to the offending agent. Here, we studied whether the sequential exposure to SWCNT via pharyngeal aspiration and infection of mice with the ubiquitous intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii would impact on the immune response of the host against the parasite. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pre-exposed by pharyngeal administration of SWCNT (80 + 80 μg/mouse for two consecutive days followed by intravenous injection with either 1x103 or 1x104 green fluorescence protein and luciferase-expressing T. gondii tachyzoites. The dissemination of T. gondii was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in real time for 7 days and by plaque formation. The inflammatory response was analysed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and by assessment of morphological changes and immune responses in lung and spleen. Results There were no differences in parasite distribution between mice only inoculated with T. gondii or those mice pre-exposed for 2 days to SWCNT before parasite inoculum. Lung and spleen histology and inflammation markers in BAL fluid reflected the effects of SWCNT exposure and T. gondii injection, respectively. We also noted that CD11c positive dendritic cells but not F4/80 positive macrophages retained SWCNT in the lungs 9 days after pharyngeal aspiration. However, co-localization of T. gondii with CD11c or F4/80 positive cells could not be observed in lungs or spleen. Pre-exposure to SWCNT did not affect the splenocyte response to T. gondii. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that pre-exposure to SWCNT does not enhance or suppress the early immune response to T. gondii in mice.

  8. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majse eNafisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION 2 (rwa2, previously identified as having reduced O-acetylation of both pectins and hemicelluloses, exhibit pleiotrophic phenotype on the leaf surface. The cuticle layer appeared diffused and was significantly thicker and underneath cell wall layer was interspersed with electron-dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed and surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g. lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases. In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  9. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kang, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  10. Phenotypically heterogeneous podoplanin-expressing cell populations are associated with the lymphatic vessel growth and fibrogenic responses in the acutely and chronically infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Maria; Cannatá, Antonio; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Rota, Marcello; Goichberg, Polina

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac lymphatic vasculature undergoes substantial expansion in response to myocardial infarction (MI). However, there is limited information on the cellular mechanisms mediating post-MI lymphangiogenesis and accompanying fibrosis in the infarcted adult heart. Using a mouse model of permanent coronary artery ligation, we examined spatiotemporal changes in the expression of lymphendothelial and mesenchymal markers in the acutely and chronically infarcted myocardium. We found that at the time of wound granulation, a three-fold increase in the frequency of podoplanin-labeled cells occurred in the infarcted hearts compared to non-operated and sham-operated counterparts. Podoplanin immunoreactivity detected LYVE-1-positive lymphatic vessels, as well as masses of LYVE-1-negative cells dispersed between myocytes, predominantly in the vicinity of the infarcted region. Podoplanin-carrying populations displayed a mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα, and intermittently expressed Prox-1, a master regulator of the lymphatic endothelial fate. At the stages of scar formation and maturation, concomitantly with the enlargement of lymphatic network in the injured myocardium, the podoplanin-rich LYVE-1-negative multicellular assemblies were apparent in the fibrotic area, aligned with extracellular matrix deposits, or located in immediate proximity to activated blood vessels with high VEGFR-2 content. Of note, these podoplanin-containing cells acquired the expression of PDGFRβ or a hematoendothelial epitope CD34. Although Prox-1 labeling was abundant in the area affected by MI, the podoplanin-presenting cells were not consistently Prox-1-positive. The concordance of podoplanin with VEGFR-3 similarly varied. Thus, our data reveal previously unknown phenotypic and structural heterogeneity within the podoplanin-positive cell compartment in the infarcted heart, and suggest an alternate ability of podoplanin-presenting cardiac cells to generate lymphatic endothelium and pro

  11. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S Poulsen

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in addition to the well-documented physicochemical-dependent adverse lung effects. A proposed mechanism is through a strong and sustained pulmonary secretion of acute phase proteins to the blood. We identified physicochemical determinants of MWCNT-induced systemic acute phase response by analyzing effects of pulmonary exposure to 14 commercial, well-characterized MWCNTs in female C57BL/6J mice pulmonary exposed to 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg MWCNT/mouse. Plasma levels of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2 and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saa1 and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater and lasted longer than hepatic Saa1 mRNA expression. Plasma SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels were related to time and physicochemical properties using adjusted, multiple regression analyses. SAA3 and SAA1/2 plasma protein levels were increased after exposure to almost all of the MWCNTs on day 1, whereas limited changes were observed on day 28 and 92. SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels did not correlate and only SAA3 protein levels correlated with neutrophil influx. The multiple regression analyses revealed a protective effect of MWCNT length on SAA1/2 protein level on day 1, such that a longer length resulted in lowered SAA1/2 plasma levels. Increased SAA3 protein levels were positively related to dose and content of Mn, Mg and Co on day 1, whereas oxidation and diameter of the MWCNTs were protective on day 28 and 92, respectively. The results of this study reveal very differently controlled pulmonary and hepatic acute phase responses after MWCNT exposure. As the responses were influenced by the physicochemical properties of the MWCNTs, this study provides the first step

  12. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Knudsen, Kristina B; Jackson, Petra; Weydahl, Ingrid E K; Saber, Anne T; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in addition to the well-documented physicochemical-dependent adverse lung effects. A proposed mechanism is through a strong and sustained pulmonary secretion of acute phase proteins to the blood. We identified physicochemical determinants of MWCNT-induced systemic acute phase response by analyzing effects of pulmonary exposure to 14 commercial, well-characterized MWCNTs in female C57BL/6J mice pulmonary exposed to 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg MWCNT/mouse. Plasma levels of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2) and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saa1 and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater and lasted longer than hepatic Saa1 mRNA expression. Plasma SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels were related to time and physicochemical properties using adjusted, multiple regression analyses. SAA3 and SAA1/2 plasma protein levels were increased after exposure to almost all of the MWCNTs on day 1, whereas limited changes were observed on day 28 and 92. SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels did not correlate and only SAA3 protein levels correlated with neutrophil influx. The multiple regression analyses revealed a protective effect of MWCNT length on SAA1/2 protein level on day 1, such that a longer length resulted in lowered SAA1/2 plasma levels. Increased SAA3 protein levels were positively related to dose and content of Mn, Mg and Co on day 1, whereas oxidation and diameter of the MWCNTs were protective on day 28 and 92, respectively. The results of this study reveal very differently controlled pulmonary and hepatic acute phase responses after MWCNT exposure. As the responses were influenced by the physicochemical properties of the MWCNTs, this study provides the first step towards designing

  13. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Kristina B.; Jackson, Petra; Weydahl, Ingrid E. K.; Saber, Anne T.; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in addition to the well-documented physicochemical-dependent adverse lung effects. A proposed mechanism is through a strong and sustained pulmonary secretion of acute phase proteins to the blood. We identified physicochemical determinants of MWCNT-induced systemic acute phase response by analyzing effects of pulmonary exposure to 14 commercial, well-characterized MWCNTs in female C57BL/6J mice pulmonary exposed to 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg MWCNT/mouse. Plasma levels of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2) and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saa1 and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater and lasted longer than hepatic Saa1 mRNA expression. Plasma SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels were related to time and physicochemical properties using adjusted, multiple regression analyses. SAA3 and SAA1/2 plasma protein levels were increased after exposure to almost all of the MWCNTs on day 1, whereas limited changes were observed on day 28 and 92. SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels did not correlate and only SAA3 protein levels correlated with neutrophil influx. The multiple regression analyses revealed a protective effect of MWCNT length on SAA1/2 protein level on day 1, such that a longer length resulted in lowered SAA1/2 plasma levels. Increased SAA3 protein levels were positively related to dose and content of Mn, Mg and Co on day 1, whereas oxidation and diameter of the MWCNTs were protective on day 28 and 92, respectively. The results of this study reveal very differently controlled pulmonary and hepatic acute phase responses after MWCNT exposure. As the responses were influenced by the physicochemical properties of the MWCNTs, this study provides the first step towards designing

  14. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposure in A549 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ju

    Full Text Available The wide application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT has raised serious concerns about their safety on human health and the environment. However, the potential harmful effects of MWCNT remain unclear and contradictory. To clarify the potentially toxic effects of MWCNT and to elucidate the associated underlying mechanisms, the effects of MWCNT on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined at both the cellular and the protein level. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were examined, followed by a proteomic analysis (2-DE coupled with LC-MS/MS of the cellular response to MWCNT. Our results demonstrate that MWCNT induces cytotoxicity in A549 cells only at relatively high concentrations and longer exposure time. Within a relatively low dosage range (30 µg/ml and short time period (24 h, MWCNT treatment does not induce significant cytotoxicity, cell cycle changes, apoptosis, or DNA damage. However, at these low doses and times, MWCNT treatment causes significant changes in protein expression. A total of 106 proteins show altered expression at various time points and dosages, and of these, 52 proteins were further identified by MS. Identified proteins are involved in several cellular processes including proliferation, stress, and cellular skeleton organization. In particular, MWCNT treatment causes increases in actin expression. This increase has the potential to contribute to increased migration capacity and may be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS.

  15. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  16. Dissociating the effects of habituation, black walls, buspirone and ethanol on anxiety-like behavioral responses in shoaling zebrafish. A 3D approach to social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Le, Xi; He, Lucy; Zhu, Liqun; Weng, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the different patterns of anxiety-like behavioral responses is of great interest for pharmacological and genetic research. Here we report the effects of 3.5-hr habituation, buspirone and ethanol on those responses in shoaling zebrafish (Danio rerio). Since in these experiments we used a container with white walls, the effects of black-vs.-white walls were tested in a separate experiment. An important objective was to determine whether factors unrelated to anxiety played a role in modulating the responses. The anxiety-like behavioral responses studied here are social cohesion, distance from bottom and bottom-dwell time, radial distribution (to study thigmotaxis), transparent-wall preference (to study escape responses), locomotion and freezing. The experimental conditions yielded distinctly different response patterns. Thigmotaxis was the most obvious response to white walls and it was significantly reduced after 3.5-hr habituation. It was not affected by any of the drugs. The reduction of social cohesion after 3.5-hr habituation and in the 0.5% ethanol group was probably the most interesting effect seen in this study. A role of anxiety herein was suggested but could not be established with certainty. Other hypotheses were also discussed. The large increase of distance-from-bottom resulting in swimming close to the water surface, which occurred in both buspirone groups and in the 0.5%-ethanol group, is most likely not an anxiolytic response, because of the discrepancy with the in the literature well-established time-course and the absence of any effect of 3.5-hr habituation or black walls on vertical measures. Finally, locomotion and duration freezing could not be specifically taken as indicators for the state of anxiety and the results concerning transparent-wall preference were not sufficient clear. We conclude that the neuronal and ethological mechanisms underlying the effects of habituation, white-aversion, buspirone and ethanol on anxiety

  17. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  18. Nocardia brasiliensis cell wall lipids modulate macrophage and dendritic responses that favor development of experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Villarreal, J Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis.

  19. Nocardia brasiliensis Cell Wall Lipids Modulate Macrophage and Dendritic Responses That Favor Development of Experimental Actinomycetoma in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Villarreal, J. Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  20. Microfluidic strategy to investigate dynamics of small blood vessel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasotharan, Sanjesh; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Resistance arteries (RAs, 30-300 microns in diameter) that are located within the terminal part of the vascular tree regulate the laminar perfusion of tissue with blood, via the peripheral vascular resistance, and hence controls the systemic blood pressure. The structure of RAs is adapted to actively controlling flow resistance by dynamically changing their diameter, which is non-linearly dependent on the temporal variation of the transmural pressure, perfusion flow rate and spatiotemporal changes in the chemical environment. Increases in systemic blood pressure (hypertension) resulting from pathologic changes in the RA response represent the primary risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We use a microfluidic strategy to investigate small blood vessels by quantifying structural variations within the arterial wall, RA outer contour and diameter over time. First, we document the artery response to vasomotor drugs that were homogeneously applied at step-wise increasing concentration. Second, we investigate the response in the presence of well-defined axial and circumferential heterogeneities. Artery per- and superfusion is discussed based on microscale PIV measurements of the fluid velocity on both sides of the arterial wall. Structural changes in the arterial wall are quantified using cross-correlation and proper orthogonal decomposition analyses of bright-field micrographs.

  1. Examining the plankton acoustic response with a vessel mounted ADCP across oceanic fronts located in the Drake Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blanc

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On December 2001 and January 2006, during the LMG01-9 and LMG06-1 cruises to Antarctic Peninsula, at-sea oceanographic and acoustic measurements were conducted onboard the R/V L. M. Gould icebreaker along two transects located between (55.15 °S, 65 ºW and (64.65 °S, 65 ºW and between (55.15 ºS, 64.91 ºW and (62.7 ºS, 62.21 ºW, respectively. The scientific crew consisted of researchers from two US institutes, and a scientific observer from the Argentinean Naval Service of Research & Development under the frame of the US National Science Foundation Antarctic Program. The present work accomplishes an alternative application for a vesselmounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP with an operating frequency of 153.6 kHz. Volume Acoustic Backscattering Strengths, S V, were computed from the recorded ADCP's voltages. The obtained values fell in a range of -92 dB to -62 dB, for the layer of the water column comprised between 26 m - 300 m on 2001 and in the range of -93 dB to -58 dB for the water column between 22 m - 300 m on 2006. Depth-averaged, S V, for the upper water column (about the first 150 m on experiment transects were computed as well as S V values averaged in depth and latitude. Data processing revealed interesting features about the upper ocean acoustic behaviour. On December 2001, a significant non-uniform scattering response in the ensonified water column with quite high values of S V, associated with the diel vertical migration, was obtained. Additionally, a remarkable increment in the scattering response was observed at the estimated location of the Antarctic Divergence (AD. This feature was also observed on January 2006 in addition to remarkable high values of S V, in coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula. Plotting and exhaustive analyses of S V (z profiles enabled the visualisation of three distinct types of qualitative patterns, namely, curves with: (I two observable maxima, (II only one maximum, (III a depth

  2. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  3. System-based identification of toxicity pathways associated with multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced pathological responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Dymacek, Julian [Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6070 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Mercer, Robert R. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Pacurari, Maricica [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Denvir, James [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755 (United States); Castranova, Vincent [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Qian, Yong, E-mail: yaq2@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Guo, Nancy L., E-mail: lguo@hsc.wvu.edu [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The fibrous shape and biopersistence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have raised concern over their potential toxicity after pulmonary exposure. As in vivo exposure to MWCNT produced a transient inflammatory and progressive fibrotic response, this study sought to identify significant biological processes associated with lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data, based upon whole genome mRNA expression, bronchoaveolar lavage scores, and morphometric analysis from C57BL/6J mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 μg MWCNT at 1, 7, 28, or 56 days post-exposure. Using a novel computational model employing non-negative matrix factorization and Monte Carlo Markov Chain simulation, significant biological processes with expression similar to MWCNT-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data in mice were identified. A subset of genes in these processes was determined to be functionally related to either fibrosis or inflammation by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and was used to determine potential significant signaling cascades. Two genes determined to be functionally related to inflammation and fibrosis, vascular endothelial growth factor A (vegfa) and C-C motif chemokine 2 (ccl2), were confirmed by in vitro studies of mRNA and protein expression in small airway epithelial cells exposed to MWCNT as concordant with in vivo expression. This study identified that the novel computational model was sufficient to determine biological processes strongly associated with the pathology of lung inflammation and fibrosis and could identify potential toxicity signaling pathways and mechanisms of MWCNT exposure which could be used for future animal studies to support human risk assessment and intervention efforts. - Highlights: • A novel computational model identified toxicity pathways matching in vivo pathology. • Systematic identification of MWCNT-induced biological processes in mouse lungs • MWCNT-induced functional networks of lung

  4. Pleiotropic effects of cell wall amidase LytA on Streptococcus pneumoniae sensitivity to the host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; Campuzano, Susana; Moscoso, Miriam; González-Camacho, Fernando; Domenech, Mirian; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2015-02-01

    The complement system is a key component of the host immune response for the recognition and clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we demonstrate that the amidase LytA, the main pneumococcal autolysin, inhibits complement-mediated immunity independently of effects on pneumolysin by a complex process of impaired complement activation, increased binding of complement regulators, and direct degradation of complement C3. The use of human sera depleted of either C1q or factor B confirmed that LytA prevented activation of both the classical and alternative pathways, whereas pneumolysin inhibited only the classical pathway. LytA prevented binding of C1q and the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein to S. pneumoniae, thereby reducing activation of the classical pathway on the bacterial surface. In addition, LytA increased recruitment of the complement downregulators C4BP and factor H to the pneumococcal cell wall and directly cleaved C3b and iC3b to generate degradation products. As a consequence, C3b deposition and phagocytosis increased in the absence of LytA and were markedly enhanced for the lytA ply double mutant, confirming that a combination of LytA and Ply is essential for the establishment of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis in a murine model of infection. These data demonstrate that LytA has pleiotropic effects on complement activation, a finding which, in combination with the effects of pneumolysin on complement to assist with pneumococcal complement evasion, confirms a major role of both proteins for the full virulence of the microorganism during septicemia. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Physiological and biochemical responses of two keystone polychaete species: Diopatra neapolitana and Hediste diversicolor to Multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Lucia; Neto, Victor; Pretti, Carlo; Figueira, Etelvina; Chiellini, Federica; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2017-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are one of the most important carbon Nanomaterials (NMs). The production and use of these carbon NMs is increasing rapidly and, therefore, the need to assess their presence in the environment and associated risks has become increasingly important. However, limited literature is available regarding the impacts induced in aquatic organisms by this pollutant, namely in invertebrate species. Diopatra neapolitana and Hediste diversicolor are keystone polychaete species inhabiting estuaries and shallow water bodies intertidal mudflats, frequently used to evaluate the impact of environmental disturbances in these systems. To our knowledge, no information is available on physiological and biochemical alterations on these two species due to MWCNTs exposure. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of different MWCNTs concentrations (0.01; 0.10 and 1.00mg/L) in both species physiological (regenerative capacity and respiration rate) and biochemical (energy reserves, metabolic activities, oxidative stress related biomarkers and neurotoxicity markers) performance, after 28 days of exposure. The results obtained revealed that exposure to MWCNTs induced negative effects on the regenerative capacity of D. neapolitana. Additionally, higher MWCNTs concentrations induced increased respiration rates in D. neapolitana. MWCNTs altered energy-related responses, with higher values of electron transport system activity, glycogen and protein concentrations in both polychaetes exposed to this contaminant. Furthermore, when exposed to MWCNTs both species showed oxidative stress with higher lipid peroxidation, lower ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione, and higher activity of antioxidant (catalase and superoxide dismutase) and biotransformation (glutathione-S-transferases) enzymes in exposed organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Postweld Heat Treatment Process in a Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A516 Grade 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peasura, Prachya

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the application of the response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) experiment in mathematical model and optimizes postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The material of study is a pressure vessel steel ASTM A516 grade 70 that is used for gas metal arc welding. PWHT parameters examined in this study included PWHT temperatures and time. The resulting materials were examined using CCD experiment and the RSM to determine the resulting material tensile strength test, observed with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that using a full quadratic model with the proposed mathematical model is YTS = -285.521 + 15.706X1 + 2.514X2 - 0.004X1(2) - 0.001X2(2) - 0.029X1X2. Tensile strength parameters of PWHT were optimized PWHT time of 5.00 hr and PWHT temperature of 645.75°C. The results show that the PWHT time is the dominant mechanism used to modify the tensile strength compared to the PWHT temperatures. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that pearlite can contribute to higher tensile strength. Pearlite has an intensity, which results in increased material tensile strength. The research described here can be used as material data on PWHT parameters for an ASTM A516 grade 70 weld.

  7. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations ...

  8. Mechanosensing in developing lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Paz, Lara; Lammert, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is responsible for fluid homeostasis, transport of immune cells, inflammatory molecules, and dietary lipids. It is composed of a network of lymphatic capillaries that drain into collecting lymphatic vessels and ultimately bring fluid back to the blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) that line lymphatic capillaries present loose overlapping intercellular junctions and anchoring filaments that support fluid drainage. When interstitial fluid accumulates within tissues, the extracellular matrix (ECM) swells and pulls the anchoring filaments. This results in opening of the LEC junctions and permits interstitial fluid uptake. The absorbed fluid is then transported within collecting lymphatic vessels, which exhibit intraluminal valves that prevent lymph backflow and smooth muscle cells that sequentially contract to propel lymph.Mechanotransduction involves translation of mechanical stimuli into biological responses. LECs have been shown to sense and respond to changes in ECM stiffness, fluid pressure-induced cell stretch, and fluid flow-induced shear stress. How these signals influence LEC function and lymphatic vessel growth can be investigated by using different mechanotransduction assays in vitro and to some extent in vivo.In this chapter, we will focus on the mechanical forces that regulate lymphatic vessel expansion during embryonic development and possibly secondary lymphedema. In mouse embryos, it has been recently shown that the amount of interstitial fluid determines the extent of lymphatic vessel expansion via a mechanosensory complex formed by β1 integrin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR3). This model might as well apply to secondary lymphedema.

  9. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  10. On-line monitoring and analysis of reactor vessel integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerson, D.S.; Impink, A.J. Jr.; Balkey, K.R.; Andreychek, T.S.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for on-line monitoring and analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity in a unit in which reactor coolant is circulated along the inner wall of the pressure vessel, the method comprising the steps of: generating on an on-line basis, temperature signals representative of the temperature of the reactor coolant circulating along the inner wall of the pressure vessel; generating on an on-line basis, a pressure signal representative of the reactor coolant pressure; generating a signal representative of fast neutron fluence to which the reactor pressure vessel has been subjected; generating as a function of the fluence signal a visual representation of the actual real time reference nil-ductibility transition temperature (RT/sub ndt/) across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness at a preselected critical location in the wall; generating as a function of transients in the reactor coolant temperature and pressur signals, a visual representation of the real time required RT/sub ndt/, across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness at the selected critical location, the required RT/sub ndt/ being the RT/sub ndt/ that would be required in the pressure vessel wall for flaw initiation to occur as a result of stresses set-up by the transients; and superimposing the visual representations of the real-time actual and required RT/sub ndt's/ for flaw initiation across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness for the selected critical location to generate a visual representation of the difference in value between the actual and required RT/sub ndt/ presented as an RT/sub ndt/ margin.

  11. Leukoaraiosis is associated with arterial wall thickness: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriel, Eitan; Csiba, Laszlo; Berenyi, Ervin; Varkonyi, Ildiko; Mehes, Gabor; Kardos, Laszlo; Karni, Arnon; Bornstein, Natan M

    2012-06-01

    Leukoaraiosis refers to an age-related, abnormal appearance of the brain white matter on neuroimaging. The association between leukoaraiosis and cerebrovascular disease suggests that ischemia may be an important contributing factor; however, the pathogenesis of the condition remains controversial. We hypothesized that physical abnormalities of blood vessels might be culpable and compared the external and internal measurements of blood vessel walls between brains that demonstrated leukoaraiosis on imaging and normal control brains. Fourteen brains of individuals who had been diagnosed as having severe leukoaraiosis and five non-leukoaraiosis control brains were studied. Arterial cross-sections were evaluated by length measurements with an image analysis device. Arterial wall thickness and the ratio of the outer and inner diameters of the vessel were measured. We measured a total of 108 vessels in the leukoaraiosis group and 95 vessels in the control group. The vessel walls of the leukoaraiosis patients were an average of 5.5 µm thicker than the walls of control vessels of the same inside diameter (P = 0.0000, 95% CI 3.01-8.08) and an average of 2.3 µm thicker than walls of control vessels of the same outside diameter (P = 0.016, 95% CI 0.48-4.17). Our data provide evidence that leukoaraiosis is associated with vessel wall thickening in an additive fashion and indicate that structural vascular abnormalities are associated with leukoaraiosis. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  13. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  14. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  15. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Pascal J. H.; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and

  16. Assessing Vessel Traffic Service Operator Situation Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.W.F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes my study of situation awareness assessment of Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) operators. VTS operators are the traffic controllers on the water. They are responsible for a safe and efficient handling of vessel traffic. They monitor traffic, provide information on request and

  17. HSV-1 targets lymphatic vessels in the eye and draining lymph node of mice leading to edema in the absence of a functional type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher D; Cohen, Alex; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2013-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induces new lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) in the cornea via expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by virally infected epithelial cells. Here, we extend this observation to demonstrate the selective targeting of corneal lymphatics by HSV-1 in the absence of functional type I interferon (IFN) pathway. Specifically, we examined the impact of HSV-1 replication on angiogenesis using type I IFN receptor deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice. HSV-1-induced lymphatic and blood vessel growth into the cornea proper was time-dependent in immunocompetent animals. In contrast, there was an initial robust growth of lymphatic vessels into the cornea of HSV-1-infected CD118(-/-)mice, but such vessels disappeared by day 5 postinfection. The loss was selective as blood vessel integrity remained intact. Magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy analysis of the draining lymph nodes of CD118(-/-) mice revealed extensive edema and loss of lymphatics compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a loss of lymphatic vessels in CD118(-/-) mice, HSV-1 infection resulted in epithelial thinning associated with geographic lesions and edema within the cornea, which is consistent with a loss of lymphatic vasculature. These results underscore the key role functional type I IFN pathway plays in the maintenance of structural integrity within the cornea in addition to the anti-viral characteristics often ascribed to the type I IFN cytokine family. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  19. A study on the radiation damage and recovery of neutron irradiated vessel steel using magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Duck-Gun; Jeong, Hee-Tae; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    1999-04-01

    The radiation damage and thermal recovery characteristic of neutron irradiated SA508-3 reactor pressure vessel steel specimens have been investigated. Two recovery stages were identified from the results of hardness measurements during isochronal annealing and the mechanism responsible for the two stages was explained by using the results of Barkhausen noise measurement on the basis of the interaction between radiation induced defects and the magnetic domain wall. The coercivity was not changed by neutron irradiation, whereas the maximum magnetic induction increased. Barkhausen noise parameters associated with the domain wall motion were decreased by neutron irradiation and recovered with subsequent heat treatments.

  20. Numerical prediction of the response of a squat shear wall sunjected to monotonic loading through PARC_CL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belletti, B.; Esposito, R.; Damoni, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper adopts the FEM to describe the behaviour of a squat shear wall subjected to monotonic loading conditions. Nonlinear finite element analyses (NLFEA) have been performed with the model, denoted as PARC_CL, implemented at the University of Parma in the user’s subroutine UMAT.for for the

  1. A fast vibro-acoustic response analysis method for double wall structures including a viscothermal air layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Grooteman, F.P.

    2000-01-01

    The damping behaviour of a thin air layer between two flexible panels can be used to reduce sound radiation of structural excited panels. The numerical model of the double wall panels takes into account full acousto-elastic interaction and viscothermal wave propagation in the air layer. This means

  2. Defection-selective solubilization and chemically-responsive solubility switching of single-walled carbon nanotubes with cucurbit[7]uril

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Inagaki, Ayumi; Yamagishi, Tada-aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were suspended in aqueous media with cucurbit[7]uril (CB7), while SWCNTs were insoluble with cucurbit[5]uril (CB5). Moreover, defection-selective solubilization of SWCNTs with CB7 was demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Trapping of defect point to improve response time via controlled azimuthal anchoring in a vertically aligned liquid crystal cell with polymer wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Youn Sik; Lee, Hee Kyu; Lee, Seung Hee [Polymer BIN Fusion Research Center, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Chonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon [AMLCD Division, Samsung Electronics, Kiheung, Kyunggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lu, Ruibo; Wu, Shin-Tson [College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: lsh1@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-03-07

    Conventional multi-domain vertically aligned liquid crystal (LC) cells have defect points due to the collision of LC directors during the formation of multiple domains. In addition, the location of defects changes with time resulting in a slow response time. This paper proposes a robust vertically aligned LC cell, where the LCs are locked by polymer walls, and the azimuthal anchoring on the surface of the alignment layer is controlled by the polymerization of a UV curable reactive mesogen monomer. As a result, the defect points are trapped at a single position, resulting in a greatly improved response time.

  4. What are the residual stresses doing in our blood vessels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Y C

    1991-01-01

    We show that the residual strain and stress in the blood vessels are not zero, and that the zero-stress state of a blood vessel consists of open-sector segments whose opening angles vary along the longitudinal axis of the vessel. When the homeostatic state of the blood vessel is changed, e.g., by a sudden hypertension, the opening angle will change. The time constant of the opening angle change is a few hours (e.g., in the pulmonary artery) or a few days (e.g., in the aorta). From a kinematic point of view, a change of opening angle is a bending of the blood vessel wall, which is caused by a nonuniformly distributed residual strain. From a mechanics point of view, changes of blood pressure and residual strain cause change of stress in the blood vessel wall. Correlating the stress with the change of residual strain yields a fundamental biological law relating the rate of growth or resorption of tissue with the stress in the tissue. Thus, residual stresses are related to the remodeling of the blood vessel wall. Our blood vessel remodels itself when stress changes. The stress-growth law provides a biomechanical foundation for tissue engineering.

  5. [Bladder injury by penetration of artificial vessel graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Tamaki, Gaku; Kura, Tatsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2009-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injury by artificial vessel graft is extremely rare and only 3 cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of bladder injury by penetration of artificial vessel graft. An 80-year-old male underwent a femoro-femoral crossover bypass surgery for arteriosclerosis obliterans in our hospital. Postoperatively he complained of urinary incontinence and was referred to the urology department. Ultrasonography for evaluating microscopic hematuria revealed a high echoic linear structure in the bladder and subsequent cystoscopy found an artificial vessel graft penetrating bladder wall. Vascular surgeons reconstructed femoro-femoral bypass and we removed the artificial vessel graft and repaired the injured bladder wall. This is the fourth case of bladder penetrating injury by artificial vessel graft and we summarize the reported cases.

  6. Role of pathogen-derived cell wall carbohydrates and prostaglandin E2 in immune response and suppression of fish immunity by the oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Rodrigo; Wang, Tiehui; Duncan, Gary J; Skaar, Ida; Mélida, Hugo; Bulone, Vincent; van West, Pieter; Secombes, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Saprolegnia parasitica is a freshwater oomycete that is capable of infecting several species of fin fish. Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by this microbe, has a substantial impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. No sustainable treatment against saprolegniosis is available, and little is known regarding the host response. In this study, we examined the immune response of Atlantic salmon to S. parasitica infection and to its cell wall carbohydrates. Saprolegnia triggers a strong inflammatory response in its host (i.e., induction of interleukin-1β1 [IL-1β1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), while severely suppressing the expression of genes associated with adaptive immunity in fish, through downregulation of T-helper cell cytokines, antigen presentation machinery, and immunoglobulins. Oomycete cell wall carbohydrates were recognized by fish leukocytes, triggering upregulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, similar to what is observed during infection. Our data suggest that S. parasitica is capable of producing prostaglandin [corrected] E2 (PGE2) in vitro, a metabolite not previously shown to be produced by oomycetes, and two proteins with homology to vertebrate enzymes known to play a role in prostaglandin biosynthesis have been identified in the oomycete genome. Exogenous PGE2 was shown to increase the inflammatory response in fish leukocytes incubated with cell wall carbohydrates while suppressing genes involved in cellular immunity (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and the IFN-γ-inducible protein [γ-IP]). Inhibition of S. parasitica zoospore germination and mycelial growth by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) also suggests that prostaglandins may be involved in oomycete development. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Phase transition and random-field induced domain wall response in quantum ferroelectrics SrTi18O3: review and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Itoh, Toshirou Yagi, Yoshiaki Uesu, Wolfgang Kleemann and Robert Blinc

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotope exchange of 16O by 18O in SrTiO3 causes a drastic change from paraelectric to ferroelectric, due to the suppression of quantum fluctuation. The phase transition and origin of the huge domain wall response were evaluated by dielectric, magnetic (NMR, and optical measurements (SHG, light scattering. The results obtained corroborate (1 smeared ferroelectric transition at Tc due to quenched random field, (2 a quite large dielectric contribution from domain walls, (3 incomplete softening of the transverse optic mode, and (4 a large contribution from the relaxational mode to the phase transition. Quantitative explanations, given to individual results, may give hints to grasp the mechanism for the evolution of ferroelectricity, in which quantum fluctuation and random fields are dominant perturbations. Finally, some of the news studies on the SrTiO3 were also introduced.

  8. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  9. Rapid Changes in Cell Wall Yielding of Elongating Begonia argenteo-guttata L. Leaves in Response to Changes in Plant Water Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, M D; Matthews, M A

    1992-12-01

    Elongation and epidermal cell turgor (P) of Begonia argenteoguttata L. leaves were simultaneously measured to determine the wall-yielding behavior of growing leaf cells in response to changes in plant water status. Rapid changes in plant water status were imposed by irrigating the rooting media with solutions of -0.20 and -0.30 MPa mannitol. These treatments caused decreases in P of 0.09 and 0.17 MPa, respectively. The decreases in P were complete within 10 min, and P did not change thereafter. Following treatments, leaf elongation was nil for periods of 25 to 38 min. Subsequently, elongation recovered to steady rates that were 45 or 75% lower than in the well-watered controls. Leaves of plants that were pretreated with -0.30 MPa of mannitol and rewatered showed an increase in P of 0.19 MPa, which was complete within 15 min; P did not change thereafter. Rewatering caused a several-fold increase in leaf elongation rates, which subsequently declined while P was increasing, to reach steady rates similar to that of the controls. Several estimates of elastic deformation indicated that most of the elongation responses to altered P were due to changes in irreversible deformation. The results showed that the initial effects of changes in P on leaf elongation were partially compensated for by changes in the cell wall-yielding properties. We conclude that linear relationships between P and adjusted growth rates are not necessarily indicative of constant wall-yielding properties. Instead, these relationships may reflect the effect of P on wall-loosening processes.

  10. Rapid Changes in Cell Wall Yielding of Elongating Begonia argenteo-guttata L. Leaves in Response to Changes in Plant Water Status 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, Marcelo D.; Matthews, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Elongation and epidermal cell turgor (P) of Begonia argenteoguttata L. leaves were simultaneously measured to determine the wall-yielding behavior of growing leaf cells in response to changes in plant water status. Rapid changes in plant water status were imposed by irrigating the rooting media with solutions of −0.20 and −0.30 MPa mannitol. These treatments caused decreases in P of 0.09 and 0.17 MPa, respectively. The decreases in P were complete within 10 min, and P did not change thereafter. Following treatments, leaf elongation was nil for periods of 25 to 38 min. Subsequently, elongation recovered to steady rates that were 45 or 75% lower than in the well-watered controls. Leaves of plants that were pretreated with −0.30 MPa of mannitol and rewatered showed an increase in P of 0.19 MPa, which was complete within 15 min; P did not change thereafter. Rewatering caused a several-fold increase in leaf elongation rates, which subsequently declined while P was increasing, to reach steady rates similar to that of the controls. Several estimates of elastic deformation indicated that most of the elongation responses to altered P were due to changes in irreversible deformation. The results showed that the initial effects of changes in P on leaf elongation were partially compensated for by changes in the cell wall-yielding properties. We conclude that linear relationships between P and adjusted growth rates are not necessarily indicative of constant wall-yielding properties. Instead, these relationships may reflect the effect of P on wall-loosening processes. PMID:16653208

  11. BPC 157 and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwerth, Sven; Brcic, Luka; Vuletic, Lovorka Batelja; Kolenc, Danijela; Aralica, Gorana; Misic, Marija; Zenko, Anita; Drmic, Domagoj; Rucman, Rudolf; Sikiric, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the described effects of BPC 157 on blood vessels after different types of damage, and elucidate by investigating different aspects of vascular response to injury (endothelium damage, clotting, thrombosis, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasculoneogenesis and edema formation) especially in connection to the healing processes. In this respect, BPC 157 was concluded to be the most potent angiomodulatory agent, acting through different vasoactive pathways and systems (e.g. NO, VEGF, FAK) and leading to optimization of the vascular response followed, as it has to be expected, by optimization of the healing process. Formation of new blood vessels involves two main, partly overlapping mechanisms, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The additional mechanism of arteriogenesis is involved in the formation of collaterals. In conjunction with blood vessel function, we at least have to consider leakage of fluid/proteins/plasma, resulting in edema/exudate formation as well as thrombogenesis. Blood vessels are also strongly involved in tumor biology. In this aspect, we have neoangiogenesis resulting in pathological vascularization, vascular invasion resulting in release of metastatic cells and the phenomenon of homing resulting in formation of secondary tumors--metastases.

  12. Response of the lower respiratory tract to injury. Mechanisms of repair of the parenchymal cells of the alveolar wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, S I; Bitterman, P B; Crystal, R G

    1983-12-01

    Although the lower respiratory tract is frequently exposed to injurious agents, the lung does possess some ability to effect repair and thus restore the damaged alveolar wall to normal; however, in some circumstances, normal repair is not possible. The result is often a markedly deranged alveolus, with improper proportions of epithelial cells (eg, relatively more cuboidal type-2-like cells), a loss of endothelial cells or migration of endothelial cells into improper locations, and a proliferation of interstitial fibroblasts with an accompanying deposition of a collagenous extracellular matrix (ie, fibrosis). Although the development of "fibrosis" is frequently thought to be a form of attempted "repair" of an injured alveolar wall, this concept is not clearly established; it is possible that the expansion of fibroblastic numbers in the alveolar wall is part of the disease process itself, resulting from alveolar macrophagic activation, rather than an attempt by the macrophage to "repair" an injured alveolar wall. Thus, it is not known if the development of fibrosis represents "healing" and thus is beneficial (as a localized scar "heals" a localized incision in the skin) or whether it represents part of the disease process itself. The distinction is important, as it is unclear whether therapy should be directed against the development of fibrosis per se. If fibroblastic expansion and deposition of the connective tissue products of these fibroblasts are a useful form of repair, prevention of this process may cause future loss of pulmonary function. Alternatively, if "fibrosis" compromises pulmonary function (particularly decreased compliance), prevention of fibrosis might be beneficial. It is apparent, therefore, that what is needed is an understanding of the processes that lead to alveolar parenchymal cellular repair and how such processes might be manipulated for the benefit of the patient.

  13. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice accumulation on vessels contributes to an ext...

  14. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  15. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  16. Method to Determine the Stress-Strain Response of As-Formed Thin-Walled Tubular Structures Using a Flaring Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurendic, S.; Anderson, D.

    2017-09-01

    Finite element simulations are used extensively to refine the forming steps of draw and wall iron (DWI) aluminum bottles; therefore, accurate material data is required Unfortunately, the material properties of the base sheet cannot presently be used for simulation of the later forming stages due to preceding significant deformation (ironing) and thermal treatments. Measuring the stress-strain response using traditional methods (e.g. tensile test) becomes increasingly difficult at later stages of the bottle forming process due to a significant diameter reduction of the bottle neck from successive die-necking stages. Moreover, failure during forming tends to occur in the final deformation stages when the bottle opening is rolled over, creating a brim roll, at which point brim roll splits may occur. Knowledge of the stress-strain response prior to the roll over may lead to improved product design, reduced waste, and an optimized product. Therefore, this work details a flaring apparatus and data analysis method to determine the stress-strain response in the die-necked region of thin-walled aluminum bottles fabricated from AA3104 sheet metal.

  17. Biomechanical deformable image registration of longitudinal lung CT images using vessel information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazoulat, Guillaume; Owen, Dawn; Matuszak, Martha M; Balter, James M; Brock, Kristy K

    2016-07-07

    Spatial correlation of lung tissue across longitudinal images, as the patient responds to treatment, is a critical step in adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this work is to expand a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm (Morfeus) to achieve accurate registration in the presence of significant anatomical changes. Six lung cancer patients previously treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Exhale CT scans were obtained at treatment planning and following three weeks of treatment. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the follow-up CT using Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm. To model the complex response of the lung, an extension to Morfeus has been developed: an initial deformation was estimated with Morfeus consisting of boundary conditions on the chest wall and incorporating a sliding interface with the lungs. It was hypothesized that the addition of boundary conditions based on vessel tree matching would provide a robust reduction of the residual registration error. To achieve this, the vessel trees were segmented on the two images by thresholding a vesselness image based on the Hessian matrix's eigenvalues. For each point on the reference vessel tree centerline, the displacement vector was estimated by applying a variant of the Demons registration algorithm between the planning CT and the deformed follow-up CT. An expert independently identified corresponding landmarks well distributed in the lung to compute target registration errors (TRE). The TRE was: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mm after rigid registration, Morfeus and Morfeus with boundary conditions on the vessel tree, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of boundary conditions on the vessels significantly improved the accuracy in modeling the response of the lung and tumor over the course of radiotherapy. Minimizing and modeling these geometrical

  18. Contact-inhibited chemotaxis in de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeland M H Merks

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels form either when dispersed endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner walls of fully formed blood vessels organize into a vessel network (vasculogenesis, or by sprouting or splitting of existing blood vessels (angiogenesis. Although they are closely related biologically, no current model explains both phenomena with a single biophysical mechanism. Most computational models describe sprouting at the level of the blood vessel, ignoring how cell behavior drives branch splitting during sprouting. We present a cell-based, Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg model (also called Cellular Potts Model simulation of the initial patterning before the vascular cords form lumens, based on plausible behaviors of endothelial cells. The endothelial cells secrete a chemoattractant, which attracts other endothelial cells. As in the classic Keller-Segel model, chemotaxis by itself causes cells to aggregate into isolated clusters. However, including experimentally observed VE-cadherin-mediated contact inhibition of chemotaxis in the simulation causes randomly distributed cells to organize into networks and cell aggregates to sprout, reproducing aspects of both de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth. We discuss two branching instabilities responsible for our results. Cells at the surfaces of cell clusters attempting to migrate to the centers of the clusters produce a buckling instability. In a model variant that eliminates the surface-normal force, a dissipative mechanism drives sprouting, with the secreted chemical acting both as a chemoattractant and as an inhibitor of pseudopod extension. Both mechanisms would also apply if force transmission through the extracellular matrix rather than chemical signaling mediated cell-cell interactions. The branching instabilities responsible for our results, which result from contact inhibition of chemotaxis, are both generic developmental mechanisms and interesting examples of unusual patterning instabilities.

  19. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner

  20. Assessment of yeast cell wall as replacements for antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets: effects on performance, intestinal histo-morphology and humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Haldar, S; Bedford, M R; Muthusami, N; Samanta, I

    2012-04-01

    The study compared the effects of an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast cell wall (YCW) on performance, microbiology and histo-morphology of the small intestine and humoral immune responses in Ross 308 broilers. The treatments (eight replicates/treatment, n = 12/replicate) were negative control (NC, without AGP), positive control (PC, supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate, 400 mg/kg), Y and YCW (supplemented with yeast and YCW, respectively, 1000 mg/kg). Live weight at 42 days improved (p = 0.086) in the PC, Y and YCW groups. Feed conversion ratio was better (p = 0.039) in the YCW group compared with the other groups. Antibiotic growth promoter in the PC group shortened the villi in duodenum (p = 0.044). Mucosal Escherichia coli number was higher in the PC group (p < 0.001), whereas in the digesta E. coli number was lower (p = 0.001) in the PC, Y and YCW groups in relation to the NC. Mucosal Salmonella populations increased (p = 0.0001) in the PC group, whereas in the digesta, all treatments reduced the Salmonella (p = 0.0001). Following oral challenge with Salmonella pullorum, YCW increased E. coli numbers on the mucosa (p < 0.001) whereas in the digesta the Y group had lower (p < 0.0001) number of E. coli. In the digesta, Salmonella count was lower in the YCW group compared with the other treatments (p < 0.01). Yeast cell wall -treated birds exhibited better (p < 0.05) humoral immune response against Newcastle disease which was far more persistent over time than in any other treatments. It was concluded that the yeast and the yeast cell wall may have effects identical to BMD on performance of broilers and thus may constitute an effective replacement strategy in the dietary regimens for broiler chickens. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Containment vessel drain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  2. Analysis of the distribution of copper amine oxidase in cell walls of legume seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzi, M; Tipping, A J; Marcus, S E; Knox, J P; Federico, R; Angelini, R; McPherson, M J

    2001-11-01

    Copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO) has been proposed to play a role in H2O2 production in plant cell walls during cell development and in response to pathogen attack. We have compared the localisation of CuAO in pea (Pisum sativum L.), lentil (Lens culinaris M.) and chick pea (Cicer arietinum L.) grown under different light conditions, using both immuno- and histochemical techniques. The enzyme was detected by indirect immunofluorescence in the cell walls of parenchyma tissues of etiolated pea and lentil plants and was particularly abundant at intercellular spaces. Upon de-etiolation, CuAO largely disappeared from cortical cell walls except in the region of intercellular spaces. In the apical internode of light-grown seedlings, CuAO occurred mainly in cortical cell walls and, to some extent, in cell walls of xylem vessels. In both the elongation zone and mature regions of roots, CuAO was restricted to cortical cell walls and some cell junctions close to the meristem. Extensin epitopes co-localised to intercellular spaces of the cortex in de-etiolated pea, indicating that CuAO may have a role in cell wall strengthening at intercellular spaces. In chick pea, the localisation of the enzyme varied between different cultivars that have differing susceptibility to the fungus Ascochyta rabiei. In a susceptible cultivar Calia, immunogold labelling localised CuAO to cell walls of the cortex, as in lentil and pea, while in a resistant cultivar Sultano, it was most abundant in xylem vessels and, in light-grown plants, in the epidermis. These expression patterns are discussed with regard to the possible functions of amine oxidase in cell growth, cell differentiation and pathogen resistance.

  3. Progress of ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K., E-mail: Kimihiro.Ioki@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bayon, A. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, No. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Choi, C.H.; Daly, E.; Dani, S.; Davis, J.; Giraud, B.; Gribov, Y.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Jun, C.; Levesy, B. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC “Sintez”, Efremov Inst., 189631 Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Le Barbier, R.; Martinez, J.-M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pathak, H. [ITER-India, A-29, GIDC Electronic Estate, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Preble, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sa, J.W. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Terasawa, A.; Utin, Yu. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► This covers the overall status and progress of the ITER vacuum vessel activities. ► It includes design, R and D, manufacturing and approval process of the regulators. ► The baseline design was completed and now manufacturing designs are on-going. ► R and D includes ISI, dynamic test of keys and lip-seal welding/cutting technology. ► The VV suppliers produced full-scale mock-ups and started VV manufacturing. -- Abstract: Design modifications were implemented in the vacuum vessel (VV) baseline design in 2011–2012 for finalization. The modifications are mostly due to interface components, such as support rails and feedthroughs for the in-vessel coils (IVC). Manufacturing designs are being developed at the domestic agencies (DAs) based on the baseline design. The VV support design was also finalized and tests on scale mock-ups are under preparation. Design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering the assembly methods and the required tolerances. Further modifications are required to be consistent with the DAs’ manufacturing designs. Dynamic tests on the inter-modular and stub keys to support the blanket modules are being performed to measure the dynamic amplification factor (DAF). An in-service inspection (ISI) plan has been developed and R and D was launched for ISI. Conceptual design of the VV instrumentation has been developed. The VV baseline design was approved by the agreed notified body (ANB) in accordance with the French Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order procedure.

  4. Effects of yeast cell wall on growth performance, immune responses and intestinal short chain fatty acid concentrations of broilers in an experimental necrotic enteritis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Da Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical necrotic enteritis (NE causes devastating economic losses in the broiler chicken industry, especially in birds raised free of in-feed antibiotics. Prebiotics are potential alternatives to in-feed antibiotics. Yeast cell wall extract (YCW derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a prebiotic with known immune modulating effects. This study examined the effects of YCW and antibiotics (AB during subclinical NE on broiler growth performance, intestinal lesions, humoral immune response and gut microflora metabolites. The study employed a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors were: NE challenge (yes or no and feed additive (control, AB, or YCW. Each treatment was replicated in 8 floor pens with 15 birds per pen. Challenged birds had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR than unchallenged birds on d 35 (P < 0.05. Dietary inclusion of AB decreased FCR regardless of challenge (P < 0.05 on d 24 and 35. Inclusion of YCW reduced serum interleukin-1 (IL-1 concentration in NE challenged birds (P < 0.01 and increased immunoglobulin (Ig G (P < 0.05 and Ig M (P < 0.05 levels compared to other dietary treatments regardless of challenge. Yeast cell wall extract increased formic acid concentration in cecal contents during challenge and increased butyric acid concentration in unchallenged birds on d 16. This study indicates YCW suppressed inflammatory response, promoted generation of immunoglobulin and increased short chain fatty acid production suggesting potential benefits to bird health.

  5. Transient Response of a Fluid-Filled, Thick-Walled Spherical Shell Embedded in an Elastic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahari Ako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of transient elastodynamics analysis of a thick-walled, fluid-filled spherical shell embedded in an elastic medium with an analytical approach. This configuration is investigated at first step for a full-space case. Different constitutive relations for the elastic medium, shell material and filling fluid can be considered, as well as different excitation sources (including S/P wave or plane/spherical incident wave at different locations. With mapmaking visualisation, the wave propagation phenomena can be described and better understood. The methodology is going to be applied to analysis of the tunnels or other shell like structures under the effect of nearby underground explosion.

  6. Evolución de los modelos constitutivos de respuesta pasiva para paredes arteriales//Evolution of constitutive models for passive response of the arterial walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fernández‐Collazo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La respuesta mecánica de las paredes arteriales se modifica como consecuencia del envejecimiento y el desarrollo de enfermedades. Estos cambios se ven reflejados en modificaciones en su estructura, composición, resistencia y forma. La predicción de su comportamiento en dependencia de su estado fisiológico usando modelos biomecánicos se muestra como una potente herramienta en el tratamiento y diagnóstico de aneurismas, ateroesclerosis, hipertensión arterial entre otras. Realizando un profundo análisis de la literatura consultada se presenta un estudio bibliográfico de los modelos constitutivos de paredes arteriales en su respuesta pasiva, clasificándolos y destacando sus principales ventajas, desventajas y la evolución de estos desde los puramente fenomenológicos hasta los más complejos.Palabras claves: modelos, arterias, respuesta pasiva, biomecánica._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe mechanical response of arterial walls is modified as a result of aging and disease development. These changes are reflected in changes in its composition, strength, shape and structure. The prediction of their behavior, depending on their physiological state used biomechanical models is shown as a powerful tool in the treatment and diagnosis of aneurysms, atherosclerosis, hypertensionand others. It´s presented in its passive response, a profound analysis of the literature and the bibliographic review of the constitutive models of arterial walls, classifying and highlighting their main advantages, disadvantages and the  volution from purely phenomenological to the most complex response.Key words: models, artery, passive response, biomechanics.

  7. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  8. Adoption of in-vessel retention concept for VVER-440/V213 reactors in Central European Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovic, Peter, E-mail: peter.matejovic@ivstt.sk [Inzinierska Vypoctova Spolocnost (IVS), Jana Holleho 5, 91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Barnak, Miroslav; Bachraty, Milan; Vranka, Lubomir [Inzinierska Vypoctova Spolocnost (IVS), Jana Holleho 5, 91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Berky, Robert [Integrita a Bezpecnost Ocelovych Konstrukcii, Rybnicna 40, 831 07 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Design of in-vessel retention concept for VVER-440/V213 reactors. • Thermal loads acting on the inner reactor surface. • Structural response of reactor pressure vessel. • External reactor vessel cooling. - Abstract: An in-vessel retention (IVR) concept was proposed for standard VVER-440/V213 reactors equipped with confinement made of reinforced concrete and bubbler condenser pressure suppression system. This IVR concept is based on simple modifications of existing plant technology and thus it was attractive for plant operators in Central European Countries. Contrary to the solution that was adopted before at Loviisa NPP in Finland (two units of VVER-440/V213 reactor with steel confinement equipped with ice condenser), the coolant access to the reactor pressure vessel from flooded cavity is enabled via closable hole installed in the centre of thermal shield of the reactor lower head instead of lowering this massive structure in the case of severe accident. As a consequence, the crucial point of this IVR concept is narrow gap between torispherical lower head and thermal and biological shield. Here the highest thermal flux is expected in the case of severe accident. Thus, realistic estimation of thermal load and corresponding deformations of reactor wall and their impact on gap width for coolant flow are of primarily importance. In this contribution the attention is paid especially to the analytical support with emphasis to the following points: 1) {sup ∗}Estimation of thermal loads acting on the inner reactor surface; 2) {sup ∗}Estimation of structural response of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with emphasis on the deformation of outer reactor surface and its impact on the annular gap between RPV wall and thermal/biological shield; 3) {sup ∗}Analysis of external reactor vessel cooling. For this purpose the ASTEC code was used for performing analysis of core degradation scenarios, the ANSYS code for structural analysis of reactor vessel

  9. Wavy-walled bioreactor supports increased cell proliferation and matrix deposition in engineered cartilage constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ericka M; Bilgen, Bahar; Barabino, Gilda A

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic forces in bioreactors can decisively influence extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilage constructs. In the present study, the reduced fluid shear, high-axial mixing environment provided by a wavy-walled bioreactor was exploited in the cultivation of cartilage constructs using polyglycolic acid scaffolds seeded with bovine articular chondrocytes. Increased growth as defined by weight, cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition was observed in cartilage constructs from wavy-walled bioreactors in comparison with those from spinner flasks cultured under the same conditions. The wet weight composition of 4-week constructs from the wavy-walled bioreactor was similar to that of spinner flask constructs, but the former were 60% heavier due to equally higher incorporation of extracellular matrix and 30% higher cell population. It is most likely that increased construct matrix incorporation was a result of increased mitotic activity of chondrocytes cultured in the environment of the wavy-walled bioreactor. A layer of elongated cells embedded in type I collagen formed at the periphery of wavy-walled bioreactor and spinner flask constructs, possibly as a response to local shear forces. On the basis of the robustness and reproducibility of the extracellular matrix composition of cartilage constructs, the wavy-walled bioreactor demonstrated promise as an experimental cartilage tissue-engineering vessel. Increased construct growth in the wavy-walled bioreactor may lead to enhanced mechanical properties and expedited in vitro cultivation.

  10. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  11. [Polyurethane vessels for microvascular surgical training to reduce animal use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sonja A; Lang, Axel; Beer, Gertrude M

    2004-01-01

    Systematic training of the manual skills is inevitable in learning microsurgery. Generally, first exercises are done on two-dimensional models, then the training continues on animals. With the growing ethical awareness, the obligation to protect animals and the stricter animal protection laws, realistic three-dimensional models have become necessary for training of microsurgery. However, the available alternatives all have certain disadvantages. We tested vessels made of polyurethane for microvascular surgical training and compared them to the available three-dimensional synthetic alternatives. Rose-coloured (arteries) or blue (veins), opaque vessels with a minimal wall thickness of 0.12 mm and a minimal internal diameter of 1 mm are used. To mimic the surgical access and the depth of the operative field, the vessels can be embedded in a synthetic box with or without a cap. The completed anastomosis is checked by injection of a coloured fluid. The consistency and the variable relation of the thickness of the wall to the internal diameter very closely reflect the biological situation. Even training on very fragile venous walls is possible in all manners. After completion of anastomosis the vessels can be opened longitudinally to check the patency of the anastomotic site. The described polyurethane vessels are very suitable for microsurgical training as a useful step between the two-dimensional model and the animal. The number of animals required for microsurgical training can clearly be reduced by the use of such synthetic polyurethane vessels.

  12. Influence of nanotube length and density on the plasmonic terahertz response of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, P.; Shuba, M. V.; Beckerleg, C.; Yuko, D. I.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Ksenevich, V.; Viet, Ho; Nasibulin, A. G.; Tenne, R.; Hendry, E.

    2018-01-01

    We measure the conductivity spectra of thin films comprising bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different average lengths in the frequency range 0.3–1000 THz and temperature interval 10–530 K. The observed temperature-induced changes in the terahertz conductivity spectra are shown to depend strongly on the average CNT length, with a conductivity around 1 THz that increases/decreases as the temperature increases for short/long tubes. This behaviour originates from the temperature dependence of the electron scattering rate, which we obtain from Drude fits of the measured conductivity in the range 0.3–2 THz for 10 μm length CNTs. This increasing scattering rate with temperature results in a subsequent broadening of the observed THz conductivity peak at higher temperatures and a shift to lower frequencies for increasing CNT length. Finally, we show that the change in conductivity with temperature depends not only on tube length, but also varies with tube density. We record the effective conductivities of composite films comprising mixtures of WS2 nanotubes and CNTs versus CNT density for frequencies in the range 0.3–1 THz, finding that the conductivity increases/decreases for low/high density films as the temperature increases. This effect arises due to the density dependence of the effective length of conducting pathways in the composite films, which again leads to a shift and temperature dependent broadening of the THz conductivity peak.

  13. Understanding the Effect of Gas Dynamics in Plasma Gun Performance for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Will; Underwood, Thomas; Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed coaxial plasma accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on both the properties of the plasma flow and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Specific emphasis is placed on quantifying the variation in these properties using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume as the gun volume is progressively filled with more neutral gas. These results are mapped to the operational dynamics of the gun via a time-resolved Schlieren cinematic visualization of the density gradient within the flow. Resulting videos indicate the existence of two distinct modes with vastly different characteristic timescales, spatial evolution, and plasma properties. Time resolved quantification of the associated plasma heat flux for both modes, including a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 10 GW m-2, is presented using both a fast thermocouple gauge and an IR camera. Both diagnostics in conjunction with a heat transfer model provide an accurate description of the energy transfer dynamics and operational characteristics of plasma guns. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program.

  14. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice acc...

  15. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Jackson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2) and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saal and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater...... and lasted longer than hepatic Saal mRNA expression. Plasma SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels were related to time and physicochemical properties using adjusted, multiple regression analyses. SAA3 and SAA1/2 plasma protein levels were increased after exposure to almost all of the MWCNTs on day 1, whereas...... and hepatic acute phase responses after MWCNT exposure. As the responses were influenced by the physicochemical properties of the MWCNTs, this study provides the first step towards designing MWCNT that induce less SAA....

  16. Lymphoid Aggregates Remodel Lymphatic Collecting Vessels that Serve Mesenteric Lymph Nodes in Crohn Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Bala, Shashi; Rahier, Jean-François; Johnson, Michael W; Wang, Peter L; Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Chau, Amélie; Pariente, Benjamin; Kartheuser, Alex; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Early pathological descriptions of Crohn disease (CD) argued for a potential defect in lymph transport; however, this concept has not been thoroughly investigated. In mice, poor healing in response to infection-induced tissue damage can cause hyperpermeable lymphatic collecting vessels in mesenteric adipose tissue that impair antigen and immune cell access to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), which normally sustain appropriate immunity. To investigate whether analogous changes might occur in human intestinal disease, we established a three-dimensional imaging approach to characterize the lymphatic vasculature in mesenteric tissue from controls or patients with CD. In CD specimens, B-cell-rich aggregates resembling tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) impinged on lymphatic collecting vessels that enter and exit LNs. In areas of creeping fat, which characterizes inflammation-affected areas of the bowel in CD, we observed B cells and apparent innate lymphoid cells that had invaded the lymphatic vessel wall, suggesting these cells may be mediators of lymphatic remodeling. Although TLOs have been described in many chronic inflammatory states, their anatomical relationship to preestablished LNs has never been revealed. Our data indicate that, at least in the CD-affected mesentery, TLOs are positioned along collecting lymphatic vessels in a manner expected to affect delivery of lymph to LNs. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  1. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  2. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  4. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  5. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  6. 2011 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  7. 2011 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  8. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  9. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  10. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  11. Thermo active piles and diaphragm walls building process and thermal response test; Pilotes y pantallas termoactivas. Proceso constructivo y caracterizacion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazariegos, A.; Anton, L. C.; Valle, R.; Urchueguia, J.; Quilis, S.; Martinez, S.; Magraner, T.

    2009-07-01

    Thermo active foundation technology uses building foundation piles diaphragm wall slabs as ground heat exchangers to provide building with heating and cooling. This type of foundation is based on the use of the ground temperature to enhance the heat pump coefficient of performance (COP). In this kind of structures, the heat exchange can be done through a closed circuit installed on the reinforced of the foundation. This closed circuit is made up of HDPE pipes geothermal probes, through which water or brine circulates producing a heat exchange between this fluid and the ground. this fluid is led to a geothermal heat pump GHP, generating the energy required for air-conditioning a building. ENERGESIS, leading company in the air-conditioning field using geothermal energy and RADIO KRONSA, leading company in the engineering field of soil and subsoil, with the collaboration of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (UPV) and the Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas (UPM), have developed an action line to design and implement saving energy facilities by using geothermal energy associated with the foundations. A series of tests at work have been done in order to have a procedure to implement the thermal response of thermo active piles and diaphragm walls. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  13. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Biyue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT with wall pressure (WP, blood pressure on the lumen wall and spatial wall pressure gradient (WPG in a human atherosclerotic right coronary artery were studied. The pulsatile blood flow was simulated using a three dimensional mathematical model. The blood was treated as an incompressible viscous non-Newtonian fluid. The geometry of the artery was re-constructed using an in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS 44-slice dataset obtained from a patient with consent obtained. The WT, the WP and the WPG were averaged on each slice, respectively, and Pearson correlation analysis was performed on slice averaged base. Each slice was then divided into 8 segments and averaged vessel WT, WP and WPG were collected from all 352 segments for correlation analysis. Each slice was also divided into 2 segments (inner semi-wall of bend and outer semi-wall of bend and the correlation analysis was performed on the 88 segments. Results Under mean pressure, the Pearson coefficient for correlation between WT and WP was r = − 0.52 (p  Conclusions Results from this representative case report indicated that plaque wall thickness correlated negatively with wall pressure (r = −0.81 by slice and positively with wall pressure gradient (r = 0.45. The slice averaged WT has a strong linear relationship with the slice averaged WP. Large-scale patient studies are needed to further confirm our findings.

  14. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; López-Romero, Everardo; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response.

  15. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Alba-Fierro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall (CW components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60 has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response.

  16. Studies on in-vessel debris coolability in ALPHA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yu; Yamano, Norihiro; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    In-vessel debris coolability experiments have been performed in ALPHA Program at JAERI. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) produced by a thermite reaction was applied as a debris simulant. Two scoping experiments using approximately 30 kg or 50 kg of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were conducted. In addition to post-test observations, temperature histories of the debris simulant and the lower head experimental vessel were evaluated. Rapid temperature reduction observed on the outer surface of the experimental vessel may imply that water penetration into a gap between the solidified debris and the experimental vessel occurred resulting in an effective cooling of once heated vessel wall. Preliminary measurement of a gap width was made with an ultrasonic device. Signals to show the existence of gaps, ranging from 0.7 mm to 1.4 mm, were detected at several locations.

  17. Toxicological effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The uptake kinetics and mechanisms and the toxic responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Song; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Aiguo [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Hu, Yang [College of Science, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Wang, Gaoxue, E-mail: wanggaoxue@126.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Ling, Fei, E-mail: feiling@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • MWCNTs (<100 mg/L) were not toxic to S. cerevisiae. • MWCNTs were internalized in S. cerevisiae cells by three pathways. • The uptake kinetics and the subcellular distribution of MWCNTs in S. cerevisiae cells were shown. • S. cerevisiae cells were undergoing apoptosis by mitochondrial impairment pathway. - Abstract: Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an experimental model, the potential toxicological effects of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated following exposure to 0–600 mg/L for 24 h. Results indicated that MWCNTs (>100 mg/L) had adverse effects on the cell proliferation. MWCNTs were clearly visible in lysosome, vacuole, endosome, mitochondria, multivesicular body and localization in the perinuclear region. The uptake kinetics data demonstrated that the maximum MWCNTs content (209.61 mg/g) was reached at 3 h, and a steady state was reached after 18 h. Based on the combined results of transmission electron microscope, endocytosis inhibition experiments and endocytosis-related genes (END3, END6, Sla2 and Rsp5) expression analysis, we elucidated MWCNTs uptake mechanism: (i) via a direct penetration of single MWCNTs; (ii) via endocytosis of single MWCNTs; and (iii) via endocytosis of MWCNTs aggregates. The percentage of apoptosis was significant increased at 600 mg/L. The decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c shown dose-dependent manners. Interestingly, there was no significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The apoptosis-related genes (SOD1, SOD2, Yca1, Nma111 and Nuc1) were significant changed. These results obtained in our study demonstrated that oxidized MWCNTs induce Saccharomyces cerevisiae apoptosis via mitochondrial impairment pathway.

  18. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

  19. Wall reflection modeling for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) measurements on Textor and ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Vasu, P.; von Hellermann, M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of optical signals by reflections from the tokamak vessel wall is a matter of great concern. For machines such as ITER and future reactors, where the vessel wall will be predominantly metallic, this is potentially a risk factor for quantitative optical emission spectroscopy. This is,

  20. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, F.M. van der; Bekkering, S.; Kroon, J.; Yeang, C.; Bossche, J. Van den; Buul, J.D. van; Ravandi, A.; Nederveen, A.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Scipione, C.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Koschinsky, M.L.; Witztum, J.L.; Tsimikas, S.; Riksen, N.P.; Stroes, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its

  1. Oxidized Phospholipids on Lipoprotein(a) Elicit Arterial Wall Inflammation and an Inflammatory Monocyte Response in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Fleur M.; Bekkering, Siroon; Kroon, Jeffrey; Yeang, Calvin; van den Bossche, Jan; van Buul, Jaap D.; Ravandi, Amir; Nederveen, Aart J.; Verberne, Hein J.; Scipione, Corey; Nieuwdorp, Max; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Riksen, Niels P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a prevalent, independent cardiovascular risk factor, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity are poorly defined. Because Lp(a) is the prominent carrier of proinflammatory oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), part of its atherothrombosis might be

  2. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  3. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  4. The passive biomechanics of human pelvic collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitrios; Edgar, Lowell T; Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Nixon, Katherine; Duarte, Delfim; Hawkins, Edwin D; Jamalian, Samira; Cunnea, Paula; Lo Celso, Cristina; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Fotopoulou, Christina; Moore, James E

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system has a major significance in the metastatic pathways in women's cancers. Lymphatic pumping depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, and the mechanical behavior of lymphatic vessels regulates the function of the system. However, data on the mechanical properties and function of human lymphatics are lacking. Our aim is to characterize, for the first time, the passive biomechanical behavior of human collecting lymphatic vessels removed at pelvic lymph node dissection during primary debulking surgeries for epithelial ovarian cancer. Isolated vessels were cannulated and then pressurized at varying levels of applied axial stretch in a calcium-free Krebs buffer. Pressurized vessels were then imaged using multi-photon microscopy for collagen-elastin structural composition and fiber orientation. Both pressure-diameter and force-elongation responses were highly nonlinear, and axial stretching of the vessel served to decrease diameter at constant pressure. Pressure-diameter behavior for the human vessels is very similar to data from rat mesenteric vessels, though the human vessels were approximately 10× larger than those from rats. Multiphoton microscopy revealed the vessels to be composed of an inner layer of elastin with an outer layer of aligned collagen fibers. This is the first study that successfully described the passive biomechanical response and composition of human lymphatic vessels in patients with ovarian cancer. Future work should expand on this knowledge base with investigations of vessels from other anatomical locations, contractile behavior, and the implications on metastatic cell transport.

  5. Enhanced defense responses in Arabidopsis induced by the cell wall protein fractions from Pythium oligandrum require SGT1, RAR1, NPR1 and JAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Takenaka, Shigehito; Hase, Shu; Kubota, Mayumi; Ichinose, Yuki; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Nakaho, Kazuhiro; Klessig, Daniel F; Takahashi, Hideki

    2009-05-01

    The cell wall protein fraction (CWP) is purified from the non-pathogenic biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum and is composed of two glycoproteins (POD-1 and POD-2), which are structurally similar to class III elicitins. In tomato plants treated with CWP, jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ET)-dependent signaling pathways are activated, and resistance to Ralstonia solanaceraum is enhanced. To dissect CWP-induced defense mechanisms, we investigated defense gene expression and resistance to bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Col-0 treated with CWP. When the leaves of Col-0 were infiltrated with CWP, neither visible necrosis nor salicylic acid (SA)-responsive gene (PR-1 and PR-5) expression was induced. In contrast, JA-responsive gene (PDF1.2 and JR2) expression was up-regulated and the resistance to R. solanaceraum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 was enhanced in response to CWP. Such CWP-induced defense responses were completely compromised in CWP-treated coi1-1 and jar1-1 mutants with an impaired JA signaling pathway. The induction of defense-related gene expression after CWP treatment was partially compromised in ET-insensitive ein2-1 mutants, but not in SA signaling mutants or nahG transgenic plants. Global gene expression analysis using cDNA array also suggested that several other JA- and ET-responsive genes, but not SA-responsive genes, were up-regulated in response to CWP. Further analysis of CWP-induced defense responses using another eight mutants with impaired defense signaling pathways indicated that, interestingly, the induction of JA-responsive gene expression and enhanced resistance to two bacterial pathogens in response to CWP were completely compromised in rar1-1, rar1-21, sgt1a-1, sgt1b (edm1) and npr1-1 mutants. Thus, the CWP-induced defense system appears to be regulated by JA-mediated and SGT1-, RAR1- and NPR1-dependent signaling pathways.

  6. Integrating Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vessels, Surface Vessels and Aircraft into Oceanographic Research Vessel Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Borges de Sousa, J.; Martins, R.; Rajan, K.

    2012-12-01

    Autonomous platforms are increasingly used as components of Integrated Ocean Observing Systems and oceanographic research cruises. Systems deployed can include gliders or propeller-driven autonomous underwater vessels (AUVs), autonomous surface vessels (ASVs), and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Prior field campaigns have demonstrated successful communication, sensor data fusion and visualization for studies using gliders and AUVs. However, additional requirements exist for incorporating ASVs and UASs into ship operations. For these systems to be optimally integrated into research vessel data management and operational planning systems involves addressing three key issues: real-time field data availability, platform coordination, and data archiving for later analysis. A fleet of AUVs, ASVs and UAS deployed from a research vessel is best operated as a system integrated with the ship, provided communications among them can be sustained. For this purpose, Disruptive Tolerant Networking (DTN) software protocols for operation in communication-challenged environments help ensure reliable high-bandwidth communications. Additionally, system components need to have considerable onboard autonomy, namely adaptive sampling capabilities using their own onboard sensor data stream analysis. We discuss Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) software currently used for situational awareness and planning onshore, and in the near future event detection and response will be coordinated among multiple vehicles. Results from recent field studies from oceanographic research vessels using AUVs, ASVs and UAS, including the Rapid Environmental Picture (REP-12) cruise, are presented describing methods and results for use of multi-vehicle communication and deliberative control networks, adaptive sampling with single and multiple platforms, issues relating to data management and archiving, and finally challenges that remain in addressing these technological issues. Significantly, the

  7. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second group of 20 (the experimental group) was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, two months, and four months. Five rats at two months of age with hyperglycemia were treated with insulin for eight weeks. Renal tissues were ...

  8. Microsurgical Training using Reusable Human Vessels from Discarded Tissues in Lymph Node Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Ishii

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of human vessels at the beginning of microsurgery training is highly recommended. But vessels with the appropriate length for training are not often obtained. Whether these vessels may be reused for training has not been reported. Accordingly, we harvested vessels from discarded tissues in lymph node dissection and demonstrated that vascular anastomosis training using the same human vessels several times is possible by placing the vessels in a freezer and defrosting them with hot water. Vascular walls can be stored for microsurgical training until about 4 years after harvest, as shown in the gross appearance and histologic findings of our preserved vessels. We recommend the technique presented here for the longterm reuse of human vessels for microsurgery training that closely resembles real procedures.

  9. Multiple large vessel aneurysmal formation in HIV-infected patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-14

    Nov 14, 2017 ... HIV proteins are noted within these lymphocytes, but the exact significance of this abnormality is yet to be defined. Transmural necrosis of the vessel wall occurs because of the probable ischemia and results in weakness and aneurysmal formation. The exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Theories such as ...

  10. In vivo activation of a T helper 2-driven innate immune response in lung fibrosis induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Ma, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary exposure to certain forms of carbon nanotubes (CNT) induces fibrosing lesions in the lungs that manifest an acute inflammation followed by chronic interstitial fibrosis. The mechanism of CNT-induced fibrogenesis is largely unknown. The biphasic development with drastically distinct pathologic manifestations suggests a junction of acute-to-chronic transition. Here we analyzed the molecular pathways and regulators underlying the pathologic development of CNT-induced lung fibrosis. Mice were exposed to multi-walled CNT (MWCNT; XNRI MWNT-7, Mitsui; 40 μg) by pharyngeal aspiration for 7 days along with vehicle and carbonaceous controls. Genome-wide microarray analyses of the lungs identified a range of differentially expressed genes that potentially function in the acute-to-chronic transition through pathways involving immune and inflammatory regulation, responses to stress and extracellular stimuli, and cell migration and adhesion. In particular, a T helper 2 (Th2)-driven innate immune response was significantly enriched. We then demonstrated that MWCNT induced the expression of Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and a panel of signature downstream genes, such as Il4i1, Chia, and Ccl11/Eotaxin, time dependently. Induction of Th2 cytokines took place in CD4+ T lymphocytes indicating activation of Th2 cells. Furthermore, induction involved activation of a Th2 cell-specific signaling pathway through phosphorylation of STAT6 and up-regulation of GATA-3 to mediate the transcription of Th2 target genes. Our study uncovers activation of a Th2-driven immune/inflammatory response during pulmonary fibrosis development induced by MWCNT. The findings provide novel insights into the molecular events that control the transition from an acute inflammatory response to chronic fibrosis through Th2 functions in CNT-exposed lungs.

  11. Magnetic field influences on the lateral dose response functions of photon-beam detectors: MC study of wall-less water-filled detectors with various densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Delfs, Björn; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-06-01

    The distortion of detector reading profiles across photon beams in the presence of magnetic fields is a developing subject of clinical photon-beam dosimetry. The underlying modification by the Lorentz force of a detector’s lateral dose response function—the convolution kernel transforming the true cross-beam dose profile in water into the detector reading profile—is here studied for the first time. The three basic convolution kernels, the photon fluence response function, the dose deposition kernel, and the lateral dose response function, of wall-less cylindrical detectors filled with water of low, normal and enhanced density are shown by Monte Carlo simulation to be distorted in the prevailing direction of the Lorentz force. The asymmetric shape changes of these convolution kernels in a water medium and in magnetic fields of up to 1.5 T are confined to the lower millimetre range, and they depend on the photon beam quality, the magnetic flux density and the detector’s density. The impact of this distortion on detector reading profiles is demonstrated using a narrow photon beam profile. For clinical applications it appears as favourable that the magnetic flux density dependent distortion of the lateral dose response function, as far as secondary electron transport is concerned, vanishes in the case of water-equivalent detectors of normal water density. By means of secondary electron history backtracing, the spatial distribution of the photon interactions giving rise either directly to secondary electrons or to scattered photons further downstream producing secondary electrons which contribute to the detector’s signal, and their lateral shift due to the Lorentz force is elucidated. Electron history backtracing also serves to illustrate the correct treatment of the influences of the Lorentz force in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code applied in this study.

  12. Magnetic field influences on the lateral dose response functions of photon-beam detectors: MC study of wall-less water-filled detectors with various densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, Hui Khee; Delfs, Björn; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-06-21

    The distortion of detector reading profiles across photon beams in the presence of magnetic fields is a developing subject of clinical photon-beam dosimetry. The underlying modification by the Lorentz force of a detector's lateral dose response function-the convolution kernel transforming the true cross-beam dose profile in water into the detector reading profile-is here studied for the first time. The three basic convolution kernels, the photon fluence response function, the dose deposition kernel, and the lateral dose response function, of wall-less cylindrical detectors filled with water of low, normal and enhanced density are shown by Monte Carlo simulation to be distorted in the prevailing direction of the Lorentz force. The asymmetric shape changes of these convolution kernels in a water medium and in magnetic fields of up to 1.5 T are confined to the lower millimetre range, and they depend on the photon beam quality, the magnetic flux density and the detector's density. The impact of this distortion on detector reading profiles is demonstrated using a narrow photon beam profile. For clinical applications it appears as favourable that the magnetic flux density dependent distortion of the lateral dose response function, as far as secondary electron transport is concerned, vanishes in the case of water-equivalent detectors of normal water density. By means of secondary electron history backtracing, the spatial distribution of the photon interactions giving rise either directly to secondary electrons or to scattered photons further downstream producing secondary electrons which contribute to the detector's signal, and their lateral shift due to the Lorentz force is elucidated. Electron history backtracing also serves to illustrate the correct treatment of the influences of the Lorentz force in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code applied in this study.

  13. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with recombinant Dengue virus 3 envelope proteins induce significant and specific immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versiani, Alice F; Astigarraga, Ruiz G; Rocha, Eliseu S O; Barboza, Ana Paula M; Kroon, Erna G; Rachid, Milene A; Souza, Daniele G; Ladeira, Luiz O; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel F; Jorio, Ado; Da Fonseca, Flávio G

    2017-04-04

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in the world. In this article we present results on the development, characterization and immunogenic evaluation of an alternative vaccine candidate against Dengue. The MWNT-DENV3E nanoconjugate was developed by covalent functionalization of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) with recombinant dengue envelope (DENV3E) proteins. The recombinant antigens were bound to the MWNT using a diimide-activated amidation process and the immunogen was characterized by TEM, AFM and Raman Spectroscopy. Furthermore, the immunogenicity of this vaccine candidate was evaluated in a murine model. Immunization with MWNT-DENV3E induced comparable IgG responses in relation to the immunization with non-conjugated proteins; however, the inoculation of the nanoconjugate into mice generated higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Cell-mediated responses were also evaluated, and higher dengue-specific splenocyte proliferation was observed in cell cultures derived from mice immunized with MWNT-DENV3E when compared to animals immunized with the non-conjugated DENV3E. Despite the recent licensure of the CYD-TDV dengue vaccine in some countries, results from the vaccine's phase III trial have cast doubts about its overall efficacy and global applicability. While questions about the effectiveness of the CYD-TDV vaccine still lingers, it is wise to keep at hand an array of vaccine candidates, including alternative non-classical approaches like the one presented here.

  14. Ultrasonic Thickness of Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles in Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction in women with stress incontinency with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Dehghan-Manshadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary Incontinence (UI as a common lower urinary tract dysfunction , results from Pelvic Floor Muscle's (PFM underactivity.Because of co-activation of PFM and the Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles (LAWM, this study was aimed to investigate the changes in the ultrasonic thickness of the LAWM in response to PFM contraction in stress urinary incontinent (SUIwomen with and without Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Materials & Methods: A total of 28 women, 10 healthy, 18 SUI with and without CLBP (9 in each group participated in this quasi-experimental study. After collecting demographic information and assessment of PFM function, changes in ultrasonic thickness of right LAWM were measured in response to PFM contraction. One way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s correlation tests were performed to analyze the data. Values of P0.05. There was a significant increase in thickness of the Traversus Abdominis Muscle (TrA during PFM contraction in control group comparing experimental groups (P=0.03. Women in control group showed significantly higher PFM strength and more intravaginal pressure (P=0.001. Conclusion: Changes in ultrasonic thickness of the TrA during PFM contraction revealed disturbance of co-activation of the LAWM and the PFM in women with and without SUI CLBP.

  15. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients' cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects' responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P ventilation decreased (all P ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.).

  16. Optimal Branching Structure of Fluidic Networks with Permeable Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius R. Pepe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological and engineering studies of Hess-Murray’s law are focused on assemblies of tubes with impermeable walls. Blood vessels and airways have permeable walls to allow the exchange of fluid and other dissolved substances with tissues. Should Hess-Murray’s law hold for bifurcating systems in which the walls of the vessels are permeable to fluid? This paper investigates the fluid flow in a porous-walled T-shaped assembly of vessels. Fluid flow in this branching flow structure is studied numerically to predict the configuration that provides greater access to the flow. Our findings indicate, among other results, that an asymmetric flow (i.e., breaking the symmetry of the flow distribution may occur in this symmetrical dichotomous system. To derive expressions for the optimum branching sizes, the hydraulic resistance of the branched system is computed. Here we show the T-shaped assembly of vessels is only conforming to Hess-Murray’s law optimum as long as they have impervious walls. Findings also indicate that the optimum relationship between the sizes of parent and daughter tubes depends on the wall permeability of the assembled tubes. Our results agree with analytical results obtained from a variety of sources and provide new insights into the dynamics within the assembly of vessels.

  17. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  18. Network of endocardial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Hong Bae; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Ki Woo; Sohn, Jamin; Son, Boram; Chang, Byung-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been reports on threadlike structures inside the heart, they have received little attention. We aimed to develop a method for observing such structures and to reveal their ultrastructures. An in situ staining method, which uses a series of procedures of 0.2-0.4% trypan blue spraying and washing, was applied to observe threadlike structures on the surfaces of endocardia. The threadlike structures were isolated and observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Networks of endocardial vessels (20 μm in thickness) with expansions (40-100 μm in diameter) were visualized; they were movable on the endocardium of the bovine atrium and ventricle. CLSM showed that (1) rod-shaped nuclei were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel and (2) there were many cells inside the expansion. TEM on the endocardial vessel revealed that (1) there existed multiple lumens (1-7 μm in diameter) and (2) the extracellular matrices mostly consisted of collagen fibers, which were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel or were locally organized in reticular structures. We investigated the endocardial circulatory system in bovine cardiac chambers and its ultrastructures, such as nucleic distributions, microlumens, and collagenous extracellular matrices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  20. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  1. Mapping differential cellular protein response of mouse alveolar epithelial cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of atomic layer deposition coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Gina M; Taylor, Alexia J; Hussain, Salik; Dandley, Erinn C; Griffith, Emily H; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C; Bereman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a prototypical engineered nanomaterial, have been increasingly manufactured for a variety of novel applications over the past two decades. However, since CNTs possess fiber-like shape and cause pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, there is concern that mass production of CNTs will lead to occupational exposure and associated pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to use contemporary proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of cellular response in E10 mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro after exposure to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) that were functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a method used to generate highly uniform and conformal nanoscale thin-film coatings of metals to enhance novel conductive properties of CNTs. We hypothesized that specific types of metal oxide coatings applied to the surface of MWCNTs by ALD would determine distinct proteomic profiles in mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro that could be used to predict oxidative stress and pulmonary inflammation. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs were functionalized by ALD with zinc oxide (ZnO) to yield Z-MWCNTs or aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to yield A-MWCNTs. Significant differential protein expression was found in the following critical pathways: mTOR/eIF4/p70S6K signaling and Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response increased following exposure to Z-MWCNTs, interleukin-1 signaling increased following U-MWCNT exposure, and inhibition of angiogenesis by thrombospondin-1, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction increased following A-MWCNT exposure. This study demonstrates that specific types of metal oxide thin film coatings applied by ALD produce distinct cellular and biochemical responses related to lung inflammation and fibrosis compared to uncoated MWCNT exposure in vitro.

  2. Boosted learned kernels for data-driven vesselness measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Common vessel centerline extraction methods rely on the computation of a measure providing the likeness of the local appearance of the data to a curvilinear tube-like structure. The most popular techniques rely on empirically designed (hand crafted) measurements as the widely used Hessian vesselness, the recent oriented flux tubeness or filters (e.g. the Gaussian matched filter) that are developed to respond to local features, without exploiting any context information nor the rich structural information embedded in the data. At variance with the previously proposed methods, we propose a completely data-driven approach for learning a vesselness measure from expert-annotated dataset. For each data point (voxel or pixel), we extract the intensity values in a neighborhood region, and estimate the discriminative convolutional kernel yielding a positive response for vessel data and negative response for non-vessel data. The process is iterated within a boosting framework, providing a set of linear filters, whose combined response is the learned vesselness measure. We show the results of the general-use proposed method on the DRIVE retinal images dataset, comparing its performance against the hessian-based vesselness, oriented flux antisymmetry tubeness, and vesselness learned with a probabilistic boosting tree or with a regression tree. We demonstrate the superiority of our approach that yields a vessel detection accuracy of 0.95, with respect to 0.92 (hessian), 0.90 (oriented flux) and 0.85 (boosting tree).

  3. Evaluation of performance of analytical and numerical methods to account for liquefaction effects on the seismic response of anchored quay walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elsäcker, W.A.; Besseling, F.; Lengkeek, H.J.; Brinkgreve, R.B.J.; de Gijt, J.G.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Liquefaction induced by earthquakes has shown to have potential devastating influence on seismic performance of anchored quay walls. Therefore, measures to mitigate liquefaction are commonly part of the design of quay walls in
    seismically active regions. Such mitigation measures are costly.

  4. A living cell quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for continuous monitoring of cytotoxic responses of macrophages to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous engineered nanomaterials (ENMs exist and new ENMs are being developed. A challenge to nanotoxicology and environmental health and safety is evaluating toxicity of ENMs before they become widely utilized. Cellular assays remain the predominant test platform yet these methods are limited by using discrete time endpoints and reliance on organic dyes, vulnerable to interference from ENMs. Label-free, continuous, rapid response systems with biologically meaningful endpoints are needed. We have developed a device to detect and monitor in real time responses of living cells to ENMs. The device, a living cell quartz crystal microbalance biosensor (QCMB, uses macrophages adherent to a quartz crystal. The communal response of macrophages to treatments is monitored continuously as changes in crystal oscillation frequency (Δf. We report the ability of this QCMB to distinguish benign from toxic exposures and reveal unique kinetic information about cellular responses to varying doses of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. Results We analyzed macrophage responses to additions of Zymosan A, polystyrene beads (PBs (benign substances or SWCNT (3-150 μg/ml in the QCMB over 18 hrs. In parallel, toxicity was monitored over 24/48 hrs using conventional viability assays and histological stains to detect apoptosis. In the QCMB, a stable unchanging oscillation frequency occurred when cells alone, Zymosan A alone, PBs alone or SWCNTs without cells at the highest dose alone were used. With living cells in the QCMB, when Zymosan A, PBs or SWCNTs were added, a significant decrease in frequency occurred from 1-6 hrs. For SWCNTs, this Δf was dose-dependent. From 6-18 hrs, benign substances or low dose SWCNT (3-30 μg/ml treatments showed a reversal of the decrease of oscillation frequency, returning to or exceeding pre-treatment levels. Cell recovery was confirmed in conventional assays. The lag time to see the Δf reversal in QCMB plots

  5. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Sarah S., E-mail: spo@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mortensen, Alicja, E-mail: almo@food.dtu.dk [National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg (Denmark); Szarek, Józef, E-mail: szarek@uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 10-719 Olsztyn (Poland); Wu, Dongmei, E-mail: dongmei.wu@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Andersen, Ole, E-mail: oa@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jacobsen, Nicklas R., E-mail: nrj@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Wallin, Håkan, E-mail: hwa@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, DK-1014 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Vogel, Ulla, E-mail: ubv@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNT{sub Large} exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Systemic and hepatic alterations were evaluated in female mice following MWCNT instillation. • Despite being physicochemically

  6. A living cell quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for continuous monitoring of cytotoxic responses of macrophages to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exist and new ENMs are being developed. A challenge to nanotoxicology and environmental health and safety is evaluating toxicity of ENMs before they become widely utilized. Cellular assays remain the predominant test platform yet these methods are limited by using discrete time endpoints and reliance on organic dyes, vulnerable to interference from ENMs. Label-free, continuous, rapid response systems with biologically meaningful endpoints are needed. We have developed a device to detect and monitor in real time responses of living cells to ENMs. The device, a living cell quartz crystal microbalance biosensor (QCMB), uses macrophages adherent to a quartz crystal. The communal response of macrophages to treatments is monitored continuously as changes in crystal oscillation frequency (Δf). We report the ability of this QCMB to distinguish benign from toxic exposures and reveal unique kinetic information about cellular responses to varying doses of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Results We analyzed macrophage responses to additions of Zymosan A, polystyrene beads (PBs) (benign substances) or SWCNT (3-150 μg/ml) in the QCMB over 18 hrs. In parallel, toxicity was monitored over 24/48 hrs using conventional viability assays and histological stains to detect apoptosis. In the QCMB, a stable unchanging oscillation frequency occurred when cells alone, Zymosan A alone, PBs alone or SWCNTs without cells at the highest dose alone were used. With living cells in the QCMB, when Zymosan A, PBs or SWCNTs were added, a significant decrease in frequency occurred from 1-6 hrs. For SWCNTs, this Δf was dose-dependent. From 6-18 hrs, benign substances or low dose SWCNT (3-30 μg/ml) treatments showed a reversal of the decrease of oscillation frequency, returning to or exceeding pre-treatment levels. Cell recovery was confirmed in conventional assays. The lag time to see the Δf reversal in QCMB plots was linearly SWCNT

  7. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Kauai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Kauai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  8. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Tinian

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Tinian. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  9. Puerto Rico Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Puerto Rico. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  10. American Samoa Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for American Samoa. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  11. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Oahu, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  12. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Molokai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Molokai, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  13. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Rota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Rota. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  14. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Lanai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Lanai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  15. For-Hire Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Directory is maintained as the sample frame for the For-Hire Survey. I contains data on for-hire vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Data include...

  16. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Saipan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Saipan. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  17. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Maui. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  18. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  19. Percolated pore networks of oxygen plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for fast response, high sensitivity capacitive humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, H. P.; Jung, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, K. H.; Lee, C. J.; Yun, K. N.; Min, N. K.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the preparation of capacitive-type relative humidity sensors incorporating plasma-activated multi-wall carbon nanotube (p-MWCNT) electrodes and on their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Highly open porous conductive electrodes, which are almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes, are fabricated by spray-depositing MWCNT networks on a polyimide layer. Oxygen plasma activation of the MWCNTs is also explored to improve the water adsorption of the MWCNT films, by introducing oxygen-containing functional groups on the CNT surface. Polyimide humidity sensors with optimized p-MWCNT network electrodes exhibit exceptionally fast response times (1.5 for adsorption and 2 s for desorption) and high sensitivity (0.75 pF/% RH). These results may be partially due to their percolated pore structure being more accessible for water molecules, expending the diffusion of moisture to the polyimide sensing film, and partially due to the oxygenated surface of p-MWCNT films, allocating more locations for adsorption or attraction of water molecules to contribute to the sensitivity.

  20. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes induce an inflammatory response in human primary monocytes through oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Shefang, E-mail: yeshefang@xmu.edu.cn; Zhang Honggang; Wang Yifang; Jiao Fei; Lin Cuilin; Zhang Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@xmu.edu.cn [Xiamen University, Department of Biomaterials, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, College of Materials (China)

    2011-09-15

    A mechanistic understanding of interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and living systems has become imperative owing to the growing nanomedicine applications and the mounting societal concerns on nanosafety. The addition of different chemical groups leads to a significant change in the properties of CNTs, and the resulting functionalized CNTs are generating great interest in many biological applications, such as biosensors and transporters. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) (with a diameter of 1-2 nm and mean length of 500 nm) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of carboxylated SWCNTs in human primary monocytes. The results demonstrated that carboxylated SWCNTs were cytotoxic, triggering apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M phase arrest in human primary monocytes. Flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis indicated that internalized carboxylated SWCNTs were mainly accumulated in the cytoplasm. Exposure of human primary monocytes to carboxylated SWCNTs led to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in human primary monocytes. Pretreatment of human primary monocytes with antioxidants or NF-{kappa}B-specific inhibitor before exposure to carboxylated SWCNTs significantly abolished carboxylated SWCNTs-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression. These results provide novel insights into the carboxylated SWCNTs-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory responses in vitro.

  1. Response of anaerobic granular sludge to iron oxide nanoparticles and multi-wall carbon nanotubes during beet sugar industrial wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambuchi, John J; Zhang, Zhaohan; Shan, Lili; Liang, Dandan; Zhang, Peng; Feng, Yujie

    2017-06-15

    The accelerated use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the consumer and industrial sectors has triggered the need to understand their potential environmental impact. The response of anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) to IONPs and MWCNTs during the anaerobic digestion of beet sugar industrial wastewater (BSIW) was investigated in this study. The IONPs increased the biogas and subsequent CH4 production rates in comparison with MWCNTs and the control samples. This might be due to the utilization of IONPs and MWCNTs as conduits for electron transfer toward methanogens. The MWCNTs majorly enriched the bacterial growth, while IONP enrichment mostly benefitted the archaea population. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that AGS produced extracellular polymeric substances, which interacted with the IONPs and MWCNTs. This provided cell protection and prevented the nanoparticles from piercing through the membranes and thus cytotoxicity. The results provide useful information and insights on the adjustment of anaerobic microorganisms to the natural complex environment based on nanoparticles infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pressure vessel design manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of the book covers types of loadings, failures, and stress theories, and how they apply to pressure vessels. The book delineates the procedures for designing typical components as well as those for designing large openings in cylindrical shells, ring girders, davits, platforms, bins and elevated tanks. The techniques for designing conical transitions, cone-cylinder intersections, intermediate heads, flat heads, and spherically dished covers are also described. The book covers the design of vessel supports subject to wind and seismic loads and one section is devoted to the five major ways of analyzing loads on shells and heads. Each procedure is detailed enough to size all welds, bolts, and plate thicknesses and to determine actual stresses.

  3. New research vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Two “new” ocean-going research vessels operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Science Foundation (NSF) will soon begin full-time scientific duties off the coast of California and in the Antarctic, respectively. The 37.5-m Scripps vessel, named Robert Gordon Sprout in honor of the ex-president of the University of California, replaces the smaller ship Ellen B. Scripps, which had served the institution since 1965. The new ship is a slightly modified Gulf Coast workboat. Under the name of Midnight Alaskan, it had been used for high-resolution geophysical surveys in American and Latin American waters by such firms as Arco Oil & Gas, Exxon, Pennzoil, and Racal-Decca before its purchase by Scripps from a Lousiana chartering firm last summer.

  4. Large vessel vasculitides

    OpenAIRE

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Pukšić, Silva; Gudelj Gračanin, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in y...

  5. Very Versatile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    data. This source provides information on aluminum hydrofoil vessels without the added weight of foil structures. The composite armor around the...seating compartment. The sides should also limit wave splash on the deck. The freeboard should contribute reserve buoyancy , increasing large-angle and...Resistance, Powering, and Propulsion Savitsky’s Method Since model testing data or other reliable performance data was unavailable for the proposed

  6. Academic Research Vessels 1985-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    of them MVC ). Recommnendati ons. * Complete reliance of the academic community on non-academic vessels should be avoided, since such vessels are not...responsible for management of a major fishery on the Bering Sea shelf. This area is covered by ice much of the year. With the spring melting of the ice is...of the group. 5. Meetings of the group shall normally be held four times yearly in- *1 cluding spring and fall semi-annual UNOLS meetings, and at

  7. Information Sharing of Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) and Maritime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The marine information system provides a central database with online access to support the monitoring of violating vessels, aid to navigation. The system provides emergency response to increase safety within marine activities. Violating vessels data registered by the VTS is collected as evidence for assessment.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of WRKY gene family in Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt and WRKY genes involved in responses to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Shen, Qingxi J; Wang, Bo; He, Bin; Xiao, Suqin; Chen, Ling; Yu, Tengqiong; Ke, Xue; Zhong, Qiaofang; Fu, Jian; Chen, Yue; Wang, Lingxian; Yin, Fuyou; Zhang, Dunyu; Ghidan, Walid; Huang, Xingqi; Cheng, Zaiquan

    2017-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt, a very important and special wild rice species, shows abundant genetic diversity and disease resistance features, especially high resistance to bacterial blight. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial blight resistance in O. officinalis have not yet been elucidated. The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant growth, development and stress response. However, little is known about the numbers, structure, molecular phylogenetics, and expression of the WRKY genes under Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) stress in O. officinalis due to lacking of O. officinalis genome. Therefore, based on the RNA-sequencing data of O. officinalis, we performed a comprehensive study of WRKY genes in O. officinalis and identified 89 OoWRKY genes. Then 89 OoWRKY genes were classified into three groups based on the WRKY domains and zinc finger motifs. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supported that the evolution of OoWRKY genes were consistent with previous studies of WRKYs, and subgroup IIc OoWRKY genes were the original ancestors of some group II and group III OoWRKYs. Among the 89 OoWRKY genes, eight OoWRKYs displayed significantly different expression (>2-fold, pWRKY family of transcription factors in O.officinalis. Insight was gained into the classification, evolution, and function of the OoWRKY genes, revealing the putative roles of eight significantly different expression OoWRKYs in Xoo strains PXO99 and C5 stress responses in O.officinalis. This study provided a better understanding of the evolution and functions of O. officinalis WRKY genes, and suggested that manipulating eight significantly different expression OoWRKYs would enhance resistance to bacterial blight.

  9. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  10. Sustainable Oceanographic Vessels - Setting an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leer, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to climate change, global warming and post “peak oil” fuel scarcity, the oceanographic community should consider reducing its carbon foot print. Why should scientists operate inefficient vessels while lecturing the general public on the need to reduce CO2 emissions? We have already seen curtailment of ship schedules and ship lay-ups, due in part to rising fuel costs, following $140/barrel crude oil. When the global recession ends, upward pressure on oil prices will again commence. Who can forecast how high fuel prices may ultimately rise during the typical 25-30 year lifetime of a research vessel? Are we to curtail future work at sea when oceanic climate research is becoming ever more important? A catamaran research vessel has been designed which can be electrically propelled from by a combination of high efficiency generators, photovoltaic panels and/or sails. Sail produced power is transformed with propellers and motor/generators into electric power which is stored in battery banks. This vessel could operate as the first true hybrid oceanographic research vessel. It could even continue operations without fuel in cases of a severe fuel shortage or fueling denial. Since the power produced by any water turbine increases with the cube of the velocity flowing over its propeller, the low fluid friction and high stability of a catamaran, with reasonably slender hulls, provide an important boost to efficient hybrid operation. The author has chartered a 42’ hybrid catamaran sailboat and found it efficient and extremely easy to operate and control. A 79’ motor sailing catamaran research vessel by Lock Crowther Designs will be presented as one example of a sustainable research vessel with excellent speed and sea-keeping. A center well makes operation as a small drilling/coring ship for coastal climate investigation possible. The center well also supports a host of remote sensing and robotic gear handling capabilities.

  11. Design assessment for manufacturability of supporting structures for IWS and ELM coil of ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu-Gyeong, E-mail: aspirany@hhi.co.kr [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Dong-gu, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yun-Seok; Kwon, Tae-Hoon; Jung, Yung-Jin [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Dong-gu, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hee-Jae; Kim, Byung-Chul; Lee, Young-Ju [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A “bridge type” welding method was proposed for IWS rib and ELM coil supports. ► This method could reduce the welding distortion and increase the manufacturability. ► Structural integrity of proposed design was assessed for both P and S type damages. ► Results show that the proposed designs meet the design criteria of RCC-MR. -- Abstract: A vacuum vessel is one of the core facilities of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and basically all-welded structure. Korea is responsible for the procurement of sector 1 and 6 of the main vessel. Accordingly, the design review for the fabrication is in progress by ITER Korea and Hyundai Heavy Industries. Due to anticipated manufacturing problems such as the welding distortion, the design of some components of main vessel, IWS (In-Wall Shield) supporting rib and ELM (Edge Localized Mode) coil support, needs to be modified. To release the risk of welding distortion, the welding method called “bridge type” is suggested and the shape of weld joint is adjusted to secure the manufacturability of the issued components. The elastic and limit analyses with fatigue evaluation have been performed under the most critical loading condition to verify the structural integrity of modified design. Analysis results show that the proposed designs meet the design criteria of RCC-MR. The design deviation requests have been submitted to ITER Organization and ANB (Agreed Notified Body) for approval and their verification is currently in progress.

  12. The evaluation of pressure effects on the ex-vessel cooling for KNGR with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the effect of external vessel cooling on debris coolability and vessel integrity for the KNGR were examined from the two typical pressure range of high(170 bar) and low(5 bar)case using the lower plenum model in MELCOR1.8.4. As the conditions of these calculations, 80 ton of debris was relocated simultaneously into the lower vessel head and the debris relocation temperature from the core region was 2700 K. The decay heat has been assumed to be that of one hour after reactor shutdown. The creep failure of the vessel wall was simulated with 1-D model, which can consider the rapid temperature gradient over the wall thickness during the ex-vessel cooling. From the calculation results, both the coolant temperature and the total amount of coolant mass injected into the cavity are known to be the important factors in determining the time period to keep the external vessel cool. Therefore, a long-term strategy to keep the coolant temperature subcooled throughout the transient is suggested to sustain or prolong the effect of external vessel cooling. Also, it is expected that to keep the primary side at low pressure and to perform the ex-vessel flooding be the essential conditions to sustain the vessel integrity. From MELCOR, the penetration failure always occurs after relocation regardless of the RCS pressure or availability of the external vessel cooling. Therefore, It is expected that the improvement of the model for the penetration tube failure will be necessary.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of WRKY gene family in Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt and WRKY genes involved in responses to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmiao Jiang

    Full Text Available Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt, a very important and special wild rice species, shows abundant genetic diversity and disease resistance features, especially high resistance to bacterial blight. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial blight resistance in O. officinalis have not yet been elucidated. The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant growth, development and stress response. However, little is known about the numbers, structure, molecular phylogenetics, and expression of the WRKY genes under Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo stress in O. officinalis due to lacking of O. officinalis genome. Therefore, based on the RNA-sequencing data of O. officinalis, we performed a comprehensive study of WRKY genes in O. officinalis and identified 89 OoWRKY genes. Then 89 OoWRKY genes were classified into three groups based on the WRKY domains and zinc finger motifs. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supported that the evolution of OoWRKY genes were consistent with previous studies of WRKYs, and subgroup IIc OoWRKY genes were the original ancestors of some group II and group III OoWRKYs. Among the 89 OoWRKY genes, eight OoWRKYs displayed significantly different expression (>2-fold, p<0.01 in the O. officinalis transcriptome under Xoo strains PXO99 and C5 stress 48 h, suggesting these genes might play important role in PXO99 and C5 stress responses in O. officinalis. QRT-PCR analysis and confirmation of eight OoWRKYs expression patterns revealed that they responded strongly to PXO99 and C5 stress 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, and the trends of these genes displaying marked changes were consistent with the 48 h RNA-sequencing data, demonstrated these genes played important roles in response to biotic stress and might even involved in the bacterial blight resistance. Tissue expression profiles of eight OoWRKY genes revealed that they were highly expressed in root, stem, leaf, and flower, especially in leaf (except OoWRKY71

  14. Design and implementation of visual inspection system handed in tokamak flexible in-vessel robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng; Xu, Lifei [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China)

    2016-05-15

    In-vessel viewing system (IVVS) is a fundamental tool among the remote handling systems for ITER, which is used to providing information on the status of the in-vessel components. The basic functional requirement of in-vessel visual inspection system is to perform a fast intervention with adequate optical resolution. In this paper, we present the software and hardware solution, which is designed and implemented for tokamak in-vessel viewing system that installed on end-effector of flexible in-vessel robot working under vacuum and high temperature. The characteristic of our in-vessel viewing system consists of two parts: binocular heterogeneous vision inspection tool and first wall scene emersion based augment virtuality. The former protected with water-cooled shield is designed to satisfy the basic functional requirement of visual inspection system, which has the capacity of large field of view and high-resolution for detection precision. The latter, achieved by overlaying first wall tiles images onto virtual first wall scene model in 3D virtual reality simulation system, is designed for convenient, intuitive and realistic-looking visual inspection instead of viewing the status of first wall only by real-time monitoring or off-line images sequences. We present the modular division of system, each of them in smaller detail, and go through some of the design choices according to requirements of in-vessel visual inspection task.

  15. ITER Vacuum Vessel design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K., E-mail: Kimihiro.Ioki@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Choi, C.H.; Daly, E.; Dani, S.; Davis, J.; Giraud, B.; Gribov, Y.; Hamlyn-Harris, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Jones, L. [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Jun, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC ' Sintez' , Efremov Inst., 189631 Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Le Barbier, R.; Martinez, J.-M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H. [ITER-India, A-29, GIDC Electronic Estate, Sector -25, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Preble, J.; Reich, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Sa, J.W. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Terasawa, A.; Utin, Yu. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2012-08-15

    After implementing a few design modifications (referred to as the 'Modified Reference Design') in 2009, the Vacuum Vessel (VV) design had been stabilized. The VV design is being finalized, including interface components such as support rails and feedthroughs for the in-vessel coils. It is necessary to make adjustments to the locations of the blanket supports and manifolds to accommodate design modifications to the in-vessel coils. The VV support design is also being finalized considering a structural simplification. Design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering the assembly methods and the required tolerances. The detailed layout of ferritic steel plates and borated steel plates was optimized based on the toroidal field ripple analysis. A dynamic test on the inter-modular key to support the blanket modules was performed to measure the dynamic amplification factor (DAF). An R and D program has started to select and qualify the welding and cutting processes for the port flange lip seal. The ITER VV material 316 L(N) IG was already qualified and the Modified Reference Design was approved by the Agreed Notified Body (ANB) in accordance with the Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order procedure.

  16. Candida albicans response regulator gene SSK1 regulates a subset of genes whose functions are associated with cell wall biosynthesis and adaptation to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neeraj; Inglis, Diane; Roman, Elvira; Pla, Jesus; Li, Dongmei; Calera, Jose A; Calderone, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Ssk1p of Candida albicans is a putative response regulator protein of the Hog1 two-component signal transduction system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the phosphorylation state of Ssk1p determines whether genes that promote the adaptation of cells to osmotic stress are activated. We have previously shown that C. albicans SSK1 does not complement the ssk1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and that the ssk1 mutant of C. albicans is not sensitive to sorbitol. In this study, we show that the C. albicans ssk1 mutant is sensitive to several oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide, menadione, and potassium superoxide when each is incorporated in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) agar medium. We used DNA microarrays to identify genes whose regulation is affected by the ssk1 mutation. RNA from mutant cells (strain CSSK21) grown in YPD medium for 3 h at 30 degrees C was reverse transcribed and then compared with similarly prepared RNA from wild-type cells (CAF2). We observed seven genes from mutant cells that were consistently up regulated (three-fold or greater compared to CAF2). In S. cerevisiae, three (AHP1, HSP12, and PYC2) of the seven genes that were up regulated provide cells with an adaptation function in response to oxidative stress; another gene (GPH1) is regulated under stress conditions by Hog1p. Three other genes that are up regulated encode a cell surface protein (FLO1), a mannosyl transferase (MNN4-4), and a putative two-component histidine kinase (CHK1) that regulates cell wall biosynthesis in C. albicans. Of the down-regulated genes, ALS1 is a known cell adhesin in C. albicans. Verification of the microarray data was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR for HSP12, AHP1, CHK1, PYC2, GPH1, ALS1, MNN4-4, and FLO1. To further determine the function of Ssk1p in the Hog1p signal transduction pathway in C. albicans, we used Western blot analysis to measure phosphorylation of Hog1p in the ssk1 mutant of C. albicans when grown under either osmotic or

  17. Transport of divalent cations: cation exchange capacity of intact xylem vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Geijn, S C; Petit, C M

    1979-12-01

    The cation exchange capacity of the intact xylem vessels in cut shoots of papyrus (Cyperus papyrus spec.) has been determined. The cation exchange capacity is independent of the cation concentration in the transpiration stream, and is equal for Ca and Co. The high value of the cation exchange capacity (0.6 to 1 x 10(-7) equivalents per square centimeter vessel wall surface) leads to the hypothesis that the porous structure of the vessel wall, and not only the inner vessel wall surface, acts as a cation exchanger.Differences between anion ([(32)P]phosphate, [(45)Ca]EDTA(2-), [(115)Cd(m)]-EDTA(2-)), and cation ([(45)Ca](2+), [(115)Cd(m)](2+)) movement are explained in terms of transport with the transpiration flux or by exchange reactions. The competition between exchange sites and natural or synthetic ligands for the divalent cations is discussed.

  18. Influence of cerebral blood vessel movements on the position of perivascular synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic activity is regulated and limited by blood flow, which is controlled by blood vessel dilation and contraction. Traditionally, the study of neurovascular coupling has mainly focused on energy consumption and oxygen delivery. However, the mechanical changes that blood vessel movements induce in the surrounding tissue have not been considered. We have modeled the mechanical changes that movements of blood vessels cause in neighboring synapses. Our simulations indicate that synaptic densities increase or decrease during vascular dilation and contraction, respectively, near the blood vessel walls. This phenomenon may alter the concentration of neurotransmitters and vasoactive substances in the immediate vicinity of the vessel wall and thus may have an influence on local blood flow. PMID:28199396

  19. Lymphatic Vessels: The Next Frontier in Lung Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Lamattina, Anthony Mark; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2017-09-01

    Lymphatic vessels are essential for the uptake of fluid, immune cells, macromolecules, and lipids from the interstitial space. During lung transplant surgery, the pulmonary lymphatic vessel continuum is completely disrupted, and, as a result, lymphatic drainage function is severely compromised. After transplantation, the regeneration of an effective lymphatic drainage system plays a crucial role in maintaining interstitial fluid balance in the lung allograft. In the meantime, these newly formed lymphatic vessels are commonly held responsible for the development of immune responses leading to graft rejection, because they are potentially capable of transporting antigen-presenting cells loaded with allogeneic antigens to the draining lymph nodes. However, despite remarkable progress in the understanding of lymphatic biology, there is still a paucity of consistent evidence that demonstrates the exact impacts of lymphatic vessels on lung graft function. In this review, we examine the current literature related to roles of lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of lung transplant rejection.

  20. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  1. Vessel Traffic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Yorker" articles titled Silent Spring by Rachel Carson in 1963 produced a unifying effect, "the sort of rallying point of the movement to protect the...6232, 92d Cong., 1st. sess., 1971, p. 2. 15. Carson , Rachel L. , The Sea Around Us, New York: Oxford Univesity Press, 195-, p. IV. 16. U.S., Congress...Government Printing Office, 1974. 63. Buhler, L. and Geiger, J., Vessel Traffic Data Extraction MethodoloqX, Silver Spring , Maryland, O6erFae-tns

  2. Vanishing corneal vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Luke; Chana, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    We wish to highlight the importance of acknowledging the accompanying effects of topical phenylephrine drops on the eye other than its intended mydriasis. We reported a case of a 92-year-old woman with a corneal graft who was noted to have superficial corneal vascularisation which was not documented previously. After the instillation of topical tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5%, for funduscopy, the corneal vascularisation was not visible. When reassessed on another visit, tropicamide had no effect on the vessels and only phenylephrine did. We wish to highlight that when reviewing patients in cornea clinics, instilling phenylephrine prior to being seen may mask important corneal vascularisation. PMID:24121816

  3. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  4. EFFECT OF 2,6-DICHLOROBENZONITRILE (DCB ON SECONDARY WALL DEPOSITION AND LIGNIFICATION IN THE STEM OF HIBISCUS CANNABINUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRAMOD Sivan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out on the secondary xylem of actively growing shoots of Hibiscus cannabinus treated with cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB. Treatment with 20µM DCB induced differentiation of xylem fibres with thin secondary walls and parenchyma cells with abnormal wall thickening and lignification. At concentration above 50 µM resulted in the disappearance of cambial zone, inhibition of secondary wall deposition, lignification of primary walls, deformed vessel walls and dispersed lignin distribution in secondary walls. Transmission electron microscopic study revealed the initiation and formation of large intercellular spaces between the walls of differentiating xylem elements. Abnormal pattern of wall deposition and inhomogeneous lignin distribution was evident in fibres and vessel. The length and width of both fibres and vessel elements were reduced significantly even with lower concentrations of DCB.

  5. Customizable engineered blood vessels using 3D printed inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Cameron B; Meier, Elizabeth M; Joshi, Neeraj N; Wu, Bin; Lam, Mai T

    2016-04-15

    Current techniques for tissue engineering blood vessels are not customizable for vascular size variation and vessel wall thickness. These critical parameters vary widely between the different arteries in the human body, and the ability to engineer vessels of varying sizes could increase capabilities for disease modeling and treatment options. We present an innovative method for producing customizable, tissue engineered, self-organizing vascular constructs by replicating a major structural component of blood vessels - the smooth muscle layer, or tunica media. We utilize a unique system combining 3D printed plate inserts to control construct size and shape, and cell sheets supported by a temporary fibrin hydrogel to encourage cellular self-organization into a tubular form resembling a natural artery. To form the vascular construct, 3D printed inserts are adhered to tissue culture plates, fibrin hydrogel is deposited around the inserts, and human aortic smooth muscle cells are then seeded atop the fibrin hydrogel. The gel, aided by the innate contractile properties of the smooth muscle cells, aggregates towards the center post insert, creating a tissue ring of smooth muscle cells. These rings are then stacked into the final tubular construct. Our methodology is robust, easily repeatable and allows for customization of cellular composition, vessel wall thickness, and length of the vessel construct merely by varying the size of the 3D printed inserts. This platform has potential for facilitating more accurate modeling of vascular pathology, serving as a drug discovery tool, or for vessel repair in disease treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of microvascular responses to visible and near-infrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; Farshidi, D; Wang, G X; He, Y L; Kelly, K M; Wu, W J; Chen, B; Ying, Z X

    2014-08-01

    Pulsed dye laser (PDL) is a commonly used treatment for Port Wine Stain birthmarks (PWS). However, deeper components of PWS are often resistant to PDL. Deeper penetrating lasers, including the long pulsed Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser have been used, but carry greater risk. This study evaluates the distinct blood vessel thermal responses to visible (595 nm) and near infrared (1,064 nm) lasers using animal and numerical models. Blood vessels in the rodent dorsal skin chamber (DSC) were irradiated by a 595 nm PDL and a long-pulsed 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser. Laser-induced immediate and 1-hour post-structural and functional changes in the vessels were documented. Numerical simulations were conducted using a 1,000 µm depth SD mouse skin fold to simulate experimental conditions. PDL irradiation produced immediate blood vessel hemorrhage. Modeling indicated this occurs due to preferential heating of the superior parts of large blood vessels. Nd:YAG irradiation resulted in blood vessel constriction; modeling indicated more uniform heating of vessel walls. PDL and Nd:YAG lasers result in distinct tissue responses. This supports different observable clinical treatment end points when using these devices. Vessel constriction associated with the Nd:YAG may be more difficult to observe and is one reason this device may carry greater risk. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ISO and EIGA standards for cryogenic vessels and accessories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The EIGA/WG 6’s scope is cryogenic vessels and accessories, including their design, material compatibility, operational requirements and periodical inspection. The specific responsibilities include monitoring international standardization (ISO, CEN) and regulations (UN, TPED, PED...

  8. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS, OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS AND OF VESSELS SOLD OR ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the provisions of this part are: (a) All vessels which may in the future be constructed or sold with construction...

  9. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D. [and others

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  10. Lung vessel segmentation in CT images using graph-cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiwei; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate lung vessel segmentation is an important operation for lung CT analysis. Filters that are based on analyzing the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix are popular for pulmonary vessel enhancement. However, due to their low response at vessel bifurcations and vessel boundaries, extracting lung vessels by thresholding the vesselness is not sufficiently accurate. Some methods turn to graph-cuts for more accurate segmentation, as it incorporates neighbourhood information. In this work, we propose a new graph-cuts cost function combining appearance and shape, where CT intensity represents appearance and vesselness from a Hessian-based filter represents shape. Due to the amount of voxels in high resolution CT scans, the memory requirement and time consumption for building a graph structure is very high. In order to make the graph representation computationally tractable, those voxels that are considered clearly background are removed from the graph nodes, using a threshold on the vesselness map. The graph structure is then established based on the remaining voxel nodes, source/sink nodes and the neighbourhood relationship of the remaining voxels. Vessels are segmented by minimizing the energy cost function with the graph-cuts optimization framework. We optimized the parameters used in the graph-cuts cost function and evaluated the proposed method with two manually labeled sub-volumes. For independent evaluation, we used 20 CT scans of the VESSEL12 challenge. The evaluation results of the sub-volume data show that the proposed method produced a more accurate vessel segmentation compared to the previous methods, with F1 score 0.76 and 0.69. In the VESSEL12 data-set, our method obtained a competitive performance with an area under the ROC curve of 0.975, especially among the binary submissions.

  11. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vicente, Andres; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate-specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow.

  12. Heat-pipes-based first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, PO Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Khripunov, V. [Russian Research Center `Kurchatov Institute`, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Antipenkov, A. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, PO Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Ulianov, A. [State Enterprise `Krasnaya Zvezda`, Electrolytny pr-d., 1a, Moscow 115230 (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Feasibilities of heat pipes application for the heat transfer out of plasma facing components in test and power fusion reactors are discussed. Based on the space technology and practice the ``hot`` ITER first wall with liquid metal and water heat pipes are proposed in two options: heat-pipes and vapor-chamber options. Other high heat loading in-vessel elements such as divertor target and limiter can be provided by effective and reliable heat pipe cooling systems. (orig.).

  13. Retinal vessel centerline extraction using multiscale matched filters, confidence and edge measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofka, Michal; Stewart, Charles V

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of improving detection of low-contrast and narrow vessels and eliminating false detections at nonvascular structures, a new technique is presented for extracting vessels in retinal images. The core of the technique is a new likelihood ratio test that combines matched-filter responses, confidence measures and vessel boundary measures. Matched filter responses are derived in scale-space to extract vessels of widely varying widths. A vessel confidence measure is defined as a projection of a vector formed from a normalized pixel neighborhood onto a normalized ideal vessel profile. Vessel boundary measures and associated confidences are computed at potential vessel boundaries. Combined, these responses form a six-dimensional measurement vector at each pixel. A training technique is used to develop a mapping of this vector to a likelihood ratio that measures the "vesselness" at each pixel. Results comparing this vesselness measure to matched filters alone and to measures based on the Hessian of intensities show substantial improvements, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Hessian can be used in place of the matched filter to obtain similar but less-substantial improvements or to steer the matched filter by preselecting kernel orientations. Finally, the new vesselness likelihood ratio is embedded into a vessel tracing framework, resulting in an efficient and effective vessel centerline extraction algorithm.

  14. Novel Method for Vessel Cross-Sectional Shear Wave Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Li, Guo-Yang; Lee, Fu-Feng; Zhang, Qihao; Cao, Yanping; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-07-01

    Many studies have investigated the applications of shear wave imaging (SWI) to vascular elastography, mainly on the longitudinal section of vessels. It is important to investigate SWI in the arterial cross section when evaluating anisotropy of the vessel wall or complete plaque composition. Here, we proposed a novel method based on the coordinate transformation and directional filter in the polar coordinate system to achieve vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging. In particular, ultrasound radiofrequency data were transformed from the Cartesian to the polar coordinate system; the radial displacements were then estimated directly. Directional filtering was performed along the circumferential direction to filter out the reflected waves. The feasibility of the proposed vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging method was investigated through phantom experiments and ex vivo and in vivo studies. Our results indicated that the dispersion relation of the shear wave (i.e., the guided circumferential wave) within the vessel can be measured via the present method, and the elastic modulus of the vessel can be determined. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-06-01

    Four large, highly irradiated through-wall weld samples are to be removed from the Trawsfynydd Magnox reactor pressure vessel. The reactor was shut down in 1993 after 28 years of operation. The samples will be tested to investigate the integrity of steel pressure vessels. The choice of specialised tooling for the operation and its deployment are discussed. A Ultra High Power Pressure Water Jet cutting method has been selected to meet the demanding remote robotic requirements. (UK).

  16. Elastomeric free-form blood vessels for interconnecting organs on chip systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Bakht, Syeda Mahwish; Aleman, Julio; Shin, Su Ryon; Yue, Kan; Sica, Marco; Ribas, João; Duchamp, Margaux; Ju, Jie; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Atala, Anthony; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-26

    Conventional blood vessel-on-a-chip models are typically based on microchannel-like structures enclosed within bulk elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). However, these bulk vascular models largely function as individual platforms and exhibit limited flexibility particularly when used in conjunction with other organ modules. Oftentimes, lengthy connectors and/or tubes are still needed to interface multiple chips, resulting in a large waste volume counterintuitive to the miniaturized nature of organs-on-chips. In this work, we report the development of a novel form of a vascular module based on PDMS hollow tubes, which closely emulates the morphology and properties of human blood vessels to integrate multiple organs-on-chips. Specifically, we present two templating strategies to fabricate hollow PDMS tubes with adjustable diameters and wall thicknesses, where metal rods or airflow were employed as the inner templates, while plastic tubes were used as the outer template. The PDMS tubes could then be functionalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in their interior surfaces to further construct elastomeric biomimetic blood vessels. The endothelium developed biofunctionality as demonstrated by the expression of an endothelial biomarker (CD31) as well as dose-dependent responses in the secretion of von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide upon treatment with pharmaceutical compounds. We believe that with their clear advantages including high optical transparency, gas permeability, and tunable elasticity matching those of native blood vessels, these free-form PDMS vascular modules can supplement bulk vascular organoids and likely replace inert plastic tubes in integrating multiple organoids into a single microfluidic circuitry.

  17. Elastomeric Free-Form Blood Vessels for Interconnecting Organs on Chip Systems †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Bakht, Syeda Mahwish; Aleman, Julio; Shin, Su-Ryon; Yue, Kan; Sica, Marco; Ribas, João; Duchamp, Margaux; Ju, Jie; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Atala, Anthony; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Conventional blood vessel-on-a-chip models are typically based on microchannel-like structures enclosed within bulk elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). However, these bulk vascular models largely function as individual platforms and exhibit limited flexibility particularly when used in conjunction with other organ modules. Oftentimes lengthy connectors and/or tubes are still needed to interface multiple chips, resulting in a large waste volume counterintuitive to the miniaturized nature of the organs-on-chips. In this work, we report the development of a novel form of vascular module based on PDMS hollow tubes, which closely emulates the morphology and properties of the human blood vessels to integrate multiple organ-on-chips. Specifically, we present two templating strategies to fabricate hollow PDMS tubes with adjustable diameters and wall thicknesses, where metal rods or airflow were employed as the inner templates, while plastic tubes were used as the outer template. The PDMS tubes could then be functionalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in their interior surfaces to further construct the elastomeric biomimetic blood vessels. The endothelium developed biofunctionality as demonstrated by the expression of endothelial biomarker CD31 as well as dose-dependent responses in the secretion of von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide upon treatment with pharmaceutical compounds. We believe that, with their clear advantages including high optical transparency, gas permeability, and tunable elasticity matching those of native blood vessels, these free-form PDMS vascular modules can supplement the bulk vascular organoids and likely replace the inert plastic tubes in integrating multiple organoids into a single microfluidic circuitry. PMID:26999423

  18. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  20. [Large vessel vasculitides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Puksić, Silva; Gracanin, Ana Gudelj

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in young ages. Although all large arteries can be affected, the aorta, subclavian and carotid arteries are most commonly involved. The most common symptoms included upper extremity claudication, hypertension, pain over the carotid arteries (carotidynia), dizziness and visual disturbances. Early diagnosis and treatment has improved the outcome in patients with TA.

  1. Vessel segmentation in screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordang, J. J.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Blood vessels are a major cause of false positives in computer aided detection systems for the detection of breast cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a framework for the segmentation of blood vessels in screening mammograms. The proposed framework is based on supervised learning using a cascade classifier. This cascade classifier consists of several stages where in each stage a GentleBoost classifier is trained on Haar-like features. A total of 30 cases were included in this study. In each image, vessel pixels were annotated by selecting pixels on the centerline of the vessel, control samples were taken by annotating a region without any visible vascular structures. This resulted in a total of 31,000 pixels marked as vascular and over 4 million control pixels. After training, the classifier assigns a vesselness likelihood to the pixels. The proposed framework was compared to three other vessel enhancing methods, i) a vesselness filter, ii) a gaussian derivative filter, and iii) a tubeness filter. The methods were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristics curves, the Az values. The Az value of the cascade approach is 0:85. This is superior to the vesselness, Gaussian, and tubeness methods, with Az values of 0:77, 0:81, and 0:78, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that our proposed framework is a promising method for the detection of vessels in screening mammograms.

  2. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  3. Aspergillus nidulans cell wall composition and function change in response to hosting several Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-galactopyranose mutase activity mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Kausar Alam

    Full Text Available Deletion or repression of Aspergillus nidulans ugmA (AnugmA, involved in galactofuranose biosynthesis, impairs growth and increases sensitivity to Caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthesis antagonist. The A. fumigatus UgmA (AfUgmA crystal structure has been determined. From that study, AfUgmA mutants with altered enzyme activity were transformed into AnugmA▵ to assess their effect on growth and wall composition in A. nidulans. The complemented (AnugmA::wild type AfugmA strain had wild type phenotype, indicating these genes had functional homology. Consistent with in vitro studies, AfUgmA residues R182 and R327 were important for its function in vivo, with even conservative amino (RK substitutions producing AnugmA? phenotype strains. Similarly, the conserved AfUgmA loop III histidine (H63 was important for Galf generation: the H63N strain had a partially rescued phenotype compared to AnugmA▵. Collectively, A. nidulans strains that hosted mutated AfUgmA constructs with low enzyme activity showed increased hyphal surface adhesion as assessed by binding fluorescent latex beads. Consistent with previous qPCR results, immunofluorescence and ELISA indicated that AnugmA▵ and AfugmA-mutated A. nidulans strains had increased α-glucan and decreased β-glucan in their cell walls compared to wild type and AfugmA-complemented strains. Like the AnugmA▵ strain, A. nidulans strains containing mutated AfugmA showed increased sensitivity to antifungal drugs, particularly Caspofungin. Reduced β-glucan content was correlated with increased Caspofungin sensitivity. Aspergillus nidulans wall Galf, α-glucan, and β-glucan content was correlated in A. nidulans hyphal walls, suggesting dynamic coordination between cell wall synthesis and cell wall integrity.

  4. Cell wall degrading enzyme induced rice innate immune responses are suppressed by the type 3 secretion system effectors XopN, XopQ, XopX and XopZ of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanwita Sinha

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses are induced in plants and animals through perception of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns. These immune responses are suppressed by pathogens during infection. A number of studies have focussed on identifying functions of plant pathogenic bacteria that are involved in suppression of Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. In comparison, there is very little information on functions used by plant pathogens to suppress Damage Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. Xanthomonasoryzae pv. oryzae, a gram negative bacterial pathogen of rice, secretes hydrolytic enzymes such as LipA (Lipase/Esterase that damage rice cell walls and induce innate immune responses. Here, we show that Agrobacterium mediated transient transfer of the gene for XopN, a X. oryzae pv. oryzae type 3 secretion (T3S system effector, results in suppression of rice innate immune responses induced by LipA. A xopN (- mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae retains the ability to suppress these innate immune responses indicating the presence of other functionally redundant proteins. In transient transfer assays, we have assessed the ability of 15 other X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S secreted effectors to suppress rice innate immune responses. Amongst these proteins, XopQ, XopX and XopZ are suppressors of LipA induced innate immune responses. A mutation in any one of the xopN, xopQ, xopX or xopZ genes causes partial virulence deficiency while a xopN (- xopX (- double mutant exhibits a greater virulence deficiency. A xopN (- xopQ (- xopX (- xopZ (- quadruple mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae induces callose deposition, an innate immune response, similar to a X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S(- mutant in rice leaves. Overall, these results indicate that multiple T3S secreted proteins of X. oryzae pv. oryzae can suppress cell wall damage induced rice innate immune responses.

  5. [The application of ultrasonography to estimate blood vessel injury of upper limbs sustaining electric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-ke; Li, Li-gen; Chen, Yue-xiu; Hu, Xiao-juan; Yang, Yong-ming

    2003-12-01

    To explore a new method in estimating extent and degree of arterial injury in upper limbs sustaining high tension electric burns. Eighteen patients (twenty-four upper limbs) with high tension electricity injury were admitted from December 1998 to September 2002, The damaged limbs consisted of four parts: wrist wound part, 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm parts around wrist wound, where the radial and ulnar arteries were detected using B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination. The changes of endangium, vessel diameter, thickness of the vessel wall and volume of blood flow were recorded respectively. The parameters of normal radial and ulnar arteries were also determined as normal control. B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination showed that the endangium in radial and ulnar arteries become coarse, edema or exfoliation. The vessel wall was thicker than that of the normal control and the thickness was heterogeneity. The vessel wall could be necrosis in severe patient and the vessel cavity was stricture or beaded. Thrombosis or occlusion could occur at the site of severe injury area in vessel. The decrease in volume of blood flow was observed. The condition of the radial and ulnar arteries become well apart from 10 - 15 cm of wrist wound. The ultrasonography can be used to detect the changes in endangium, diameter, thickness of the vessel wall, blood flow volume in injury blood vessel caused by electric burn injury. It is helpful in judging the degree and extent of injury vessel and could be a safe, non-invasive diagnostic method and is worth popularizing.

  6. Numerical model study of radio frequency vessel sealing thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John

    2015-03-01

    Several clinically successful clinical radio frequency vessel-sealing devices are currently available. The dominant thermodynamic principles at work involve tissue water vaporization processes. It is necessary to thermally denature vessel collagen, elastin and their adherent proteins to achieve a successful fusion. Collagens denature at middle temperatures, between about 60 and 90 C depending on heating time and rate. Elastin, and its adherent proteins, are more thermally robust, and require temperatures in excess of the boiling point of water at atmospheric pressure to thermally fuse. Rapid boiling at low apposition pressures leads to steam vacuole formation, brittle tissue remnants and frequently to substantial disruption in the vessel wall, particularly in high elastin-content arteries. High apposition pressures substantially increase the equilibrium boiling point of tissue water and are necessary to ensure a high probability of a successful seal. The FDM numerical models illustrate the beneficial effects of high apposition pressures.

  7. Earlywood vessels of Castanea sativa record temperature before their formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Patrick; Solomonoff, Natalie; García-González, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the climatic signal contained in the earlywood vessel size of the ring-porous chestnut (Castanea sativa) and the physiological processes involved in the underlying mechanisms. In order to assign the encoded signal to a specific physiological process, bud phenology and vessel formation were monitored along an elevation transect and chronologies of the size of the first row of earlywood vessels were retrospectively correlated with 40 yr of early spring temperatures. The first vessels appeared in late April to early May, after encoding both a negative temperature signal in February-March (during tree quiescence) and a positive temperature signal in early April (at the time of resumption of shoot growth). We hypothesize that February and March temperatures affect cambial sensitivity to auxin, preconditioning tree responses later in the season. Furthermore, April temperature is related to tree activation whereby new hormone production fosters vessel expansion.

  8. Mechanical behavior of peripheral stents and stent-vessel interaction: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Serena; Flamini, Vittoria; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper stents employed to treat peripheral artery disease are analyzed through a three-dimensional finite-element approach, based on a large-strain and large-displacement formulation. Aiming to evaluate the influence of some stent design parameters on stent mechanics and on the biomechanical interaction between stent and arterial wall, quasi-static and dynamic numerical analyses are carried out by referring to computational models of commercially and noncommercially available versions of both braided self-expandable stents and balloon-expandable stents. Addressing isolated device models, opening mechanisms and flexibility of both opened and closed stent configurations are numerically experienced. Moreover, stent deployment into a stenotic peripheral artery and possible postdilatation angioplasty (the latter for the self-expandable device only) are simulated by considering different idealized vessel geometries and accounting for the presence of a stenotic plaque. Proposed results highlight important differences in the mechanical response of the two types of stents, as well as a significant influence of the vessel shape on the stress distributions arising upon the artery-plaque system. Finally, computational results are used to assess both the stent mechanical performance and the effectiveness of the stenting treatment, allowing also to identify possible critical conditions affecting the risk of stent fracture, tissue damage, and/or pathological tissue response.

  9. Further Study on Strain Growth in Spherical Containment Vessels Subjected to Internal Blast Loading

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Strain growth is a phenomenon observed in the elastic response of containment vessels subjected to internal blast loading, which is featured by the increased vibration amplitude of the vessel in a later stage. Previous studies attributed the strain growth in spherical containment vessels to the beating between two close vibration modes, the interactions between the vessel vibration and the reflected shock waves and the structural perturbation. In this paper, it is shown th...

  10. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578±154, 530±171, and 426±174 mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0±0.4 mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4 mm outer diameter).

  11. The extended abdominal wall flap for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, S T; Senghaas, A; Turley, R; Ravindra, K V; Zenn, M R; Levin, L S; Erdmann, D

    2011-06-01

    Patients with extensive loss of the abdominal wall tissue have few options for restoring the abdominal cavity. Composite tissue allotransplantation has been used for limited abdominal wall reconstruction in the setting of visceral transplantation, yet replacement of the entire abdominal wall has not been described. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal abdominal skin surface available through an external iliac/femoral cuff-based pedicle. Five human cadaveric abdominal walls were injected with methylene blue to analyze skin perfusion based on either the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA; n = 5) or a cuff of external iliac/femoral artery (n = 5) containing the deep circumflex iliac, deep inferior epigastric, and superficial inferior epigastric, and superficial circumflex iliac arteries. Abdominal wall flaps were taken full thickness from the costal margin to the midaxillary line and down to the pubic tubercle and proximal thigh. In all specimens, the deep inferior epigastric, deep circumflex iliac, superficial inferior epigastric, and superficial circumflex iliac arteries were found to originate within a 4-cm cuff of the external iliac/femoral artery. Abdominal wall flaps injected through a unilateral external iliac/femoral segment had a significantly greater degree of total flap perfusion than those injected through the DIEA alone (76.5% ± 4% vs 57.2% ± 5%; Student t test, P DIEA vessel alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Method to Detect Corneal Lymphatic Vessels In Vivo by Intrastromal Injection of Fluorescein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Viet Nhat Hung; Hou, Yanhong; Horstmann, Jens; Bock, Felix; Cursiefen, Claus

    2017-11-09

    Corneal lymphatic vessels are clinically invisible because of their thin walls and clear lymph fluid. There is no easy and established method for in vivo imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels so far. In this study, we present a novel approach to visualize corneal lymphatic vessels in vivo by injecting intrastromal fluorescein sodium. Six- to eight-week-old female BALB/c mice were used in the mouse model of suture-induced corneal neovascularization. Two weeks after the suture placement, fluorescein sodium was injected intrastromally. The fluorescein, taken up by the presumed lymphatic vessels, was then tracked using a clinically used Spectralis HRA + OCT device. Immunohistochemistry staining with specific lymphatic marker LYVE-1 and pan-endothelial marker CD31 was used to confirm the indirect lymphangiography findings. By injecting fluorescein intrastromally, both corneal blood and lymphatic vessels were detected. While the lymphatic vessels were visible as bright vessel-like structures using HRA, the blood vessels appeared as dark networks. Fluorescein-labeled lymphatic vessels were colocalized with LYVE-1 in immunohistochemically stained sections of the same specimen. Corneal lymphatic vessels can be easily imaged in vivo in the murine model using intrastromal fluorescein injection.

  13. Fast blood-flow simulation for large arterial trees containing thousands of vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Alexandre; Clarke, Richard; Ho, Harvey

    2017-02-01

    Blood flow modelling has previously been successfully carried out in arterial trees to study pulse wave propagation using nonlinear or linear flow solvers. However, the number of vessels used in the simulations seldom grows over a few hundred. The aim of this work is to present a computationally efficient solver coupled with highly detailed arterial trees containing thousands of vessels. The core of the solver is based on a modified transmission line method, which exploits the analogy between electrical current in finite-length conductors and blood flow in vessels. The viscoelastic behaviour of the arterial-wall is taken into account using a complex elastic modulus. The flow is solved vessel by vessel in the frequency domain and the calculated output pressure is then used as an input boundary condition for daughter vessels. The computational results yield pulsatile blood pressure and flow rate for every segment in the tree. This solver is coupled with large arterial trees generated from a three-dimensional constrained constructive optimisation algorithm. The tree contains thousands of blood vessels with radii spanning ~1 mm in the root artery to ~30 μm in leaf vessels. The computation takes seconds to complete for a vasculature of 2048 vessels and less than 2 min for a vasculature of 4096 vessels on a desktop computer.

  14. Air pressures in wood frame walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton. TenWolde; Charles G. Carll; Vyto. Malinauskas

    1998-01-01

    Wind pressures can play an important role in the wetting of exterior walls (driving rain). In response, the rain screen concept, including compartmentalization and air spaces, has been developed to provide pressure equalization and limit water entry into the wall. However, conventional construction such as wood lap siding has not been evaluated as to its ability to...

  15. Lymphatic vessels: new targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Seidel, Catharina D; Detmar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the physiological control of the tissue fluid balance and in the initiation of immune responses. Recent studies have shown that lymphangiogenesis, the growth of new lymphatic vessels and/or the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, is a characteristic feature of acute inflammatory reactions and of chronic inflammatory diseases. In these conditions, lymphatic vessel expansion occurs at the tissue level but also within the draining lymph nodes. Surprisingly, activation of lymphatic vessel function by delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor-C exerts anti-inflammatory effects in several models of cutaneous and joint inflammation. These effects are likely mediated by enhanced drainage of extravasated fluid and inflammatory cells, but also by lymphatic vessel-mediated modulation of immune responses. Although some of the underlying mechanisms are just beginning to be identified, lymphatic vessels have emerged as important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory conditions. In this context, it is of great interest that some of the currently used anti-inflammatory drugs also potently activate lymphatic vessels.

  16. 50 CFR 648.8 - Vessel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel identification. 648.8 Section 648.8... identification. (a) Vessel name and official number. Each fishing vessel subject to this part and over 25 ft (7.6... or ocean quahog vessels licensed under New Jersey law may use the appropriate vessel identification...

  17. The correspondence between coronary arterial wall strain and histology in a porcine model of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Yun; Zhu Hui; Friedman, Morton H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)], E-mail: mhfriedm@duke.edu

    2009-09-21

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the leading cause of mortality in cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is a powerful clinical technique that provides real-time cross-sectional images of the arterial wall and atherosclerotic plaques. However, it does not provide sufficient information about the histological composition of plaques to characterize their vulnerability. Arterial wall strain measurements may provide insights into plaque composition and vulnerability, complementing the information directly available in the IVUS echogram. We have developed a method to measure the transverse arterial wall strain tensor in response to luminal pressure change, by registering IVUS images acquired at different pressures. This method has been validated by using IVUS images with simulated motion and IVUS images of a vessel phantom. In this study, we further evaluate the method by assessing the correspondence of the calculated strain distribution and the histological composition of atherosclerotic coronary arteries from Sinclair miniature pigs following 12 months of a high fat diet. The images were acquired in situ using a clinical IVUS system and under computer-controlled pressurization. After image acquisition, the artery segments were fixed for histology to identify plaque components. The strain distributions were aligned with the corresponding histological sections. The stiffness of various components of the lesion, inferred from the wall strain distribution, was consistent with the tissue composition seen in the histological cross-sections. These findings suggest that strain measurements from IVUS are promising for assessing plaque vulnerability.

  18. The correspondence between coronary arterial wall strain and histology in a porcine model of atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yun; Zhu, Hui; Friedman, Morton H.

    2009-09-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the leading cause of mortality in cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is a powerful clinical technique that provides real-time cross-sectional images of the arterial wall and atherosclerotic plaques. However, it does not provide sufficient information about the histological composition of plaques to characterize their vulnerability. Arterial wall strain measurements may provide insights into plaque composition and vulnerability, complementing the information directly available in the IVUS echogram. We have developed a method to measure the transverse arterial wall strain tensor in response to luminal pressure change, by registering IVUS images acquired at different pressures. This method has been validated by using IVUS images with simulated motion and IVUS images of a vessel phantom. In this study, we further evaluate the method by assessing the correspondence of the calculated strain distribution and the histological composition of atherosclerotic coronary arteries from Sinclair miniature pigs following 12 months of a high fat diet. The images were acquired in situ using a clinical IVUS system and under computer-controlled pressurization. After image acquisition, the artery segments were fixed for histology to identify plaque components. The strain distributions were aligned with the corresponding histological sections. The stiffness of various components of the lesion, inferred from the wall strain distribution, was consistent with the tissue composition seen in the histological cross-sections. These findings suggest that strain measurements from IVUS are promising for assessing plaque vulnerability.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of the dorsal vessel of Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister, 1835 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Francisca Sant'Anna Nogueira

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the microanatomy of the dorsal vessel of the triatomine Panstrongylus megistus. The organ is a tuble anatomically divided into an anterior aorta anad a posterior heart, connected to the body wall through 8 pairs of alary muscles. The heart is divided in 3 chambers by means of 2 pairs of cardiac valves. a pair of ostia can be observed in the lateral wall of each chamber. A bundle of nerve fibers was found outside the organ, running dorsally along its major axis. A group of longitudinal muscular fibers was found in the ventral portion of the vessel. The vessel was found to be lined both internally and externally by pericardial cells covered by a thin laminar membrane. Inseide the vessel the pericardial cells were disposed in layers and on the outside they formed clusters or rows.

  20. Noninvasive detection of coronary artery wall thickening with age in healthy subjects using high resolution MRI with beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Firmin, David N

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate coronary artery wall thickening with age in a small healthy cohort using a highly efficient, reliable, and reproducible high-resolution MR technique. A 3D cross-sectional MR vessel wall images (0.7 × 0.7 × 3 mm resolution) with retrospective beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction (B2B-RMC) were obtained in the proximal right coronary artery of 21 healthy subjects (age, 22-62 years) with no known cardiovascular disease. Lumen and outer wall (lumen + vessel wall) areas were measured in one central slice from each subject and average wall thickness and wall area/outer wall area ratio (W/OW) calculated. Imaging was successful in 18 (86%) subjects with average respiratory efficiency 99.3 ± 1.7%. Coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW significantly correlate with subject age, increasing by 0.088 mm and 0.031 per decade respectively (R = 0.53, P = 0.024 and R = 0.48, P = 0.046). No relationship was found between lumen area and vessel wall thickness (P = NS), but outer wall area increased significantly with vessel wall thickness at 19 mm(2) per mm (P = 0.046). This is consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Despite the small size of our healthy cohort, using high-resolution MR imaging and B2B-RMC, we have demonstrated increasing coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW with age. The results obtained are consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  2. Southeast Region Headboat Survey-Vessel list/Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of vessels that have been on the SRHS through time, their owners/operators, marinas/docks and their contact information. This assists in...

  3. Genetics of hereditary large vessel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of hereditary large vessel diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) have not only identified responsible genes but also provided better understanding of the pathophysiology and revealed possible new therapeutic targets. Genes identified for these diseases include FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2, TGFB3, SKI, EFEMP2, COL3A1, FLNA, ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK and SLC2A10, as well as others. Their dysfunction disrupts the function of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, as well as that of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle contractile apparatus, resulting in progression of structural damage to large vessels, including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Notably, it has been shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway has a key role in the pathogenesis of MFS and related disorders, which may be important for development of strategies for medical and surgical treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  4. Investigation of impulsively loaded pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.; Cornwell, R.; Hanner, D.; Leichter, H.; Mohr, P.

    1963-10-15

    Explosion containment vessels for containing from 2,000 to 3,000 five ton nuclear explosions are considered. Analysis methods appear adequate and lowest weights using the most advanced materials available in the next five years are projected.None of these materials can be fabricated today and all require extensive development. Present material technology limits the choice of materials and defines the weight. The addition of safety factors and fixtures (nozzles, etc.) will add to this weight considerably, and may well radically alter the vessel response. Improvements in the strength weight ratios of metals and glasses over those considered in this report do not appear reasonable at this time. Winding schemes to utilize the high strength of steel wires and somehow maintain a reasonable thickness appear to offer the most promise. A `ductile` beryllium would of course offer vast improvement, but no indications that this is being developed have appeared and all presently known beryllium is much too brittle.

  5. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in......-plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...

  6. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  7. ENHANCEMENT OF A SUNSPOT LIGHT WALL WITH EXTERNAL DISTURBANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Erdélyi, Robert, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-20

    Based on the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations, we study the response of a solar sunspot light wall to external disturbances. A flare occurrence near the light wall caused material to erupt from the lower solar atmosphere into the corona. Some material falls back to the solar surface and hits the light bridge (i.e., the base of the light wall), then sudden brightenings appear at the wall base followed by the rise of wall top, leading to an increase of the wall height. Once the brightness of the wall base fades, the height of the light wall begins to decrease. Five hours later, another nearby flare takes place, and a bright channel is formed that extends from the flare toward the light bridge. Although no obvious material flow along the bright channel is found, some ejected material is conjectured to reach the light bridge. Subsequently, the wall base brightens and the wall height begins to increase again. Once more, when the brightness of the wall base decays, the wall top fluctuates to lower heights. We suggest, based on the observed cases, that the interaction of falling material and ejected flare material with the light wall results in the brightenings of wall base and causes the height of the light wall to increase. Our results reveal that the light wall can be not only powered by the linkage of p -mode from below the photosphere, but may also be enhanced by external disturbances, such as falling material.

  8. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ying-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chi-Shiun, E-mail: cschiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor.

  9. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  10. Thinner regions of intracranial aneurysm wall correlate with regions of higher wall shear stress: a 7.0 tesla MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankena, Roos; Kleinloog, Rachel; Verweij, Bon H.; van Ooij, Pim; ten Haken, Bennie; Luijten, Peter R.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method for semi-quantitative wall thickness assessment on in vivo 7.0 tesla (7T) MRI images of intracranial aneurysms for studying the relation between apparent aneurysm wall thickness and wall shear stress. Materials and Methods Wall thickness was analyzed in 11 unruptured aneurysms in 9 patients, who underwent 7T MRI with a TSE based vessel wall sequence (0.8 mm isotropic resolution). A custom analysis program determined the in vivo aneurysm wall intensities, which were normalized to signal of nearby brain tissue and were used as measure for apparent wall thickness (AWT). Spatial wall thickness variation was determined as the interquartile range in AWT (the middle 50% of the AWT range). Wall shear stress was determined using phase contrast MRI (0.5 mm isotropic resolution). We performed visual and statistical comparisons (Pearson’s correlation) to study the relation between wall thickness and wall shear stress. Results 3D colored AWT maps of the aneurysms showed spatial AWT variation, which ranged from 0.07 to 0.53, with a mean variation of 0.22 (a variation of 1.0 roughly means a wall thickness variation of one voxel (0.8mm)). In all aneurysms, AWT was inversely related to WSS (mean correlation coefficient −0.35, P<0.05). Conclusions A method was developed to measure the wall thickness semi-quantitatively, using 7T MRI. An inverse correlation between wall shear stress and AWT was determined. In future studies, this non-invasive method can be used to assess spatial wall thickness variation in relation to pathophysiologic processes such as aneurysm growth and –rupture. PMID:26892986

  11. Wall conditioning and particle control in Extrap T2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsåker, H.; Larsson, D.; Brunsell, P.; Möller, A.; Tramontin, L.

    1997-02-01

    The Extrap T2 reversed field pinch experiment is operated with the former OHTE vacuum vessel, of dimensions R = 1.24 m and a = 0.18 m and with a complete graphite liner. It is shown that a rudimentary density control can be achieved by means of frequent helium glow discharge conditioning of the wall. The standard He-GDC is well characterized and reproducible. The trapping and release of hydrogen and impurities at the wall surfaces have been studied by mass spectrometry and surface analysis. The shot to shot particle exchange between wall and plasma can be approximately accounted for.

  12. Feeling Wall Tension in an Interactive Demonstration of Laplace's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letic, Milorad

    2012-01-01

    Laplace's Law plays a major role in explanations of the wall tension of structures like blood vessels, the bladder, the uterus in pregnancy, bronchioles, eyeballs, and the behavior of aneurisms or the enlarged heart. The general relation of Laplace's law, expressing that the product of the radius of curvature (r) and pressure (P) is equal to wall…

  13. Earthquake resistant structural walls: Test of walls with and without openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, K. N.; Daniel, J. I.; Aristizabal-Ochoa, J. D.; Fiorato, A. E.; Corley, W. G.

    1981-07-01

    Two one-third scale, six-story wal specimens were subjected to inelastic load reversals representing severe earthquake forces exerted by double acting hydraulic rams, located on both sides of the wall specimens, and applied to the top of each wall. The specimens were designed of earthquake resistant reinforced concrete wall elements in coupled wall systems based on the 1976 Uniform Building Code. The loading was calculated using a modified DRAIN two-dimensional computer program with two actual earthquake records used as input ground motion data. One specimen was a solid wall and the other included six openings simulating windows. When data was normalized by yield capacities, the resonse of the two walls to the inelastic loading was similar. The presence of window openings had little effect on the deformation characteristics of the sample walls in response to the cyclic loads.

  14. 2013 East Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  15. SC/OQ Vessel Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data tables holding information for the Surf Clam/Ocean Quahog vessel and dealer/processor logbooks (negative and positive), as well as individual tag information...

  16. 2011 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  17. 2011 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2013 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2011 East Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. Integrin binding: Sticking around vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchley, Michael R.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-09-01

    A study demonstrates that controlled integrin binding on a biomaterial was capable of promoting vascular cell sprouting and formation of a non-leaky blood vessel network in a healthy and diseased state.

  1. Transposition of the great vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessel called the ductus arteriosus open, allowing some mixing of the 2 blood circulations. A procedure using ... they are not already immune. Eating well, avoiding alcohol, and controlling diabetes both before and during pregnancy ...

  2. 2013 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. Vessel Permit System Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GARFO issues federal fishing permits annually to owners of fishing vessels who fish in the Greater Atlantic region, as required by federal regulation. These permits...

  4. 2011 Tug Towing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  5. Caribbean PR Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels fishing in Puerto Rico. The catch and effort data for the entire trip are...

  6. Coastal Discard Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data on the type and amount of marine resources that are discarded or interacted with by vessels that are selected to report to the Southeast...

  7. Optical Sensing using Fiber Bragg Gratings for Monitoring Structural Damage in Composite Over-Wrapped Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They are made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber-matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  8. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Voß

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches—when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac—are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  9. Assessment of W7-X plasma vessel pressurisation in case of LOCA taking into account in-vessel components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbonavičius, E., E-mail: Egidijus.Urbonavicius@lei.lt; Povilaitis, M., E-mail: Mantas.Povilaitis@lei.lt; Kontautas, A., E-mail: Aurimas.Kontautas@lei.lt

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the LOCA in W7-X was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. • Benchmarking of the results received with two codes provides more confidence in results and helps in identification of possible important differences in the modelling. • The performed analysis answered the questions set in the installed plasma vessel venting system during overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. • Differences in time until opening the burst disk observed in ASTEC and COCOSYS results are caused by differences in heat transfer modelling. - Abstract: This paper presents the analysis of W7-X vacuum vessel response taking into account in-vessel components. A detailed analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the loss of coolant accident was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. The performed analysis showed that the installed plasma vessel venting system prevents overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. The performed analysis revealed differences in heat transfer modelling implemented in ASTEC and COCOSYS computer codes, which require further investigation to justify the correct approach for application to fusion facilities.

  10. Prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior had the form of beakers varying in outline but similar in size. They were wheel-thrown, mould-made or manufactured by using a combination of wheel-throwing and mould-made appliqués. Given that face vessels are considerably scarcer than other kinds of pottery, more than fifty finds from Moesia Superior make an enviable collection. In this and other provinces face vessels have been recovered from military camps, civilian settlements and necropolises, which suggests that they served more than one purpose. It is generally accepted that the faces-masks gave a protective role to the vessels, be it to protect the deceased or the family, their house and possessions. More than forty of all known finds from Moesia Superior come from Viminacium, a half of that number from necropolises. Although tangible evidence is lacking, there must have been several local workshops producing face vessels. The number and technological characteristics of the discovered vessels suggest that one of the workshops is likely to have been at Viminacium, an important pottery-making centre in the second and third centuries.

  11. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which...... g/mouse of small, entangled (CNTsmall, 0.8 +/- 0.1 pm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNTLarge, 4 +/- 0.4 mu m long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1,3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess...

  12. The composition of collagen in the aneurysm wall of men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villard, C.; Eriksson, P.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lindeman, J.H.; Hultgren, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Loss of vessel wall integrity by degradation is essential for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and ultimately its rupture. The observed greater rupture rate in women with AAA might be related to gender differences in the biomechanical properties of the aneurysm wall.

  13. Probabilistic Structural Integrity Analysis of Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Vessel under Low Temperature Overpressure Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsoung-Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic boiling water reactor pressure vessel has been evaluated by the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. First, the analysis model was built for the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel considering the plant specific data. Meanwhile, the flaw models which comprehensively simulate all kinds of preexisting flaws along the vessel wall were employed here. The low temperature overpressure transient which has been concluded to be the severest accident for a boiling water reactor pressure vessel was considered as the loading condition. It is indicated that the fracture mostly happens near the fusion-line area of axial welds but with negligible failure risk. The calculated results indicate that the domestic reactor pressure vessel has sufficient structural integrity until doubling of the present end-of-license operation.

  14. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  15. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  16. High-intensity endurance training results in faster vessel-specific rate of vasorelaxation in type 1 diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Murias

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of moderate- (MD and high-intensity endurance training (HD and resistance training (RD on the vasorelaxation responsiveness of the aorta, iliac, and femoral vessels in type 1 diabetic (D rats. Vasorelaxation to acetylcholine was modeled as a mono-exponential function. A potential mediator of vasorelaxation, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS was determined by Western blots. Vessel lumen-to-wall ratios were calculated from H&E stains. The vasorelaxation time-constant (τ (s was smaller in control (C (7.2 ± 3.7 compared to D (9.1 ± 4.4 and it was smaller in HD (5.4 ± 1.5 compared to C, D, RD (8.3 ± 3.7 and MD (8.7 ± 3.8 (p<0.05. The rate of vasorelaxation (% · s(-1 was larger in HD (2.7 ± 1.2 compared to C (2.0 ± 1.2, D (2.0 ± 1.5, RD (2.0 ± 1.0, and MD (2.0 ± 1.2 (p<0.05. τ vasorelaxation was smaller in the femoral (6.9 ± 3.7 and iliac (6.9 ± 4.7 than the aorta (9.0 ± 5.0 (p<0.05. The rate of vasorelaxation was progressively larger from the femoral (3.1 ± 1.4 to the iliac (2.0 ± 0.9 and to the aorta (1.3 ± 0.5 (p<0.05. e-NOS content (% of positive control was greater in HD (104 ± 90 compared to C (71 ± 64, D (85 ± 65, RD (69 ± 43, and MD (76 ± 44 (p<0.05. e-NOS normalized to lumen-to-wall ratio (% · mm(-1 was larger in the femoral (11.7 ± 11.1 compared to the aorta (3.2 ± 1.9 (p<0.05. Although vasorelaxation responses were vessel-specific, high-intensity endurance training was the most effective exercise modality in restoring the diabetes-related loss of vascular responsiveness. Changes in the vasoresponsiveness seem to be endothelium-dependent as evidenced by the greater e-NOS content in HD and the greater normalized e-NOS content in the smaller vessels.

  17. Automated method for identification and artery-venous classification of vessel trees in retinal vessel networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Joshi

    Full Text Available The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44% correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42%.

  18. Solitonlike attractor for blood vessel tip density in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, numerical simulations of a stochastic model have shown that the density of vessel tips in tumor-induced angiogenesis adopts a solitonlike profile [Sci. Rep. 6, 31296 (2016), 10.1038/srep31296]. In this work, we derive and solve the equations for the soliton collective coordinates that indicate how the soliton adapts its shape and velocity to varying chemotaxis and diffusion. The vessel tip density can be reconstructed from the soliton formulas. While the stochastic model exhibits large fluctuations, we show that the location of the maximum vessel tip density for different replicas follows closely the soliton peak position calculated either by ensemble averages or by solving an alternative deterministic description of the density. The simple soliton collective coordinate equations may also be used to ascertain the response of the vessel network to changes in the parameters and thus to control it.

  19. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  20. Advanced in-vessel retention design for next generation risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In the TMI-2 accident, approximately twenty (20) tons of molten core material drained into the lower plenum. Early advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs assumed a lower head failure and incorporated various measures for ex-vessel accident mitigation. However,one of the major findings from the TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project was that one part of the reactor lower head wall estimated to have attained a temperature of 1100 deg C for about 30 minutes has seemingly experienced a comparatively rapid cooldown with no major threat to the vessel integrity. In this regard, recent empirical and analytical studies have shifted interests to such in-vessel retention designs or strategies as reactor cavity flooding, in-vessel flooding and engineered gap cooling of the vessel. Accurate thermohydrodynamic and creep deformation modeling and rupture prediction are the key to the success in developing practically useful in-vessel accident/risk management strategies. As an advanced in-vessel design concept, this work presents the COrium Attack Syndrome Immunization Structures (COASIS) that are being developed as prospective in-vessel retention devices for a next-generation LWR in concert with existing ex-vessel management measures. Both the engineered gap structures in-vessel (COASISI) and ex-vessel (COASISO) are demonstrated to maintain effective heat transfer geometry during molten core debris attack when applied to the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The likelihood of lower head creep rupture during a severe accident is found to be significantly suppressed by the COASIS options. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. 50 CFR 697.8 - Vessel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel identification. 697.8 Section 697.8 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION....8 Vessel identification. (a) Vessel name and official number. Each fishing vessel issued a limited...

  2. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  3. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  4. Validation of the fast-running in-vessel model ASTRID for predicting the radioactive releases to the containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaakko, M. [VTT Processes (Finland); Schmuck, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The ASTRID (Assessment of Source Term for Emergency Response based on Installation Data) process model is used for the faster than real-time prediction of the radioactivity released into the containment and further into the environment in case of an emergency situation in a light water reactor. Combined together with the containment module COCOSYS the model can predict the entire radioactivity release chain from the primary system to the containment and further into the environment. In the paper the ASTRID thermohydraulic module PROCESS is presented shortly. The thermohydraulic part is a fast running solution for the drift-flux based thermohydraulics. In high temperatures the core degradation leading to the melt pool formation in the reactor barrel and reactor vessel lower head is calculated in the in-vessel module RELOMEL. Finally after the reactor vessel wall has been eroded due to the molten corium in the lower plenum, the massive radioactivity release occurs into the containment. But even before this scenario the radioactivity may be transported from the superheated core to the containment by the coolant. The reference plants for the development have been the Westinghouse type 4-loop PWR, the French type 3-loop PWR, The German type 4-loop Konvoi PWR, the Loviisa VVER type PWR, and the Olkiluoto type internal pump BWR. The reference code for the DBA thermal hydraulics has been the SMABRE code. In the developmental assessment the capability of the rough nodalization of ASTRID has been tested against the SMABRE nodalization describing the plants with 50 - 500 nodes. For the developmental assessment of the in-vessel severe accident the sample cases are calculated with MELCOR. The more thorough validation is based on the internationally known system codes, RELAP5, MELCOR, CATHARE and ATHLET. In the validation the most problematic area is the radioactivity transport into the containment. This part of the validation is done with the integrated code system. (authors)

  5. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  6. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  7. Grounding Damage to Conventional Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Marie; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    regulations for design of bottom compartment layout with regard to grounding damages are largely based on statistical damage data. New and updated damage statistics holding 930 grounding accident records has been investigated. The bottom damage statistics is compared to current regulations for the bottom......The present paper is concerned with rational design of conventional vessels with regard to bottom damage generated in grounding accidents. The aim of the work described here is to improve the design basis, primarily through analysis of new statistical data for grounding damage. The current...... for the relation between the amount of deformed structure and the energy absorption. Finally, the paper shows how damage statistics for existing, conventional vessels can be used together with theoretical prediction methods for determining grounding damage distributions for new vessel types not included...

  8. 19 CFR 4.5 - Government vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government vessels. 4.5 Section 4.5 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Arrival and Entry of Vessels § 4.5 Government vessels. (a) No... that is the property of, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) will be treated as a Government vessel...

  9. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque of carotid arteries with histopathological correlation: Vascular wall MR imaging vs. color Doppler ultrasonography (US)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Yuji; Nagayama, Masako; Suga, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Yamagata, Sen; Okumura, Akira; Amoh, Yoshiki; Nakashita, Satoru; Van Cauteren, Marc; Dodo, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether the vessel wall MRI of carotid arteries would differentiate at-risk soft plaque from solid fibrous plaque by identifying liquid components more accurately than color Doppler ultrasonography (US...

  10. Exact Thermal Analysis of Functionally Graded Cylindrical and Spherical Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2017-07-